Sample records for vieux desert band

  1. Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2 1 Department of Geology, University of Alexandria, Egypt 2 Geology Department localities in an area approximately 30,000 km2 within the eastern desert of Egypt. With the exception

  2. Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt BACKUS, Ethan L.1, GAGNON, Kelli E.1, EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.1, and KHALIL, Khalil Isaac2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt University, Egypt Sponsored by NSF-OISE-1004021 Session 92:T3. Sigma Gamma Epsilon Undergraduate Research over 30,000 km2 in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The deposits most resemble Algoma-type iron

  3. The Desert Environment January 26, 1999 1 The Desert Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiss, Steven P.

    The Desert Environment January 26, 1999 1 The Desert Environment Revised Paper Steven P. Reiss1@cs.brown.edu Abstract The Desert software engineering environment is a suite of tools developed to enhance pro- grammer virtual files on demand to address specific tasks. All this is done in an open and extensible environment

  4. Interdisciplinary Graduate Internship Opportunities Desert Archaeology, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Interdisciplinary Graduate Internship Opportunities ARIZONA Desert Archaeology, Inc. Desert to regulatory compliance. Interested in sponsoring graduate internships William Doelle, President Desert credit by working on research projects or campaigns. The purpose of the internship program is to provide

  5. GEOLOGICAL NOTE Desert Pavement: An Environmental Canary?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    GEOLOGICAL NOTE Desert Pavement: An Environmental Canary? P K. Haft Division of Earth and Ocean 27708 Ie-mail: /wff@geo.duke_eciul ABSTRACT Ongoing ctisruption of ancient, varnished desert pavement that the pavement disturbances reported here ~ue rarc on the millcnnhll time scale of desert varnish format ion

  6. Mosses in the Desert: Fascinating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    ;· 2. How does a desert moss do this and what are the implications? ­ a. applications to agriculture the membranes damaged by desiccation. ­ (ii) a quick repair time is the key to surviving drought: half during;· 8. Recall the 100+ proteins required to effect repairs for desiccation tolerance. ­ a. should

  7. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  8. american southwest desert: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q Geosciences Websites Summary: Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q Margarita M. Marinova...

  9. atacama desert soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CellDerived Desert Hedgehog Controls Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Hedgehog Controls the Development of Peripheral Nerve Sheaths by the signaling protein Desert...

  10. UNLV DESERT SUNRISE DESERT SUNRISE HOME Project Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3E Ambassadors and U.S.MANAGEMENT Annual DEPARTMENT OFUNLV DESERT

  11. Plants--Desert Studies Center + -Common names from Edmund Jaeger's Desert Wild Flowers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Plants--Desert Studies Center + - Common names from Edmund Jaeger's Desert Wild Flowers * - Common Encelia farinosa *+Brittlebush, Incienso Page 1 of 7DSC Plant List 8/18/2007file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\Owner.YOUR-780C524461\\My Documents\\DSC\\biology\\plants... #12;Top of Page · Biology Index Page

  12. Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning and desert dust observations from GOME and SCIAMACHY · Conclusions and Outlook #12; · Absorbing Aerosol

  13. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  14. amargosa desert research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH Service Several largescale solar...

  15. agassizii desert tortoise: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH Service Several largescale solar...

  16. SUNLIGHT TRANSMISSION THROUGH DESERT DUST AND MARINE AEROSOLS: DIFFUSE LIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUNLIGHT TRANSMISSION THROUGH DESERT DUST AND MARINE AEROSOLS: DIFFUSE LIGHT CORRECTIONS TO SUN transmission through desert dust and marine aerosols: Diffuse light corrections to Sun photometry 2004; published 27 April 2004. [1] Desert dust and marine aerosols are receiving increased scientific

  17. BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES & GUIDANCE MANUAL: DESERT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES & GUIDANCE MANUAL: DESERT RENEWABLE ENERGY SOUTHWEST REGION #12;Draft BMPs and Guidance October 5, 2009 DISCLAIMER Best Management Practices & Guidance Eugenia Laychak Mignon Marks James W. Reede, Jr., Ed. D. Paul Richins Authors Roger Johnson Manager

  18. High performance robotic traverse of desert terrain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittaker, William (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents tentative innovations to enable unmanned vehicle guidance for a class of off-road traverse at sustained speeds greater than 30 miles per hour. Analyses and field trials suggest that even greater navigation speeds might be achieved. The performance calls for innovation in mapping, perception, planning and inertial-referenced stabilization of components, hosted aboard capable locomotion. The innovations are motivated by the challenge of autonomous ground vehicle traverse of 250 miles of desert terrain in less than 10 hours, averaging 30 miles per hour. GPS coverage is assumed to be available with localized blackouts. Terrain and vegetation are assumed to be akin to that of the Mojave Desert. This terrain is interlaced with networks of unimproved roads and trails, which are a key to achieving the high performance mapping, planning and navigation that is presented here.

  19. Desert Pavement and Buried Archaeological Features in the Arid West: A Case Study from Southern Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlstrom, Richard V. N.; Roberts, Heidi

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    u t e . New York: DESERT PAVEMENT AND BURIED ARCHAEOLOGICAL10. Cooke, Ronald U. Stone Pavements in Deserts. Annals of tt , Sif O i d a k DESERT PAVEMENT AND BURIED ARCHAEOLOGICAL

  20. Vesicular Horizon Distribution, Properties, and Pedogenic Processes in Deserts of the Western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Judith Katherine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of desert soils of Mongolia. Euras. Soil Sci. 42:1204-1217.of desert soils of Mongolia. Euras. Soil Sci. 42:1204-1217.of desert soils of Mongolia. Euras. Soil Sci. 42:1204-1217.

  1. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    centers as a clean and renewable energy resource. The demandProtective Council Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plancenters as a clean and renewable energy resource. Whether

  2. EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Final Environmental Impact Statement Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project, California June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact...

  3. Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields, Northwestern Nevada: Implications for...

  4. Every Square Inch: The Fight for the California Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argandona, Monica

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    centers as a clean and renewable energy resource. The demandfor Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies CaliforniaProtective Council Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan

  5. area thar desert: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mahowald, Natalie 13 Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for...

  6. area southeastern desert: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mahowald, Natalie 13 Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for...

  7. area eastern desert: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 21 Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for...

  8. area western desert: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mahowald, Natalie 24 Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision Support Tool for...

  9. amargosa desert nye: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the TOMS AI make Mahowald, Natalie 32 Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: Decision...

  10. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  11. Evaluation of a Translocated Population of Desert Mule Deer in the Chihuahuan Desert of Northern Coahuila, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortega-Sanchez, Alfonso

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF A TRANSLOCATED POPULATION OF DESERT MULE DEER IN THE CHIHUAHUAN DESERT OF NORTHERN COAHUILA, MEXICO A Dissertation by ALFONSO ORTEGA-SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A..., Michael P. Masser December 2013 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Copyright 2013 Alfonso Ortega-Sanchez ii ABSTRACT Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) are large (30–150 kg) ungulates that occur from southern Alaska to the desert...

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Northern Saudi Arabia in Wadi Kareim and Wadi Mobarak in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and the Nuwaybah formation in NW Saudi and extends from Egypt, Israel, and Jordan to Ethiopia and Yemen. The ANS (Fig. 1a) developed during

  13. Desert Peak EGS Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy Act ImplementingALEnergy Deputy Secretary ofDesert

  14. Desert Peak EGS Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E L D *Department ofDescriptive ModelDesert

  15. Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas: EnergySprings, California:Desert

  16. Food Deserts and Eating Habits of Children Participating in the WIC Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewell, Kassi Kae

    2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Food Desert Mapping This thesis also utilizes the USDA?s (ERS division) data on food deserts to determine which participating WIC clients reside in food desert zip codes. The USDA defines a food desert as a census tract in which at least 33 percent..., and 80 RQ6: What percentage of the western region WIC participants reside in food deserts? Participant Zip Codes 21 4. MATERIALS AND METHODS Institutional Review Board The proposed study has been approved...

  17. GPUs: An Oasis in the Supercomputing Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamleh, Waseem

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel metric is introduced to compare the supercomputing resources available to academic researchers on a national basis. Data from the supercomputing Top 500 and the top 500 universities in the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) are combined to form the proposed "500/500" score for a given country. Australia scores poorly in the 500/500 metric when compared with other countries with a similar ARWU ranking, an indication that HPC-based researchers in Australia are at a relative disadvantage with respect to their overseas competitors. For HPC problems where single precision is sufficient, commodity GPUs provide a cost-effective means of quenching the computational thirst of otherwise parched Lattice practitioners traversing the Australian supercomputing desert. We explore some of the more difficult terrain in single precision territory, finding that BiCGStab is unreliable in single precision at large lattice sizes. We test the CGNE and CGNR forms of the conjugate gradient method on the normal equa...

  18. Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Facilities...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95F (35C). Ambient air temperature will be measured in the shade, protected from wind, at a height of 2 inches (5 centimeters) above the ground surface. No desert tortoise...

  19. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch...

  20. NextEra Energy Resources, LLC (Desert Sunlight) | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    financing of the development of the Desert Sunlight Project, a 550 MW photovoltaic (PV) solar generating plant. The project is owned by NextEra, GE, and Sumitoto of America (50%,...

  1. Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada Ralph L. Seiler sources. Tungsten concentrations in 100 ground water samples from all aquifers used as drinking water indicates that W exhibits Tungsten con- centrations are strongly and positively correlated

  2. Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Regional Gravity...

  3. Effects of Land Surface Characteristics on Pedogenesis, Biological Soil Crust Community Diversity, and Ecosystem Functions in a Mojave Desert Piedmont Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietrasiak, Nicole

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shrub patches and water harvesting in the Negev Desert: theshrub patches and water harvesting in the Negev Desert: the

  4. GPUs: An Oasis in the Supercomputing Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waseem Kamleh

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel metric is introduced to compare the supercomputing resources available to academic researchers on a national basis. Data from the supercomputing Top 500 and the top 500 universities in the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) are combined to form the proposed "500/500" score for a given country. Australia scores poorly in the 500/500 metric when compared with other countries with a similar ARWU ranking, an indication that HPC-based researchers in Australia are at a relative disadvantage with respect to their overseas competitors. For HPC problems where single precision is sufficient, commodity GPUs provide a cost-effective means of quenching the computational thirst of otherwise parched Lattice practitioners traversing the Australian supercomputing desert. We explore some of the more difficult terrain in single precision territory, finding that BiCGStab is unreliable in single precision at large lattice sizes. We test the CGNE and CGNR forms of the conjugate gradient method on the normal equations. Both CGNE and a modified form of CGNR (with restarts) provide reliable convergence for quark propagator calculations in single precision.

  5. An endangered oasis of aquatic microbial biodiversity in the Chihuahuan desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forney, Larry J.

    An endangered oasis of aquatic microbial biodiversity in the Chihuahuan desert Valeria Souza, representing a desert oasis of high biodiversity. Here, we combine data from molecular microbiology and geology

  6. Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Caitlin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

  7. New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmerom, Yemane

    New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt rocks, or tufas, exposed along the flanks of the Libyan Plateau near Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

  8. Soil Formation and Transport Processes on Hillslopes along a Precipitation Gradient in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Justine J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000, Desert pavement characteristics on wadi terrace andalluvial fan surfaces: Wadi Al-Bih, UAE and Oman:

  9. Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from observations show that desert dust and heavy air pollution over East Asia have similar ability to glaciate desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L21804, doi:10

  10. INTEG. AND COMP. BIOL., 42:6875 (2002) Ecological and Evolutionary Physiology of Desert Birds: A Progress Report1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    of desert environments, regions where high ambient temperature (Ta) and low water availability limits of mechanisms of energy and water conservation among species of desert rodents, which avoid temperature extremes studies that show that desert birds may have evolved specific features to deal with hot desert conditions

  11. Decision Center for a Desert City Water/Climate Briefings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    Water and its Role in Mitigation of Surface/Ground water depletion ­ Max Krzyzewski Climate Change EfDecision Center for a Desert City Water/Climate Briefings A place where multiple perspectives with the public policy community to investigate water, climate, decision-making and vulnerability

  12. Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH of renewable energy is of vital importance. Through its focus on reducing the environmental impacts of solar PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ environmental/index.html April 2011 The Issue

  13. Erratum to Case Study: Desert Arid Under "For More Information"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the surrounding mountain ranges. These arid lands of the United States lay nestled between the mountain ranges of them died before they were rescued, this desert area of exceptional heat has been known since as "Death Valley."1 Death Valley is part of the dry mountainous Southwest ecoregion, which includes the Mojave

  14. Desert pavement morphology and dynamics, Big Bend National Park, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Courtney Michelle

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Desert pavements consist of a one- to two-layer thick surface armory of stones overlying finer, virtually stone-free material which often adopts the appearance of a meticulously tiled mosaic. They cover half of the arid land surface in North America...

  15. Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modeling efforts, quantify the flux of groundwater nutrients to the lower Truckee River; 2. Using benchWater Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction Research Program #12;A Multi-Level Approach to Modeling Ground- and Surface Water Exchange

  16. ReproducedfromVadoseZoneJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Hydraulic Properties of a Desert Soil Chronosequence in the Mojave Desert, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Donald, T. G. Caldwell, S. G. Benner, and D. G. Meadows ABSTRACT packed gravel that overlies a thin (3­10 cm layer of closely packed gravel that overlies a thin, gravel-poor, vesicular A (Av) soil horizon. Well), fine-grained, gravel-poor, vesicular A (Av) soil horizon.1 Desert pave-Desert pavements are prominent

  17. Relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautenstrauch, K.R.; O`Farrell, T.P.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven hundred fifty-nine transects having a total length of 1,191 km were walked during 1981--1986 to determine the distribution and relative abundance of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The abundance of tortoises on NTS was low to very low relative to other populations in the Mojave Desert. Sign of tortoises was found from 880 to 1,570 m elevation and was more abundant above 1,200 m than has been reported previously for Nevada. Tortoises were more abundant on NTS on the upper alluvial fans and slopes of mountains than in valley bottoms. They also were more common on or near limestone and dolomite mountains than on mountains of volcanic origin.

  18. The Pennsylvania State University Marching Blue Band Blue Band Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    The Pennsylvania State University Marching Blue Band Press Kit Blue Band Office 101 Blue Band Director vcc2@psu.edu orb1@psu.edu gad157@psu.edu (814) 865 - 3982 #12;History of the Blue Band The Marching Blue Band numbers 310 members which includes: 260 instrumentalists, 34 silks, 14 Touch of Blue

  19. Fire Impacts on the Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenstermaker Lynn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located within the Mojave Desert, which is the driest region in North America. Precipitation on the NNSS varies from an annual average of 130 millimeters (mm; 5.1 inches) with a minimum of 47 mm (1.9 inches) and maximum of 328 mm (12.9 inches) over the past 15 year period to an annual average of 205 mm (8.1 inches) with an annual minimum of 89 mm (3.5 inches) and maximum of 391 mm (15.4 inches) for the same time period; for a Frenchman Flat location at 970 meters (m; 3182 feet) and a Pahute Mesa location at 1986 m (6516 feet), respectively. The combination of aridity and temperature extremes has resulted in sparsely vegetated basins (desert shrub plant communities) to moderately vegetated mountains (mixed coniferous forest plant communities); both plant density and precipitation increase with increasing elevation. Whereas some plant communities have evolved under fire regimes and are dependent upon fire for seed germination, plant communities within the Mojave Desert are not dependent on a fire regime and therefore are highly impacted by fire (Brown and Minnich, 1986; Brooks, 1999). As noted by Johansen (2003) natural range fires are not prevalent in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts because there is not enough vegetation present (too many shrub interspaces) to sustain a fire. Fire research and hence publications addressing fires in the Southwestern United States (U.S.) have therefore focused on forest, shrub-steppe and grassland fires caused by both natural and anthropogenic ignition sources. In the last few decades, however, invasion of mid-elevation shrublands by non-native Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and Bromus tectorum (Hunter, 1991) have been highly correlated with increased fire frequency (Brooks and Berry, 2006; Brooks and Matchett, 2006). Coupled with the impact of climate change, which has already been shown to be playing a role in increased forest fires (Westerling et al., 2006), it is likely that the fire frequency will further increase in the Mojave Desert (Knapp 1998; Smith et al., 1987; Smith et al., 2000).

  20. EIS-0448: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to First Solar for the Proposed Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    First Solar Desert Sunlight Solar Farm (DSSF) Project, proposes to develop a 550-megawatt photovoltaic solar project and proposes to facilitate the construction and operation of the Red Bluff Substation, California Desert Conservation Area (CDCA) Plan, Riverside County, California.

  1. sonorensis | winter 2005 11 As the intense heat of day in the Sonoran Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medellín, Rodrigo

    sonorensis | winter 2005 11 As the intense heat of day in the Sonoran Desert gives way to cooler and fruit. Once the intense Sonoran Desert heat ebbs, and fall encroaches, the bats head southward, back as threatened in 1994. FORECAST FOR THE LESSER LONG-NOSED BAT A USFWS recovery plan in 1994 listed conservation

  2. A numerical modeling study on desert oasis self-supporting mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    A numerical modeling study on desert oasis self-supporting mechanisms Peter C. Chua, *, Shihua Lub February 2005 Abstract Oasis self-supporting mechanisms due to oasis breeze circulation (OBC) are proposed from the oasis makes the oasis surface colder than the surrounding desert surface. The sensible heat

  3. Ecological controls on water-cycle response to climate variability in deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    sites for waste disposal (4). For example, the proposed U.S. repository to isolate highly radioactive are critical for water resources and waste disposal in deserts. Desert environments are particularly vulnerable in response to elevated winter precipitation reduced soil water storage to half of that in a nonvegetated

  4. Response of desert pavement to seismic shaking, Hector Mine earthquake, California, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Response of desert pavement to seismic shaking, Hector Mine earthquake, California, 1999 P. K. Haff characteristic surface disturbances on nearby desert pavements. These disturbances included (1) zones of wholesale gravel displacement interspersed with zones of intact pavement, (2) displaced and rotated cobbles

  5. REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    REGULAR ARTICLE Impact of biological soil crusts and desert plants on soil microfaunal community are supplied by a variety of sources in the desert food web; both vascular and non-vascular plants and cyanobacteria supply carbon, and cyanobacteria and plant-associated rhizosphere bacteria are sources

  6. The Adjustment of Avian Metabolic Rates and Water Fluxes to Desert Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    ambient air temperatures (Ta), low primary productivity, and lack of surface water place deserts among and Seely 1982; Williams and Tieleman 2000b). Likewise, lack of surface water ostensibly limits water intake461 The Adjustment of Avian Metabolic Rates and Water Fluxes to Desert Environments B. Irene

  7. Global observations and spectral characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Global observations and spectral characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols M. de (UV) absorbing aerosols, mainly desert dust and biomass burning aerosols. The AAI is not an aerosol quantity, but a radiation difference in the UV. Its main advantages are its insensitivity to scattering

  8. Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity tectonic process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity, University of Assiut, Egypt Received 10 January 2001; received in revised form 24 October 2001; accepted 25 in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt is constraint by 40 Ar/39 Ar ages of hornblende and muscovite from Meatiq

  9. Nitrate dynamics in the soil and unconfined aquifer in arid groundwater coupled ecosystems of the Monte desert, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    of the Monte desert, Argentina J. N. Aranibar,1,2 P. E. Villagra,1,3 M. L. Gomez,1 E. Jobbágy,4 M. Quiroga,1 R desert, Argentina, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G04015, doi:10.1029/2010JG001618. 1. Introduction [2] Drylands desert, Argentina, shallow groundwater is exploited by deep rooted trees, increasing primary productivity

  10. BLM West Desert District Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France: Energy ResourcesBurleyBLM SierraBLM West Desert

  11. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  12. Biotic Processes Regulating the Carbon Balance of Desert Ecosystems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S [UNR; Smith, Stanley D [UNLV; Evans, Dave [WSU; Ogle, Kiona [ASU; Fenstermaker, Lynn [DRI

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Our results from the 10-year elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration study at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) indicate that the Mojave Desert is a dynamic ecosystem with the capacity to respond quickly to environmental changes. The Mojave Desert ecosystem is accumulating carbon (C), and over the 10-year experiment, C accumulation was significantly greater under elevated [CO{sub 2}] than under ambient, despite great fluctuations in C inputs from year to year and even apparent reversals in which [CO{sub 2}] treatment had greater C accumulations.

  13. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  14. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  15. HD 137510: An Oasis in the Brown Dwarf Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Endl; Artie P. Hatzes; William D. Cochran; Barbara McArthur; Carlos Allende Prieto; Diane B. Paulson Eike Guenther; Ana Bedalov

    2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the beginning of precise Doppler surveys, which have had stunning success in detecting extrasolar planetary companions, one surprising enigma has emerged: the relative paucity of spectroscopic binaries where the secondary mass lies in between the stellar and planetary mass regime. This gap in the mass function for close-in (a < 3 - 4 AU) companions to solar-type stars is generally referred to as the ``Brown Dwarf Desert''. Here we report the detection of a companion to HD 137510 (G0IV), with a minimum mass of 26 M_Jupiter, moving in an eccentric orbit (e=0.4) with a period of 798 days and an orbital semimajor axis of 1.85 AU. The detection is based on precise differential radial velocity (RV) data obtained by the McDonald Observatory and Thueringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg planet search programs.

  16. HD 137510: An Oasis in the Brown Dwarf Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endl, M; Cochran, W D; McArthur, B; Allende-Prieto, C; Günther, D B; Bedalov, A; Endl, Michael; Hatzes, Artie P.; Cochran, William D.; Arthur, Barbara Mc; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Guenther, Diane B. Paulson Eike; Bedalov, Ana

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the beginning of precise Doppler surveys, which have had stunning success in detecting extrasolar planetary companions, one surprising enigma has emerged: the relative paucity of spectroscopic binaries where the secondary mass lies in between the stellar and planetary mass regime. This gap in the mass function for close-in (a < 3 - 4 AU) companions to solar-type stars is generally referred to as the ``Brown Dwarf Desert''. Here we report the detection of a companion to HD 137510 (G0IV), with a minimum mass of 26 M_Jupiter, moving in an eccentric orbit (e=0.4) with a period of 798 days and an orbital semimajor axis of 1.85 AU. The detection is based on precise differential radial velocity (RV) data obtained by the McDonald Observatory and Thueringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg planet search programs.

  17. Desert Peak to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A., (ed) Nevada geothermal areas: Desert Peak, Humboldt House, Beoware: Guidebook for field trip Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  18. Soils and Brine Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Hyperarid Desert Playa, Ouargla Basin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soils and Brine Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Hyperarid Desert Playa, Ouargla Basin, Algerian. The chemical and mineralogical specificity of this hyperarid ecosystem has been compared to other areas under

  19. Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

  20. Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Wadi Hafafit Culmination (central Eastern Desert, Egypt). Implication for Neoproterozoic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the Wadi Hafafit Culmination (central Eastern Desert, Egypt.O. 530 El-Maadi, Cairo, Egypt Institut für Geowissenschaften, Universität Tübingen Sigwartstr. 10, D

  1. Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinova, Elena

    Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders? V. Linseele a by the Belgian Middle Egypt Prehistoric Project of Leuven University under the direction of P.M. Vermeersch

  2. Short residence time and fast transport of fine detritus in the Judean Desert: Clues from 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    in Darga Wadi, a dry river in the Judean Desert, Israel, part of the drainage area of the Dead Sea and its late Pleistocene precursor, Lake Lisan (Figure 1). Darga Wadi is located in an arid region in which

  3. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, D.S.

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrometer is disclosed for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the waveguide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the waveguide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis. 16 figs.

  4. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldman, Don S. (Folsom, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  5. Thermal Performance of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S. S.; Helal, M. A.; El-Demirdash, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Performance of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky Region) S.S. Sheble* M. H. Khalil M. A. Helal Prof. M. El- Demirdash3 Asso. Prof. Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Asso. Prof. Building Physics... Institute (HBRC) Prof. & head of Building Physics Institute (HBRC) Prof. & Chairman of HBRC Housing & Building National Research Center (HBRC) Cairo, Egypt * Author ABSTRACT Toshky region is a desert region located in the south east...

  6. Rehab permits desert line to run at original pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurdi, A.M.; Abougfeefa, M.S. (Agip Oil Co. Ltd., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)); Denney, A.K. (John Brown Engineering and Constructors Ltd., London (United Kingdom))

    1993-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive inspection and rehabilitation program on a 34-in. desert pipeline in gas-condensate service has restored the line to full operating pressures and ensured the line's active service life for at least 20 years. Since Agip Oil Co. Ltd. built the 133-km pipeline in 1972 using API 5L Grade X-60, it has suffered six known failures. There has been no single cause of the failures. As a consequence of the failures, the line has been progressively down rated from the original operating pressure of 700 psig to 500 psig. So that the line could again be operated between 650 and 700 psig, two options have been considered: extensive study and investigation leading to inspection and replacement of suspect pipe: total replacement of the line. These options were evaluated from economic and safety points of view. A major consideration was that the line will be operating in its current manner for only the next 2 years before changing to dry-gas transportation. The first option was therefore considered viable. The paper discusses the failure mechanisms, the history of hydrogen-induced cracking, the 1989 failure, survey results, calculation of acceptable pressures, and the rehabilitation program.

  7. SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION IN THE TRIBE SCHIZOPETALAE (BRASSICACEAE): A MOLECULAR, MORPHOLOGICAL, AND ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DIVERSIFICATION OF AN ENDEMIC LINEAGE FROM THE ATACAMA DESERT (CHILE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toro Nunez, Oscar Fernando

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As aridity has been identified as an active promoter of diversification in deserts, attempts to test organismal differentiation in the Atacama Desert have resulted particularly challenging. Most limitations are related to ...

  8. Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

  9. Does variation in mineral composition alter the short-wave light scattering properties of desert dust aerosol?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    retrievals of mineral dust aerosol from space by visible and near-infrared radiometers. Errors in aerosol depth in deserts and the surrounding regions during periods of high wind. Long range transport of desert particles into the air [6] (wind alone does not have sufficient energy to remove particles from the surface

  10. Holocene freshwater carbonate structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q Margarita M. Marinova a,b , A. Nele Meckler c , Christopher P. McKay b region of the Sahara Desert, near the triple border of Egypt, Sudan, and Libya (N22°, E25°), re- ceives- ibrated years BP; Wendorf and expedition, 1977). While some parts of southwest Egypt have been extensively

  11. Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the ArabianNubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: evidence from fission track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the Arabian­Nubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt were performed in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The results provide insights into the processes driving reserved. Keywords: Phanerozoic; Fission track thermochronology; Palaeostress; Arabian­Nubien shield; Egypt

  12. The northern boundary of the desert tortoise range on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautenstrauch, K.R.; Brown, G.A.; Goodwin, R.G.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted in 1993 to more accurately define the northern boundary of the range of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Eighty-six transects totaling 338.2 km were walked along this boundary and 53 tortoise signs were recorded. Tortoise signs were found all along the northern edge of Jackass and Frenchman flats. Signs were found north of those valleys only in the Calico Hills at the south end of Topopah Valley and in the CP Hills at the extreme southern end of Yucca Flat. A revised map of the range of desert tortoises on NTS is presented. This information can be used by the US Department of Energy to determine whether activities conducted along or near this boundary will affect desert tortoises.

  13. Variability in desert bighorn and Rambouillet sheep using restriction fragment length polymorphisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyles, Ingrid Doodeheefver

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , was resuspended in Tris-EDTA, and the concentration of DNA in yg/ml was determined (Skow et al. 1988). 18 Table 1. Species identification. No. 1 2 3 4 6 7 DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX DBHS NV/TX Heparinized Blood.... Rambo. Calif. Rambo. Calif. Rambo. DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form DNA extracted form UCB UCB UCB UCB UCB DBHS NV/TX: Desert Bighorn Sheep Nevada/Texas cross DBHS AZ/AZ: Desert Bighorn Sheep...

  14. Natural history of thorny devils Moloch horridus (Lacertilia: Agamidae) in the Great Victoria Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pianka, Eric R.

    183 Natural history of thorny devils Moloch horridus (Lacertilia: Agamidae) in the Great Victoria received August 1997; accepted February 1998 Abstract Daily movements and activity of three male and five female thorny devils (Moloch horridus) were monitored using biotelemetry in the Great Victoria Desert

  15. Can Desert Dwellers Continue To Afford Lush Lawns: Analyzing Consumer Response to Rate Changes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Can Desert Dwellers Continue To Afford Lush Lawns: Analyzing Consumer Response to Rate Changes of price and weather on wa- ter demand is important for Arizona. If the effect of weather is not well. In part, this is because few other studies use household data, and instead use data aggregated

  16. Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem J . E . B A R R E over the previous decade and altered ecosystem properties in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems of melt-water had significant influences on Taylor Valley ecosystems that persisted for several years

  17. Metabolism, Swimming Performance, and Tissue Biochemistry of High Desert Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss ssp.): Evidence for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    413 Metabolism, Swimming Performance, and Tissue Biochemistry of High Desert Redband Trout (Ucrit) and oxygen consumption in the field at 12 and 24 C; (2) biochemical indices of energy metabolism gradient. Fur- ther, we also examined genetic and morphological character- istics of fish from these two

  18. Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 2750 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 27­50 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt, Graz, Austria b Mansoura University, Faculty of Science, Geology Department, El Mansoura, Egypt c February 2003; accepted 3 September 2004 Abstract The Wadi Mubarak belt in Egypt strikes west­east (and

  19. Balancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    at the Census block group level for 2005 3. Energy consumption data from 2005 Census Mesic Landscaping XericBalancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case Study on Phoenix, AZ effect, water scarcity, and energy consumption. The transformation of native landscapes into built

  20. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  1. ORNITHOCOPROPHILOUS PLANTS OF MOUNT DESERT ROCK, A REMOTE BIRD-NESTING ISLAND IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    ORNITHOCOPROPHILOUS PLANTS OF MOUNT DESERT ROCK, A REMOTE BIRD-NESTING ISLAND IN THE GULF OF MAINE for the maintenance of plant communities (Cruden 1966; Gillham 1970; Howe and Smallwood 1982; Mulder and Keall 2001 to botanists as they often determine which plant species are dispersed and become established in such remote

  2. Structure and Function of Chihuahuan Desert Ecosystem The Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Land degradation in most of the Chihuahuan Desert is characterized by a shift from grass- to shrub objective where perennial plants have been completely lost from a site, whereas the term reclamation is used to support revegetation, reclamation, and restoration objectives. This chapter is organized into three

  3. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    kelkar, sharad

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  4. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  5. Urbanization and food availability advance the reproductive phenology of a Sonoran Desert songbird

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Urbanization and food availability advance the reproductive phenology of a Sonoran Desert songbird for vernal reproductive activity. Other supplementary cues, such as food availability, fine tune reproductive availability (Chamberlain et al. 2009, Ibis). General Methods Species: Abert's Towhee, Melozone aberti. Capture

  6. Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazard, Lisa C.

    22 Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard* DepartmentCl-secreting salt glands of many birds and reptiles, the nasal salt glands of lizards can secrete potassium as well iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Lizards were given combinations of ions for several days, and secreted salt

  7. Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert spring ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert wildfires in these often remote areas has been inconsistent and proxy records are often not available. Remote sensing methods have been used in other environments to gain information about fires that have

  8. Iron control of past productivity in the coastal upwelling system off the Atacama Desert, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Iron control of past productivity in the coastal upwelling system off the Atacama Desert, Chile in the productivity of the upwelling system off presently arid northern Chile during the last 100,000 years. Changes in productivity are found to be in phase with the precessional cycle ($20,000 years) and with inputs of iron from

  9. Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 38813897 Field measurements of desert dust deposition in Libya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Michèle

    Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 3881­3897 Field measurements of desert dust deposition in Libya-based dust monitoring study of three zones across Libya, ranging from the Mediterranean coast to the Sahara studies in North Africa shows that areas of Libya have the highest dust deposition rates on record. r 2006

  10. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  11. The Relative Abundance of Desert Tortoises on the Nevada Test Site within Ecological Landform Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Woodward, Kurt R. Rautenstrauch, Derek B. Hall, and W. Kent Ostler

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sign-survey transects were sampled in 1996 to better determine the relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These transects were sampled within ecological land-form units (ELUs), which are small, ecologically homogeneous units of land. Two-hundred and six ELUs were sampled by walking 332 transects totaling 889 kilometers (km) (552 miles [mi]). These ELUs covered 528 km{sup 2} (204 mi{sup 2}). Two-hundred and eighty-one sign were counted. An average of 0.32 sign was found per km walked. Seventy percent of the area sampled had a very low abundance of tortoises, 29 percent had a low abundance, and 1 percent had a moderate abundance. A revised map of the relative abundance of desert tortoise on the NTS is presented. Within the 1,330 km{sup 2} (514 mi{sup 2}) of desert tortoise habitat on the NTS, 49 percent is classified as having no tortoises or a very low abundance, 18 percent has a low or moderate abundance, 12 percent is unclassified land being used by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, and the remaining 21 percent still has an unknown abundance of desert tortoises. Based on the results of this work, the amount of tortoise habitat previously classified as having an unknown or low-moderate abundance, and on which clearance surveys and on-site monitoring was required, has been reduced by 20 percent.

