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Sample records for vieux desert band

  1. UNLV DESERT SUNRISE DESERT SUNRISE HOME Project Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UNLV DESERT SUNRISE DESERT SUNRISE HOME Project Summary Desert Sunrise is a net-zero site energy home that combines the culture and traditions of the Moapa Band of Paiutes of Southern Nevada with contemporary, evidence-based design practices to produce a safe, comfortable and energy efficient home in the heart of the Mojave Desert. Relevance of Project to the Goals of the Competition Desert Sunrise was designed using a rigorous research approach to understand how advanced building technologies

  2. DESERT SUNLIGHT | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DESERT SUNLIGHT DESERT SUNLIGHT PDF icon DOE-LPO_Project-Posters_PV_Desert-Sunlight.pdf More Documents & Publications DESERT SUNLIGHT Powering New Markets: Utility-scale Photovoltaic Solar GENESIS DOE-LPO_Email-Update_001_Through_11

  3. Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Geothermal Area (Redirected from Desert Peak Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Desert Peak Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2...

  4. Desert Peak EGS Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Desert Peak EGS Project Desert Peak EGS Project Desert Peak EGS Project presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon desert_peak_egs_peer2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Desert Peak EGS Project Bradys EGS Project Creation of an Engineered Geothermal System through Hydraulic and Thermal Stimulation

  5. Desert Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Desert Solar Place: Apple Valley, California Zip: 92308 Sector: Renewable Energy, Solar Product: Selling and installing commercial renewable energy projects, mainly...

  6. DESERT SUNLIGHT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (FIPP) to finance Desert Sunlight, a 550-MW photovoltaic (PV) solar generation plant. ... The loan guarantees helped attract new lenders into the utility-scale photovoltaic market ...

  7. Desert Wind Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Wind Power Facility Desert Wind Power Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Proposed Developer...

  8. Desert Peak EGS Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Desert Peak EGS Project DOE Award: DE-FC6-02ID14406 Ethan Chabora GeothermEx, a Schlumberger Company Ezra Zemach Ormat Nevada Inc. Project Officer: Bill Vandermeer Total Project Funding: $7.6M April 22nd, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Insert photo of your choice 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov - Timeline * Project start date: September 2002 * Project end date: Q3 2013 * Percentage complete: 90% - Budget *

  9. Supersymmetry without the Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Poland, David

    2006-09-26

    Naturalness of electroweak symmetry breaking in weak scale supersymmetric theories may suggest the absence of the conventional supersymmetric desert. We present a simple, realistic framework for supersymmetry in which (most of) the virtues of the supersymmetric desert are naturally reproduced without having a large energy interval above the weak scale. The successful supersymmetric prediction for the low-energy gauge couplings is reproduced due to a gauged R symmetry present in the effective theory at the weak scale. The observable sector superpotential naturally takes the form of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, but without being subject to the Landau pole constraints up to the conventional unification scale. Supersymmetry breaking masses are generated by the F-term and D-term VEVs of singlet and U(1){sub R} gauge fields, as well as by anomaly mediation, at a scale not far above the weak scale. We study the resulting pattern of supersymmetry breaking masses in detail, and find that it can be quite distinct. We construct classes of explicit models within this framework, based on higher dimensional unified theories with TeV-sized extra dimensions. A similar model based on a non-R symmetry is also presented. These models have a rich phenomenology at the TeV scale, and allow for detailed analyses of, e.g., electroweak symmetry breaking.

  10. Desert Sky Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sky Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Sky Wind Farm Facility Desert Sky Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  11. Erosion Resistance Index (ERI) to Assess Site Stability in Desert Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamada, Yuki; Grippo, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    A new spectral indexerosion resistance index (ERI)was developed to assess erosion risks in desert landscapes. The index was developed by applying trigonometry to the combination of the green/red band-ratio and the red/near infrared band-ratio from very high spatial resolution imagery. The resultant ERI maps showed spatially cohesive distributions of high and low index values across the study areas. High index values were observed over areas that were resistant to erosion (such as desert pavement and dense vegetation), while low index values overlapped with areas likely dominated by loose sandy soils, such as stream beds and access roads. Although further investigation is warranted, this new index, ERI, shows promise for the assessment of erosion risks in desert regions.

  12. Desert Peak EGS Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EGS Project Desert Peak EGS Project Geothermal Technologies Program 2010 Peer Review Desert Peak EGS Project, for the Engineered Geothermal Systems Demonstration Projects and Innovative Exploration Technologies. Objective to stimulate permeability in tight well 27-15 and improve connection to rest of the field; improve overall productivity or injectivity. Successful stimulation yields more production and enables more power generation. PDF icon egs_drakos_desert_peak.pdf More Documents &

  13. Desert Queen Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ,"group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Location Fernley, NV County Churchill County, NV Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Northwest...

  14. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Operation Clean Desert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teacher's Guide Return to Top Operation Clean Desert in the Classroom is a science module ... of contamination caused by historic nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site. ...

  15. EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County, CA EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County, CA June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Final Environmental...

  16. Desert Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Desert Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Desert Hot...

  17. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  18. Desert Sunlight Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sunlight Solar Power Plant Facility Desert Sunlight Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer First Solar Location Desert Center, California Coordinates 33.7541038,...

  19. BLM California Desert District Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Desert District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Desert District Office Address: 22835 Calle San Juan De Los Lagos Place: Moreno Valley, CA Zip: 92553...

  20. Geothermometry At Desert Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Queen Area (Garchar & Arehart, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Desert Queen Area (Garchar &...

  1. Reflection Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

  2. Refraction Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

  3. Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

  4. Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration...

  5. Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And...

  6. Cuttings Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration...

  7. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- News & Views Camp Desert Rock

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Camp Desert Rock Photo - Camp Desert Rock Camp Desert Rock, also known as Desert Atom Camp, Nevada, was home to the U.S. Army's Atomic Maneuver Battalion in the 1950s. More than 2,300 soldiers were trained here in 1955. The 100 semi-permanent buildings and more than 500 tents often were filled to the 6,000 personnel capacity. Desert Rock Airport, with its 7,500 foot runway, was built on the former Camp Desert Rock. At peak operation Camp Desert Rock comprised of 100 semi-permanent buildings,

  8. California Desert Native Plants Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Desert Native Plants Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: California Desert Native Plants ActLegal...

  9. BLM West Desert District Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    West Desert District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: BLM West Desert District Office Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Phone Number: (801) 977-4300 ParentHolding Organization:...

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  11. Kick-Starting the School Year with Operation Clean Desert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 10, 2012 Kick-Starting the School Year with Operation Clean Desert School is back in session and Operation Clean Desert was there to give it a kick start! On August 21, 2012, the Operation Clean Desert Teacher's Guide made its debut along with the recently revised companion activity book during the 2012 Educator Appreciation Day & Back To School Fair at The Mirage in Las Vegas, NV. Hundreds of teachers attended the event (hosted by MGM Resorts International) and approximately 150

  12. Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal...

  13. America's Atomic Army: The Historical Archaeology of Camp Desert Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan R. Edwards

    2007-11-02

    Established in 1951, Camp Desert Rock served as the training ground for America's 'Atomic Army'. For the next six years, U.S. ground troops traveled to the Nevada desert to participate in military maneuvers during atmospheric atomic weapons testing. Nearly 60,000 soldiers received physical and psychological training in atomic warfare. Abandoned when atmospheric testing ended, Camp Desert Rock was dismantled and its buildings moved to other locations. Today, the camp appears as a sterile expanse of desert marked by rock-lined tent platforms, concrete foundations, and trash scatters. Although visually unimposing, the site is rich with the history of America's nuclear testing program.

  14. Desert Hills, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Hills, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.5538996, -114.3724569 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  15. Desert Peak II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Desert Peak II Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Churchill, Nevada Coordinates 39.753854931241, -118.95378112793 Loading map......

  16. City of Palm Desert - Energy Independence Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conditioners Windows Doors Other EE Program Info Sector Name Local Administrator Palm Desert Website http:www.cityofpalmdesert.orgIndex.aspx?page484 State California Program...

  17. Palm Desert, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.7222445, -116.3744556 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  18. Desert Hot Springs, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Riverside County, California. It falls under California's 41st congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Desert Hot Springs, California BCL Associates Inc...

  19. Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Structures and Geothermal Reservoirs in the Humboldt Structural Zone Citation James E. Faulds,Larry J. Garside,Gary L. Oppliger. 2003. Structural Analysis of the Desert...

  20. InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States by developing basic measurements and interpretations that will assist reservoir management and expansion at Bradys, Desert Peak and the Desert Peak EGS study...

  1. Field Mapping At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  2. Ground Gravity Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

  3. Ground Magnetics At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Magnetics At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE...

  4. Desert View Highlands, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Desert View Highlands is a census-designated place in Los Angeles County, California.1...

  5. Desert Shores, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Desert Shores is a census-designated place in Imperial County, California.1 References ...

  6. Desert scientists turn to rainforest for climate answers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Desert scientists turn to rainforest for climate answers Desert scientists turn to rainforest for climate answers Work in Brazil's Amazon Basin should improve climate prediction. May 30, 2014 Curiosity zaps Mars for vital signs: ChemCam, designed by Lab team, looks for elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, all of which are crucial for life. Heath-Powers: Los Alamos scientist Heath Powers, foreground, and on-site technician Vagner Castro work on field equipment for measuring carbon

  7. Desert Birthday Be Prepared Environmental Management's Operation Clean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Desert Birthday Be Prepared Environmental Management's Operation Clean Desert program turns 10 in April. The Emergency Operations Center in North Las Vegas gets reconfigured to enhance mission. Will you know what to do if an emergency strikes the NvE? See page 10. See page 3. See page 4. JLON Hosts American, British Joint Working Group The Joint Laboratory Office-Nevada (JLON), in concert with Mark Martinez, deputy principal associate director for Weapons and Complex Integration at the Lawrence

  8. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-PV-DesertSunlight

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DESERT SUNLIGHT By working with 14 commercial lending partners, Desert Sunlight helped pave the way for future utility-scale photovoltaic solar deals. INVESTING in AMERICAN ENERGY OWNERS NextEra Energy, General Electric & Sumitomo of America LOCATION Riverside County, California LOAN AMOUNT $1.5 Billion ISSUANCE DATE September 2011 GENERATION CAPACITY 550 MW PROJECTED ANNUAL GENERATION 1,060,000 MWh CLIMATE BENEFIT 614,000 Metric Tons of C0 2 Prevented Annually

  9. InfiniBand Interconnects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPICH2 MVAPICH2 Equipment InfiniBand 4x 10 GigE Fujitsu switch NetEffect NIC Equipment & Benchmarks Latency Results Bandwidth Results Bidirectional Bandwidth...

  10. EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA...

  11. PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: PSInSAR At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

  12. EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County, CA |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy 8: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County, CA EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County, CA June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Final Environmental Impact Statement Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project, California June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement First Solar Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project October 6, 2011 EIS-0448: Record of Decision Issuance of a Loan Guarantee to First Solar, Inc., for the

  13. Dramatic Demand Reduction In The Desert Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, Robert; Hsieh, Sean; Lee, Joon; Baghzouz, Yahia; Cross, Andrew; Chatterjee, Sarah

    2015-07-06

    This report summarizes a project that was funded to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), with subcontractors Pulte Homes and NV Energy. The project was motivated by the fact that locations in the Desert Southwest portion of the US demonstrate very high peak electrical demands, typically in the late afternoons in the summer. These high demands often require high priced power to supply the needs, and the large loads can cause grid supply problems. An approach was proposed through this contact that would reduce the peak electrical demands to an anticipated 65% of what code-built houses of the similar size would have. It was proposed to achieve energy reduction through four approaches applied to a development of 185 homes in northwest part of Las Vegas named Villa Trieste. First, the homes would all be highly energy efficient. Secondly, each house would have a PV array installed on it. Third, an advanced demand response technique would be developed to allow the resident to have some control over the energy used. Finally, some type of battery storage would be used in the project. Pulte Homes designed the houses. The company considered initial cost vs. long-term savings and chose options that had relatively short paybacks. HERS (Home Energy Rating Service) ratings for the homes are approximately 43 on this scale. On this scale, code-built homes rate at 100, zero energy homes rate a 0, and Energy Star homes are 85. In addition a 1.764 Wp (peak Watt) rated PV array was used on each house. This was made up of solar shakes that were in visual harmony with the roofing material used. A demand response tool was developed to control the amount of electricity used during times of peak demand. While demand response techniques have been used in the utility industry for some time, this particular approach is designed to allow the customer to decide the degree of participation in the response activity. The temperature change in the residence can be decided by the residents by adjusting settings. In a sense the customer can choose between greater comfort and greater money savings during demand response circumstances. Finally a battery application was to be considered. Initially it was thought that a large battery (probably a sodium-sulfur type) would be installed. However, after the contract was awarded, it was determined that a single, centrally-located battery system would not be appropriate for many reasons, including that with the build out plan there would not be any location to put it. The price had risen substantially since the budget for the project was put together. Also, that type of battery has to be kept hot all the time, but its use was only sought for summer operation. Hence, individual house batteries would be used, and these are discussed at the end of this report. Many aspects of the energy use for climate control in selected houses were monitored before residents moved in. This was done both to understand the magnitude of the energy flows but also to have data that could be compared to the computer simulations. The latter would be used to evaluate various aspects of our plan. It was found that good agreement existed between actual energy use and computed energy use. Hence, various studies were performed via simulations. Performance simulations showed the impact on peak energy usage between a code built house of same size and shape compared to the Villa Trieste homes with and without the PV arrays on the latter. Computations were also used to understand the effect of varying orientations of the houses in this typical housing development, including the effect of PV electrical generation. Energy conservation features of the Villa Trieste homes decreased the energy use during peak times (as well as all others), but the resulting decreased peak occurred at about the same time as the code-built houses. Consideration of the PV generation decreases the grid energy use further during daylight hours, but did not extend long enough many days to decrease the peak. Hence, a demand response approach, as planned, was needed. With participation of the residents in the demand response program developed does enable the houses to reduce the peak demand between 66% and 72%, depending on the built years. This was addressed fully in the latter part the study and is described in the latter part of this report.

  14. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  15. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  16. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Gonzales, Aaron A. (San Jose, CA); Patel, Mahadeo R. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  17. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Gonzales, Aaron A. (San Jose, CA); Patel, Mahadeo R. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  18. Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review Report | Department of Energy East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review PDF icon egs_008_zemach.pdf More Documents & Publications Feasibility of EGS Development at Bradys Hot Springs, Nevada Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System through

  19. The Mystery of the Gun Turret in the Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R. D.

    2015-11-30

    The mystery of the gun turret in the desert began with an ingenious idea: to develop a reusable open-air line of sight diagnostic device to support LLNL’s early nuclear weapons development efforts. Obtained from the Mare Island Navy Shipyard (MINS) in January 1957, the gun turret traveled by ship to the Naval Construction Battalion base at Port Hueneme, California, and then by truck to Area 2 in the Yucca Flats valley at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS).

  20. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldman, Don S. (Folsom, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  1. Fire Impacts on the Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenstermaker Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located within the Mojave Desert, which is the driest region in North America. Precipitation on the NNSS varies from an annual average of 130 millimeters (mm; 5.1 inches) with a minimum of 47 mm (1.9 inches) and maximum of 328 mm (12.9 inches) over the past 15 year period to an annual average of 205 mm (8.1 inches) with an annual minimum of 89 mm (3.5 inches) and maximum of 391 mm (15.4 inches) for the same time period; for a Frenchman Flat location at 970 meters (m; 3182 feet) and a Pahute Mesa location at 1986 m (6516 feet), respectively. The combination of aridity and temperature extremes has resulted in sparsely vegetated basins (desert shrub plant communities) to moderately vegetated mountains (mixed coniferous forest plant communities); both plant density and precipitation increase with increasing elevation. Whereas some plant communities have evolved under fire regimes and are dependent upon fire for seed germination, plant communities within the Mojave Desert are not dependent on a fire regime and therefore are highly impacted by fire (Brown and Minnich, 1986; Brooks, 1999). As noted by Johansen (2003) natural range fires are not prevalent in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts because there is not enough vegetation present (too many shrub interspaces) to sustain a fire. Fire research and hence publications addressing fires in the Southwestern United States (U.S.) have therefore focused on forest, shrub-steppe and grassland fires caused by both natural and anthropogenic ignition sources. In the last few decades, however, invasion of mid-elevation shrublands by non-native Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and Bromus tectorum (Hunter, 1991) have been highly correlated with increased fire frequency (Brooks and Berry, 2006; Brooks and Matchett, 2006). Coupled with the impact of climate change, which has already been shown to be playing a role in increased forest fires (Westerling et al., 2006), it is likely that the fire frequency will further increase in the Mojave Desert (Knapp 1998; Smith et al., 1987; Smith et al., 2000).

  2. Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location San Emidio...

  3. 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  4. Stepout-Deepening Wells At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Stepout-Deepening Wells At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location San Emidio...

  5. EIS-0448: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to First Solar for the Proposed Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    First Solar Desert Sunlight Solar Farm (DSSF) Project, proposes to develop a 550-megawatt photovoltaic solar project and proposes to facilitate the construction and operation of the Red Bluff Substation, California Desert Conservation Area (CDCA) Plan, Riverside County, California.

  6. Oxygen A-band Exploitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ? scatteringreflection diagnostics of media permeated with gas Hi-res O 2 A-band Spectroscopy, I: Cloud products are statistical cross-section density...

  7. Band anticrossing in dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2003-12-23

    Alloying III-V compounds with small amounts of nitrogen leads to dramatic reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy in the resulting dilute nitride alloys. The effect originates from an anti-crossing interaction between the extended conduction-band states and localized N states. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic subbands. The downward shift of the lower conduction subband edge is responsible for the N-induced reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy. The changes in the conduction band structure result in significant increase in electron effective mass and decrease in the electron mobility, and lead to a large enhance of the maximum doping level in GaInNAs doped with group VI donors. In addition, a striking asymmetry in the electrical activation of group IV and group VI donors can be attributed to mutual passivation process through formation of the nearest neighbor group-IV donor nitrogen pairs.

  8. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  9. Biotic Processes Regulating the Carbon Balance of Desert Ecosystems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S; Smith, Stanley D; Evans, Dave; Ogle, Kiona; Fenstermaker, Lynn

    2012-12-13

    Our results from the 10-year elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration study at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) indicate that the Mojave Desert is a dynamic ecosystem with the capacity to respond quickly to environmental changes. The Mojave Desert ecosystem is accumulating carbon (C), and over the 10-year experiment, C accumulation was significantly greater under elevated [CO{sub 2}] than under ambient, despite great fluctuations in C inputs from year to year and even apparent reversals in which [CO{sub 2}] treatment had greater C accumulations.

  10. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Dataset) | SciTech Connect Dataset: Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting. Authors:

  11. Desert Peak to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A., (ed) Nevada geothermal areas: Desert Peak, Humboldt House, Beoware: Guidebook for field trip Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  12. VP of Transmission System Asset Management for Desert Southwest Region (Maintenance Manager)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Maintenance (G5000) 615 S. 43rd Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85009...

  13. Operation Clean Desert Educates Hundreds of Students on EM Program in

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nevada | Department of Energy Operation Clean Desert Educates Hundreds of Students on EM Program in Nevada Operation Clean Desert Educates Hundreds of Students on EM Program in Nevada September 24, 2015 - 12:05pm Addthis Jeff Wurtz, an NNSS groundwater specialist, uses an ant farm style model to show middle school students how an aquifer works. Jeff Wurtz, an NNSS groundwater specialist, uses an ant farm style model to show middle school students how an aquifer works. Hundreds of teachers

  14. SunLine Tests HHICE Bus in Desert Climate | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tests HHICE Bus in Desert Climate SunLine Tests HHICE Bus in Desert Climate Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Projects (Fact Sheet). PDF icon 40107.pdf More Documents & Publications SunLine Transit Agency, Hydrogen-Powered Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results SunLine Transit Agency Hydrogen-Powered Transit Buses: Third Evaluation Report -- Appendices SunLine Transit Agency Hydrogen-Powered Transit Buses: Third Evaluation Report and

  15. Observed 20th Century Desert Dust Variability: Impact on Climate and Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahowald, Natalie; Kloster, Silvia; Engelstaedter, S.; Moore, Jefferson Keith; Mukhopadhyay, S.; McConnell, J. R.; Albani, S.; Doney, Scott C.; Bhattacharya, A.; Curran, M. A. J.; Flanner, Mark G.; Hoffman, Forrest M; Lawrence, David M.; Lindsay, Keith; Mayewski, P. A.; Neff, Jason; Rothenberg, D.; Thomas, E.; Thornton, Peter E; Zender, Charlie S.

    2010-01-01

    Desert dust perturbs climate by directly and indirectly interacting with incoming solar and outgoing long wave radiation, thereby changing precipitation and temperature, in addition to modifying ocean and land biogeochemistry. While we know that desert dust is sensitive to perturbations in climate and human land use, previous studies have been unable to determine whether humans were increasing or decreasing desert dust in the global average. Here we present observational estimates of desert dust based on paleodata proxies showing a doubling of desert dust during the 20th century over much, but not all the globe. Large uncertainties remain in estimates of desert dust variability over 20th century due to limited data. Using these observational estimates of desert dust change in combination with ocean, atmosphere and land models, we calculate the net radiative effect of these observed changes (top of atmosphere) over the 20th century to be -0.14 {+-} 0.11 W/m{sup 2} (1990-1999 vs. 1905-1914). The estimated radiative change due to dust is especially strong between the heavily loaded 1980-1989 and the less heavily loaded 1955-1964 time periods (-0.57 {+-} 0.46 W/m{sup 2}), which model simulations suggest may have reduced the rate of temperature increase between these time periods by 0.11 C. Model simulations also indicate strong regional shifts in precipitation and temperature from desert dust changes, causing 6 ppm (12 PgC) reduction in model carbon uptake by the terrestrial biosphere over the 20th century. Desert dust carries iron, an important micronutrient for ocean biogeochemistry that can modulate ocean carbon storage; here we show that dust deposition trends increase ocean productivity by an estimated 6% over the 20th century, drawing down an additional 4 ppm (8 PgC) of carbon dioxide into the oceans. Thus, perturbations to desert dust over the 20th century inferred from observations are potentially important for climate and biogeochemistry, and our understanding of these changes and their impacts should continue to be refined.

  16. Resistive band for turbomachine blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Herbert Chidsey; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-08-25

    A turbomachine system includes a rotor that defines a longitudinal axis of the turbomachine system. A first blade is coupled to the rotor, and the first blade has first and second laminated plies. A first band is coupled to the first blade and is configured to resist separation of the first and second laminated plies.

  17. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David A. (Walnut Creek, CA); Flood, William S. (Berkeley, CA); Arthur, Allan A. (Martinez, CA); Voelker, Ferdinand (Orinda, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

  18. Augustine Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Deep in the Coachella Valley, the tribe's reservation is a desert environment entirely below sea level, with an average elevation of minus 90 feet. Strong, consistent winds cross the desert floor, indicating that wind power might be viable for this underdeveloped reservation.

  19. Numerical modeling of aerial bursts and ablation melting of Libyan desert

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    glass. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Numerical modeling of aerial bursts and ablation melting of Libyan desert glass. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical modeling of aerial bursts and ablation melting of Libyan desert glass. No abstract prepared. Authors: Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick Publication Date: 2006-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 892766 Report Number(s): SAND2006-4263C TRN: US200623%%501 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation:

  20. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S.

    2007-12-19

    Increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration during the last 250 years are unequivocal, and CO{sub 2} will continue to increase at least for the next several decades (Houghton et al. 2001, Keeling & Whorf 2002). Arid ecosystems are some of the most important biomes globally on a land surface area basis, are increasing in area at an alarming pace (Dregne 1991), and have a strong coupling with regional climate (Asner & Heidebrecht 2005). These water-limited ecosystems also are predicted to be the most sensitive to elevated CO{sub 2}, in part because they are stressful environments where plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} may be amplified (Strain & Bazzaz 1983). Indeed, all C{sub 3} species examined at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF) have shown increased A{sub net} under elevated CO{sub 2} (Ellsworth et al. 2004, Naumburg et al. 2003, Nowak et al. 2004). Furthermore, increased shoot growth for individual species under elevated CO{sub 2} was spectacular in a very wet year (Smith et al. 2000), although the response in low to average precipitation years has been smaller (Housman et al. 2006). Increases in perennial cover and biomass at the NDFF are consistent with long term trends in the Mojave Desert and elsewhere in the Southwest, indicating C sequestration in woody biomass (Potter et al. 2006). Elevated CO{sub 2} also increases belowground net primary production (BNPP), with average increases of 70%, 21%, and 11% for forests, bogs, and grasslands, respectively (Nowak et al. 2004). Although detailed studies of elevated CO{sub 2} responses for desert root systems were virtually non-existent prior to our research, we anticipated that C sequestration may occur by desert root systems for several reasons. First, desert ecosystems exhibit increases in net photosynthesis and primary production at elevated CO{sub 2}. If large quantities of root litter enter the ecosystem at a time when most decomposers are inactive, significant quantities of carbon may be stored belowground in relatively recalcitrant forms. Indeed, a model-based analysis predicted that the arid/semiarid southwestern bioclimatic region had one of the highest rates of net carbon storage in the United States over the past century (Schimel et al. 2000). Second, root systems of desert plants are often extensive (Foxx et al. 1984, Hartle et al. 2006) with relatively large proportions of roots deep in the soil (Schenk & Jackson 2002). Thus, an understanding of belowground processes in desert ecosystems provides information on the potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems.

  1. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility-scale PV Solar Market | Department of Energy Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market February 9, 2015 - 12:01am Addthis In 2011, LPO issued loan guarantees to the first 5 PV projects larger than 100 MW in the U.S. An additional 17 projects have been financed since without loan guarantees. In 2011, LPO issued loan

  2. Campo Band of Mission Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Campo Band of Mission Indians ("Band") goal is to develop a 300 MW wind energy project ("Kumeyaay Wind II") in two phases over the next two to five years.

  3. Photovoltaic at Hollywood and Desert Breeze Recreational Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Shane

    2015-09-24

    Executive Summary Renewable Energy Initiatives for Clark County Parks and Recreation Solar Project DOE grant # DE-EE0003180 In accordance with the goals of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for promoting solar energy as clean, carbon-free and cost-effective, the County believed that a recreational center was an ideal place to promote solar energy technologies to the public. This project included the construction of solar electricity generation facilities (40kW) at two Clark County facility sites, Desert Breeze Recreational Center and Hollywood Recreational Center, with educational kiosks and Green Boxes for classroom instruction. The major objectives and goals of this Solar Project include demonstration of state of the art technologies for the generation of electricity from solar technology and the creation of an informative and educational tool in regards to the benefits and process of generating alternative energy. Clark County partnered with Anne Johnson (design architect/consultant), Affiliated Engineers Inc. (AEI), Desert Research Institute (DRI), and Morse Electric. The latest photovoltaic technologies were used in the project to help create the greatest expected energy savings for60443 each recreational center. This coupled with the data created from the monitoring system will help Clark County and NREL further understand the real time outputs from the system. The educational portion created with AEI and DRI incorporates material for all ages with a focus on K - 12. The AEI component is an animated story telling the fundamentals of how sunlight is turned into electricity and DRI‘s creation of Solar Green Boxes brings environmental education into the classroom. In addition to the educational component for the public, the energy that is created through the photovoltaic system also translates into saved money and health benefits for the general public. This project has helped Clark County to further add to its own energy reduction goals created by the energy management agenda (Resolution to Encourage Sustainability) and the County’s Eco-initiative. Each site has installed photovoltaic panels on the existing roof structures that exhibit suitable solar exposure. The generation systems utilize solar energy creating electricity used for the facility’s lighting system and other electrical requirements. Unused electricity is sent to the electric utility grid, often at peak demand times. Educational signage, kiosks and information have been included to inform and expand the public’s understanding of solar energy technology. The Solar Green Boxes were created for further hands on classroom education of solar power. In addition, data is sent by a Long Term PV performance monitoring system, complete with data transmission to NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), located in Golden, CO. This system correlates local solar irradiance and weather with power production. The expected outcomes of this Solar Project are as follows: (1) Successful photovoltaic electricity generation technologies to capture solar energy in a useful form of electrical energy. (2) Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and environmental degradation resulting from reduced energy demand from traditional electricity sources such as fossil fuel fired and nuclear power plants. (3) Advance the research and development of solar electricity generation. (4) The education of the general public in regards to the benefits of environmentally friendly electricity generation and Clark County’s efforts to encourage sustainable living practices. (5) To provide momentum for the nexus for future solar generation facilities in Clark County facilities and buildings and further the County’s energy reduction goals. (6) To ultimately contribute to the reduction of dependence on foreign oil and other unsustainable sources of energy. This Solar Project addresses several objectives and goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Energy Technology Program. The project improves the integration and performance of solar electricity directly through implementation of cutting edge technology. The project further addresses this goal by laying important ground work and infrastructure for integration into the utility grid in future related projects. There will also be added security, reliability, and diversity to the energy system by providing and using reliable, secure, distributed electricity in Clark County facilities as well as sending such electricity back into the utility electric grid. A final major objective met by the Solar Project will be the displacement of energy derived by fossil fuels with clean renewable energy created by photovoltaic panels.

  4. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  5. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  6. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    2013-04-30

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  7. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  8. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  9. Band structure engineering and thermoelectric properties of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    charge-compensated filled skutterudites (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Band structure engineering and thermoelectric properties of charge-compensated filled skutterudites Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Band structure engineering and thermoelectric properties of charge-compensated filled skutterudites Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the

  10. X-BAND KLYSTRON DEVELOPMENT AT SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlieks, Arnold E.; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    The development of X-band klystrons at SLAC originated with the idea of building an X-band Linear Collider in the late 1980's. Since then much effort has been expended in developing a reliable X-band Power source capable of delivering >50 MW RF power in pulse widths >1.5 {micro}s. I will report on some of the technical issues and design strategies which have led to the current SLAC klystron designs.

  11. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, D.A.; Flood, W.S.; Arthur, A.A.; Voelker, F.

    1984-03-20

    A broad-band beam bunther is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-

  12. Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians would like to begin to focus on renewable sources for electricity and to actively target lowering the energy usage of the community.

  13. Aroostook Band of Micmac Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the project is to develop a strategic energy plan in order to reduce energy costs in the Aroostook Band of Micmacs' government buildings and homes.

  14. Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) is using the grant funds from the Department of Energy to complete the Energy Efficiency Improvements to seven EBCI facilities.

  15. Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Knapp, Steve

    2011-04-26

    Steve Knapp from Monsanto on "Wood-Producing Sunflower? Mining Genetic Diversity in Desert-Dwelling Wild Species" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  16. Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  17. Apparatus for loading a band saw blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reeves, Steven R. (49 Williams Ave., West Valley, NY 14171)

    1990-01-01

    A band saw blade is loaded between pairs of guide wheels upon tensioning the blade by guiding the blade between pairs of spaced guide plates which define converging slots that converge toward the guide wheels. The approach is particularly useful in loading blades on underwater band saw machines used to cut radioactive materials.

  18. Apparatus for loading a band saw blade

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reeves, S.R.

    1990-03-20

    A band saw blade is loaded between pairs of guide wheels upon tensioning the blade by guiding the blade between pairs of spaced guide plates which define converging slots that converge toward the guide wheels. The approach is particularly useful in loading blades on underwater band saw machines used to cut radioactive materials. 2 figs.

  19. Ecological energetics of the desert tortoise (Gopherus Agassizii): Effects of rainfall and drought

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, C.C.

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate ecological effects of variation in the temporal distribution of a limiting resource (water in the Mojave Desert), energetics of two free-living populations of desert tortoises (Gopherus [=Xerobates] agassizii) were studied concurrently over 18 mo with use of doubly-labeled water. Field metabolic rates (FMR) and feeding rates were highly variable. This variability was manifested at several levels, including seasonal changes within populations, year-to-year differences within populations, and differences between populations. Underlying observed patterns and contrasts was considerable variation among individuals. Much of the variation in energetic variables was associated with a single climatic variable, rainfall. Seasonal, annual, and interpopulation differences in FMR and foraging rates corresponded to differences in availability of free-standing water from rainstorms. Some differences among individuals were apparently due to differences in proclivity or ability to drink. Tortoises had very low FMRs relative to other reptiles, allowed them to tolerate long periods of chronic energy shortage during a drought. Calculations suggested that tortoises experienced a net loss of energy shortage during a drought and tortoises experienced a net loss of energy on their spring diet of succulent annual plants. If so, tortoises require drier forage to accrue an energy profit, emphasizing reliance on drinking rainwater. Further, it suggests that growth (as protein deposition) and net acquisition of energy may be temporally decoupled in desert tortoises, with potential consequences for geographic variation in life history. Energy acquisition and expenditure in desert tortoises are strongly constrained by the contingencies of rainfall, both indirectly through effects on availability and quality of food, and directly through reliance on free-standing water for drinking, which is apparently necessary for achieving a net annual energy profit. 61 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. DOE/NV/10845 IT U S VECAS LIBRARY UC-703 I?. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0845 IT U S VECAS LIBRARY UC-703 I?. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE 3 I 'UNIVERSITY OF . ? .NEVADA SYSTEM Jenny B. Chapman Sam L. Hokett EVALUATION OF GROUNDWATER MONITORING AT O F F S m NUCLEAR TEST AREAS March 1991 WATER RESOURCES CENTER Publication #45085 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. EVALUATION OF GROUNDWATER MONITORING AT OFFSITE NUCLEAR TEST AREAS b-r Jenny B. Chapman Sam L

  1. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  2. Desert architecture for educational buildings, a case study: A center for training university graduates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebeid, M.

    1996-10-01

    A new program for training graduates in desert development is being implemented by the Desert Development Center (DDC) of the American University in Cairo. The facilities consist of fifty bed/sitting rooms for accommodating 100 students. Each unit consists of two rooms and a bathroom for the use of 4 students; a lecture theater which can house 120 students, with adjoining office for trainers as well as necessary facilities; a general cafeteria which can serve 120--150 persons and an adjoining dining room for teaching staff. The cafeteria building also houses the kitchen; a cold storage area; a laundry room, storerooms, sleeping quarters and services for the labor force of the building complex; a system of solar water heaters; and a special sanitary sewage system for treatment of waste water produced by the building`s activities. When designing and implementing this complex, architectural elements and building philosophy based on the concept of integrating with the environment were considered. Elements included orientation heights and building materials suited to the desert environment, thick walls, outer and inner finishing materials, roofs, malkafs, floors, colors, solar heaters, lighting, green areas, windbreaks, terraces, and furniture. The paper includes a general evaluation of this educational building based on the PRA approach (Participatory Rapid Appraisal) involving those living and working in it. As a result of her position with the project, the author was able to evaluate the original designs, recommend modifications, and evaluate their implementation and fulfillment of the original goals of the projects.

  3. ARM - Campaign Instrument - s-band-profiler

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentss-band-profiler Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : NOAA S-band (2835 Mhz) Profiler (S-BAND-PROFILER) Instrument Categories Atmospheric Profiling, Cloud Properties Campaigns CRYSTAL-FACE [ Download Data ] Off Site Campaign : various, including non-ARM sites, 2002.06.26 - 2002.08.01 Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers [ Download Data ] Southern Great

  4. Control Banding and Nanotechnology Synergist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Paik, S

    2009-12-15

    The average Industrial Hygienist (IH) loves a challenge, right? Okay, well here is one with more than a few twists. We start by going through the basics of a risk assessment. You have some chemical agents, a few workers, and the makings of your basic exposure characterization. However, you have no occupational exposure limit (OEL), essentially no toxicological basis, and no epidemiology. Now the real handicap is that you cannot use sampling pumps, cassettes, tubes, or any of the media in your toolbox, and the whole concept of mass-to-dose is out the window, even at high exposure levels. Of course, by the title, you knew we were talking about nanomaterials (NM). However, we wonder how many IHs know that this topic takes everything you know about your profession and turns it upside down. It takes the very foundations that you worked so hard in college and in the field to master and pulls it out from underneath you. It even takes the gold standard of our profession, the quantitative science of exposure assessment, and makes it look pretty darn rusty. Now with NM there is the potential to get some aspect of quantitative measurements, but the instruments are generally very expensive and getting an appropriate workplace personal exposure measurement can be very difficult if not impossible. The potential for workers getting exposures, however, is very real, as evidenced by a recent publication reporting worker exposures to polyacrylate nanoparticles in a Chinese factory (Song et al. 2009). With something this complex and challenging, how does a concept as simple as Control Banding (CB) save the day? Although many IHs have heard of CB, most of their knowledge comes from its application in the COSHH Essentials toolkit. While there is conflicting published research on COSHH Essentials and its value for risk assessments, almost all of the experts agree that it can be useful when no OELs are available (Zalk and Nelson 2008). It is this aspect of CB, its utility with uncertainty, that attracted international NM experts to recommend this qualitative risk assessment approach for NM. However, since their CB recommendation was only in theory, we took on the challenge of developing a working toolkit, the CB Nanotool (see Zalk et al. 2009 and Paik et al. 2008), as a means to perform a risk assessment and protect researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. While it's been acknowledged that engineered NM have potentially endless benefits for society, it became clear to us that the very properties that make nanotechnology so useful to industry could also make them dangerous to humans and the environment. Among the uncertainties and unknowns with NM are: the contribution of their physical structure to their toxicity, significant differences in their deposition and clearance in the lungs when compared to their parent material (PM), a lack of agreement on the appropriate indices for exposure to NM, and very little background information on exposure scenarios or populations at risk. Part of this lack of background information can be traced to the lack of risk assessments historically performed in the industry, with a recent survey indicating that 65% of companies working with NM are not doing any kind of NM-specific risk assessment as they focus on traditional PM methods for IH (Helland et al. 2009). The good news is that the amount of peer-reviewed publications that address environmental, health and safety aspects of NM has been increasing over the last few years; however, the percentage of these that address practical methods to reduce exposure and protect workers is orders of magnitude lower. Our intent in developing the CB Nanotool was to create a simplified approach that would protect workers while unraveling the mysteries of NM for experts and non-experts alike. Since such a large part of the toxicological effects of both the physical and chemical properties of NM were unknown, not to mention changing logarithmically as new NM research continues growing, we needed to account for this lack of information as part of the CB Nano

  5. Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bands that are opaque at the surface * Approximately 40% of the OLR comes from the far-IR * Until recently, the observational tools were not available to evaluate the accuracy of...

