Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

PERFORMANCE MODELLING; BUNKER CONSUMPTION AS FUNCTION OF VESSEL SPEED.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? An investigation of the bunker consumption as function of speed is made, which tries to identify the behaviour of the relationship. A lot of… (more)

Karlsson, John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Bunker Bar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

traitor. But in China's new market economy, a traitor's bunker can be repurposed as a military-themed bar with a war room, portraits of Lin and Mao and a funky entrance fashioned out of a partial plane fuselage. The Cultural Revolution is something a lot...

Hacker, Randi; Greene, Megan

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Wellhead bunker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the production and delivery of oil and/or gas from a well, a wellhead is completely enclosed within a bunker equipped with a sump line and ladders. A top cover encloses the upper end of the bunker and is supported on structure. Vents are included as a part of the top cover to provide ventilation through the bunker.

Boley, J.W.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

4

The bunkering industry and its effect on shipping tanker operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bunkering industry provides the shipping industry with the fuel oil that the vessels consume. The quality of the fuel oil provided will ensure the safe operation of vessels. Shipping companies under their fuel oil ...

Boutsikas, Angelos

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Coal bunker repairs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detroit Edison's St. Clair Power Plant (STCPP) Units 1 through 4 are 1950's vintage fossil fueled units with an average capacity of 163 megawatt per unit. Each unit had identical 2190 ton bunkers. The Unit No. 1 bunker had been experiencing noticeable exterior deterioration at the lower level internal support system. An internal bunker inspection revealed large deflections in the network of beams supporting the bunker side walls. A complete collapse of the internal support beams was imminent. Failure of these beams would have transferred the coal pressure loads to the bunker skin and external stiffeners which were not capable of sustaining the load and were also showing signs of distress. This paper presents the temporary repair installed immediately after inspection, the redesign of the lower internal support system and construction procedures involved in bringing the bunker back into operating condition.

Emmons, M.H.; Hoffman, M.G. (Detroit Edison Co., MI (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

military  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2%2A en Military Academic Collaborations http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdefenseprogramsmilitaryacademiccollaborations

7

The Bunker Convention : International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollition Damage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of the thesis is to examine the International Convention on Civil Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution Damage – the Bunker Convention – that… (more)

Ringås, Cassia Ribeiro Naegele

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

military marine vessels’ fuel consumption. This will likelyfuel consumption for international bunkers – Chinese vessels

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Superfund cleanup at Bunker Hill: An overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report gives an overview of the history, completed work, and future work for the Bunker Hill Study area.

Not Available

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Bunker Hill Sediment Characterization Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long history of mineral extraction in the Coeur d’Alene Basin has left a legacy of heavy metal laden mine tailings that have accumulated along the Coeur d’Alene River and its tributaries (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2001; Barton, 2002). Silver, lead and zinc were the primary metals of economic interest in the area, but the ores contained other elements that have become environmental hazards including zinc, cadmium, lead, arsenic, nickel, and copper. The metals have contaminated the water and sediments of Lake Coeur d’Alene, and continue to be transported downstream to Spokane Washington via the Spokane River. In 1983, the EPA listed the Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex on the National Priorities List. Since that time, many of the most contaminated areas have been stabilized or isolated, however metal contaminants continue to migrate through the basin. Designation as a Superfund site causes significant problems for the economically depressed communities in the area. Identification of primary sources of contamination can help set priorities for cleanup and cleanup options, which can include source removal, water treatment or no action depending on knowledge about the mobility of contaminants relative to water flow. The mobility of contaminant mobility under natural or engineered conditions depends on multiple factors including the physical and chemical state (or speciation) of metals and the range of processes, some of which can be seasonal, that cause mobilization of metals. As a result, it is particularly important to understand metal speciation (National Research Council, 2005) and the link between speciation and the rates of metal migration and the impact of natural or engineered variations in flow, biological activity or water chemistry.

Neal A. Yancey; Debby F. Bruhn

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Vessel Bunkering Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,923,981 1,983,422 1,912,984 2,002,834 2,133,395 1,768,324 1,923,981 1,983,422 1,912,984 2,002,834 2,133,395 1,768,324 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 466,132 461,533 276,013 259,319 296,947 283,254 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 43,014 69,102 45,147 30,589 32,414 38,891 1984-2012 Connecticut 6,654 5,683 3,914 1,898 1,502 2,838 1984-2012 Maine 8,298 6,815 15,611 4,207 4,128 13,349 1984-2012 Massachusetts 21,336 48,094 19,193 17,529 17,132 13,612 1984-2012 New Hampshire 2,740 2,552 2,327 1,110 1,395 1,815 1984-2012 Rhode Island 3,987 5,958 4,101 5,824 8,257 7,243 1984-2012 Vermont 0 0 0 21 0 35 1984-2012 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 147,629 129,789 104,487 67,726 76,446 74,154 1984-2012 Delaware 615 919 582 485 1,658 615 1984-2012 District of Columbia 11 7 5 13 15 17 1984-2012