  12. The relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site within ecological landform units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, R. [Bechtel National (United States); Rautenstrauch, K.R. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States); Hall, D.B.; Ostler, W.K. [Bechtel Nevada (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sign-survey transects were sampled in 1996 to better determine the relative abundance of desert tortoises on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These transects were sampled within ecological land-form units (ELUs), which are small, ecologically homogeneous units of land. Two-hundred and six ELUs were sampled by walking 332 transects totaling 889 kilometers (km). These ELUs covered 528 km{sup 2}. Two-hundred and eight-one sign were counted. An average of 0.32 sign was found per km walked. Seventy percent of the area sampled had a very low abundance of tortoises, 29% had a low abundance, and 1% had a moderate abundance. A revised map of the relative abundance of desert tortoise on the NTS is presented. Within the 1,330 km{sup 2} of desert tortoise habitat on the NTS, 49% is classified as having no tortoises or a very low abundance, 18% has a low or moderate abundance, 12% is unclassified land being used by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, and the remaining 21% still has an unknown abundance of desert tortoises. Based on the results of this work, the amount of tortoise habitat previously classified as having an unknown or low-moderate abundance, and on which clearance surveys and on-site monitoring was required, has been reduced by 20%.

  13. Sensing in the Urban Technological Deserts A Position Paper for Smart Cities in Least Developed Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensing in the Urban Technological Deserts A Position Paper for Smart Cities in Least Developed to ubiquitous computing. This paradigm has made the concept of smart cities a reality that is now in synchrony or users of existential services such as hospitals, the implementation of smart cities is equally important

  14. Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert and cerebrosides in the SC compared with mesic spar- rows. In this study, we investigated developmental plasticity modifications of the lipid composition of the SC. The expression of plasticity in CWL seems to be a response

  15. Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D EVELOPMENT I SSUES Solar Power in the Desert: Are the2 Most of the large-scale solar power projects utilize largethat will be affected by solar power facilities. There are

  16. Stable isotope geochemistry of sulfur bearing minerals and clay mineralogy of some soils and sediments in Loot Desert, central Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Stable isotope geochemistry of sulfur bearing minerals and clay mineralogy of some soils Keywords: Sulfur geochemistry Gypsum crystallization water Clay mineralogy Palygorskite Iranian soils Loot technique and clay mineralogy were studied in different landforms in Loot Desert, central Iran. Four

  17. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  18. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David A. (Walnut Creek, CA); Flood, William S. (Berkeley, CA); Arthur, Allan A. (Martinez, CA); Voelker, Ferdinand (Orinda, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

  19. Effects of Land Surface Characteristics on Pedogenesis, Biological Soil Crust Community Diversity, and Ecosystem Functions in a Mojave Desert Piedmont Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietrasiak, Nicole

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000. Desert pavement characteristics on wadi-terrace andalluvial fan surfaces: Wadi Al-Bih, U.A.E. and Oman.

  20. Bosonic condensation in a flat energy band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baboux, F; Jacqmin, T; Biondi, M; Lemaître, A; Gratiet, L Le; Sagnes, I; Schmidt, S; Türeci, H E; Amo, A; Bloch, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat bands are non-dispersive energy bands made of fully degenerate quantum states. Such bands are expected to support emergent phenomena with extraordinary spatial and temporal structures, as they strongly enhance the effect of any perturbation induced by disorder, dissipation or interactions. However, flat bands usually appear at energies above the ground state, preventing their study in systems in thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we use cavity polaritons to circumvent this issue. We engineer a flat band in a frustrated lattice of micro-pillar optical cavities. By taking advantage of the non-hermiticity of our system, we achieve for the first time bosonic condensation in a flat band. This allows revealing the peculiar effect of disorder in such band: The condensate fragments into highly localized modes, reflecting the elementary eigenstates produced by geometric frustration. This non-hermitian engineering of a bosonic flat band condensate offers a novel approach to studying coherent phases of light and matte...

  1. Low band gap polymers Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low band gap polymers for Organic Photovoltaics Eva Bundgaard Ph.D. Dissertation Risř National Bundgaard Title: Low band gap polymers for Organic photovoltaics Department: The polymer department Report the area of organic photovoltaics are focusing on low band gap polymers, a type of polymer which absorbs

  2. Poisson statistics for random deformed band matrices with power law band width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Pchelin

    2015-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We show Poisson statistics for random band matrices which diagonal entries have Gaussian components. These components are possibly as small as $n^{-\\varepsilon}$. Particularly, our result is applicable for a band matrix cut from the GUE with the band width satisfying $w^{3.5}density of states (DOS) is obtained for complex deformed Gaussian band matrices with arbitrary $w$. A lower estimate of the DOS is also proven for arbitrary $w$ in a certain class of band matrices.

  3. The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stu¨we a,*, H. Fritz, Austria b Department of Geology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Received 8 September 2004; received of kilometres of the East- ern Desert of Egypt. Its sedimentary record shows that deposition occurred in two

  4. 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind ProjectsourceInformation 2-M Probe At Desert Peak

  5. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE 11 UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA SYSTEM DOE/W/10162--20

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg U.S. S p e c t®% DESERT

  6. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  7. Possible chiral bands in {sup 194}Tl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masiteng, P. L.; Ramashidzha, T. M.; Maliage, S. M.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Vymers, P. A. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, 7535 Bellville (South Africa); Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Bark, R. A.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); Kau, J.; Komati, F. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of the North West, Private Bag X2046, 2735 Mafikeng (South Africa); Lindsay, R. [University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, 7535 Bellville (South Africa); Matamba, I. [University of Venda for Science and Technology, Thohoyandou (South Africa); Mutshena, P. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of Venda for Science and Technology, Thohoyandou (South Africa); Zhang, Y. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of Cape Town, Private Bag, 7701 Rondebosch (South Africa)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High spin states in {sup 194}Tl, excited through the {sup 181}Ta({sup 18}O,5n) fusion evaporation reaction, were studied using the AFRODITE array at iThemba LABS. Candidate chiral bands built on the {pi}h{sub 9/2} x {nu}i{sub 13/2}{sup 1} configuration were found. Furthermore these bands were observed through a band crossing caused by the excitation of a {nu}i{sub 13/2} pair. Above the band crossing the excitation energies remain close, suggesting that chirality may persist for the four quasiparticle configuration too.

  8. Mesozoic rift basins in western desert of Egypt, their southern extension and impact on future exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, M.A. (Conoco, Cairo (Egypt))

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rift basins are a primary target of exploration in east, central, and west Africa. These intracratonic rift basins range in age from the Triassic to the Neogene and are filled with lagoonal-lacustrine sand-shale sequences. Several rift basins may be present in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the northeastern African platform, the Mesozoic Tethyan strand lines were previously interpreted to have limited southern extension onto the continent. This concept, based upon a relatively limited amount of subsurface data, has directed and focused the exploration for oil and gas to the northernmost 120 km of the Western Desert of Egypt. Recent well and geophysical data indicate a southerly extension of mesozoic rift basins several hundred kilometers inland from the Mediterranean Sea. Shushan/Faghur and Abu Gharadig/Bahrein basins may represent subparallel Mesozoic basins, trending northeast-southwest. Marine Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sediments were recently reported from wells drilled approximately 500 km south of the present-day Mediterranean shoreline. The link of these basins with the Sirte basin to the southwest in Libya is not well understood. Exploration is needed to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of such basins.

  9. Diet of desert tortoises at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and implications for habitat reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakestraw, D.L.; Holt, E.A.; Rautenstrauch, K.R.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The diet of desert tortoises at Yucca Mountain was assessed during 1992 to 1995 using a combination of feeding observations and scat analysis. Feeding observation data (1993 through 1995) showed that tortoises fed on a wide variety of items. The most frequently eaten items were forbs and annual grasses. These two forage groups comprised more than 90% of all bites taken. Analysis of scat (1992 and 1993) also showed that grasses and forbs were the most common groups, making up more than 80% of the composition of scat. Yearly differences between proportions of species in the diet were observed and were most likely attributable to differences in plant productivity, which is linked to rainfall patterns. Non-native species were an important component of the diet in all years, accounting for 13 to 50% of all bites observed and 6 to 24% of scat contents. A list of all items encountered in the diet is provided. To facilitate reclamation of desert tortoise habitat disturbed by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, native forage species that should be included in reclamation seed mixes, when feasible, were identified. Although shrubs make up only a small proportion of the diet, they should also be included in reclamation efforts because they provide habitat structure. Tortoise cover sites, and microhabitats amenable to seed germination and seedling establishment. In addition, non-native species should not be planted on reclaimed sites and, if necessary, sites should be recontoured and soil compaction reduced prior to planting.

  10. Environmental Tradeoffs in a Desert City: An Investigation of Water Use, Energy Consumption, and Local Air Temperature in Phoenix, AZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Environmental Tradeoffs in a Desert City: An Investigation of Water Use, Energy Consumption Area This study examined 16 Census Block Groups (2000) within the City of Phoenix to investigate are critical for long-term urban planning. Figure 2: Study Area: 16 Census Block Groups within City of Phoenix

  11. Environmental effects on distributions of culturable soil oligotrophic bacteria along an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Richard E.

    an elevational gradient in the Chihuahuan Desert James H. Campbell*, John C. Zak, Randall M. Jeter, Richard E from five sites along an elevational and vegetational gradient within Big Bend National Park during the first stressors to be investigated. Microbes capable of metabolism at low concentra- tions of carbon

  12. Sesquiterpene Quinones and Related Metabolites from Phyllosticta spinarum, a Fungal Strain Endophytic in Platycladus orientalis of the Sonoran Desert1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    Endophytic in Platycladus orientalis of the Sonoran Desert1 E. M. Kithsiri Wijeratne, Priyani A. Paranagama, a fungal strain endophytic in Platycladus orientalis. The structures of the new compounds were determined of Phyllosticta spinarum (Botry- osphaeriaceae), a fungal strain endophytic in the leaf tissue of oriental arbor

  13. Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Effects of Stocking Rate on the Variability of Peak Standing Crop in a Desert Steppe of Eurasia Grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and partitioned by species and functional groups, in the desert steppe of Inner Mongolia, China. The treatments Science, Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, Hohhot 010018, Inner Mongolia, People's Republic of China Experimental Range, P.O. Box 30003, MSC 3JER, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8003, USA L. A Á Y. Liu Inner Mongolia

  15. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  16. Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castańo, Gabriel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

  17. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  18. Maximum Likelihood Sub-band Weighting for Robust Speech Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , bins of log filter-band energy (FBE) in each sub-band are multiplied with a weighting factor depending on the reliability of the sub-band. For each sub-band, zero padding is performed on the log FBE vector lengthening. For the DCT has the size of full-band FBE vector, the feature vector consists of the correlations across

  19. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. NDFF whole-ecosystem manipulation is a flagship experiment of the Terrestrial Carbon Process (TCP) research program of the US Dept. of Energy. It is also a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and a contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The NDFF was developed in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and DOE-EPSCoR programs. FACE (Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment) technology allows researchers to elevate the carbon dioxide level in large study plots while minimizing ecosystem disturbance. At the NDFF the concentration of CO2 was elevated by 50 percent above the present atmospheric levels in three plots in the Mojave Desert ecosystem, while six other plots remained at the current level. This experimental design provided a large area in which integrated teams of scientists could describe and quantify processes regulating carbon, nutrient, and water balances in desert ecosystems.

  20. Thermochronometric Investigation of Multiple Unconformities and Post-depositional Thermal History of a Fault Block in the Northern Western Desert, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glauser, Travis Robert

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Detrital apatite and zircon (U-TH)/He analysis across a recently discovered unconformity in the Western Desert of Egypt provides new insight into the tectonic evolution of northeastern Africa. The unconformity juxtaposes ...

  1. Dipole Bands in {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Msezane, B. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, Kwadlangezwa 3886 (South Africa); Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M. [Physics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Belleville 7535 (South Africa)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High spin states in {sup 196}Hg have been populated in the {sup 198}Pt({alpha},6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

  2. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Synchronous, Focally Modulated -Band Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graybiel, Ann M.

    , primarily synchronous -band voltage oscillations occur in the sensorimotor and frontal cortex of humansBehavioral/Systems/Cognitive Synchronous, Focally Modulated -Band Oscillations Characterize Local oscillations in the -frequency band ( 15­30Hz

  3. ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stepp, Jeffrey David (Grandview, MO); Hensley, Dale (Grandview, MO)

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz-6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

  4. ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepp, Jeffrey David (Grandview, MO); Hensley, Dale (Grandview, MO)

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz 6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

  5. Control Banding and Nanotechnology Synergist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Paik, S

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The average Industrial Hygienist (IH) loves a challenge, right? Okay, well here is one with more than a few twists. We start by going through the basics of a risk assessment. You have some chemical agents, a few workers, and the makings of your basic exposure characterization. However, you have no occupational exposure limit (OEL), essentially no toxicological basis, and no epidemiology. Now the real handicap is that you cannot use sampling pumps, cassettes, tubes, or any of the media in your toolbox, and the whole concept of mass-to-dose is out the window, even at high exposure levels. Of course, by the title, you knew we were talking about nanomaterials (NM). However, we wonder how many IHs know that this topic takes everything you know about your profession and turns it upside down. It takes the very foundations that you worked so hard in college and in the field to master and pulls it out from underneath you. It even takes the gold standard of our profession, the quantitative science of exposure assessment, and makes it look pretty darn rusty. Now with NM there is the potential to get some aspect of quantitative measurements, but the instruments are generally very expensive and getting an appropriate workplace personal exposure measurement can be very difficult if not impossible. The potential for workers getting exposures, however, is very real, as evidenced by a recent publication reporting worker exposures to polyacrylate nanoparticles in a Chinese factory (Song et al. 2009). With something this complex and challenging, how does a concept as simple as Control Banding (CB) save the day? Although many IHs have heard of CB, most of their knowledge comes from its application in the COSHH Essentials toolkit. While there is conflicting published research on COSHH Essentials and its value for risk assessments, almost all of the experts agree that it can be useful when no OELs are available (Zalk and Nelson 2008). It is this aspect of CB, its utility with uncertainty, that attracted international NM experts to recommend this qualitative risk assessment approach for NM. However, since their CB recommendation was only in theory, we took on the challenge of developing a working toolkit, the CB Nanotool (see Zalk et al. 2009 and Paik et al. 2008), as a means to perform a risk assessment and protect researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. While it's been acknowledged that engineered NM have potentially endless benefits for society, it became clear to us that the very properties that make nanotechnology so useful to industry could also make them dangerous to humans and the environment. Among the uncertainties and unknowns with NM are: the contribution of their physical structure to their toxicity, significant differences in their deposition and clearance in the lungs when compared to their parent material (PM), a lack of agreement on the appropriate indices for exposure to NM, and very little background information on exposure scenarios or populations at risk. Part of this lack of background information can be traced to the lack of risk assessments historically performed in the industry, with a recent survey indicating that 65% of companies working with NM are not doing any kind of NM-specific risk assessment as they focus on traditional PM methods for IH (Helland et al. 2009). The good news is that the amount of peer-reviewed publications that address environmental, health and safety aspects of NM has been increasing over the last few years; however, the percentage of these that address practical methods to reduce exposure and protect workers is orders of magnitude lower. Our intent in developing the CB Nanotool was to create a simplified approach that would protect workers while unraveling the mysteries of NM for experts and non-experts alike. Since such a large part of the toxicological effects of both the physical and chemical properties of NM were unknown, not to mention changing logarithmically as new NM research continues growing, we needed to account for this lack of information as part of the CB Nano

  6. Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries. Band-Gap Engineering of Carbon Nanotubes with Grain Boundaries. Abstract: Structure and electronic properties of...

  7. Large-magnitude miocene extension in the central Mojave Desert: Implications for Paleozoic to Tertiary paleogeography and tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, J. Douglas; Bartley, John M.; Glazner, Allen F.

    1990-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ., and D. J. DePaolo, Proterozoic crustal history of the western United States as determined by neodymium isotopic mapping, Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., 99, 674-685, 1987. Bowen, O. E., Geology and mineral deposits of the Barstow Quadrangle, San Bernardino... County, California, Bull. 165, 208 pp., Div. of Mines, Calif. Dep. of Nat. Resour., Sacramento, 1954. Burchfiel, B.C., and G. A. Davis, Mojave Desert and environs, in The Geotectonic Development of California, edited by W. G. Ernst, pp. 217...

  8. Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Rothenberg, D. [Cornell University; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Moore, Jefferson Keith [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Jones, C. D. [Hadley Center, Devon, England

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

  9. System-level, Unified In-band and Out-of-band Dynamic Thermal Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the decrease in computation capacity. Less studied are out-of-band techniques (e.g. CPU cooling fans [10]) that operate completely outside the critical performance path of an application. Out-of-band techniques cool system slowdowns or shutdowns. Techniques such as dynamically scaling down the voltage of the CPUs

  10. Energy Band Model Based on Effective Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Ariel

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we demonstrate an alternative method of deriving an isotropic energy band model using a one-dimensional definition of the effective mass and experimentally observed dependence of mass on energy. We extend the effective mass definition to anti-particles and particles with zero rest mass. We assume an often observed linear dependence of mass on energy and derive a generalized non-parabolic energy-momentum relation. The resulting non-parabolicity leads to velocity saturation at high particle energies. We apply the energy band model to free relativistic particles and carriers in solid state materials and obtain commonly used dispersion relations and experimentally confirmed effective masses. We apply the model to zero rest mass particles in graphene and propose using the effective mass for photons. Therefore, it appears that the new energy band model based on the effective mass can be applied to relativistic particles and carriers in solid state materials.

  11. Band filling effects on temperature performance of intermediate band quantum wire solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunets, Vas. P., E-mail: vkunets@uark.edu; Furrow, C. S.; Ware, M. E.; Souza, L. D. de; Benamara, M.; Salamo, G. J. [Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Mortazavi, M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71601 (United States)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed studies of solar cell efficiency as a function of temperature were performed for quantum wire intermediate band solar cells grown on the (311)A plane. A remotely doped one-dimensional intermediate band made of self-assembled In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As quantum wires was compared to an undoped intermediate band and a reference p-i-n GaAs sample. These studies indicate that the efficiencies of these solar cells depend on the population of the one-dimensional band by equilibrium free carriers. A change in this population by free electrons under various temperatures affects absorption and carrier transport of non-equilibrium carriers generated by incident light. This results in different efficiencies for both the doped and undoped intermediate band solar cells in comparison with the reference GaAs p-i-n solar cell device.

  12. UNIDENTIFIED INFRARED EMISSION BANDS: PAHs or MAONs?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Kwok; Yong Zhang, E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that the carrier of the unidentified infrared emission (UIE) bands is an amorphous carbonaceous solid with mixed aromatic/aliphatic structures, rather than free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. Through spectral fittings of the astronomical spectra of the UIE bands, we show that a significant amount of the energy is emitted by the aliphatic component, implying that aliphatic groups are an essential part of the chemical structure. Arguments in favor of an amorphous, solid-state structure rather than a gas-phase molecule as a carrier of the UIE are also presented.

  13. HYDROPHOBIC CHARACTERISTICS OF COMPOSITE INSULATORS IN SIMULATED INLAND ARID DESERT ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Yasin; Al-Arainy, Abdulrehman Ali; Malik, Nazar Hussain; Qureshi, Muhammad Iqbal [Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Presently along with traditional insulators i.e. glass and porcelain, etc., the polymeric insulators are also used world widely. These polymeric insulators are very sensitive to various environmental parameters e.g. UV radiations, heat, etc. The UV radiation level in the central region of Saudi Arabia is high as compared to the recommended IEC-61109 standard for the accelerated aging of the composite insulators. In this study, thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) insulators were subjected to accelerated aging stress as per IEC standard as well as modified IEC standard simulating the inland arid desert's atmospheric conditions. The hydrophobic characteristics were studied by measuring the contact angle along the insulator surface before and after the accelerated aging of the samples. It was found that TPE loses its hydrophobic properties more as compared to EPDM insulator. This loss was proportional to the intensity of UV irradiation. The rate of recovery is also low for both the tested materials as compared to Silicone Rubber insulators.

  14. Evaluation of 27+ Years Old Photovoltaic Modules Operated in a Hot-Desert Climatic Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Raghutaman, B.; Kuitche, J.; TamizhMani, G.; Backus, C. E.; Osterwald, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of failure mechanisms from the long-term field deployed modules is of great importance to the photovoltaic industry. This paper investigates the modules removed from a water pumping array operated over 27+ years in a hot-desert climatic condition, Arizona. Thirty-two modules were evaluated in this investigation. Each module is comprised of silicone rubber superstrate/encapsulant, mono-Si cells, fiberglass-like substrate, potted junction box and neoprene cable. Ten of these thirty-two modules were either non-functional or near non-functional with less than 30% of the original power. The other twenty-two functional modules showed an average power degradation of 1.08% per year over 27 years of operation. After the damp-heat (1000 hours of 85degC/85%RH), thermal cycling (two-hundred cycles of 90degC/-40degC) and hot-spot stress tests the modules lost about 11%, 9.8% and 3.5% of power, respectively.

  15. Carbon Monoxide bands in M dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakiv V. Pavlenko; Hugh R. A. Jones

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the observational and theoretical spectra of the $\\Delta v$ = 2 CO bands in a range of M dwarfs. We investigate the dependence of theoretical spectra on effective temperatures as well as carbon abundance. In general we find that the synthetic CO bands fit the observed data extremely well and are excellent diagnostics. In particular the synthetic spectra reasonably match observations and the best fit temperatures are similar to those found by empirical methods. We also examine the \\CDC isotopic ratio. We find that fundamental $^{13}$CO bands around 2.345 and 2.375 $\\mu$m are good discriminators for the \\CDC ratio in M dwarfs. The 2.375 $\\mu$m is more useful because it doesn't suffer such serious contamination by water vapour transitions. Our current dataset does not quite have the wavelength coverage to perform a reliable determination of the \\CDC ratio in M dwarfs. For this we recommend observing the region 2.31--2.40 $\\mu$m at a resolution of better than 1000. Alternatively the observational problems of contamination by water vapour at 2.345 $\\mu$m maybe solved by observing at resolutions of around 50000. We also investigated the possibility of using the $\\Delta v$ = 1 CO bands around 4.5 $\\mu$m. We find that the contamination due to water vapour is even more of a problem at these wavelengths.

  16. Shear banding in soft glassy materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzanne M. Fielding

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Many soft materials, including foams, dense emulsions, micro gel bead suspensions, star polymers, dense packing of surfactant onion micelles, and textured morphologies of liquid crystals, share the basic "glassy" features of structural disorder and metastability. These in turn give rise to several notable features in the low frequency shear rheology (deformation and flow properties) of these materials: in particular, the existence of a yield stress below which the material behaves like a solid, and above which it flows like a liquid. In the last decade, intense experimental activity has also revealed that these materials often display a phenomenon known as shear banding, in which the flow profile across the shear cell exhibits macroscopic bands of different viscosity. Two distinct classes of yield stress fluid have been identified: those in which the shear bands apparently persist permanently (for as long as the flow remains applied), and those in which banding arises only transiently during a process in which a steady flowing state is established out of an initial rest state (for example, in a shear startup or step stress experiment). After surveying the motivating experimental data, we describe recent progress in addressing it theoretically, using the soft glassy rheology model and a simple fluidity model. We also briefly place these theoretical approaches in the context of others in the literature, including elasto-plastic models, shear transformation zone theories, and molecular dynamics simulations. We discuss finally some challenges that remain open to theory and experiment alike.

  17. Kinematics analyses of Dodekapod Prakash Bande a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Subir Kumar

    Kinematics analyses of Dodekapod Prakash Bande a , Martin Seibt b , Eckart Uhlmann b , S.K. Saha c. Tel.: +91 11 2659 1135; fax: +91 11 2658 2053. E-mail address: saha@mech.iitd.ernet.in (S.K. Saha

  18. Reflets de la Physique n3338 Trempons un vieux pinceau bouriff dans un verre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bico,José

    déclencher un airbag peuvent ainsi se retrouver dramatiquement collées entre elles. Combien de cheveux se

  19. A gravity study of the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition zone, Basin and Range province, western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Debra Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chairman, Neville Carter approved funding for me to attend a GSA field trip in the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition area for an initial look at the rocks. As I wrote computer programs and ran models, it really helped me to remember..., they did not use a modeling technique; instead, Bancroft's method (1960) was used to determine the maximum possible depth to an assumed step-source. SEISMIC STUDIES Because of the basin and range physiography, and the generally north-south orientation...

  20. Fabrication of photonic band gap materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Constant, Kristen (Ames, IA); Subramania, Ganapathi S. (Ames, IA); Biswas, Rana (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA)

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a periodic dielectric structure exhibiting photonic band gap effects includes forming a slurry of a nano-crystalline ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material and monodisperse polymer microspheres, depositing a film of the slurry on a substrate, drying the film, and calcining the film to remove the polymer microspheres therefrom. The film may be cold-pressed after drying and prior to calcining. The ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material may be titania, and the polymer microspheres may be polystyrene microspheres.

  1. Permanent magnet focused X-band photoinjector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, David U. L. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); Rosenzweig, James (Los Angeles, CA)

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact high energy photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injection and the linac. High electron beam brightness is achieved by accelerating a tightly focused electron beam in an integrated, multi-cell, X-band rf linear accelerator (linac). The photoelectron linac employs a Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, easing manufacturing tolerances and costs.

  2. The Zeeman effect in the G band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Uitenbroek; E. Miller-Ricci; A. Asensio Ramos; J. Trujillo Bueno

    2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of measuring magnetic field strength in G-band bright points through the analysis of Zeeman polarization in molecular CH lines. To this end we solve the equations of polarized radiative transfer in the G band through a standard plane-parallel model of the solar atmosphere with an imposed magnetic field, and through a more realistic snapshot from a simulation of solar magneto-convection. This region of the spectrum is crowded with many atomic and molecular lines. Nevertheless, we find several instances of isolated groups of CH lines that are predicted to produce a measurable Stokes V signal in the presence of magnetic fields. In part this is possible because the effective Land\\'{e} factors of lines in the stronger main branch of the CH A$^{2}\\Delta$--X$^{2}\\Pi$ transition tend to zero rather quickly for increasing total angular momentum $J$, resulting in a Stokes $V$ spectrum of the G band that is less crowded than the corresponding Stokes $I$ spectrum. We indicate that, by contrast, the effective Land\\'{e} factors of the $R$ and $P$ satellite sub-branches of this transition tend to $\\pm 1$ for increasing $J$. However, these lines are in general considerably weaker, and do not contribute significantly to the polarization signal. In one wavelength location near 430.4 nm the overlap of several magnetically sensitive and non-sensitive CH lines is predicted to result in a single-lobed Stokes $V$ profile, raising the possibility of high spatial-resolution narrow-band polarimetric imaging. In the magneto-convection snapshot we find circular polarization signals of the order of 1% prompting us to conclude that measuring magnetic field strength in small-scale elements through the Zeeman effect in CH lines is a realistic prospect.

  3. Broad Band Photon Harvesting Biomolecules for Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Meredith; B. J. Powell; J. Riesz; R. Vogel; D. Blake; I. Kartini; G. Will; S. Subianto

    2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the key principles of artificial photosynthesis for photovoltaic energy conversion. We demonstrate these principles by examining the operation of the so-called "dye sensitized solar cell" (DSSC) - a photoelectrochemical device which simulates the charge separation process across a nano-structured membrane that is characteristic of natural systems. These type of devices have great potential to challenge silicon semiconductor technology in the low cost, medium efficiency segment of the PV market. Ruthenium charge transfer complexes are currently used as the photon harvesting components in DSSCs. They produce a relatively broad band UV and visible response, but have long term stability problems and are expensive to manufacture. We suggest that a class of biological macromolecules called the melanins may be suitable replacements for the ruthenium complexes. They have strong, broad band absorption, are chemically and photochemically very stable, can be cheaply and easily synthesized, and are also bio-available and bio-compatible. We demonstrate a melanin-based regenerative solar cell, and discuss the key properties that are necessary for an effective broad band photon harvesting system.

  4. Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Intermediate Band Solar Cells W. Walukiewicz 1 , K. M.single-junction intermediate band solar cells. Figure 5:conversion efficiency for a solar cell fabricated from a Zn

  5. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Wednesday, 26 March 2008 00:00 Prospective challengers to...

  6. Direct band gap narrowing in highly doped Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Zhaohong

    Direct band gap narrowing in highly doped n-type Ge is observed through photoluminescence measurements by determining the spectrum peak shift. A linear relationship between the direct band gap emission and carrier concentration ...

  7. FROM RUBBER BANDS TO RATIONAL MAPS RESEARCH REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurston, Dylan

    FROM RUBBER BANDS TO RATIONAL MAPS RESEARCH REPORT DYLAN P. THURSTON Dedicated to the memory-print, and surely has mistakes; please give comments! , elastic networks (rubber bands) at equilibrium within

  8. Quebec Recovery of White-Fronted Goose Banded in Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. H. Hewitt Journal:  Bird Banding Volume:  19 Issue:  3 (July) Section:  General Notes Year:  1948 Pages:  124

  9. Arctic Tern Banded in Greenland, Recovered in Ontario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Shortt Journal:  Bird Banding Volume:  20 Issue:  1 (January) Section:  General Notes Year:  1949 Pages:  50

  10. Excitation of Banded Whistler Waves in the Magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, S. Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Kaijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Banded whistler waves can be generated by the whistler anisotropy instability driven by two bi-Maxwellian electron components with T{sub {perpendicular}}/T{sub {parallel}} > 1 at different T{sub {parallel}} For typical magnetospheric condition of 1 < {omega}{sub e}/{Omega}{sub e} < 5 in regions associated with strong chorus, upper-band waves can be excited by anisotropic electrons below {approx} 1 keV, while lower-band waves are excited by anisotropic electrons above {approx} 10 keV. Lower-band waves are generally field-aligned and substantially electromagnetic, while upper-band waves propagate obliquely and have quasi-electrostatic fluctuating electric fields. The quasi-electrostatic feature of upper-band waves suggests that they may be more easily identified in electric field observations than in magnetic field observations. Upper-band waves are liable to Landau damping and the saturation level of upperband waves is lower than lower-band waves, consistent with observations that lower-band waves are stronger than upper-band waves on average. The oblique propagation, the lower saturation level, and the more severe Landau damping together would make upper-band waves more tightly confined to the geomagnetic equator (|{lambda}{sub m}| < {approx}10{sup o}) than lower-band waves.

  11. FROM RUBBER BANDS TO RATIONAL MAPS RESEARCH REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurston, Dylan

    FROM RUBBER BANDS TO RATIONAL MAPS RESEARCH REPORT DYLAN P. THURSTON Dedicated to the memory and conformal surfaces with boundary, that let us on the one hand tell when one rubber band network is looser a circle of ideas, relating: , elastic networks (rubber bands) at equilibrium within a graph, , extremal

  12. Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    pinning in multi-band superconductors 2 1. Introduction The multi-band nature of superconductivity in iron the anisotropy of superconducting parameters in the iron-based superconductors. In particular, Kidzun et al. [23Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors C.J. van der Beek, M. Konczykowski

  13. absorption band profiles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption band profiles First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Band profiles and band...

  14. DESERT PAVEMENTS AND SOILS ON BASALTIC PYROCLASTIC DEPOSITS AT LATHROP WELLS AND RED CONE VOLCANOES, SOUTHERN NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Valentine; C.D. Harrington

    2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of desert pavement and accretionary soils are intimately linked in arid environments such as the Mojave Desert. Well-sorted fallout scoria lapilli at Lathrop Wells (75-80 ky) and Red Cone ({approx}1 Ma) volcanoes (southern Nevada) formed an excellent starting material for pavement, allowing infiltration of eolian silt and fine sand that first clogs the pore space of underlying tephra and then aggrades and develops vesicular A (Av) horizons. Variations in original pyroclast sizes provide insight into minimum and maximum clast sizes that promote pavement and soil formation: pavement becomes ineffective when clasts can saltate under the strongest winds, while clasts larger than coarse lapilli are unable to form an interlocking pavement that promotes silt accumulation (necessary for Av development). Contrary to predictions that all pavements above altitudes of {approx}400 m would have been ''reset'' in their development after late Pleistocene vegetation advances (about 15 ka), the soils and pavements show clear differences in maturity between the two volcanoes. This indicates that either the pavement soils develop slowly over many 10,000's of years and then are very stable, or that, if they are disrupted by vegetation advances, subsequent pavements are reestablished with successively more mature characteristics.