  6. Dipole Bands in {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D.; Msezane, B.; Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P.; Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M.; Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P.

    2011-10-28

    High spin states in {sup 196}Hg have been populated in the {sup 198}Pt({alpha},6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

  7. Ramona Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    RAMONA RAMONA BAND BAND OF OF CAHUILLA CAHUILLA INDIANS INDIANS Concept and Design for the Ramona Concept and Design for the Ramona Eco Eco - - Tourism Center Tourism Center Tribal History Tribal History The Reservation was established on The Reservation was established on February 10, 1893. February 10, 1893. Ramona is part of the Bear Clan of the Ramona is part of the Bear Clan of the Cahuilla Nation and are descendents of the Cahuilla Nation and are descendents of the Apapatcem Apapatcem

  8. Eastern Band of Cherokee - Strategic Energy Planning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Strategic Energy Plan Funded By: Department of Energy Technical Support: SCIES at Clemson University Project Manager - Damon Lambert Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Technical Support - Robert Leitner Associate Director South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies - Clemson University 2 EBCI Tribal Government * Three-branch Government * There are over 13,725 enrolled members of the Tribe today * 8,200+ members live on the land held in trust for the ECBI by the US

  9. ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stepp, Jeffrey David (Grandview, MO); Hensley, Dale (Grandview, MO)

    2006-09-12

    A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz 6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

  10. ISM band to U-NII band frequency transverter and method of frequency transversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stepp, Jeffrey David (Grandview, MO); Hensley, Dale (Grandview, MO)

    2006-04-04

    A frequency transverter (10) and method for enabling bi-frequency dual-directional transfer of digitally encoded data on an RF carrier by translating between a crowded or otherwise undesirable first frequency band, such as the 2.4 GHz ISM band, and a less-crowded or otherwise desirable second frequency band, such as the 5.0 GHz-6.0 GHz U-NII band. In a preferred embodiment, the transverter (10) connects between an existing data radio (11) and its existing antenna (30), and comprises a bandswitch (12); an input RF isolating device (14); a transmuter (16); a converter (18); a dual output local oscillator (20); an output RF isolating device (22); and an antenna (24) tuned to the second frequency band. The bandswitch (12) allows for bypassing the transverter (10), thereby facilitating its use with legacy systems. The transmuter (14) and converter (16) are adapted to convert to and from, respectively, the second frequency band.

  11. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Utility-scale PV Solar Market | Department of Energy In 2011, LPO issued loan guarantees to the first 5 PV projects larger than 100 MW in the U.S. An additional 17 projects have been financed since without loan guarantees. In 2011, LPO issued loan guarantees to the first 5 PV projects larger than 100 MW in the U.S. An additional 17 projects have been financed since without loan guarantees. LPO issued a $1.46 billion loan guarantee to Desert Sunlight, a 550-MW photovoltaic solar project

  12. A Microcantilever Sensor Array for the Detection and Inventory of Desert Tortoises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venedam, R. J.; Dillingham, T. R.

    2008-07-01

    Wehavedesignedandtestedaportableinstrumentconsistingofasmallinfraredcameracoupledwithanarrayofpiezoresistivemicrocantileversensorsthatisusedtoprovidereal-time,non-invasive data on desert tortoise den occupancy. The piezoresistive microcantilever (PMC) sensors are used to obtain a chemical signature of tortoise presence from the air deep within the dens, and provide data in cases where the camera cannot extend deep enough into the den to provide visual evidence of tortoise presence. The infrared camera was used to verify the PMC data during testing, and in many cases, such as shallower dens, may be used to provide exact numbers on den populations.

  13. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE 11 UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA SYSTEM DOE/W/10162--20

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    % DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE 11 UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA SYSTEM DOE/W/10162--20 DE86 0 0 1 4 5 6 NEVADA TEST SITE RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM by Richard D. McArthur and Joseph F. Kordas September 1985 WATER RESOURCES CENTER DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any

  14. IR Spectral Bands and Performance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for IR Spectral Bands and Performance Citation Chris Douglass. IR Spectral Bands...

  15. Band Excitation Method Applicable to Scanning Probe Microscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter...

  16. Modeling fluid flow in deformation bands with stabilized localization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling fluid flow in deformation bands with stabilized localization mixed finite elements. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling fluid flow in deformation bands...

  17. Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians - Development of a Strategic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians "First Steps to Implement Strategic Energy Plan" Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians "First Steps to Implement Strategic Energy Plan" ...

  18. High power W-band klystrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caryotakis, George; Scheitrum, Glenn; Jongewaard, Erik; Vlieks, Arnold; Fowkes, Randy [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Li, Jeff [University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The development of W-band klystrons is discussed. Modeling of the klystron performance predicts 100 kW output power from a single klystron. The permanent magnet focusing and small size of the circuit permit combination of multiple klystrons in a module. A six-klystron module in a single vacuum envelope is expected to produce 500 kW peak power and up to 5 kW average power. The critical issues in the W-band klystron development are the electron beam transport and the fabrication of the klystron circuit. Two microfabrication techniques, EDM and LIGA, are being evaluated to produce the W-band circuit. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Band filling effects on temperature performance of intermediate band quantum wire solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunets, Vas. P. Furrow, C. S.; Ware, M. E.; Souza, L. D. de; Benamara, M.; Salamo, G. J.; Mortazavi, M.

    2014-08-28

    Detailed studies of solar cell efficiency as a function of temperature were performed for quantum wire intermediate band solar cells grown on the (311)A plane. A remotely doped one-dimensional intermediate band made of self-assembled In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As quantum wires was compared to an undoped intermediate band and a reference p-i-n GaAs sample. These studies indicate that the efficiencies of these solar cells depend on the population of the one-dimensional band by equilibrium free carriers. A change in this population by free electrons under various temperatures affects absorption and carrier transport of non-equilibrium carriers generated by incident light. This results in different efficiencies for both the doped and undoped intermediate band solar cells in comparison with the reference GaAs p-i-n solar cell device.

  20. Assessment of damage to the desert surfaces of Kuwait due to the Gulf War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. . Center for Remote Sensing); Al-Ajmi, D. . Environmental and Earth Sciences Div.)

    1993-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on a joint research project by Boston University and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research that commenced in April 1992. The project aim is to establish the extent and nature of environmental damage to the desert surface and coastal zone of Kuwait due to the Gulf War and its aftermath. Change detection image enhancement techniques were employed to enhance environmental change by comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper images obtained before the wars and after the cessation of the oil and well fires. Higher resolution SPOT images were also utilized to evaluate the nature of the environmental damage to specific areas. The most prominent changes were due to: (1) the deposition of oil and course-grained soot on the desert surface as a result of oil rain'' from the plume that emanated from the oil well fires; (2) the formation of hundreds of oil lakes, from oil seepage at the damaged oil well heads; (3) the mobilization of sand and dust and (4) the pollution of segments of the coastal zone by the deposition of oil from several oil spills. Interpretation of satellite image data are checked in the field to confirm the observations, and to assess the nature of the damage. Final results will be utilized in establishing the needs for remedial action to counteract the harmful effects of the various types of damage to the environment of Kuwait.

  1. Cabazon Band of Mission Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cabazon Band of Mission Indians' long-range goals are to become energy self-sufficient, foster economic diversity, grow jobs, and improve the well-being of members of the tribe as well as those in its region of Southern California.

  2. X-Band Photoinjector Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Feng; Adolphsen, Chris; Ding, Yuantao; Li, Zenghai; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    SLAC is studying the feasibility of using an X-band RF photocathode gun to produce low emittance bunches for applications such as a mono-energetic MeV {gamma} ray source (in collaboration with LLNL) and a photoinjector for a compact FEL. Beam dynamics studies are being done for a configuration consisting of a 5.5-cell X-band gun followed by several 53-cell high-gradient X-band accelerator structures. A fully 3D program, ImpactT, is used to track particles taking into account space charge forces, short-range longitudinal and transverse wakefields, and the 3D rf fields in the structures, including the quadrupole component of the couplers. The effect of misalignments of the various elements, including the drive-laser, gun, solenoid and accelerator structures, are evaluated. This paper presents these results and estimates of the expected bunch emittance vs cathode gradient, and the effects of mixing between the fundamental and off-frequency longitudinal modes. An X-band gun at SLAC has been shown to operate reliably with a 200 MV/m acceleration gradient at the cathode, which is nearly twice the 115 MV/m acceleration gradient in the LCLS gun. The higher gradient should roughly balance the space charge related transverse emittance growth for the same bunch charge but provide a 3-4 times shorter bunch length. The shorter length would make the subsequent bunch compression easier and allow for a more effective use of emittance exchange. Such a gun can also be used with an X-band linac to produce a compact FEL or g ray source that would require rf sources of only one frequency for beam generation and acceleration. The feasibility of using an X-band rf photocathode gun and accelerator structures to generate high quality electron beams for compact FELs and g ray sources is being studied at SLAC. Results from the X-band photoinjector beam dynamics studies are reported in this paper.

  3. Project Reports for Augustine Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Deep in the Coachella Valley, the tribe's reservation is a desert environment entirely below sea level, with an average elevation of minus 90 feet. Strong, consistent winds cross the desert floor, indicating that wind power might be viable for this underdeveloped reservation.

  4. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

    2007-11-30

    In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the worlds great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plant-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform. We report here the most significant findings of our study.

  5. X-Band RF Gun Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlieks, Arnold; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Anderson, Scott; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-06-22

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  6. S-Band Loads for SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasnykh, A.; Decker, F.-J.; LeClair, R.; /INTA Technologies, Santa Clara

    2012-08-28

    The S-Band loads on the current SLAC linac RF system were designed, in some cases, 40+ years ago to terminate 2-3 MW peak power into a thin layer of coated Kanthal material as the high power absorber [1]. The technology of the load design was based on a flame-sprayed Kanthal wire method onto a base material. During SLAC linac upgrades, the 24 MW peak klystrons were replaced by 5045 klystrons with 65+ MW peak output power. Additionally, SLED cavities were introduced and as a result, the peak power in the current RF setup has increased up to 240 MW peak. The problem of reliable RF peak power termination and RF load lifetime required a careful study and adequate solution. Results of our studies and three designs of S-Band RF load for the present SLAC RF linac system is discussed. These designs are based on the use of low conductivity materials.

  7. Fabrication of photonic band gap materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Constant, Kristen (Ames, IA); Subramania, Ganapathi S. (Ames, IA); Biswas, Rana (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA)

    2002-01-15

    A method for forming a periodic dielectric structure exhibiting photonic band gap effects includes forming a slurry of a nano-crystalline ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material and monodisperse polymer microspheres, depositing a film of the slurry on a substrate, drying the film, and calcining the film to remove the polymer microspheres therefrom. The film may be cold-pressed after drying and prior to calcining. The ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material may be titania, and the polymer microspheres may be polystyrene microspheres.

  8. Agua Caliente Band - Strategic Energy Plan Development

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    STRATEGIC ENERGY PLAN DEVELOPMENT Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians Agua Caliente Indian Reservation Program Overview GOALS * Establishment of a Comprehensive Tribal Energy Policy * Incorporate Energy Efficiency, Renewable Resources into Tribal Economic Development Framework * Capture Economic and Environmental Benefits While Maintaining Respect for Tribal Culture and Traditions PROGRAM OVERVIEW Goals * Create a Living Document That Will Be Responsive to the Planning Needs of the Tribe *

  9. Permanent magnet focused X-band photoinjector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, David U. L. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); Rosenzweig, James (Los Angeles, CA)

    2002-09-10

    A compact high energy photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injection and the linac. High electron beam brightness is achieved by accelerating a tightly focused electron beam in an integrated, multi-cell, X-band rf linear accelerator (linac). The photoelectron linac employs a Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, easing manufacturing tolerances and costs.

  10. Manzanita Band of Mission Indians- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Manzanita Band of Mission Indians ("the tribe") has long recognized that its reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit. The tribe is now investigating the feasibility of commercial scale development of a wind power project on tribal lands. The proposed project is a joint effort between the tribe and its subcontractor and consultant, SeaWest Consulting.

  11. Pay-banding | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Pay-banding | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog

  12. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  13. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R.; /SLAC; Smithe, D.N.; /Mission Res., Newington

    2005-09-12

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat} {approx} {lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focusing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35% beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry.

  14. W-band sheet beam klystron simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, E.R.; Caryotakis, G.; Fowkes, W.R. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Smithe, D.N. [Mission Research Corporation, 8560 Cinderbed Road, Ste. 700, Newington, Virginia 22122 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    With the development of ever higher energy particle accelerators comes the need for compactness and high gradient, which in turn require very high frequency high power rf sources. Recent development work in W-band accelerating techniques has spurred the development of a high-power W-band source. Axisymmetric sources suffer from fundamental power output limitations (P{sub sat}{approximately}{lambda}{sup 2}) brought on by the conflicting requirements of small beam sizes and high beam current. The sheet beam klystron allows for an increase in beam current without substantial increase in the beam current density, allowing for reduced cathode current densities and focussing field strengths. Initial simulations of a 20:1 aspect ratio sheet beam/cavity interaction using the 3 dimensional particle-in-cell code Magic3D have demonstrated a 35{percent} beam-power to RF power extraction efficiency. Calculational work and numerical simulations leading to a prototype W-band sheet beam klystron will be presented, together with preliminary cold test structure studies of a proposed RF cavity geometry. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. NDFF whole-ecosystem manipulation is a flagship experiment of the Terrestrial Carbon Process (TCP) research program of the US Dept. of Energy. It is also a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and a contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The NDFF was developed in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and DOE-EPSCoR programs. FACE (Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment) technology allows researchers to elevate the carbon dioxide level in large study plots while minimizing ecosystem disturbance. At the NDFF the concentration of CO2 was elevated by 50 percent above the present atmospheric levels in three plots in the Mojave Desert ecosystem, while six other plots remained at the current level. This experimental design provided a large area in which integrated teams of scientists could describe and quantify processes regulating carbon, nutrient, and water balances in desert ecosystems.

  16. Project Reports for Campo Band of Mission Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Campo Band of Mission Indians ("Band") goal is to develop a 300 MW wind energy project ("Kumeyaay Wind II") in two phases over the next two to five years.

  17. Cabazon Band of Mission Indians- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Strategic energy planning effort to assist in achieving the tribe's primary goals of economic diversity, economic self-sufficiency, and protecting the health and welfare of tribal members. The Cabazon Band Reservation, located on four sections of non-contiguous land on the eastern half of the Coachella Valley in Riverside County is approximately 25 miles east of Palm Springs, comprises 1500 acres and currently has the seventh highest residential electricity rates among U.S. Native American reservations. The Strategic Energy Plan will enable the tribe to make informed decisions in creating and conducting an effective energy management program for their people.

  18. W-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Burke, A.; Jensen, A.; Jongewaard, E.a Krasnykh, A.; Neubauer, M.; Phillips, R.; Rauenbuehler, K.; /SLAC

    2011-11-11

    Sheet beam devices provide important advantages for very high power, narrow bandwidth RF sources like accelerator klystrons [1]. Reduced current density and increased surface area result in increased power capabi1ity, reduced magnetic fields for focusing and reduced cathode loading. These advantages are offset by increased complexity, beam formation and transport issues and potential for mode competition in the ovennoded cavities and drift tube. This paper will describe the design issues encountered in developing a 100 kW peak and 2 kW average power sheet beam k1ystron at W-band including beam formation, beam transport, circuit design, circuit fabrication and mode competition.

  19. Universal EUV in-band intensity detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berger, Kurt W.

    2004-08-24

    Extreme ultraviolet light is detected using a universal in-band detector for detecting extreme ultraviolet radiation that includes: (a) an EUV sensitive photodiode having a diode active area that generates a current responsive to EUV radiation; (b) one or more mirrors that reflects EUV radiation having a defined wavelength(s) to the diode active area; and (c) a mask defining a pinhole that is positioned above the diode active area, wherein EUV radiation passing through the pinhole is restricted substantially to illuminating the diode active area.

  20. Inter-band optoelectronic properties in quantum dot structure of low band gap III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, Anup; Maiti, Biswajit; Chanda, Debasree

    2014-04-14

    A generalized theory is developed to study inter-band optical absorption coefficient (IOAC) and material gain (MG) in quantum dot structures of narrow gap III-V compound semiconductor considering the wave-vector (k{sup ?}) dependence of the optical transition matrix element. The band structures of these low band gap semiconducting materials with sufficiently separated split-off valance band are frequently described by the three energy band model of Kane. This has been adopted for analysis of the IOAC and MG taking InAs, InSb, Hg{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Te, and In{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}As{sub y}P{sub 1?y} lattice matched to InP, as example of IIIV compound semiconductors, having varied split-off energy band compared to their bulk band gap energy. It has been found that magnitude of the IOAC for quantum dots increases with increasing incident photon energy and the lines of absorption are more closely spaced in the three band model of Kane than those with parabolic energy band approximations reflecting the direct the influence of energy band parameters. The results show a significant deviation to the MG spectrum of narrow-gap materials having band nonparabolicity compared to the parabolic band model approximations. The results reflect the important role of valence band split-off energies in these narrow gap semiconductors.

  1. Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium, represented by the Morongo Band, is comprised of tribes in California, Arizona and New Mexico.

  2. Excitation of Banded Whistler Waves in the Magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, S. Peter; Liu, Kaijun; Winske, Dan

    2012-07-13

    Banded whistler waves can be generated by the whistler anisotropy instability driven by two bi-Maxwellian electron components with T{sub {perpendicular}}/T{sub {parallel}} > 1 at different T{sub {parallel}} For typical magnetospheric condition of 1 < {omega}{sub e}/{Omega}{sub e} < 5 in regions associated with strong chorus, upper-band waves can be excited by anisotropic electrons below {approx} 1 keV, while lower-band waves are excited by anisotropic electrons above {approx} 10 keV. Lower-band waves are generally field-aligned and substantially electromagnetic, while upper-band waves propagate obliquely and have quasi-electrostatic fluctuating electric fields. The quasi-electrostatic feature of upper-band waves suggests that they may be more easily identified in electric field observations than in magnetic field observations. Upper-band waves are liable to Landau damping and the saturation level of upperband waves is lower than lower-band waves, consistent with observations that lower-band waves are stronger than upper-band waves on average. The oblique propagation, the lower saturation level, and the more severe Landau damping together would make upper-band waves more tightly confined to the geomagnetic equator (|{lambda}{sub m}| < {approx}10{sup o}) than lower-band waves.

  3. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-08-04

    Scanning probe microscopy may include a method for generating a band excitation (BE) signal and simultaneously exciting a probe at a plurality of frequencies within a predetermined frequency band based on the excitation signal. A response of the probe is measured across a subset of frequencies of the predetermined frequency band and the excitation signal is adjusted based on the measured response.

  4. W-band free-electron masers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freund, H. P. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, Virginia 22102 (United States); Jackson, R. H.; Danly, B. G.; Levush, B. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States)

    1999-05-07

    Theoretical analyses of high power W-band (i.e., {approx_equal}94 GHz) free-electron maser amplifiers are presented for a helical wiggler/cylindrical waveguide configuration using the three-dimensional slow-time-scale ARACHNE simulation code [9]. The geometry treated by ARACHNE is that of an electron beam propagating through the cylindrical waveguide subject to a helical wiggler and an axial guide magnetic field. Two configurations are discussed. The first is the case of a reversed-guide field geometry where the guide field is oriented antiparallel to the helicity of the wiggler field. Using a 330 kV/20 A electron beam, efficiencies of the order of 7% are calculated with a bandwidth (FWHM) of 5 GHz. The second example employs a strong guide field of 20 kG oriented parallel to the helicity of the wiggler. Here, efficiencies of greater than 8% are possible with a FWHM bandwidth of 4.5 GHz using a 300 kV/20 A electron beam. A normalized emittance of 95 mm-mrad is assumed in both cases, and no beam losses are observed for either case. Both cases assume interaction with the fundamental TE{sub 11} mode, which has acceptably low losses in the W-band.

  5. PLUTONIUM UPTAKE AND BEHAVIOR IN PLANTS OF THE DESERT SOUTHWEST: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

    2011-03-01

    Eight species of desert vegetation and associated soils were collected from the Nevada National Security Site (N2S2) and analyzed for 238Pu and 239+240Pu concentrations. Amongst the plant species sampled were: atmospheric elemental accumulators (moss and lichen), the very slow growing, long-lived creosote bush and the rapidly growing, short-lived cheatgrass brome. The diversity of growth strategies provided insight into the geochemical behavior and bio-availability of Pu at the N2S2. The highest concentrations of Pu were measured in the onion moss (24.27 Bq kg-1 238Pu and 52.78 Bq kg-1 239+240Pu) followed by the rimmed navel lichen (8.18 Bq kg-1 and 18.4 Bq kg-1 respectively), pointing to the importance of eolian transport of Pu. Brome and desert globemallow accumulated between 3 and 9 times higher concentrations of Pu than creosote and sage brush species. These results support the importance of species specific elemental accumulation strategies rather than exposure duration as the dominant variable influencing Pu concentrations in these plants. Total vegetation elemental concentrations of Ce, Fe, Al, Sm and others were also analyzed. Strong correlations were observed between Fe and Pu. This supports the conclusion that Pu was accumulated as a consequence of the active accumulation of Fe and other plant required nutrients. Cerium and Pu are considered to be chemical analogs. Strong correlations observed in plants support the conclusion that these elements displayed similar geochemical behavior in the environment as it related to the biochemical uptake process of vegetation. Soils were also sampled in association with vegetation samples. This allowed for the calculation of a concentration ratio (CR). The CR values for Pu in plants were highly influenced by the heterogeneity of Pu distribution among sites. Results from the naturally occurring elements of concern were more evenly distributed between sample sites. This allowed for the development of a pattern of plant species that accumulated Ce, Sm, Fe and Al. The highest accumulators of these elements were onion moss, lichen flowed by brome. The lowest accumulators were creosote bush and fourwing saltbush. This ranked order corresponds to plant accumulations of Pu.

  6. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF THREE MOJAVE DESERT GRASSES IN RESPONSE TO ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; C. K. IVANS; P. VIVIN; J. R. SEEMANN; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Gas exchange, biomass and N allocation were compared among three Mojave Desert grasses representing different functional types to determine if photosynthetic responses and the associated allocation of resources within the plant changed after prolonged exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}. Leaf gas exchange characteristics were measured for Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens (C{sub 3} invasive annual), Achnatherum hymenoides (C{sub 3} native perennial) and Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4} native perennial) exposed to 360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (ambient) and 1000 {micro}mol mol{sup -1} (elevated) CO{sub 2} concentrations in a glasshouse experiment, and tissue biomass and total N pools were quantified from three harvests during development. The maximum rate of carboxylation by the N-rich enzyme Rubisco (Vc{sub max}), which was inferred from the relationship between net CO{sub 2} assimilation (A{sub net}) and intracellular CO{sub 2} concentration (c{sub i}), declined in the C{sub 3} species Bromus and Achnatherum across all sampling dates, but did not change at elevated CO{sub 2} for the C{sub 4} Pleuraphis. Whole plant N remained the same between CO{sub 2} treatments for all species, but patterns of allocation differed for the short- and long-lived C{sub 3} species. For Bromus, leaf N used for photosynthesis was reallocated to reproduction at elevated CO{sub 2} as inferred from the combination of lower Vc{sub max} and N per leaf area (NLA) at elevated CO{sub 2}, but similar specific leaf area (SLA, cm{sup 2} g{sup -1}), and of greater reproductive effort (RE) for the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment. Vc{sub max}, leaf N concentration and NLA declined for the perennial Achnatherum at elevated CO{sub 2} potentially due to accumulation of carbohydrates or changes in leaf morphology inferred from lower SLA and greater total biomass at elevated CO{sub 2}. In contrast, Vc{sub max} for the C{sub 4} perennial Pleuraphis did not change at elevated CO{sub 2}, and tissue biomass and total N were the same between CO{sub 2} treatments. Adjustments in photosynthetic capacity at elevated CO{sub 2} may optimize N allocation of C{sub 3} species in the Mojave Desert, which may influence plant performance and plant-plant interactions of these co-occurring species.

  7. Fine structure on the green band in ZnO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D. C.; Look, D. C.; Jogai, B.

    2001-06-01

    An emission band at 2.4 eV, called the green band, is observed in most ZnO samples, no matter what growth technique is used. Sometimes this band includes fine structure, which consists mainly of doublets, repeated with a longitudinal-optical-phonon-energy spacing (72 meV). We have developed a vibronic model for the green band, based on transitions from two separate shallow donors to a deep acceptor. The donors, at energies 30 and 60 meV from the conduction-band edge, respectively, are also found from Hall-effect measurements. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Hybrid Band effects program (Lockheed Martin shared vision CRADA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, L. D.

    2012-03-01

    Hybrid Band{trademark} (H-band) is a Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control (LMMFC) designation for a specific RF modulation that causes disruption of select electronic components and circuits. H-Band enables conventional high-power microwave (HPM) effects (with a center frequency of 1 to 2 GHz, for example) using a higher frequency carrier signal. The primary technical objective of this project was to understand the fundamental physics of Hybrid Band{trademark} Radio Frequency effects on electronic systems. The follow-on objective was to develop and validate a Hybrid Band{trademark} effects analysis process.

  9. Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

    2009-01-30

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the First Steps phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribes plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: Develop the Tribes energy goals and objectives Establish the Tribes current energy usage Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives Create an action plan for the selected options

  10. Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) always seeks new opportunities to diversify its economy and create new career opportunities for tribal members, which is the purpose of this feasibility study. The MBCI will study the feasibility of locating a renewable energy installation on tribal lands. The technologies to be utilized in the renewable energy installation will be those that can readily handle poultry litter, either alone or in combination with wood residues. The purpose of the study is to determine whether such an installation can be both economically sustainable and consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the tribe. The feasibility study will result in the development of a thorough business plan that will allow the MBCI to make an informed decision regarding this project.

  11. Wide band stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bashforth, M.B.; Gardner, D.; Patrick, D.; Lewallen, T.A.; Nammath, S.R.; Painter, K.D.; Vadnais, K.G.

    1996-03-12

    A wide band ground penetrating radar system is described embodying a method wherein a series of radio frequency signals is produced by a single radio frequency source and provided to a transmit antenna for transmission to a target and reflection therefrom to a receive antenna. A phase modulator modulates those portions of the radio frequency signals to be transmitted and the reflected modulated signal is combined in a mixer with the original radio frequency signal to produce a resultant signal which is demodulated to produce a series of direct current voltage signals, the envelope of which forms a cosine wave shaped plot which is processed by a Fast Fourier Transform Unit 44 into frequency domain data wherein the position of a preponderant frequency is indicative of distance to the target and magnitude is indicative of the signature of the target. 6 figs.

  12. Wide band stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bashforth, Michael B.; Gardner, Duane; Patrick, Douglas; Lewallen, Tricia A.; Nammath, Sharyn R.; Painter, Kelly D.; Vadnais, Kenneth G.

    1996-01-01

    A wide band ground penetrating radar system (10) embodying a method wherein a series of radio frequency signals (60) is produced by a single radio frequency source (16) and provided to a transmit antenna (26) for transmission to a target (54) and reflection therefrom to a receive antenna (28). A phase modulator (18) modulates those portion of the radio frequency signals (62) to be transmitted and the reflected modulated signal (62) is combined in a mixer (34) with the original radio frequency signal (60) to produce a resultant signal (53) which is demodulated to produce a series of direct current voltage signals (66) the envelope of which forms a cosine wave shaped plot (68) which is processed by a Fast Fourier Transform unit 44 into frequency domain data (70) wherein the position of a preponderant frequency is indicative of distance to the target (54) and magnitude is indicative of the signature of the target (54).

  13. Secondary production of benthic insects in three cold-desert streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, W.L.

    1987-07-01

    Aquatic insect production was studied in three cold-desert streams in eastern Washington (Douglas Creek, Snively Springs, and Rattlesnake Springs). The size-frequency method was applied to individual taxa to estimate total insect production. production was also assessed for functional groups and trophic levels in each stream. Optioservus sp. (riffle beetles) and Baetis sp. (mayflies) accounted for 72% of the total insect numbers and 50% of the total biomass in Douglas Creek. Baetis sp. accounted for 42% of the total insect numbers and 25% of the total biomass in Snively Springs. Simulium sp. (blackflies) and Baetis sp. comprised 74% of the total insect numbers and 55% of the total biomass in Rattlesnake Springs. Grazer-scrapers (49%) and collectors (48%) were the most abundant functional groups in Douglas Creek. Collectors were the most abundant functional group in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Herbivores and detritivores were the most abundant trophic level in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Dipterans (midges and blackflies) were the most productive taxa within the study streams, accounting for 40% to 70% of the total community production. Production by collectors and detritivores was the highest of all functional groups and trophic levels in all study streams.

  14. Corrosion of Uranium in Desert Soil, with Application to GCD Source Term M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDERSON, HOWARD L.; BACA, JULIANNE; KRUMHANSL, JAMES L.; STOCKMAN, HARLAN W.; THOMPSON, MOLLIE E.

    1999-09-01

    Uranium fragments from the Sandia Sled Track were studied as analogues for weapons components and depleted uranium buried at the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) site in Nevada. The Sled Track uranium fragments originated as weapons mockups and counterweights impacted on concrete and soil barriers, and experienced heating and fragmentation similar to processes thought to affect the Nuclear Weapons Accident Residues (NWAR) at GCD. Furthermore, the Sandia uranium was buried in unsaturated desert soils for 10 to 40 years, and has undergone weathering processes expected to affect the GCD wastes. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analyses of the fragments show rapid alteration from metals to dominantly VI-valent oxy-hydroxides. Leaching studies of the samples give results consistent with published U-oxide dissolution rates, and suggest longer experimental periods (ca. 1 year) would be required to reach equilibrium solution concentrations. Thermochemical modeling with the EQ3/6 code indicates that the uranium concentrations in solutions saturated with becquerelite could increase as the pore waters evaporate, due to changes in carbonate equilibria and increased ionic strength.

  15. HYDROPHOBIC CHARACTERISTICS OF COMPOSITE INSULATORS IN SIMULATED INLAND ARID DESERT ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Yasin; Al-Arainy, Abdulrehman Ali; Malik, Nazar Hussain; Qureshi, Muhammad Iqbal

    2010-06-15

    Presently along with traditional insulators i.e. glass and porcelain, etc., the polymeric insulators are also used world widely. These polymeric insulators are very sensitive to various environmental parameters e.g. UV radiations, heat, etc. The UV radiation level in the central region of Saudi Arabia is high as compared to the recommended IEC-61109 standard for the accelerated aging of the composite insulators. In this study, thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) insulators were subjected to accelerated aging stress as per IEC standard as well as modified IEC standard simulating the inland arid desert's atmospheric conditions. The hydrophobic characteristics were studied by measuring the contact angle along the insulator surface before and after the accelerated aging of the samples. It was found that TPE loses its hydrophobic properties more as compared to EPDM insulator. This loss was proportional to the intensity of UV irradiation. The rate of recovery is also low for both the tested materials as compared to Silicone Rubber insulators.

  16. Estimating Annual Precipitation in the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Previous attempts to create precipitation-elevation functions in western Nevada have been difficult and result in large uncertainty. In the WRD data analysis, the effect of geographic scale on the precipitation-elevation function was overlooked. This contributed to an erroneous Maxey-Eakin recharge estimate.

  17. Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.; Carle, S.F.

    1990-11-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) working under an Interagency agreement with the Department of Energy is engaged in a broad geoscience program to assess and identify a potential repository for high level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The USGS program, referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project, or YMP, consists of integrated geologic, hydrologic and geophysical studies which range in nature from site specific to regional. This report is an evaluation of different acquisition methods for future regional seismic reflection studies to be conducted in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, located in the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In January 1988, field studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the common-depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to map subsurface geological horizons within the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada. The goal of the field study was to investigate which seismic reflection method(s) should be used for mapping shallow to lower-crustal horizons. Therefore, a wide-variety of field acquisition parameters were tested, included point versus linear receiver group arrays; Vibroseis (service and trademark of Conoco, Inc.) versus explosive sources; Vibroseis array patterns; and Vibroseis sweep and frequency range. 31 refs., 33 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians - 2010 Project | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians - 2010 Project Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians - 2010 Project Summary The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) will conduct a feasibility and predevelopment study of potential solar projects on its lands in southern California. The project will focus on evaluating opportunities for solar power at larger ACBCI facilities and on its lands and allow ACBCI to complete its next logical step in implementing its Strategic Energy Plan,

  19. Germanium blocked impurity band infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossington, C.S.; Haller, E.E.

    1988-08-01

    Germanium blocked impurity band (BIB) photoconductors have been fabricated and characterized for responsivity, dark current, and noise equivalent power. BIB photoconductors theoretically provide an extension of the spectral response, a reduction in sensitivity to cosmic radiation and a reduction in noise characteristics compared with conventional photoconductors. Silicon BIB detectors have been successfully developed by researchers at Rockwell International, which do indeed meet their theoretical potential. In the proper configuration, these same Si BIB detectors are capable of continuous detection of individual photons in the wavelength range from 0.4 to 28 ..mu..m. Until the BIB concept was developed, detection of individual photons was only possible with photomultiplier tubes which detected visible light. Due to the successes of the Si BIB detectors, it seemed natural to extend this concept to Ge detectors, which would then allow an extension of the spectral response over conventional Ge detectors from /approximately/100 ..mu..m to /approximately/200 ..mu..m. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  1. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic...

  2. Project Reports for Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) is using the grant funds from the Department of Energy to complete the Energy Efficiency Improvements to seven EBCI facilities.

  3. Project Reports for Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians would like to begin to focus on renewable sources for electricity and to actively target lowering the energy usage of the community.

  4. Ramona Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians- 1999 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ramona Band of Cauhilla Indians is establishing an ecotourism facility on their Reservation at the southern end of the San Bernardino National Forest in southern California.

  5. Project Reports for Aroostook Band of Micmac Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the project is to develop a strategic energy plan in order to reduce energy costs in the Aroostook Band of Micmacs' government buildings and homes.

  6. Project Reports for Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) will conduct a feasibility and predevelopment study of potential solar projects on its lands in southern California. Learn more ...

  7. Minnesota Chippewa Tribe: White Earth Band- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several northern Minnesota tribes interested in building a common foundation for strategic tribal energy capacity have banded together for strategic energy resource planning.

  8. Battle Mountain Band - Te-Moak: Solar Energy Park

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Battle Mountain Band - Te-Moak Chairman Joseph Holley and Vice-chairman Mark Oppenhein, Members Donna Hill, Delbert Holley, Lydia Johnson, and Lydell Oppenhein Solar Energy Park ...

  9. Independently tunable dual-band perfect absorber based on graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Independently tunable dual-band perfect absorber based on graphene at mid-infrared frequencies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Independently tunable ...

  10. Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians (SYBCI) will prepare a comprehensive, strategic energy plan that incorporates energy efficiency, renewable energy, and other energy management and development options.

  11. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-05-28

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  12. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  13. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B.