12

An analysis of bunker design and construction’s impact on golf course management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Sand bunkers serve multiple roles as components in the game of golf and golf course design. Bunkers began on early Scottish linksland courses as natural… (more)

Soldan, Daryn M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Stochastic modeling of mine conveyor/bunker systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time studies have revealed that in longwall coal mining the outbye haulage and the face conveyor account for 22% and 27% of the total downtime respectively. The outbye haulage generally is a layout of belt conveyors, which are serially connected. Although bunkers can increase the conveyor system availability, they may not maximize exploitation of the production potential if either the volumes of the bunkers are inadequate or their locations in the system are inappropriate. The availability of the conveyor system in a function of the bunker volume and location. Therefore the determination of the optimum bunker volume and location is important. With the exception of a few studies in the Soviet Union, and the work on the buffer problem in industrial engineering, most mining researchers have used the simulation technique. Because these studies necessarily have unrealistic assumptions, they are of little practical value. The solution to this problem is made difficult because the determination of the system availability becomes complicated because of the presence of the bunker. Although the availability of a system of conveyors can be determined by modeling the system as an ordinary Markov Process, the inclusion of a bunker in the system destroys the Markov Property and precludes the use of conventional Markov Theory. However the supplementary variable technique can be used to model the conveyor/bunker system. Using this technique a formula for the availability of a conveyor/bunker system has been developed in this study. This formula has been used to determine the optimum locations and optimum capacities of one or more bunkers in conveyor systems.

Baral, S.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effectiveness of using a filling device with a displaced middle bunker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method of charging coke ovens uses a 2-1 sequence with a displaced bunker. The coking and machine bunkers are emptied consistently into the oven chamber being charged. The charge gases are evacuated either simultaneously into both collecting mains, or alternately. The middle bunker is emptied into a chamber charged earlier using the end bunker chambers. The advantage of the new method lies in combining the consecutive emptying operations of bunkers 3 and 1 with the emptying of the middle bunker and with leveling the charge using the coke pushing machine. Time efficiency studies showed that the new method saves a great deal of time.

Konstantinov, E.N.; Martynenko, V.V.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A study on bunker fuel management for the shipping liner services  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider a bunker fuel management strategy study for a single shipping liner service. The bunker fuel management strategy includes three components: bunkering ports selection (where to bunker), bunkering amounts determination (how much to bunker) and ship speeds adjustment (how to adjust the ship speeds along the service route). As these three components are interrelated, it is necessary to optimize them jointly in order to obtain an optimal bunker fuel management strategy for a single shipping liner service. As an appropriate model representing the relationship between bunker fuel consumption rate and ship speed is important in the bunker fuel management strategy, we first study in detail this empirical relationship. We find that the relationship can be different for different sizes of containerships and provide an empirical model to express this relationship for different sizes of containerships based on real data obtained from a shipping company. We further highlight the importance of using the appropriate consumption rate model in the bunker fuel management strategy as using a wrong or aggregated model can result in inferior or suboptimal strategies. We then develop a planning level model to determine the optimal bunker fuel management strategy, i.e. optimal bunkering ports, bunkering amounts and ship speeds, so as to minimize total bunker fuel related cost for a single shipping liner service. Based on the optimization model, we study the effects of port arrival time windows, bunker fuel prices, ship bunker fuel capacity and skipping port options on the bunker fuel management strategy of a single shipping liner service. We finally provide some insights obtained from two case studies.

Zhishuang Yao; Szu Hui Ng; Loo Hay Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Bunker View: Limited-range head-motion-parallax visualization for complex data sets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bunker View: Limited-range head-motion-parallax visualization for complex data sets Andrei State tracking. #12;3. THE BUNKER VIEW SYSTEM We propose to use image precomputation to avoid high lag and low

State, Andrei

17

Bunker: A Privacy-Oriented Platform for Network Tracing Andrew G. Miklas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bunker: A Privacy-Oriented Platform for Network Tracing Andrew G. Miklas , Stefan Saroiu , Alec processing and anony- mization must be performed at line speed. This paper presents Bunker, a network tracing benefits of online anonymization. Bunker uses virtualization, encryption, and restricted I/O interfaces

Hunt, Galen

18

Quantifying kinetic fractionation in Bunker Cave speleothems using D47 Tobias Kluge*, Hagit P. Affek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying kinetic fractionation in Bunker Cave speleothems using D47 Tobias Kluge*, Hagit P. Holocene and modern speleothems from Bunker Cave (Germany) as well as modern material from the adjacent in the kinetic isotope fractionation in Bunker Cave are associated with changing drip water super saturation