  15. Cosmogenic {sup 3}He surface-exposure dating of stone pavements. Implications for landscape evolution in deserts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S.G. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); McFadden, L.D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Poths, J.; Olinger, C.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of stone pavements, a ubiquitous gravel armor mantling landforms in arid regions of the world, has been previously attributed to erosion by wind and water or alternating shrinking and swelling of soil horizons, implying that gravel is concentrated at the land surface in a time-transgressive manner. A newly proposed model for pavement evolution differs from these models in that pavement clasts are continuously maintained at the land surface in response to deposition and pedogenic modification of windblown dust. In-situ cosmogenic {sup 3}He surface-exposure ages on volcanic and alluvial landforms in the Mojave Desert of California are used to understand pavement evolution over geologic time scales and to test this new model. These exposure ages are stratigraphically consistent, show internal consistency at each site, and, for stone pavements adjacent to pristine, continuously exposed volcanic bedrock, are indistinguishable at the 1{sigma} level. We conclude that stone pavements are born at the surface and that pavements may provide one of the longest-term records of geologic, hydrologic, and climatic processes operating on desert surfaces. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Semiconductor heterojunction band offsets and charge neutrality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chomsik

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    = 33&Pb = 3 3&PAB = 35 1 . aI M 0 A 0. ? 1 2. 0. Energy(eV) 1 2. 0 0. ? 1 0. Energy(eV) 1 2. Figure 4. 4. Local density of states, parameters for this case are s, = ? 7, s?= 1, s, = l&sp 7~Pa = 4~A = 4)DAB ? .35. -12. 0. Energy(eV) 0... Signature of APS Member Roland E. Allen Department of Physics'- Texas A&M University ' College Station, TX 77843 s p ~ CX3 SEMICONDUCTOR HETEROJUNCTION BAND OFFSETS AND CHARGE NEUTRALITY A Thesis by CHOMSIK LEE Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate...

  17. Universal EUV in-band intensity detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berger, Kurt W.

    2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme ultraviolet light is detected using a universal in-band detector for detecting extreme ultraviolet radiation that includes: (a) an EUV sensitive photodiode having a diode active area that generates a current responsive to EUV radiation; (b) one or more mirrors that reflects EUV radiation having a defined wavelength(s) to the diode active area; and (c) a mask defining a pinhole that is positioned above the diode active area, wherein EUV radiation passing through the pinhole is restricted substantially to illuminating the diode active area.

  18. Hybrid Band effects program (Lockheed Martin shared vision CRADA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, L. D.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid Band{trademark} (H-band) is a Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control (LMMFC) designation for a specific RF modulation that causes disruption of select electronic components and circuits. H-Band enables conventional high-power microwave (HPM) effects (with a center frequency of 1 to 2 GHz, for example) using a higher frequency carrier signal. The primary technical objective of this project was to understand the fundamental physics of Hybrid Band{trademark} Radio Frequency effects on electronic systems. The follow-on objective was to develop and validate a Hybrid Band{trademark} effects analysis process.

  19. Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffin, Doug

    Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A OU Behavioral Neuroscience Works Cited. Brownell, P.H. & R.D. Farley. 1979 Arachnological Society. Burnham Beeches, Bucks. Stephens, A.V. 1999. Honors Thesis. University of Oklahoma

  20. Age constraints on the formation and emplacement of Neoproterozoic ophiolites along the AllaqiHeiani Suture, South Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    ­Heiani Suture, South Eastern Desert of Egypt K.A. Ali a,d, , M.K. Azer b , H.A. Gahlan c , S.A. Wilde d , M., Richardson, TX 75080, USA b Geology Department, National Research Centre, Dokki-Cairo, Egypt c Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egypt d Department of Applied Geology

  1. Puzzling Phenomenon of Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Wszolek

    2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of the first diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) dates back to the pioneering years of stellar spectroscopy. Today, we know about 300 absorption structures of this kind. There exists a great variety of the profiles and intensities of DIBs, so they can not be readily described, classified or characterized. To the present day no reliable identification of the DIBs' carriers has been found. Many carriers of DIBs have been proposed over the years. They ranged from dust grains to free molecules of different kinds, and to more exotic specimens, like hydrogen negative ion. Unfortunately, none of them is responsible for observed DIBs. Furthermore, it was shown that a single carrier cannot be responsible for all known DIBs. It is hard to estimate how many carriers can participate in producing these bands. The problem is further complicated by the fact that to this day it is still impossible to find any laboratory spectrum of any substance which would match the astrophysical spectra. Here, a historical outline concerning DIBs is followed by a brief description of their whole population. Then, a special attention is focused on the procedures trying to extract spectroscopic families within the set of all known DIBs.

  2. Red Band Needle Blight Programme Red Band Needle Blight of Pine Programme Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and that the private 1 | Paper 1 - Minutes | Debbie Erskine | 23/01/2009 #12;Red Band Needle Blight Programme Group Group England Working Group Wales Working Group RBNB Operational GB Working Group (including private Groups would only meet on an ad hoc basis and the structure was agreed. Action: Jim/Roddie to re

  3. Wide band stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bashforth, M.B.; Gardner, D.; Patrick, D.; Lewallen, T.A.; Nammath, S.R.; Painter, K.D.; Vadnais, K.G.

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide band ground penetrating radar system is described embodying a method wherein a series of radio frequency signals is produced by a single radio frequency source and provided to a transmit antenna for transmission to a target and reflection therefrom to a receive antenna. A phase modulator modulates those portions of the radio frequency signals to be transmitted and the reflected modulated signal is combined in a mixer with the original radio frequency signal to produce a resultant signal which is demodulated to produce a series of direct current voltage signals, the envelope of which forms a cosine wave shaped plot which is processed by a Fast Fourier Transform Unit 44 into frequency domain data wherein the position of a preponderant frequency is indicative of distance to the target and magnitude is indicative of the signature of the target. 6 figs.

  4. Wide band stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bashforth, Michael B. (Buellton, CA); Gardner, Duane (Santa Maria, CA); Patrick, Douglas (Santa Maria, CA); Lewallen, Tricia A. (Ventura, CA); Nammath, Sharyn R. (Santa Barbara, CA); Painter, Kelly D. (Goleta, CA); Vadnais, Kenneth G. (Alexandria, VA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide band ground penetrating radar system (10) embodying a method wherein a series of radio frequency signals (60) is produced by a single radio frequency source (16) and provided to a transmit antenna (26) for transmission to a target (54) and reflection therefrom to a receive antenna (28). A phase modulator (18) modulates those portion of the radio frequency signals (62) to be transmitted and the reflected modulated signal (62) is combined in a mixer (34) with the original radio frequency signal (60) to produce a resultant signal (53) which is demodulated to produce a series of direct current voltage signals (66) the envelope of which forms a cosine wave shaped plot (68) which is processed by a Fast Fourier Transform unit 44 into frequency domain data (70) wherein the position of a preponderant frequency is indicative of distance to the target (54) and magnitude is indicative of the signature of the target (54).

  5. Band terminations in density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Afanasjev

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of the terminating bands has been performed in the relativistic mean field framework. It was shown that nuclear magnetism provides an additional binding to the energies of the specific configuration and this additional binding increases with spin and has its {\\it maximum} exactly at the terminating state. This suggests that the terminating states can be an interesting probe of the time-odd mean fields {\\it provided that other effects can be reliably isolated.} Unfortunately, a reliable isolation of these effects is not that simple: many terms of the density functional theories contribute into the energies of the terminating states and the deficiencies in the description of those terms affect the result. The recent suggestion \\cite{ZSW.05} that the relative energies of the terminating states in the $N \

  6. Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the “First Steps” phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribe’s plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: • Develop the Tribe’s energy goals and objectives • Establish the Tribe’s current energy usage • Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options • Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives • Create an action plan for the selected options

  7. [Climate implications of terrestrial paleoclimate]. Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute annual report, fiscal year 1994/1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigand, P.E.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to collect terrestrial climate indicators for paleoclimate synthesis. The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal. To this end personnel at the Quaternary Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada are conducting the following activities: Analyses of packrat middens; Analysis of pollen samples; and Determination of vegetation climate relationships.

  8. Band gap engineering at a semiconductor - crystalline oxide interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moghadam, Jahangir-Moghadam; Shen, Xuan; Chrysler, Matthew; Ahmadi-Majlan, Kamyar; Su, Dong; Ngai, Joseph H.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The epitaxial growth of crystalline oxides on semiconductors provides a pathway to introduce new functionalities to semiconductor devices. Key to integrating the functionalities of oxides onto semiconductors is controlling the band alignment at interfaces between the two materials. Here we apply principles of band gap engineering traditionally used at heterojunctions between conventional semiconductors to control the band offset between a single crystalline oxide and a semiconductor. Reactive molecular beam epitaxy is used to realize atomically abrupt and structurally coherent interfaces between SrZrxTi1-xO? and Ge, in which the band gap of the former is enhanced with Zr content x. We presentmore »structural and electrical characterization of SrZrxTi1-xO?-Ge heterojunctions and demonstrate a type-I band offset can be achieved. These results demonstrate that band gap engineering can be exploited to realize functional semiconductor crystalline oxide heterojunctions.« less

  9. acoustic band gaps: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    type of phononic crystals manufactured Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.10631.2167794 The propagation of acoustic waves in periodic composite Deymier, Pierre 2 Acoustic band gap...

  10. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic...

  11. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  12. Diffuse interstellar bands in M33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Keith T; Evans, Christopher J; Cox, Nick L J; Sarre, Peter J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first sample of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the nearby galaxy M33. Studying DIBs in other galaxies allows the behaviour of the carriers to be examined under interstellar conditions which can be quite different from those of the Milky Way, and to determine which DIB properties can be used as reliable probes of extragalactic interstellar media. Multi-object spectroscopy of 43 stars in M33 has been performed using Keck/DEIMOS. The stellar spectral types were determined and combined with literature photometry to determine the M33 reddenings E(B-V)_M33. Equivalent widths or upper limits have been measured for the {\\lambda}5780 DIB towards each star. DIBs were detected towards 20 stars, demonstrating that their carriers are abundant in M33. The relationship with reddening is found to be at the upper end of the range observed in the Milky Way. The line of sight towards one star has an unusually strong ratio of DIB equivalent width to E(B-V)_M33, and a total of seven DIBs were detected towards...

  13. Intermediate Band Properties of Femtosecond-Laser Hyperdoped Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Eric

    . The high concentration of dopants forms an intermediate band (IB), instead of discrete energy levels exhibits broad-band light absorption to wavelengths deep below the corresponding bandgap energy of silicon) using secondary ion mass spectrometry. By varying the pressure of SF6, we find that the surface adsorbed

  14. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  15. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  16. A multi-band phase-locked loop frequency synthesizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Samuel Michael

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to switch to different bands of operation. The multi-band PLL frequency synthesizer is implemented in a standard 1.2[]m CMOS technology using a 2.7V supply. The frequency synthesizer has a measured frequency range of 111 to 290MHz with phase noise up to -96d...

  17. V Concurs de Bandes de la UPF BASES GENERALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geffner, Hector

    V Concurs de Bandes de la UPF BASES GENERALS requisits generals: Podran participar-hi tots els comunitat universitŕria de la UPF. inscripció: Les bandes que es presentin a concurs lliuraran al Punt d i la política de privacitat, de manera que exoneren la UPF de qualsevol responsabilitat derivada d

  18. K-BAND RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE SURVEY OF SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    K-BAND RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE SURVEY OF SOUTHEASTERN MICHIGAN Shannon Curry1 , Michael Ahlers University of Michigan 2455 Hayward St. Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 USA cruf@umich.edu 2 DTU Space Technical resolution. A K-Band airborne version has been built and flown across southeast Michigan. A kurtosis detector

  19. SEMIEMPIRICAL MOLECULAR ORBITAL CALCULATIONS OF BAND GAPS OF CONJUGATED POLYMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    SEMI­EMPIRICAL MOLECULAR ORBITAL CALCULATIONS OF BAND GAPS OF CONJUGATED POLYMERS Tahir Cagin Research and Development Center, Materials Labarotory, Polymer Branch, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 geometries and energy band gaps of conjugated polymers. In this study, we used a modified version of semi

  20. absorption band substructure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption band substructure First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 THE ABSORPTION BAND EDGE...

  1. First principles investigation of scaling trends of zirconium silicate interface band offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutton, Robert W.

    First principles investigation of scaling trends of zirconium silicate interface band offsets out to investigate the scaling trends of band offsets at model silicon/zirconium silicate interfaces. Owing to the d character of zirconium silicate conduction bands, the band gap and band offset are shown

  2. Observation of excitonic and band-to-band behavior in ordered InGaP{sub 2} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.D.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Lee, H.; Nelson, J.S.; Schneider, R.P. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alonso, R.G.; Horner, G.S.; Machol, J.; Mascarenhas, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoluminescence measurements on ordered InGaP{sub 2} were studied as a function of temperature, laser power density, and magnetic field. The temperature varied between 1.4 and 300 K, the laser power densities ranged from 10 nW/cm{sup 2} to 20 W/cm{sup 2}, and the maximum magnetic field was 13.6 T. The data show both excitonic and band-to-band behavior, depending upon the incident laser power density. A consistent interpretation of all data leads to a type-II valence-band offset between the ordered domains.

  3. angstrom extinction band: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Galactic extinction curve, which implies that the properties of dust in the extragalactic enviroment are similar to those of the Milky Way. The ratio of the total V band extinction...

  4. Feasibility of band gap engineering of pyrite FeS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Ruoshi

    We use first-principles computations to investigate whether the band gap of pyrite FeS? can be increased by alloying in order to make it a more effective photovoltaic material. In addition to the isostructural compounds ...

  5. Band gap engineering strategy via polarization rotation in perovskite ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Fenggong, E-mail: fenggong@sas.upenn.edu; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M., E-mail: rappe@sas.upenn.edu [The Makineni Theoretical Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104–6323 (United States)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a strategy to engineer the band gaps of perovskite oxide ferroelectrics, supported by first principles calculations. We find that the band gaps of perovskites can be substantially reduced by as much as 1.2?eV through local rhombohedral-to-tetragonal structural transition. Furthermore, the strong polarization of the rhombohedral perovskite is largely preserved by its tetragonal counterpart. The B-cation off-center displacements and the resulting enhancement of the antibonding character in the conduction band give rise to the wider band gaps of the rhombohedral perovskites. The correlation between the structure, polarization orientation, and electronic structure lays a good foundation for understanding the physics of more complex perovskite solid solutions and provides a route for the design of photovoltaic perovskite ferroelectrics.

  6. Global estimation of precipitation using opaque microwave bands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Frederick Wey-Min, 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the use of opaque microwave bands for global estimation of precipitation rate. An algorithm was developed for estimating instantaneous precipitation rate for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

  7. Substrate-induced band gap opening in epitaxial graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H.A. Electronic states of graphene nanoribbons studied withS.G. Louie. Energy gaps in graphene nanoribbons. Phys. Rev.band-gap engineering of graphene nanoribbons. Phys. Rev.

  8. Direct observation of a dispersionless impurity band in hydrogenated graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberer, D.

    We show with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy that a new energy band appears in the electronic structure of electron-doped hydrogenated monolayer graphene (H-graphene). Its occupation can be controlled with the ...

  9. Multi-band OFDM UWB receiver with narrowband interference suppression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelleci, Burak

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi band orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM) compatible ultra wideband (UWB) receiver with narrowband interference (NBI) suppression capability is presented. The average transmit power of UWB system ...

  10. New description of the doublet bands in doubly odd nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganev, H. G.; Georgieva, A. I. [Institute of Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Brant, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Ventura, A. [Ente per le Nuove tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente, I-40129 Bologna and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bologna (Italy)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimentally observed {delta}I=1 doublet bands in some odd-odd nuclei are analyzed within the orthosymplectic extension of the interacting vector boson model (IVBM). A new, purely collective interpretation of these bands is given on the basis of the obtained boson-fermion dynamical symmetry of the model. It is illustrated by its application to three odd-odd nuclei from the A{approx}130 region, namely {sup 126}Pr, {sup 134}Pr, and {sup 132}La. The theoretical predictions for the energy levels of the doublet bands as well as E2 and M1 transition probabilities between the states of the yrast band in the last two nuclei are compared with experiment and the results of other theoretical approaches. The obtained results reveal the applicability of the orthosymplectic extension of the IVBM.

  11. Comparative cytotaxonomy in the tribe Bovini studied by banding techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rich, Donna Carol

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. James E. Womack Chromosomes of eight species of the tribe Bovini were studied by G ? banding, C ? banding and silver staining techniques. The results of this comparative cytogenetic study support the theory that Robertsonian fusion... in the tribe Bovini whose species appear to differ by a series of centromeric fusions. The phylogenetic tree derived from the cytogenetic data of this study is not consistent with morphological and behavioral trees previously described for the tribe Bovini...

  12. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, Roark A.; /MIT /MIT /NIFS, Gifu /JAERI, Kyoto /LLNL, Livermore; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; /MIT; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  13. A Study of the Process of Commissioning New Music for the Concert Band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, James

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the process of commissioning a new composition for the concert band. Composer Brian Balmages was commissioned to write a piece for concert band that had standard band instrumentation and was of Grade IV difficulty. The Temple...

  14. Shear band dynamics from a mesoscopic modeling of plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Jagla

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ubiquitous appearance of regions of localized deformation (shear bands) in different kinds of disordered materials under shear is studied in the context of a mesoscopic model of plasticity. The model may or may not include relaxational (aging) effects. In the absence of relaxational effects the model displays a monotonously increasing dependence of stress on strain-rate, and stationary shear bands do not occur. However, in start up experiments transient (although long lived) shear bands occur, that widen without bound in time. I investigate this transient effect in detail, reproducing and explaining a t^1/2 law for the thickness increase of the shear band that has been obtained in atomistic numerical simulations. Relaxation produces a negative sloped region in the stress vs. strain-rate curve that stabilizes the formation of shear bands of a well defined width, which is a function of strain-rate. Simulations at very low strain-rates reveal a non-trivial stick-slip dynamics of very thin shear bands that has relevance in the study of seismic phenomena. In addition, other non-stationary processes, such as stop-and-go, or strain-rate inversion situations display a phenomenology that matches very well the results of recent experimental studies.

  15. Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians Re-direct Destination: This plan outlines the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians' comprehensive energy...

  16. Scent marking in wild banded mongooses: 2. Intrasexual overmarking and competition between males

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RĂĽedi, Peter

    Scent marking in wild banded mongooses: 2. Intrasexual overmarking and competition between males on wild banded mongooses, Mungos mungo, suggests that overmarking may primarily affect behavioural mating

  17. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinxin [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A longstanding puzzle in isotopic studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotopic ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotopic ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found that higher nitrogen concentrations in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous concentrations had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotopic ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic heterotrophic difference in carbon isotopic compositions.

  18. Robotic end gripper with a band member to engage object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollard, R.E.; Robinson, S.C.; Thompson, W.F.; Couture, S.A.; Sutton, B.J.

    1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An end effector for use with robotic arms and like devices is described that utilizes a flexible band to draw an object against an anvil having a concave surface. One typical convex surface is created by a V-block, with an apex of the V being centrally located. If an object to be grasped is fragile, the contour of the concave surface closely matches the surface of the object. Typically the movement of the band is effected by a linear actuator, with the anvil remaining fixed relative to a support base. Several embodiments are described that utilize variations in drawing the band toward the anvil, with one of these embodiments described in detail in the form of a fabricated unit. One embodiment includes a cover element that can be moved over an object after the grasping thereof, with this cover potentially serving various functions. Movement of the cover can be effected with a second linear actuator. 8 figures.

  19. Robotic end gripper with a band member to engage object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollard, Roy E. (Maryville, TN); Robinson, Samuel C. (Knoxville, TN); Thompson, William F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Couture, Scott A. (Knoxville, TN); Sutton, Bill J. (Powell, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An end effector for use with robotic arms and like devices that utilizes a flexible band to draw an object against an anvil having a concave surface. One typical convex surface is created by a V-block, with an apex of the V being centrally located. If an object to be grasped is fragile, the contour of the concave surface closely matches the surface of the object. Typically the movement of the band is effected by a linear actuator, with the anvil remaining fixed relative to a support base. Several embodiments are described that utilize variations in drawing the band toward the anvil, with one of these embodiments described in detail in the form of a fabricated unit. One embodiment includes a cover element that can be moved over an object after the grasping thereof, with this cover potentially serving various functions. Movement of the cover can be effected with a second linear actuator.

  20. Numerical method for shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plohr, Jee Yeon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plohr, Bradley J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical method for mesoscale simulation of high strain-rate loading of ductile metal containing inclusions is described. Because of small-scale inhomogeneities, such a composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). The modeling framework is the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. /27-139, 1992], which ensures that the micromechanical response of the material is reflected in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To calculate the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands by Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996] is adapted and extended.

  1. Status Report and Proposal Concerning the Supply of Depleted Uranium Metal Bands for a Particle Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Status Report and Proposal Concerning the Supply of Depleted Uranium Metal Bands for a Particle Detector

  2. Electronic band structure of magnetic bilayer graphene superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, C. Huy; Nguyen, T. Thuong [Theoretical and Computational Physics Department, Institute of Physics, VAST, 10 Dao Tan, Ba Dinh Distr., Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); SISSA/International School for Advanced Study, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Nguyen, V. Lien, E-mail: nvlien@iop.vast.ac.vn [Theoretical and Computational Physics Department, Institute of Physics, VAST, 10 Dao Tan, Ba Dinh Distr., Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); Institute for Bio-Medical Physics, 109A Pasteur, 1st Distr., Hochiminh City (Viet Nam)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic band structure of the bilayer graphene superlattices with ?-function magnetic barriers and zero average magnetic flux is studied within the four-band continuum model, using the transfer matrix method. The periodic magnetic potential effects on the zero-energy touching point between the lowest conduction and the highest valence minibands of pristine bilayer graphene are exactly analyzed. Magnetic potential is shown also to generate the finite-energy touching points between higher minibands at the edges of Brillouin zone. The positions of these points and the related dispersions are determined in the case of symmetric potentials.

  3. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen-Tuong, Viet (Seaford, VA); Dylla, III, Henry Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

  4. Special purpose modes in photonic band gap fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Campbell, Sara

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic band gap fibers are described having one or more defects suitable for the acceleration of electrons or other charged particles. Methods and devices are described for exciting special purpose modes in the defects including laser coupling schemes as well as various fiber designs and components for facilitating excitation of desired modes. Results are also presented showing effects on modes due to modes in other defects within the fiber and due to the proximity of defects to the fiber edge. Techniques and devices are described for controlling electrons within the defect(s). Various applications for electrons or other energetic charged particles produced by such photonic band gap fibers are also described.

  5. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Dylla, H.F. III

    1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost. 5 figs.

  6. Energy distribution of nonequilibrium electrons and optical phonons in GaAs under band-to-band pumping by intense short pulses of light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altybaev, G. S.; Kumekov, S. E., E-mail: skumekov@mail.ru; Mahmudov, A. A. [Satpaev Kazakh National Technical University (Kazakhstan)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deviation from the Fermi distribution of nonequilibrium electrons and distribution of 'hot' optical phonons in GaAs under band-to-band pumping by picosecond pulses of light are calculated.

  7. Shear bands in a bulk metallic glass after large plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, D.D.; Wang, Y.B.; Liao, X.Z.; Shen, J. (Harbin); (Sydney)

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A transmission electron microscopy investigation is conducted to trace shear bands in a Zr{sub 53}Cu{sub 18.7}Ni{sub 12}Al{sub 16.3} bulk metallic glass after experiencing 4% plastic deformation. Shear band initiation, secondary shear band interactions, mature shear band broadening and the interactions of shear bands with shear-induced nanocrystals are captured. Results suggest that the plasticity of the bulk metallic glass is enhanced by complex shear bands and their interactions which accommodate large plastic strain and prevent catastrophic shear band propagation.

  8. Evidence for hybrid surface metallic band in (4?×?4) silicene on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsoutsou, D., E-mail: dtsoutsou@ims.demokritos.gr; Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Golias, E.; Tsipas, P.; Dimoulas, A. [National Center for Scientific Research “Demokritos,” 15310 Athens (Greece)] [National Center for Scientific Research “Demokritos,” 15310 Athens (Greece)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic band structure of monolayer (4?×?4) silicene on Ag(111) is imaged by angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A dominant hybrid surface metallic band is observed to be located near the bulk Ag sp-band which is also faintly visible. The two-dimensional character of the hybrid band has been distinguished against the bulk character of the Ag(111) sp-band by means of photon energy dependence experiments. The surface band exhibits a steep linear dispersion around the K{sup Ż}{sub Ag} point and has a saddle point near the M{sup Ż}{sub Ag} point of Ag(111) resembling the ?-band dispersion in graphene.

  9. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Nevada Test Site Development Corporations's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1300) (EA) which analyzes the potential environmental effects of developing operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, between Mercury Camp and U.S. Highway 95 and east of Desert Rock Airport. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of infrastructure improvements necessary to support fill build out of the 512-acre Desert Rock Sky Park. Two alternative actions were evaluated: (1) Develop, operate and maintain a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, and (2) taking no action. The purpose and need for the commercial industrial park are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment. Section 4.0 the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternative. Cumulative effects are addressed in Section 5.0. Mitigation measures are addressed in Section 6.0. The Department of Energy determined that the proposed action of developing, operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site would best meet the needs of the agency.

  10. ON THE SIMULATION OF KINK BANDS IN FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ON THE SIMULATION OF KINK BANDS IN FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES Kim D. Sørensen , Lars P. Mikkelsen reinforced composites are carried out using the commercial finite element program ABAQUS. A smeared in fiber reinforced composites has been the subject of a number of recent investigations. It has been found

  11. On complex perturbations of infinite band Schrodinger operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Golinskii; S. Kupin

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a complex perturbation of a self-adjoint infinite band Schrodinger operator (defined in the form sense), and obtain the Lieb--Thirring type inequalities for the rate of convergence of the discrete spectrum of the perturbed operator to the joint essential spectrum of both operators.

  12. Amplitude modulation free, wide band frequency modulated oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Dick Frank

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /g sCIRIE/90 " --j/s~P&CI, 5 (5) The value of thc capacitance produced across the tank circuit is C = qgRICI. he c!er'vation gust nade is only good for the case where a si~mal is nodulated over a narrow band of two or t'. ~e per- cent deviation...

  13. Spatial dependence of banded chorus intensity near the magnetic equator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a provides a new boundary condition for consideration in current and future chorus generation models electrons with energies of 10 to 100 keV during and after geomagnetic storms can result in energy diffusion, using CRRES measurements, for both upper and lower band chorus as a function of L-shell and MLT

  14. CIRCULARLY POLARIZED ANTENNA ON SOI FOR THE 60 GHZ BAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the primary criteria for evaluating the quality of the antenna; Improper feed, higher order band radiation integrated on SOI. In the first part, we describe the spiral antenna theory in order to have good radiation. The feeding structure is composed of a transition between radiofrequency coplanar waveguide feed, coplanar

  15. Bird Banding Fall 2014 The Arboretum at Penn State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    -Central Rail Trail in Big Hollow, approximately 0.5 mile NW of the H.O. Smith Botanic Gardens. Banding is forest edge of brush growth, primarily 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 9-Sep 11-Sep 13-Sep 15-Sep 17-Sep

  16. Band-engineered Ge-on-Si lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jifeng

    We report optically-pumped Ge-on-Si lasers with direct gap emission near 1600 nm at room temperature. The Ge-on-Si material was band-engineered by tensile strain and n-type doping to compensate the energy difference between ...

  17. Degenerate band edges in optical fiber with multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the forward energy fluxes S of the two media defines the coupling efficiency Ľ S2=S1. For PBG materialsDegenerate band edges in optical fiber with multiple grating: efficient coupling to slow light), School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia 2 CUDOS, School

  18. Simultaneous confidence bands in curve prediction applied to load curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Simultaneous confidence bands in curve prediction applied to load curves J.M. Aza¨is1, S. Bercu2, J, load curve. 1 Introduction In curve prediction, one is generally interested in deriving simultaneous this technique in the numerical context of load curve pre- diction: power producers like EDF, the electrical

  19. Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Anisotropy of strong pinning in multi-band superconductors C.J. van der Beek, M. Konczykowski of the critical current density in iron-based superconductors is evaluated using a phenomenological approach collective pinning limit, and the strong pinning limit relevant for iron-based superconductors at low

  20. Structure and evolution of a convective band MCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdes-Manzanilla, Arturo

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation of the Mesoscale Convective Complex apparently aided in the formation of new lines of convection behind the primary convective line of the system. This process was repeated twice in the storm life cycle and led to multiple bands of convection...

  1. Safety Analysis for Packaging Steel Banded Wooden Shipping Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FERRELL, P.C.

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the steel banded wooden shipping containers, which are certified as Type AF packagings. The authorized payload for these containers is unirradiated, slightly enriched, uranium ingots, billets, extrusions, and scrap materials. The amount of uranium in the containers will not exceed the LSA-II material requirements as defined in 49 CFR 173.403.

  2. absorption bands observed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption bands observed First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AKARI observations of ice...

  3. Single-band and Dual-band Beam Switching Systems and Offset-fed Beam Scanning Reflectarray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jungkyu

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    for multi-band applications. A modified Butler matrix is used to reduce a size and a sidelobe level. The bandwidth of the microstrip antenna is inherently small. A broadband circularly polarized microstrip antenna with dual-offset feedlines is introduced...

  4. Trap cultures reveal higher species richness of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in comparison to soil samples in the Phoenix metropolitan area.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes colonization of plant roots from urban desert preserves a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    samples in the Phoenix metropolitan area.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes colonization of plant roots from urban desert preserves (Brundett 1999). Dark septate endophytes (DSE) are another type of root colonizing fungi mainly classified

  5. Taxonomy of Clifford Cl_{3,0} subgroups: Choir and band groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirino M. Sugon Jr.; Daniel J. McNamara

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We list the subgroups of the basis set of Cl_{3,0} and classify them according to three criteria for construction of universal Clifford algebras: (1) each generator squares to +1 or -1, (2) the generators within the group anticommute, and (3) the order of the resulting group is 2^{n+1}, where n is the number of nontrivial generators. Obedient groups we call choirs; disobedient groups, bands. We classify choirs by modes and bands by rhythms, based on canonical equality. Each band generator has a transposition (number of other generators it commutes with). The band's transposition signature is the band's chord. The sum of transpositions divided by twice the number of generator pair combinations is the band's beat. The band's order deviation is the band's disorder. For n less than or equal 3, we show that the Cl_{3,0} basis set has 21 non-isomorphic subgroups consisting of 9 choirs and 12 bands.

  6. Drinking up the desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Lisa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the fastest-growing cities in America, Tucson, Arizona suffers from a classic case of urban sprawl. Fueled by the prevalence of lot splits and cheap suburban land, little was done to curb the city's unsustainable ...

  7. Surviving Operation Desert Storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vice, J. (Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Dayton, OH (United States))

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of aircraft survivability during the invasion of Iraq is examined detailing anecdotal evidence of susceptibility and vulnerability reduction. Among the aircraft used that were designed to be more survivable than their predecessors were the F-117, A-10, F/A-18, and the AH-64. Reduced vulnerability is incorporated into the aircraft designs in the form of damage tolerant components, redundancy, self-sealing fluid systems, and miniaturization.

  8. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111A Lithologic andRECORDD O E F 1325.8

  9. Desert Peak EGS Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E L D *Department ofDescriptive Model of

  10. High peak power test of S-band waveguide switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassiri, A.; Grelick, A.; Kustom, R.L.; White, M.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The injector and source of particles for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 2856-MHz S-band electron-positron linear accelerator (linac) which produces electrons with energies up to 650 MeV or positrons with energies up to 450 MeV. To improve the linac rf system availability, an additional modulator-klystron subsystem is being constructed to provide a switchable hot spare unit for each of the five existing S-band transmitters. The switching of the transmitters will require the use of SF6-pressurized waveguide switches at a peak operating power of 35 MW. A test stand was set up at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Klystron-Microwave laboratory to conduct tests characterizing the power handling capability of these waveguide switches. Test results are presented.

  11. RF modulation studies on the S band pulse compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, G; Pei, S; Xiao, O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An S band SLED-type pulse compressor has been manufactured by IHEP to challenge the 100 MW maximum input power, which means the output peak power is about 500 MW at the phase reversal time. In order to deal with the RF breakdown problem, the dual side-wall coupling irises model was used. To further improve the reliability at very high power, amplitude modulation and phase modulation with flat-top output were taken into account. The RF modulation studies on an S-band SLED are presented in this paper. Furthermore, a method is developed by using the CST Microwave Studio transient solver to simulate the time response of the pulse compressor, which can be a verification of the modulate theory. In addition, the experimental setup was constructed and the flat-top output is obtained in the low power tests.

  12. RF modulation studies on the S band pulse compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Shu; F. Zhao; S. Pei; O. Xiao

    2015-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An S band SLED-type pulse compressor has been manufactured by IHEP to challenge the 100 MW maximum input power, which means the output peak power is about 500 MW at the phase reversal time. In order to deal with the RF breakdown problem, the dual side-wall coupling irises model was used. To further improve the reliability at very high power, amplitude modulation and phase modulation with flat-top output were taken into account. The RF modulation studies on an S-band SLED are presented in this paper. Furthermore, a method is developed by using the CST Microwave Studio transient solver to simulate the time response of the pulse compressor, which can be a verification of the modulate theory. In addition, the experimental setup was constructed and the flat-top output is obtained in the low power tests.