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  14. Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Shan, W.; Scrapulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Becla, P.

    2005-03-21

    It has long been recognized that the introduction of a narrow band of states in a semiconductor band gap could be used to achieve improved power conversion efficiency in semiconductor-based solar cells. The intermediate band would serve as a ''stepping stone'' for photons of different energy to excite electrons from the valence to the conduction band. An important advantage of this design is that it requires formation of only a single p-n junction, which is a crucial simplification in comparison to multijunction solar cells. A detailed balance analysis predicts a limiting efficiency of more than 50% for an optimized, single intermediate band solar cell. This is higher than the efficiency of an optimized two junction solar cell. Using ion beam implantation and pulsed laser melting we have synthesized Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys with x<0.03. These highly mismatched alloys have a unique electronic structure with a narrow oxygen-derived intermediate band. The width and the location of the band is described by the Band Anticrossing model and can be varied by controlling the oxygen content. This provides a unique opportunity to optimize the absorption of solar photons for best solar cell performance. We have carried out systematic studies of the effects of the intermediate band on the optical and electrical properties of Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys. We observe an extension of the photovoltaic response towards lower photon energies, which is a clear indication of optical transitions from the valence to the intermediate band.

  15. Physical properties and analytical models of band-to-band tunneling in low-bandgap semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Chun-Hsing Dang Chien, Nguyen

    2014-01-28

    Low-bandgap semiconductors, such as InAs and InSb, are widely considered to be ideal for use in tunnel field-effect transistors to ensure sufficient on-current boosting at low voltages. This work elucidates the physical and mathematical considerations of applying conventional band-to-band tunneling models in low-bandgap semiconductors, and presents a new analytical alternative for practical use. The high-bandgap tunneling generates most at maximum field region with shortest tunnel path, whereas the low-bandgap generations occur dispersedly because of narrow tunnel barrier. The local electrical field associated with tunneling-electron numbers dominates in low-bandgap materials. This work proposes decoupled electric-field terms in the pre-exponential factor and exponential function of generation-rate expressions. Without fitting, the analytical results and approximated forms exhibit great agreements with the sophisticated forms both in high- and low-bandgap semiconductors. Neither nonlocal nor local field is appropriate to be used in numerical simulations for predicting the tunneling generations in a variety of low- and high-bandgap semiconductors.

  16. A Calibrated Maxey-Eakin Curve for the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin, which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Recharge rates are estimated on the basis that some fraction of annual precipitation will recharge, and that fraction will increase with increasing elevation. This results in a hypothetical curve relating annual groundwater recharge to annual precipitation. Field validation of recharge rates is critical in order to establish credibility to any estimate. This is due to the fact that the Maxey-Eakin model is empirical. An empirical model is derived from practical experience rather than basic theory. Therefore, a validated Maxey-Eakin model in one groundwater basin does not translate to a different one. In the WRD's Maxey-Eakin model, they used a curve calibrated against three locations in western Nevada and applied it to the Fenner Basin. It is of particular importance to note that all three of the WRD's location are west of longitude 116{sup o}W, where annual precipitation is significantly lower. Therefore, The WRD's Maxey-Eakin curve was calibrated to a drier climate, and its application to the Fenner Basin lacks credibility.

  17. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL COLONIZATION OF LARREA TRIDENTATA AND AMBROSIA DUMOSA ROOTS VARIES WITH PRECIPITATION AND SEASON IN THE MOJAVE DESERT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. E. APPLE; C. I. THEE; V. L. SMITH-LONGOZO; C. R. COGAR; C. E. WELLS; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.

  18. Fast, narrow-band computer model for radiation calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Z.; Holmstedt, G.

    1997-01-01

    A fast, narrow-band computer model, FASTNB, which predicts the radiation intensity in a general nonisothermal and nonhomogeneous combustion environment, has been developed. The spectral absorption coefficients of the combustion products, including carbon dioxide, water vapor, and soot, are calculated based on the narrow-band model. FASTNB provides an accurate calculation at reasonably high speed. Compared with Grosshandler`s narrow-band model, RADCAL, which has been verified quite extensively against experimental measurements, FASTNB is more than 20 times faster and gives almost exactly the same results.

  19. Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians - Strategic Tribal Energy Planning Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribal Energy Program Review Denver, CO November, 2 012 By: Erica Helms---Schenk, Environmental Director Soboba Energy Efficiency and ConservaKon Project Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians Our Champions - Who is Involved? Gerald Wilson Soboba Tribal Environmental & Brian McDonald - Department our SCE RepresentaKves Soboba Tribal Council IT --- Steven Nino Public Works - Ken McLaughlin and Summer Willis Project Goals and ObjecKves

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes. The 8.2-Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  2. Agua Caliente Band's Pursuit of Energy Self-Sufficiency Gains...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photo from Larry Fossum, Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians. In 2011, DOE student intern Chelsea Chee, a member of the Navajo Nation, published a report highlighting how the ...

  3. Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians will establish a comprehensive energy strategic plan that captures economic and environmental benefits while continuing to respect tribal cultural practices and traditions.

  4. Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) plans to complete a feasibility study to evaluate a combined wind/solar power generation project on its Whitewater Ranch trust lands in southern California.

  5. Systematic study of photoluminescence upon band gap excitation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Systematic study of photoluminescence upon band gap excitation in perovskite-type titanates R sub 12Nasub 12TiOsub 3:Pr (RLa, Gd, Lu, and Y) Citation Details In-Document ...

  6. An X-Band Gun Test Area at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Chu, T.S.; Dunning, M.P.; Jobe, R.K.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Hast, C.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, F.; Walz, D.R.; Marsh, R.A.; Anderson, S.G.; Hartemann, F.V.; Houck, T.L.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-09-07

    The X-Band Test Area (XTA) is being assembled in the NLCTA tunnel at SLAC to serve as a test facility for new RF guns. The first gun to be tested will be an upgraded version of the 5.6 cell, 200 MV/m peak field X-band gun designed at SLAC in 2003 for the Compton Scattering experiment run in ASTA. This new version includes some features implemented in 2006 on the LCLS gun such as racetrack couplers, increased mode separation and elliptical irises. These upgrades were developed in collaboration with LLNL since the same gun will be used in an injector for a LLNL Gamma-ray Source. Our beamline includes an X-band acceleration section which takes the electron beam up to 100 MeV and an electron beam measurement station. Other X-Band guns such as the UCLA Hybrid gun will be characterized at our facility.

  7. Fractional quantum spin Hall effect in flat-band checkerboard...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Fractional quantum spin Hall effect in flat-band checkerboard lattice model Authors: Li, Wei ; Sheng, D. N. ; Ting, C. S. ; Chen, Yan Publication Date: 2014-08-04 OSTI ...

  8. Band gap engineering strategy via polarization rotation in perovskite ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Fenggong Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2014-04-14

    We propose a strategy to engineer the band gaps of perovskite oxide ferroelectrics, supported by first principles calculations. We find that the band gaps of perovskites can be substantially reduced by as much as 1.2?eV through local rhombohedral-to-tetragonal structural transition. Furthermore, the strong polarization of the rhombohedral perovskite is largely preserved by its tetragonal counterpart. The B-cation off-center displacements and the resulting enhancement of the antibonding character in the conduction band give rise to the wider band gaps of the rhombohedral perovskites. The correlation between the structure, polarization orientation, and electronic structure lays a good foundation for understanding the physics of more complex perovskite solid solutions and provides a route for the design of photovoltaic perovskite ferroelectrics.

  9. Linear Scaling of the Exciton Binding Energy versus the Band...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Linear Scaling of the Exciton Binding Energy versus the Band Gap of Two-Dimensional Materials This content will become publicly available on August 6, 2016 Prev Next Title:...

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: W-Band ARM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kevin Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The W-Band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) is a dual polarization 95 GHz radar that will be deployed at the SGP CART site in the spring of...

  11. Little River Band of Ottawa Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    he main purpose of this project is to increase human capacity of the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians (LRBOI) to understand the components of renewable energy and the importance of energy efficiency.

  12. Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians in Lakeport, California, will establish a Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program to provide training, outreach, and education on energy assistance and conservation to low-income families.

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsRadiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) Campaign Links RHUBC Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us...

  14. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Wednesday, 26 March 2008 00:00 Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest

  15. Ramona Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ramona Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians ("Ramona Band" or "tribe") will be the first tribe to develop its entire reservation off-grid, using renewable energy as the primary power source. The tribe will purchase and install the primary components for a 65-80 kilowatt-hours per day central wind/PV/propane generator hybrid system that will power the reservation's housing, offices, ecotourism, and training businesses. The electricity is planned to be distributed through an underground mini-grid.

  16. Method for Creating Photonic Band Gap Materials - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Method for Creating Photonic Band Gap Materials Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Innovative microstructures that can direct light in a manner similar to the way semiconductors can influence electrons can be produced by creating what is termed a photonic band gap. These microstructures have the potential to change the way optoelectronic devices, such as photodiodes, LEDs, and integrated optical circuit elements, are designed and used. Ames Laboratory

  17. AN H-BAND SPECTROSCOPIC METALLICITY CALIBRATION FOR M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad F.; Deshpande, Rohit; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Bochanski, John J., E-mail: rct151@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We present an empirical near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic method for estimating M dwarf metallicities, based on features in the H band, as well as an implementation of a similar published method in the K band. We obtained R {approx} 2000 NIR spectra of a sample of M dwarfs using the NASA IRTF-SpeX spectrograph, including 22 M dwarf metallicity calibration targets that have FGK companions with known metallicities. The H-band and K-band calibrations provide equivalent fits to the metallicities of these binaries, with an accuracy of {+-}0.12 dex. We derive the first empirically calibrated spectroscopic metallicity estimate for the giant planet-hosting M dwarf GJ 317, confirming its supersolar metallicity. Combining this result with observations of eight other M dwarf planet hosts, we find that M dwarfs with giant planets are preferentially metal-rich compared to those that host less massive planets. Our H-band calibration relies on strongly metallicity-dependent features in the H band, which will be useful in compositional studies using mid- to high-resolution NIR M dwarf spectra, such as those produced by multiplexed surveys like SDSS-III APOGEE. These results will also be immediately useful for ongoing spectroscopic surveys of M dwarfs.

  18. David Blackwell’s Forty Years in the Idaho Desert, The Foundation for 21st Century Geothermal Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLing, Travis; McCurry, Mike; Cannon, Cody; Neupane, Ghanashyam; Wood, Thomas; Podgorney, Robert; Welhan, John; Mines, Greg; Mattson, Earl; Wood, Rachel; Palmer, Carl

    2015-04-01

    Dr. David Blackwell has had a profound influence on geo-thermal exploration and R&D in Idaho. Forty years have elapsed since the first Southern Methodist University (SMU) temperature logging truck rolled onto the high desert in Southern Idaho, yet even after so much time has elapsed, most recent and ongoing geothermal R&D can trace its roots to the foundational temperature studies led by Dr. Blackwell. We believe that the best way to honor any scientist is to see their work carried forward by others. As this paper demonstrates, it has been an easy task to find a host of Idaho researchers and students eager to contribute to this tribute paper. We organize this paper by ongoing or recent projects that continue to benefit left to Idaho by Dr. David Blackwell.

  19. [Climate implications of terrestrial paleoclimate]. Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute annual report, fiscal year 1994/1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigand, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to collect terrestrial climate indicators for paleoclimate synthesis. The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal. To this end personnel at the Quaternary Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada are conducting the following activities: Analyses of packrat middens; Analysis of pollen samples; and Determination of vegetation climate relationships.

  20. Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior Chippewa Indian Reservation Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior Chippewa Indian ...

  1. Robotic end gripper with a band member to engage object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollard, R.E.; Robinson, S.C.; Thompson, W.F.; Couture, S.A.; Sutton, B.J.

    1994-05-10

    An end effector for use with robotic arms and like devices is described that utilizes a flexible band to draw an object against an anvil having a concave surface. One typical convex surface is created by a V-block, with an apex of the V being centrally located. If an object to be grasped is fragile, the contour of the concave surface closely matches the surface of the object. Typically the movement of the band is effected by a linear actuator, with the anvil remaining fixed relative to a support base. Several embodiments are described that utilize variations in drawing the band toward the anvil, with one of these embodiments described in detail in the form of a fabricated unit. One embodiment includes a cover element that can be moved over an object after the grasping thereof, with this cover potentially serving various functions. Movement of the cover can be effected with a second linear actuator. 8 figures.

  2. Robotic end gripper with a band member to engage object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pollard, Roy E.; Robinson, Samuel C.; Thompson, William F.; Couture, Scott A.; Sutton, Bill J.

    1994-01-01

    An end effector for use with robotic arms and like devices that utilizes a flexible band to draw an object against an anvil having a concave surface. One typical convex surface is created by a V-block, with an apex of the V being centrally located. If an object to be grasped is fragile, the contour of the concave surface closely matches the surface of the object. Typically the movement of the band is effected by a linear actuator, with the anvil remaining fixed relative to a support base. Several embodiments are described that utilize variations in drawing the band toward the anvil, with one of these embodiments described in detail in the form of a fabricated unit. One embodiment includes a cover element that can be moved over an object after the grasping thereof, with this cover potentially serving various functions. Movement of the cover can be effected with a second linear actuator.

  3. Blocked impurity band hybrid infrared focal plane arrays for astronomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D.B.; Seib, D.H.; Stetson, S.B.; Herter, T.; Rowlands, N.; Schoenwald, J.

    1989-02-01

    High-performance infrared hybrid focal plane arrays using 10 x 50 element Si:As Blocked-Impurity-Band (BIB) detectors (cut-off wavelength = 28 ..mu..m) and matching switched MOSFET multiplexers have been developed and characterized for space astronomy. Use of impurity band conduction technology provides detectors which are nuclear radiation hard and free of the many anomalies associated with conventional silicon photoconductive detectors. Emphasis in this paper is on recent advances in detector material quality which have led to significantly improved detector and hybrid characteristics. Results demonstrating increase quantum efficiency (particular at short wavelength infrared), obtained by varying the Blocked-Impurity-Band detector properties (infrared active layer thickness and arsenic doping profile), are summarized. Read noise and dark current for different temperatures have been measured and are also described. The hybrid array performance achieved clearly demonstrates that BIB detectors are well suited for use in astronomical instrumentation.

  4. Numerical method for shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plohr, Jee Yeon N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plohr, Bradley J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A numerical method for mesoscale simulation of high strain-rate loading of ductile metal containing inclusions is described. Because of small-scale inhomogeneities, such a composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). The modeling framework is the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. /27-139, 1992], which ensures that the micromechanical response of the material is reflected in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To calculate the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands by Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996] is adapted and extended.

  5. Amorphous copper tungsten oxide with tunable band gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Le; Shet, Sudhakar; Tang Houwen; Wang Heli; Yan Yanfa; Turner, John; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Ahn, Kwang-soon

    2010-08-15

    We report on the synthesis of amorphous copper tungsten oxide thin films with tunable band gaps. The thin films are synthesized by the magnetron cosputtering method. We find that due to the amorphous nature, the Cu-to-W ratio in the films can be varied without the limit of the solubility (or phase separation) under appropriate conditions. As a result, the band gap and conductivity type of the films can be tuned by controlling the film composition. Unfortunately, the amorphous copper tungsten oxides are not stable in aqueous solution and are not suitable for the application of photoelectrochemical splitting of water. Nonetheless, it provides an alternative approach to search for transition metal oxides with tunable band gaps.

  6. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen-Tuong, Viet (Seaford, VA); Dylla, III, Henry Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

    1997-01-01

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

  7. Special purpose modes in photonic band gap fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Campbell, Sara

    2013-04-02

    Photonic band gap fibers are described having one or more defects suitable for the acceleration of electrons or other charged particles. Methods and devices are described for exciting special purpose modes in the defects including laser coupling schemes as well as various fiber designs and components for facilitating excitation of desired modes. Results are also presented showing effects on modes due to modes in other defects within the fiber and due to the proximity of defects to the fiber edge. Techniques and devices are described for controlling electrons within the defect(s). Various applications for electrons or other energetic charged particles produced by such photonic band gap fibers are also described.

  8. Structure of dipole bands in {sup 106}In

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, A. Y.; Palit, R.; Naik, Z.; Joshi, P. K.; Mazumdar, I.; Sihotra, S.; Mehta, D.; Kumar, S.; Chakrabarti, R.; Kshetri, R.

    2009-06-15

    High spin states in neutron-deficient {sup 106}In were investigated using {sup 78}Se({sup 32}S,p3n) reaction at 125 MeV. The level scheme is extended up to 7 MeV of excitation energy for the negative parity states constituting four dipole bands, and the positive parity states which mainly exhibit single-particle excitations are extended up to 5 MeV. Projected deformed Hartree-Fock calculations were carried out to understand the configurations of different bands in this nucleus.

  9. Center for Inverse Design: Modality 1 - Inverse Band Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1: Inverse Band Structure Modality 1 applies to cases where we have a single material system, but an astronomical number of configurations, and where the target properties can be calculated on the fly. The approach is also called Inverse Band Structure (IBS). The IBS approach began a dozen years ago within the Solid-State Theory group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Imagine that you have a

  10. Electronic band structure of magnetic bilayer graphene superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, C. Huy; Nguyen, T. Thuong

    2014-09-28

    Electronic band structure of the bilayer graphene superlattices with ?-function magnetic barriers and zero average magnetic flux is studied within the four-band continuum model, using the transfer matrix method. The periodic magnetic potential effects on the zero-energy touching point between the lowest conduction and the highest valence minibands of pristine bilayer graphene are exactly analyzed. Magnetic potential is shown also to generate the finite-energy touching points between higher minibands at the edges of Brillouin zone. The positions of these points and the related dispersions are determined in the case of symmetric potentials.

  11. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Dylla, H.F. III

    1997-11-04

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost. 5 figs.

  12. Energy distribution of nonequilibrium electrons and optical phonons in GaAs under band-to-band pumping by intense short pulses of light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altybaev, G. S.; Kumekov, S. E. Mahmudov, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    Deviation from the Fermi distribution of nonequilibrium electrons and distribution of 'hot' optical phonons in GaAs under band-to-band pumping by picosecond pulses of light are calculated.

  13. Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians- 2015 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians is seeking to install a 76.9-kilowatt (kW) solar photovoltaic (PV) system to offset the energy costs of the Tribal Education and Family Services offices located at the Heritage Plaza office building.

  14. Project Reports for Cabazon Band of Mission Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Cabazon Band of Mission Indians' long-range goals are to become energy self-sufficient, foster economic diversity, grow jobs, and improve the well-being of members of the tribe as well as those in its region of Southern California.

  15. Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians (GTB) will conduct a feasibility study to determine the cost effectiveness and other economic, environmental, cultural, and social benefits of maximizing the diversity of energy sources used at GTB facilities. This includes an assessment of energy conservation measures as well as renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, and biomass.

  16. Mesa Grande Band of Mission Indians- 2004 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mesa Grande Band of Mission Indians, located in northern San Diego County, will conduct a study of the feasibility of reducing air pollution generated on the reservation by an over-reliance on wood-burning stoves, kerosene heaters, and gasoline generators, and to identify the types of renewable energy systems that could be used for residential structures and well-pump systems.

  17. Evidence for hybrid surface metallic band in (4??4) silicene on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsoutsou, D. Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Golias, E.; Tsipas, P.; Dimoulas, A.

    2013-12-02

    The electronic band structure of monolayer (4??4) silicene on Ag(111) is imaged by angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A dominant hybrid surface metallic band is observed to be located near the bulk Ag sp-band which is also faintly visible. The two-dimensional character of the hybrid band has been distinguished against the bulk character of the Ag(111) sp-band by means of photon energy dependence experiments. The surface band exhibits a steep linear dispersion around the K{sup }{sub Ag} point and has a saddle point near the M{sup }{sub Ag} point of Ag(111) resembling the ?-band dispersion in graphene.

  18. Origin of banded iron formations : oceanic crust leaching & self-organized

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mineral banding. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Origin of banded iron formations : oceanic crust leaching & self-organized mineral banding. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Origin of banded iron formations : oceanic crust leaching & self-organized mineral banding. No abstract prepared. Authors: Wang, Yifeng ; Konishi, Hiromi [1] ; Merino, Enrique [2] ; Xu, Huifang [1] + Show Author Affiliations (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI) (Indiana

  19. Broad-band characteristics of circular button pickups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, W.C.

    1992-10-01

    A broad-band.theory of the circular button pickup is presented. Expressions for the longitudinal and transverse transfer impedance of a pair of such pickups are derived in the frequency domain. The broad-band expressions are shown to reduce to the standard electrostatic transfer functions for wavelengths large compared to the button diameter. The theory is shown to be in reasonable agreement with measurements performed on standard LEP button electrodes. In particular, the theory explains a resonance in the response of the LEP buttons which made them unsuitable, in standard form, for their intended application as pickups in the LBL Advanced Light Source feedback system. The buttons were modified to suppress the resonance and subsequently incorporated into the feedback system.

  20. Systematic study of photoluminescence upon band gap excitation in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    perovskite-type titanates R {sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3}:Pr (R=La, Gd, Lu, and Y) (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Systematic study of photoluminescence upon band gap excitation in perovskite-type titanates R {sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3}:Pr (R=La, Gd, Lu, and Y) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Systematic study of photoluminescence upon band gap excitation in perovskite-type titanates R {sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3}:Pr (R=La, Gd, Lu, and Y) Pr{sup 3+}-doped perovskites R

  1. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest contenders, has a rather impressive list of features of its own but has lacked a key

  2. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest contenders, has a rather impressive list of features of its own but has lacked a key

  3. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest contenders, has a rather impressive list of features of its own but has lacked a key

  4. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest contenders, has a rather impressive list of features of its own but has lacked a key

  5. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene Print Prospective challengers to silicon, the long-reigning king of semiconductors for computer chips and other electronic devices, have to overcome silicon's superb collection of materials properties as well as sophisticated fabrication technologies refined by six decades of effort by materials scientists and engineers. Graphene, one of the latest contenders, has a rather impressive list of features of its own but has lacked a key

  6. Project Reports for Manzanita Band of Mission Indians- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Manzanita Band of Mission Indians ("the tribe") has long recognized that its reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit. The tribe is now investigating the feasibility of commercial scale development of a wind power project on tribal lands. The proposed project is a joint effort between the tribe and its subcontractor and consultant, SeaWest Consulting.

  7. Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, located in the northwest corner of Minnesota near the Canadian border, will assess the potential to expand the use of biomass resources for energy autonomy and economic development on tribal lands. Specifically, the tribe will evaluate the technical, market, financial, and cultural aspects of using its extensive, forested lands to create a sustainable bioproducts-based business and will develop a business plan to guide tribal industry development.

  8. ARM - Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Links RHUBC Home NSA Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Experiment Planning RHUBC Proposal Abstract Full Proposal (pdf, 420kb) Science Plan (pdf) Operations Plan (pdf, 144kb) Instruments Contacts News ARM Press Release (Feb. 26, 2007) Images flickr_dots Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) Now available: RHUBC-II website Between February and March 2007 at the ACRF North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow, high-spectral-resolution observations were collected by two

  9. Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe Leslie Isham, Director/Assistant Director Lac Courte Oreilles Energy Project Lac Courte Oreilles Public works Department First Steps towards Tribal Weatherization Assessing the Feasibility of the Hydro Dam About Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) * Located in Upper Northwest Wisconsin * 76,000 acres and 15 miles wide * 90 miles from Duluth 100 miles from Eau Claire 10 miles from Hayward * Close to 6,000 members, 50% live on or near the reservation * 68% unemployment

  10. Lac Courte Oreilles Lake Superior Band of Ojibwe Energy Projects

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OdaawaaZaga'iganing or Lac Courte Oreilles Lake Superior Band Of Ojibwe LCO Energy Department Staff: Director: Leslie Isham Coordinator: Denise Johnson Energy Projects: Assessing Hydro Dam First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization Lac Courte Oreilles's Mission We, the Anishinaabeg, the people of OdaawaaZaaga'iganing, the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe, will sustain our heritage by preserving our past, strengthening our present and embracing our future. We will defend our inherent sovereign rights and

  11. Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians - Facility Retrofit Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians EBCI Facility Retrofit Project 2 Project Overview * Energy efficient implementations * Seven Tribally owned/leased facilities * Modified to cover 9 Buildings * Reduction of energy consumption by at least 30% * Reduction of air pollutants and GHG emissions 3 Cherokee Fairgrounds & Exhibit Building 545 Tsali Boulevard Cherokee, NC 4 Implementations *Replacement of HVAC units *Routine HVAC maintenance schedule *Install programmable thermostats *Adjust insulation

  12. Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians - Strategic Energy Planning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - FY07 Program Review Meeting - 5-8 Nov 2007 Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians First Steps Project Project Manager - Damon Lambert Tribal Planner/Grant Writer Planning & Development Department Technical Support - Robert Leitner Associate Director South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies - Clemson University 2 Tribal Energy Program - FY07 Program Review Meeting - 5-8 Nov 2007 Demographics * The modern EBCI are descendents of those Cherokee who avoided the forced removal to Oklahoma in the

  13. X-band photoinjector for a chirped-pulse FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landahl, E. C.; Alvis, R. M.; Troha, A. L.; Hartemann, F. V.; Baldis, H. A. [Applied Science Department, University of California, Davis California 95616 (United States); Institute for Laser Science and Applications, LLNL, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Le Sage, G. P.; White, W. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bennett, C. V. [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Li, K.; Heritage, J. P. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Davis, California (United States); Ho, C. H. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Taiwan (China); Luhmann, N. C. Jr. [Applied Science Department, University of California, Davis California 95616 (United States)

    1999-05-07

    The phase noise and jitter characteristics of the laser and rf systems of a high gradient X-band photoinjector have been measured experimentally. The laser oscillator is a self-modelocked Titanium:Sapphire system operating at the 108th subharmonic of the rf gun. The X-band signal is produced from the laser by a phase-locked dielectric resonance oscillator, and amplified by a pulsed TWT and klystron. A comparison between the klystron and TWT amplifier phase noise and the fields excited in the rf gun demonstrates the filtering effect of the high Q structure, thus indicating that the rf gun can be used as a master oscillator, and could be energized by either a rf oscillator such as a magnetron or a compact source such as a cross-field amplifier. In particular, the rf gun can play the role of a pulsed rf clock to synchronize the photocathode laser system: direct drive of a synchronously modelocked AlGaAs quantum well laser has been achieved using the X-band gun rf fields. This novel, GHz repetition rate, laser system is being developed to replace the more conventional femtosecond Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. Some advantages include pumping this laser with a stabilized current source instead of a costly, low efficiency pump laser. Finally, dark current measurements and initial photoelectron measurements are reported.

  14. X-band photoinjector for a chirped-pulse FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landahl, E.C.; Alvis, R.M.; Troha, A.L.; Hartemann, F.V.; Baldis, H.A.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr. [Applied Science Department, University of California, Davis , California 95616 (United States); Landahl, E.C.; Alvis, R.M.; Troha, A.L.; Hartemann, F.V.; Baldis, H.A. [Institute for Laser Science and Applications, LLNL, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Le Sage, G.P.; White, W.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bennett, C.V. [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Li, K.; Heritage, J.P. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Davis, California (United States); Ho, C.H. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (Taiwan)

    1999-05-01

    The phase noise and jitter characteristics of the laser and rf systems of a high gradient X-band photoinjector have been measured experimentally. The laser oscillator is a self-modelocked Titanium:Sapphire system operating at the 108th subharmonic of the rf gun. The X-band signal is produced from the laser by a phase-locked dielectric resonance oscillator, and amplified by a pulsed TWT and klystron. A comparison between the klystron and TWT amplifier phase noise and the fields excited in the rf gun demonstrates the filtering effect of the high Q structure, thus indicating that the rf gun can be used as a master oscillator, and could be energized by either a rf oscillator such as a magnetron or a compact source such as a cross-field amplifier. In particular, the rf gun can play the role of a pulsed rf clock to synchronize the photocathode laser system: direct drive of a synchronously modelocked AlGaAs quantum well laser has been achieved using the X-band gun rf fields. This novel, GHz repetition rate, laser system is being developed to replace the more conventional femtosecond Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. Some advantages include pumping this laser with a stabilized current source instead of a costly, low efficiency pump laser. Finally, dark current measurements and initial photoelectron measurements are reported. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Wide band focusing x-ray spectrograph with spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Hammer, D. A.

    2008-01-15

    A new, wide spectral bandwidth x-ray spectrograph, the wide-bandwidth focusing spectrograph with spatial resolution (WB-FSSR), based on spherically bent mica crystals, is described. The wide bandwidth is achieved by combining three crystals to form a large aperture dispersive element. Since the WB-FSSR covers a wide spectral band, it is very convenient for application as a routine diagnostic tool in experiments in which the desired spectral coverage is different from one test to the next. The WB-FSSR has been tested in imploding wire-array experiments on a 1 MA pulsed power machine, and x-ray spectra were recorded in the 1-20 A spectral band using different orders of mica crystal reflection. Using a two mirror-symmetrically placed WB-FSSR configuration, it was also possible to distinguish between a real spectral shift and a shift of recorded spectral lines caused by the spatial distribution of the radiating plasma. A spectral resolution of about 2000 was demonstrated and a spatial resolution of {approx}100 {mu}m was achieved in the spectral band of 5-10 A in second order of mica reflection. A simple method of numerical analysis of spectrograph capability is proposed.

  16. Performance Models for the Spike Banded Linear System Solver

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Manguoglu, Murat; Saied, Faisal; Sameh, Ahmed; Grama, Ananth

    2011-01-01

    With availability of large-scale parallel platforms comprised of tens-of-thousands of processors and beyond, there is significant impetus for the development of scalable parallel sparse linear system solvers and preconditioners. An integral part of this design process is the development of performance models capable of predicting performance and providing accurate cost models for the solvers and preconditioners. There has been some work in the past on characterizing performance of the iterative solvers themselves. In this paper, we investigate the problem of characterizing performance and scalability of banded preconditioners. Recent work has demonstrated the superior convergence properties and robustness of banded preconditioners,more » compared to state-of-the-art ILU family of preconditioners as well as algebraic multigrid preconditioners. Furthermore, when used in conjunction with efficient banded solvers, banded preconditioners are capable of significantly faster time-to-solution. Our banded solver, the Truncated Spike algorithm is specifically designed for parallel performance and tolerance to deep memory hierarchies. Its regular structure is also highly amenable to accurate performance characterization. Using these characteristics, we derive the following results in this paper: (i) we develop parallel formulations of the Truncated Spike solver, (ii) we develop a highly accurate pseudo-analytical parallel performance model for our solver, (iii) we show excellent predication capabilities of our model – based on which we argue the high scalability of our solver. Our pseudo-analytical performance model is based on analytical performance characterization of each phase of our solver. These analytical models are then parameterized using actual runtime information on target platforms. An important consequence of our performance models is that they reveal underlying performance bottlenecks in both serial and parallel formulations. All of our results are validated on diverse heterogeneous multiclusters – platforms for which performance prediction is particularly challenging. Finally, we provide predict the scalability of the Spike algorithm using up to 65,536 cores with our model. In this paper we extend the results presented in the Ninth International Symposium on Parallel and Distributed Computing.« less

  17. Effects of microstructure banding on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth in X65 pipeline steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronevich, Joseph A.; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Chris W.

    2015-09-10

    Banded ferrite-pearlite X65 pipeline steel was tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to evaluate the effects of oriented pearlite on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth. Test specimens were oriented in the steel pipe such that cracks propagated either parallel or perpendicular to the banded pearlite. The ferrite-pearlite microstructure exhibited orientation dependent behavior in which fatigue crack growth rates were significantly lower for cracks oriented perpendicular to the banded pearlite compared to cracks oriented parallel to the bands. Thus the reduction of hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth across the banded pearlite is attributed to a combination of crack-tip branching and impeded hydrogen diffusion across the banded pearlite.

  18. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; et al

    2014-09-10

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has anmore » exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic – heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.« less

  19. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinxin [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A longstanding puzzle in isotopic studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotopic ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotopic ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found that higher nitrogen concentrations in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous concentrations had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotopic ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic heterotrophic difference in carbon isotopic compositions.

  20. s d 2 Graphene: Kagome Band in a Hexagonal Lattice (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    s d 2 Graphene: Kagome Band in a Hexagonal Lattice Citation Details In-Document Search Title: s d 2 Graphene: Kagome Band in a Hexagonal Lattice Authors: Zhou, Miao ; Liu, Zheng ;...

  1. s d 2 Graphene: Kagome Band in a Hexagonal Lattice (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    s d 2 Graphene: Kagome Band in a Hexagonal Lattice Prev Next Title: s d 2 Graphene: Kagome Band in a Hexagonal Lattice Authors: Zhou, Miao ; Liu, Zheng ; Ming, Wenmei ; Wang,...

  2. High-Efficiency, Wide-Band Three-Phase Rectifiers and Adaptive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency, Wide-Band Three-Phase Rectifiers and Adaptive Rectifier Management High-Efficiency, Wide-Band Three-Phase Rectifiers and Adaptive Rectifier Management Higher-Efficiency...

  3. Determination of Band Offsets between the High-k Dielectric LaAlO3...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    found that band gaps of high-k dielectric films are also significantly affected by film growth conditions. Therefore, we can not rely on previously published LaAlO3 band gap...

  4. X-band photoinjector for a chirped-pulse FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luhmann, Jr., N. C.; Alvis, R. M.; Baldis, H. A.; Hartemann, F. V; Heritage, J. P.; Ho, C. H.; Landahl, E. C.; Li, K.; Troha,A. L.; White, W. E.

    1998-12-15

    The phase noise and jitter characteristics of the laser and rf systems of a high gradient X-band photoinjector have been measured experimentally. When > 100 coherently phased 5 MeV electron bunches are produced in bursts, the photoinjector should be an ideal electron source for a pulsed, pre-bunched free-electron laser (FEL) operating at 100 GHz. The laser oscillator is a self-modelocked Titanium:Sapphire system operating at the 108th subharmonic of the rf gun. The X-band signal is produced from the laser by a phase-locked dielectric resonance oscillator, and amplified by a pulsed TWT and klystron. A comparison between the klystron and TWT amplifier phase noise and the fields excited in the rf gun demonstrates the filtering effect of the high Q structure, thus indicating that the rf gun can be used as a master oscillator, and could be energized by either a rf oscillator such as a magnetron or a compact source such as a cross-field amplifier. In particular, the rf gun can play the role of a pulsed rf clock to synchronize the photocathode laser system: direct drive of a synchronously mode-locked AlGaAs quantum well laser has been achieved using the X0-band gun rf fields. This novel, GHz repetition rate, sub-picosecond laser system is being developed to replace the more conventional femtosecond Ti: Al2O3 system. Some advantages include pumping this laser with a stabilized current source instead of a costly, low efficiency pump laser. Finally, dark current measurements and initial photoelectron measurements are reported.

  5. Deep z-band observations of the coolest Y dwarf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopytova, Taisiya G.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Deacon, Niall R.; Brandner, Wolfgang; Buenzli, Esther; Bayo, Amelia; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Manjavacas, Elena; Kopon, Derek; Biller, Beth A.

    2014-12-10

    WISE J085510.83-071442.5 (hereafter, WISE 0855-07) is the coolest Y dwarf known to date and is located at a distance of 2.31 0.08 pc, giving it the fourth largest parallax of any known star or brown dwarf system. We report deep z-band observations of WISE 0855-07 using FORS2 on UT1/Very Large Telescope. We do not detect any counterpart to WISE 0855-07 in our z-band images and estimate a brightness upper limit of AB mag > 24.8 (F {sub ?} < 0.45 ?Jy) at 910 65 nm with 3? confidence. We combine our z-band upper limit with previous near- and mid-infrared photometry to place constraints on the atmospheric properties of WISE 0855-07 via comparison to models which implement water clouds in the atmospheres of T {sub eff} < 300 K substellar objects. We find that none of the available models that implement water clouds can completely reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution of WISE 0855-07. Every model significantly disagrees with the (3.6 ?m/4.5 ?m) flux ratio and at least one other bandpass. Since methane is predicted to be the dominant absorber at 3-4 ?m, these mismatches might point to an incorrect or incomplete treatment of methane in current models. We conclude that (a) WISE0855-07 has T {sub eff} ? 200-250 K, (b) <80% of its surface is covered by clouds, and (c) deeper observations, and improved models of substellar evolution, atmospheres, clouds, and opacities will be necessary to better characterize this object.