  13. The Broad Band Spectral Energy Distributions of SDSS Blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Huaizhen; Jiang, Yunguo; Yi, Tingfeng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compiled the radio, optical, and X-ray data of blazars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database, and presented the distribution of luminosities and broad band spectral indices. The distribution of luminosities shows that the averaged luminosity of flat-spectral radio quasars (FSRQs) is larger than that of BL Lacs objects. On the other hand, the broad band spectral energy distribution reveals that FSRQs and low energy peaked BL Lac objects (LBLs) objects have similar spectral properties, but high energy peaked BL Lac objects (HBLs) have a distinct spectral property. This may be due to that different subclasses of blazars have different intrinsic environments and are at different cooling levels. Even so, a unified scheme also is revealed from the color-color diagram, which hints that there are similar physical processes operating in all objects under a range of intrinsic physical conditions or beaming parameter.

  14. Majorana Flat Bands in s-Wave Gapless Topological Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shusa Deng; Gerardo Ortiz; Amrit Poudel; Lorenza Viola

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate how the non-trivial interplay between spin-orbit coupling and nodeless $s$-wave superconductivity can drive a fully gapped two-band topological insulator into a time-reversal invariant gapless topological superconductor supporting symmetry-protected Majorana flat bands. We characterize topological phase diagrams by a ${\\mathbb Z}_2 \\times{\\mathbb Z}_2$ partial Berry-phase invariant, and show that, despite the trivial crystal geometry, no unique bulk-boundary correspondence exists. We trace this behavior to the anisotropic quasiparticle bulk gap closing, linear vs. quadratic, and argue that this provides a unifying principle for gapless topological superconductivity. Experimental implications for tunneling conductance measurements are addressed, relevant for lead chalcogenide materials.

  15. Dissipationless Directed Transport in Rocked Single-Band Quantum Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiangbin Gong; Dario Poletti; Peter Hanggi

    2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using matter waves that are trapped in a deep optical lattice, dissipationless directed transport is demonstrated to occur if the single-band quantum dynamics is periodically tilted on one half of the lattice by a monochromatic field. Most importantly, the directed transport can exist for almost all system parameters, even after averaged over a broad range of single-band initial states. The directed transport is theoretically explained within ac-scattering theory. Total reflection phenomena associated with the matter waves travelling from a tilting-free region to a tilted region are emphasized. The results are of relevance to ultracold physics and solid-state physics, and may lead to powerful means of selective, coherent, and directed transport of cold particles in optical lattices.

  16. Chiral CP^2 skyrmions in three-band superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Garaud; Johan Carlstrom; Egor Babaev; Martin Speight

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that under certain conditions, three-component superconductors (and in particular three-band systems) allow stable topological defects different from vortices. We demonstrate the existence of these excitations, characterized by a $CP^2$ topological invariant, in models for three-component superconductors with broken time reversal symmetry. We term these topological defects "chiral $GL^{(3)}$ skyrmions", where "chiral" refers to the fact that due to broken time reversal symmetry, these defects come in inequivalent left- and right-handed versions. In certain cases these objects are energetically cheaper than vortices and should be induced by an applied magnetic field. In other situations these skyrmions are metastable states, which can be produced by a quench. Observation of these defects can signal broken time reversal symmetry in three-band superconductors or in Josephson-coupled bilayers of $s_\\pm$ and s-wave superconductors.

  17. Band Tunneling through Double Barrier in Bilayer Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan A. Alshehab; Hocine Bahlouli; Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    By taking into account the full four band energy spectrum, we calculate the transmission probability and conductance of electrons across symmetric and asymmetric double potential barrier with a confined interlayer potential difference in bilayer graphene. For energies less than the interlayer coupling \\gamma_{1}, E \\gamma_{1}, we obtain four possible ways for transmission resulting from the two propagating modes. We compute the associated transmission probabilities as well as their contribution to the conductance, study the effect of the double barrier geometry.

  18. TECHNICAL PAPER Micromachined W-band polymeric tunable iris filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    -variable electrical length. Tunable filters with 3.8% tuning range at 20 GHz and a minimum insertion loss of 3.6 dTECHNICAL PAPER Micromachined W-band polymeric tunable iris filter Firas Sammoura · Liwei Lin.79 GHz and a minimum insertion loss of 2.37 dB with return loss better than 15 dB. As a tunable filter

  19. Implications of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granite, E.J.; King, W.P.; Stanko, D.C.; Pennline, H.W.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium dioxide is a well-known photooxidation catalyst. It will oxidize mercury in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun and oxygen and/or moisture to form mercuric oxide. Several companies manufacture self-cleaning windows. These windows have a transparent coating of titanium dioxide. The titanium dioxide is capable of destroying organic contaminants in air in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun, thereby keeping the windows clean. The commercially available self-cleaning windows were used to sequester mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures. Samples of the self-cleaning glass were placed into specially designed photo-reactors in order to study the removal of elemental mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures resembling air. The possibility of removing mercury from ambient air with a self-cleaning glass apparatus is examined. The intensity of 365-nm ultraviolet light was similar to the natural intensity from sunlight in the Pittsburgh region. Passive removal of mercury from the air may represent an option in lieu of, or in addition to, point source clean-up at combustion facilities. There are several common band-gap semiconductor oxide photocatalysts. Sunlight (both the ultraviolet and visible light components) and band-gap semiconductor particles may have a small impact on the global cycle of mercury in the environment. The potential environmental consequences of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides are discussed. Heterogeneous photooxidation might impact the global transport of elemental mercury emanating from flue gases.

  20. Engineering Design of a Multipurpose X-band Accelerating Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudkov, Dmitry; Samoshkin, Alexander; Zennaro, Riccardo; Dehler, Micha; Raguin, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both FEL projects, SwissFEL and Fermi-Elettra each require an X-band RF accelerating structure for optimal bunch compression at the respective injectors. As the CLIC project is pursuing a program for producing and testing the X-band high-gradient RF structures, a collaboration between PSI, Elettra and CERN has been established to build a multipurpose X-band accelerating structure. This paper focuses on its engineering design, which is based on the disked cells jointed together by diffusion bonding. Vacuum brazing and laser beam welding is used for auxiliary components. The accelerating structure consists of two coupler subassemblies, 73 disks and includes a wakefield monitor and diagnostic waveguides. The engineering study includes the external cooling system, consisting of two parallel cooling circuits and an RF tuning system, which allows phase advance tuning of the cell by deforming the outer wall. The engineering solution for the installation and sealing of the wake field monitor feed-through devices that...

  1. Transport band gap opening at metal–organic interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haidu, Francisc, E-mail: francisc.haidu@physik.tu-chemnitz.de; Salvan, Georgeta; Zahn, Dietrich R. T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Smykalla, Lars; Hietschold, Michael [Solid Surfaces Analysis, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Knupfer, Martin [Electronic and Optical Properties Department, IFW Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interface formation between copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and two representative metal substrates, i.e., Au and Co, was investigated by the combination of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy. The occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals and thus the transport band gap of CuPc are highly influenced by film thickness, i.e., molecule substrate distance. Due to the image charge potential given by the metallic substrates the transport band gap of CuPc “opens” from (1.4?±?0.3) eV for 1?nm thickness to (2.2?±?0.3) eV, and saturates at this value above 10?nm CuPc thickness. The interface dipoles with values of 1.2?eV and 1.0?eV for Au and Co substrates, respectively, predominantly depend on the metal substrate work functions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements using synchrotron radiation provide detailed information on the interaction between CuPc and the two metal substrates. While charge transfer from the Au or Co substrate to the Cu metal center is present only at sub-monolayer coverages, the authors observe a net charge transfer from the molecule to the Co substrate for films in the nm range. Consequently, the Fermi level is shifted as in the case of a p-type doping of the molecule. This is, however, a competing phenomenon to the energy band shifts due to the image charge potential.

  2. A Multiple-Channel Sub-Band Transient Detection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Smith

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a unique multiple-channel sub-band transient detection system to record transient electromagnetic signals in carrier-dominated radio environments; the system has been used to make unique observations of weak, transient HF signals. The detection system has made these observations possible through improved sensitivity compared to conventional broadband transient detection systems; the sensitivity improvement is estimated to be at least 20 dB. The increase in sensitivity has been achieved through subdivision of the band of interest (an 18 MHz tunable bandwidth) into eight sub-band independent detection channels, each with a 400 kHz bandwidth and its own criteria. The system generates a system trigger signal when a predetermined number of channels (typically five) trigger within a predetermined window of time (typically 100 ~s). Events are recorded with a broadband data acquisition system sampling at 50 or 100 Msample/s, so despite the fact that the detection system operates on portions of the signal confined to narrow bands, data acquisition is broadband. Between May and September of 1994, the system was used to detect and record over six thousand transient events in the frequency band from 3 to 30 MHz. Approximately 500 of the events have been characterized as paired bursts of radio noise with individual durations of 2 to 10 ps and separations between the bursts of 5 to 160 ps. The paired transients are typically 5 to 40 dB brighter than the background electromagnetic spectrum between carrier signals. We have termed these events SubIonospheric Pulse Pairs (SIPPS) and presently have no explanation as to their source. Our observations of SIPPS resemble observations of TransIonospheric Pulse Pairs (TIPPs) recorded by the Blackboard instrument on the ALEXIS satellite; the source of TIPP events is also unknown. Most of the recorded SIPP events do not exhibit frequency dispersion, implying propagation along a line-of-sight (groundwave) path; but seven of the pairs exhibit dispersion characteristic of skywave propagation via refraction from the ionosphere. The maximum line-of-sight observation range for radio propagation extends as far as 300 km for a source at an altitude of 5 km, and 520 km for a source at 15 km. Refraction from the ionosphere, however, may allow HF radiation to propagate around the globe. Information about the times and locations of sources, in conjunction with regional, weather maps and computer models of ionospheric propagation, suggest that some SIPP events originate in the vicinity of large-scale thunderstorm complexes.

  3. Annual Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the data collected during field activities and quarterly soil-gas sampling activities conducted from May 9, 2005, through May 20, 2006, at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 329, Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip (DRA) Fuel Spill; Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-44-01, Fuel Spill. The CAU is located at the DRA, which is located approximately two miles southwest of Mercury, Nevada, as shown in Figure 1-1. Field activities were conducted in accordance with the revised sampling approach outlined in the Addendum to the Closure Report (CR) for CAU 329 (NNSA/NSO, 2005) to support data collection requirements. The previous annual monitoring program for CAU 329 was initiated in August 2000 using soil-gas samples collected from three specific intervals at the DRA-0 and DRA-3 monitoring wells. Results of four sampling events from 2000 through 2003 indicated there is uncertainty in the approach to establish a rate of natural attenuation as specified in ''Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Work Plan for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (DOE/NV, 1999). As a result, the Addendum to the CR (NNSA/NSO, 2005) was completed to address this uncertainty by modifying the previous approach. A risk evaluation was added to the scope of the project to determine if the residual concentration of the hazardous constituents of JP4 pose an unacceptable risk to human health or the environment and if a corrective action was required at the site, because the current quarterly monitoring program is not expected to yield a rate constant that could be used effectively to determine a biodegradation rate for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in less than the initial five years outlined in the CR. Additionally, remediation to the Tier 1 action level for TPH is not practical or technically feasible due to the depth of contamination.

  4. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

  5. Pressure Behaviour of the UV and Green Emission Bands in ZnO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pressure Behaviour of the UV and Green Emission Bands in ZnO Micro-rods. Pressure Behaviour of the UV and Green Emission Bands in ZnO Micro-rods. Abstract: The pressure behavior of...

  6. Grand Traverse Band Renewable Energy Feasibility Study in Wind, Biomass and Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzanne McSawby, Project Director

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for wind, biomass, solar on the Grand Traverse Band tribal lands from 2005 - 2008

  7. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  8. Diffuse Interstellar Band at 5850 as a Member of 5797 Spectroscopic Family

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katarzyna Bryndal; Bogdan Wszo?ek

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The carriers of diffuse interstellar bands are still mysterious species. There exist many arguments that diffuse bands at 5797 and 5850 angstroms have the same carrier. Using high-resolution spectra of few dozens of reddened stars we have searched mutual correlation between intensities of considered bands. Results of our analysis indicate that 5797 and 5850 really tend to have the same carrier.

  9. The PortevinLe Chatelier (PLC) effect and shear band formation in an AA5754 alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niewczas, Marek

    The Portevin­Le Chatelier (PLC) effect and shear band formation in an AA5754 alloy Herdawandi Halim in order to observe Portevin­Le Chatelier (PLC) band behaviour during tensile deformation of AA5754 sheet and subsequently to measure the level of incre- mental plastic strain carried within the bands. In addition, PLC

  10. Retention of Butt-End Aluminum Leg Bands by Wild Turkeys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Matthew J.

    Note Retention of Butt-End Aluminum Leg Bands by Wild Turkeys MATTHEW J. BUTLER,1,2 Department wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) captured in Texas and Kansas, USA, 2000­2009. We examined 187 recaptured or harvested radiotagged wild turkeys to determine band retention and modeled band

  11. Band anticrossing effects in highly mismatched semiconductor alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Junqiao

    2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The first five chapters of this thesis focus on studies of band anticrossing (BAC) effects in highly electronegativity- mismatched semiconductor alloys. The concept of bandgap bowing has been used to describe the deviation of the alloy bandgap from a linear interpolation. Bowing parameters as large as 2.5 eV (for ZnSTe) and close to zero (for AlGaAs and ZnSSe) have been observed experimentally. Recent advances in thin film deposition techniques have allowed the growth of semiconductor alloys composed of significantly different constituents with ever- improving crystalline quality (e.g., GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x} and GaP{sub 1-x}N{sub x} with x {approx}< 0.05). These alloys exhibit many novel and interesting properties including, in particular, a giant bandgap bowing (bowing parameters > 14 eV). A band anticrossing model has been developed to explain these properties. The model shows that the predominant bowing mechanism in these systems is driven by the anticrossing interaction between the localized level associated with the minority component and the band states of the host. In this thesis I discuss my studies of the BAC effects in these highly mismatched semiconductors. It will be shown that the results of the physically intuitive BAC model can be derived from the Hamiltonian of the many-impurity Anderson model. The band restructuring caused by the BAC interaction is responsible for a series of experimental observations such as a large bandgap reduction, an enhancement of the electron effective mass, and a decrease in the pressure coefficient of the fundamental gap energy. Results of further experimental investigations of the optical properties of quantum wells based on these materials will be also presented. It will be shown that the BAC interaction occurs not only between localized states and conduction band states at the Brillouin zone center, but also exists over all of k-space. Finally, taking ZnSTe and ZnSeTe as examples, I show that BAC also occurs between localized states and the valence band states. Soft x-ray fluorescence experiments provide direct evidence of the BAC interaction in these systems. In the final chapter of the thesis, I describe and summarize my studies of optical properties of wurtzite InN and related alloys. Early studies performed on InN films grown by sputtering techniques suggested a direct bandgap of {approx}1.9 eV for this semiconductor. Very recently, high-quality InN films with much higher mobility have become available by using the molecular beam epitaxy growth method. Optical experiments carried out on these samples reveal a narrow bandgap for InN of 0.77 eV, much lower than the previously accepted value. Optical properties of InGaN and InAlN ternaries on the In rich side have also been characterized and are found to be consistent with the narrow bandgap of InN. The bandgap bowing parameters in these alloys were determined. In the context of these findings, the bandgap energies of InGaN and InAlN were found to cover a wide spectral range from the infrared for InN to the ultraviolet for GaN and deep ultraviolet for AlN. The significance of this work is rooted in many important applications of nitride semiconductors in optoelectronics and solar energy conversion devices.

  12. History and Evolution of Control Banding: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Nelson, D

    2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Banding (CB) strategies offer simplified solutions for controlling worker exposures to constituents often encountered in the workplace. The original CB model was developed within the pharmaceutical industry; however, the modern movement involves models developed for non-experts to input hazard and exposure potential information for bulk chemical processes, receiving control advice as a result. The CB approach utilizes these models for the dissemination of qualitative and semi-quantitative risk assessment tools being developed to complement the traditional industrial hygiene model of air sampling and analysis. It is being applied and tested in small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) within developed countries and industrially developing countries; however, large enterprises (LEs) have also incorporated these strategies within chemical safety programs. Existing research of the components of the most available CB model, the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Essentials, has shown that exposure bands do not always provide adequate margins of safety, that there is a high rate of under-control errors, that it works better with dusts than with vapors, that there is an inherent inaccuracy in estimating variability, and that when taken together the outcomes of this model may lead to potentially inappropriate workplace confidence in chemical exposure reduction in some operations. Alternatively, large-scale comparisons of industry exposure data to this CB model's outcomes have indicated more promising results with a high correlation seen internationally. With the accuracy of the toxicological ratings and hazard band classification currently in question, their proper reevaluation will be of great benefit to the reliability of existing and future CB models. The need for a more complete analysis of CB model components and, most importantly, a more comprehensive prospective research process remains and will be important in understanding implications of the model's overall effectiveness. Since the CB approach is now being used worldwide with an even broader implementation in progress, further research toward understanding its strengths and weaknesses will assist in its further refinement and confidence in its ongoing utility.

  13. ZnO/Sn:In2O3 and ZnO/CdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZnOSn:In2O3 and ZnOCdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber photovoltaics . ZnOSn:In2O3 and ZnOCdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber photovoltaics . Abstract: Band...

  14. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campisi, Isidoro E. (Newport News, VA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An absorber wave guide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the wave guide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the wave guide.

  15. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campisi, I.E.

    1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An absorber waveguide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the waveguide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the waveguide. 11 figs.

  16. VIMOS total transmission profiles for broad-band filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mieske; M. Rejkuba; S. Bagnulo; C. Izzo; G. Marconi

    2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    VIMOS is a wide-field imager and spectrograph mounted on UT3 at the VLT, whose FOV consists of four 7'x8' quadrants. Here we present the measurements of total transmission profiles -- i.e. the throughput of telescope + instrument -- for the broad band filters U, B, V, R, I, and z for each of its four quadrants. Those measurements can also be downloaded from the public VIMOS web-page. The transmission profiles are compared with previous estimates from the VIMOS consortium.

  17. Band Structure Asymmetry of Bilayer Graphene Revealed by Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.Q.; Henriksen, E.A.; Jiang, Z.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Kim, P.; Stormer, H.L.; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on infrared spectroscopy of bilayer graphene integrated in gated structures. We observe a significant asymmetry in the optical conductivity upon electrostatic doping of electrons and holes. We show that this finding arises from a marked asymmetry between the valence and conduction bands, which is mainly due to the inequivalence of the two sublattices within the graphene layer and the next-nearest-neighbor interlayer coupling. From the conductivity data, the energy difference of the two sublattices and the interlayer coupling energy are directly determined.

  18. W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Update and Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 -VisualizingVote For the Next HowSEEW-band ARM

  19. Triaxial strongly deformed bands in {sup 164}Hf and the effect of elevated yrast line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Wenchao [Department of Physics, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Two exotic rotational bands have been identified in {sup 164}Hf and linked to known states. They are interpreted as being associated with the calculated triaxial strongly deformed (TSD) potential energy minimum. The bands are substantially stronger and are located at much lower spins than the previously discovered TSD bands in {sup 168}Hf. In addition to the proton and neutron shell gaps at large trixiality, it was proposed that the relative excitation energy of TSD bands above the yrast line plays an important role in the population of TSD bands.

  20. Partially filled intermediate band of Cr-doped GaN films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonoda, S. [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the band structure of sputtered Cr-doped GaN (GaCrN) films using optical absorption, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, and charge transport measurements. It was found that an additional energy band is formed in the intrinsic band gap of GaN upon Cr doping, and that charge carriers in the material move in the inserted band. Prototype solar cells showed enhanced short circuit current and open circuit voltage in the n-GaN/GaCrN/p-GaN structure compared to the GaCrN/p-GaN structure, which validates the proposed concept of an intermediate-band solar cell.

  1. Enhancement of band-to-band tunneling in mono-layer transition metal dichalcogenides two-dimensional materials by vacancy defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Xiang-Wei; Li, Shu-Shen [State Key Laboratory of Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Gong, Jian [School of Physics Science and Technology, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot 010021 (China); Xu, Nuo [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Zhang, Jinfeng; Hao, Yue [Key Laboratory of Wide Band Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi'an 710071 (China); Wang, Lin-Wang, E-mail: lwwang@lbl.gov [Material Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The band-to-band tunneling of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides nano-junction is investigated using atomistic ab initio quantum transport simulations. From the simulation, it is found that the transition metal vacancy defect in the two-dimensional MX{sub 2} (M = Mo,W; X = S,Se) band-to-band tunneling diode can dramatically boost the on-state current up to 10 times while maintaining the device sub-threshold swing. The performance enhancement mechanism is discussed in detail by examining partial density of states of the system. It is found that the transition metal vacancy induces band-gap states, which reduce the effective length of the tunneling transition region.

  2. Voltage-matched, monolithic, multi-band-gap devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic, tandem, photonic cells include at least a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor layer, wherein each semiconductor layer includes an n-type region, a p-type region, and a given band-gap energy. Formed within each semiconductor layer is a sting of electrically connected photonic sub-cells. By carefully selecting the numbers of photonic sub-cells in the first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s), and by carefully selecting the manner in which the sub-cells in a first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s) are electrically connected, each of the first and second layer sub-cell strings may be made to achieve one or more substantially identical electrical characteristics.

  3. Voltage-Matched, Monolithic, Multi-Band-Gap Devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M. W.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic, tandem, photonic cells include at least a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor layer, wherein each semiconductor layer includes an n-type region, a p-type region, and a given band-gap energy. Formed within each semiconductor layer is a string of electrically connected photonic sub-cells. By carefully selecting the numbers of photonic sub-cells in the first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s), and by carefully selecting the manner in which the sub-cells in a first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s) are electrically connected, each of the first and second layer sub-cell strings may be made to achieve one or more substantially identical electrical characteristics.

  4. Engineering integrated pure narrow-band photon sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Pomarico; Bruno Sanguinetti; Clara I. Osorio; Harald Herrmann; Rob Thew

    2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering and controlling well defined states of light for quantum information applications is of increasing importance as the complexity of quantum systems grows. For example, in quantum networks high multi-photon interference visibility requires properly devised single mode sources. In this paper we propose a spontaneous parametric down conversion source based on an integrated cavity-waveguide, where single narrow-band, possibly distinct, spectral modes for the idler and the signal fields can be generated. This mode selection takes advantage of the clustering effect, due to the intrinsic dispersion of the nonlinear material. In combination with a CW laser and fast detection, our approach provides a means to engineer a source that can efficiently generate pure photons, without filtering, that is compatible with long distance quantum communication. Furthermore, it is extremely flexible and could easily be adapted to a wide variety of wavelengths and applications.

  5. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caddeau, MP

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from 15 channels between 170 and 183.310 GHz. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. Channels between 170.0 and 176.0 GHz are particularly sensitive to the presence of liquid water. The sensitivity to water vapor of the 183.31-GHz line is approximately 30 times higher than at the frequencies of the two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) for a precipitable water vapor (PWV) amount of less than 2.5 mm. Measurements from the GVRP instrument are therefore especially useful during low-humidity conditions (PWV < 5 mm). In addition to integrated water vapor and liquid water, the GVRP can provide low-resolution vertical profiles of water vapor in very dry conditions.

  6. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940's. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analyst's understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  7. Band offsets at heterojunctions and the charge neutrality condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taferner, Waltraud Teresa

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P InSb ZnSe Znte Gap indirect indirect indirect indirect direct indirect direct direct direct direct direct direct E4 (eV) O'K 0. 76 1. 13 2. 30 1. 88 1. 55 2. 35 0. 78 0. 43 1. 41 0. 23 2. 68 2. 56 If the atoms of a...&' ?r&rl c!?? &'nt h&: R . F. . X I 1 e n t C. 'k&r&ic &?f l'nn&rr&it&ee) l. H. B. r&ss (:& I e m h e r! R. R. L?cchese (lvlpmhe& ) etta. g R. AIT&&J?' &t t (Ifead of Department) May 1990 ABSTRACT Band OfFsets at Heterojunctions...

  8. 1634 IEEE ANTENNAS AND WIRELESS PROPAGATION LETTERS, VOL. 12, 2013 A Compact Dual-Band Rectenna Using Slot-Loaded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    , dual-band rectenna, dual-band rectifier, energy harvesting, wireless power transmission. I bands, RF energy harvesters capable of operating in multiple bands are of great importance. Nowadays by a microwave signal of available power of 9 dBm for a load resistor of 2.2 k . Index Terms--Dipole antenna

  9. TWO PLANETARY COMPANIONS AROUND THE K7 DWARF GJ 221: A HOT SUPER-EARTH AND A CANDIDATE IN THE SUB-SATURN DESERT RANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arriagada, Pamela; Minniti, Dante [Department of Astronomy, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015-1305 (United States); Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Wende, Sebastian, E-mail: parriaga@astro.puc.cl [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report two low-mass companions orbiting the nearby K7 dwarf GJ 221 that have emerged from reanalyzing 4.4 yr of publicly available HARPS spectra complemented with 2 years of high-precision Doppler measurements with Magellan/PFS. The HARPS measurements alone contain the clear signal of a low-mass companion with a period of 125 days and a minimum mass of 53.2 M{sub Circled-Plus} (GJ 221b), falling in a mass range where very few planet candidates have been found (sub-Saturn desert). The addition of 17 PFS observations allows the confident detection of a second low-mass companion (6.5 M{sub Circled-Plus }) in a hot orbit (3.87 day period, GJ 221c). Spectroscopic and photometric calibrations suggest that GJ 221 is slightly depleted ([Fe/H] {approx} -0.1) compared to the Sun, so the presence of two low-mass companions in the system confirms the trend that slightly reduced stellar metallicity does not prevent the formation of planets in the super-Earth to sub-Saturn mass regime.

  10. Surface Plasmon Band Gap Sensor A new sensor for robust on-field biosensing (SEN 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnaud Benahmed; Robert Lam; Chih-Ming Ho

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Networked Sensing Surface Plasmon Band Gap Sensor A newsensing concept Nanostructures for Surface Plasmon SensingSurface Plasmon are surface EM waves whose wavelength is

  11. Theoretical performance of solar cell based on mini-bands quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aly, Abou El-Maaty M., E-mail: drabouelmaaty@hotmail.com, E-mail: ashraf.nasr@gmail.com [Power Electronics and Energy Conversion Department, ERI, NRCB (Egypt); College of Computer, Qassim University, P.O.B. 6688, Buryadah 51453 (Saudi Arabia); Nasr, A., E-mail: drabouelmaaty@hotmail.com, E-mail: ashraf.nasr@gmail.com [Radiation Engineering Department, NCRRT, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); College of Computer, Qassim University, P.O.B. 6688, Buryadah 51453 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The tremendous amount of research in solar energy is directed toward intermediate band solar cell for its advantages compared with the conventional solar cell. The latter has lower efficiency because the photons have lower energy than the bandgap energy and cannot excite mobile carriers from the valence band to the conduction band. On the other hand, if mini intermediate band is introduced between the valence and conduction bands, then the smaller energy photons can be used to promote charge carriers transfer to the conduction band and thereby the total current increases while maintaining a large open circuit voltage. In this article, the influence of the new band on the power conversion efficiency for structure of quantum dots intermediate band solar cell is theoretically investigated and studied. The time-independent Schrödinger equation is used to determine the optimum width and location of the intermediate band. Accordingly, achievement of a maximum efficiency by changing the width of quantum dots and barrier distances is studied. Theoretical determination of the power conversion efficiency under the two different ranges of QD width is presented. From the obtained results, the maximum power conversion efficiency is about 70.42%. It is carried out for simple cubic quantum dot crystal under fully concentrated light. It is strongly dependent on the width of quantum dots and barrier distances.

  12. Fractional Band Filling in an Atomic Chain Structure J. N. Crain,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himpsel, Franz J.

    then splits into a spinon and holon band. The energy scale of this many-electron effect can be boosted [13

  13. Band structure engineering through orbital interaction for enhanced thermoelectric power factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    Band structure engineering for specific electronic or optical properties is essential for the further development of many important technologies including thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, and microelectronics. In this ...

  14. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell is described having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of ''pinning'' the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14[+-]0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap. 7 figures.

  15. The mechanism and realization of a band-agile coaxial relativistic backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge, Xingjun; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Qian, Baoliang; Wang, Haitao [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanism and realization of a band-agile coaxial relativistic backward-wave oscillator (RBWO) are presented. The operation frequency tuning can be easily achieved by merely altering the inner-conductor length. The key effects of the inner-conductor length contributing to the mechanical frequency tunability are investigated theoretically and experimentally. There is a specific inner-conductor length where the operation frequency can jump from one mode to another mode, which belongs to a different operation band. In addition, the operation frequency is tunable within each operation band. During simulation, the L-band microwave with a frequency of 1.61 GHz is radiated when the inner-conductor length is 39?cm. Meanwhile, the S-band microwave with a frequency of 2.32 GHz is radiated when the inner-conductor length is 5?cm. The frequency adjustment bandwidths of L-band and S-band are about 8.5% and 2%, respectively. Moreover, the online mechanical tunability process is described in detail. In the initial experiment, the generated microwave frequencies remain approximately 1.59 GHz and 2.35?GHz when the inner-conductor lengths are 39?cm and 5?cm. In brief, this technical route of the band-agile coaxial RBWO is feasible and provides a guide to design other types of band-agile high power microwaves sources.

  16. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 90, 115209 (2014) Computational search for direct band gap silicon crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jooyoung

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of microns thick, while solar cells made from direct band gap materials (such as CdTe, CIGS, or CZTS) can

  17. Temperature dependent band offsets in PbSe/PbEuSe quantum well heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simma, M.; Bauer, G.; Springholz, G. [Institut fuer Halbleiter und Festkoerperphysik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The band offsets of PbSe/Pb{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}Se multi-quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy are determined as a function of temperature and europium content using temperature-modulated differential transmission spectroscopy. The confined quantum well states in the valence and conduction bands are analyzed using a k{center_dot}p model with envelope function approximation. From the fit of the experimental data, the normalized conduction band offset is determined as 0.45{+-}0.15 of the band gap difference, independently of Eu content up to 14% and temperature from 20 to 300 K.

  18. Band gap and band parameters of InN and GaN from quasiparticle energy calculations based on exact-exchange density-functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Band gap and band parameters of InN and GaN from quasiparticle energy calculations based on exact; published online 20 October 2006 The authors have studied the electronic structure of InN and GaN employing. © 2006 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2364469 The group III-nitrides AlN, GaN, and In

  19. CO Cameron band and CO2+ UV doublet emissions in the dayglow of Venus: Role of CO in the Cameron band production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhardwaj, Anil

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Present study deals with the model calculations of CO Cameron band and CO2+ ultraviolet doublet emissions in the dayglow of Venus. The overhead and limb intensities of CO Cameron band and CO2+ UV doublet emissions are calculated for low, moderate, and high solar activity conditions. Using updated cross sections, the impact of dierent e-CO cross section for Cameron band production is estimated. The electron impact on CO is the major source mechanism of Cameron band, followed by electron and photon impact dissociation of CO2. The overhead intensities of CO Cameron band and CO2+ UV doublet emissions are about a factor of 2 higher in solar maximum than those in solar minimum condition. The effect of solar EUV flux models on the emission intensity is ~30-40% in solar minimum condition and ~2-10% in solar maximum condition. At the altitude of emission peak (135 km), the model predicted limb intensity of CO Cameron band and CO2+ UV doublet emissions in moderate (F10.7 = 130) solar activity condition is about 2400 an...

  20. Dual-band infrared capabilities for imaging buried object sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Perkins, D.E.; Clark, G.A.; Hernandez, J.E.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1993-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss dual-band infrared (DBIR) capabilities for imaging buried object sizes. We identify physical features affecting thermal contrast needed to distinguish buried object sites from undisturbed sites or surface clutter. Apart from atmospheric transmission and system performance, these features include: object size, shape, and burial depth; ambient soil, disturbed soil and object site thermal diffusivity differences; surface temperature, emissivity, plant-cover, slope, albedo and roughness variations; weather conditions and measurement times. We use good instrumentation to measure the time-varying temperature differences between buried object sites and undisturbed soil sites. We compare near surface soil temperature differences with radiometric infrared (IR) surface temperature differences recorded at 4.7 {plus_minus} 0.4 {mu}m and at 10.6 {plus_minus} 1.0 {mu}m. By producing selective DBIR image ratio maps, we distinguish temperature-difference patterns from surface emissivity effects. We discuss temperature differences between buried object sites, filled hole site (without buried objects), cleared (undisturbed) soil sites, and grass-covered sites (with and without different types of surface clutter). We compare temperature, emissivity-ratio, visible and near-IR reflectance signatures of surface objects, leafy plants and sod. We discuss the physical aspects of environmental, surface and buried target features affecting interpretation of buried targets, surface objects and natural backgrounds.

  1. Precision Magnet Measurements for X-Band Accelerator Quadrupole Triplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Armstrong, J P

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-band test station is being developed at LLNL to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades to mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology at LLNL. Beamline magnets will include an emittance compensation solenoid, windowpane steering dipoles, and quadrupole magnets. Demanding tolerances have been placed on the alignment of these magnets, which directly affects the electron bunch beam quality. A magnet mapping system has been established at LLNL in order to ensure the delivered magnets match their field specification, and the mountings are aligned and capable of reaching the specified alignment tolerances. The magnet measurement system will be described which uses a 3-axis Lakeshore gauss probe mounted on a 3-axis translation stage. Alignment accuracy and precision will be discussed, as well as centering measurements and analysis. The dependence on data analysis over direct multi-pole measurement allows a significant improvement in useful alignment information. Detailed analysis of measurements on the beamline quadrupoles will be discussed, including multi-pole content both from alignment of the magnets, and the intrinsic level of multi-pole magnetic field.

  2. A representative sample of Be stars III: H band spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Steele; J. S. Clark

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present H band (1.53 - 1.69 micron) spectra of 57 isolated Be stars of spectral types O9-B9 and luminosity classes III,IV & V. The HI Brackett (n-4) series is seen in emission from Br 11-18, and FeII emission is also apparent for a subset of those stars with HI emission. No emission from species with a higher excitation temperature, such as He II or CIII is seen, and no forbidden line emission is present. A subset of 12 stars show no evidence for emission from any species; these stars appear indistinguishable from normal B stars of a comparable spectral type. In general the line ratios constructed from the transitions in the range Br 11-18 do not fit case B recombination theory particularly well. Strong correlations between the line ratios with Br-gamma and spectral type are found. These results most likely represent systematic variations in the temperature and ionization of the circumstellar disc with spectral type. Weak correlations between the line widths and projected rotational velocity of the stars are observed; however no systematic trend for increasing line width through the Brackett series is observed.

  3. High-spin structure and Band Termination in $^{103}$Cd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chakraborty; Krishichayan; S. Mukhopadhyay; S. Ray; S. N. Chintalapudi; S. S. Ghugre; N. S. Pattabiraman; A. K. Sinha; S. Sarkar; U. Garg; S. Zhu; M. Saha Sarkar

    2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited states of the neutron deficient $^{103}$Cd nucleus have been investigated via the $^{72}$Ge($^{35}$Cl, p3n) reaction at beam energy of 135 MeV by use of in-beam spectroscopic methods. Gamma rays depopulating the excited states were detected using the Gammasphere spectrometer with high-fold $\\gamma$-ray coincidences. A quadrupole $\\gamma$-ray coincidence analysis ($\\gamma^{4}$) has been used to extend the known level scheme. The positive parity levels have been established up to $J = 35/2\\hbar$ and $E_{x} = 7.071$ MeV. In addition to the observation of highly-fragmented level scheme belonging to the positive-parity sequences at E$_{x}\\sim$ 5 MeV, the termination of a negative-parity sequence connected by $E2$ transitions has been established at $J = 47/2 \\hbar$ and $E_{x} = 11.877$ MeV. The experimental results corresponding to both the positive- and negative-parity sequences have been theoretically interpreted in the framework of the core particle coupling model. Evidence is presented for a shape change from collective prolate to non-collective oblate above the $J^{\\pi} = 39/2^{-}$ (8011 keV) level and for a smooth termination of the negative-parity band.

  4. Frozen light in photonic crystals with degenerate band edge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Figotin; I. Vitebskiy

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Consider a plane monochromatic wave incident on a semi-infinite periodic structure. What happens if the normal component of the transmitted wave group velocity vanishes? At first sight, zero normal component of the transmitted wave group velocity simply implies total reflection of the incident wave. But we demonstrate that total reflection is not the only possible outcome. Instead, the transmitted wave can appear in the form of a frozen mode with very large diverging amplitude and either zero, or purely tangential energy flux. The field amplitude in the transmitted wave can exceed that of the incident wave by several orders of magnitude. There are two qualitatively different kinds of frozen mode regime. The first one is associated with a stationary inflection point of electromagnetic dispersion relation. This phenomenon has been analyzed in our previous publications. Now, our focus is on the frozen mode regime related to a degenerate photonic band edge. An advantage of this new phenomenon is that it can occur in much simpler periodic structures. This spectacular effect is extremely sensitive to the frequency and direction of propagation of the incident plane wave. These features can be very attractive in a variety practical applications, such as higher harmonic generation and wave mixing, light amplification and lasing, highly efficient superprizms, etc.

  5. Enhancement of computer program SPECTRAN to provide optional synthesis of 1/12 octave-band and critical-band spectra from 1/3 octave-band spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Young-Soo [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Liebich, R.E. [Raytheon Environmental Services Company, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes greatly enhanced version of the computer program SPECTRAN, which was initially presented in Paper No. 96-RA104.01, at the A&WMA 89th Annual Meeting in June 1996. The program has had three basic upgrades since that time. The first is provision of an option to use either batch-mode input from previously prepared data files or a {open_quotes}user-friendly{close_quotes} interactive input routine. The latter is primarily for first-time users and those having only one, or very few, spectra to process. The second improvement is the synthesis of 1/12 octave-band spectra from 1/3 octave-band spectra, with {open_quotes}tone correction,{close_quotes} in a manner similar to that used in the original version of the program. The third fundamental improvement is addition of a unique new capability to synthesize classic {open_quotes}critical-band{close_quotes} spectra from 1/3 octave-band input spectra. Critical-band spectra are also termed {open_quotes}equivalent-rectangular-bandwidth (ERB){close_quotes} and {open_quotes}equal-contribution-to-speech (ECS){close_quotes} spectra.

  6. Intermediate-band solar cells based on quantum dot supracrystals Q. Shao and A. A. Balandina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    parameter in the photovoltaic PV solar cell technology. It is defined as = FFVocJsc Pin , 1 where FFIntermediate-band solar cells based on quantum dot supracrystals Q. Shao and A. A. Balandina Nano to implement the intermediate-band solar cell with the efficiency exceeding the Shockley-Queisser limit

  7. Dopant-induced band filling and bandgap renormalization in CdO:In films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thereof or The Regents of the University of California. 1 #12;Abstract The effect of carrier concentration-Moss effect for a nonparabolic conduction band and bandgap renormalization effects. The band filling attracted much interest due to their tremendous importance in applications such as displays, photovoltaic

  8. Fractal Shear Bands at Elastic-Plastic Transitions in Random Mohr-Coulomb Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    Fractal Shear Bands at Elastic-Plastic Transitions in Random Mohr-Coulomb Materials J. Li, A.M.ASCE1 ; and M. Ostoja-Starzewski, M.ASCE2 Abstract: This paper studies fractal patterns forming of plastic grains (i.e., a shear-band system) is always a monotonically growing fractal under increasing

  9. Crossing of large multiquasiparticle magnetic-rotation bands in $^{198}$Bi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Pai; G. Mukherjee; S. Bhattacharyya; C. Bhattacharya; S. Bhattacharya; T. Bhattacharjee; S. K. Basu; S. Kundu; T. K. Ghosh; K. Banerjee; T. K. Rana; J. K. Meena; R. K. Bhowmik; R. P. Singh; S. Muralithar; S. Chanda; R. Garg; B. Maheshwari; D. Choudhury; A. K. Jain

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    High-spin states in the doubly-odd $^{198}$Bi nucleus have been studied by using the $^{185,187}$Re($^{16}$O, xn) reactions at the beam energy of 112.5 MeV. $\\gamma-\\gamma$ coincidence were measured by using the INGA array with 15 Compton suppressed clover HPGe detectors. The observed levels have been assigned definite spin-parity. The high spin structure is grouped into three bands (B1, B2 and B3), of which two (B1 and B2) exhibit the properties of magnetic rotation (MR). Tilted axis cranking calculations were carried out to explain the MR bands having large multi-quasiparticle configurations. The calculated results explain the bands B1 and B2 very nicely, confirming the shears mechanism and suggest a crossing of two MR bands in both the cases. The crossing is from 6-qp to 8-qp in band B1 and from 4-qp to 6-qp in band B2, a very rare finding. A semiclassical model has also been used to obtain the particle-hole interaction strengths for the bands B1 and B2, below the band crossing.

  10. A Multi-band VCO PLL with the Continuously Maintained Optimum VCO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Woo-Young

    , voltage, and temperature (PVT) variation and, consequently, multi-band VCOs are commonly used. A multi with the selected VCO sub-band is done in the low- gain mode. Fig. 1 shows the block diagram of one type of a dual Structure: Fig. 3 shows the block diagram of our PLL that can continuously maintain optimum Vcont. Our PLL

  11. Semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations of ultrafast photodissociation dynamics associated with the Chappuis band of ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William H.

    with the Chappuis band of ozone Victor S. Batista and William H. Millera) Department of Chemistry, University A ) of ozone following photoexcitation of the molecule in the gas phase with visible light. Our algorithm and recurrence events, as well as an interpretation of experimental studies of the Chappuis band of ozone

  12. Characterization of Al and Mg alloys from their x-ray emission bands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in that regard. The main alloying element of Mg alloys is aluminum. Also, magnesium is an important alloying element of aluminum alloys. Therefore, studying the band structure of Mg­Al alloys is as important1 Characterization of Al and Mg alloys from their x-ray emission bands Philippe Jonnard, Karine Le

  13. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 195405 (2012) Graphene on Ru(0001): Evidence for two graphene band structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 195405 (2012) Graphene on Ru(0001): Evidence for two graphene band structures) High-resolution photoemission illustrates that the band structure of graphene on Ru(0001) exhibits a well- defined splitting. This splitting is largest with the graphene directly on the Ru(0001) substrate

  14. Beta band oscillations during basic sentence comprehension in patients with schizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuperberg, Gina

    Beta band oscillations during basic sentence comprehension in patients with schizophrenia Kirsten & Hickok (2009) Beta band oscillations during language processing ·In language comprehension we bind words wordlists elicits larger responses in the lower beta frequency range1 ·This has been attributed

  15. Comparison of Model Prediction With Measurements of Galactic Background Noise at L-Band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with measurements made with several modern L-band remote sensing radiometers. The comparison validates the model and ocean salinity that are needed for understanding the hydrological cycle, ocean circu- lation, and energy surface salinity, which requires high radiometric accuracy (at L-band the sensitivity to salinity

  16. Active Slip Band Separation and the Energetics of Slip in Single Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Active Slip Band Separation and the Energetics of Slip in Single Crystals Abstract This research supports recent efforts to provide an energetic ap- proach the formulation of new measures of the active slip-band separation and of the number of lattice cells

  17. Low-voltage broad-band electroabsorption from thin Ge/SiGe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David A. B.

    Low-voltage broad-band electroabsorption from thin Ge/SiGe quantum wells epitaxially grown than 5 dB over the entire telecommunication S- and C-bands with only 1V drive using a new Ge/SiGe QW epitaxy design approach; further, this is demonstrated with the thinnest Ge/SiGe epitaxy to date, using

  18. Rubber Band Recoil By R. Vermorel, N. Vandenberghe and E. Villermaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rubber Band Recoil By R. Vermorel, N. Vandenberghe and E. Villermaux Universit´e de Provence, IRPHE, 49, rue Fr´ed´eric Joliot-Curie 13384 Marseille Cedex 13, France When an initially stretched rubber to obtain a relation be- tween the buckled wavelength, the initial stretching and the rubber band thickness

  19. Thermoelectric power measurements of wide band gap semiconducting Chul-Ho Lee,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Philip

    Thermoelectric power measurements of wide band gap semiconducting nanowires Chul-Ho Lee,1 Gyu online 13 January 2009 We investigated the temperature-dependent thermoelectric power TEP of individual concentration in wide band gap semiconducting nano- wires employing temperature-dependent thermoelectric power

  20. Slow electromagnetic pulse propagation through a narrow transmission band in a coaxial photonic crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, William

    Slow electromagnetic pulse propagation through a narrow transmission band in a coaxial photonic the slow group-velocity propagation of electromagnetic pulses through a narrow transmission band describe a simple experimental configuration that leads to slow-group-velocity electromagnetic pulse

  1. Contribution to the establishment of the R-banded karyotype in dogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Contribution to the establishment of the R-banded karyotype in dogs M Moreno-Millán A Rodero FJ a system of arranging R-bands. We describe a new contribution to the canine karyotype obtained after cultures of integral blood according to the method of de Grouchy et al (1964) slightly mod- ified

  2. Light trapping design for low band-gap polymer solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Sajeev

    Light trapping design for low band-gap polymer solar cells Stephen Foster1,* and Sajeev John1,2 1 demonstrate numerically a 2-D nanostructured design for light trapping in a low band-gap polymer solar cell observe an enhancement in solar absorption of almost 40% relative to a planar cell. Improvements

  3. Plasma process-induced band-gap modifications of a strained SiGe heterostructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Durgamadhab "Durga"

    Plasma process-induced band-gap modifications of a strained SiGe heterostructure P. K. Swain,a) S the strain of coherently strained SiGe. This work investigates the change in valence-band discontinuity in plasma-exposed SiGe films due to strain relaxation by a capacitance­voltage (C­V) profiling technique

  4. Electronic structure of QD arrays: Application to intermediate-band solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    )Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK Abstract-Intermediate band solar cells (IBSC) have the thermodynamic efficiency limits of solar energy conversion. While tandem solar cells can the- oretically exceedNUSOD 2007 Electronic structure of QD arrays: Application to intermediate-band solar cells S

  5. Band gap changes of GaN shocked to 13 GPa M. D. McCluskeya)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    Band gap changes of GaN shocked to 13 GPa M. D. McCluskeya) and Y. M. Gupta Institute for Shock, California 94304 Received 24 October 2001; accepted for publication 19 December 2001 The band gap of GaN in shock-wave experiments. Shock waves were generated by impacting the GaN samples with c-cut sapphire

  6. Fine structure of the red luminescence band in undoped GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reshchikov, M. A., E-mail: mreshchi@vcu.edu [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Usikov, A. [Nitride Crystals, Inc., 181E Industry Ct., Ste. B, Deer Park, New York 11729 (United States); Saint-Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, 49 Kronverkskiy Ave., 197101 Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu. [Nitride Crystals, Inc., 181E Industry Ct., Ste. B, Deer Park, New York 11729 (United States)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Many point defects in GaN responsible for broad photoluminescence (PL) bands remain unidentified. Their presence in thick GaN layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) detrimentally affects the material quality and may hinder the use of GaN in high-power electronic devices. One of the main PL bands in HVPE-grown GaN is the red luminescence (RL) band with a maximum at 1.8?eV. We observed the fine structure of this band with a zero-phonon line (ZPL) at 2.36?eV, which may help to identify the related defect. The shift of the ZPL with excitation intensity and the temperature-related transformation of the RL band fine structure indicate that the RL band is caused by transitions from a shallow donor (at low temperature) or from the conduction band (above 50?K) to an unknown deep acceptor having an energy level 1.130?eV above the valence band.

  7. PLASTICITY OF DAMAGED SOLIDS AND SHEAR BAND LOCALIZATION MARIA K.DUSZEK and PIOTR PERZYNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    694 PLASTICITY OF DAMAGED SOLIDS AND SHEAR BAND LOCALIZATION MARIA K.DUSZEK and PIOTR PERZYNA of shear band localization conditions for finite elastic-plastic rate independent deformations of damaged for elastic-plastic solids when iso- tropic and kinematic hardening effects and micro-damage process are taken

  8. A Near-Infrared Stellar Spectral Library: II. K-Band Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind C. Ranade; Harinder P. Singh; Ranjan Gupta; N. M. Ashok

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the second in the series of papers on near-infrared (NIR) stellar spectral library produced by reducing the observations carried out with 1.2 meter Gurushikhar Infrared Telescope (GIRT), at Mt. Abu, India using a NICMOS3 HgCdTe 256 X 256 NIR array based spectrometer. In paper I (Ranade et al. 2004), H-band spectra of 135 stars at a resolution of ~16 Ang were presented. The K-band library being released now consists of 114 stars covering spectral types O7--M7 and luminosity classes I--V. The spectra have a moderate resolution of ~22 Ang in the K band and have been continuum shape corrected to their respective effective temperatures. We hope to release the remaining J-band spectra soon. The complete H and K-Band library is available online at: http://vo.iucaa.ernet.in/~voi/NIR_Header.html

  9. One-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structures formed by discharge plasmas in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkhipenko, V. I.; Simonchik, L. V., E-mail: l.simonchik@dragon.bas-net.by; Usachonak, M. S. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics of the NAS of Belarus, Ave. Nezavisimostsi 68, 220072 Minsk (Belarus); Callegari, Th.; Sokoloff, J. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE, Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the ability to develop one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure in X-band waveguide solely by using the positive columns of glow discharges in neon at the middle pressure. Plasma inhomogeneities are distributed uniformly along a typical X-band waveguide with cross section of 23?×?10?mm{sup 2}. It is shown that electron densities larger than 10{sup 14?}cm{sup ?3} are needed in order to create an effective one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure. Some applications for using the one-dimensional electromagnetic band gap structure in waveguide as a control of microwave (broadband filter and device for variation of pulse duration) are demonstrated.

  10. Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  11. Defect-Band Emission Photoluminescence Imaging on Multi-Crystalline Si Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, F.; Johnston, S.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Defect-band photoluminescence (PL) imaging with an InGaAs camera was applied to multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers, which were taken from different heights of different Si bricks. Neighboring wafers were picked at six different processing steps, from as-cut to post-metallization. By using different cut-off filters, we were able to separate the band-to-band emission images from the defect-band emission images. On the defect-band emission images, the bright regions that originate from the grain boundaries and defect clusters were extracted from the PL images. The area fraction percentage of these regions at various processing stages shows a correlation with the final cell electrical parameters.

  12. Effects of CO2 on H2O band profiles and band strengths in mixed H2O:CO2 ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karin I. Oberg; Helen J. Fraser; A. C. Adwin Boogert; Suzanne E. Bisschop; Guido W. Fuchs; Ewine F. van Dishoeck; Harold Linnartz

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    H2O is the most abundant component of astrophysical ices. In most lines of sight it is not possible to fit both the H2O 3 um stretching, the 6 um bending and the 13 um libration band intensities with a single pure H2O spectrum. Recent Spitzer observations have revealed CO2 ice in high abundances and it has been suggested that CO2 mixed into H2O ice can affect relative strengths of the 3 um and 6 um bands. We used laboratory infrared transmission spectroscopy of H2O:CO2 ice mixtures to investigate the effects of CO2 on H2O ice spectral features at 15-135 K. We find that the H2O peak profiles and band strengths are significantly different in H2O:CO2 ice mixtures compared to pure H2O ice. In all H2O:CO2 mixtures, a strong free-OH stretching band appears around 2.73 um, which can be used to put an upper limit on the CO2 concentration in the H2O ice. The H2O bending mode profile also changes drastically with CO2 concentration; the broad pure H2O band gives way to two narrow bands as the CO2 concentration is increased. This makes it crucial to constrain the environment of H2O ice to enable correct assignments of other species contributing to the interstellar 6 um absorption band. The amount of CO2 present in the H2O ice of B5:IRS1 is estimated by simultaneously comparing the H2O stretching and bending regions and the CO2 bending mode to laboratory spectra of H2O, CO2, H2O:CO2 and HCOOH.

  13. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Work Plan for Corrective Action Unit 329: Area 22 Desert Rock Airstrip Fuel Spill, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Draft of Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared as a characterization and closure report for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 329: Area 22, Desert Rock Airstrip (DRA) Fuel Spill identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site, consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 22-44-01, which encompasses an area contaminated by three recorded spills from a 25,000-gallon underground fuel storage tank. The tank was installed in 1980 and was imbedded in sand and gravel approximately 16 feet below the ground surface. Historically, the DRA consisted of a single runway, several portable buildings, two underground storage tanks containing aviation jet fuel, and plumbing to several refueling areas on the ramp. The constituents of potential concern from the spill were total petroleum hydrocarbons as gasoline or JP-4. This provides the methodology for sampling contaminated soil-vapor and soil to determine what activities, if any, are required for closure of this si te. In addition, there is sufficient process knowledge of the tank's historical use to recommend closure of CAU 329 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process. This process combines elements of the Data Quality Objectives process and the observational approach to help plan and conduct corrective actions. The study concluded that the spill is localized; therefore, it is very unlikely that the underground water supply has been or will be affected by these spills. In addition, there were high levels of carbon dioxide detected above the release which indicate that the spill is currently in the process of undergoing biological degradation and is not migrating. This CAU has been approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to be moved into Appendix III of the FFACO. Closure is expected to be in-place with administrative controls and soil-vapor sampling. A closure report will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval upo n completion of the field activities.

  14. A Generalized {ital K} Correction for Type Ia Supernovae: Comparing {ital R}-band Photometry Beyond {ital z=9.2} with B,V, and {ital R}-band Nearby Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodbar, Ariel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    spectroscopically peculiar supernovae, and to search for anyK Correction for Type Ia Supernovae: Comparing R-bandK Correction for Type Ia Supernovae: Comparing R-band

  15. Valence band hybridization in N-rich GaN1-xAsx alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Denlinger, J.D.; Shan, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Kimura, A.; Tang, H.F.; Kuech, T.F.

    2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used photo-modulated transmission and optical absorption spectroscopies to measure the composition dependence of interband optical transitions in N-rich GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} alloys with x up to 0.06. The direct bandgap gradually decreases as x increases. In the dilute x limit, the observed band gap approaches 2.8 eV; this limiting value is attributed to a transition between the As localized level, which has been previously observed in As-doped GaN at 0.6 eV above the valence band maximum in As-doped GaN, and the conduction band minimum. The structure of the valence band of GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} is explained by the hybridization of the localized As states with the extended valence band states of GaN matrix. The hybridization is directly confirmed by soft x-ray emission experiments. To describe the electronic structure of the GaN{sub 1-x}As{sub x} alloys in the entire composition range a linear interpolation is used to combine the effects of valence band hybridization in N-rich alloys with conduction band anticrossing in As-rich alloys.

  16. Two-zone heterogeneous structure within shear bands of a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yang; Yao, Kefu; Liu, Xue [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Mo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Shear bands, the main plastic strain carrier in metallic glasses, are severely deformed regions often considered as disordered and featureless. Here we report the observations of a sandwich-like heterogeneous structure inside shear bands in Pd{sub 40.5}Ni{sub 40.5}P{sub 19} metallic glass sample after plastic deformation by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results suggest a two-step plastic deformation mechanism with corresponding microstructure evolution at atomic scale, which may intimately connected to the stability of the shear band propagation and the overall plastic deformability.

  17. A narrow-band speckle-free light source via random Raman lasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokr, Brett H; Bixler, Joel N; Dyer, Phillip N; Noojin, Gary D; Redding, Brandon; Thomas, Robert J; Rockwell, Benjamin A; Cao, Hui; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, no light source exists which is both narrow-band and speckle-free with sufficient brightness for full-field imaging applications. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are excellent spatially incoherent sources, but are tens of nanometers broad. Lasers on the other hand can produce very narrow-band light, but suffer from high spatial coherence which leads to speckle patterns which distort the image. Here we propose the use of random Raman laser emission as a new kind of light source capable of providing short-pulsed narrow-band speckle-free illumination for imaging applications.

  18. Investigation of shear-banding mechanism in fully dense nanocrystalline Ni sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Rongtao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Zhou Jianqiu, E-mail: zhouj@njut.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Li Xinbo; Jiang Hua; Ling Xiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolution of shear banding in fully dense electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni was successfully monitored by using a digital image correlation technique under a quasi-static uniaxial tensile load. To investigate the microscopic physical mechanism of the shear banding, in-situ tensile testing for the nanocrystalline Ni sample was conducted in a transmission electron microscope and fracture surface of the sample was examined by field emission scanning electron microscope. The results suggest that grain boundary migration based on atomic diffusion is a main carrier of the shear banding.

  19. Emergence of rotational bands in ab initio no-core configuration interaction calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Caprio; P. Maris; J. P. Vary; R. Smith

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotational bands have been observed to emerge in ab initio no-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations for p-shell nuclei, as evidenced by rotational patterns for excitation energies, electromagnetic moments, and electromagnetic transitions. We investigate the ab initio emergence of nuclear rotation in the Be isotopes, focusing on 9Be for illustration, and make use of basis extrapolation methods to obtain ab initio predictions of rotational band parameters for comparison with experiment. We find robust signatures for rotational motion, which reproduce both qualitative and quantitative features of the experimentally observed bands.

  20. Properties of rotational bands at the spin limit in A $\\sim$ 50, A $\\sim$ 65 and A $\\sim$ 110 nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janzen, V P; Andrews, H R; Ball, G C; Cameron, J A; Cromaz, M; DeGraaf, J; Flibotte, S; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Hackman, G; Headly, D M; Jonkman, J; Mullins, S M; Radford, D C; Ragnarsson, I; Rodríguez, J L; Svensson, C E; Waddington, J C; Ward, D; Zwartz, G

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of rotational bands at the spin limit in A $\\sim$ 50, A $\\sim$ 65 and A $\\sim$ 110 nuclei

  1. Design and Development of Dual Polarized, Stacked Patch Antenna Element for S-Band Dual-Pol Weather Radar Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhardwaj, Shubhendu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Weather Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .for S-Band Weather Radar . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dual-polpatterns of polarimetric weather radars,” Journal of

  2. Ultra-High Gradient Compact S-Band Linac for Laboratory and Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faillace, Luigi; /RadiaBeam Tech.; Agustsson, Ronald; /RadiaBeam Tech.; Frigola, Pedro; /RadiaBeam Tech.; Murokh, Alex; /RadiaBeam Tech.; Dolgashev, Valery; /SLAC; Rosenzweig, James; /UCLA

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing demand from the industrial and research communities for high gradient, compact RF accelerating structures. The commonly used S-band SLAC-type structure has an operating gradient of only about 20 MV/m; while much higher operating gradients (up to 70 MV/m) have been recently achieved in X-band, as a consequence of the substantial efforts by the Next Linear Collider (NLC) collaboration to push the performance envelope of RF structures towards higher accelerating gradients. Currently however, high power X-band RF sources are not readily available for industrial applications. Therefore, RadiaBeam Technologies is developing a short, standing wave S-band structure which uses frequency scaled NLC design concepts to achieve up to a 50 MV/m operating gradient at 2856 MHz. The design and prototype commissioning plans are presented.

  3. Field measurements of a swell band, shore normal, flux divergence reversal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Link, Shmuel G

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout this thesis we will discuss the theoretical background and empirical observation of a swell band shore normal flux divergence reversal. Specifically, we will demonstrate the existence and persistence of the ...

  4. Calculation of wakefields in a 17 GHz beam-driven photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Min

    We present the theoretical analysis and computer simulation of the wakefields in a 17 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) structure for accelerator applications. Using the commercial code CST Particle Studio, the fundamental ...

  5. Dual-band reflectarrays using microstrip ring elements and their applications with various feeding arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Chul Min

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -fed reflectarray antenna has been designed to demonstrate the dual-band circular polarized operation. The proposed ring structure provides many advantages of compact size, more freedom in the selection of element spacing, less blockage between circuit layers...

  6. Tunable frequency band-gap and pulse propagation in a strongly nonlinear diatomic chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. B. Herbold; J. Kim; V. F. Nesterenko; S. Wang; C. Daraio

    2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    One-dimensional nonlinear phononic crystals have been assembled from periodic diatomic chains of stainless steel cylinders alternated with Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) spheres. We report the presence of acoustic band gaps in the dispersion relation of the linearized systems and study the transformation of single and multiple pulses in linear, nonlinear and strongly nonlinear regimes with numerical calculations and experiments. The limiting frequencies of the band gap are within the audible frequency range (20-20,000 Hz) and can be tuned by varying the particle's material properties, mass and initial compression. Pulses rapidly transform within very short distances from the impacted end due to the influence of the band gap in the linear and in nonlinear elastic chains. The effects of an in situ band gap created by a mean dynamic compression are observed in the strongly nonlinear wave regime.

  7. System and Circuit Design Techniques for Silicon-based Multi-band/Multi-standard Receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Nozahi, Mohamed A.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    by the global trend of developing multi-band/multistandard terminals for low-cost and multifunction transceivers. Exploring the unused 10-66 GHz frequency spectrum for high data rate communication is also another trend in the wireless industry...

  8. Band structure engineering through orbital interaction for enhanced thermoelectric power factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Hong; Sun, Wenhao; Ceder, Gerbrand [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Armiento, Rickard [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Lazic, Predrag [Theoretical Physics Division, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka Cesta 54, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Band structure engineering for specific electronic or optical properties is essential for the further development of many important technologies including thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, and microelectronics. In this work, we report orbital interaction as a powerful tool to finetune the band structure and the transport properties of charge carriers in bulk crystalline semiconductors. The proposed mechanism of orbital interaction on band structure is demonstrated for IV-VI thermoelectric semiconductors. For IV-VI materials, we find that the convergence of multiple carrier pockets not only displays a strong correlation with the s-p and spin-orbit coupling but also coincides with the enhancement of power factor. Our results suggest a useful path to engineer the band structure and an enticing solid-solution design principle to enhance thermoelectric performance.

  9. Shear Banding and Spatiotemporal Oscillations in Vortex Matter in Nanostructured Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Reichhardt; C. J. Olson Reichhardt

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple nanostructured pinning array geometry where a rich variety of complex vortex shear banding phenomena can be realized. A single row of pinning sites is removed from a square pinning array. Shear banding effects arise when vortex motion in the pin-free channel nucleates motion of vortices in the surrounding pinned regions, creating discrete steps in the vortex velocity profile away from the channel. Near the global depinning transition, the width of the band of moving vortices undergoes oscillations or fluctuations that can span the entire system. We use simulations to show that these effects should be observable in the transport properties of the system. Similar large oscillations and shear banding effects are known to occur for sheared complex fluids in which different dynamical phases coexist.

  10. Zone folding effect in Raman G-band intensity of twisted bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dresselhaus, Mildred

    The G-band Raman intensity is calculated for twisted bilayer graphene as a function of laser excitation energy based on the extended tight binding method. Here we explicitly consider the electron-photon and electron-phonon ...

  11. Investigation of shear banding in three-dimensional foams G. Ovarlez1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stress, this leads to the viscosity bifurcation phenomenon [8,9]. This implies that, in addition) and shear-induced resuspension [11]. Some yield stress fluids seem not to exhibit shear banding, although

  12. Investigation of shear banding in three-dimensional foams G. Ovarlez1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    average is equal to macro. In macroscopic rheo- metric experiments, under applied stress, this leads-induced resuspension [11]. Some yield stress fluids seem not to exhibit shear banding, although experiments only

  13. Rock Bands/Rock Brands: Mediation and Musical Performance in Post-liberalization Bangalore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coventry, Chloe Louise

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the Delhi-based electronica band Midival Punditz (Murthymoney and listening to electronica at swanky clubs; rather,in a kind of lo-fi electronica that is meant to document

  14. F. J. Wild A. C. Jones A. W. Tudhope Investigation of luminescent banding in solid coral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REPORT F. J. Wild á A. C. Jones á A. W. Tudhope Investigation of luminescent banding in solid coral-Verlag 2000 F. J. Wild á A. C. Jones (&) Department of Chemistry, The University of Edinburgh, King

  15. arecibo l-band feed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Galactic studies with the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) is conducting a neutral hydrogen (HI) survey of the whole Arecibo sky (declination range from -1 to 38 degrees), with...

  16. Narrow-Band Absorption-Enhanced Quantum Dot/J-Aggregate Conjugates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Brian J.

    We report narrow-band absorption enhancement of semiconductor nanocrystals via Förster resonance energy transfer from cyanine J-aggregates. These J-aggregated dyes associate electrostatically with short quantum-dot (QD) ...

  17. Parametric representation of wave propagation in nonuniform media (both in transmission and stop bands)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Popov; V. Kovalchuk

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical approach based on the parametric representation of the wave propagation in nonuniform media was considered. In addition to the previously developed theory of parametric antiresonance describing the field attenuation in stop bands, in the present paper the behaviour of the Bloch wave in a transmission band was investigated. A wide class of exact solutions was found and the correspondence to the quasi-periodic Floquet solutions was shown.

  18. On a Limiting Distribution of Singular Values of Random Band Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Lytova; Leonid Pastur

    2015-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An equation is obtained for the Stieltjes transform of the normalized distribution of singular values of non-symmetric band random matrices in the limit when the band width and rank of the matrix simultaneously tend to infinity. Conditions under which this limit agrees with the quarter-circle law are found. An interesting particular case of lower triangular random matrices is also considered and certain properties of the corresponding limiting singular value distribution are given.

  19. Solar DEM Models : A solar image in color band b, mn pixels,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Solar DEM Models : A solar image in color band b, m×n pixels, containing a particular solar feature, for t = 1, 2, . . . , T. btM sianFieldRandomGaus I M I I bbb T t bbtt bbb bb 2 1 2 )( #12;Solar DEM.bI : the measure error of the ith row and jth column pixel of the certain image in color band b. ijbe #12;Solar DEM

  20. Thermophotovoltaic conversion using selective infrared line emitters and large band gap photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandhorst, Jr., Henry W. (Auburn, AL); Chen, Zheng (Auburn, AL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient thermophotovoltaic conversion can be performed using photovoltaic devices with a band gap in the 0.75-1.4 electron volt range, and selective infrared emitters chosen from among the rare earth oxides which are thermally stimulated to emit infrared radiation whose energy very largely corresponds to the aforementioned band gap. It is possible to use thermovoltaic devices operating at relatively high temperatures, up to about 300.degree. C., without seriously impairing the efficiency of energy conversion.