  6. History and Evolution of Control Banding: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Nelson, D

    2006-07-19

    Control Banding (CB) strategies offer simplified solutions for controlling worker exposures to constituents often encountered in the workplace. The original CB model was developed within the pharmaceutical industry; however, the modern movement involves models developed for non-experts to input hazard and exposure potential information for bulk chemical processes, receiving control advice as a result. The CB approach utilizes these models for the dissemination of qualitative and semi-quantitative risk assessment tools being developed to complement the traditional industrial hygiene model of air sampling and analysis. It is being applied and tested in small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) within developed countries and industrially developing countries; however, large enterprises (LEs) have also incorporated these strategies within chemical safety programs. Existing research of the components of the most available CB model, the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Essentials, has shown that exposure bands do not always provide adequate margins of safety, that there is a high rate of under-control errors, that it works better with dusts than with vapors, that there is an inherent inaccuracy in estimating variability, and that when taken together the outcomes of this model may lead to potentially inappropriate workplace confidence in chemical exposure reduction in some operations. Alternatively, large-scale comparisons of industry exposure data to this CB model's outcomes have indicated more promising results with a high correlation seen internationally. With the accuracy of the toxicological ratings and hazard band classification currently in question, their proper reevaluation will be of great benefit to the reliability of existing and future CB models. The need for a more complete analysis of CB model components and, most importantly, a more comprehensive prospective research process remains and will be important in understanding implications of the model's overall effectiveness. Since the CB approach is now being used worldwide with an even broader implementation in progress, further research toward understanding its strengths and weaknesses will assist in its further refinement and confidence in its ongoing utility.

  7. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campisi, I.E.

    1992-05-12

    An absorber waveguide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the waveguide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the waveguide. 11 figs.

  8. Narrow-band optical transmission of metallic nanoslit arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Zhijun; Yang Ying; Zuo Xiaoliu

    2012-10-22

    Metallic nanoslit arrays usually demonstrate wide transmission bands for transverse-magnetic-polarized incidence light. Here, we show that by introducing multi-dielectric layers underneath the metallic structure layer on the substrate, a narrow peak is formed, whose bandwidth can be down to a few nanometers. Three types of resonance modes in the region under the metal layer are identified responsible for the formation of the peak, i.e., a two-dimensional cavity resonance mode, which supports optical transmission, and two in-plane hybrid surface plasmon resonance modes locating on both sides of the peak that suppresses the transmission. Such structures can be applied in advanced photonic devices.

  9. Project Reports for Cabazon Band of Mission Indians- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Strategic energy planning effort to assist in achieving the tribe's primary goals of economic diversity, economic self-sufficiency, and protecting the health and welfare of tribal members. The Cabazon Band Reservation, located on four sections of non-contiguous land on the eastern half of the Coachella Valley in Riverside County is approximately 25 miles east of Palm Springs, comprises 1500 acres and currently has the seventh highest residential electricity rates among U.S. Native American reservations. The Strategic Energy Plan will enable the tribe to make informed decisions in creating and conducting an effective energy management program for their people.

  10. Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-03-06

    The Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR) is a zenith-pointing Doppler cloud radar operating at approximately 35 GHz. The KAZR is an evolutionary follow-on radar to ARM's widely successful millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR). The main purpose of the KAZR is to provide vertical profiles of clouds by measuring the first three Doppler moments: reflectivity, radial Doppler velocity, and spectra width. At the sites where the dual-polarization measurements are made, the Doppler moments for the cross-polarization channel are also available. In addition to the moments, velocity spectra are also continuously recorded for each range gate.

  11. Intermediate band solar cells: Recent progress and future directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okada, Y. Tamaki, R.; Farrell, D. J.; Yoshida, K.; Ahsan, N.; Shoji, Y.; Sogabe, T.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J. Yoshida, M.; Pusch, A.; Hess, O.; Phillips, C. C.; Kita, T.; Guillemoles, J.-F.

    2015-06-15

    Extensive literature and publications on intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs) are reviewed. A detailed discussion is given on the thermodynamics of solar energy conversion in IBSCs, the device physics, and the carrier dynamics processes with a particular emphasis on the two-step inter-subband absorption/recombination processes that are of paramount importance in a successful implementation high-efficiency IBSC. The experimental solar cell performance is further discussed, which has been recently demonstrated by using highly mismatched alloys and high-density quantum dot arrays and superlattice. IBSCs having widely different structures, materials, and spectral responses are also covered, as is the optimization of device parameters to achieve maximum performance.

  12. Campo Band of Mission Indians - Renewable Energy Update

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Connolly Miskwish November 16, 2012 — Campo is one of twelve Bands o — 50 megawatt facility comprised of 25 2---MW turbines — 25 year lease — Outside owner with tribe receiving a royalty based on gross output — Lease negotiated in 2004 — 160 MW project — Project development began in 2006 MW---hour California Market Price Referent 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 — More direct involvement by tribal government — Less reliance on

  13. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campisi, Isidoro E. (Newport News, VA)

    1992-01-01

    An absorber wave guide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the wave guide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the wave guide.

  14. Project Reports for Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians: Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium, represented by the Morongo Band, is comprised of tribes in California, Arizona and New Mexico.

  15. Grand Traverse Band Renewable Energy Feasibility Study in Wind, Biomass and Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzanne McSawby, Project Director Steve Smiley, Principle Investigator Grand Traverse Resort, Cost Sharing Partner

    2008-12-31

    Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for wind, biomass, solar on the Grand Traverse Band tribal lands from 2005 - 2008

  16. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  17. Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians: Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium- 2006 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium, represented by the Morongo Band, is comprised of tribes in California, Arizona and New Mexico.

  18. Band structure of ABC-trilayer graphene superlattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uddin, Salah Chan, K. S.

    2014-11-28

    We investigate the effect of one-dimensional periodic potentials on the low energy band structure of ABC trilayer graphene first by assuming that all the three layers have the same potential. Extra Dirac points having the same electron hole crossing energy as that of the original Dirac point are generated by superlattice potentials with equal well and barrier widths. When the potential height is increased, the numbers of extra Dirac points are increased. The dispersions around the Dirac points are not isotropic. It is noted that the dispersion along the k{sub y} direction for k{sub x}?=?0 oscillates between a non-linear dispersion and a linear dispersion when the potential height is increased. When the well and barrier widths are not identical, the symmetry of the conduction and valence bands is broken. The extra Dirac points are shifted either upward or downward depending on the barrier and well widths from the zero energy, while the position of the central Dirac point oscillates with the superlattice potential height. By considering different potentials for different layers, extra Dirac points are generated not from the original Dirac points but from the valleys formed in the energy spectrum. Two extra Dirac points appear from each pair of touched valleys, so four Dirac points appeared in the spectrum at particular barrier height. By increasing the barrier height of superlattice potential two Dirac points merge into the original Dirac point. This emerging and merging of extra Dirac points is different from the equal potential case.

  19. Agua Caliente Band's Pursuit of Energy Self-Sufficiency Gains Momentum |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Agua Caliente Band's Pursuit of Energy Self-Sufficiency Gains Momentum Agua Caliente Band's Pursuit of Energy Self-Sufficiency Gains Momentum March 1, 2016 - 11:02am Addthis Concept drawing of the Agua Caliente Band’s Heritage Plaza Parking Lot Project, which involves installing solar arrays, partly funded by a DOE grant, on carport shade structures. Photo from Larry Fossum, Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians. Concept drawing of the Agua Caliente Band's Heritage

  20. Triaxial strongly deformed bands in {sup 164}Hf and the effect of elevated yrast line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Wenchao

    2012-10-20

    Two exotic rotational bands have been identified in {sup 164}Hf and linked to known states. They are interpreted as being associated with the calculated triaxial strongly deformed (TSD) potential energy minimum. The bands are substantially stronger and are located at much lower spins than the previously discovered TSD bands in {sup 168}Hf. In addition to the proton and neutron shell gaps at large trixiality, it was proposed that the relative excitation energy of TSD bands above the yrast line plays an important role in the population of TSD bands.

  1. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Nevada Test Site Development Corporations's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-03-01

    The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1300) (EA) which analyzes the potential environmental effects of developing operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, between Mercury Camp and U.S. Highway 95 and east of Desert Rock Airport. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of infrastructure improvements necessary to support fill build out of the 512-acre Desert Rock Sky Park. Two alternative actions were evaluated: (1) Develop, operate and maintain a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, and (2) taking no action. The purpose and need for the commercial industrial park are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment. Section 4.0 the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternative. Cumulative effects are addressed in Section 5.0. Mitigation measures are addressed in Section 6.0. The Department of Energy determined that the proposed action of developing, operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site would best meet the needs of the agency.

  2. Initial assessment of an airborne Ku-band polarimetric SAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been used for a variety of dual-use research applications since the 1940's. By measuring the direction of the electric field vector from radar echoes, polarimetry may enhance an analyst's understanding of scattering effects for both earth monitoring and tactical surveillance missions. Polarimetry may provide insight into surface types, materials, or orientations for natural and man-made targets. Polarimetric measurements may also be used to enhance the contrast between scattering surfaces such as man-made objects and their surroundings. This report represents an initial assessment of the utility of, and applications for, polarimetric SAR at Ku-band for airborne or unmanned aerial systems.

  3. W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widener, KB; Johnson, K

    2005-01-05

    The W-band Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud Radar (WACR) systems are zenith pointing Doppler radars that probe the extent and composition of clouds at 95.04 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar reports estimates for the first three spectra moments for each range gate up to 15 km. The 0th moment is reflectivity, the 1st moment is radial velocity, and the 2nd moment is spectral width. Also available are the raw spectra files. Unlike the millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR), the WACR does not use pulse coding and operates in only copolarization and cross-polarization modes.

  4. Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians is located in the northern part of lower Michigan on approximately 590 acres of land. The tribe originally had no consistent vision or strategic plan concerning its energy use. This project had three objectives. The first objective was to produce a comprehensive energy plan for the tribe. The second objective was to create an energy organization and tribal energy code. The third objective was to increase the capacity of the tribe for better understanding (through active tribal participation), capability, knowledge and awareness of energy issues through bimonthly articles in the tribal newsletter and two energy workshops. The vision, strategic plan, and code will provide the focus, direction and guidelines as the tribe seeks to develop renewable energy and energy efficiency.

  5. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caddeau, MP

    2010-06-23

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Profiler (GVRP) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from 15 channels between 170 and 183.310 GHz. Atmospheric emission in this spectral region is primarily due to water vapor, with some influence from liquid water. Channels between 170.0 and 176.0 GHz are particularly sensitive to the presence of liquid water. The sensitivity to water vapor of the 183.31-GHz line is approximately 30 times higher than at the frequencies of the two-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) for a precipitable water vapor (PWV) amount of less than 2.5 mm. Measurements from the GVRP instrument are therefore especially useful during low-humidity conditions (PWV < 5 mm). In addition to integrated water vapor and liquid water, the GVRP can provide low-resolution vertical profiles of water vapor in very dry conditions.

  6. Voltage-matched, monolithic, multi-band-gap devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2006-08-22

    Monolithic, tandem, photonic cells include at least a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor layer, wherein each semiconductor layer includes an n-type region, a p-type region, and a given band-gap energy. Formed within each semiconductor layer is a sting of electrically connected photonic sub-cells. By carefully selecting the numbers of photonic sub-cells in the first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s), and by carefully selecting the manner in which the sub-cells in a first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s) are electrically connected, each of the first and second layer sub-cell strings may be made to achieve one or more substantially identical electrical characteristics.

  7. Project Reports for Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) always seeks new opportunities to diversify its economy and create new career opportunities for tribal members, which is the purpose of this feasibility study. The MBCI will study the feasibility of locating a renewable energy installation on tribal lands. The technologies to be utilized in the renewable energy installation will be those that can readily handle poultry litter, either alone or in combination with wood residues. The purpose of the study is to determine whether such an installation can be both economically sustainable and consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the tribe. The feasibility study will result in the development of a thorough business plan that will allow the MBCI to make an informed decision regarding this project.

  8. Out of band radiation effects on resist patterning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, Simi A .; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-11

    Our previous work estimated the expected out-of-band (OOB) flare contribution at the wafer level assuming that there is a given amount of OOB at the collector focus. We found that the OOB effects are wavelength, resist, and pattern dependent. In this paper, results from rigorous patterning evaluation of multiple OOB-exposed resists using the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA MET are presented. A controlled amount of OOB is applied to the resist films before patterning is completed with the MET. LER and process performance above the resolution limit and at the resolution limits are evaluated and presented. The results typically show a negative impact on LER and process performance after the OOB exposures except in the case of single resist formulation, where resolution and performance improvement was observed.

  9. Voltage-Matched, Monolithic, Multi-Band-Gap Devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M. W.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2006-08-22

    Monolithic, tandem, photonic cells include at least a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor layer, wherein each semiconductor layer includes an n-type region, a p-type region, and a given band-gap energy. Formed within each semiconductor layer is a string of electrically connected photonic sub-cells. By carefully selecting the numbers of photonic sub-cells in the first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s), and by carefully selecting the manner in which the sub-cells in a first and second layer photonic sub-cell string(s) are electrically connected, each of the first and second layer sub-cell strings may be made to achieve one or more substantially identical electrical characteristics.

  10. Operation Clean Desert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  11. DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CIRCULAR 1 2 CENTER FOR WATER R E S ~ U R C E ~ REHiARCH GROUND-WATER SERIES C - 1 GEOHYDROLOGIC DATA FROM THE PICEANCE CREEK B A S I N BETWEEN THE WHITE AND COLQRAD.0 RIVERS, NORTHWESTERN COLORADO D . L. C o f f i n , F . A. W e l d e r , R . K. G l a n z m a n , and X. W. D u t t o n U n i t e d S t a t e s G e o l o g i c a l Survey Prepared by T h e U n i t e d S t a t e s G e o l o g i c a l Survey i n c o o p e r a t i o n w i t h . 1 he C o l o r a . d o W a . t e r C o n s e r v a t i o

  12. Band-Gap Engineering at a Semiconductor-Crystalline Oxide Interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jahangir-Moghadam, Mohammadreza; Ahmadi-Majlan, Kamyar; Shen, Xuan; Droubay, Timothy; Bowden, Mark; Chrysler, Matthew; Su, Dong; Chambers, Scott A.; Ngai, Joseph H.

    2015-02-09

    The epitaxial growth of crystalline oxides on semiconductors provides a pathway to introduce new functionalities to semiconductor devices. Key to integrating the functionalities of oxides onto semiconductors is controlling the band alignment at interfaces between the two materials. Here we apply principles of band gap engineering traditionally used at heterojunctions between conventional semiconductors to control the band offset between a single crystalline oxide and a semiconductor. Reactive molecular beam epitaxy is used to realize atomically abrupt and structurally coherent interfaces between SrZrxTi1-xO₃ and Ge, in which the band gap of the former is enhanced with Zr content x. We presentmore » structural and electrical characterization of SrZrxTi1-xO₃-Ge heterojunctions and demonstrate a type-I band offset can be achieved. These results demonstrate that band gap engineering can be exploited to realize functional semiconductor crystalline oxide heterojunctions.« less

  13. Band-Gap Engineering at a Semiconductor-Crystalline Oxide Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jahangir-Moghadam, Mohammadreza; Ahmadi-Majlan, Kamyar; Shen, Xuan; Droubay, Timothy; Bowden, Mark; Chrysler, Matthew; Su, Dong; Chambers, Scott A.; Ngai, Joseph H.

    2015-02-09

    The epitaxial growth of crystalline oxides on semiconductors provides a pathway to introduce new functionalities to semiconductor devices. Key to integrating the functionalities of oxides onto semiconductors is controlling the band alignment at interfaces between the two materials. Here we apply principles of band gap engineering traditionally used at heterojunctions between conventional semiconductors to control the band offset between a single crystalline oxide and a semiconductor. Reactive molecular beam epitaxy is used to realize atomically abrupt and structurally coherent interfaces between SrZrxTi1-xO? and Ge, in which the band gap of the former is enhanced with Zr content x. We present structural and electrical characterization of SrZrxTi1-xO?-Ge heterojunctions and demonstrate a type-I band offset can be achieved. These results demonstrate that band gap engineering can be exploited to realize functional semiconductor crystalline oxide heterojunctions.

  14. TEMPORAL SPECTRAL SHIFT AND POLARIZATION OF A BAND-SPLITTING SOLAR TYPE II RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Guohui; Chen, Yao; Lv, Maoshui; Kong, Xiangliang; Feng, Shiwei; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2014-10-01

    In many type II solar radio bursts, the fundamental and/or the harmonic branches of the bursts can split into two almost parallel bands with similar spectral shapes and frequency drifts. However, the mechanisms accounting for this intriguing phenomenon remain elusive. In this study, we report a special band-splitting type II event in which spectral features appear systematically earlier on the upper band (with higher frequencies) than on the lower band (with lower frequencies) by several seconds. Furthermore, the emissions carried by the splitting band are moderately polarized with the left-hand polarized signals stronger than the right-hand ones. The polarization degree varies in a range of 0.3 to 0.6. These novel observational findings provide important constraints on the underlying physical mechanisms of band-splitting of type II radio bursts.

  15. Effects of microstructure banding on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth in X65 pipeline steels

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ronevich, Joseph A.; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Chris W.

    2015-09-10

    Banded ferrite-pearlite X65 pipeline steel was tested in high pressure hydrogen gas to evaluate the effects of oriented pearlite on hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth. Test specimens were oriented in the steel pipe such that cracks propagated either parallel or perpendicular to the banded pearlite. The ferrite-pearlite microstructure exhibited orientation dependent behavior in which fatigue crack growth rates were significantly lower for cracks oriented perpendicular to the banded pearlite compared to cracks oriented parallel to the bands. Thus the reduction of hydrogen assisted fatigue crack growth across the banded pearlite is attributed to a combination of crack-tip branching and impededmore » hydrogen diffusion across the banded pearlite.« less

  16. Independently tunable dual-band perfect absorber based on graphene at

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mid-infrared frequencies (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Independently tunable dual-band perfect absorber based on graphene at mid-infrared frequencies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Independently tunable dual-band perfect absorber based on graphene at mid-infrared frequencies We design a dual-band absorber formed by combining two cross-shaped metallic resonators of different sizes within a super-unit-cell arranged in mirror symmetry. Simulations indicate

  17. Nonequilibrium Green's function formulation of intersubband absorption for nonparabolic single-band effective mass Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolek, Andrzej

    2015-05-04

    The formulas are derived that enable calculations of intersubband absorption coefficient within nonequilibrium Green's function method applied to a single-band effective-mass Hamiltonian with the energy dependent effective mass. The derivation provides also the formulas for the virtual valence band components of the two-band Green's functions which can be used for more exact estimation of the density of states and electrons and more reliable treatment of electronic transport in unipolar n-type heterostructure semiconductor devices.

  18. Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior Chippewa

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indian Reservation | Department of Energy Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior Chippewa Indian Reservation Fond du Lac Band Leads Climate Resilience Efforts on Lake Superior Chippewa Indian Reservation September 23, 2014 - 11:24am Addthis From the White House Council on Environmental Quality blog: Last Friday I had the pleasure of visiting the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indian Reservation. I was joined by Raina Thiele, Associate Director of White

  19. Project Reports for Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians - 2010 Project |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians - 2010 Project Project Reports for Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians - 2010 Project The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) will conduct a feasibility and predevelopment study of potential solar projects on its lands in southern California. Learn more about this project or find details in the below status reports. PDF icon November 2009 status report PDF icon October 2010 status report PDF icon Final report More

  20. Little River Band of Ottawa Indians … First Steps to Human Capacity Building

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Little River Band of Ottawa Indians Melissa Waitner, GPC Grant Writer 375 River Street Manistee, Michigan 49660 mwaitner@lrboi.com - The Little River Band of Ottawa Indians (LRBOI) is a Federally Recognized Tribal Nation located in Manistee, Michigan along the shores of Lake Michigan. - Our people are the descendants of nine Ottawa bands whose leaders were signatories to the 1836 Treaty of Washington and the 1855 Treaty of Detroit. - For over 100 years, succeeding generations of Ottawa leaders

  1. Little River Band of Ottawa Indians … First Steps to Human Capacity Building

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Little River Band of Ottawa Indians Melissa Waitner, GPC Grant Writer 375 River Street Manistee, Michigan 49660 mwaitner@lrboi.com  The Little River Band of Ottawa Indians (LRBOI) is a Federally Recognized Tribal Nation located in Manistee, Michigan along the shores of Lake Michigan.  Our people are the descendants of nine Ottawa bands whose leaders were signatories to the 1836 Treaty of Washington and the 1855 Treaty of Detroit.  For over 100 years, succeeding generations of Ottawa

  2. Fully Polarimetric Differential Intensity W-band Imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Kelly, James F.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Lechelt, Wayne M.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2013-05-31

    We present a novel architecture based upon a Dicke-switched heterodyne radiometer architecture employing two identical input sections consisting of horn and orthomode transducer to detect the difference between the H and V polarization states of two separate object patches imaged by the radiometer. We have constructed and described previously a fully polarimetric W-band passive millimeter wave imager constructed to study the phenomenology of anomaly detection using polarimetric image exploitation of the Stokes images. The heterodyne radiometer used a PIN diode switch between the input millimeter wave energy and that of a reference load in order to eliminate the effects of component drifts and reduce the effects of 1/f noise. The differential approach differs from our previous work by comparing H and V polarization states detected by each of the two input horns instead of a reference load to form signals delta H and delta V from closely adjacent paired object patches. This novel imaging approach reduces common mode noise and enhances detection of small changes between the H and V polarization states of two object patches, now given as difference terms of the fully polarimetric radiometer. We present the theory of operation, initial proof of concept experimental results, and extension of the differential radiometer to a system with a binocular fore optics that allow adjustment of the convergence or shear of the object patches viewed by the differential polarimetric imager.

  3. Project Reports for Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians (SYBCI) will prepare a comprehensive, strategic energy plan that incorporates energy efficiency, renewable energy, and other energy management and development options.

  4. Project Reports for Ramona Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians- 1999 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ramona Band of Cauhilla Indians is establishing an ecotourism facility on their Reservation at the southern end of the San Bernardino National Forest in southern California.

  5. Theoretical performance of solar cell based on mini-bands quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aly, Abou El-Maaty M. E-mail: ashraf.nasr@gmail.com; Nasr, A. E-mail: ashraf.nasr@gmail.com

    2014-03-21

    The tremendous amount of research in solar energy is directed toward intermediate band solar cell for its advantages compared with the conventional solar cell. The latter has lower efficiency because the photons have lower energy than the bandgap energy and cannot excite mobile carriers from the valence band to the conduction band. On the other hand, if mini intermediate band is introduced between the valence and conduction bands, then the smaller energy photons can be used to promote charge carriers transfer to the conduction band and thereby the total current increases while maintaining a large open circuit voltage. In this article, the influence of the new band on the power conversion efficiency for structure of quantum dots intermediate band solar cell is theoretically investigated and studied. The time-independent Schrdinger equation is used to determine the optimum width and location of the intermediate band. Accordingly, achievement of a maximum efficiency by changing the width of quantum dots and barrier distances is studied. Theoretical determination of the power conversion efficiency under the two different ranges of QD width is presented. From the obtained results, the maximum power conversion efficiency is about 70.42%. It is carried out for simple cubic quantum dot crystal under fully concentrated light. It is strongly dependent on the width of quantum dots and barrier distances.

  6. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-12-27

    A single-junction solar cell is described having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of ''pinning'' the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14[+-]0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap. 7 figures.

  7. Accurate Band-Structure Calculations for the 3d Transition Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    developed a method to calculate accurate band structures and bandgap energies for 3d transition metal oxides using an augmented GW formalism. Significance and Impact This approach...

  8. Project Reports for Minnesota Chippewa Tribe: White Earth Band- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several northern Minnesota tribes interested in building a common foundation for strategic tribal energy capacity have banded together for strategic energy resource planning.

  9. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

  10. Development of a Multi Megawatt Circulator for X Band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilson, J.; Ives, L.; Tantawi, S.G.; /Calabazas Creek Res., Saratoga /SLAC

    2008-03-24

    Research is in progress on a TeV-scale linear collider that will operate at 5-10 times the energy of present-generation accelerators. This will require development of high power RF sources generating of 50-100 MW per source. Transmission of power at this level requires overmoded waveguide to avoid breakdown. In particular, the TE{sub 01} circular waveguide mode is currently the mode of choice for waveguide transmission at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the Multimode Delay Line Distribution System (MDLDS). A common device for protecting an RF source from reflected power is the waveguide circulator. A circulator is typically a three-port device that allows low loss power transmission from the source to the load, but diverts power coming from the load (reflected power) to a third terminated port. To achieve a low loss, matched, three port junction requires nonreciprocal behavior. This is achieved using ferrites in a static magnetic field which introduces a propagation constant dependent on RF field direction relative to the static magnetic field. Circulators are currently available at X-Band for power levels up to 1 MW in fundamental rectangular waveguide; however, the next generation of RF sources for TeV-level accelerators will require circulators in the 50-100 MW range. Clearly, conventional technology is not capable of reaching the power level required. In this paper, we discuss the development of an X-Band circulator operating at multi-megawatt power levels in overmoded waveguide. The circulator will employ an innovative coaxial geometry using the TE{sub 01} mode. Difficulties in maintaining mode purity in oversized rectangular guide preclude increasing guide area to allow increasing the power level to the desired 50-100 MW range. The TE{sub 01} mode in circular waveguide is very robust mode for transmission of high power in overmoded waveguide. The mode is ideal for transmission of high power microwaves because of its low-losses, zero tangential field on the guide (which minimizes arcing problems) and reduced propensity for mode conversion compared to non-asymmetric circular waveguide modes. Unfortunately, no current designs exist for circulators using the circular TE{sub 01} mode. The basic building block for all low-loss circulators and isolators is a nonreciprocal element with a phase shift dependent on the propagation direction in the guide. Such an element can be constructed by placement of a hollow ferrite rod in a cylindrical waveguide. An inner conductor placed inside the ferrite rod conducts a current pulse that induces an azimuthal magnetic field inside the ferrite. This configuration is depicted in Figure 1a. An alternate configuration using permanent magnets is shown in Figure 1b. Either of these configurations will create a different phase shift for waves propagating in opposite directions along the waveguide axis. This feature can be used to develop a high power circulator. We are currently testing a TE{sub 01} nonreciprocal phase shifter in a 50 MW test stand. This device is in the configuration shown in Figure 1a. The induced differential phase shift and loss will be measured and compared to calculations.

  11. Analysis of the efficiency of intermediate band solar cells based on quantum dot supercrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heshmati, S; Golmohammadi, S; Abedi, K; Taleb, H

    2014-03-28

    We have studied the influence of the quantum-dot (QD) width and the quantum-dot conduction band (QD-CB) offset on the efficiency of quantum-dot intermediate band solar cells (QD-IBSCs). Simulation results demonstrate that with increasing QD-CB offset and decreasing QD width, the maximum efficiency is achieved. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Dilute group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man

    2015-02-24

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  13. Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man

    2012-07-31

    An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

  14. Defect-Band Emission Photoluminescence Imaging on Multi-Crystalline Si Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, F.; Johnston, S.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

    2011-07-01

    Defect-band photoluminescence (PL) imaging with an InGaAs camera was applied to multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers, which were taken from different heights of different Si bricks. Neighboring wafers were picked at six different processing steps, from as-cut to post-metallization. By using different cut-off filters, we were able to separate the band-to-band emission images from the defect-band emission images. On the defect-band emission images, the bright regions that originate from the grain boundaries and defect clusters were extracted from the PL images. The area fraction percentage of these regions at various processing stages shows a correlation with the final cell electrical parameters.

  15. RRI-GBT MULTI-BAND RECEIVER: MOTIVATION, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maan, Yogesh; Deshpande, Avinash A.; Chandrashekar, Vinutha; Chennamangalam, Jayanth; Rao, K. B. Raghavendra; Somashekar, R.; Ezhilarasi, M. S.; Sujatha, S.; Kasturi, S.; Sandhya, P.; Duraichelvan, R.; Amiri, Shahram; Aswathappa, H. A.; Sarabagopalan, G.; Ananda, H. M.; Anderson, Gary; Bauserman, Jonah; Beaudet, Carla; Bloss, Marty; Barve, Indrajit V.; and others

    2013-01-15

    We report the design and development of a self-contained multi-band receiver (MBR) system, intended for use with a single large aperture to facilitate sensitive and high time-resolution observations simultaneously in 10 discrete frequency bands sampling a wide spectral span (100-1500 MHz) in a nearly log-periodic fashion. The development of this system was primarily motivated by need for tomographic studies of pulsar polar emission regions. Although the system design is optimized for the primary goal, it is also suited for several other interesting astronomical investigations. The system consists of a dual-polarization multi-band feed (with discrete responses corresponding to the 10 bands pre-selected as relatively radio frequency interference free), a common wide-band radio frequency front-end, and independent back-end receiver chains for the 10 individual sub-bands. The raw voltage time sequences corresponding to 16 MHz bandwidth each for the two linear polarization channels and the 10 bands are recorded at the Nyquist rate simultaneously. We present the preliminary results from the tests and pulsar observations carried out with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope using this receiver. The system performance implied by these results and possible improvements are also briefly discussed.

  16. Electronic band structure and Kondo coupling in YbRh2Si2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigger, G.A.

    2010-04-15

    The electronic band structure of YbRh2Si2 is calculated in a relativistic framework including correlation corrections and magnetization of the Yb ion and compared to detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectra. The photoemission spectra for LuRh2Si2 are used as reference to identify electronic bands with no f symmetry. The calculated band structure manifests a 4f13 spin-polarized configuration leaving the unoccupied state at 1.4eV above the Fermi energy. At the band theory level, the 4f bands are located far below the Fermi level and the anisotropic Coulomb interaction within the 4f shell spreads the multilevel into broader 4f complexes below -2.5eV . The photoemission spectra obtained on YbRh2Si2 show a clear f -multilevel splitting into j=7/2 and 5/2 excitations. The interaction of the 4f7/2 levels close to the Fermi energy with two conduction bands shows visible hybridization gaps of 45 and 80meV, respectively. We discuss the origin of these excitations and provide an analysis according to Anderson's single-impurity model with parameters suggested by the band-structure calculation and the photoemission spectra. Both experiment and theory indicate nearly identical Fermi surfaces for LuRh2Si2 and YbRh2Si2 . The valency of Yb in YbRh2Si2 is estimated to be close to +3.

  17. Evidence of ion intercalation mediated band structure modification and opto-ionic coupling in lithium niobite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shank, Joshua C.; Tellekamp, M. Brooks; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2015-01-21

    The theoretically suggested band structure of the novel p-type semiconductor lithium niobite (LiNbO{sub 2}), the direct coupling of photons to ion motion, and optically induced band structure modifications are investigated by temperature dependent photoluminescence. LiNbO{sub 2} has previously been used as a memristor material but is shown here to be useful as a sensor owing to the electrical, optical, and chemical ease of lithium removal and insertion. Despite the high concentration of vacancies present in lithium niobite due to the intentional removal of lithium atoms, strong photoluminescence spectra are observed even at room temperature that experimentally confirm the suggested band structure implying transitions from a flat conduction band to a degenerate valence band. Removal of small amounts of lithium significantly modifies the photoluminescence spectra including additional larger than stoichiometric-band gap features. Sufficient removal of lithium results in the elimination of the photoluminescence response supporting the predicted transition from a direct to indirect band gap semiconductor. In addition, non-thermal coupling between the incident laser and lithium ions is observed and results in modulation of the electrical impedance.

  18. The use of bulk states to accelerate the band edge statecalculation of a semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vomel, Christof; Tomov, Stanimire Z.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Marques,Osni A.; Dongarra, Jack J.

    2006-05-10

    We present a new technique to accelerate the convergence of the folded spectrum method in empirical pseudopotential band edge state calculations for colloidal quantum dots. We use bulk band states of the materials constituent of the quantum dot to construct initial vectors and a preconditioner. We apply these to accelerate the convergence of the folded spectrum method for the interior states at the top of the valence and the bottom of the conduction band. For large CdSe quantum dots, the number of iteration steps until convergence decreases by about a factor of 4 compared to previous calculations.

  19. Electronic Band Dispersion Of CeAg{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} Studied Using Angle

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electronic Band Dispersion Of CeAg{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} Studied Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic Band Dispersion Of CeAg{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} Studied Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to determine the electronic band dispersion of CeAg{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} single crystal along the {Gamma}-Z

  20. Extended investigation of superdeformed bands in {sup 151,152}Tb nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin, J.; Byrski, Th.; Duchene, G.; Beck, F. A.; Curien, D.; Dubray, N.; Dudek, J.; Courtin, S.; Dorvaux, O.; France, G. de; Gall, B.; Joshi, P.; Nourredine, A.; Pachoud, E.; Piqueras, I.; Vivien, J. P.; Gozdz, A.; Odahara, A.; Schunck, N.; Adimi, N.

    2008-01-15

    A detailed study of known and new SD bands in Tb isotopes has been performed with the use of the EUROBALL IV {gamma}-ray array. The high-statistics data set has allowed for the extension of known SD bands at low and high spins by new {gamma}-ray transitions. These transitions, as it turns out, correspond to the rotational frequencies where the principal superdeformed gaps (Z=66,N=86) close giving rise to up- or down-bending mechanisms. This enables to attribute the underlying theoretical configurations with much higher confidence as compared to the previous identifications. Five new SD bands have been discovered, three of them assigned to the {sup 152}Tb and the two others to the {sup 151}Tb nuclei. Nuclear mean-field calculations have been used to interpret the structure of known SD bands as well as of the new ones in terms of nucleonic configurations.

  1. Project Reports for Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians will establish a comprehensive energy strategic plan that captures economic and environmental benefits while continuing to respect tribal cultural practices and traditions.

  2. Project Reports for Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians-2015 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this grant, Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians will install a 76.9-kilowatt (kW) SunEdison solar photovoltaic (PV) system to offset the energy usage costs of the Tribal Education and Family Services offices.

  3. Project Reports for Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) plans to complete a feasibility study to evaluate a combined wind/solar power generation project on its Whitewater Ranch trust lands in southern California.

  4. Quasi-phase-matching of the dual-band nonlinear left-handed metamaterial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yahong Song, Kun; Gu, Shuai; Liu, Zhaojun; Guo, Lei; Zhao, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Xin

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate a type of nonlinear meta-atom creating a dual-band nonlinear left-handed metamaterial (DNLHM). The DNLHM operates at two distinct left-handed frequency bands where there is an interval of one octave between the two center frequencies. Under the illumination of a high-power signal at the first left-handed frequency band corresponding to fundamental frequency (FF), second-harmonic generation (SHG) is observed at the second left-handed band. This means that our DNLHM supports backward-propagating waves both at FF and second-harmonic (SH) frequency. We also experimentally demonstrate quasi-phase-matching configurations for the backward SHG. This fancy parametric process can significantly transmits the SH generated by an incident FF wave.

  5. A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the third opens a band-gap in the normal way. Low-dimensional metals have attracted much attention because of their unique electronic properties, which often lead to exotic...

  6. Dipole bands in high spin states of {sub 57}{sup 135}La{sub 78}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, Ritika; Kumar, S.; Saxena, Mansi; Goyal, Savi; Siwal, Davinder; Verma, S.; Mandal, S.; Palit, R.; Saha, Sudipta; Sethi, J.; Sharma, Sushil K.; Trivedi, T.; Jadav, S. K.; Donthi, R.; Naidu, B. S.

    2014-08-14

    High spin states of {sup 135}La have been investigated using the reaction {sup 128}Te({sup 11}B,4n){sup 135}La at a beam energy of 50.5 MeV. Two negative parity dipole bands (?I = 1) have been established. Crossover E2 transitions have been observed for the first time in one of the dipole bands. For the Tilted Axis Cranking (TAC) calculations, a three-quasiparticle (3qp) configuration ?(h{sub 11/2}){sup 1}??(h{sub 11/2}){sup ?2} and a five-quasiparticle (5qp) configuration ?(h{sub 11/2}){sup 1}(g{sub 7/2}/d{sub 5/2}){sup 2}??(h{sub 11/2}){sup ?2} have been taken for the two negative parity dipole bands. The comparison of experimental observables with TAC calculations supports the configuration assignments for both the dipole bands.

  7. Project Reports for Little River Band of Ottawa Indians- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of this project is to increase human capacity of the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians (LRBOI) to understand the components of renewable energy and the importance of energy efficiency.

  8. A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal Print A "wire" of indium only one or a few atoms wide grown on a silicon surface comprises an ideal test laboratory for studying...

  9. Project Reports for Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians in Lakeport, California, will establish a Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program to provide training, outreach, and education on energy assistance and conservation to low-income families.

  10. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-122 G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state or reflect those of the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. DOESC-ARMTR-122 G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product A...