  1. A high-resolution, four-band SAR testbed with real-time image formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.; Sander, G.; Thompson, M.; Burns, B.; Fellerhoff, R.; Dubbert, D.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the Twin-Otter SAR Testbed developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This SAR is a flexible, adaptable testbed capable of operation on four frequency bands: Ka, Ku, X, and VHF/UHF bands. The SAR features real-time image formation at fine resolution in spotlight and stripmap modes. High-quality images are formed in real time using the overlapped subaperture (OSA) image-formation and phase gradient autofocus (PGA) algorithms.

  2. Band gap engineering for graphene by using Na{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, S. J.; Lee, P. R.; Kim, J. G.; Ryu, M. T.; Park, H. M.; Chung, J. W., E-mail: jwc@postech.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the noble electronic properties of graphene, its industrial application has been hindered mainly by the absence of a stable means of producing a band gap at the Dirac point (DP). We report a new route to open a band gap (E{sub g}) at DP in a controlled way by depositing positively charged Na{sup +} ions on single layer graphene formed on 6H-SiC(0001) surface. The doping of low energy Na{sup +} ions is found to deplete the ?* band of graphene above the DP, and simultaneously shift the DP downward away from Fermi energy indicating the opening of E{sub g}. The band gap increases with increasing Na{sup +} coverage with a maximum E{sub g}?0.70?eV. Our core-level data, C 1s, Na 2p, and Si 2p, consistently suggest that Na{sup +} ions do not intercalate through graphene, but produce a significant charge asymmetry among the carbon atoms of graphene to cause the opening of a band gap. We thus provide a reliable way of producing and tuning the band gap of graphene by using Na{sup +} ions, which may play a vital role in utilizing graphene in future nano-electronic devices.

  3. Valence band structure of the icosahedral Ag-In-Yb quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, H. R.; Simutis, G.; Dhanak, V. R.; Nugent, P. J.; McGrath, R. [Surface Science Research Centre and Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Cui, C. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Shimoda, M. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Tsai, A. P. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Ishii, Y. [Department of Physics, Chuo University, Kasuga, Tokyo 112-8551 (Japan)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The valence band structure of the icosahedral (i) Ag-In-Yb quasicrystal, which is isostructural to the binary i-Cd-Yb system, is investigated by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). Experimental results are compared with electronic-structure calculations of a cubic approximant of the same phase. UPS spectra from the fivefold, threefold, and twofold i-Ag-In-Yb surfaces reveal that the valence band near to the Fermi level is dominated by Yb 4f-derived states, in agreement with calculations. The spectra also exhibit peaks which are surface core level shifted, caused by changes in the electronic structure in surface layers. Calculations yield a pseudogap in the density of states due to a hybridization of the Yb 5d band with the Ag 5p and In 5p bands. Both experimental and calculated band features are very similar to those of Cd-Yb. The modification of the band structure after surface treatment by sputtering and by oxidation is also studied. Additionally, the work function of i-Ag-In-Yb measured from the width of UPS spectrum is found to be almost unaffected by surface orientation, but increases after sputtering or oxidation.

  4. Electronic band structure and optical properties of the cubic, Sc, Y and La hydride systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterman, D.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic band structure calculations are used to interpret the optical spectra of the cubic Sc, Y and La hydride systems. Self-consistent band calculations of ScH/sub 2/ and YH/sub 2/ were carried out. The respective joint densities of states are computed and compared to the dielectric functions determined from the optical measurements. Additional calculations were performed in which the Fermi level or band gap energies are rigidly shifted by a small energy increment. These calculations are then used to simulate the derivative structure in thermomodulation spectra and relate the origin of experimental interband features to the calculated energy bands. While good systematic agreement is obtained for several spectral features, the origin of low-energy interband transitions in YH/sub 2/ cannot be explained by these calculated bands. A lattice-size-dependent premature occupation of octahedral sites by hydrogen atoms in the fcc metal lattice is suggested to account for this discrepancy. Various non-self-consistent calculations are used to examine the effect of such a premature occupation. Measurements of the optical absorptivity of LaH/sub x/ with 1.6 < x < 2.9 are presented which, as expected, indicate a more premature occupation of the octahedral sites in the larger LaH/sub 2/ lattice. These experimental results also suggest that, in contrast to recent calculations, LaH/sub 3/ is a small-band-gap semiconductor.

  5. Band gap structure modification of amorphous anodic Al oxide film by Ti-alloying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canulescu, S., E-mail: stec@fotonik.dtu.dk; Schou, J. [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Rechendorff, K.; Pleth Nielsen, L. [Danish Technological Institute, Kongsvang Alle 29, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Borca, C. N. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V. [ISA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Bordo, K.; Ambat, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The band structure of pure and Ti-alloyed anodic aluminum oxide has been examined as a function of Ti concentration varying from 2 to 20 at.?%. The band gap energy of Ti-alloyed anodic Al oxide decreases with increasing Ti concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that Ti atoms are not located in a TiO{sub 2} unit in the oxide layer, but rather in a mixed Ti-Al oxide layer. The optical band gap energy of the anodic oxide layers was determined by vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy in the energy range from 4.1 to 9.2?eV (300–135?nm). The results indicate that amorphous anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a direct band gap of 7.3?eV, which is about ?1.4?eV lower than its crystalline counterpart (single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Upon Ti-alloying, extra bands appear within the band gap of amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, mainly caused by Ti 3d orbitals localized at the Ti site.

  6. Desert Southwest Region Ten Year...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carcinogenic characteristics, especially the penta and creosote, and the arsenic is a poison that has proven to cause adverse health effects. Many jurisdictions now consider...

  7. DESERT SUNLIGHT | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact UsDepartment of Energyand ENERGY OFFICEDESERT

  8. Desert Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy Offshore Place:WindOilCowalJilinDenaliDesarrolloApple

  9. Phase Angle Effects on 3-micron Absorption Band on Ceres: Implications for Dawn Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takir, Driss; Sanchez, Juan A; Corre, Lucille Le; Hardersen, Paul S; Nathues, Andreas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase angle-induced spectral effects are important to characterize since they affect spectral band parameters such as band depth and band center, and therefore skew mineralogical interpretations of planetary bodies via reflectance spectroscopy. Dwarf planet (1) Ceres is the next target of NASA's Dawn mission, which is expected to arrive in March 2015. The visible and near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) onboard Dawn has the spatial and spectral range to characterize the surface between 0.25-5.0 microns. Ceres has an absorption feature at 3.0 microns due to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing minerals (e.g. Lebofsky et al. 1981, Rivkin et al. 2003). We analyzed phase angle-induced spectral effects on the 3-micron absorption band on Ceres using spectra measured with the long-wavelength cross-dispersed (LXD: 1.9-4.2 microns) mode of the SpeX spectrograph/imager at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Ceres LXD spectra were measured at different phase angles ranging from 0.7o to 22o. We found that the band...

  10. Apparatus for producing a thin sample band in a microchannel system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Stewart K. (Livermore, CA; , Nilson, Robert H. (Cardiff, CA)

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention improves the performance of microchannel systems for chemical and biological synthesis and analysis by providing a method and apparatus for producing a thin band of a species sample. Thin sample bands improve the resolution of microchannel separation processes, as well as many other processes requiring precise control of sample size and volume. The new method comprises a series of steps in which a species sample is manipulated by controlled transport through a junction formed at the intersection of four or more channels. A sample is first inserted into the end of one of these channels in the vicinity of the junction. Next, this sample is thinned by transport across the junction one or more times. During these thinning steps, flow enters the junction through one of the channels and exists through those remaining, providing a divergent flow field that progressively stretches and thins the band with each traverse of the junction. The thickness of the resulting sample band may be smaller than the channel width. Moreover, the thickness of the band may be varied and controlled by altering the method alone, without modification to the channel or junction geometries. The invention is applicable to both electroosmotic and electrophoretic transport, to combined electrokinetic transport, and to some special cases in which bulk fluid transport is driven by pressure gradients. It is further applicable to channels that are open, filled with a gel or filled with a porous or granular material.

  11. M dwarf luminosity, radius, and $\\alpha$-enrichment from $I$-band spectral features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrien, Ryan C; Bender, Chad F; Deshpande, Rohit; Robertson, Paul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the ubiquity of M dwarfs and their growing importance to studies of exoplanets, Galactic evolution, and stellar structure, methods for precisely measuring their fundamental stellar properties remain elusive. Existing techniques for measuring M dwarf luminosity, mass, radius, or composition are calibrated over a limited range of stellar parameters or require expensive observations. We find a strong correlation between the $K_S$-band luminosity ($M_K$), the observed strength of the $I$-band sodium doublet absorption feature, and [Fe/H] in M dwarfs without strong H$\\alpha$ emission. We show that the strength of this feature, coupled with [Fe/H] and spectral type, can be used to derive M dwarf $M_K$ and radius without requiring parallax. Additionally, we find promising evidence that the strengths of the $I$-band sodium doublet and the nearby $I$-band calcium triplet may jointly indicate $\\alpha$-element enrichment. The use of these $I$-band features requires only moderate-resolution near-infrared spectros...

  12. Reading data stored in the state of metastable defects in silicon using band-band photoluminescence: Proof of concept and physical limits to the data storage density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rougieux, F. E.; Macdonald, D. [Research School of Engineering, College of Engineering and Computer Science, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of bistable defects in crystalline silicon such as iron-boron pairs or the boron-oxygen defect can be changed at room temperature. In this letter, we experimentally demonstrate that the chemical state of a group of defects can be changed to represent a bit of information. The state can then be read without direct contact via the intensity of the emitted band-band photoluminescence signal of the group of defects, via their impact on the carrier lifetime. The theoretical limit of the information density is then computed. The information density is shown to be low for two-dimensional storage but significant for three-dimensional data storage. Finally, we compute the maximum storage capacity as a function of the lower limit of the photoluminescence detector sensitivity.

  13. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  14. Atomistic full-band simulations of monolayer MoS{sub 2} transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jiwon; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K. [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)] [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the transport properties of deeply scaled monolayer MoS{sub 2} n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), using full-band ballistic quantum transport simulations, with an atomistic tight-binding Hamiltonian obtained from density functional theory. Our simulations suggest that monolayer MoS{sub 2} MOSFETs can provide near-ideal subthreshold slope, suppression of drain-induced barrier lowering, and gate-induced drain leakage. However, these full-band simulations exhibit limited transconductance. These ballistic simulations also exhibit negative differential resistance (NDR) in the output characteristics associated with the narrow width in energy of the lowest conduction band, but this NDR may be substantially reduced or eliminated by scattering in MoS{sub 2}.

  15. High-Q band edge mode of plasmonic crystals studied by cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Naoki, E-mail: nyamamot@phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the quality factor (Q-factor) of the band edge modes in the plasmonic crystal by a cathodoluminescence technique. We have found that the Q-factor at the ? point depends on the terrace width (D)/period (P) ratio of the plasmonic crystal. The finite-difference time-domain methods predict that the band edge mode at D/P?=?3/4 has a high-Q-factor (Q???250 by Palik's permittivity data and Q???530 by Johnson and Christy's data). The beam-scan spectral images allowed us to visualize the standing surface plasmon polariton waves at the band edge energies, and a high-Q-factor of ?200 was observed at D/P???3/4.

  16. Predicted band structures of III-V semiconductors in wurtzite phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrit De; Craig E. Pryor

    2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    While non-nitride III-V semiconductors typically have a zincblende structure, they may also form wurtzite crystals under pressure or when grown as nanowhiskers. This makes electronic structure calculation difficult since the band structures of wurtzite III-V semiconductors are poorly characterized. We have calculated the electronic band structure for nine III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase using transferable empirical pseudopotentials including spin-orbit coupling. We find that all the materials have direct gaps. Our results differ significantly from earlier {\\it ab initio} calculations, and where experimental results are available (InP, InAs and GaAs) our calculated band gaps are in good agreement. We tabulate energies, effective masses, and linear and cubic Dresselhaus zero-field spin-splitting coefficients for the zone-center states. The large zero-field spin-splitting coefficients we find may lead to new functionalities for designing devices that manipulate spin degrees of freedom.

  17. Investigation of crystalline and electronic band alignment properties of GaP/Ge(111) heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixit, V. K.; Kumar, Shailendra; Singh, S. D.; Khamari, S. K.; Kumar, R.; Tiwari, Pragya; Sharma, T. K.; Oak, S. M. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Phase, D. M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452001 (India)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium phosphide (GaP) epitaxial layer and nanostructures are grown on n-Ge(111) substrates using metal organic vapour phase epitaxy. It is confirmed by high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements that the layer is highly crystalline and oriented with the coexistence of two domains, i.e., GaP(111)A and GaP(111)B, with an angle of 60° between them due to the formation of a wurtzite monolayer at the interface. The valence band offset between GaP and Ge is 0.7?±?0.1?eV as determined from the valence band onsets and from Kraut's method. A band alignment diagram for GaP/Ge/GeOx is also constructed which can be used to design monolithic optoelectronic integrated circuits.

  18. Dynamical generation of Floquet Majorana flat bands in s-wave superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrit Poudel; Gerardo Ortiz; Lorenza Viola

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present quantum control techniques to engineer flat bands of symmetry-protected Majorana edge modes in s-wave superconductors. Specifically, we show how periodic control may be employed for designing time-independent effective Hamiltonians, which support $Floquet$ $Majorana$ $flat$ $bands$, starting from equilibrium conditions that are either topologically trivial or only support individual Majorana pairs. In the first approach, a suitable modulation of the chemical potential simultaneously induces Majorana flat bands and dynamically $activates$ a pre-existing chiral symmetry which is responsible for their protection. In the second approach, the application of effective parity kicks dynamically $generates$ a desired chiral symmetry by suppressing chirality-breaking terms in the static Hamiltonian. Our results demonstrate how the use of time-dependent control enlarges the range of possibilities for realizing gapless topological superconductivity, potentially enabling access to topological states of matter that have no known equilibrium counterpart.

  19. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Sandhya (Bloomington, MN); Tuttle, Gary L. (Ames, IA); Sigalas, Mihail (Ames, IA); McCalmont, Jonathan S. (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA)

    2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  20. ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION OF WEAK G BAND STARS: CNO AND Li ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczak, Jens; Lambert, David L., E-mail: adamczak@astro.as.utexas.edu [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We determined the chemical composition of a large sample of weak G band stars-a rare class of G and K giants of intermediate mass with unusual abundances of C, N, and Li. We have observed 24 weak G band stars with the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory and derived spectroscopic abundances for C, N, O, and Li, as well as for selected elements from Na-Eu. The results show that the atmospheres of weak G band stars are highly contaminated with CN-cycle products. The C underabundance is about a factor of 20 larger than for normal giants and the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio approaches the CN-cycle equilibrium value. In addition to the striking CN-cycle signature the strong N overabundance may indicate the presence of partially ON-cycled material in the atmospheres of the weak G band stars. The exact mechanism responsible for the transport of the elements to the surface has yet to be identified but could be induced by rapid rotation of the main sequence progenitors of the stars. The unusually high Li abundances in some of the stars are an indicator for Li production by the Cameron-Fowler mechanism. A quantitative prediction of a weak G band star's Li abundance is complicated by the strong temperature sensitivity of the mechanism and its participants. In addition to the unusual abundances of CN-cycle elements and Li, we find an overabundance of Na that is in accordance with the NeNa chain running in parallel with the CN cycle. Apart from these peculiarities, the element abundances in a weak G band star's atmosphere are consistent with those of normal giants.

  1. Chemical banding revealed by chemical etching in a cold-rolled metastable stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celada, C., E-mail: c.celada@cenim.csic.es [MATERALIA Research Group, Department of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Toda-Caraballo, I., E-mail: it247@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Kim, B., E-mail: bnk20@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); San Martín, D., E-mail: dsm@cenim.csic.es [MATERALIA Research Group, Department of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The current work describes the metallographic characterization of the initial microstructure of a cold rolled precipitation hardening semi-austenitic stainless steel (12Cr–9Ni–4Mo–2Cu–1Ti, in wt.%). The use of the Lichtenegger and Blöch (L–B) color etching solution has been shown to reveal not only the phases present in the microstructure, but also the existence of chemical banding along the rolling direction. The L–B reagent has been found to color the microstructure in bands depending on what alloying elements have segregated to each band. Two-dimensional electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) maps have shown that Ni, Cu and Ti segregate together in the bands, while Cr has an opposite behavior. Mo has a mixed segregation behavior although much weaker than the other elements and more prompt to segregate like Ni does. A direct comparison of light optical micrographs with the EPMA maps of the same area of the microstructure has enable to establish a direct relationship between the alloying element band concentration and the resulting etching color contrast obtained with the L–B reagent. Thermodynamic calculations predict that solidification in this steel takes place with ferrite as the primary phase. Equilibrium partitioning coefficient calculations seem to support the observed segregation patterns. - Highlights: • A cold rolled metastable stainless steel has been characterized thoroughly. • EPMA shows that Ni, Cu and Ti segregate together; Cr in an opposite way. • L–B color etching is sensitive to the segregation of these chemical elements. • This chemical banding has been reduced by applying a homogenization heat treatment. • Partitioning coefficient calculations agree with the observed segregation patterns.

  2. Near-field scanning optical microscopy as a simultaneous probe of fields and band structure of photonic crystals: A computational study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    optical microscopy NSOM imaging to simultaneously obtain both the eigenfield distribution and the band

  3. RF design of X-band RF deflector for femtosecond diagnostics of LCLS electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgashev, Valery A.; Wang Juwen [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA, 94025 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We designed a successful constant impedance traveling wave X-band rf deflector for electron beam diagnostics at the 14 GeV SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This is the first practical deflector built with a waveguide coupler. The 1-meter rf deflector produces 24 MeV peak transverse kick when powered with 20 MW of 11.424 GHz rf. The design is based on our experience with high gradient X-band accelerating structures. Several deflectors of this design have been built at SLAC and are currently in use. Here we describe the design and distinguishing features of this device.

  4. New Analytical Approach for Computation of Band Structure in One-dimensional Periodic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sina Khorasani; Ali Adibi

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a new approach for the exact calculation of band structure in one-dimensional periodic media, such as photonic crystals and superlattices, based on the recently reported differential transfer matrix method (DTMM). The media analyzed in this paper can have arbitrary profile of refractive index. We derive a closed form dispersion equation using differential transfer matrix formalism, and simplify it under the assumptions of even symmetry and real-valued wavenumber. We also show that under normal incidence both TE and TM modes must have the same band structure. Several numerical test cases are also studied and discussed.

  5. A Minimal Two-band Model for the Superconducting Fe-pnictides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghu, S.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the discovery of the Fe-pnictide superconductors, LDA band structure calculations showed that the dominant contributions to the spectral weight near the Fermi energy came from the Fe 3d orbitals. The Fermi surface is characterized by two hole surfaces around the {Lambda} point and two electron surfaces around the M point of the 2 Fe/cell Brillouin zone. Here, we describe a 2-band model that reproduces the topology of the LDA Fermi surface and exhibits both ferromagnetic and q = ({pi}, 0) spin density wave (SDW) fluctuations. We argue that this minimal model contains the essential low energy physics of these materials.

  6. Direct measurements of band gap grading in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, M P; Zhang, Y; Kiowski, O; Powalla, M; Lemmer, U; Slobodskyy, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct measurements of depth-resolved band gap variations of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers. A new measurement technique combining parallel measurements of local thin-film interference and spectral photoluminescence was developed for this purpose. We find sample-dependent correlation parameters between measured band gap depth and composition profiles, and emphasize the importance of direct measurements. These results bring a quantitative insight into the electronic properties of the solar cells and open a new way to analyze parameters that determine the efficiency of solar cells.

  7. Measurement of wakefield suppression in a detuned x-band accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Higo, T.; Kubo, K.; Miller, R.; Ruth, R.; Thompson, K.; Wang, J.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is underway at SLAC to develop accelerator structures for a next generation linear collider. A full-scale prototype X-band structure has been built in which the dipole mode frequencies were detuned to suppress the long-range transverse wakefield by about two orders of magnitude. To verify that the detuning works as expected, a facility to measure the long-range wakefield, called the Accelerator Structure SETup, or ASSET, was constructed in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). This paper presents the results from the measurement of the prototype X-band structure with this facility.

  8. Direct measurements of band gap grading in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. P. Heinrich; Z-H. Zhang; Y. Zhang; O. Kiowski; M. Powalla; U. Lemmer; A. Slobodskyy

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct measurements of depth-resolved band gap variations of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers. A new measurement technique combining parallel measurements of local thin-film interference and spectral photoluminescence was developed for this purpose. We find sample-dependent correlation parameters between measured band gap depth and composition profiles, and emphasize the importance of direct measurements. These results bring a quantitative insight into the electronic properties of the solar cells and open a new way to analyze parameters that determine the efficiency of solar cells.

  9. Surface Plasmon Polariton Assisted Optical Switching in Noble Metal Nanoparticle Systems: A Sub-Band Gap Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhara, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a proposed book chapter surface plasmon polariton assisted optical switching in noble metal nanoparticle systems is discussed in the sub-band gap formalism.

  10. L & M band infrared studies of V4332 Sagittarii - detection of the water-ice absorption band at 3.05 microns and the CO fundamental band in emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dipankar P. K. Banerjee; Watson P. Varricatt; Nagarhalli M. Ashok

    2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    L and M band observations of the nova-like variable V4332 Sgr are presented. Two significant results are obtained viz. the unusual detection of water ice at 3.05 microns and the fundamental band of 12CO at 4.67 microns in emission. The ice feature is a first detection in a nova-like variable while the CO emission is rarely seen in novae. These results, when considered together with other existing data, imply that V4332 Sgr could be a young object surrounded by a circumstellar disc containing gas, dust and ice. The reason for a nova-like outburst to occur in such a system is unclear. But since planets are believed to form in such disks, it appears plausible that the enigmatic outburst of V4332 Sgr could be due to a planetary infall. We also give a more reliable estimate for an epoch of dust formation around V4332 Sgr which appears to have taken place rather late in 1999 - nearly five years after its outburst.

  11. Infrared Spectroscopy of H3O : The 1 Fundamental Band Jian Tang and Takeshi Oka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oka, Takeshi

    Infrared Spectroscopy of H3O : The 1 Fundamental Band Jian Tang and Takeshi Oka Department, Illinois 60637 E-mail: t-oka@uchicago.edu Received December 24, 1998 The infrared spectrum of H3O 113.6(1)°. © 1999 Academic Press Key Words: infrared spectroscopy; H3O ; vibration

  12. A Near-Infrared Stellar Spectral Library: III. J-Band Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind C. Ranade; N. M. Ashok; Harinder P. Singh; Ranjan Gupta

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the third in the series of papers published on near-infrared (NIR) stellar spectral library by Ranade et al. (2004 & 2007). The observations were carried out with 1.2 meter Gurushikhar Infrared Telescope (GIRT), at Mt. Abu, India using a NICMOS3 HgCdTe $256 \\times 256$ NIR array based spectrometer. In paper I (Ranade et al. 2004), H-band spectra of 135 stars at a resolution of $\\sim 16$\\AA & paper II (Ranade et al. 2007), K band spectra of 114 stars at a resolution of $\\sim 22$\\AA were presented. The J-band library being released now consists of 126 stars covering spectral types O5--M8 and luminosity classes I--V. The spectra have a moderate resolution of $\\sim 12.5$\\AA in the J band and have been continuum shape corrected to their respective effective temperatures. The complete set of library in near-infrared (NIR) will serve as a good database for researchers working in the field of stellar population synthesis. The complete library in J, H & K is available online at: http://vo.iucaa.ernet.in/$\\sim$voi/NIR\\_Header.html

  13. FRACTAL SHAPED MICROSTRIP COUPLED LINE BAND PASS FILTERS FOR SUPPRESSION OF 2ND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    1 FRACTAL SHAPED MICROSTRIP COUPLED LINE BAND PASS FILTERS FOR SUPPRESSION OF 2ND HARMONIC Il Kwon Koch fractal curves are proposed for the first time. These filters are fabricated on Liquid Crystal, the 2nd harmonic of fractal filters can be significantly suppressed through the use of fractal shapes

  14. Broad-band microwave imaging spectroscopy with a solar-dedicated array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and to study energy release and particle energization in transient events, requires a solarBroad-band microwave imaging spectroscopy with a solar-dedicated array T.S. Bastiana, D.E. Garyb, S of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 dSolar Astronomy 264-33, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 ABSTRACT For many

  15. The effect of a multivalley energy band structure on the thermoelectric figure of merit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-49 The effect of a multivalley energy band structure on the thermoelectric figure of merit D. M A comparison is drawn between the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit of a multivalleyed semiconductor a multivalleyed semiconductor in thermoelectric applications it is concluded that the beneficial effect

  16. Synchronous Ultra-Wide Band Wireless Sensors Networks for oil and gas exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savazzi, Stefano

    Synchronous Ultra-Wide Band Wireless Sensors Networks for oil and gas exploration Stefano Savazzi1 of new oil and gas reservoir. Seismic exploration requires a large number (500 ÷ 2000 nodes, MAC and network layer to develop wireless sensors networks tailored for oil (and gas) exploration

  17. Intensity profiles of superdeformed bands in Pb isotopes in a two-level mixing model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, A. N.; Szigeti, S. S.; Rogers, J. I. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Davidson, P. M. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Cardamone, D. M. [Physics Department, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed two-level mixing model of the decay out of superdeformed bands is applied to examine the loss of flux from the yrast superdeformed bands in {sup 192}Pb, {sup 194}Pb, and {sup 196}Pb. Probability distributions for decay to states at normal deformations are calculated at each level. The sensitivity of the results to parameters describing the levels at normal deformation and their coupling to levels in the superdeformed well is explored. It is found that except for narrow ranges of the interaction strength coupling the states, the amount of intensity lost is primarily determined by the ratio of {gamma} decay widths in the normal and superdeformed wells. It is also found that while the model can accommodate the observed fractional intensity loss profiles for decay from bands at relatively high excitation, it cannot accommodate the similarly abrupt decay from bands at lower energies if standard estimates of the properties of the states in the first minimum are employed.

  18. Characterization of Graphene-based Nano-antennas in the Terahertz Band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Characterization of Graphene-based Nano-antennas in the Terahertz Band (Invited Paper) Ignacio and Communication Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 16640 Kista, Sweden Email: lemme@kth.se Abstract--Graphene communications at the nanoscale. Indeed, graphene- based nano-antennas just a few micrometers in size have been

  19. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE 37 (2002) 2441 2446 Influence of L uders bands on magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clapham, Lynann

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is primarily utilized for the detection of corrosion defects in oil and gas pipelines [6, 7]. As most and gas pipelines during in-service aging act as stress raisers as these pipelines are operated at up. The MFL results indicate that magnetic flux leaks out into the air from regions with L ¨uders bands due

  20. Off-The-Grid X-band Weather Radar Network for the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    and target. CayeyNWS radar Mayaguez The Problem #12;Puerto Rico Test Bed · Multi-level Research Team · Low · Relay Stations #12;Network Node · Weather Radar · Processing Computer · Wireless Link #12;X-Band Weather cost · Better Merging algorithms · More Radars.... #12;PR Test Bed Team #12;Questions · ??? #12;Live

  1. Goncu, JASA-EL Exploiting pattern transformation to tune phononic band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    .05 × 103 kg/m3 , Young's modulus Er = 360 kPa, shear modulus Gr = 120 kPa and longitudinal speed of sound . The attenuation of electromagnetic, acoustic or elastic waves in certain frequency ranges known as band gaps numerically the propagation of elastic waves in a 2D bi-disperse granular crystal composed of large (and soft

  2. PHYSICAL NATURE OF SHEAR BANDS FORMATION AND CONSTITUTIVE MODELLING FOR PLASTIC INSTABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    697 PHYSICAL NATURE OF SHEAR BANDS FORMATION AND CONSTITUTIVE MODELLING FOR PLASTIC INSTABILITYtokrzyska 21,00-049 Warsaw,Poland Revue Phys. Appl. 23 (1988) 697 AVRIL 1988, Studies of plastic deformation dependent hardening property can be pivotal in the modelling for plastic deform- ation instability

  3. Sea ice extent mapping using Ku band scatterometer data Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Sea ice extent mapping using Ku band scatterometer data Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long enhancement techniques can be used to increase the utility of scatterometer data in monitoring sea-ice extent is the incidence angle dependence of o . Dual-polarization A and B parameters are used to identify sea ice

  4. STRUCTURE DE BANDES DES CRISTAUX DE TYPE WURTZITE TRANSITIONS OPTIQUES INTRINSQUES DANS LE CdS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    825. STRUCTURE DE BANDES DES CRISTAUX DE TYPE WURTZITE TRANSITIONS OPTIQUES INTRINSČQUES DANS LE Cd Brillouin pour des cristaux de type wurtzite est déduite des considérations de la théorie des groupes. Le Cd d'excitons. Un second article traite le problčme de l'exciton dans les cristaux de type wurtzite

  5. Unoccupied band structure of wurtzite GaN,,0001... T. Valla and P. D. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Unoccupied band structure of wurtzite GaN,,0001... T. Valla and P. D. Johnson Department of Physics of the unoccupied states of thin-film n-type wurtzite GaN. For incident electron energies below 30 eV, free of electronic devices based on heteroepitaxially grown wurtzite films of these nitrides.1 Extensive investiga

  6. Bandgap and band discontinuity in wurtzite/zincblende GaAs homomaterial heterostructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalish, Ilan

    Bandgap and band discontinuity in wurtzite/zincblende GaAs homomaterial heterostructure Ron Gurwitz (Received 28 January 2012; accepted 21 April 2012; published online 9 May 2012) A wurtzite GaAs epilayer photovoltage spectroscopy. The wurtzite structure of the epilayer is disclosed by scanning electron microscope

  7. Band offsets at zincblende-wurtzite GaAs nanowire sidewall surfaces P. Capiod,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Band offsets at zincblende-wurtzite GaAs nanowire sidewall surfaces P. Capiod,1 T. Xu,1,2 J. P. Nys of zincblende (ZB)-wurtzite (WZ) GaAs nanowires are investigated by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and density inclusions consisting of zinc-blende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) segments form during the growth of NWs and where

  8. Photonic band structures of periodic arrays of pores in a metallic host

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroud, David

    . Scherer, O. Painter, B. D'Urso, R. Lee, and A. Yariv, "InGaAsP photonic band gap crystal membrane mi Crystal Waveguides," Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3787­3790 (1996). 6. O. Painter, R. K. Lee, A. Scherer, A. Yariv Spontaneous Emission in Solid-State Physics and Electronics," Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 2059­2062 (1987). 4. A

  9. A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in-situ, wireless soil sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    1 A low RF-band impedance spectroscopy based sensor for in-situ, wireless soil sensing Gunjan of impedance spectroscopy. Impedance measurement at multiple frequencies is done by comparing the amplitude impedance of the board in the measurements to minimize the errors. Measurements of both real and imaginary

  10. New Reconfigurable Power Divider Based on Radial Waveguide and Cylindrical Electromagnetic Band Gap Structure for Low

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Structure for Low Power and Low Cost Smart Antenna Systems Halim Boutayeb, Paul Watson and Toby Kemp AntennaNew Reconfigurable Power Divider Based on Radial Waveguide and Cylindrical Electromagnetic Band Gap halim.boutayeb@huawei.com Abstract--A new low power and low cost technique is proposed for designing

  11. Ultrathin, high-efficiency, broad-band, omni-acceptance, organic solar cells enhanced by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ultrathin, high-efficiency, broad-band, omni- acceptance, organic solar cells enhanced by plasmonic: Three of central challenges in solar cells are high light coupling into solar cell, high light trapping and demonstration of a new ultra-thin high- efficiency organic solar cell (SC), termed "plasmonic cavity

  12. Near-band edge optical properties of exfoliated h-BN layers , J. Barjon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Near-band edge optical properties of exfoliated h-BN layers J. Loayza 1,2 , J. Barjon 2 , A when it is supported by a h-BN film, in particular when mechanically exfoliated from h-BN crystallites layers have been obtained by mechanically exfoliating small crystallites. Exfoliated flakes were reported

  13. Exploiting pattern transformation to tune phononic band gaps in a two-dimensional granular crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) cylinders is investigated numerically. This system was previously shown to undergo a pattern transformation with uniaxial compression by Go¨ncu¨ et al. [Soft Matter 7, 2321 (2011)]. The dispersion relations, or elastic waves in certain frequency ranges known as band gaps is an important feature of these materials

  14. C-band side-entry Ge quantum-well electroabsorption modulator on SOI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David A. B.