  11. Band structure engineering through orbital interaction for enhanced thermoelectric power factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Hong; Sun, Wenhao; Ceder, Gerbrand; Armiento, Rickard; Lazic, Predrag

    2014-02-24

    Band structure engineering for specific electronic or optical properties is essential for the further development of many important technologies including thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, and microelectronics. In this work, we report orbital interaction as a powerful tool to finetune the band structure and the transport properties of charge carriers in bulk crystalline semiconductors. The proposed mechanism of orbital interaction on band structure is demonstrated for IV-VI thermoelectric semiconductors. For IV-VI materials, we find that the convergence of multiple carrier pockets not only displays a strong correlation with the s-p and spin-orbit coupling but also coincides with the enhancement of power factor. Our results suggest a useful path to engineer the band structure and an enticing solid-solution design principle to enhance thermoelectric performance.

  12. Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Shadow-Band Radiometer Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Shadow-Band Radiometer Network M. A. Miller, R. M. Reynolds, and J. J. Bartholomew Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction A network of ship-mounted marine fast-rotating shadow-band radiometers (FRSRs) and broadband radiometers have been deployed over the fast four years on several backbone ships, funded jointly by Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Sensor Intercomparison

  13. Ku-band 6-bit RF MEMS time delay network. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Ku-band 6-bit RF MEMS time delay network. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ku-band 6-bit RF MEMS time delay network. No abstract prepared. Authors: Nordquist, Christopher Daniel ; Sullivan, Charles Thomas ; Kraus, Garth Merlin ; Austin, Franklin, IV [1] ; Finnegan, Patrick Sean [1] ; Ballance, Mark H. [1] ; Dyck, Christopher William + Show Author Affiliations (LMATA Government Services, LLC, Albuquerque, NM) Publication Date: 2008-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 966236 Report

  14. Project Reports for Ramona Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians- 2002 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ramona Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians ("Ramona Band" or "tribe") will be the first tribe to develop its entire reservation off-grid, using renewable energy as the primary power source. The tribe will purchase and install the primary components for a 65-80 kilowatt-hours per day central wind/PV/propane generator hybrid system that will power the reservation's housing, offices, ecotourism, and training businesses. The electricity is planned to be distributed through an underground mini-grid.

  15. High-Efficiency, Wide-Band Three-Phase Rectifiers and Adaptive Rectifier

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management | Department of Energy Efficiency, Wide-Band Three-Phase Rectifiers and Adaptive Rectifier Management High-Efficiency, Wide-Band Three-Phase Rectifiers and Adaptive Rectifier Management Higher-Efficiency Power Conversion and Managed Supply Improve Energy Utilization Information technology (IT) and telecommunications facilities consume ~48 billion kWh of electricity in the United States. Energy consumption within IT data center facilities could be improved in three key areas:

  16. Performance characteristics of a perforated shadow band under clear sky conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Michael J.

    2010-12-15

    A perforated, non-rotating shadow band is described for separating global solar irradiance into its diffuse and direct normal components using a single pyranometer. Whereas shadow bands are normally solid so as to occult the sensor of a pyranometer throughout the day, the proposed band has apertures cut from its circumference to intermittently expose the instrument sensor at preset intervals. Under clear sky conditions the device produces a saw tooth waveform of irradiance data from which it is possible to reconstruct separate global and diffuse curves. The direct normal irradiance may then be calculated giving a complete breakdown of the irradiance curves without need of a second instrument or rotating shadow band. This paper describes the principle of operation of the band and gives a mathematical model of its shading mask based on the results of an optical ray tracing study. An algorithm for processing the data from the perforated band system is described and evaluated. In an extended trial conducted at NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, the band coupled with a thermally corrected Eppley PSP produced independent curves for diffuse, global and direct normal irradiance with low mean bias errors of 5.6 W/m{sup 2}, 0.3 W/m{sup 2} and -2.6 W/m{sup 2} respectively, relative to collocated reference instruments. Random uncertainties were 9.7 W/m{sup 2} (diffuse), 17.3 W/m{sup 2} (global) and 19.0 W/m{sup 2} (direct). When the data processing algorithm was modified to include the ray trace model of sensor exposure, uncertainties increased only marginally, confirming the effectiveness of the model. Deployment of the perforated band system can potentially increase the accuracy of data from ground stations in predominantly sunny areas where instrumentation is limited to a single pyranometer. (author)

  17. Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper-oxide

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Layers in Tl-based Copper-oxide Superconductor using Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper-oxide Layers in Tl-based Copper-oxide Superconductor using Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper-oxide Layers in Tl-based Copper-oxide Superconductor using Angle-resolved Photoemission

  18. Electron Elevator: Excitations across the Band Gap via a Dynamical Gap

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    State (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electron Elevator: Excitations across the Band Gap via a Dynamical Gap State Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on January 26, 2017 Title: Electron Elevator: Excitations across the Band Gap via a Dynamical Gap State Authors: Lim, A. ; Foulkes, W. M. C. ; Horsfield, A. P. ; Mason, D. R. ; Schleife, A. ; Draeger, E. W. ; Correa, A. A. Publication Date: 2016-01-27 OSTI Identifier: 1236285 Grant/Contract

  19. Prompt Proton Decay and Deformed Bands in 56Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, E. K.; Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L. L.; Torres, D. A.; Ragnarsson, I.; Andreoiu, C.; Baktash, Cyrus; Carpenter, M. P.; Charity, R. J.; Chiara, C. J.; Ekman, J.; Fahlander, C.; Hoel, C.; Pechenaya, O. L.; Reviol, W.; du Rietz, R.; Sarantites, D. G.; Seweryniak, D.; Sobotka, L. G.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Zhu, S.

    2008-06-01

    High-spin states in the doubly magic N=Z nucleus {sup 56}Ni have been investigated with three fusion-evaporation reaction experiments. New {gamma}-ray transitions are added, and a confirmation of a previously suggested prompt proton decay from a rotational band in {sup 56}Ni into the ground state of {sup 55}Co is presented. The rotational bands in {sup 56}Ni are discussed within the framework of cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations.

  20. Thermophotovoltaic conversion using selective infrared line emitters and large band gap photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandhorst, Jr., Henry W. (Auburn, AL); Chen, Zheng (Auburn, AL)

    2000-01-01

    Efficient thermophotovoltaic conversion can be performed using photovoltaic devices with a band gap in the 0.75-1.4 electron volt range, and selective infrared emitters chosen from among the rare earth oxides which are thermally stimulated to emit infrared radiation whose energy very largely corresponds to the aforementioned band gap. It is possible to use thermovoltaic devices operating at relatively high temperatures, up to about 300.degree. C., without seriously impairing the efficiency of energy conversion.

  1. Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians - Conservation and Renewable Energy Planning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    du Flambeau Tribal Energy Program Lac du Flambeau Tribal Energy Program Renewable Energy and Conservation Renewable Energy and Conservation Planning Planning Larry Wawronowicz Larry Wawronowicz Deputy Administrator of Natural Resources Deputy Administrator of Natural Resources November 8, 2007 November 8, 2007 Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians Chippewa Indians DE DE - - PS36 PS36 - - 06GO96038 06GO96038 Brief Summary of Tribe Brief

  2. Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa & Chippewa Indians - Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Tribal Energy Program Review DOE Tribal Energy Program Review Denver, Colorado Denver, Colorado November 5 November 5 - - 8, 2007 8, 2007 Final Report Final Report December 2007 December 2007 Grand Traverse Band Grand Traverse Band * * 4,023 Members 4,023 Members * * 2,370 Acres 2,370 Acres - - Checkerboard Checkerboard * * Six Six - - County Service Area County Service Area * * EDC: 2 Casinos, Resort (424 Rooms), EDC: 2 Casinos, Resort (424 Rooms), Gas Station, etc. Gas Station, etc. * *

  3. Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians - Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Tribal Energy Forum DOE Tribal Energy Forum October 25, 2006 October 25, 2006 Grand Traverse Band Grand Traverse Band * * 3,988 Members 3,988 Members * * 2,370 Acres 2,370 Acres - - Checkerboard Checkerboard * * Six Six - - County Service Area County Service Area * * EDC: 2 Casinos, Resort (424 Rooms), Gas EDC: 2 Casinos, Resort (424 Rooms), Gas Station, etc. Station, etc. * * Gov Gov ' ' t: Administration, Housing, Medicine t: Administration, Housing, Medicine Lodge, Strong Heart Center,

  4. TWO PLANETARY COMPANIONS AROUND THE K7 DWARF GJ 221: A HOT SUPER-EARTH AND A CANDIDATE IN THE SUB-SATURN DESERT RANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arriagada, Pamela; Minniti, Dante; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian; Wende, Sebastian

    2013-07-01

    We report two low-mass companions orbiting the nearby K7 dwarf GJ 221 that have emerged from reanalyzing 4.4 yr of publicly available HARPS spectra complemented with 2 years of high-precision Doppler measurements with Magellan/PFS. The HARPS measurements alone contain the clear signal of a low-mass companion with a period of 125 days and a minimum mass of 53.2 M{sub Circled-Plus} (GJ 221b), falling in a mass range where very few planet candidates have been found (sub-Saturn desert). The addition of 17 PFS observations allows the confident detection of a second low-mass companion (6.5 M{sub Circled-Plus }) in a hot orbit (3.87 day period, GJ 221c). Spectroscopic and photometric calibrations suggest that GJ 221 is slightly depleted ([Fe/H] {approx} -0.1) compared to the Sun, so the presence of two low-mass companions in the system confirms the trend that slightly reduced stellar metallicity does not prevent the formation of planets in the super-Earth to sub-Saturn mass regime.

  5. Band gap engineering for graphene by using Na{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, S. J.; Lee, P. R.; Kim, J. G.; Ryu, M. T.; Park, H. M.; Chung, J. W.

    2014-08-25

    Despite the noble electronic properties of graphene, its industrial application has been hindered mainly by the absence of a stable means of producing a band gap at the Dirac point (DP). We report a new route to open a band gap (E{sub g}) at DP in a controlled way by depositing positively charged Na{sup +} ions on single layer graphene formed on 6H-SiC(0001) surface. The doping of low energy Na{sup +} ions is found to deplete the ?* band of graphene above the DP, and simultaneously shift the DP downward away from Fermi energy indicating the opening of E{sub g}. The band gap increases with increasing Na{sup +} coverage with a maximum E{sub g}?0.70?eV. Our core-level data, C 1s, Na 2p, and Si 2p, consistently suggest that Na{sup +} ions do not intercalate through graphene, but produce a significant charge asymmetry among the carbon atoms of graphene to cause the opening of a band gap. We thus provide a reliable way of producing and tuning the band gap of graphene by using Na{sup +} ions, which may play a vital role in utilizing graphene in future nano-electronic devices.

  6. Electronic Band Structure And Kondo Coupling in YbRh(2)Si(2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigger, G.A.; Baumberger, F.; Shen, Z.X.; Yin, Z.P.; Pickett, W.E.; Maquilon, S.; Fisk, Z.; /UC, Davis

    2007-09-26

    The electronic band structure of YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is calculated in a relativistic framework including correlation corrections and magnetization of the Yb ion and compared to detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectra. The photoemission spectra for LuRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} are used as reference to identify electronic bands with no f symmetry. The calculated band structure manifests a 4f{sup 13} spin-polarized configuration leaving the unoccupied state at 1.4 eV above the Fermi energy. At the band theory level, the 4f bands are located far below the Fermi level and the anisotropic Coulomb interaction within the 4f shell spreads the multilevel into broader 4f complexes below -2.5 eV. The photoemission spectra obtained on YbRh2Si2 show a clear f-multilevel splitting into j=7/2 and 5/2 excitations. The interaction of the 4f{sub 7/2} levels close to the Fermi energy with two conduction bands shows visible hybridization gaps of 45 and 80 meV, respectively. We discuss the origin of these excitations and provide an analysis according to Anderson's single-impurity model with parameters suggested by the band-structure calculation and the photoemission spectra. Both experiment and theory indicate nearly identical Fermi surfaces for LuRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. The valency of Yb in YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is estimated to be close to +3.

  7. Reading data stored in the state of metastable defects in silicon using band-band photoluminescence: Proof of concept and physical limits to the data storage density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rougieux, F. E.; Macdonald, D.

    2014-03-24

    The state of bistable defects in crystalline silicon such as iron-boron pairs or the boron-oxygen defect can be changed at room temperature. In this letter, we experimentally demonstrate that the chemical state of a group of defects can be changed to represent a bit of information. The state can then be read without direct contact via the intensity of the emitted band-band photoluminescence signal of the group of defects, via their impact on the carrier lifetime. The theoretical limit of the information density is then computed. The information density is shown to be low for two-dimensional storage but significant for three-dimensional data storage. Finally, we compute the maximum storage capacity as a function of the lower limit of the photoluminescence detector sensitivity.

  8. Band structure engineering and thermoelectric properties of charge-compensated filled skutterudites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Xiaoya; Yang, Jiong; Wu, Lijun; Salvador, James R.; Zhang, Cheng; Villaire, William L.; Haddad, Daad; Yang, Jihui; Zhu, Yimei; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-12

    Thermoelectric properties of semiconductors are intimately related to their electronic band structure, which can be engineered via chemical doping. Dopant Ga in the cage-structured skutterudite Co4Sb12 substitutes Sb sites while occupying the void sites. Combining quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations, we show that Ga dual-site occupancy breaks the symmetry of the Sb-Sb network, splits the deep triply-degenerate conduction bands, and drives them downward to the band edge. The charge-compensating nature of the dual occupancy Ga increases overall filling fraction limit. By imparting this unique band structure feature, and judiciously doping the materials by increasing the Yb content,more » we promote the Fermi level to a point where carriers are in energetic proximity to these features. Increased participation of these heavier bands in electronic transport leads to increased thermopower and effective mass. Further, the localized distortion from Ga/Sb substitution enhances the phonon scattering to reduce the thermal conductivity effectively.« less

  9. Apparatus for producing a thin sample band in a microchannel system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Stewart K.

    2008-05-13

    The present invention improves the performance of microchannel systems for chemical and biological synthesis and analysis by providing a method and apparatus for producing a thin band of a species sample. Thin sample bands improve the resolution of microchannel separation processes, as well as many other processes requiring precise control of sample size and volume. The new method comprises a series of steps in which a species sample is manipulated by controlled transport through a junction formed at the intersection of four or more channels. A sample is first inserted into the end of one of these channels in the vicinity of the junction. Next, this sample is thinned by transport across the junction one or more times. During these thinning steps, flow enters the junction through one of the channels and exists through those remaining, providing a divergent flow field that progressively stretches and thins the band with each traverse of the junction. The thickness of the resulting sample band may be smaller than the channel width. Moreover, the thickness of the band may be varied and controlled by altering the method alone, without modification to the channel or junction geometries. The invention is applicable to both electroosmotic and electrophoretic transport, to combined electrokinetic transport, and to some special cases in which bulk fluid transport is driven by pressure gradients. It is further applicable to channels that are open, filled with a gel or filled with a porous or granular material.

  10. Method for producing a thin sample band in a microchannel device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.

    2004-08-03

    The present invention improves the performance of microchannel systems for chemical and biological synthesis and analysis by providing a method and apparatus for producing a thin band of a species sample. Thin sample bands improve the resolution of microchannel separation processes, as well as many other processes requiring precise control of sample size and volume. The new method comprises a series of steps in which a species sample is manipulated by controlled transport through a junction formed at the intersection of four or more channels. A sample is first inserted into the end of one of these channels in the vicinity of the junction. Next, this sample is thinned by transport across the junction one or more times. During these thinning steps, flow enters the junction through one of the channels and exists through those remaining, providing a divergent flow field that progressively stretches and thins the band with each traverse of the junction. The thickness of the resulting sample band may be smaller than the channel width. Moreover, the thickness of the band may be varied and controlled by altering the method alone, without modification to the channel or junction geometries. The invention is applicable to both electroosmotic and electrophoretic transport, to combined electrokinetic transport, and to some special cases in which bulk fluid transport is driven by pressure gradients. It is further applicable to channels that are open, filled with a gel or filled with a porous or granular material.

  11. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  12. Local strain effect on the band gap engineering of graphene by a first-principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gui, Gui; Booske, John; Ma, Zhenqiang E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu; Morgan, Dane; Zhong, Jianxin E-mail: mazq@engr.wisc.edu

    2015-02-02

    We have systematically investigated the effect of local strain on electronic properties of graphene by first-principles calculations. Two major types of local strain, oriented along the zigzag and the armchair directions, have been studied. We find that local strain with a proper range and strength along the zigzag direction results in opening of significant band gaps in graphene, on the order of 10{sup ?1?}eV; whereas, local strain along the armchair direction cannot open a significant band gap in graphene. Our results show that appropriate local strain can effectively open and tune the band gap in graphene; therefore, the electronic and transport properties of graphene can also be modified.

  13. Method of manufacturing flexible metallic photonic band gap structures, and structures resulting therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Sandhya (Bloomington, MN); Tuttle, Gary L. (Ames, IA); Sigalas, Mihail (Ames, IA); McCalmont, Jonathan S. (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA)

    2001-08-14

    A method of manufacturing a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable in the infrared region, comprises the steps of spinning on a first layer of dielectric on a GaAs substrate, imidizing this first layer of dielectric, forming a first metal pattern on this first layer of dielectric, spinning on and imidizing a second layer of dielectric, and then removing the GaAs substrate. This method results in a flexible metallic photonic band gap structure operable with various filter characteristics in the infrared region. This method may be used to construct multi-layer flexible metallic photonic band gap structures. Metal grid defects and dielectric separation layer thicknesses are adjusted to control filter parameters.

  14. Band alignment and interfacial structure of ZnO/Si heterojunction with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} as interlayers (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Band alignment and interfacial structure of ZnO/Si heterojunction with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} as interlayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Band alignment and interfacial structure of ZnO/Si heterojunction with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} as interlayers Energy band alignment of ZnO/Si heterojunction with thin interlayers Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} grown by atomic layer

  15. Analysis of several high-resolution infrared bands of spiropentane, C5H8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maki, Arthur G.; Price, Joseph E.; Harzan, J.; Nibler, Joseph W.; Weber, Alfons; Masiello, Tony; Blake, Thomas A.

    2015-06-01

    he high-resolution infrared absorption spectrum of spiropentane (C5H8) has been measured from 200 to 4000 cm 1, and a detailed analysis is presented for eight bands in the region from 700 to 2200 cm 1. Two fundamental perpendicular bands were analyzed, m22 and m24 near 1050 and 780 cm 1, respectively, along with two fundamental parallel bands, m14 and m16 near 1540 and 990 cm1, respectively. Two other fundamentals, m17 and m23, are seen as intense overlapping bands near 880 cm*1 and are Coriolis-coupled, producing a complex mixture in which only P-branch transitions could be tentatively assigned for m17. In addition, three binary combination bands were fit at about 1570, 2082, and 2098 cm*1 which are assigned as either 2m24 or m5 + m16 in the first case, m4 + m22 in the second case, and 2m22 in the latter case. The two l-type resonance constants, q+ and q*, were determined for each of the two perpendicular fundamentals m22 and m24. Those two constants were also responsible for splittings observed in the K = 3 levels of m24. For the ground state the order of the split K = 2 B1/B2 levels has been reversed from that reported previously, based on the measurements and assignments for the m24 band. Rovibrational parameters deduced from the analyses are compared with those obtained from density functional Gaussian calculations at the anharmonic level.

  16. Leaf seal for gas turbine stator shrouds and a nozzle band

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Sexton, Brendan Francis (Simpsonville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A leaf seal assembly is secured to the trailing edge of a shroud segment for sealing between the shroud segment and the leading edge side wall of a nozzle outer band. The leaf seal includes a circumferentially elongated seal plate biased by a pair of spring clips disposed in a groove along the trailing edge of the shroud segment to maintain the seal plate in engagement with the flange on the leading edge side wall of the nozzle outer band. The leaf seal plate and spring clips receive pins tack-welded to the shroud segment to secure the leaf seal assembly in place.

  17. A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal Print Wednesday, 23 February 2005 00:00 A "wire" of indium only one or a few atoms wide grown on a silicon surface comprises an ideal test laboratory for studying one-dimensional (1D) metals. A new example comes from a collaboration between researchers from Yonsei University in Korea, the ALS, and the University of Oregon, who have discovered that the phase transition from metal to

  18. Realizing novel accelerator concepts in an X-band photo-injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, R

    2010-04-13

    In this project we propose to investigate the use of novel accelerator structure cell geometry to enhance the performance of X-band photo-injectors. Making novel accelerator concepts possible involves fabrication and testing of components to ensure that the performance predicted by simulation is robustly achievable. This work is important because photo-injectors are increasingly used to provide high brightness electron beams for light sources, pushing their performance to the limits, but also requiring them to be user-facility stable. Careful investigation in both computer simulation and design, and low power testing of piece parts will enable the successful fabrication of an advanced X-band photo-injector.

  19. A panel of sequence tagged sites for chromosome band 11q23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tunnacliffe, A.; Perry, H. ); Radice, P. Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan ); Budarf, M.L.; Emanuel, B.S. )

    1993-09-01

    A panel of sequence tagged sites (STSs) representing 30 markers previously assigned to human chromosome band 11q23 has been assembled. Eleven STSs represent cloned genes, and the remainder are from anonymous DNA segments. The STSs have been used in PCR experiments to localize their cognate sequences further with respect to five translocation breakpoints that define three intervals in 11q23. Two of these translocation breakpoints have been mapped more precisely by the STS assignments. The STS panel will form a useful starting point for the generation of a genomic contig of band 11q23. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Origin of the failed ensemble average rule for the band gaps of disordered

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nonisovalent semiconductor alloys (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Origin of the failed ensemble average rule for the band gaps of disordered nonisovalent semiconductor alloys « Prev Next » Title: Origin of the failed ensemble average rule for the band gaps of disordered nonisovalent semiconductor alloys Authors: Ma, Jie ; Deng, Hui-Xiong ; Luo, Jun-Wei ; Wei, Su-Huai Publication Date: 2014-09-02 OSTI Identifier: 1180832 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-05CH11231; AC36-08GO28308 Type: Publisher's

  1. Matter-wave propagation in optical lattices: geometrical and flat-band

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    effects (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Matter-wave propagation in optical lattices: geometrical and flat-band effects This content will become publicly available on March 17, 2017 « Prev Next » Title: Matter-wave propagation in optical lattices: geometrical and flat-band effects Authors: Metcalf, Mekena ; Chern, Gia-Wei ; Ventra, Massimiliano Di ; Chien, Chih-Chun Publication Date: 2016-03-17 OSTI Identifier: 1242316 Grant/Contract Number: FG02-05ER46204;

  2. A Minimal Two-band Model for the Superconducting Fe-pnictides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghu, S.

    2010-03-25

    Following the discovery of the Fe-pnictide superconductors, LDA band structure calculations showed that the dominant contributions to the spectral weight near the Fermi energy came from the Fe 3d orbitals. The Fermi surface is characterized by two hole surfaces around the {Lambda} point and two electron surfaces around the M point of the 2 Fe/cell Brillouin zone. Here, we describe a 2-band model that reproduces the topology of the LDA Fermi surface and exhibits both ferromagnetic and q = ({pi}, 0) spin density wave (SDW) fluctuations. We argue that this minimal model contains the essential low energy physics of these materials.

  3. Development of an L-Band RF Electron Gun for SASE in the Infrared Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Kato, Ryukou; Isoyama, Goro; Hayano, Hitoshi; Urakawa, Junji

    2010-02-03

    We conduct research on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in the infrared region using the 40 MeV, 1.3 GHz L-band linac of Osaka University. The linac equipped with a thermionic electron gun can accelerate a high-intensity single-bunch beam though its normalized emittance is high. In order to advance the research on SASE, we have begun development of an RF gun for the L-band linac in collaboration with KEK. We will report conceptual design of the RF gun and present the status of development of another RF gun for STF at KEK.

  4. Structural studies and band gap tuning of Cr doped ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinet, Gunjan Kumar, Ravindra Sajal, Vivek

    2014-04-24

    Structural and optical properties of Cr doped ZnO nanoparticles prepared by the thermal decomposition method are presented. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the substitution of Cr on Zn sites without changing the wurtzite structure of ZnO. Modified form of W-H equations was used to calculate various physical parameters and their variation with Cr doping is discussed. Significant red shift was observed in band gap, i.e., a band gap tuning is achieved by Cr doping which could eventually be useful for optoelectronic applications.

  5. Quasi one-dimensional band dispersion and surface metallization in long-range ordered polymeric wires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vasseur, Guillaume; Fagot-Revurat, Yannick; Sicot, Muriel; Kierren, Bertrand; Moreau, Luc; Malterre, Daniel; Cardenas, Luis; Galeotti, Gianluca; Lipton-Duffin, Josh; Rosei, Frederico; et al

    2016-01-04

    We study the electronic structure of an ordered array of poly(para-phenylene) chains produced by surface-catalyzed dehalogenative polymerization of 1,4-dibromobenzene on copper (110). The quantization of unoccupied molecular states is measured as a function of oligomer length by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, with Fermi level crossings observed for chains longer than ten phenyl rings. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a quasi-one-dimensional valence band as well as a direct gap of 1.15 eV, as the conduction band is partially filled through adsorption on the surface. Tight-binding modelling and ab initio density functional theory calculations lead to a full description of the organic band-structure, includingmore » the k-dispersion, the gap size and electron charge transfer mechanisms, highlighting a strong substrate-molecule interaction that drives the system into a metallic behaviour. In summary, we have fully characterized the band structure of a carbon-based conducting wire. This model system may be considered as a fingerprint of -conjugation of surface organic frameworks.« less

  6. Electronegativity calculation of bulk modulus and band gap of ternary ZnO-based alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Keyan; Kang, Congying [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Xue, Dongfeng, E-mail: dongfeng@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2012-10-15

    In this work, the bulk moduli and band gaps of M{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O (M = Be, Mg, Ca, Cd) alloys in the whole composition range were quantitatively calculated by using the electronegativity-related models for bulk modulus and band gap, respectively. We found that the change trends of bulk modulus and band gap with an increase of M concentration x are same for Be{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O and Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O, while the change trends are reverse for Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O and Ca{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O. It was revealed that the bulk modulus is related to the valence electron density of atoms whereas the band gap is strongly influenced by the detailed chemical bonding behaviors of constituent atoms. The current work provides us a useful guide to compositionally design advanced alloy materials with both good mechanical and optoelectronic properties.

  7. Discrete decay of the yrast superdeformed band in the {sup 151}Tb nucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin, J.; Duchene, G.; Beck, F. A.; Byrski, Th.; Curien, D.; Courtin, S.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B.; Nourredine, A.; Pachoud, E.; Piqueras, I.; Vivien, J. P.; Twin, P.; Cullen, D. M.; King, S. L.; Paul, E. S.; Adimi, N.; Appelbe, D. E.; Simpson, J.

    2008-09-15

    The Euroball array has been used to search for linking transitions between the superdeformed (SD) and the normal deformed (ND) wells in {sup 151}Tb. Many {gamma} rays in the energy range 2-4 MeV have been observed in coincidence with the yrast SD band. It is proposed that the highest energy transition of 3748 keV and the strongest line (2818 keV) of the previously observed transitions both decay from the same SD level as their links with the ND states have been identified. The current spectra have insufficient statistics to completely identify the decay point in the SD band. Theoretical calculations covering SD bands in the A{approx_equal}150 region enable the two possible spin assignments to be compared with experimental data on proposed links in {sup 149}Gd and {sup 152}Dy. It is concluded that the energy of the lowest SD band member in {sup 151}Tb has an excitation energy of 12861 keV and a spin of 65/2{sup +}.

  8. Study of transmission line attenuation in broad band millimeter wave frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandya, Hitesh Kumar B.; Austin, M. E.; Ellis, R. F.

    2013-10-15

    Broad band millimeter wave transmission lines are used in fusion plasma diagnostics such as electron cyclotron emission (ECE), electron cyclotron absorption, reflectometry and interferometry systems. In particular, the ECE diagnostic for ITER will require efficient transmission over an ultra wide band, 100 to 1000 GHz. A circular corrugated waveguide transmission line is a prospective candidate to transmit such wide band with low attenuation. To evaluate this system, experiments of transmission line attenuation were performed and compared with theoretical loss calculations. A millimeter wave Michelson interferometer and a liquid nitrogen black body source are used to perform all the experiments. Atmospheric water vapor lines and continuum absorption within this band are reported. Ohmic attenuation in corrugated waveguide is very low; however, there is Bragg scattering and higher order mode conversion that can cause significant attenuation in this transmission line. The attenuation due to miter bends, gaps, joints, and curvature are estimated. The measured attenuation of 15 m length with seven miter bends and eighteen joints is 1 dB at low frequency (300 GHz) and 10 dB at high frequency (900 GHz), respectively.

  9. Project Reports for Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians – 2015 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this grant, the Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians plans to install the Soboba Community Solar Energy Project, a 1.0-megawatt (MW) AC ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) system that, once installed, will generate approximately 1,884,686 kilowatt-hours (kWh)/year, meeting 80% of the annual energy needs of key community facilities.

  10. Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians- 2007 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa will gather and compile information on the tribe's energy use, conduct energy audits of reservation facilities, identify where conservation efforts would be worthwhile, and evaluate policy changes needed to implement conservation measures.

  11. Project Reports for Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians- 2007 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa will gather and compile information on the tribe's energy use, conduct energy audits of reservation facilities, identify where conservation efforts would be worthwhile, and evaluate policy changes needed to implement conservation measures.

  12. Band-gap tailoring of ZnO by means of heavy Al doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sernelius, B.E.; Berggren, K.; Jin, Z.; Hamberg, I.; Granqvist, C.G.

    1988-06-15

    Films of ZnO:Al were produced by weakly reactive dual-target magnetron sputtering. Optical band gaps, evaluated from spectrophotometric data, were widened in proportion to the Al doping. The widening could be quantitatively reconciled with an effective-mass model for n-doped semiconductors, provided the polar character of ZnO was accounted for.

  13. Project Reports for Pala Band of Mission Indians – 2015 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under this grant, the Pala Band of Mission Indians plan on building a 94.8-kilowatt (kW) DC solar system on its fire station. The system will use a combination of rooftop PV and ground-mounted panels that will be installed on land adjacent to the Pala Indian Reservation’s fire station.

  14. Project Reports for Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians (GTB) will conduct a feasibility study to determine the cost effectiveness and other economic, environmental, cultural, and social benefits of maximizing the diversity of energy sources used at GTB facilities. This includes an assessment of energy conservation measures as well as renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, and biomass.

  15. X-Band Multi-Beam Klystron Design and Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Aaron; Neilson, Jeff; Tantawi, Sami

    2015-04-15

    Progress on the development of a 5MW 16 beam x-band multi-beam klystron is presented. The power from each of the 16 klystrons is combined using a matched waveguide network. Mechanical and electric models and simulations are discussed. The status of procuring and assembling parts is presented.

  16. G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, A; Cadeddu, M

    2012-12-05

    The G-Band Vapor Radiometer Precipitable Water Vapor (GVRPWV) value-added product (VAP) computes precipitable water vapor using neural network techniques from data measured by the GVR. The GVR reports time-series measurements of brightness temperatures for four channels located at 183.3 ± 1, 3, 7, and 14 GHz.

  17. Burlap bands as a sampling technique for green anoles (Anolis carolinensis) and other reptiles commonly found on tree boles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James L.

    2006-07-01

    This paper examines the use and successfulness of using burlap bands on tree boles as a sampling technique for green anoles.

  18. Experimental determination of band offsets of NiO-based thin film heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawade, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Mutsumi, E-mail: mutsumi@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology/Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda 278-8510 (Japan); Chichibu, Shigefusa F. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba, Sendai 9808577 (Japan)

    2014-10-28

    The energy band diagrams of NiO-based solar cell structures that use various n-type oxide semiconductors such as ZnO, Mg{sub 0.3}Zn{sub 0.7}O, Zn{sub 0.5}Sn{sub 0.5}O, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Sn (ITO), SnO{sub 2}, and TiO{sub 2} were evaluated by photoelectron yield spectroscopy. The valence band discontinuities were estimated to be 1.6?eV for ZnO/NiO and Mg{sub 0.3}Zn{sub 0.7}O/NiO, 1.7?eV for Zn{sub 0.5}Sn{sub 0.5}O/NiO and ITO/NiO, and 1.8?eV for SnO{sub 2}/NiO and TiO{sub 2}/NiO heterojunctions. By using the valence band discontinuity values and corresponding energy bandgaps of the layers, energy band diagrams were developed. Judging from the band diagram, an appropriate solar cell consisting of p-type NiO and n-type ZnO layers was deposited on ITO, and a slight but noticeable photovoltaic effect was obtained with an open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 0.96?V, short circuit current density (J{sub sc}) of 2.2??A/cm{sup 2}, and fill factor of 0.44.

  19. Roles of nanoclusters in shear banding and plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieh, T.G.

    2012-07-31

    During the course of this research we published 33 papers in various physics/material journals. We select four representing papers in this report and their results are summarized as follows. I. To study shear banding process, it is pertinent to know the intrinsic shear strain rate within a propagating shear band. To this aim, we used nanoindentation technique to probe the mechanical response of a Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 bulk metallic glass in locality and found notable pop-in events associated with shear band emission. Using a free volume model and under the situation when temperature and stress/hardness are fixed result in an equation, which predicts that hardness serration caused by pop-in decreases exponentially with the strain rate. Our data are in good agreement with the prediction. The result also predicts that, when strain rate is higher than a critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1, there will be no hardness serration, thereby no pop-in. In other words, multiple shear bandings will take place and material will flow homogeneously. The critical strain rate of 1700 s^-1 can be treated as the intrinsic strain rate within a shear band. We subsequently carried out a simulation study and showed that, if the imposed strain rate was over , the shear band spacing would become so small that the entire sample would virtually behave like one major shear band. Using the datum strain rate =1700 s^-1 and based on a shear band nucleation model proposed by us, the size of a shear-band nucleus in Au-BMG was estimated to be 3 ???? 10^6 atoms, or a sphere of ~30 nm in diameter. II. Inspired by the peculiar result published in a Science article ?¢????Super Plastic Bulk Metallic Glasses at Room Temperature?¢???, we synthesized the Zr-based bulk metallic glass with a composition identical to that in the paper (Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10) and, subsequently, tested in compression at the same slow strain rate (~10^-4 s^-1). We found that the dominant deformation mode is always single shear. The stress-strain curve exhibited serrated pattern in the plastic region, which conventionally has been attributed to individual shear band propagation. The scanning electron micrographs taken from the deformed sample surface revealed regularly spaced striations. Analysis indicates that the observed stress-strain serrations are intimately related to the striations on the shear surface, suggesting the serrations were actually caused slip-and-stick shear along the principal shear plane. We further use video camera to conduct in situ compression experiments to unambiguously confirm the one-to-one temporal and spatial correspondence between the intermittent sliding and flow serration. This preferential shear band formation along the principal shear plane is, in fact, a natural consequence of Mode II crack, independent of strain softening or hardening, usually claimed in the literature. III. Flow serration in compression of metallic glasses is caused by the formation and propagation of localized shear bands. These shear bands propagate at an extremely high speed, so high that a load cell and load frame were unable to capture the details of the dynamic event. To subdue this problem, we conducted uniaxial compression on Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 bulk metallic glass using a high-speed camera to capture the sample image and also high-sensitivity strain gauges attached to the test samples to directly measure the strain. The displacement-time curves obtained from the test and a magnified version of the displacement burst reveals clearly a three-step (acceleration, steady-state, and deceleration) process during shear band propagation. The fastest propagating speed occurring at the steady state is calculated as 8????10^2 ???µm/s. This speed is about 1,000 times faster than the crosshead speed. This explains the gradual disappearance of flow serration at higher strain rates previously reported during compression of

  20. P and n-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including band gap widening elements, devices utilizing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

    1988-10-04

    An n-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including a band gap widening element; a method of fabricating p-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including a band gap widening element; and electronic and photovoltaic devices incorporating said n-type and p-type materials.

  1. Heterojunction band offsets and dipole formation at BaTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaz, Snjezana; Zeng, Zhaoquan; Brillson, Leonard J.; Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff, Columbus, Ohio 43210

    2013-11-14

    We used a complement of photoemission and cathodoluminescence techniques to measure formation of the BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO) on SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) heterojunction band offset grown monolayer by monolayer by molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) provided core level and valence band edge energies to monitor the valence band offset in-situ as the first few crystalline BTO monolayers formed on the STO substrate. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) measured Fermi level positions within the band gap, work functions, and ionization potentials of the growing BTO film. Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy measured energies and densities of interface states at the buried heterojunction. Kraut-based XPS heterojunction band offsets provided evidence for STO/BTO heterojunction linearity, i.e., commutativity and transitivity. In contrast, UPS and XPS revealed a large dipole associated either with local charge transfer or strain-induced polarization within the BTO epilayer.

  2. X-band RF Photoinjector for Laser Compton X-ray and Gamma-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, R. A.; Anderson, G. G.; Anderson, S. G.; Gibson, D. J.; Barty, C. J.

    2015-05-06

    Extremely bright narrow bandwidth gamma-ray sources are expanding the application of accelerator technology and light sources in new directions. An X-band test station has been commissioned at LLNL to develop multi-bunch electron beams. This multi-bunch mode will have stringent requirements for the electron bunch properties including low emittance and energy spread, but across multiple bunches. The test station is a unique facility featuring a 200 MV/m 5.59 cell X-band photogun powered by a SLAC XL4 klystron driven by a Scandinova solid-state modulator. This paper focuses on its current status including the generation and initial characterization of first electron beam. Design and installation of the inverse-Compton scattering interaction region and upgrade paths will be discussed along with future applications.

  3. Nonlinear optical response of semiconductor-nanocrystals-embedded photonic band gap structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Chen; Zhang, Huichao; Tang, Luping; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Lv, Changgui; Cui, Yiping; Zhang, Jiayu

    2014-04-28

    Colloidal CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals (NCs), which were dispersed in SiO{sub 2} sol, were utilized to fabricate a SiO{sub 2}:NCs/TiO{sub 2} all-dielectric photonic band gap (PBG) structure. The third-order nonlinear refractive index (n{sub 2}) of the PBG structure was nearly triple of that of the SiO{sub 2}:NCs film due to the local field enhancement in the PBG structure. The photoinduced change in refractive index (Δn) could shift the PBG band edge, so the PBG structure would show significant transmission modification, whose transmission change was ∼17 folds of that of the SiO{sub 2}:NCs film. Under excitation of a 30 GW/cm{sup 2} femtosecond laser beam, a transmission decrease of 80% was realized.

  4. Band gap tuning in transition metal oxides by site-specific substitution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ho Nyung; Chisholm, Jr., Matthew F; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Singh, David J; Choi, Woo Seok

    2013-12-24

    A transition metal oxide insulator composition having a tuned band gap includes a transition metal oxide having a perovskite or a perovskite-like crystalline structure. The transition metal oxide includes at least one first element selected form the group of Bi, Ca, Ba, Sr, Li, Na, Mg, K, Pb, and Pr; and at least one second element selected from the group of Ti, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt. At least one correlated insulator is integrated into the crystalline structure, including REMO.sub.3, wherein RE is at least one Rare Earth element, and wherein M is at least one element selected from the group of Co, V, Cr, Ni, Mn, and Fe. The composition is characterized by a band gap of less of 4.5 eV.

  5. THE FIRST H-BAND SPECTRUM OF THE GIANT PLANET ? PICTORIS b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilcote, Jeffrey; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Larkin, James E.; Barman, Travis; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul; Macintosh, Bruce; Ingraham, Patrick; Bauman, Brian; Burrows, Adam S.; Cardwell, Andrew; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Gavel, Donald; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Goodsell, Stephen J.; and others

    2015-01-01

    Using the recently installed Gemini Planet Imager (GPI), we have obtained the first H-band spectrum of the planetary companion to the nearby young star ? Pictoris. GPI is designed to image and provide low-resolution spectra of Jupiter-sized, self-luminous planetary companions around young nearby stars. These observations were taken covering the H band (1.65 ?m). The spectrum has a resolving power of ?45 and demonstrates the distinctive triangular shape of a cool substellar object with low surface gravity. Using atmospheric models, we find an effective temperature of 1600-1700 K and a surface gravity of log (g) = 3.5-4.5 (cgs units). These values agree well with ''hot-start'' predictions from planetary evolution models for a gas giant with mass between 10 and 12 M {sub Jup} and age between 10 and 20 Myr.

  6. Superdeformed band up to spin approx. (127/2 in /sup 149/Gd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, B.; Taras, P.; Flibotte, S.; Banville, F.; Gascon, J.; Cournoyer, S.; Monaro, S.; Nadon, N.; Prevost, D.; Thibault, D.; and others

    1988-02-08

    A rotational band of nineteen transitions, extending to spinapprox.(127/2h-dash-bar and with an average moment of inertia scrI/sup (2)/ of 77 h-dash-bar/sup 2/ MeV/sup -1/, has been observed in /sup 149/Gd. Its intensity accounts for approximately (1/2% of the total fusion cross section. Lifetime measurements yielded an average quadrupole moment of 17 +- 2 e-b, in excellent agreement with the value calculated microscopically for a superdeformed shape. The trends in scrI/sup (1)/ and scrI/sup (2)/ are consistent with very weak pairing effects. The data also suggest that to populate superdeformed bands significantly one must form cold residual nuclei.

  7. Initial Testing of the Mark-0 X-Band RF Gun at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlieks, Arnold; Adolphsen, C.; Dolgashev, V.; Lewandowski, J.; Limborg, Cecile; Weathersby, S.; /SLAC

    2012-06-06

    A new X-band RF gun (Mark-0) has been assembled, tuned and was tested in the ASTA facility at SLAC. This gun has been improved from an earlier gun used in Compton-scattering experiments at SLAC by the introduction of a racetrack dual-input coupler to reduce quadrupole fields. Waveguide-to-coupler irises were also redesigned to reduce surface magnetic fields and therefore peak pulse surface heating. Tests of this photocathode gun will allow us to gain early operational experience for beam tests of a new gun with further improvements (Mark-1) being prepared for SLAC's X-Band Test Area (XTA) program and the LLNL MEGa-ray program. Results of current testing up to {approx} 200 MV/m peak surface Electric fields are presented.

  8. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ozbay, Ekmel (Ames, IA); Tuttle, Gary (Ames, IA); Michel, Erick (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA); Biswas, Rana (Ames, IA); Chan, Che-Ting (Ames, IA); Soukoulis, Costas (Ames, IA)

    1995-01-01

    A method for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap.

  9. Fabrication of Ceramic Layer-by-Layer Infrared Wavelength Photonic Band Gap Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Hao-Chuan Kang

    2004-12-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals, also known as photonic crystals, are periodic dielectric structures which form a photonic band gap that prohibit the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves of certain frequencies at any incident angles. Photonic crystals have several potential applications including zero-threshold semiconductor lasers, the inhibition of spontaneous emission, dielectric mirrors, and wavelength filters. If defect states are introduced in the crystals, light can be guided from one location to another or even a sharp bending of light in micron scale can be achieved. This generates the potential for optical waveguide and optical circuits, which will contribute to the improvement in the fiber-optic communications and the development of high-speed computers.

  10. The origin of 2.7?eV blue luminescence band in zirconium oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perevalov, T. V. Zhuravlev, K. S.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Gulyaev, D. V.; Aliev, V. S.; Yelisseyev, A. P.

    2014-12-28

    The luminescence spectra of non-stoichiometric zirconium oxide film series with different oxygen vacancies' concentrations show the blue photoluminescence band centered near a 2.7?eV peak. There is a broad band at 5.2?eV in the luminescence excitation spectrum for blue emission. The ab-initio quantum-chemical calculation gives a peak in the optical absorption at 5.1?eV for the oxygen vacancy in cubic ZrO{sub 2}. It was concluded that the 2.7?eV blue luminescence excited near 5.2?eV in a zirconium oxide film is associated with the oxygen vacancy.

  11. Narrow band wavelength selective filter using grating assisted single ring resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhathan, P. Murukeshan, V. M.

    2014-09-15

    This paper illustrates a filter configuration which uses a single ring resonator of larger radius connected to a grating resonator at its drop port to achieve single wavelength selectivity and switching property with spectral features suitable for on-chip wavelength selection applications. The proposed configuration is expected to find applications in silicon photonics devices such as, on-chip external cavity lasers and multi analytic label-free biosensors. The grating resonator has been designed for a high Q-factor, high transmittivity, and minimum loss so that the wavelength selectivity of the device is improved. The proof-of-concept device has been demonstrated on a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) platform through electron beam lithography and Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process. The transmission spectrum shows narrow band single wavelength selection and switching property with a high Free Spectral Range (FSR) ?60 nm and side band rejection ratio >15 dB.

  12. Support pedestals for interconnecting a cover and nozzle band wall in a gas turbine nozzle segment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC); Webbon, Waylon Willard (Greenville, SC); Bagepalli, Radhakrishna (Schenectady, NY); Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Kellock, Iain Robertson (Simpsonville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner band portions. Each band portion includes a nozzle wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through the apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. Structural pedestals interconnect the cover and nozzle wall and pass through holes in the impingement plate to reduce localized stress otherwise resulting from a difference in pressure within the chamber of the nozzle segment and the hot gas path and the fixed turbine casing surrounding the nozzle stage. The pedestals may be cast or welded to the cover and nozzle wall.

  13. Two-band lasing in epitaxially stacked tunnel-junction semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinokurov, D. A.; Ladugin, M. A.; Lyutetskii, A. V.; Marmalyuk, A. A.; Petrunov, A. N.; Pikhtin, N. A.; Slipchenko, S. O. Sokolova, Z. N.; Stankevich, A. L.; Fetisova, N. V.; Shashkin, I. S.; Averkiev, N. S.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2010-06-15

    Epitaxially stacked tunnel-junction laser hetero structures were grown by hydride metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy in the system of AlGaAs/GaAs/In GaAs alloys. Based on such structures, mesa stripe lasers with an aperture of 150 s- 7 m were fabricated. The possibility of controlling the lasing wavelength by varying the active region thickness in each tunnel-junction laser structure was demonstrated. Independent two-band lasing at wavelengths of 914 and 925 nm (the difference frequency is 2.3 THz) was achieved at a maximum optical radiation power of 20 W in each band of the epitaxially stacked tunnel-junction semiconductor laser.

  14. Using Measurements of Fill Factor at High Irradiance to Deduce Heterobarrier Band Offsets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, J. M.; Steiner, M. A.; Kanevce, A.

    2011-07-01

    Using a 2D device simulation tool, we examine the high irradiance behavior of a single junction, GaAs concentrator cell as a function of the doping in the back surface confinement layer. The confinement layer is designed to be a barrier for both holes and electrons in the base of the solar cell. For a p-type base we show that the FF of the cell at high concentrations is a strong function of both the magnitude of the valence band offset and the doping level in the barrier. In short, for a given valence band offset (VBO), there is a critical barrier doping, below which the FF drops rapidly with lower doping. This behavior is confirmed experimentally for a GaInP/GaAs double heterostructure solar cell where the critical doping concentration (at 500 suns) in the back surface confinement layer is ~1e18 cm-3 for a VBO of 300 meV.

  15. The effect of spin-orbit coupling in band structure of few-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahdan, Muhammad Fauzi Darma, Yudi

    2014-03-24

    Topological insulators are electronic materials that have a bulk band gap like an ordinary insulator but have protected conducting states on their edge or surface. This can be happened due to spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry. Moreover, the edge current flows through their edge or surface depends on its spin orientation and also it is robust against non-magnetic impurities. Therefore, topological insulators are predicted to be useful ranging from spintronics to quantum computation. Graphene was first predicted to be the precursor of topological insulator by Kane-Mele. They developed a Hamiltonian model to describe the gap opening in graphene. In this work, we investigate the band structure of few-layer graphene by using this model with analytical approach. The results of our calculations show that the gap opening occurs at K and K’ point, not only in single layer, but also in bilayer and trilayer graphene.

  16. High power operation of an X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Yucong; He, Hu; Lei, Lurong; Chen, Zhaofu [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-11-15

    An X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is designed in order to increase output microwave power and operating frequency of the amplifier tube. The experiment is performed on a Tesla-type accelerator. The amplifier is driven by an electron beam of 2.8 kA at 720 kV, and a microwave power of 30 kW and frequency of 9.384 GHz is injected into an input cavity by means of an external source, then a microwave power of over 800 MW is extracted, the amplifier gain is about 44 dB, and conversion efficiency is 40%. The experiment proves that output power of nearly GWs can be generated with the X-band coaxial multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier driven by a kW-level input power.

  17. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ozbay, E.; Tuttle, G.; Michel, E.; Ho, K.M.; Biswas, R.; Chan, C.T.; Soukoulis, C.

    1995-04-11

    A method is disclosed for fabricating a periodic dielectric structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. Alignment holes are formed in a wafer of dielectric material having a given crystal orientation. A planar layer of elongate rods is then formed in a section of the wafer. The formation of the rods includes the step of selectively removing the dielectric material of the wafer between the rods. The formation of alignment holes and layers of elongate rods and wafers is then repeated to form a plurality of patterned wafers. A stack of patterned wafers is then formed by rotating each successive wafer with respect to the next-previous wafer, and then placing the successive wafer on the stack. This stacking results in a stack of patterned wafers having a four-layer periodicity exhibiting a photonic band gap. 42 figures.

  18. Study of the formation of adiabatic shear bands in mild steel under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costin, L.S.

    1982-01-01

    The conditions of strain and temperature under which adiabatic shear bands form were examined using a torsional Kolsky (split-Hopkinson) bar apparatus. Thin walled tubular specimens of 1018 cold rolled steel were tested at an approximately constant strain rate in one of two strain rate regimes. In addition, the initial test temperature was varied from 173/sup 0/K to 300/sup 0/K. The total specimen strain was varied from test to test in order to determine the strain at which localized deformation begins at a given strain-rate and temperature. Using a series of fine lines scribed along the inner surface of the tube parallel to its axis, the strain distribution along the gage length of the specimen was determined by post-test examination. In this way it was determined whether the deformation was homogeneous or localized into a shear band.

  19. The Effects of Heterogeneity in Magma Water Concentration on the Development of Flow Banding and Spherulites in Rhyolitic Lava

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaman, S.; Dyar, D; Marinkovic, N

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the origin of flow-banded rhyolites that consist of compositionally similar darker and lighter flow bands of contrasting texture and color. Infrared radiation was used to obtain Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra from which water concentrations were calculated, and to map variations in water concentrations across zones of spherulites and glass from the 23 million year old Sycamore Canyon lava flow of southern Arizona. Lighter-colored, thicker flow bands consist of gray glass, fine-grained quartz, and large (1.0 to 1.5 mm) spherulites. Darker-colored, thinner flow bands consist of orange glass and smaller (0.1 to 0.2 mm) spherulites. The centers of both large and small spherulites are occupied by either (1) a quartz or sanidine crystal, (2) a granophyric intergrowth, or (3) a vesicle. Mapping of water concentration (dominantly OH- in glass and OH- and H2O in sanidine crystals) illustrates fluctuating water availability during quenching of the host melt. Textures of large spherulites in the lighter (gray) bands in some cases indicate complex quenching histories that suggest that local water concentration controlled the generation of glass versus crystals. Small spherulites in darker (orange) bands have only one generation of radiating crystal growth. Both the glass surrounding spherulites, and the crystals in the spherulites contain more water in the gray flow bands than in the orange flow bands. Flow banding in the Sycamore Canyon lava flow may have originated by the stretching of a magma that contained pre-existing zones (vesicles or proto-vesicles) of contrasting water concentration, as the magma flowed in the conduit and on the surface. Variation in the original water concentration in the alternating layers is interpreted to have resulted in differences in undercooling textures in spherulites in the lighter compared to the darker flow bands.

  20. Augustine Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians - Energy Conservation and Energy Options Analysis

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mary Ann Green, Chairperson Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy Resources Development November, 2007 AUGUSTINE BAND OF CAHUILLA INDIANS - Eight-member tribe with flat, developable 540 acre reservation in rapidly urbanizing area. Limited but capable management resources. - Reservation undeveloped except for small casino and temporary Tribal offices. Regional economy would support suburban retail and office development. - Tribal Chairperson is highly motivated to make the Reservation a

  1. Magnetic frustration in the three-band Anderson lattice model for high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ihle, D.; Kasner, M. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-band Anderson lattice model for the CuO{sub 2} planes in high-{Tc} superconductors is established. Treating this model by perturbation theory, the effective spin interactions are derived. The antiferromagnetic superexchange integrals are calculated as functions of the direct oxygen transfer and the hole concentration. It is found that frustration in the superexchange occurs, even in the undoped case, which increases with oxygen trnasfer and decreases with hole concentration.

  2. Characterization and Simulation of Transient Vibrations Using Band Limited Temporal Moments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smallwood, David O.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described to characterize shocks (transient time histories) in terms of the Fourier energy spectrum and the temporal moments of the shock passed through a contiguous set of band pass filters. The product model is then used to generate of a random process as simulations that in the mean will have the same energy and moments as the characterization of the transient event.

  3. Miniaturized Multi-Band Antenna Design via Element Collocation and Inductive Feed Loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R. P.

    2012-09-12

    In a FY09 SDRD project, four separate antennas were designed to receive signals of interest covering a broad range of frequencies. While the elements exceeded specifications, the array footprint is substantial. Research performed by the CU Microwave Active Antenna Group in collaboration with RSL, showed promise in realizing a reduced structure. This work will expand upon this previous research. This project will result in a prototype quad-band antenna.

  4. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  5. ARM - Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign-II (RHUBC-II)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign-II (RHUBC-II) At an elevation of more than 5000 meters and

  6. Project Reports for Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, located in the northwest corner of Minnesota near the Canadian border, will assess the potential to expand the use of biomass resources for energy autonomy and economic development on tribal lands. Specifically, the tribe will evaluate the technical, market, financial, and cultural aspects of using its extensive, forested lands to create a sustainable bioproducts-based business and will develop a business plan to guide tribal industry development.

  7. Double-band Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell > Research Highlights >

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Research Highlights In This Section The Structural Evolution and Diffusion During the Chemical Transformation from Cobalt to Cobalt Phosphide Nanoparticles Joint Density-Functional Theory of Electrochemistry Double-band Electrode Channel Flow DEMS Cell Sulfur@Carbon Cathodes for Lithium Sulfur Batteries Better Ham & Cheese: Enhanced Anodes and Cathodes for Fuel Cells Epitaxial Single Crystal Nanostructures for Batteries & PVs High

  8. Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians: Biomass Energy Feasiblity Study Update

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Health and Bioenergy: Technology Opportunities and Barriers Scott Haase McNeil Technologies June 20, 2003 Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians: Biomass Energy Feasibility Study Update Presented to DOE Tribal Energy Program Scott Haase October 19, 2004 * Project overview * Resource assessment * Assess on-site electric and thermal applications * Assess local/regional utility market * Economic analysis * Alternative products Presentation Outline * Evaluate and determine potential options for creating

  9. Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians: Scotts Valley Energy Office and Human Capacity Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SCOTTS VALLEY BAND OF POMO INDIANS Project Energy Manager Temashio Anderson Project Location: Tribes of Lake County, California SCOTTS VALLEY TRIBAL MULTI-COUNTY WEATHERIZATION PROGRAM FY 2009-2011 FINAL TRIBAL ENERGY REVIEW AND UPDATE IRENIA QUITIQUIT, ENVIRONMENTAL DIRECTOR SCOTTS VALLEY EPA & NATURAL RESOURCES DEPARTMENT PROJECT ACCOMPLISHMENTS v Provided weatherization training to 35 tribal trainees to bring green job opportunities to Indian Country v 4 tribal trainees - Wx

  10. Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians - Wind Meteorological Tower Deployment and Data Measurement and Analysis

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Band of Kumeyaay Indians Meteorlogical Tower Deployment and Data Measurement and Analysis Ewiiaapaayp Indian Reservation * The Ewiiaapaayp Reservation is divided between the 4,542.5-acre land parcel near Mt. Laguna that is approximately 47 miles east of San Diego and 19 miles east of Alpine, and the 10-acre land parcel at 4054/4058 Willows Road in Alpine, CA, an unincorporated community of east San Diego County. The Project * The Tribe continues its assessment of its wind resource and

  11. Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians - Renewable Energy Strategic Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strategic Plan Little Traverse Bay Bands Of Odawa Indians Albert Colby Jr. and Steve Smiley Tribal History 1855 Treaty established present reservation boundaries in Northern Michigan. Tribe reaffirmed on September 21, 1994. 1995 Tribe received first BIA contract designed to establish service programs to Tribal members, including Law Enforcement, Tribal Court, Housing, Natural Resources, Human Services and Enrollment Departments. Tribal History 1995 Tribe received first Indian Health Service

  12. Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians - Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study DOE Tribal Energy Program Review Denver, Colorado November 14 - 20, 2008 November 2008 Grand Traverse Band * 3,988 Members * 2,370 Acres - Checkerboard * Six-County Service Area * EDC: 2 Casinos, Resort Hotels (600 Rooms), Gas Station, etc. * Gov't: Administration, Housing, Medicine Lodge, Strong Heart Center, Day Care, etc. Grand Traverse Resort and Spa Turtle Creek Casino Hotel (June 08) GTB Energy Vision & Plan Three Focus Areas:

  13. Morongo Band of Mission Indians - Southwest Tribal Energy Consortiums Renewable Energy Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium Renewable Energy Feasibility Study U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review Todd Hooks, SWTEC Member, Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians Carolyn Stewart, Red Mountain Energy Partners October 2006 1 © 2006 All Rights Reserved Discussion Outline 1 Project Overview 2 Project Location 3 Project Participants 4 Project Status 5 Next Steps Project Overview 2 © 2006 All Rights Reserved Project Overview >> Background Feasibility study to

  14. Mesa Grande Band of Mission Indians Tribal Energy Project Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mesa Grande Band of Mission Indians Tribal Energy Project Feasibility Study The Land The Land The Land Reservation consists of 1820 acres Historically as low as 120 acres Acquisition of 800+ acres in 1988 Purchase of 900 acres in 1998 The People 700 members today 130 living on Reservation 90% people on Reservation below poverty line Long waiting list of people wanting to live on Reservation Challenges Facing the Tribe Quality, Affordable Housing Decent, Living Wage Jobs Sustainable Growth Upper

  15. FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-12-18

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW μs-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  16. Energy band alignment and electronic states of amorphous carbon surfaces in vacuo and in aqueous environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caro, Miguel A.; Mtt, Jukka; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Laurila, Tomi

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we obtain the energy band positions of amorphous carbon (aC) surfaces in vacuum and in aqueous environment. The calculations are performed using a combination of (i) classical molecular dynamics (MD), (ii) Kohn-Sham density functional theory with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional, and (iii) the screened-exchange hybrid functional of Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE). PBE allows an accurate generation of a-C and the evaluation of the local electrostatic potential in the a-C/water system, HSE yields an improved description of energetic positions which is critical in this case, and classical MD enables a computationally affordable description of water. Our explicit calculation shows that, both in vacuo and in aqueous environment, the a-C electronic states available in the region comprised between the H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O levels of water correspond to both occupied and unoccupied states within the a-C pseudogap region. These are localized states associated to sp{sup 2} sites in a-C. The band realignment induces a shift of approximately 300?meV of the a-C energy band positions with respect to the redox levels of water.

  17. Temperature-driven band inversion in Pb?.??Sn?.??Se: Optical and Hall-effect studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Naween; Gu, Genda; Buvaev, Sanal; Hebard, A. F.; Tanner, D. B.; Chen, Zhiguo; Li, Zhiqiang; Choudhary, Kamal; Sinnott, S. B.; Martin, C.

    2014-12-23

    Optical and Hall-effect measurements have been performed on single crystals of Pb?.??Sn?.??Se, a IV-VI mixed chalcogenide. The temperature dependent (10300 K) reflectance was measured over 407000 cm? (5870 meV) with an extension to 15,500 cm? (1.92 eV) at room temperature. The reflectance was fit to the Drude-Lorentz model using a single Drude component and several Lorentz oscillators. The optical properties at the measured temperatures were estimated via Kramers-Kronig analysis as well as by the Drude-Lorentz fit. The carriers were p-type with the carrier density determined by Hall measurements. A signature of valence intraband transition is found in the low-energy optical spectra. It is found that the valence-conduction band transition energy as well as the free carrier effective mass reach minimum values at 100 K, suggesting temperature-driven band inversion in the material. Density function theory calculation for the electronic band structure also make similar predictions.

  18. Temperature-driven band inversion in Pb?.??Sn?.??Se: Optical and Hall-effect studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anand, Naween; Gu, Genda; Buvaev, Sanal; Hebard, A. F.; Tanner, D. B.; Chen, Zhiguo; Li, Zhiqiang; Choudhary, Kamal; Sinnott, S. B.; Martin, C.

    2014-12-23

    Optical and Hall-effect measurements have been performed on single crystals of Pb?.??Sn?.??Se, a IV-VI mixed chalcogenide. The temperature dependent (10300 K) reflectance was measured over 407000 cm? (5870 meV) with an extension to 15,500 cm? (1.92 eV) at room temperature. The reflectance was fit to the Drude-Lorentz model using a single Drude component and several Lorentz oscillators. The optical properties at the measured temperatures were estimated via Kramers-Kronig analysis as well as by the Drude-Lorentz fit. The carriers were p-type with the carrier density determined by Hall measurements. A signature of valence intraband transition is found in the low-energy opticalmorespectra. It is found that the valence-conduction band transition energy as well as the free carrier effective mass reach minimum values at 100 K, suggesting temperature-driven band inversion in the material. Density function theory calculation for the electronic band structure also make similar predictions.less

  19. The use of bulk states to accelerate the band edge state calculation of a semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voemel, Christof . E-mail: voemel@eecs.berkeley.edu; Tomov, Stanimire Z. . E-mail: tomov@cs.utk.edu; Wang, Lin-Wang . E-mail: LWWang@lbl.gov; Marques, Osni A. . E-mail: OAMarques@lbl.gov; Dongarra, Jack J. . E-mail: dongarra@cs.utk.edu

    2007-05-01

    We present a new technique to accelerate the convergence of the folded spectrum method in empirical pseudopotential band edge state calculations for colloidal quantum dots. We use bulk band states of the materials constituent of the quantum dot to construct initial vectors and a preconditioner. We apply these to accelerate the convergence of the folded spectrum method for the interior states at the top of the valence and the bottom of the conduction band. For large CdSe quantum dots, the number of iteration steps until convergence decreases by about a factor of 4 compared to previous calculations.

  20. Carrier Multiplication in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Theoretical Screening of Candidate Materials Based on Band-Structure Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, J. W.; Franceschetti, A.; Zunger, A.

    2008-01-01

    Direct carrier multiplication (DCM) occurs when a highly excited electron-hole pair decays by transferring its excess energy to the electrons rather than to the lattice, possibly exciting additional electron-hole pairs. Atomistic electronic structure calculations have shown that DCM can be induced by electron-hole Coulomb interactions, in an impact-ionization-like process whose rate is proportional to the density of biexciton states {rho}{sub XX}. Here we introduce a DCM 'figure of merit' R{sub 2}(E) which is proportional to the ratio between the biexciton density of states {rho}{sub XX} and the single-exciton density of states {rho}{sub x}, restricted to single-exciton and biexciton states that are coupled by Coulomb interactions. Using R{sub 2}(E), we consider GaAs, InAs, InP, GaSb, InSb, CdSe, Ge, Si, and PbSe nanocrystals of different sizes. Although DCM can be affected by both quantum-confinement effects (reflecting the underly electronic structure of the confined dot-interior states) and surface effects, here we are interested to isolate the former. To this end the nanocrystal energy levels are obtained from the corresponding bulk band structure via the truncated crystal approximation. We find that PbSe, Si, GaAs, CdSe, and InP nanocrystals have larger DCM figure of merit than the other nanocrystals. Our calculations suggest that high DCM efficiency requires high degeneracy of the corresponding bulk band-edge states. Interestingly, by considering band structure effects we find that as the dot size increases the DCM critical energy E{sub 0} (the energy at which R{sub 2}(E) becomes {ge}1) is reduced, suggesting improved DCM. However, whether the normalized E{sub 0}/{var_epsilon}{sub g} increases or decreases as the dot size increases depends on dot material.

  1. Origin of multi-band emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jianfu; Lu, Jufu; Xu, Bing

    2014-06-20

    We study the origin of non-thermal emissions from the Galactic black hole X-ray binary Cygnus X-1, which is a confirmed high-mass microquasar. By analogy with the methods used in studies of active galactic nuclei, we propose a two-dimensional, time-dependent radiation model from the microquasar Cygnus X-1. In this model, the evolution equation for relativistic electrons in a conical jet are numerically solved by including escape, adiabatic, and various radiative losses. The radiative processes involved are synchrotron emission, its self-Compton scattering, and inverse Compton scatterings of an accretion disk and its surrounding stellar companion. This model also includes an electromagnetic cascade process of an anisotropic ?-? interaction. We study the spectral properties of electron evolution and its emission spectral characteristic at different heights of the emission region located in the jet. We find that radio data from Cygnus X-1 are reproduced by the synchrotron emission, the Fermi Large Area Telescope measurements by the synchrotron emission and Comptonization of photons of the stellar companion, and the TeV band emission fluxes by the Comptonization of the stellar photons. Our results show the following. (1) The radio emission region extends from the binary system scales to the termination of the jet. (2) The GeV band emissions should originate from the distance close to the binary system scales. (3) The TeV band emissions could be inside the binary system, and these emissions could be probed by the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array. (4) The MeV tail emissions, which produce a strongly linearly polarized signal, are emitted inside the binary system. The location of the emissions is very close to the inner region of the jet.

  2. X-band Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar (X-SAPR) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N

    2012-10-29

    The X-band scanning ARM cloud radar (X-SAPR) is a full-hemispherical scanning polarimetric Doppler radar transmitting simultaneously in both H and V polarizations. With a 200 kW magnetron transmitter, this puts 100 kW of transmitted power for each polarization. The receiver for the X-SAPR is a Vaisala Sigmet RVP-900 operating in a coherent-on-receive mode. Three X-SAPRs are deployed around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility in a triangular array. A fourth X-SAPR is deployed near Barrow, Alaska on top of the Barrow Arctic Research Center.

  3. Experimental study of the valence band of Bi2Se3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heremans, Joseph; Gao, Yibin; He, Bin; Androulakis, Yiannis; Parker, David S

    2014-01-01

    The valence band of Bi2Se3 is investigated with Shubnikov - de Haas measurements, galvanomagnetic and thermoelectric transport. At low hole concentration, the hole Fermi surface is closed and box-like, but at higher concentrations it develops tube-like extensions that are open. The experimentally determined density-of-states effective mass is lighter than density-functional theory calculations predict; while we cannot give a definitive explanation for this, we suspect that the theory may lack sufficient precision to compute room-temperature transport properties, such as the Seebeck coefficient, in solids in which there are Van der Waals interlayer bonds.

  4. Finite-dimensional approximations of the resolvent of an infinite band matrix and continued fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrios, Dolores; Lopez, Guillermo L; Martinez-Finkelshtein, A; Torrano, Emilio

    1999-04-30

    The approximability of the resolvent of an operator induced by a band matrix by the resolvents of its finite-dimensional sections is studied. For bounded perturbations of self-adjoint matrices a positive result is obtained. The convergence domain of the sequence of resolvents can be described in this case in terms of matrices involved in the representation. This result is applied to tridiagonal complex matrices to establish conditions for the convergence of Chebyshev continued fractions on sets in the complex domain. In the particular case of compact perturbations this result is improved and a connection between the poles of the limit function and the eigenvalues of the tridiagonal matrix is established.

  5. A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal Print A "wire" of indium only one or a few atoms wide grown on a silicon surface comprises an ideal test laboratory for studying one-dimensional (1D) metals. A new example comes from a collaboration between researchers from Yonsei University in Korea, the ALS, and the University of Oregon, who have discovered that the phase transition from metal to insulator that occurs at low temperature in indium wires on the silicon (111) surface

  6. A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal Print A "wire" of indium only one or a few atoms wide grown on a silicon surface comprises an ideal test laboratory for studying one-dimensional (1D) metals. A new example comes from a collaboration between researchers from Yonsei University in Korea, the ALS, and the University of Oregon, who have discovered that the phase transition from metal to insulator that occurs at low temperature in indium wires on the silicon (111) surface

  7. A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal Print A "wire" of indium only one or a few atoms wide grown on a silicon surface comprises an ideal test laboratory for studying one-dimensional (1D) metals. A new example comes from a collaboration between researchers from Yonsei University in Korea, the ALS, and the University of Oregon, who have discovered that the phase transition from metal to insulator that occurs at low temperature in indium wires on the silicon (111) surface

  8. A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal Print A "wire" of indium only one or a few atoms wide grown on a silicon surface comprises an ideal test laboratory for studying one-dimensional (1D) metals. A new example comes from a collaboration between researchers from Yonsei University in Korea, the ALS, and the University of Oregon, who have discovered that the phase transition from metal to insulator that occurs at low temperature in indium wires on the silicon (111) surface

  9. Monolayer-induced band shifts at Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mkinen, A. J. Kim, Chul-Soo; Kushto, G. P.

    2014-01-27

    We report our study of the interfacial electronic structure of Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces that have been chemically modified with various organic monolayers, including octadecene and two para-substituted benzene derivatives. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals an upward band shift, associated with the assembly of these organic monolayers on the Si substrates, that does not correlate with either the dipole moment or the electron withdrawing/donating character of the molecular moieties. This suggests that the nature and quality of the self-assembled monolayer and the intrinsic electronic structure of the semiconductor material define the interfacial electronic structure of the functionalized Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces.

  10. Analysis of plasma-magnetic photonic crystal with a tunable band gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehdian, H.; Mohammadzahery, Z.; Hasanbeigi, A. [Department of Physics and Plasma Research Institute of Tarbiat Moallem University, 49 Dr Mofatteh Avenue, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, electromagnetic wave propagation through the one-dimensional plasma-magnetic photonic crystal in the presence of external magnetic field has been analyzed. The dispersion relation, transmission and reflection coefficients have been obtained by using the transfer matrix method. It is investigated how photonic band gap of photonic crystals will be tuned when both dielectric function {epsilon} and magnetic permeability {mu} of the constitutive materials, depend on applied magnetic field. This is shown by one dimensional photonic crystals consisting of plasma and ferrite material layers stacked alternately.

  11. Characterization and calibration of 8-channel E-band heterodyne radiometer system for SST-1 tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siju, Varsha; Kumar, Dharmendra; Shukla, Praveena; Pathak, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2014-05-15

    An 8-channel E-band heterodyne radiometer system (7486 GHz) is designed, characterized, and calibrated to measure the radial electron temperature profile by measuring Electron Cyclotron Emission spectrum at SST-1 Tokamak. The developed radiometer has a noise equivalent temperature of 1 eV and sensitivity of 5 10{sup 9} V/W. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperature, a calibration measurement of the radiometer system is performed using hot-cold Dicke switch method, which confirms the system linearity.

  12. Winter Hydroelectric Dam Feasibility Assessment: The Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WINTER HYDROELECTRIC DAM FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENT THE LAC COURTE OREILLES BAND OF LAKE SUPERIOR OJIBWE PRESENTED BY JASON WEAVER LAC COURTE OREILLES HISTORY * WE ARE LOCATED IN SAWYER COUNTY IN THE NORTHWESTERN REGION OF WISCONSIN. * WE HAVE 7,310 ENROLLED TRIBAL MEMBERS * THE RESERVATION CONSIST OF 76,465 ACRES, ABOUT 10,500 ACRES ARE WATER * WE HAVE ENTERED 4 SOVEREIGN TREATIES WITH THE U.S. GOVERNMENT. 1825, 1837, 1842 AND THE LA POINTE TREATY OF 1854 WHICH ESTABLISHED THE CURRENT RESERVATIONS

  13. Electronic band structure imaging of three layer twisted graphene on single crystal Cu(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marquez Velasco, J.; Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Athens ; Kelaidis, N.; Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Tsoutsou, D.; Tsipas, P.; Speliotis, Th.; Pilatos, G.; Likodimos, V.; Falaras, P.; Dimoulas, A.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2013-11-18

    Few layer graphene (FLG) is grown on single crystal Cu(111) by Chemical Vapor Deposition, and the electronic valence band structure is imaged by Angle-Resolved Photo-Emission Spectroscopy. It is found that graphene essentially grows polycrystalline. Three nearly ideal Dirac cones are observed along the Cu ?{sup }K{sup } direction in k-space, attributed to the presence of ?4 twisted three layer graphene with negligible interlayer coupling. The number of layers and the stacking order are compatible with Raman data analysis demonstrating the complementarity of the two techniques for a more accurate characterization of FLG.

  14. First principles electronic band structure and phonon dispersion curves for zinc blend beryllium chalcogenide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabhi, Shweta Mankad, Venu Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-04-24

    A detailed theoretical study of structural, electronic and Vibrational properties of BeX compound is presented by performing ab-initio calculations based on density-functional theory using the Espresso package. The calculated value of lattice constant and bulk modulus are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical data and agree reasonably well. BeX (X = S,Se,Te) compounds in the ZB phase are indirect wide band gap semiconductors with an ionic contribution. The phonon dispersion curves are represented which shows that these compounds are dynamically stable in ZB phase.