    C-band side-entry Ge quantum-well electroabsorption modulator on SOI operating at 1 V swing J. Modulation was due to the quantum-confined Stark effect from ten Ge/SiGe quantum wells epitaxially grown the totally internally reflecting air-SiGe interface and a frustrated total internal reflection from

  15. New multi-rod linear actuator for direct-drive, wide mechanical band pass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    (e.g. gears). This mechanical transmission is required in order to adapt the load to a standard motor), · reducing noise, · increasing movement control, · widening the mechanical band pass, · lowering maintenance. For automation applications, such as command (plane command, hard disk harm) or regulation (vibration

  16. Solar DEM Model Proposal : A solar image in color band b, mn pixels,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Solar DEM Model Proposal : A solar image in color band b, m×n pixels, containing a particular solar 11 )( #12;Solar DEM Model Proposal : the volume (abundance?) of ion ii : the proportion of the total volume at temperature t t T t bitt I i ib MIE 11 )( #12;Solar Dataset · 15 Filters.txt files

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation in Gases with a NarrowBand Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    , France (\\Phi) now at the Institute of Energy and Power Plant Technology, TH Darmstadt, 64287 DarmstadtMonte Carlo Simulation of Radiation in Gases with a Narrow­Band Model and a Net is used for simulation of radiative heat transfers in non­gray gases. The proposed procedure is based

  18. Formation of bands and ridges on Europa by cyclic deformation: Insights from analogue wax experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Formation of bands and ridges on Europa by cyclic deformation: Insights from analogue wax perform a set of analogue wax experiments aimed at understanding the processes and conditions that lead to lineament formation on Europa. We heat a layer of wax from below and cool it from above so that a solid

  19. Unifier: Unifying Cache Management and Communication Buffer Management for PVFS over InfiniBand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panda, Dhabaleswar K.

    , and National Science Foundation's grants #EIA- 9986052, #CCR-0204429, and #CCR-0311542.Ą Work done whileBand Jiesheng Wu1 ˇ Pete Wyckoff2 Dhabaleswar Panda1 Rob Ross3 1 Computer and Information Science The Ohio State Columbus, OH 43212 pw@osc.edu 3 Mathematics and Computer Science Division Argonne National Laboratory

  20. Unifier: Unifying Cache Management and Communication Buffer Management for PVFS over InfiniBand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panda, Dhabaleswar K.

    , and National Science Foundation's grants #EIA- 9986052, #CCR-0204429, and #CCR-0311542.Ą Work done in partBand Jiesheng Wu1 ˇ Pete Wyckoff2 Dhabaleswar Panda1 Rob Ross3 1 Computer and Information Science The Ohio State Columbus, OH 43212 pw@osc.edu 3 Mathematics and Computer Science Division Argonne National Laboratory

  1. A narrow-band high-speed switched-capacitor sixth order bandpass ladder filter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adut, Jozef

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In narrow-band high-speed switched-capacitor filters, the main limitation comes from the capacitance spread and from amplifier settling time. A secondary clock, that averages at an integer fraction of the main clock signal, is used to reduce...

  2. Time-dependent model for diluted magnetic semiconductors including band structure and confinement effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Time-dependent model for diluted magnetic semiconductors including band structure and confinement dynamics in confined diluted magnetic semiconductors induced by laser. The hole-spin relaxation process light-induced magnetization dynamics in ferro- magnetic films and in diluted magnetic semiconductors DMS

  3. High Performance MPI on IBM 12x InfiniBand Architecture Abhinav Vishnu Brad Benton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panda, Dhabaleswar K.

    . Panda Network Based Computing Lab Department of Computer Science and Engineering The Ohio StateHigh Performance MPI on IBM 12x InfiniBand Architecture Abhinav Vishnu Brad Benton Dhabaleswar K University {vishnu, panda}@cse.ohio-state.edu IBM Austin 11501 Burnet Road Austin, TX 78758 {brad.benton}@us.ibm

  4. VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND KU for submission to the university library. Date Dr. David Long Chair, Graduate Committee Accepted of Engineering and Technology #12;ABSTRACT VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER

  5. The Electrical and Band-Gap Properties of Amorphous Zinc-Indium-Tin Oxide Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    MRSEC The Electrical and Band-Gap Properties of Amorphous Zinc-Indium-Tin Oxide Thin Films D Science & Engineering Center For zinc-indium-tin oxide (ZITO) films, grown by pulsed-laser deposition was replaced by substitution with zinc and tin in equal molar proportions (co-substitution). All ZITO films

  6. Energy Band-Gap Engineering of Graphene Nanoribbons Melinda Y. Han,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Philip

    , New York, New York 10027, USA 2 Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027Energy Band-Gap Engineering of Graphene Nanoribbons Melinda Y. Han,1 Barbaros O¨ zyilmaz,2 Yuanbo an energy gap near the charge neutrality point. Individual graphene layers are contacted with metal

  7. High-Efficiency X-Band MMIC GaN Power Amplifiers Operating as Rectifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    High-Efficiency X-Band MMIC GaN Power Amplifiers Operating as Rectifiers Michael Litchfield, Scott two 10 x 100j.Lm power combined devices. The MMICs exhibit 67% and 56% power added efficiency at VDD a RF-to-DC efficiency of 64%. The output powers of the two MMIC PAs are around 3.2W. In rectifier mode

  8. Maximum Theoretical Efficiency Limit of Photovoltaic Devices: Effect of Band Structure on Excited State Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    Maximum Theoretical Efficiency Limit of Photovoltaic Devices: Effect of Band Structure on Excited a theoretical limit for the maximum energy conversion efficiency of single junction photovoltaic cells for the efficiency variations observed for real photovoltaic devices today.4-6 Here, we show that the extractable

  9. A Generalization of the Rainbow Band Separation Attack and its Applications to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recovery Attack, Rainbow, Enhanced STS, Enhanced TTS, MFE, Diophantine Equations, MQQ-Enc, MQQ-Sig 1-trivial generaliza- tion of the well known Unbalanced Oil and Vinegar (UOV) signature scheme (Eurocrypt '99) minimizing the length of the signatures. By now the Rainbow Band Separation attack is the best key recovery

  10. THE EFFECT OF MEMORY INCLUSION ON MUTUAL INFORMATION BETWEEN SPEECH FREQUENCY BANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabal, Peter

    through bandwidth extension (BWE) attempts to regenerate the low (20­300 Hz) and high band (3.4­8 k compatibility with existing networks. In contrast to the abundance of published research on BWE tech- niques. This initial attempt, however, did not present a mean- ingful conclusion in terms of BWE. This work

  11. Low-order-mode harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifier in W band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, Y. S.; Chen, C. H.; Yang, S. J.; Lai, C. H.; Lin, T. Y.; Lo, Y. C.; Hong, J. W. [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Hung, C. L. [Department of Communication Engineering, National Penghu University of Science and Technology, Penghu, Taiwan (China); Chang, T. H. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling-wave amplifiers (gyro-TWAs) allow for magnetic field reduction and frequency multiplication. To avoid absolute instabilities, this work proposes a W-band harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA operating at low-order modes. By amplifying a fundamental harmonic TE{sub 11} drive wave, the second harmonic component of the beam current initiates a TE{sub 21} wave to be amplified. Absolute instabilities in the gyro-TWA are suppressed by shortening the interaction circuit and increasing wall losses. Simulation results reveal that compared with Ka-band gyro-TWTs, the lower wall losses effectively suppress absolute instabilities in the W-band gyro-TWA. However, a global reflective oscillation occurs as the wall losses decrease. Increasing the length or resistivity of the lossy section can reduce the feedback of the oscillation to stabilize the amplifier. The W-band harmonic multiplying gyro-TWA is predicted to yield a peak output power of 111 kW at 98 GHz with an efficiency of 25%, a saturated gain of 26 dB, and a bandwidth of 1.6 GHz for a 60 kV, 7.5 A electron beam with an axial velocity spread of 8%.

  12. Integrated Polymer Optoelectronic Time Delay Device for an X-band Phased Array Antenna System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    Integrated Polymer Optoelectronic Time Delay Device for an X-band Phased Array Antenna System Brie ABSTRACT A 4-bit polymer optoelectronic true time delay device is demonstrated. The device is composed of monolithically integrated, low loss, passive polymer waveguide delay lines and 2x2 polymer thermo-optic switches

  13. InN/GaN Superlattices: Band Structures and Their Pressure Dependence Iza Gorczyca1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svane, Axel Torstein

    InN/GaN Superlattices: Band Structures and Their Pressure Dependence Iza Gorczyca1Ă , Tadek Suski1; published online May 20, 2013 Creation of short-period InN/GaN superlattices is one of the possible ways with one monolayer of InN and 40 monolayers of GaN. The results are compared with calculations performed

  14. Band engineering of GaN/AlN quantum wells by Si dopants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuo, Xiaolong; Ni, Jianchao; Li, Jinchai; Lin, Wei; Cai, Duanjun; Li, Shuping, E-mail: lsp@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: jykang@xmu.edu.cn; Kang, Junyong, E-mail: lsp@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: jykang@xmu.edu.cn [Fujian Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials and Applications, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic properties of GaN/AlN quantum wells are engineered by Si doped in different positions with the aid of the first-principle calculations. The local potential where the dopant located is dragged down as a result of negative center induced by the Si atom, leading to a different shift of the potential, and further affects the band bending and carrier distribution. The band profiles are depicted by analyzing the projected densities of states, it is found that the different positions of Si doping lead to a different band bending owing to the modified polarization fields. The spatial distributions of electrons and holes plotted by the partial charge densities reveal that electrons and holes experience redistribution by Si dopant in different positions. The above results demonstrate that the effect of polarization on the band bending has been significantly modulated by Si doped in different positions. Such modification of electronic structure is especially valuable for the fabrication of GaN/AlN QWs under desired control.

  15. Band gap reduction in GaNSb alloys due to the anion mismatch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veal, T.D.; Piper, L.F.J.; Jollands, S.; Bennett, B.R.; Jefferson, P.H.; Thomas, P.A.; McConville, C.F.; Murdin, B.N.; Buckle, L.; Smith, G.W.; Ashley, T. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 5XH (United Kingdom); QinetiQ Ltd., St. Andrews Road, Malvern, Worcestershire, WR14 3PS (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural and optoelectronic properties in GaN{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x} alloys (0{<=}x<0.02) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on both GaSb substrates and AlSb buffer layers on GaAs substrates are investigated. High-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) and reciprocal space mapping indicate that the GaN{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x} epilayers are of high crystalline quality and the alloy composition is found to be independent of substrate, for identical growth conditions. The band gap of the GaNSb alloys is found to decrease with increasing nitrogen content from absorption spectroscopy. Strain-induced band-gap shifts, Moss-Burstein effects, and band renormalization were ruled out by XRD and Hall measurements. The band-gap reduction is solely due to the substitution of dilute amounts of highly electronegative nitrogen for antimony, and is greater than observed in GaNAs with the same N content.

  16. the normal modes. The appearance of the broad band series between 2700 and 1900 cm1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Haiyi

    density rechargeable lithium-ion batteries self-assembled from graphite oxide nanoplatelets-salt of graphite oxide that ketone functionalities must be present in the GO structure. Deuterium ex- change over graphite oxide imposes a shift of all OH re- lated bands, allowing for clear distinction between C­ OH

  17. A narrow-band high-speed switched-capacitor sixth order bandpass ladder filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adut, Jozef

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In narrow-band high-speed switched-capacitor filters, the main limitation comes from the capacitance spread and from amplifier settling time. A secondary clock, that averages at an integer fraction of the main clock signal, is used to reduce...

  18. OUTFLOWS AND DARK BANDS AT ARCADE-LIKE ACTIVE REGION CORE BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tarr, L. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode have revealed outflows and non-thermal line broadening in low intensity regions at the edges of active regions (ARs). We use data from Hinode's EIS, Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer instrument to investigate the boundaries of arcade-like AR cores for NOAA ARs 11112, 10978, and 9077. A narrow, low intensity region that is observed at the core's periphery as a dark band shows outflows and increased spectral line broadening. This dark band is found to exist for days and appears between the bright coronal loop structures of different coronal topologies. We find a case where the dark band region is formed between the magnetic field from emerging flux and the field of the pre-existing flux. A magnetic field extrapolation indicates that this dark band is coincident with the spine lines or magnetic separatrices in the extrapolated field. This occurs over unipolar regions where the brightened coronal field is separated in connectivity and topology. This separation does not appear to be infinitesimal and an initial estimate of the minimum distance of separation is found to be Almost-Equal-To 1.5-3.5 Mm.

  19. Observation of precursorlike behavior of femtosecond pulses in a dye with a strong absorption band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springer, Matthew M.; Yang, Wenlong; Kolomenski, Alexandre A.; Schuessler, Hans A.; Strohaber, James; Kattawar, George W.; Sokolov, Alexei V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    absorption band and anomalous dispersion at a wavelength of approximately 800 nm. We explore this regime experimentally with sub-10-fs pulses with a central wavelength of approximately 800 nm from a Ti : sapphire oscillator. The pulses are passed through a...

  20. Birds of Prey and the Band-Tailed Pigeon on Isla Guadalupe, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... BIRDS OF PREY AND THE BAND-TAILED PIGEON ON ISLA GUADALUPE, MEXICO JUAN-PABLO GALLO-REYNOSO, Centro de Investigación en Alimentación ... nascent recovery, such studies should be encouraged. Mexico has taken a major step toward the island’s conservation by declaring ...

  1. A Compact X-Band Linac for an X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adolphsen, Chris; Huang, Zhirong; Bane, Karl L.F.; Li, Zenghai; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Faya; Nantista, Christopher D.; /SLAC

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    With the growing demand for FEL light sources, cost issues are being reevaluated. To make the machines more compact, higher frequency room temperature linacs are being considered, specifically ones using C-band (5.7 GHz) rf technology, for which 40 MV/m gradients are achievable. In this paper, we show that an X-band (11.4 GHz) linac using the technology developed for NLC/GLC can provide an even lower cost solution. In particular, stable operation is possible at gradients of 100 MV/m for single bunch operation and 70 MV/m for multibunch operation. The concern, of course, is whether the stronger wakefields will lead to unacceptable emittance dilution. However, we show that the small emittances produced in a 250 MeV, low bunch charge, LCLS-like S-band injector and bunch compressor can be preserved in a multi-GeV X-band linac with reasonable alignment tolerances. The successful lasing and operation of the LCLS [1] has generated world-wide interest in X-ray FELs. The demand for access to such a light source by researchers eager to harness the capabilities of this new tool far exceeds the numbers that can be accommodated, spurring plans for additional facilities. Along with cost, spatial considerations become increasingly important for a hard X-ray machine driven by a multi-GeV linac. The consequent need for high acceleration gradient focuses attention on higher frequency normal conducting accelerator technology, rather than the superconducting technology of a soft X-ray facility like FLASH. C-band technology, such as used by Spring-8, is a popular option, capable of providing 40 MV/m. However, more than a decade of R&D toward an X-band linear collider, centered at SLAC and KEK, has demonstrated that this frequency option can extend the gradient reach to the 70-100 MV/m range. The following design and beam dynamics calculations show an X-band linac to be an attractive choice on which to base an X-ray FEL.

  2. Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adolphsen, C.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wu, J.; /SLAC; Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Several linac driven X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) are being developed to provide high brightness photon beams with very short, tunable wavelengths. In this paper, three XFEL configurations are proposed that achieve LCLS-like performance using X-band linac drivers. These linacs are more versatile, efficient and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. For each of the designs, the overall accelerator layout and the shaping of the bunch longitudinal phase space are described briefly. During the last 40 years, the photon wavelengths from linac driven FELs have been pushed shorter by increasing the electron beam energy and adopting shorter period undulators. Recently, the wavelengths have reached the X-ray range, with FLASH (Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg) and LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) successfully providing users with soft and hard X-rays, respectively. FLASH uses a 1.2 GeV L-band (1.3 GHz) superconducting linac driver and can deliver 10-70 fs FWHM long photon pulses in a wavelength range of 44 nm to 4.1 nm. LCLS uses the last third of the SLAC 3 km S-band (2.856 GHz) normal-conducting linac to produce 3.5 GeV to 15 GeV bunches to generate soft and hard X-rays with good spatial coherence at wavelengths from 2.2 nm to 0.12 nm. Newer XFELs (at Spring8 and PSI) use C-band (5.7 GHz) normal-conducting linac drivers, which can sustain higher acceleration gradients, and hence shorten the linac length, and are more efficient at converting rf energy to bunch energy. The X-band (11.4 GHz) rf technology developed for NLC/GLC offers even higher gradients and efficiencies, and the shorter rf wavelength allows more versatility in longitudinal bunch phase space compression and manipulation. In the following sections, three different configurations of X-band linac driven XFELs are described that operate from 6 to 14 GeV. The first (LOW CHARGE DESIGN) has an electron bunch charge of only 10 pC; the second (OPTICS LINEARIZATION DESIGN) is based on optics linearization of the longitudinal phase space in the first stage bunch compressor and can operate with either a high (250 pC) or low (20 pC) bunch charge; and the third (LCLS INJECTOR DESIGN) is similar to LCLS but uses an X-band linac after the first stage bunch compressor at 250 MeV to achieve a final beam energy up to 14 GeV. Compared with LCLS, these X-band linacs are at least a factor of three shorter.

  3. THE MULTIWAVELENGTH SURVEY BY YALE-CHILE (MUSYC): DEEP MEDIUM-BAND OPTICAL IMAGING AND HIGH-QUALITY 32-BAND PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS IN THE ECDF-S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardamone, Carolin N.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Urry, C. Megan; Brammer, Gabriel [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Taniguchi, Yoshi [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Gawiser, Eric; Bond, Nicholas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Taylor, Edward; Damen, Maaike [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Treister, Ezequiel [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Cobb, Bethany E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Schawinski, Kevin [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Lira, Paulina [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Murayama, Takashi [Astronomical Institute, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Saito, Tomoki [Institute for Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sumikawa, Kentaro, E-mail: carolin.cardamone@astro.yale.ed [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present deep optical 18-medium-band photometry from the Subaru telescope over the {approx}30' x 30' Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, as part of the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). This field has a wealth of ground- and space-based ancillary data, and contains the GOODS-South field and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. We combine the Subaru imaging with existing UBVRIzJHK and Spitzer IRAC images to create a uniform catalog. Detecting sources in the MUSYC 'BVR' image we find {approx}40,000 galaxies with R {sub AB} < 25.3, the median 5{sigma} limit of the 18 medium bands. Photometric redshifts are determined using the EAzY code and compared to {approx}2000 spectroscopic redshifts in this field. The medium-band filters provide very accurate redshifts for the (bright) subset of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, particularly at 0.1 < z < 1.2 and at z {approx}> 3.5. For 0.1 < z < 1.2, we find a 1{sigma} scatter in {Delta}z/(1 + z) of 0.007, similar to results obtained with a similar filter set in the COSMOS field. As a demonstration of the data quality, we show that the red sequence and blue cloud can be cleanly identified in rest-frame color-magnitude diagrams at 0.1 < z < 1.2. We find that {approx}20% of the red sequence galaxies show evidence of dust emission at longer rest-frame wavelengths. The reduced images, photometric catalog, and photometric redshifts are provided through the public MUSYC Web site.

  4. Experimental determination of band offsets of NiO-based thin film heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawade, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Mutsumi, E-mail: mutsumi@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology/Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda 278-8510 (Japan); Chichibu, Shigefusa F. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba, Sendai 980–8577 (Japan)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy band diagrams of NiO-based solar cell structures that use various n-type oxide semiconductors such as ZnO, Mg{sub 0.3}Zn{sub 0.7}O, Zn{sub 0.5}Sn{sub 0.5}O, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Sn (ITO), SnO{sub 2}, and TiO{sub 2} were evaluated by photoelectron yield spectroscopy. The valence band discontinuities were estimated to be 1.6?eV for ZnO/NiO and Mg{sub 0.3}Zn{sub 0.7}O/NiO, 1.7?eV for Zn{sub 0.5}Sn{sub 0.5}O/NiO and ITO/NiO, and 1.8?eV for SnO{sub 2}/NiO and TiO{sub 2}/NiO heterojunctions. By using the valence band discontinuity values and corresponding energy bandgaps of the layers, energy band diagrams were developed. Judging from the band diagram, an appropriate solar cell consisting of p-type NiO and n-type ZnO layers was deposited on ITO, and a slight but noticeable photovoltaic effect was obtained with an open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 0.96?V, short circuit current density (J{sub sc}) of 2.2??A/cm{sup 2}, and fill factor of 0.44.

  5. Near infrared 3~~ overtone band of Hl Brian F. Ventrudo and Daniel T. Cassidy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oka, Takeshi

    Near infrared 3~~ overtone band of Hl Brian F. Ventrudo and Daniel T. Cassidy Department infrared spectrum of the 3vz overtone band (v2=3+0) of H; has been observed at 1.4 pm. The spectrum transitions. Short-external-cavity InCaAsP diodes were used as tunable near infrared radiation sources

  6. The Huggins band of ozone: Unambiguous electronic and vibrational Zheng-Wang Qu, Hui Zhu, Motomichi Tashiro, and Reinhard Schinkea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farantos, Stavros C.

    The Huggins band of ozone: Unambiguous electronic and vibrational assignment Zheng-Wang Qu, Hui Zhu 12 February 2004; accepted 2 March 2004 The Huggins band of ozone is investigated by means of exact.1063/1.1711589 Because of the importance of ozone for the shielding of harmful UV light, its photophysics has been

  7. The Huggins band of ozone: A theoretical analysis Zheng-Wang Qu, Hui Zhu, Sergy Yu. Grebenshchikov, and Reinhard Schinkea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farantos, Stavros C.

    The Huggins band of ozone: A theoretical analysis Zheng-Wang Qu, Hui Zhu, Sergy Yu. Grebenshchikov; accepted 16 September 2004 The Huggins band of ozone is investigated by means of dynamics calculations American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1814098 I. INTRODUCTION Because of the importance of ozone

  8. Electronic band structure of wurtzite GaN under biaxial strain in the M plane investigated with photoreflectance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Sandip

    Electronic band structure of wurtzite GaN under biaxial strain in the M plane investigated; published 7 January 2002 We investigate the modification of the electronic band structure in wurtzite Ga.40.Fy I. INTRODUCTION The wurtzite WZ structure of III-V nitrides leads to electrostatic fields due

  9. Electronic band-structure engineering of GaAs/AlxGa1(xAs quantum well superlattices with substructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Electronic band-structure engineering of GaAs/AlxGa1(xAs quantum well superlattices investigation on the band structures of electrons in both infinite and finite semiconductor quantum well of these two materials, narrower passbands and/or broad stopbands can be obtained for electrons with energy

  10. Fermi level stabilization and band edge energies in Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detert, Douglas M.; Tom, Kyle B.; Dubon, Oscar D. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Battaglia, Corsin; Javey, Ali [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Denlinger, Jonathan D. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lim, Sunnie H. N. [Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Anders, André [Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Yu, Kin M.; Walukiewicz, Wladek [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the band edge energies of Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O thin films as a function of composition by three independent techniques: we determine the Fermi level stabilization energy by pinning the Fermi level with ion irradiation, measure the binding energy of valence band states and core levels by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and probe shifts in the conduction band and valence band density of states using soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, respectively. The three techniques find consensus in explaining the origin of compositional trends in the optical-bandgap narrowing upon Cd incorporation in wurtzite ZnO and widening upon Zn incorporation in rocksalt CdO. The conduction band minimum is found to be stationary for both wurtzite and rocksalt alloys, and a significant upward rise of the valence band maximum accounts for the majority of these observed bandgap changes. Given these band alignments, alloy disorder scattering is found to play a negligible role in decreasing the electron mobility for all alloys. These band alignment details, combined with the unique optical and electrical properties of the two phase regimes, make CdZnO alloys attractive candidates for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications.

  11. Effects of surface termination on the band gap of ultrabright Si29 nanoparticles: Experiments and computational models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Effects of surface termination on the band gap of ultrabright Si29 nanoparticles: Experiments constituting a H-terminated reconstructed Si surface was recently proposed as a structural prototype termination with a N linkage in butylamine and O linkage in pentane . The emission band for N-termination

  12. A Tunable X-Band SiGe HBT Single Stage Cascode Mustafa DOGAN1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    A Tunable X-Band SiGe HBT Single Stage Cascode LNA Mustafa DOGAN1,2 1 TUBITAK ­ UEKAE, ETTM ­ EMC-band silicon-germanium (SiGe) single stage cascode tunable low-noise amplifier (LNA) for active phased array transmit/receive modules. LNA is implemented by using IHP SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) 0

  13. Band Offsets of InGaP/GaAs Heterojunctions by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy Y. Dong and R. M. Feenstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Band Offsets of InGaP/GaAs Heterojunctions by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy Y. Dong and R. M Abstract Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are used to study InGaP/GaAs heterojunctions computation of the tunnel current. Curve fitting of theory to experiment is performed. Using an InGaP band gap

  14. Roles of nanoclusters in shear banding and plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieh, T.G.

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this research we published 33 papers in various physics/material journals. We select four representing papers in this report and their results are summarized as follows. I. To study shear banding process, it is pertinent to know the intrinsic shear strain rate within a propagating shear band. To this aim, we used nanoindentation technique to probe the mechanical response of a Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 bulk metallic glass in locality and found notable pop-in events associated with shear band emission. Using a free volume model and under the situation when temperature and stress/hardness are fixed result in an equation, which predicts that hardness serration caused by pop-in decreases exponentially with the strain rate. Our data are in good agreement with the prediction. The result also predicts that, when strain rate is higher than a critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1, there will be no hardness serration, thereby no pop-in. In other words, multiple shear bandings will take place and material will flow homogeneously. The critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1 can be treated as the intrinsic strain rate within a shear band. We subsequently carried out a simulation study and showed that, if the imposed strain rate was over , the shear band spacing would become so small that the entire sample would virtually behave like one major shear band. Using the datum strain rate =1700 s^-1 and based on a shear band nucleation model proposed by us, the size of a shear-band nucleus in Au-BMG was estimated to be 3 ���� 10^6 atoms, or a sphere of ~30 nm in diameter. II. Inspired by the peculiar result published in a Science article �¢����Super Plastic Bulk Metallic Glasses at Room Temperature�¢���, we synthesized the Zr-based bulk metallic glass with a composition identical to that in the paper (Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10) and, subsequently, tested in compression at the same slow strain rate (~10^-4 s^-1). We found that the dominant deformation mode is always single shear. The stress-strain curve exhibited serrated pattern in the plastic region, which conventionally has been attributed to individual shear band propagation. The scanning electron micrographs taken from the deformed sample surface revealed regularly spaced striations. Analysis indicates that the observed stress-strain serrations are intimately related to the striations on the shear surface, suggesting the serrations were actually caused slip-and-stick shear along the principal shear plane. We further use video camera to conduct in situ compression experiments to unambiguously confirm the one-to-one temporal and spatial correspondence between the intermittent sliding and flow serration. This preferential shear band formation along the principal shear plane is, in fact, a natural consequence of Mode II crack, independent of strain softening or hardening, usually claimed in the literature. III. Flow serration in compression of metallic glasses is caused by the formation and propagation of localized shear bands. These shear bands propagate at an extremely high speed, so high that a load cell and load frame were unable to capture the details of the dynamic event. To subdue this problem, we conducted uniaxial compression on Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 bulk metallic glass using a high-speed camera to capture the sample image and also high-sensitivity strain gauges attached to the test samples to directly measure the strain. The displacement-time curves obtained from the test and a magnified version of the displacement burst reveals clearly a three-step (acceleration, steady-state, and deceleration) process during shear band propagation. The fastest propagating speed occurring at the steady state is calculated as 8����10^2 ���µm/s. This speed is about 1,000 times faster than the crosshead speed. This explains the gradual disappearance of flow serration at higher strain rates previously reported during compression of

  15. InGaAs tunnel diodes for the calibration of semi-classical and quantum mechanical band-to-band tunneling models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smets, Quentin; Verreck, Devin; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Groeseneken, Guido; Heyns, Marc M. [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); KULeuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Verhulst, Anne S.; Rooyackers, Rita; Merckling, Clément; Simoen, Eddy; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Voon Y. [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Van De Put, Maarten; Sorée, Bart [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Universiteit Antwerpen, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Promising predictions are made for III-V tunnel-field-effect transistor (FET), but there is still uncertainty on the parameters used in the band-to-band tunneling models. Therefore, two simulators are calibrated in this paper; the first one uses a semi-classical tunneling model based on Kane's formalism, and the second one is a quantum mechanical simulator implemented with an envelope function formalism. The calibration is done for In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As using several p+/intrinsic/n+ diodes with different intrinsic region thicknesses. The dopant profile is determined by SIMS and capacitance-voltage measurements. Error bars are used based on statistical and systematic uncertainties in the measurement techniques. The obtained parameters are in close agreement with theoretically predicted values and validate the semi-classical and quantum mechanical models. Finally, the models are applied to predict the input characteristics of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As n- and p-lineTFET, with the n-lineTFET showing competitive performance compared to MOSFET.

  16. $^{16}$O + $^{16}$O molecular structures of positive- and negative-parity superdeformed bands in $^{34}$S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasutaka Taniguchi

    2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures of excited states in $^{34}$S are investigated using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics and generator coordinate method (GCM). The GCM basis wave functions are calculated via energy variation with a constraint on the quadrupole deformation parameter $\\beta$. By applying the GCM after parity and angular momentum projections, the coexistence of two positive- and one negative-parity superdeformed (SD) bands are predicted, and low-lying states and other deformed bands are obtained. The SD bands have structures of $^{16}$O + $^{16}$O + two valence neutrons in molecular orbitals around the two $^{16}$O cores in a cluster picture. The configurations of the two valence neutrons are $\\delta^2$ and $\\pi^2$ for the positive-parity SD bands and $\\pi^1\\delta^1$ for the negative-parity SD band. The structural changes of the yrast states are also discussed.

  17. Tunability over three frequency bands induced by mode transition in relativistic backward wave oscillator with strong end reflections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Yuqun [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Fan, Juping; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Sun, Jun [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an efficient approach to realizing the frequency tunability of a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) over three frequency bands by mode transition without changing the slow wave structure (SWS). It is figured out that the transition of the operation mode in the RBWO can be efficiently achieved by using the strong end reflection of the SWS. This mode transition results in the tunability of the RBWO over three frequency bands at high power and high efficiency without changing the SWS. In numerical simulation, the output frequency of the RBWO can jump over 7.9?GHz in C-band, 9.9?GHz in X-band, and 12.4?GHz in Ku-band with output power exceeding 3.0?GW and conversion efficiency higher than 35% by just reasonably transforming the structures of the front and post resonant reflectors which provide the strong end reflection for the SWS.

  18. Heterojunction band offsets and dipole formation at BaTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaz, Snjezana [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, Ohio 44555 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, Ohio 44555 (United States); Zeng, Zhaoquan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 205 Dreese Lab, 2015 Neil Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 205 Dreese Lab, 2015 Neil Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Brillson, Leonard J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 205 Dreese Lab, 2015 Neil Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States) [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 205 Dreese Lab, 2015 Neil Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We used a complement of photoemission and cathodoluminescence techniques to measure formation of the BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO) on SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) heterojunction band offset grown monolayer by monolayer by molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) provided core level and valence band edge energies to monitor the valence band offset in-situ as the first few crystalline BTO monolayers formed on the STO substrate. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) measured Fermi level positions within the band gap, work functions, and ionization potentials of the growing BTO film. Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy measured energies and densities of interface states at the buried heterojunction. Kraut-based XPS heterojunction band offsets provided evidence for STO/BTO heterojunction linearity, i.e., commutativity and transitivity. In contrast, UPS and XPS revealed a large dipole associated either with local charge transfer or strain-induced polarization within the BTO epilayer.

  19. Band alignment between GaN and ZrO{sub 2} formed by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Gang; Wang, Hong, E-mail: ewanghong@ntu.edu.sg; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Center of Excellence, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Zhi Hong [Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology, 1 CREATE Way, Singapore 138602 (Singapore)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The band alignment between Ga-face GaN and atomic-layer-deposited ZrO{sub 2} was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dependence of Ga 3d and Zr 3d core-level positions on the take-off angles indicated upward band bending at GaN surface and potential gradient in ZrO{sub 2} layer. Based on angle-resolved XPS measurements combined with numerical calculations, valence band discontinuity ?E{sub V} of 1?±?0.2?eV and conduction band discontinuity ?E{sub C} of 1.2?±?0.2?eV at ZrO{sub 2}/GaN interface were determined by taking GaN surface band bending and potential gradient in ZrO{sub 2} layer into account.

  20. Multi-bands photoconductive response in AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Rong, X.; Xu, F. J.; Tang, N. [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, X. Q., E-mail: wangshi@pku.edu.cn; Shen, B., E-mail: bshen@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Fu, K.; Zhang, B. S. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, 215123 Suzhou (China); Hashimoto, H.; Yoshikawa, A. [Center for SMART Green Innovation Research, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Ge, W. K. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the optical transitions among the quantum-confined electronic states in the conduction band, we have fabricated multi-bands AlGaN/GaN quantum well infrared photodetectors. Crack-free AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with atomically sharp interfaces have been achieved by inserting an AlN interlayer, which releases most of the tensile strain in the MQWs grown on the GaN underlayer. With significant reduction of dark current by using thick AlGaN barriers, photoconductive responses are demonstrated due to intersubband transition in multiple regions with center wavelengths of 1.3, 2.3, and 4??m, which shows potential applications on near infrared detection.