  15. A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal Print A "wire" of indium only one or a few atoms wide grown on a silicon surface comprises an ideal test laboratory for studying one-dimensional (1D) metals. A new example comes from a collaboration between researchers from Yonsei University in Korea, the ALS, and the University of Oregon, who have discovered that the phase transition from metal to insulator that occurs at low temperature in indium wires on the silicon (111) surface

  16. Photonic band gaps in three-dimensional network structures with short-range order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Noh, Heeso; Yang, Jin-Kyu; Schreck, Carl F.; Dufresne, Eric R.; O'Hern, Corey S.; Cao, Hui

    2011-12-15

    We present a systematic study of photonic band gaps (PBGs) in three-dimensional (3D) photonic amorphous structures (PASs) with short-range order. From calculations of the density of optical states (DOS) for PASs with different topologies, we find that tetrahedrally connected dielectric networks produce the largest isotropic PBGs. Local uniformity and tetrahedral order are essential to the formation of PBGs in PASs, in addition to short-range geometric order. This work demonstrates that it is possible to create broad, isotropic PBGs for vector light fields in 3D PASs without long-range order.

  17. Dual-etalon cavity ring-down frequency-comb spectroscopy with broad band light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, David W; Strecker, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    In an embodiment, a dual-etalon cavity-ring-down frequency-comb spectrometer system is described. A broad band light source is split into two beams. One beam travels through a first etalon and a sample under test, while the other beam travels through a second etalon, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges ("FSR") of the two etalons are not identical, the interference pattern at the detector will consist of a series of beat frequencies. By monitoring these beat frequencies, optical frequencies where light is absorbed may be determined.

  18. Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians 10 Y Energy, Environmental, and Economic Development Platform

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians - TMBCI 10Y Energy, Environmental and Economic Development Platform DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum Series Indian Pueblo Cultural Center - Albuquerque, NM July 27, 2015 10Y Governance, Financial and Environmental Impacts TMBCI Current Annual Energy Spend: $6.5 Million est. Daily Demand: 18MW est. 0 50 100 150 200 10Y1 10Y2 10Y3 10Y4 10Y5 10Y6 10Y7 10Y8 10Y9 10Y10 10Y Growth Projection Non-tribal Utility Hydrocarbons TMBCI Efficiency and

  19. Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians - Energy Analysis

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe Location of Lac Courte Oreilles About Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) * The reservation is presently 76,465 acres and is 15 miles wide. * We have a seven member Tribal Governing Board with four year terms. * LCO's membership is about 7,000 with nearly half of its members residing on or near the reservation * There are 25 distinctly different communities within the reservation for a total of 1,019 households (2000 Census). * LCO operates two casinos; recently

  20. Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians - Conservation and Renewable Energy Planning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bryan Hoover Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians November 20, 2008 * Located in North Central Wisconsin. * The reservation is 144 square miles or 86,000 acres. * Population 3,400 Tribal Members. * Checkerboard Reservation * Area- 86,630 acres or 144 square miles * Land Ownership- 66.8%-Tribal land 33.2%-Fee land * 260 Lakes * 71 Miles of Streams * 24,000 Acres of Wetlands * 41,733 Acres of Forests * Develop and evaluate baseline data on energy consumption, costs, trends and

  1. Recent experimental results from a long-pulse J-band relativistic klystron amplifier developmental effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, K.G.; Crouch, D.D.; Sar, D.R.; Speciale, R.A.; Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; Stringfield, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Recent experimental results, supporting simulations, and design modeling are presented from a developmental effort to a produce a long pulse ({approximately}1{mu}s) J-band (5.85-8.2 GHz) relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) of the high current NRL genealogy. This RKA is designed to operate at approximately 6.6 GHz, with a desired RF output {approximately}700 MW. Conversion of electron beam energy to microwave energy is obtained by a mock magnetically insulated coaxial converter which, in various incarnations, can be made to be either a cavity gap extractor or an inverse cathode.

  2. Apparatus and methods for relieving thermally induced stresses in inner and outer bands of thermally cooled turbine nozzle stages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Guilderland, NY); Itzel, Gary Michael (Clifton Park, NY); Correia, Victor H. S. (Milton Mills, NH)

    2002-01-01

    To control the temperature mismatch between the inner and outer bands and covers forming plenums with the inner and outer bands on sides thereof remote from the hot gas path, passages extend from the leading edge of the covers in communication with the hot gases of combustion to the trailing edge of the covers in communication with the hot gas flowpath. A mixing chamber is provided in each passage in communication with compressor discharge air for mixing the hot gases of combustion and compressor discharge air for flow through the passage, thereby heating the cover and minimizing the temperature differential between the inner and outer bands and their respective covers. The passages are particularly useful adjacent the welded or brazed joints between the covers and inner band portions.

  3. Near-edge band structures and band gaps of Cu-based semiconductors predicted by the modified Becke-Johnson potential plus an on-site Coulomb U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yubo; Zhang, Jiawei; Wang, Youwei; Gao, Weiwei; Abtew, Tesfaye A.; Zhang, Peihong E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn; Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 ; Zhang, Wenqing E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Sate Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing University, Jiangsu 210093

    2013-11-14

    Diamond-like Cu-based multinary semiconductors are a rich family of materials that hold promise in a wide range of applications. Unfortunately, accurate theoretical understanding of the electronic properties of these materials is hindered by the involvement of Cu d electrons. Density functional theory (DFT) based calculations using the local density approximation or generalized gradient approximation often give qualitative wrong electronic properties of these materials, especially for narrow-gap systems. The modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) method has been shown to be a promising alternative to more elaborate theory such as the GW approximation for fast materials screening and predictions. However, straightforward applications of the mBJ method to these materials still encounter significant difficulties because of the insufficient treatment of the localized d electrons. We show that combining the promise of mBJ potential and the spirit of the well-established DFT + U method leads to a much improved description of the electronic structures, including the most challenging narrow-gap systems. A survey of the band gaps of about 20 Cu-based semiconductors calculated using the mBJ + U method shows that the results agree with reliable values to within 0.2 eV.

  4. Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians - First Steps Toward an Energy Efficient Future and MAP Biomass Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OVERVIEW To develop the capacity to conduct energy audits Implement energy efficiency measures into Tribal homes Develop a Tribally administered Energy Efficiency Program and business PROJECT PARTICIPANTS Red Lake Housing Employees Energy Cents Coalition Staff Red Lake Band Members RELEVANT BACKGROUND INFORMATION The Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians recognizes the need to develop a more sustainable, affordable and autonomous energy future for Tribal members Nearly 60% of the 1,621 housing units

  5. Strain-engineered band parameters of graphene-like SiC monolayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behera, Harihar; Mukhopadhyay, Gautam

    2014-10-06

    Using full-potential density functional theory (DFT) calculations we show that the band gap and effective masses of charge carriers in SiC monolayer (ML-SiC) in graphene-like two-dimensional honeycomb structure are tunable by strain engineering. ML-SiC was found to preserve its flat 2D graphene-like structure under compressive strain up to 7%. A transition from indirect-to-direct gap-phase is predicted to occur for a strain value lying within the interval (1.11 %, 1.76%). In both gap-phases band gap decreases with increasing strain, although the rate of decrease is different in the two gap-phases. Effective mass of electrons show a non-linearly decreasing trend with increasing tensile strain in the direct gap-phase. The strain-sensitive properties of ML-SiC, may find applications in future strain-sensors, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS) and other nano-devices.

  6. Fluorescent growth bands in irradiated-bitumen nodules: Evidence of episodic hydrocarbon migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, B.

    1997-01-01

    Minute rims of solid bitumen ({approximately}40-50 {mu}m thick) surround detrital radioactive grains in the Permian-Triassic sandstones and Arranoo Member of the Kockatea Shale from the northern Perth basin, Australia. The bitumen formed as Th- and U-bearing minerals (monazite, xenotime, zircon, thorite) irradiated and immobilized fluid hydrocarbons coming within range of alpha-particle emissions. using transmitted light and scanning electron microscopy and rims appear compositionally homogeneous, but under blue/violet epifluorescent illumination the bitumen displays complex concentric and contorted banding. These fluorescent textures indicate that multiple influxes of hydrocarbons passed through the reservoir sandstones. Following radiation-induced immobilization of hydrocarbons from the first oil influx, the bitumen nodules grew through a process of swelling and expansion outward form the mineral core during subsequent oil influxes, producing graded fluorescent growth bands. Oil droplets and lamellae also were adsorbed onto the outer portion of the nodules. Such bitumen nodules are a new and potentially important source of data for understanding the movement of hydrocarbons in sedimentary basins, specifically for identifying hydrocarbon pathways, the number of discrete hydrocarbon pulses, and the relative timing of oil migration.

  7. FABSOAR--A Fabry-Perot Spectrometer for Oxygen A-band Research Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watchorn, Steven

    2010-09-10

    Because this was a Phase I project, it did not add extensively to the body of A-band knowledge. There was no basic research performed on that subject. The principal addition was that a mechanical and optical design for a triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FABSOAR) capable of A-band sensing was sketched out and shown to be within readily feasible instrument fabrication parameters. The parameters for the proposed triple-etalon Fabry-Perot were shown to be very similar to existing Fabry-Perots built by Scientific Solutions. The mechanical design for the FABSOAR instrument incorporated the design of previous Scientific Solutions imagers, condensing the three three-inch-diameter etalons into a single, sturdy tube. The design allowed for the inclusion of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) filter wheel and a thermocooled CCD detector from Andor. The tube has supports to mount to a horizontal or vertical opticaltable surface, and was to be coupled to a Scientific Solutions pointing head at the Millstone Hill Observatory in Massachusetts for Phase II calibration and testing.

  8. 50 MW X-BAND RF SYSTEM FOR A PHOTOINJECTOR TEST STATION AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C J; Beer, G K; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Houck, T L; Adolphsen, C; Candel, A; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Li, Z; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Zhou, F; Deis, G A

    2011-03-11

    In support of X-band photoinjector development efforts at LLNL, a 50 MW test station is being constructed to investigate structure and photocathode optimization for future upgrades. A SLAC XL-4 klystron capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 microsecond pulses will be the high power RF source for the system. Timing of the laser pulse on the photocathode with the applied RF field places very stringent requirements on phase jitter and drift. To achieve these requirements, the klystron will be powered by a state of the art, solid-state, high voltage modulator. The 50 MW will be divided between the photoinjector and a traveling wave accelerator section. A high power phase shifter is located between the photoinjector and accelerator section to adjust the phasing of the electron bunches with respect to the accelerating field. A variable attenuator is included on the input of the photoinjector. The distribution system including the various x-band components is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of the RF system.

  9. Periodic dielectric structure for production of photonic band gap and devices incorporating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA); Chan, Che-Ting (Ames, IA); Soukoulis, Costas (Ames, IA)

    1994-08-02

    A periodic dielectric structure which is capable of producing a photonic band gap and which is capable of practical construction. The periodic structure is formed of a plurality of layers, each layer being formed of a plurality of rods separated by a given spacing. The material of the rods contrasts with the material between the rods to have a refractive index contrast of at least two. The rods in each layer are arranged with their axes parallel and at a given spacing. Adjacent layers are rotated by 90.degree., such that the axes of the rods in any given layer are perpendicular to the axes in its neighbor. Alternating layers (that is, successive layers of rods having their axes parallel such as the first and third layers) are offset such that the rods of one are about at the midpoint between the rods of the other. A four-layer periocity is thus produced, and successive layers are stacked to form a three-dimensional structure which exhibits a photonic band gap. By virtue of forming the device in layers of elongate members, it is found that the device is susceptible of practical construction.

  10. Rotationally resolved spectroscopy of a librational fundamental band of hydrogen fluoride tetramer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2000-07-08

    The rotationally resolved spectrum of a fundamental band of hydrogen fluoride tetramer has been recorded using a pulsed slit-jet, diode laser spectrometer. The band has a parallel rotational structure and is assigned as the H-F out-of-plane libration fundamental with A{sub u} symmetry. Ninety-five ground state combination differences were fit to a symmetric top Hamiltonian to give the following ground state rotational constants: B{sup ''}=0.132 081(7) cm{sup -1}, D{sub J}{sup ''}=7.1(7)x10{sup -7} cm{sup -1}, D{sub JK}{sup ''}=-9(2)x10{sup -7} cm{sup -1}, H{sub JJJ}{sup ''}=6(2)x10{sup -10} cm{sup -1}, H{sub JJK}{sup ''}=9(7)x10{sup -10} cm{sup -1}, H{sub JKK}{sup ''}=-1.3(8)x10{sup -10} cm{sup -1}. A total of 190 transitions were fit to determine the upper state spectroscopic constants: v{sub 4}=714.7849(1) cm{sup -1}, B{sup '}=0.129 634(5) cm{sup -1}, {delta}(C-B)=0.001 344 cm{sup -1}, D{sub J}{sup '}=6.4(5)x10{sup -7} cm{sup -1}, D{sub JK}{sup '}=-4.5(6)x10{sup -7} cm{sup -1}, {delta}D{sub K}=2.92(8)x10{sup -6} cm{sup -1}, H{sub JJJ}{sup '}=3(1)x10{sup -10} cm{sup -1}, H{sub JKK}{sup '}=-1.55(6)x10{sup -8} cm{sup -1}; {delta}H{sub KKK}=-4.65(6)x10{sup -8} cm{sup -1}. Furthermore, a perpendicular band centered at 752.7 cm{sup -1} was observed. The band has a rotational line spacing that gives an approximate B{sup ''} value of 0.132 cm{sup -1}; it has been assigned as the E{sub u} symmetry, H-F in-plane libration fundamental of the HF tetramer. Finally, a parallel band was observed at 741.0 cm{sup -1} with B{sup ''}=0.076 cm{sup -1} and has been assigned as the A{sup ''} symmetry, H-F out-of-plane libration fundamental of the HF pentamer. Structural parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies are estimated from first-principles, correlated MP2 and CCSD(T) calculations. These are the largest calculations performed to date for this system with respect to both orbital basis set and level of electron correlation. The CCSD(T) harmonic frequencies are, in particular, the first reported for the tetramer at this level of theory. Based on our results, we suggest ''best estimates'' of R{sub FF}=2.51 Aa, r{sub HF}=0.947 Aa, and {theta}{sub HFF}=9.7 degree sign for the structural parameters and a range for D{sub e} of 27.4 to 28.1 kcal/mol (D{sub 0}=19.7 to 20.4 kcal/mol) for the parameters and for the energy of the tetramer dissociating into four monomers. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Laboratory determination of the infrared band strengths of pyrene frozen in water ice: Implications for the composition of interstellar ices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardegree-Ullman, E. E.; Gudipati, M. S.; Werner, M.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Lignell, H.; Allamandola, L. J.; Stapelfeldt, K. R. E-mail: gudipati@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-04-01

    Broad infrared emission features (e.g., at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 ?m) from the gas phase interstellar medium have long been attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A significant portion (10%-20%) of the Milky Way's carbon reservoir is locked in PAH molecules, which makes their characterization integral to our understanding of astrochemistry. In molecular clouds and the dense envelopes and disks of young stellar objects (YSOs), PAHs are expected to be frozen in the icy mantles of dust grains where they should reveal themselves through infrared absorption. To facilitate the search for frozen interstellar PAHs, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the positions and strengths of the bands of pyrene mixed with H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O ices. The D{sub 2}O mixtures are used to measure pyrene bands that are masked by the strong bands of H{sub 2}O, leading to the first laboratory determination of the band strength for the CH stretching mode of pyrene in water ice near 3.25 ?m. Our infrared band strengths were normalized to experimentally determined ultraviolet band strengths, and we find that they are generally ?50% larger than those reported by Bouwman et al. based on theoretical strengths. These improved band strengths were used to reexamine YSO spectra published by Boogert et al. to estimate the contribution of frozen PAHs to absorption in the 5-8 ?m spectral region, taking into account the strength of the 3.25 ?m CH stretching mode. It is found that frozen neutral PAHs contain 5%-9% of the cosmic carbon budget and account for 2%-9% of the unidentified absorption in the 5-8 ?m region.

  12. Evidence of Eu{sup 2+} 4f electrons in the valence band spectra of EuTiO{sub 3} and EuZrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolodiazhnyi, T.; Valant, M.; Williams, J. R.; Bugnet, M.; Botton, G. A.; Ohashi, N.; Sakka, Y.

    2012-10-15

    We report on optical band gap and valence electronic structure of two Eu{sup 2+}-based perovskites, EuTiO{sub 3} and EuZrO{sub 3} as revealed by diffuse optical scattering, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and valence-band x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The data show good agreement with the first-principles studies in which the top of the valence band structure is formed by the narrow Eu 4f{sup 7} electron band. The O 2p band shows the features similar to those of the Ba(Sr)TiO{sub 3} perovskites except that it is shifted to higher binding energies. Appearance of the Eu{sup 2+} 4f{sup 7} band is a reason for narrowing of the optical band gap in the title compounds as compared to their Sr-based analogues.

  13. Product fine-structure resolved photodissociation dynamics: The A band of H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Linsen [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xie, Daiqian, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China) [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Sun, Zhigang [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Guo, Hua, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    The photodissociation dynamics of H{sub 2}O in its first absorption band is investigated on an accurate potential energy surface based on a large number of high-level ab initio points. Several ro-vibrational states of the parent molecule are considered. Different from most previous theoretical studies, the spin-orbit and ?-doublet populations of the open-shell OH fragment are reported from full-dimensional wave packet calculations. The populations of the two spin-orbit manifolds are in most cases close to the statistical limit, but the ?-doublet is dominated by the A{sup ?} component, thanks largely to the fast in-plane dissociation of H{sub 2}O(A{sup ~1}A{sup ??}). Comparisons with experimental data and a Franck-Condon model are generally very good, although some discrepancies exist.

  14. C-Band Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar (C-SAPR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N

    2012-11-13

    The C-band scanning ARM precipitation radar (C-SAPR) is a scanning polarimetric Doppler radar transmitting simultaneously in both H and V polarizations. With a 350-kW magnetron transmitter, this puts 125 kW of transmitted power for each polarization. The receiver for the C-SAPR is a National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) -developed Hi-Q system operating in a coherent-on-receive mode. The ARM Climate Research Facility operates two C-SAPRs; one of them is deployed near the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility near the triangular array of X-SAPRs, and the second C-SAPR is deployed at ARMs Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea.

  15. Photonic-band-gap effects in two-dimensional polycrystalline and amorphous structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jin-Kyu; Noh, Heeso; Liew, Seng-Fatt; Schreck, Carl; Guy, Mikhael I.; O'Hern, Corey S.; Cao, Hui

    2010-11-15

    We study numerically the density of optical states (DOS) in two-dimensional photonic structures with short-range positional order and observe a transition from polycrystalline to amorphous photonic systems. In polycrystals, photonic band gaps (PBGs) are formed within individual domains, which leads to a depletion of the DOS similar to that in periodic structures. In amorphous photonic media, the domain sizes are too small to form PBGs, thus the depletion of the DOS is weakened significantly. The critical domain size that separates the polycrystalline and amorphous regimes is determined by the attenuation length of Bragg scattering, which depends not only on the degree of positional order but also the refractive-index contrast of the photonic material. Even with relatively low-refractive-index contrast, we find that modest short-range positional order in photonic structures enhances light confinement via collective scattering and interference.

  16. Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians Energy Conservation and Options Analysis - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Turner

    2008-07-11

    The Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians was awarded a grant through the Department of Energy First Steps program in June of 2006. The primary purpose of the grant was to enable the Tribe to develop energy conservation policies and a strategy for alternative energy resource development. All of the work contemplated by the grant agreement has been completed and the Tribe has begun implementing the resource development strategy through the construction of a 1.0 MW grid-connected photovoltaic system designed to offset a portion of the energy demand generated by current and projected land uses on the Tribe’s Reservation. Implementation of proposed energy conservation policies will proceed more deliberately as the Tribe acquires economic development experience sufficient to evaluate more systematically the interrelationships between conservation and its economic development goals.

  17. Project Reports for Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians is located in the northern part of lower Michigan on approximately 590 acres of land. The tribe originally had no consistent vision or strategic plan concerning its energy use. This project had three objectives. The first objective was to produce a comprehensive energy plan for the tribe. The second objective was to create an energy organization and tribal energy code. The third objective was to increase the capacity of the tribe for better understanding (through active tribal participation), capability, knowledge and awareness of energy issues through bimonthly articles in the tribal newsletter and two energy workshops. The vision, strategic plan, and code will provide the focus, direction and guidelines as the tribe seeks to develop renewable energy and energy efficiency.

  18. Human body impedance for electromagnetic hazard analysis in the VLF to MF band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanai, H.; Chatterjee, I.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1984-08-01

    A knowledge of the average electrical impedance of the human body is essential for the analysis of electromagnetic hazards in the VLF to MF band. The purpose of the measurements was to determine the average body impedance of several human subjects as a function of frequency. Measurements were carried out with the subjects standing barefoot on a ground plane and touching various metal electrodes with the hand or index finger. The measured impedance includes the electrode polarization and skin impedances, spread impedance near the electrode, body impedance, stray capacitance between the body surface and ground, and inductance due to the body and grounding strap. These components are separated and simplified equivalent circuits are presented for body impedance of humans exposed to free-space electromagnetic waves as well as in contact with large ungrounded metallic objects therein.

  19. Independently tunable dual-band perfect absorber based on graphene at mid-infrared frequencies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yuping; Li, Tongtong; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Huiyun; O’Hara, John F.; Abele, Ethan; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Azad, Abul K.

    2015-12-22

    We design a dual-band absorber formed by combining two cross-shaped metallic resonators of different sizes within a super-unit-cell arranged in mirror symmetry. Simulations indicate that absorption efficiencies greater than 99% can be achieved at two different frequencies under normal incidence. We also employ a design scheme with graphene integration, which allows independent tuning of individual absorption frequencies by electrostatically changing the Fermi energy of the graphene layer. High absorbance is maintained over a wide incident angle range up to 50 degrees for both TE and TM polarizations. Thus, it enables a promising way to design electrically tunable absorbers, which maymore » contribute toward the realization of frequency selective detectors for sensing applications.« less

  20. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots embedded in energy fence barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wei, Guodan (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2010-07-06

    A plurality of layers of a first semiconductor material and a plurality of dots-in-a-fence barriers disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode. Each dots-in-a-fence barrier consists essentially of a plurality of quantum dots of a second semiconductor material embedded between and in direct contact with two layers of a third semiconductor material. Wave functions of the quantum dots overlap as at least one intermediate band. The layers of the third semiconductor material are arranged as tunneling barriers to require a first electron and/or a first hole in a layer of the first material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the second material within a respective quantum dot, and to require a second electron and/or a second hole in a layer of the first semiconductor material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach another layer of the first semiconductor material.

  1. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  2. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: Finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-01-09

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. Improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP.more » In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB.« less

  3. A high power Ka band millimeter wave generator with low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Jun; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Li Guolin; Zhang Zehai

    2010-08-15

    A slow wave type gigawatt millimeter wave generator is proposed in this paper. In order to increase power capacity, overmoded slow wave structures (SWSs) with larger diameter have been used. Taking advantage of the ''surface wave'' property of overmoded SWSs, the TM{sub 01} mode can be selected to be the operating mode. Calculations have also been carried out to choose a proper low operating magnetic field strength, and it agrees with particle in cell (PIC) simulations. Main structure parameters of the device are optimized by PIC simulations. A typical simulation result is that, at the beam parameters of 600 keV and 5.05 kA, and guiding magnetic field of 0.85 T, a Ka band millimeter wave with an output power of 1.05 GW is generated, yielding a conversion efficiency of about 35%.

  4. Band-filling effect on magnetic anisotropy using a Green's function method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ke, Liqin; van Schilfgaarde, Mark

    2015-07-28

    We use an analytical model to describe the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) in solids as a function of band filling. The MAE is evaluated in second-order perturbation theory, which makes it possible to decompose the MAE into a sum of transitions between occupied and unoccupied pairs. The model enables us to characterize the MAE as a sum of contributions from different, often competing terms. The nitridometalates Li2[(Li1–xTx)N], with T= Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, provide a system where the model is very effective because atomiclike orbital characters are preserved and the decomposition is fairly clean. The model results are also comparedmore » against MAE evaluated directly from first-principles calculations for this system. Good qualitative agreement is found.« less

  5. Photonic band gap of a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Yuancheng; Wei, Zeyong; Li, Hongqiang; Chen, Hong; Soukoulis, Costas M

    2013-12-10

    Here, we present a mechanism for tailoring the photonic band structure of a quarter-wave stack without changing its physical periods by embedding conductive sheets. Graphene is utilized and studied as a realistic, two-dimensional conductive sheet. In a graphene-embedded quarter-wave stack, the synergic actions of Bragg scattering and graphene conductance contributions open photonic gaps at the center of the reduced Brillouin zone that are nonexistent in conventional quarter-wave stacks. Such photonic gaps show giant, loss-independent density of optical states at the fixed lower-gap edges, of even-multiple characteristic frequency of the quarter-wave stack. The conductive sheet-induced photonic gaps provide a platform for the enhancement of light-matter interactions.

  6. Band gap narrowing in zinc oxide-based semiconductor thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Jitendra E-mail: akrsri@gmail.com; Kumar Srivastava, Amit E-mail: akrsri@gmail.com

    2014-04-07

    A simple expression is proposed for the band gap narrowing (or shrinkage) in semiconductors using optical absorption measurements of spin coated 1 at.?% Ga-doped ZnO (with additional 01.5 at.?% zinc species) thin films as ?E{sub BGN}?=?Bn{sup 1/3} [1 ? (n{sub c}/n){sup 1/3}], where B is the fitting parameter, n is carrier concentration, and n{sub c} is the critical density required for shrinkage onset. Its uniqueness lies in not only describing variation of ?E{sub BGN} correctly but also allowing deduction of n{sub c} automatically for several M-doped ZnO (M: Ga, Al, In, B, Mo) systems. The physical significance of the term [1 ? (n{sub c}/n){sup 1/3}] is discussed in terms of carrier separation.

  7. A versatile optical junction using photonic band-gap guidance and self collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Man Mohan; Medhekar, Sarang

    2014-09-29

    We show that it is possible to design two photonic crystal (PC) structures such that an optical beam of desired wavelength gets guided within the line defect of the first structure (photonic band gap guidance) and the same beam gets guided in the second structure by self-collimation. Using two dimensional simulation of a design made of the combination of these two structures, we propose an optical junction that allows for crossing of two optical signals of same wavelength and same polarization with very low crosstalk. Moreover, the junction can be operated at number of frequencies in a wide range. Crossing of multiple beams with very low cross talk is also possible. The proposed junction should be important in future integrated photonic circuits.

  8. The effect of spin-orbit coupling in band structure and edge states of bilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahdan, Muhammad Fauzi; Darma, Yudi

    2015-04-16

    Topological insulators are predicted to be useful ranging from spintronics to quantum computation. Graphene was first predicted to be the precursor of topological insulator by Kane-Mele. They developed a Hamiltonian model to describe the gap opening in graphene. In this work, we investigate the band structure of bilayer grapheme and also its edge states by using this model with analytical approach. The results of our calculation show that the gap opening occurs at K and K’ point in bilayer graphene.In addition, a pair of gapless edge modes occurs both in the zigzag and arm-chair configurations are no longer exist. There are gap created at the edge even though thery are very small.

  9. Microstructure, optical property, and electronic band structure of cuprous oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jun-Woo; Jang, Hyungkeun; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Lee, Hosun; Kang, Joongoo; Wei, Su-Huai

    2011-11-15

    Cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) thin films were grown via radio frequency sputtering deposition at various temperatures. The dielectric functions and luminescence properties of the Cu{sub 2}O thin films were measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence, respectively. High-energy peaks were observed in the photoluminescence spectra. Several critical points (CPs) were found using second derivative spectra of the dielectric functions and the standard critical point model. The electronic band structure and the dielectric functions were calculated using density functional theory, and the CP energies were estimated to compare with the experimental data. We identified the high-energy photoluminescence peaks to quasi-direct transitions which arose from the granular structures of the Cu{sub 2}O thin films.

  10. Results on the Performance of a Broad Band Focussing Cherenkov Counter

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Cester, R.; Fitch, V. L.; Montag, A.; Sherman, S.; Webb, R. C.; Witherell, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    The field of ring imaging (broad band differential) Cherenkov detectors has become a very active area of interest in detector development at several high energy physics laboratories. Our group has previously reported on a method of Cherenkov ring imaging for a counter with large momentum and angular acceptance using standard photo multipliers. Recently, we have applied this technique to the design of a set of Cherenkov counters for use in a particle search experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). This new detector operates over the range 0.998 < ..beta.. < 1.000 in velocity with a delta..beta.. approx. 2 x 10{sup -4}. The acceptance in angle is +- 14 mrad in the horizontal and +- 28 mrad in the vertical. We report here on the performance of this counter.

  11. Disorder-free localization around the conduction band edge of crossing and kinked silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kele?, mit; akan, Asl?; Bulutay, Ceyhun

    2015-02-14

    We explore ballistic regime quantum transport characteristics of oxide-embedded crossing and kinked silicon nanowires (NWs) within a large-scale empirical pseudopotential electronic structure framework, coupled to the Kubo-Greenwood transport analysis. A real-space wave function study is undertaken and the outcomes are interpreted together with the findings of ballistic transport calculations. This reveals that ballistic transport edge lies tens to hundreds of millielectron volts above the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, with a substantial number of localized states appearing in between, as well as above the former. We show that these localized states are not due to the oxide interface, but rather core silicon-derived. They manifest the wave nature of electrons brought to foreground by the reflections originating from NW junctions and bends. Hence, we show that the crossings and kinks of even ultraclean Si NWs possess a conduction band tail without a recourse to atomistic disorder.

  12. Assessing out-of-band flare effects at the wafer level for EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Kemp, Charles; Denham, Paul; Rekawa, Senajith

    2010-01-25

    To accurately estimate the flare contribution from the out-of-band (OOB), the integration of a DUV source into the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA Micro-field Exposure tool is proposed, enabling precisely controlled exposures along with the EUV patterning of resists in vacuum. First measurements evaluating the impact of bandwidth selected exposures with a table-top set-up and subsequent EUV patterning show significant impact on line-edge roughness and process performance. We outline a simulation-based method for computing the effective flare from resist sensitive wavelengths as a function of mask pattern types and sizes. This simulation method is benchmarked against measured OOB flare measurements and the results obtained are in agreement.

  13. Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davenport, Lars; Smythe, Louisa; Sarquilla, Lindsey; Ferguson, Kelly

    2015-03-27

    This plan outlines the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians’ comprehensive energy management strategy including an assessment of current practices, a commitment to improving energy performance and reducing overall energy use, and recommended actions to achieve these goals. Vision Statement The primary objective of the Strategic Energy Management Plan is to implement energy efficiency, energy security, conservation, education, and renewable energy projects that align with the economic goals and cultural values of the community to improve the health and welfare of the tribe. The intended outcomes of implementing the energy plan include job creation, capacity building, and reduced energy costs for tribal community members, and tribal operations. By encouraging energy independence and local power production the plan will promote self-sufficiency. Mission & Objectives The Strategic Energy Plan will provide information and suggestions to guide tribal decision-making and provide a foundation for effective management of energy resources within the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians (SYBCI) community. The objectives of developing this plan include; Assess current energy demand and costs of all tribal enterprises, offices, and facilities; Provide a baseline assessment of the SYBCI’s energy resources so that future progress can be clearly and consistently measured, and current usage better understood; Project future energy demand; Establish a system for centralized, ongoing tracking and analysis of tribal energy data that is applicable across sectors, facilities, and activities; Develop a unifying vision that is consistent with the tribe’s long-term cultural, social, environmental, and economic goals; Identify and evaluate the potential of opportunities for development of long-term, cost effective energy sources, such as renewable energy, energy efficiency and conservation, and other feasible supply- and demand-side options; and Build the SYBCI’s capacity for understanding, managing, and developing energy resources by identifying training, distribution of information materials, and community meeting needs and opportunities

  14. A HIGH-RESOLUTION ATLAS OF URANIUM-NEON IN THE H BAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Terrien, Ryan; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Bender, Chad F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ycas, Gabriel G. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Osterman, Steven N. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Diddams, Scott A.; Quinlan, Franklyn [Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Lawler, James E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Nave, Gillian [Atomic Physics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We present a high-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 50,000) atlas of a uranium-neon (U/Ne) hollow-cathode spectrum in the H band (1454-1638 nm) for the calibration of near-infrared spectrographs. We obtained this U/Ne spectrum simultaneously with a laser-frequency comb spectrum, which we used to provide a first-order calibration to the U/Ne spectrum. We then calibrated the U/Ne spectrum using the recently published uranium line list of Redman et al., which is derived from high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer measurements. These two independent calibrations allowed us to easily identify emission lines in the hollow-cathode lamp that do not correspond to known (classified) lines of either uranium or neon, and to compare the achievable precision of each source. Our frequency comb precision was limited by modal noise and detector effects, while the U/Ne precision was limited primarily by the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the observed emission lines and our ability to model blended lines. The standard deviation in the dispersion solution residuals from the S/N-limited U/Ne hollow-cathode lamp was 50% larger than the standard deviation of the dispersion solution residuals from the modal-noise-limited laser-frequency comb. We advocate the use of U/Ne lamps for precision calibration of near-infrared spectrographs, and this H-band atlas makes these lamps significantly easier to use for wavelength calibration.

  15. MAPPING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM WITH NEAR-INFRARED DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zasowski, G.; Mnard, B.; Bizyaev, D.; Garca-Hernndez, D. A.; Prez, A. E. Garca; Majewski, S. R.; Hayden, M. R.; Holtzman, J.; Kinemuchi, K.; Johnson, J. A.; Wilson, J. C.; Nidever, D. L.; Shetrone, M.

    2015-01-01

    We map the distribution and properties of the Milky Way's interstellar medium as traced by diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) detected in near-infrared stellar spectra from the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey. Focusing exclusively on the strongest DIB in the H band, at ? ? 1.527 ?m, we present a projected map of the DIB absorption field in the Galactic plane, using a set of about 60,000 sightlines that reach up to 15kpc from the Sun and probe up to 30mag of visual extinction. The strength of this DIB is linearly correlated with dust reddening over three orders of magnitude in both DIB equivalent width (W {sub DIB}) and extinction, with a power law index of 1.01 0.01, a mean relationship of W {sub DIB}/A{sub V} = 0.1 Šmag{sup 1} and a dispersion of ?0.05 Šmag{sup 1} at extinctions characteristic of the Galactic midplane. These properties establish this DIB as a powerful, independent probe of dust extinction over a wide range of A{sub V} values. The subset of about 14,000 robustly detected DIB features have a W {sub DIB} distribution that follows an exponential trend. We empirically determine the intrinsic rest wavelength of this transition to be ?{sub 0} = 15 272.42 Š and use it to calculate absolute radial velocities of the carrier, which display the kinematical signature of the rotating Galactic disk. We probe the DIB carrier distribution in three dimensions and show that it can be characterized by an exponential disk model with a scale height of about 100pc and a scale length of about 5kpc. Finally, we show that the DIB distribution also traces large-scale Galactic structures, including the Galactic long bar and the warp of the outer disk.

  16. Precision X-Band Linac Technologies for Nuclear Photonics Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Houck, T L; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Adolphsen, C E; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T O; Ighigeanu, D; Toma, M; Cutoiu, D

    2011-08-31

    Nuclear photonics is an emerging field of research requiring new tools, including high spectral brightness, tunable gamma-ray sources; high photon energy, ultrahigh-resolution crystal spectrometers; and novel detectors. This presentation focuses on the precision linac technology required for Compton scattering gamma-ray light sources, and on the optimization of the laser and electron beam pulse format to achieve unprecedented spectral brightness. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology will be shown to offer optimal performance in a compact package, when used in conjunction with the appropriate pulse format, and photocathode illumination and interaction laser technologies. The nascent field of nuclear photonics is enabled by the recent maturation of new technologies, including high-gradient X-band electron acceleration, robust fiber laser systems, and hyper-dispersion CPA. Recent work has been performed at LLNL to demonstrate isotope-specific detection of shielded materials via NRF using a tunable, quasi-monochromatic Compton scattering gamma-ray source operating between 0.2 MeV and 0.9 MeV photon energy. This technique is called Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain with Energetic Radiation (or FINDER). This work has, among other things, demonstrated the detection of {sup 7}Li shielded by Pb, utilizing gamma rays generated by a linac-driven, laser-based Compton scattering gamma-ray source developed at LLNL. Within this context, a new facility is currently under construction at LLNL, with the goal of generating tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range, at a repetition rate of 120 Hz, and with a peak brightness in the 10{sup 20} photons/(s x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bw).

  17. Proposal of a gigawatt-class L/Ku dual-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, J.-C. Fan, Y.-W.; Shu, T.; Zhong, H.-H.

    2014-10-15

    We present a gigawatt (GW)-class magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) which is capable of generating dual-band high power microwaves (HPMs). The proposed device, deriving from previously studied complex MILO and dual-frequency MILO, is designed to produce two HPMs in L-band and Ku-band, respectively. It is found in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation that when the diode voltage is 610?kV, HPMs with frequencies of 1.72 GHz and 14.6?GHz can be achieved with powers of 3.3?GW and 2.4?GW, respectively. The corresponding total power conversion efficiency is approximately 12.8%. Power difference of the two generated HPMs is approximately 1.4?dB, and frequency difference of them reaches a level as high as ?10?dB.

  18. Tuning the band structures of a one-dimensional width-modulated magnonic crystal by a transverse magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di, K.; Lim, H. S. Zhang, V. L.; Ng, S. C.; Kuok, M. H.; Nguyen, H. T.; Cottam, M. G.

    2014-02-07

    Theoretical studies, based on three independent techniques, of the band structure of a one-dimensional width-modulated magnonic crystal under a transverse magnetic field are reported. The band diagram is found to display distinct behaviors when the transverse field is either larger or smaller than a critical value. The widths and center positions of bandgaps exhibit unusual non-monotonic and large field-tunability through tilting the direction of magnetization. Some bandgaps can be dynamically switched on and off by simply tuning the strength of such a static field. Finally, the impact of the lowered symmetry of the magnetic ground state on the spin-wave excitation efficiency of an oscillating magnetic field is discussed. Our finding reveals that the magnetization direction plays an important role in tailoring magnonic band structures and hence in the design of dynamic spin-wave switches.

  19. The Broad-band X-ray Spectrum of IC 4329A from a Joint NuSTAR/Suzaku

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Broad-band X-ray Spectrum of IC 4329A from a Joint NuSTAR/Suzaku Observation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Broad-band X-ray Spectrum of IC 4329A from a Joint NuSTAR/Suzaku Observation Authors: Brenneman, L. W. ; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. ; Madejski, G. ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC ; Fuerst, F. ; /Caltech ; Matt, G. ; /Rome III U. ; Elvis, M. ; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. ; Harrison, F. A. ; /Caltech ;

  20. Numerical investigation of the flat band Bloch modes in a 2D photonic crystal with Dirac cones

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Peng; Fietz, Chris; Tassin, Philippe; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Institute of Electronic Structure

    2015-04-14

    A numerical method combining complex-k band calculations and absorbing boundary conditions for Bloch waves is presented. We use this method to study photonic crystals with Dirac cones. We demonstrate that the photonic crystal behaves as a zero-index medium when excited at normal incidence, but that the zero-index behavior is lost at oblique incidence due to excitation of modes on the flat band. We also investigate the formation of monomodal and multimodal cavity resonances inside the photonic crystals, and the physical origins of their different line-shape features.

  1. A modeling study of the effect of depth of burial of depleted uranium and thorium on radon gas flux at a dry desert alluvial soil radioactive waste management site (RWMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-08-01

    An integral part of designing low-level waste (LLW) disposal pits and their associated closure covers in very dry desert alluvium is the use of a radon gas transport and fate model. Radon-222 has the potential to be a real heath hazard. The production of radon-222 results from the radioactive decay (a particle emission) of radium-226 in the uranium-235 and 238 Bateman chains. It is also produced in the thorium-230 series. Both long lived radionuclides have been proposed for disposal in the shallow land burial pits in Area 5 RWMS compound of Nevada Test Site (NTS). The constructed physics based model includes diffusion and barometric pressure-induced advection of an M-chain of radionuclides. The usual Bateman decay mechanics are included for each radionuclide. Both linear reversible and linear irreversible first order sorption kinetics are assumed for each radionuclide. This report presents the details of using the noble gas transport model, CASCADR9, in an engineering design study mode. Given data on the low-level waste stream, which constitutes the ultimate source of radon-222 in the RWMS, CASCADR9 is used to generate the surface flux (pCi/cm{sup 2}-sec) of radon-222 under the realistic atmospheric and alluvial soil conditions found in the RWMS at Area 5, of the NTS. Specifically, this study examines the surface flux of radon-222 as a function of the depth of burial below the land surface.

  2. A Spitzer five-band analysis of the Jupiter-sized planet TrES-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Lust, Nate B.; Hardy, Ryan A.; Bowman, M. Oliver; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2014-12-10

    With an equilibrium temperature of 1200 K, TrES-1 is one of the coolest hot Jupiters observed by Spitzer. It was also the first planet discovered by any transit survey and one of the first exoplanets from which thermal emission was directly observed. We analyzed all Spitzer eclipse and transit data for TrES-1 and obtained its eclipse depths and brightness temperatures in the 3.6 ?m (0.083% 0.024%, 1270 110 K), 4.5 ?m (0.094% 0.024%, 1126 90 K), 5.8 ?m (0.162% 0.042%, 1205 130 K), 8.0 ?m (0.213% 0.042%, 1190 130 K), and 16 ?m (0.33% 0.12%, 1270 310 K) bands. The eclipse depths can be explained, within 1? errors, by a standard atmospheric model with solar abundance composition in chemical equilibrium, with or without a thermal inversion. The combined analysis of the transit, eclipse, and radial-velocity ephemerides gives an eccentricity of e=0.033{sub ?0.031}{sup +0.015}, consistent with a circular orbit. Since TrES-1's eclipses have low signal-to-noise ratios, we implemented optimal photometry and differential-evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms in our Photometry for Orbits, Eclipses, and Transits pipeline. Benefits include higher photometric precision and ?10 times faster MCMC convergence, with better exploration of the phase space and no manual parameter tuning.

  3. GaAs Blocked-Impurity-Band Detectors for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardozo, Benjamin Lewin

    2004-12-21

    High-purity and doped GaAs films have been grown by Liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) for development of a blocked impurity band (BIB) detector for far-infrared radiation. The film growth process developed has resulted in the capability to grow GaAs with a net active impurity concentration below 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, ideal for the blocking layer of the BIB detector. The growth of n-type LPE GaAs films with donor concentrations below the metal-insulator transition, as required for the absorbing layer of a BIB detector, has been achieved. The control of the donor concentration, however, was found to be insufficient for detector production. The growth by LPE of a high-purity film onto a commercially grown vapor-phase epitaxial (VPE) n-type GaAs doped absorbing layer resulted in a BIB device that showed a significant reduction in the low-temperature dark current compared to the absorbing layer only. Extended optical response was not detected, most likely due to the high compensation of the commercially grown GaAs absorbing layer, which restricts the depletion width of the device.

  4. Method for implantation of high dopant concentrations in wide band gap materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Usov, Igor (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-09-15

    A method that combines alternate low/medium ion dose implantation with rapid thermal annealing at relatively low temperatures. At least one dopant is implanted in one of a single crystal and an epitaxial film of the wide band gap compound by a plurality of implantation cycles. The number of implantation cycles is sufficient to implant a predetermined concentration of the dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film. Each of the implantation cycles includes the steps of: implanting a portion of the predetermined concentration of the one dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film; annealing one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film and implanted portion at a predetermined temperature for a predetermined time to repair damage to one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film caused by implantation and activates the implanted dopant; and cooling the annealed single crystal and implanted portion to a temperature of less than about 100.degree. C. This combination produces high concentrations of dopants, while minimizing the defect concentration.

  5. Geometric phase and entanglement of Raman photon pairs in the presence of photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrada, K.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Abdel-Khalek, S.

    2015-03-28

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to different noise effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we propose a useful quantum system with real physical parameters by studying the GP of a pair of Stokes and anti-Stokes photons, involving Raman emission processes with and without photonic band gap (PBG) effect. We show that the properties of GP are very sensitive to the change of the Rabi frequency and time, exhibiting collapse phenomenon as the time becomes significantly large. The system allows us to obtain a state which remains with zero GP for longer times. This result plays a significant role to enhance the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Finally, we investigate the nonlocal correlation (entanglement) between the pair photons by taking into account the effect of different parameters. An interesting correlation between the GP and entanglement is observed showing that the PBG stabilizes the fluctuations in the system and makes the entanglement more robust against the change of time and frequency.

  6. Periodic permanent magnet development for linear collider X-band klystrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Phillips, R. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

    1999-05-07

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) klystron group is currently designing, fabricating and testing 11.424 GHz klystrons with peak output powers from 50 to 75 MW at 1 to 2 {mu}s rf pulsewidths as part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). In order to eliminate the projected operational-year energy bill for klystron solenoids, Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing has been employed on our latest X-band klystron designs. A PPM beam tester has operated at the same repetition rate, voltage and average beam power required for a 75-MW NLC klystron. Prototype 50 and 75-MW PPM klystrons were built and tested during 1996 and 1997 which operate from 50 to 70 MW at efficiencies greater than 55%. Construction and testing of 75-MW research klystrons will continue while the design and reliability is perfected. This paper will discuss the design of these PPM klystrons and the results of testing to date along with future plans for the development of a low-cost Design for Manufacture (DFM) 75-MW klystron and invitation for industry participation.

  7. Periodic permanent magnet development for linear collider X-band klystrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Jongewaard, E.; Phillips, R. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) klystron group is currently designing, fabricating and testing 11.424 GHz klystrons with peak output powers from 50 to 75 MW at 1 to 2 {mu}s rf pulsewidths as part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). In order to eliminate the projected operational-year energy bill for klystron solenoids, Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing has been employed on our latest X-band klystron designs. A PPM beam tester has operated at the same repetition rate, voltage and average beam power required for a 75-MW NLC klystron. Prototype 50 and 75-MW PPM klystrons were built and tested during 1996 and 1997 which operate from 50 to 70 MW at efficiencies greater than 55{percent}. Construction and testing of 75-MW research klystrons will continue while the design and reliability is perfected. This paper will discuss the design of these PPM klystrons and the results of testing to date along with future plans for the development of a low-cost Design for Manufacture (DFM) 75-MW klystron and invitation for industry participation. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. A Ka-band TM{sub 02} mode relativistic backward wave oscillator with cascaded resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teng, Yan; Cao, Yinbin; Song, Zhimin; Ye, Hu; Shi, Yanchao; Chen, Changhua; Sun, Jun

    2014-12-15

    By combining the Cerenkov-type generator with the cascaded resonators, this paper proposes a Ka-band relativistic backward wave oscillator operating under the guide magnetic field 1.0?T with high power handling capability and high conversion efficiency. It is found that TM{sub 02} can be selected as the operation mode in order to increase the power handling capability and provide sufficient coupling with the electron beam. In slow wave structure (SWS), ripples composed of semicircle on top of the rectangle enhance the wave-beam interaction and decrease the intensity of the electric field on the metallic surface. Taking advantage of the resonator cascades, the output power and the conversion efficiency are promoted greatly. The front cascaded resonators efficiently prevent the power generated in SWS from leaking into the diode region, and quicken the startup of the oscillation due to the premodulation of the beam. However, the post cascade slightly postpones the startup because of the further energy extraction from the electron beam. The numerical simulation shows that generation with power 514?MW and efficiency 41% is obtained under the diode voltage 520?kV and current 2.4?kA. And the microwave with the pure frequency spectrum of 29.35 GHz radiates in the pure TM{sub 01} mode.

  9. Prediction of a strain-induced conduction-band minimum in embedded quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, A.J.; Zunger, A.; Canning, A.

    1998-02-01

    Free-standing InP quantum dots have previously been theoretically and experimentally shown to have a direct band gap across a large range of experimentally accessible sizes. We demonstrated that when these dots are embedded coherently within a GaP barrier material, the effects of quantum confinement in conjunction with coherent strain suggest there will be a critical diameter of dot ({approx}60 {Angstrom}), above which the dot is direct, type I, and below which it is indirect, type II. However, the strain in the system acts to produce another conduction state with an even lower energy, in which electrons are localized in small pockets at the interface between the InP dot and the GaP barrier. Since this conduction state is GaP X{sub 1c} derived and the highest occupied valence state is InP, {Gamma} derived, the fundamental transition is predicted to be indirect in both real and reciprocal space ({open_quotes}type II{close_quotes}) for all dot sizes. This effect is peculiar to the strained dot, and is absent in the freestanding dot. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. SODIUM AND OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC6791 FROM APOGEE H-BAND SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunha, Katia; Souto, Diogo; Smith, Verne V.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Bergemann, Maria; Mszros, Szabolcs; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Frinchaboy, Peter; Zasowski, Gail; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Holtzman, Jon; Garca Prez, Ana E.; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David; Beers, Timothy; Carrera, Ricardo; Geisler, Doug; Gunn, James; and others

    2015-01-10

    The open cluster NGC6791 is among the oldest, most massive, and metal-rich open clusters in the Galaxy. High-resolution H-band spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) of 11 red giants in NGC6791 are analyzed for their chemical abundances of iron, oxygen, and sodium. The abundances of these three elements are found to be homogeneous (with abundance dispersions at the level of ?0.05-0.07 dex) in these cluster red giants, which span much of the red-giant branch (T {sub eff} ? 3500-4600K), and include two red clump giants. From the infrared spectra, this cluster is confirmed to be among the most metal-rich clusters in the Galaxy (([Fe/H]) = 0.34 0.06) and is found to have a roughly solar value of [O/Fe] and slightly enhanced [Na/Fe]. Our non-LTE calculations for the studied Na I lines in the APOGEE spectral region (16373.86 and 16388.85 ) indicate only small departures from LTE (?0.04 dex) for the parameter range and metallicity of the studied stars. The previously reported double population of cluster members with different Na abundances is not found among the studied sample.

  11. Method of fabricating n-type and p-type microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material including band gap widening elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

    1990-02-02

    A method of fabricating doped microcrystalline semiconductor alloy material which includes a band gap widening element through a glow discharge deposition process by subjecting a precursor mixture which includes a diluent gas to an a.c. glow discharge in the absence of a magnetic field of sufficient strength to induce electron cyclotron resonance.

  12. THE ARAUCARIA PROJECT. POPULATION EFFECTS ON THE V- AND I-BAND MAGNITUDES OF RED CLUMP STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Gorski, Marek; Udalski, Andrzej; Ciechanowska, Anna; Laney, David E-mail: pietrzyn@astrouw.edu.p E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.p E-mail: cdl@saao.ac.z

    2010-10-15

    We present measurements of the V- and I-band magnitudes of red clump stars in 15 nearby galaxies obtained from recently published homogeneous Hubble Space Telescope photometry. Supplementing these results with similar data for another eight galaxies available in the literature, the populational effects on the V- and I-band magnitudes of red clump stars were investigated. Comparing red clump magnitudes with the I-band magnitude of the tip of the red giant branch in a total sample of 23 galaxies possessing very different environments, we demonstrate that population effects strongly affect both the V- and I-band magnitude of red clump stars in a complex way. Our empirical results basically confirm the theoretical results of Girardi and Salaris, and show that optical (V - I) photometry of red clump stars is not an accurate method for the determination of distances to nearby galaxies at the present moment, as long as the population effects are not better calibrated, both empirically and theoretically. Near-infrared photometry is a much better way to measure galaxy distances with red clump stars given its smaller sensitivity to population effects.

  13. Electronic Structures, Bonding Configurations, and Band-Gap-Opening Properties of Graphene Binding with Low-Concentration Fluorine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Yuhua; Stinespring, Charter D.; Chorpening, Benjamin

    2015-06-18

    To better understand the effects of low-level fluorine in graphene-based sensors, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals dispersion interactions has been employed to investigate the structure and impact of fluorine defects on the electrical properties of single-layer graphene films. The results show that both graphite-2H and graphene have zero band gaps. When fluorine bonds to a carbon atom, the carbon atom is pulled slightly above the graphene plane, creating what is referred to as a CF defect. The lowest-binding energy state is found to correspond to two CF defects on nearest neighbor sites, with one fluorine above the carbon plane and the other below the plane. Overall this has the effect of buckling the graphene. The results further show that the addition of fluorine to graphene leads to the formation of an energy band (BF) near the Fermi level, contributed mainly from the 2p orbitals of fluorine with a small contribution from the porbitals of the carbon. Among the 11 binding configurations studied, our results show that only in two cases does the BF serve as a conduction band and open a band gap of 0.37 eV and 0.24 eV respectively. The binding energy decreases with decreasing fluorine concentration due to the interaction between neighboring fluorine atoms. The obtained results are useful for sensor development and nanoelectronics.

  14. Electronic Structures, Bonding Configurations, and Band-Gap-Opening Properties of Graphene Binding with Low-Concentration Fluorine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duan, Yuhua; Stinespring, Charter D.; Chorpening, Benjamin

    2015-06-18

    To better understand the effects of low-level fluorine in graphene-based sensors, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) with van der Waals dispersion interactions has been employed to investigate the structure and impact of fluorine defects on the electrical properties of single-layer graphene films. The results show that both graphite-2H and graphene have zero band gaps. When fluorine bonds to a carbon atom, the carbon atom is pulled slightly above the graphene plane, creating what is referred to as a CF defect. The lowest-binding energy state is found to correspond to two CF defects on nearest neighbor sites, with one fluorine abovemore » the carbon plane and the other below the plane. Overall this has the effect of buckling the graphene. The results further show that the addition of fluorine to graphene leads to the formation of an energy band (BF) near the Fermi level, contributed mainly from the 2p orbitals of fluorine with a small contribution from the porbitals of the carbon. Among the 11 binding configurations studied, our results show that only in two cases does the BF serve as a conduction band and open a band gap of 0.37 eV and 0.24 eV respectively. The binding energy decreases with decreasing fluorine concentration due to the interaction between neighboring fluorine atoms. The obtained results are useful for sensor development and nanoelectronics.« less

  15. Tuning the plasmon band number of aluminum nanorod within the ultraviolet-visible region by gold coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jian E-mail: nanoptzhao@163.com; Li, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Jun-Wu E-mail: nanoptzhao@163.com

    2014-11-15

    The localized surface plasmon (LSP) properties of Al nanorod with Au coating have been investigated by using the quasi-static calculation. Because of the anisotropic plasmon splitting and the plasmon coupling between the Al and Au surfaces, the band number of LSP in the Al-Au core-shell nanorod could be tuned from 2 to 4 continuously in the ultraviolet-visible region. Due to the non-spherical symmetry and the dielectric polarization-induced plasmon energy fading, the Au coating-dependent plasmon shift and split are further affected by the aspect ratio and the dielectric surrounding. When the aspect ratio or the surrounding dielectric constant has a small value, the band number of LSP could only be tuned from 2 to 3. However, the band number of LSP could only be tuned from 3 to 4 when the aspect ratio or the surrounding dielectric constant has a large value. This tunable band number of LSP in the Au-coated Al nanorod provides potential application for multichannel plasmonic nanosensors.

  16. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-09-14

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  17. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    2011-05-24

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  18. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    1990-01-01

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  19. ARM: G-band (183 GHz) Vapor Radiometer profiler: 15 microwave brightness temperatures from 170.0 to 183.3 GHz

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maria Cadeddu

    2008-04-01

    G-band (183 GHz) Vapor Radiometer profiler: 15 microwave brightness temperatures from 170.0 to 183.3 GHz

  20. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (XSACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  1. ARM: W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    W-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scans (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  2. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dan Nelson; Joseph Hardin; Iosif (Andrei) Lindenmaier; Bradley Isom; Karen Johnson; Nitin Bharadwaj

    Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Hemispherical Sky RHI Scan (6 horizon-to-horizon scans at 30-degree azimuth intervals)

  3. A Low-Charge, Hard X-Ray FEL Driven with an X-band Injector and Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    After the successful operation of FLASH (Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg) and LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source), soft and hard X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) are being built, designed or proposed at many accelerator laboratories. Acceleration employing lower frequency RF cavities, ranging from L-band to C-band, is usually adopted in these designs. In the first stage bunch compression, higher-frequency harmonic RF system is employed to linearize the beam's longitudinal phase space, which is nonlinearly chirped during the lower frequency RF acceleration process. In this paper, a hard X-ray FEL design using an all X-band accelerator at 11.424 GHz (from photo-cathode RF gun to linac end) is presented, without the assistance of any harmonic RF linearization. It achieves LCLS-like performance at low charge using X-band linac drivers, which is more versatile, efficient and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. It employs initially 42 microns long (RMS), low charge (10 pC) electron bunches from an X-band photoinjector. An overall bunch compression ratio of roughly 100 times is proposed in a two stage bunch compressor system. The start-to-end macro-particle 3-D simulation employing several computer codes is presented in this paper, where space charge, wakefields, incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation (ISR and CSR) effects are included. Employing an undulator with a short period of 1.5 cm, a Genesis FEL simulation shows successful lasing at a wavelength of 0.15 nm with a pulse length of 2 fs and a power saturation length as short as 20 meters, which is equivalent to LCLS low charge mode. Its overall length of both accelerators and undulators is 180 meters (much shorter than the effective LCLS overall length of 1230 meters, including an accelerator length of 1100 meters and an undulator length of 130 meters), which makes it possible to be built in places where only limited space is available.

  4. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ?r < ?e, where ?e is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ?r ? ?e/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~?e/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  5. Band Structure of Strain-Balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN Super-lattices on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J.; Phillips, J. D.

    2011-05-31

    GaAs alloys with dilute content of Bi and N provide a large reduction in band-gap energy with increasing alloy composition. GaAsBi/GaAsN heterojunctions have a type-II band alignment, where superlattices based on these materials offer a wide range for designing effective band-gap energy by varying superlattice period and alloy composition. The miniband structure and effective band gap for strain-balanced GaAsBi/GaAsN superlattices with effective lattice match to GaAs are calculated for alloy compositions up to 5% Bi and N using the kp method. The effective band gap for these superlattices is found to vary between 0.89 and 1.32 eV for period thickness ranging from 10 to 100 . The joint density of states and optical absorption of a 40/40 GaAs0.96Bi0.04/GaAs0.98N0.02 superlattice are reported demonstrating a ground-state transition at 1.005 eV and first excited transition at 1.074 eV. The joint density of states is similar in magnitude to GaAs, while the optical absorption is approximately one order of magnitude lower due to the spatially indirect optical transition in the type-II structure. The GaAsBi/GaAsN system may provide a new material system with lattice match to GaAs in a spectral range of high importance for optoelectronic devices including solar cells, photodetectors, and light emitters.

  6. Looking for Auger signatures in III-nitride light emitters: A full-band Monte Carlo perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertazzi, Francesco Goano, Michele; Zhou, Xiangyu; Calciati, Marco; Ghione, Giovanni; Matsubara, Masahiko; Bellotti, Enrico

    2015-02-09

    Recent experiments of electron emission spectroscopy (EES) on III-nitride light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have shown a correlation between droop onset and hot electron emission at the cesiated surface of the LED p-cap. The observed hot electrons have been interpreted as a direct signature of Auger recombination in the LED active region, as highly energetic Auger-excited electrons would be collected in long-lived satellite valleys of the conduction band so that they would not decay on their journey to the surface across the highly doped p-contact layer. We discuss this interpretation by using a full-band Monte Carlo model based on first-principles electronic structure and lattice dynamics calculations. The results of our analysis suggest that Auger-excited electrons cannot be unambiguously detected in the LED structures used in the EES experiments. Additional experimental and simulative work are necessary to unravel the complex physics of GaN cesiated surfaces.

  7. Halftoning band gap of InAs/InP quantum dots using inductively coupled argon plasma-enhanced intermixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, D.; Mei, T.; Xu, C. D.; Dong, J. R.

    2006-09-25

    Inductively coupled argon plasma-enhanced intermixing of InAs/InP quantum dots grown on InP substrate is investigated. Intermixing is promoted by the near-surface defects generated by plasma exposure in annealing at a temperature of 600 deg. C for 30 s. The annealing results in a maximum differential band-gap blueshift of 106 nm but a thermal shift of only 10 nm. Band-gap halftones are obtained by controlling the amount of near-surface defects via wet chemical etching on the plasma-exposed InP cap layer. No degradation of quantum-dot crystal quality due to the process has been observed as evidenced by photoluminescence intensity.

  8. High power test results of the first SRRC/ANL high current L-band RF gun.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, C. H.

    1998-09-11

    A joint program is underway between the SRRC (Synchrotrons Radiation Research Center, Taiwan) and ANL (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) for developing a high current L-band photocathode rf guns. We have constructed an L-Band (1.3 Ghz), single cell rf photocathode gun and conducted low power tests at SRRC. High power rf conditioning of the cavity has been completed at ANL. In this paper we report on the construction and high power test results. So far we have been able to achieve > 120 MV/m axial electric field with minimal dark current. This gun will be used to replace the AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator)[l] high current gun.

  9. Band offsets of n-type electron-selective contacts on cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) for photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, Riley E. E-mail: buonassisi@mit.edu; Lee, Yun Seog; Buonassisi, Tonio E-mail: buonassisi@mit.edu; Young, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Teeter, Glenn; Park, Helen Hejin; Chua, Danny; Gordon, Roy G.

    2014-12-29

    The development of cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) photovoltaics (PVs) is limited by low device open-circuit voltages. A strong contributing factor to this underperformance is the conduction-band offset between Cu{sub 2}O and its n-type heterojunction partner or electron-selective contact. In the present work, a broad range of possible n-type materials is surveyed, including ZnO, ZnS, Zn(O,S), (Mg,Zn)O, TiO{sub 2}, CdS, and Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Band offsets are determined through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and optical bandgap measurements. A majority of these materials is identified as having a negative conduction-band offset with respect to Cu{sub 2}O; the detrimental impact of this on open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) is evaluated through 1-D device simulation. These results suggest that doping density of the n-type material is important as well, and that a poorly optimized heterojunction can easily mask changes in bulk minority carrier lifetime. Promising heterojunction candidates identified here include Zn(O,S) with [S]/[Zn] ratios >70%, and Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which both demonstrate slightly positive conduction-band offsets and high V{sub OC} potential. This experimental protocol and modeling may be generalized to evaluate the efficiency potential of candidate heterojunction partners for other PV absorbers, and the materials identified herein may be promising for other absorbers with low electron affinities.

  10. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; et al

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a bandedmore » chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.« less

  11. The change in dielectric constant, AC conductivity and optical band gaps of polymer electrolyte film: Gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghu, S. Subramanya, K. Sharanappa, C. Mini, V. Archana, K. Sanjeev, Ganesh Devendrappa, H.

    2014-04-24

    The effects of gamma (?) irradiation on dielectric and optical properties of polymer electrolyte film were investigated. The dielectric constant and ac conductivity increases with ? dose. Also optical band gap decreased from 4.23 to 3.78ev after irradiation. A large dependence of the polymer properties on the irradiation dose was noticed. This suggests that there is a possibility of improving polymer electrolyte properties on gamma irradiation.

  12. Laboratory-based x-ray reflectometer for multilayer characterization in the 15150 keV energy band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windt, David L.

    2015-04-15

    A laboratory-based X-ray reflectometer has been developed to measure the performance of hard X-ray multilayer coatings at their operational X-ray energies and incidence angles. The instrument uses a sealed-tube X-ray source with a tungsten anode that can operate up to 160 kV to provide usable radiation in the 15150 keV energy band. Two sets of adjustable tungsten carbide slit assemblies, spaced 4.1 m apart, are used to produce a low-divergence white beam, typically set to 40 ?m 800 ?m in size at the sample. Multilayer coatings under test are held flat using a vacuum chuck and are mounted at the center of a high-resolution goniometer used for precise angular positioning of the sample and detector; additionally, motorized linear stages provide both vertical and horizontal adjustments of the sample position relative to the incident beam. A CdTe energy-sensitive detector, located behind a third adjustable slit, is used in conjunction with pulse-shaping electronics and a multi-channel analyzer to capture both the incident and reflected spectra; the absolute reflectance of the coating under test is computed as the ratio of the two spectra. The instruments design, construction, and operation are described in detail, and example results are presented obtained with both periodic, narrow-band and depth-graded, wide-band hard X-ray multilayer coatings.

  13. Structural Design and Analysis for a Double-Band Cold Mass Support of the MICE Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A; Wu, Hong; Liu, X. K.; Wang, Li; Li, S. Y.; Guo, XingLong; Pan, Heng; Xu, FengYu

    2009-07-01

    The cooling channel of Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) consists of eighteen superconducting solenoid coils, which are magnetically hooked together. A pair ofcoupling magnets operating at 4 K is applied to produce up to .6 T magnetic field on the magnet centerline to keep muon beam within the RF cavity windows. The peak magnetic force on the coupling magnet from other magnets in the MICE channel is up to 500 kN inlongitudinal direction, and the requirements for magnet center and axis azimuthal angle at 4 K are stringent. A self-centered double-band cold mass support system with intermediatethermal interruption is applied for the coupling magnet. The physical center of the magnet does not change as it is cooled down from 300 K to 4.2 K with this support system. In this paper the design parameters of the support system are discussed. The integral analysis of the support system using FEA method was carried out to etermine the tension forces in bands when various loads are applied. The magnet centre displacement and concentricity deviation form the axis of the warm bore are obtained, and the peak tension in support bands is also determined according to the simulation results.

  14. Temperature-driven band inversion in Pb0.77Sn0.23Se: Optical and Hall effect studies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anand, Naween; Buvaev, Sanal; Hebard, A. F.; Tanner, D. B.; Chen, Zhiguo; Li, Zhiqiang; Choudhary, Kamal; Sinnott, S. B.; Gu, Genda; Martin, C.

    2014-12-23

    Optical and Hall-effect measurements have been performed on single crystals of Pb₀.₇₇Sn₀.₂₃Se, a IV-VI mixed chalcogenide. The temperature dependent (10–300 K) reflectance was measured over 40–7000 cm⁻¹ (5–870 meV) with an extension to 15,500 cm⁻¹ (1.92 eV) at room temperature. The reflectance was fit to the Drude-Lorentz model using a single Drude component and several Lorentz oscillators. The optical properties at the measured temperatures were estimated via Kramers-Kronig analysis as well as by the Drude-Lorentz fit. The carriers were p-type with the carrier density determined by Hall measurements. A signature of valence intraband transition is found in the low-energy opticalmore » spectra. It is found that the valence-conduction band transition energy as well as the free carrier effective mass reach minimum values at 100 K, suggesting temperature-driven band inversion in the material. Thus, density function theory calculation for the electronic band structure also make similar predictions.« less

  15. Shockley-Read-Hall recombination in pre-filled and photo-filled intermediate band solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayani, Maryam Gholami; Reenaas, Turid Worren

    2014-08-18

    In this work, we study how Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination via energy levels in the bandgap, caused by defects or impurities, affects the performance of both photo-filled and pre-filled intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs). For a pre-filled cell, the IB is half-filled in equilibrium, while it is empty for the photo-filled cell in equilibrium. The energy level, density, and capture cross-sections of the defects/impurities are varied systematically. We find that the photo-filled cells are, in general, less efficient than pre-filled cells, except when the defect level is between the conduction band and the IB. In that case, for a range of light intensities, the photo-filled cell performs better than the pre-filled. When the defect level is at the same energy as the IB, the efficiency is above 82% of the defect-free case, when less than 50% of the states at the IB lead to SRH recombination. This shows that even if SRH recombination via the IB takes place, high efficiencies can be achieved. We also show that band gap optimization can be used to reduce the SRH recombination.

  16. Comparing the Performance of Blue Gene/Q with Leading Cray XE6 and InfiniBand Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerbyson, Darren J.; Barker, Kevin J.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Hoisie, Adolfy

    2013-01-21

    AbstractThree types of systems dominate the current High Performance Computing landscape: the Cray XE6, the IBM Blue Gene, and commodity clusters using InfiniBand. These systems have quite different characteristics making the choice for a particular deployment difficult. The XE6 uses Crays proprietary Gemini 3-D torus interconnect with two nodes at each network endpoint. The latest IBM Blue Gene/Q uses a single socket integrating processor and communication in a 5-D torus network. InfiniBand provides the flexibility of using nodes from many vendors connected in many possible topologies. The performance characteristics of each vary vastly along with their utilization model. In this work we compare the performance of these three systems using a combination of micro-benchmarks and a set of production applications. In particular we discuss the causes of variability in performance across the systems and also quantify where performance is lost using a combination of measurements and models. Our results show that significant performance can be lost in normal production operation of the Cray XT6 and InfiniBand Clusters in comparison to Blue Gene/Q.

  17. Multi-MW K-Band 7th Harmonic Multiplier for High-Gradient Accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solyak, N.A.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Hirschfield, J.L.; Kazakevich, G.M.; LaPointe, M.A.; /Yale U.

    2009-05-01

    A preliminary design and current status are presented for a two-cavity 7th harmonic multiplier, intended as a high-power RF source for use in experiments aimed at developing high-gradient structures for a future collider. The harmonic multiplier is to produce power in K-band using as its RF driver an XK-5 S-band klystron (2.856 GHz). The multiplier is to be built with a TE{sub 111} rotating mode input cavity and interchangeable output cavities, a principal example being a TE{sub 711} rotating mode cavity running at 20 GHz. The design that is described uses a 250 kV, 20 A injected laminar electron beam. With 8.5 MW of S-band drive power, 4.4 MW of 20-GHz output power is predicted. The design uses a gun, magnetic coils, and beam collector from an existing waveguide 7th harmonic multiplier. The gun has been re-conditioned and the desired operating parameters have been achieved.

  18. First-principles study of band gap engineering via oxygen vacancy doping in perovskite ABB'O? solid solutions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qi, Tingting; Curnan, Matthew T.; Kim, Seungchul; Bennett, Joseph W.; Grinberg, Ilya; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2011-12-15

    Oxygen vacancies in perovskite oxide solid solutions are fundamentally interesting and technologically important. However, experimental characterization of the vacancy locations and their impact on electronic structure is challenging. We have carried out first-principles calculations on two Zr-modified solid solutions, Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O? and Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O?, in which vacancies are present. We find that the vacancies are more likely to reside between low-valent cation-cation pairs than high-valent cation-cation pairs. Based on the analysis of our results, we formulate guidelines that can be used to predict the location of oxygen vacancies in perovskite solid solutions. Our results show that vacancies can have a significant impactmoreon both the conduction and valence band energies, in some cases lowering the band gap by ?0.5 eV. The effects of vacancies on the electronic band structure can be understood within the framework of crystal field theory.less

  19. Nature of red luminescence band in research-grade ZnO single crystals: A self-activated configurational transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. N.; Xu, S. J. Zheng, C. C.; Ning, J. Q.; Ling, F. C. C.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.; Skorupa, W.

    2014-07-28

    By implanting Zn{sup +} ions into research-grade intentionally undoped ZnO single crystal for facilitating Zn interstitials (Zn{sub i}) and O vacancies (V{sub O}) which is revealed by precise X-Ray diffraction rocking curves, we observe an apparent broad red luminescence band with a nearly perfect Gaussian lineshape. This red luminescence band has the zero phonon line at ?2.4 eV and shows distinctive lattice temperature dependence which is well interpreted with the configurational coordinate model. It also shows a low kick out thermal energy and small thermal quenching energy. A self-activated optical transition between a shallow donor and the defect center of Zn{sub i}-V{sub O} complex or V{sub Zn}V{sub O} di-vacancies is proposed to be responsible for the red luminescence band. Accompanied with the optical transition, large lattice relaxation simultaneously occurs around the center, as indicated by the generation of multiphonons.

  20. Coherent quantum transport in disordered systems: A unified polaron treatment of hopping and band-like transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chee Kong; Moix, Jeremy; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-04-28

    Quantum transport in disordered systems is studied using a polaron-based master equation. The polaron approach is capable of bridging the results from the coherent band-like transport regime governed by the Redfield equation to incoherent hopping transport in the classical regime. A non-monotonic dependence of the diffusion coefficient is observed both as a function of temperature and system-phonon coupling strength. In the band-like transport regime, the diffusion coefficient is shown to be linearly proportional to the system-phonon coupling strength and vanishes at zero coupling due to Anderson localization. In the opposite classical hopping regime, we correctly recover the dynamics described by the Fermis Golden Rule and establish that the scaling of the diffusion coefficient depends on the phonon bath relaxation time. In both the hopping and band-like transport regimes, it is demonstrated that at low temperature, the zero-point fluctuations of the bath lead to non-zero transport rates and hence a finite diffusion constant. Application to rubrene and other organic semiconductor materials shows a good agreement with experimental mobility data.