  1. High power operation of an X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Yucong; He, Hu; Lei, Lurong; Chen, Zhaofu [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed in order to increase output microwave power and operating frequency of the amplifier tube. The experiment is performed on a Tesla-type accelerator. The amplifier is driven by an electron beam of 2.8 kA at 720 kV, and a microwave power of 30 kW and frequency of 9.384 GHz is injected into an input cavity by means of an external source, then a microwave power of over 800 MW is extracted, the amplifier gain is about 44 dB, and conversion efficiency is 40%. The experiment proves that output power of nearly GWs can be generated with the X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier driven by a kW-level input power.

  2. Competition and Coexistence of Order Parameters in Holographic Multi-Band Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Li, Li-Fang; Wang, Yong-Qiang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a holographic multi-band superconductor model with each complex scalar field in the bulk minimally coupled to a same gauge field. Taking into account the back reaction of matter fields on the background geometry and focusing on the two band case with two scalar order parameters, we find that depending on the strength of the back reaction and the charge ratio of the two bulk scalars, five different superconducting phases exist, and three of five phases exhibit some region where both orders coexist and are thermodynamically favored. The other two superconducting phases have only one scalar order. The model exhibits rich phase structure and we construct the full diagram for the five superconducting phases. Our analysis indicates that the equivalent attractive interaction mediated by gravity between the two order parameters tends to make the coexistence of two orders much more easy rather than more difficult.

  3. Triaxial shape coexistence and new aligned band in {sup 178}Os

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Govil, I. M. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Dhal, A.; Chaturvedi, L. [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-220115, Uttar Pradesh (India); Praharaj, C. R. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneshwar-751005 (India); Rath, A. K. [Department of Physics, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Burla, Sambalpur-768019, Orissa (India); Kumar, G. Kiran [Department of Physics, Maharaja Sayajirao University, Vadodara, Baroda 390002 (India); Basu, S. K. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Center, Bidhan Nagar, Calcutta-700064 (India); Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pattabiraman, N. S.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Calcutta Centre, Sector III LB-8, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700098 (India)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High spin states in {sup 178}Os were studied by means of {sup 165}Ho({sup 20}Ne,p6n){sup 178}Os fusion evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 150 MeV, using a clover detector array. Several new transitions belonging to {sup 178}Os were placed in a level scheme and a new aligned rotational band was observed in addition to earlier known bands. Spin-parity assignments for most of the proposed levels were made using the deduced directional correlation orientation and polarization measurements for the de-exciting transitions. Experimental results are compared with the projected angular momentum deformed Hartree-Fock model calculations and cranked Woods-Saxon model calculations. This nucleus is predicted to be prolate deformed in the ground state but the {gamma}-softness at higher excitation is revealed by the cranked Woods-Saxon model and the geometrical asymmetric model calculations.

  4. Band gap tuning in transition metal oxides by site-specific substitution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Chisholm, Jr., Matthew F; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Singh, David J; Choi, Woo Seok

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A transition metal oxide insulator composition having a tuned band gap includes a transition metal oxide having a perovskite or a perovskite-like crystalline structure. The transition metal oxide includes at least one first element selected form the group of Bi, Ca, Ba, Sr, Li, Na, Mg, K, Pb, and Pr; and at least one second element selected from the group of Ti, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt. At least one correlated insulator is integrated into the crystalline structure, including REMO.sub.3, wherein RE is at least one Rare Earth element, and wherein M is at least one element selected from the group of Co, V, Cr, Ni, Mn, and Fe. The composition is characterized by a band gap of less of 4.5 eV.

  5. Converter-Modulator Design and Operations for the ILC L-band Test Stand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reass, William A.; /Los Alamos; Burkhart, C.; Adolphsen, Chris E.; Beukers, T.; Cassel, R.; de Lira, A.; Papas, C.; Nguyen, M.; Went, R.; /SLAC; Anderson, David E.; /Oak

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To facilitate a rapid response to the International Linear Collider (ILC) L-band development program at SLAC, a spare converter-modulator was shipped from LANL. This modulator was to be a spare for the spallation neutron source (SNS) accelerator at ORNL. The ILC application requires a 33% higher peak output power (15 MW) and output current (120 Amp). This presents significant design challenges to modify the existing hardware and yet maintain switching parameters and thermal cycling within the semiconductor component ratings. To minimize IGBT commutation and free-wheeling diode currents, a different set of optimizations, as compared to the SNS design, were used to tune the resonant switching networks. Additional complexities arose as nanocrystalline cores with different performance characteristics (as compared to SNS), were used to fabricate the resonant 'boost' transformers. This paper will describe the electrical design, modeling efforts, and resulting electrical performance as implemented for the ILC L-band test stand.

  6. H-band thermal emission from the 0.79-day period planet WASP-19b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, D R; Maxted, P F L; Barman, T S; Cameron, A Collier; Hellier, C; Queloz, D; Smalley, B; Triaud, A H M J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first ground-based detection of thermal emission from an exoplanet in the H-band. Using HAWK-I on the VLT, we observed an occultation of WASP-19b by its G8V-type host star. WASP-19b is a Jupiter-mass planet with an orbital period of only 0.79 d, and thus, being highly irradiated, is expected to be hot. We measure an H-band occultation depth of (0.259 +0.046 -0.044) %. A cloud-free model of the planet's atmosphere, with no redistribution of energy from day-side to night-side, under-predicts the planet/star flux density ratio by a factor of two. As the stellar parameters, and thus the level of planetary irradiation, are well-constrained by measurement, it is likely that our model of the planet's atmosphere is too simple.

  7. Energy band modulation of graphane by hydrogen-vacancy chains: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Bi-Ru [Department of Natural science, Center for General Education, Chang Gung University, Kueishan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yang, Chih-Kai, E-mail: ckyang@nccu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics, National Chengchi University, Taipei 11605, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated a variety of configurations of hydrogen-vacancy chains in graphane by first-principles density functional calculation. We found that graphane with two zigzag H-vacancy chains segregated by one or more H chain is generally a nonmagnetic conductor or has a negligible band gap. However, the same structure is turned into a semiconductor and generates a magnetic moment if either one or both of the vacancy chains are blocked by isolated H atoms. If H-vacancy chains are continuously distributed, the structure is similar to a zigzag graphene nanoribbon embedded in graphane. It was also found that the embedded zigzag graphene nanoribbon is antiferromagnetic, and isolated H atoms left in the 2-chain nanoribbon can tune the band gap and generate net magnetic moments. Similar effects are also obtained if bare carbon atoms are present outside the nanoribbon. These results are useful for designing graphene-based nanoelectronic circuits.

  8. The effect of spin-orbit coupling in band structure of few-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahdan, Muhammad Fauzi, E-mail: sahdan89@yahoo.co.id; Darma, Yudi, E-mail: sahdan89@yahoo.co.id [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators are electronic materials that have a bulk band gap like an ordinary insulator but have protected conducting states on their edge or surface. This can be happened due to spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, the edge current flows through their edge or surface depends on its spin orientation and also it is robust against non-magnetic impurities. Therefore, topological insulators are predicted to be useful ranging from spintronics to quantum computation. Graphene was first predicted to be the precursor of topological insulator by Kane-Mele. They developed a Hamiltonian model to describe the gap opening in graphene. In this work, we investigate the band structure of few-layer graphene by using this model with analytical approach. The results of our calculations show that the gap opening occurs at K and K’ point, not only in single layer, but also in bilayer and trilayer graphene.

  9. Support pedestals for interconnecting a cover and nozzle band wall in a gas turbine nozzle segment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC); Webbon, Waylon Willard (Greenville, SC); Bagepalli, Radhakrishna (Schenectady, NY); Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Kellock, Iain Robertson (Simpsonville, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner band portions. Each band portion includes a nozzle wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through the apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. Structural pedestals interconnect the cover and nozzle wall and pass through holes in the impingement plate to reduce localized stress otherwise resulting from a difference in pressure within the chamber of the nozzle segment and the hot gas path and the fixed turbine casing surrounding the nozzle stage. The pedestals may be cast or welded to the cover and nozzle wall.

  10. Frequency Conversion: Side-band cooling, state-swapping, and coherent control of mechanical resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Jacobs; Hendra I. Nurdin; Frederick W. Strauch; Matthew James

    2010-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Sideband cooling is a technique that potentially allows mechanical resonators to be prepared in their ground states, important for future applications in quantum technologies. Tian has recently shown that side-band cooling can be implemented by modulating the coupling between a nano-resonator and a superconducting oscillator, a process of frequency conversion [L. Tian, PRB 79, 193407 (2009)]. While side-band cooling is usually treated in the steady-state regime, the effective resonant coupling will also generate near perfect state-swapping from the superconductor to the mechanical resonator. We perform numerical simulations of this system, examining the ground-state cooling achieved by the state-swapping. Further, we show that the superconducting oscillator can be used to control the amplitude and phase of the resonator, while simultaneously cooling it, and thus act as a coherent "quantum feedback controller".

  11. Indirect-direct band gap transition through electric tuning in bilayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Y.; Si, M. S., E-mail: sims@lzu.edu.cn; Wang, Y. H.; Gao, X. P. [Key laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730 000 (China)] [Key laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730 000 (China); Sung, Dongchul; Hong, Suklyun [Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143 747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143 747 (Korea, Republic of); He, Junjie [Department of Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411 105 (China)] [Department of Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411 105 (China)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the electronic properties of bilayer MoS{sub 2} exposed to an external electric field by using first-principles calculations. It is found that a larger interlayer distance, referring to that by standard density functional theory (DFT) with respect to that by DFT with empirical dispersion corrections, makes indirect-direct band gap transition possible by electric control. We show that external electric field effectively manipulates the valence band contrast between the K- and ?-valleys by forming built-in electric dipole fields, which realizes an indirect-direct transition before a semiconductor-metal transition happens. Our results provide a novel efficient access to tune the electronic properties of two-dimensional layered materials.

  12. High-frequency homogenization of zero frequency stop band photonic and phononic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonakakis, Tryfon; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an accurate methodology for representing the physics of waves, for periodic structures, through effective properties for a replacement bulk medium: This is valid even for media with zero frequency stop-bands and where high frequency phenomena dominate. Since the work of Lord Rayleigh in 1892, low frequency (or quasi-static) behaviour has been neatly encapsulated in effective anisotropic media. However such classical homogenization theories break down in the high-frequency or stop band regime. Higher frequency phenomena are of significant importance in photonics (transverse magnetic waves propagating in infinite conducting parallel fibers), phononics (anti-plane shear waves propagating in isotropic elastic materials with inclusions), and platonics (flexural waves propagating in thin-elastic plates with holes). Fortunately, the recently proposed high-frequency homogenization (HFH) theory is only constrained by the knowledge of standing waves in order to asymptotically reconstruct dispersion curves an...

  13. Narrow band wavelength selective filter using grating assisted single ring resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhathan, P., E-mail: PPrabhathan@ntu.edu.sg; Murukeshan, V. M. [Centre for Optical and Laser Engineering (COLE), School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper illustrates a filter configuration which uses a single ring resonator of larger radius connected to a grating resonator at its drop port to achieve single wavelength selectivity and switching property with spectral features suitable for on-chip wavelength selection applications. The proposed configuration is expected to find applications in silicon photonics devices such as, on-chip external cavity lasers and multi analytic label-free biosensors. The grating resonator has been designed for a high Q-factor, high transmittivity, and minimum loss so that the wavelength selectivity of the device is improved. The proof-of-concept device has been demonstrated on a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) platform through electron beam lithography and Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process. The transmission spectrum shows narrow band single wavelength selection and switching property with a high Free Spectral Range (FSR) ?60 nm and side band rejection ratio >15 dB.

  14. Single Bunch Wakefields in the CERN-PSI-ELETTRA X-band Linear Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ashmawy, Mostafa; Dehler, Micha; Raguin, Jean-Yves; Riddone, Germana; Zennaro, Riccardo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FERMI@ELETTRA and PSI-XFEL are 4th Generation Light Sources that require high quality electron beam at the entrance of the undulator chains. In this context, a specially developed X-band structure with integrated alignment monitors will be used to mitigate the nonlinearities in the longitudinal phase space due to the second order RF time curvature and the second order momentum compaction term of chicane compressor. The knowledge of the transverse and longitudinal short range wakefields in the X-band structure is essential to evaluate the beam quality in terms of longitudinal energy spread and transverse kick spread. We have used the ABCI code to numerically evaluate the transverse and longitudinal wake potentials for short bunches in this structure

  15. Reflection and transmission of ocean wave spectra by a band of randomly distributed ice floes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montiel, Fabien; Bennetts, Luke

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new ocean wave/sea-ice interaction model is proposed that simulates how a directional wave spectrum evolves as it travels through an arbitrary finite array of circular ice floes, where wave/ice dynamics are entirely governed by wave scattering effects. The model is applied to characterise the wave reflection and transmission properties of a strip of ice floes, such as an ice edge band. A method is devised to extract the reflected and transmitted directional wave spectra produced by the array. The method builds upon an integral mapping from polar to Cartesian coordinates of the scattered wave components. Sensitivity tests are conducted for a row of floes randomly perturbed from a regular arrangement. Results for random arrays are generated using ensemble averaging. A realistic ice edge band is then reconstructed from field experiments data. Simulations show a good qualitative agreement with the data in terms of transmitted wave energy and directional spreading. In particular, it is observed that short waves ...

  16. Band gap corrections for molecules and solids using Koopmans theorem and Wannier functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Jie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have proposed a method for correcting the Kohn-Sham eigen energies in the density functional theory (DFT) based on the Koopmans theorem using Wannier functions. The method provides a general approach applicable for molecules and solids for electronic structure calculations. It does not have any adjustable parameters and the computational cost is at the DFT level. For solids, the calculated eigen energies agree well with the experiments for not only the band gaps, but also the energies of other valence and conduction bands. For molecules, the calculated eigen energies agree well with the experimental ionization potentials and electron affinities, and show better trends than the traditional Delta-self-consistent-field (?SCF) results.

  17. A Single-band Cold Mass Support System for the MICE Superconducting Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Li; Liu, X.K.; Liu, C.S.; Li, L.K.; Xu, Feng Yu; Jia, Lin X.; Green, Michael A.

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The cooling channel of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) consists of eighteen superconducting solenoid coils, which are magnetically hooked together and contained in seven modules. The operations of a pair of MICE superconducting coupling magnets are affected directly by the other solenoid coils in the MICE channel. In order to meet the stringent requirement for the magnet center and axis azimuthal angle at 4.2 K, a self-centered tension-band cold mass support system with intermediate thermal interruption was applied for the MICE superconducting coupling magnet. The physical center of the magnet does not change as it is cooled down from 300 K to 4.2 K using this support system. This paper analyzed and calculated force loads on the coupling magnet under various operation modes of the MICE cooling channel. The performance parameters of a single-band cold mass support system were calculated also.

  18. Fabrication of Ceramic Layer-by-Layer Infrared Wavelength Photonic Band Gap Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Hao-Chuan Kang

    2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals, also known as photonic crystals, are periodic dielectric structures which form a photonic band gap that prohibit the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves of certain frequencies at any incident angles. Photonic crystals have several potential applications including zero-threshold semiconductor lasers, the inhibition of spontaneous emission, dielectric mirrors, and wavelength filters. If defect states are introduced in the crystals, light can be guided from one location to another or even a sharp bending of light in micron scale can be achieved. This generates the potential for optical waveguide and optical circuits, which will contribute to the improvement in the fiber-optic communications and the development of high-speed computers.

  19. Using Measurements of Fill Factor at High Irradiance to Deduce Heterobarrier Band Offsets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, J. M.; Steiner, M. A.; Kanevce, A.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a 2D device simulation tool, we examine the high irradiance behavior of a single junction, GaAs concentrator cell as a function of the doping in the back surface confinement layer. The confinement layer is designed to be a barrier for both holes and electrons in the base of the solar cell. For a p-type base we show that the FF of the cell at high concentrations is a strong function of both the magnitude of the valence band offset and the doping level in the barrier. In short, for a given valence band offset (VBO), there is a critical barrier doping, below which the FF drops rapidly with lower doping. This behavior is confirmed experimentally for a GaInP/GaAs double heterostructure solar cell where the critical doping concentration (at 500 suns) in the back surface confinement layer is ~1e18 cm-3 for a VBO of 300 meV.

  20. Ferromagnetism and the electronic band structure in (Ga,Mn)(Bi,As) epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yastrubchak, O., E-mail: yastrub@hektor.umcs.lublin.pl [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Pl. M. Curie-Sk?odowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, 41 pr. Nauki, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sadowski, J. [MAX-IV Laboratory, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Gluba, L.; ?uk, J.; Kulik, M. [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Pl. M. Curie-Sk?odowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Domagala, J. Z.; Andrearczyk, T.; Wosinski, T. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Rawski, M. [Analytical Laboratory, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Pl. M. Curie-Sk?odowskiej 3, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Impact of Bi incorporation into (Ga,Mn)As layers on their electronic- and band-structures as well as their magnetic and structural properties has been studied. Homogenous (Ga,Mn)(Bi,As) layers of high structural perfection have been grown by the low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Post-growth annealing treatment of the layers results in an improvement of their structural and magnetic properties and an increase in the hole concentration in the layers. The modulation photoreflectance spectroscopy results are consistent with the valence-band model of hole-mediated ferromagnetism in the layers. This material combines the properties of (Ga,Mn)As and Ga(Bi,As) ternary compounds and offers the possibility of tuning its electrical and magnetic properties by controlling the alloy composition.

  1. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ozbay, E.; Tuttle, G.; Michel, E.; Ho, K.M.; Biswas, R.; Chan, C.T.; Soukoulis, C.

    1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap. 42 figures.

  2. Band structures and intruder $?$$i_{13/2}$ state in $^{197}$Tl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Pai; G. Mukherjee; S. Bhattacharya; C. Bhattacharya; S. Bhattacharyya; T. Bhattacharjee; S. Chanda; S. Rajbanshi; A. Goswami; M. R. Gohil; S. Kundu; T. K. Ghosh; K. Banerjee; T. K. Rana; R. Pandey; G. K. Prajapati; S. R. Banerjee; S. Mukhopadhyay; D. Pandit; S. Pal; J. K. Meena; P. Mukhopadhyay; A. Chawdhury

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The excited states in the odd-$A$ $^{197}$Tl nucleus have been studied by populating them using the $^{197}$Au($\\alpha$, 4$n$)$^{197}$Tl reaction at the beam energy of 48 MeV. The $\\gamma-\\gamma$ coincidence data were taken using a combination of clover, LEPS and single crystal HPGe detectors. Precise spin and parity assignments of the excited states have been done through the polarization and the DCO measurements. A new band structure has been identified and the evidence for a possible intruder $\\pi i_{13/2}$ state has been found for the first time. Possible configurations of the observed bands have been discussed. The total Routhian surface calculations have been performed to study the shape of $^{197}$Tl for different configurations.

  3. Broad band X-ray spectrum of KS 1947+300 with BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Naik; P. J. Callanan; B. Paul; T. Dotani

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results obtained from three BeppoSAX observations of the accretion-powered transient X-ray pulsar KS 1947+300 carried out during the declining phase of its 2000 November -- 2001 June outburst. A detailed spectral study of KS 1947+300 across a wide X-ray band (0.1--100.0 keV) is attempted for the first time here. Timing analysis of the data clearly shows a 18.7 s pulsation in the X-ray light curves in the above energy band. The pulse profile of KS 1947+300 is characterized by a broad peak with sharp rise followed by a narrow dip. The dip in the pulse profile shows a very strong energy dependence. Broad-band pulse-phase-averaged spectroscopy obtained with three of the BeppoSAX instruments shows that the energy spectrum in the 0.1--100 keV energy band has three components, a Comptonized component, a ~0.6 keV blackbody component, and a narrow and weak iron emission line at 6.7 keV with a low column density of material in the line of sight. We place an upper limit on the equivalent width of the iron K_\\alpha line at 6.4 keV of ~13 eV (for a width of 100 eV). Assuming a spherical blackbody emitting region and the distance of the source to be 10 kpc, the radius of the emitting region is found to be in the range of 14--22 km, which rules out the inner accretion disk as the soft X-ray emitting region.

  4. V-band Transmission and Reflection Grid Amplifier Packaged in Waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rotation. In a reflection amplifier, the back short provides tuning and a cross-polarized horn or an ortho of the drain and gate to be matched. In this work, we designed and packaged a V-band single-stage grid ampli, and off-state drain-source breakdown volt- age are 750 mS/mm, 650 mA/mm, and 7 V. TRW's baseline 75- ąm

  5. Pre-Stressed Viscoelastic Composites: Effective Incremental Moduli and Band-Gap Tuning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parnell, William J. [School of Mathematics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study viscoelastic wave propagation along pre-stressed nonlinear elastic composite bars. In the pre-stressed state we derive explicit forms for the effective incremental storage and loss moduli with dependence on the pre-stress. We also derive a dispersion relation for the effective wavenumber in the case of arbitrary frequency, hence permitting a study of viscoelastic band-gap tuning via pre-stress.

  6. A preliminary study of the stratospheric warm band over North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Joseph L

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    III, DISCUSSION AND RESULTS OF CONSTANT PRESSURE ANALYSES ~ ~ 10 CHAPTER IV ~ TIME VARIATION OF STRATOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE IN THE VICIN ITY OF IBE WARN BAND i o ~ ~ ~ o o o o . o ~ ~ ~ o ~ o o ~ ~ ~ ~ RS CHAPTER V o CCSCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 45 Q. Tine-Tenperaturs Profile& Port Barrison. . ~ . . ~ " ~ ~ ~ ~ "~ "~ . ~ 48 10 ' Tine Tenperature Prcfile& Buffalc ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4T LIST OF TABLES I. Locations and teeperatures of the warn axis, and looations...

  7. The Moon Glistens: A New Work for Band by Joni Greene: A Conductor's Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Chad P.

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    in the various ensembles within the UT band program. During the spring semester of 2001, Greene met Rafael Hernandez, a master’s candidate and a teaching assistant in the UT composition department. After submitting some short works for Hernandez’ review, she... soon began taking weekly composition lessons with him. This was Greene’s first formal training in musical composition and lead to the completion of her first piece: Wave. After meeting with some success studying with Hernandez, Greene auditioned...

  8. Electron Band Structure of MnGaN Dimiter Alexandrov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    to this orbital to be occupied. LCAO electron band structure of wurtzite MnxGa1-xN for points c1 and v15 ( = 1 of the wurtzite MnxGa1-xN are determined as well. INTRODUCTION The MnxGa1-xN semiconductor alloy is important model the MnGaN alloy on Mn content. Segregated Mn species in wurtzite GaN containing Mn

  9. A NEW MULTI-BAND RADIAL VELOCITY TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTING EXOPLANETS AROUND ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Bo; Ge Jian, E-mail: boma@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: jge@astrto.ufl.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The radial velocity (RV) technique is one of the most efficient ways of detecting exoplanets. However, large RV jitters induced by starspots on an active star can inhibit detection of any exoplanet present or even lead to a false positive detection. This paper presents a new multi-band RV technique capable of substantially reducing starspot-induced RV jitters from stellar RV measurements to allow efficient and accurate extraction of RV signals caused by exoplanets. It takes full advantage of the correlation of RV jitters at different spectral bands and the independence of exoplanet signals at the corresponding bands. Simulations with a single-spot model and a multi-spot model have been conducted to investigate the RV jitter reduction capability of this method. The results show that this method can reduce the RV jitter amplitude by at least an order of magnitude, allowing detection of weaker exoplanet signals without significantly increasing RV observation time and cadence. This method can greatly reduce the observation time required to detect Earth-like planets around solar type stars with {approx}0.1 m s{sup -1} long term Doppler precision if spot-induced jitter is the dominant astrophysical noise source for RV measurements. This method can work efficiently for RV jitter removal if: (1) all the spots on a target star have approximately the same temperature during RV observations; (2) the RV jitter amplitude changes with wavelength, i.e., the RV jitter amplitude ratio, {alpha}, between two different spectral bands is not close to one; (3) the spot-induced RV jitter dominates the RV measurement error.

  10. Engineering of the band gap and optical properties of thin films of yttrium hydride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    You, Chang Chuan; Mongstad, Trygve; Maehlen, Jan Petter; Karazhanov, Smagul, E-mail: smagulk@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, P.O. Box 40, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of oxygen-containing yttrium hydride show photochromic effect at room temperature. In this work, we have studied structural and optical properties of the films deposited at different deposition pressures, discovering the possibility of engineering the optical band gap by variation of the oxygen content. In sum, the transparency of the films and the wavelength range of photons triggering the photochromic effect can be controlled by variation of the deposition pressure.

  11. Effect of silver incorporation in phase formation and band gap tuning of tungsten oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolly Bose, R.; Kumar, R. Vinod; Sudheer, S. K.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P. [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariyavattom, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695581 (India); Reddy, V. R.; Ganesan, V. [UGC - DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017, Madhyapradesh (India)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silver incorporated tungsten oxide thin films are prepared by RF magnetron sputtering technique. The effect of silver incorporation in micro structure evolution, phase enhancement, band gap tuning and other optical properties are investigated using techniques such as x-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Effect of silver addition in phase formation and band gap tuning of tungsten oxide thin films are investigated. It is found that the texturing and phase formation improves with enhancement in silver content. It is also found that as the silver incorporation enhances the thickness of the films increases at the same time the strain in the film decreases. Even without annealing the desired phase can be achieved by doping with silver. A broad band centered at the wavelength 437 nm is observed in the absorption spectra of tungsten oxide films of higher silver incorporation and this can be attributed to surface plasmon resonance of silver atoms present in the tungsten oxide matrix. The transmittance of the films is decreased with increase in silver content which can be due to increase in film thickness, enhancement of scattering, and absorption of light caused by the increase of grain size, surface roughness and porosity of films and enhanced absorption due to surface plasmon resonance of silver. It is found that silver can act as the seed for the growth of tungsten oxide grains and found that the grain size increases with silver content which in turn decreases the band gap of tungsten oxide from 3.14 eV to 2.70 eV.

  12. Measurement of intensities of bands in the electronic absorption spectrum of chlorine dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapp, Thomas Louis

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy levels are derived, Twelve bands in the electronic absorption spectrum of chlorine dioxide between the wavelengths 4250 R and 5250 R were photographed and measured. Of these twelve, the vibrational energy levels calculated for nine of them... Calculation of Vibrational Energy Levels . . . . , 35 Estimation of Errors . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . 38 CONCLUSIONS Conolusions ~ ~ ~ 47 B IBLI QGRAFEZ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 48 ~INTRGDUGT10 Analysis of thc rotational structure of the chlorine dioxide...

  13. Band gap tunning in BN-doped graphene systems with high carrier mobility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaloni, T. P.; Schwingenschlögl, U., E-mail: udo.schwingenschlogl@kaust.edu.sa [KAUST, PSE Division, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Joshi, R. P.; Adhikari, N. P. [Central Department of Physics, Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu (Nepal)

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using density functional theory, we present a comparative study of the electronic properties of BN-doped graphene monolayer, bilayer, trilayer, and multilayer systems. In addition, we address a superlattice of pristine and BN-doped graphene. Five doping levels between 12.5% and 75% are considered, for which we obtain band gaps from 0.02?eV to 2.43?eV. We demonstrate a low effective mass of the charge carriers.

  14. Miniaturized Multi-Band Antenna Design via Element Collocation and Inductive Feed Loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R. P.

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In a FY09 SDRD project, four separate antennas were designed to receive signals of interest covering a broad range of frequencies. While the elements exceeded specifications, the array footprint is substantial. Research performed by the CU Microwave Active Antenna Group in collaboration with RSL, showed promise in realizing a reduced structure. This work will expand upon this previous research. This project will result in a prototype quad-band antenna.

  15. Population effects on the red giant clump absolute magnitude The K-band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salaris, M; Salaris, Maurizio

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed analysis of the behaviour of the Red Clump K-band absolute magnitude (M(K,RC)) in simple and composite stellar populations, in light of its use as standard candle for distance determinations. The advantage of using M(K,RC), following recent empirical calibrations of its value for the solar neighbourhood, arises from its very low sensitivity to the extinction by interstellar dust. We provide data and equations which allow the determination of the K-band population correction Delta(M(K,RC)) (difference between the Red Clump brightness in the solar neighbourhood and in the population under scrutiny) for any generic stellar population. These data complement the results presented in Girardi & Salaris(2001) for the V- and I-band. We show how data from galactic open clusters consistently support our predicted Delta(M(V,RC)), Delta(M(I,RC)) and Delta(M(K,RC)) values. Multiband VIK population corrections for various galaxy systems are provided. They can be used in conjunction with the method ...

  16. FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.] [Omega-P, Inc.

    2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW ?s-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  17. Temperature-driven band inversion in Pb?.??Sn?.??Se: Optical and Hall-effect studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anand, Naween; Gu, Genda; Buvaev, Sanal; Hebard, A. F.; Tanner, D. B.; Chen, Zhiguo; Li, Zhiqiang; Choudhary, Kamal; Sinnott, S. B.; Martin, C.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical and Hall-effect measurements have been performed on single crystals of Pb?.??Sn?.??Se, a IV-VI mixed chalcogenide. The temperature dependent (10–300 K) reflectance was measured over 40–7000 cm?ą (5–870 meV) with an extension to 15,500 cm?ą (1.92 eV) at room temperature. The reflectance was fit to the Drude-Lorentz model using a single Drude component and several Lorentz oscillators. The optical properties at the measured temperatures were estimated via Kramers-Kronig analysis as well as by the Drude-Lorentz fit. The carriers were p-type with the carrier density determined by Hall measurements. A signature of valence intraband transition is found in the low-energy opticalmore »spectra. It is found that the valence-conduction band transition energy as well as the free carrier effective mass reach minimum values at 100 K, suggesting temperature-driven band inversion in the material. Density function theory calculation for the electronic band structure also make similar predictions.« less

  18. Ginzburg--Landau description of laminar-turbulent oblique band formation in transitional plane Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolland, Joran

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plane Couette flow, the flow between two parallel planes moving in opposite directions, is an example of wall-bounded flow experiencing a transition to turbulence with an ordered coexistence of turbulent and laminar domains in some range of Reynolds numbers [R_g,R_t]. When the aspect-ratio is sufficiently large, this coexistence occurs in the form of alternately turbulent and laminar oblique bands. As R goes up trough the upper threshold R_t, the bands disappear progressively to leave room to a uniform regime of featureless turbulence. This continuous transition is studied here by means of under-resolved numerical simulations understood as a modelling approach adapted to the long time, large aspect-ratio limit. The state of the system is quantitatively characterised using standard observables (turbulent fraction and turbulence intensity inside the bands). A pair of complex order parameters is defined for the pattern which is further analysed within a standard Ginzburg--Landau formalism. Coefficients of the mo...

  19. EXAMINING THE BROADBAND EMISSION SPECTRUM OF WASP-19b: A NEW z-BAND ECLIPSE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, George; Bayliss, Daniel D. R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Rd, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Bailey, Jeremy, E-mail: george@mso.anu.edu.au [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    WASP-19b is one of the most irradiated hot-Jupiters known. Its secondary eclipse is the deepest of all transiting planets and has been measured in multiple optical and infrared bands. We obtained a z-band eclipse observation with a measured depth of 0.080% {+-} 0.029%, using the 2 m Faulkes Telescope South, which is consistent with the results of previous observations. We combined our measurement of the z-band eclipse with previous observations to explore atmosphere models of WASP-19b that are consistent with its broadband spectrum. We use the VSTAR radiative transfer code to examine the effect of varying pressure-temperature profiles and C/O abundance ratios on the emission spectrum of the planet. We find that models with super-solar carbon enrichment best match the observations, which is consistent with previous model retrieval studies. We also include upper atmosphere haze as another dimension in the interpretation of exoplanet emission spectra and find that particles <0.5 {mu}m in size are unlikely to be present in WASP-19b.

  20. Photonic-band-gap properties for two-component slow light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruseckas, J.; Kudriasov, V.; Juzeliunas, G.; Unanyan, R. G.; Otterbach, J.; Fleischhauer, M. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, A. Gostauto 12, Vilnius 01108 (Lithuania); Fachbereich Physik and Research Center OPTIMAS, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern D-67663 (Germany)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider two-component ''spinor'' slow light in an ensemble of atoms coherently driven by two pairs of counterpropagating control laser fields in a double tripod-type linkage scheme. We derive an equation of motion for the spinor slow light (SSL) representing an effective Dirac equation for a massive particle with the mass determined by the two-photon detuning. By changing the detuning the atomic medium acts as a photonic crystal with a controllable band gap. If the frequency of the incident probe light lies within the band gap, the light experiences reflection from the sample and can tunnel through it. For frequencies outside the band gap, the transmission and reflection probabilities oscillate with the increasing length of the sample. In both cases the reflection takes place into the complementary mode of the probe field. We investigate the influence of the finite excited state lifetime on the transmission and reflection coefficients of the probe light. We discuss possible experimental implementations of the SSL using alkali-metal atoms such as rubidium or sodium.