19

Bunker Hill Village, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bunker Hill Village, Texas: Energy Resources Bunker Hill Village, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.7674508°, -95.5299427° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.7674508,"lon":-95.5299427,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

20

Dynamic determination of vessel speed and selection of bunkering ports for liner shipping under stochastic environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We obtain the speed and refueling decisions given by the stationary model, direct solving of the dynamic model and dynamic model solved by the modified rolling horizon approach, respectively, under all three cases

Xiaoming Sheng; Loo Hay Lee; Ek Peng Chew

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bunker callers to the port of Durban : a research into how to gain back this lost business.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The dissertation sets out to identify the reasoning behind why there has been a decline in bunker callers to the port of Durban at a… (more)

Gardner, Rob.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Sub-bituminous coal handling problems solved with bunker liner retrofit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After switching to low-sulfur sub-bituminous coal, Northern States Power Co. (NSP) experience several fires and an explosion in the coal storage bunkers of its two-unit, 384-MW Riverside plant located in Minneapolis, Minn. The most recent incident occurred in November 1993 when a blast rocked Unit 7`s coal storage bunker. The spontaneous combustion explosion was touched off when coal dust from the dust collection system was being conveyed back into the bunker and came into contact with hot coal. Reaction to the incident was swift and NSP management established a task force known as ``Operation Cease Fire`` to investigate the situation and develop a solution to eliminate fires and explosions at all of its coal-fired plants. This article describes the problems found in the coal handling systems and the steps taken to correct them.

Steppling, K.P.; McAtee, K.L.; Huggins, J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Rocket-triggered lightning test of an earth-covered munitions storage bunker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summer of 1991, nine negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes, comprising a total of 38 individual return strokes, were triggered to designated attachment points on a munitions storage bunker. Measurements were simultaneously made of the incident flash currents, both return-stroke and continuing current components, and of response at 24 test points located throughout the bunker. The recorded responses included currents, voltages, and electric and magnetic fields throughout the structure and its lightning protection system. The maximum responses observed at each test point, as directly measured and a linearly scaled to median and severe return-stroke incident current amplitudes, are presented and discussed. 8 refs.

Schnetzer, G.H.; Fisher, R.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

USENIX Association NSDI '09: 6th USENIX Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation 29 Bunker: A Privacy-Oriented Platform for Network Tracing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bunker: A Privacy-Oriented Platform for Network Tracing Andrew G. Miklas , Stefan Saroiu , Alec Wolman and anony- mization must be performed at line speed. This paper presents Bunker, a network tracing system anonymization. Bunker uses virtualization, encryption, and restricted I/O interfaces to protect the raw network

Akella, Aditya

25

A study on leakage radiation dose at ELV-4 electron accelerator bunker  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shielding is an important aspect in the safety of an accelerator and the most important aspects of a bunker shielding is the door. The bunker’s door should be designed properly to minimize the leakage radiation and shall not exceed the permitted limit of 2.5?Sv/hr. In determining the leakage radiation dose that passed through the door and gaps between the door and the wall 2-dimensional manual calculations are often used. This method is hard to perform because visual 2-dimensional is limited and is also very difficult in the real situation. Therefore estimation values are normally performed. In doing so the construction cost would be higher because of overestimate or underestimate which require costly modification to the bunker. Therefore in this study two methods are introduced to overcome the problem such as simulation using MCNPX Version 2.6.0 software and manual calculation using 3-dimensional model from Autodesk Inventor 2010 software. The values from the two methods were eventually compared to the real values from direct measurements using Ludlum Model 3 with Model 44-9 probe survey meter.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Record of Technical Change - Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Record of Technical Change, Technical Change No. CAP-1, dated April 13, 2005 for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0, September 2004, DOE/NV--1003.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

27

A holistic approach to human presence detection on man- portable military ground robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible enemy threats in a bunker, then a map showing thesethe time while inside of a bunker but produced false alarmsif it were only used for bunker exploration in certain

Birchmore, Frederick Christopher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Military Expenditure, Threats, and Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a country's external military threat; lgdp is the log ofMilitary Expenditure, Threats, and Growth * September 2003expenditure, external threats, corruption, and other

Aizenman, Joshua; Glick, Reuven

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Partnering with the Military  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ?is that two major environmental problems are being addressed at the same time. Excessive nutrients in one watershed are being used to fertilize nutrient-starved soil in another. Two ?bads? can make a ?good.?? Dr. Scott Keating, a TWRI associate... and intensity, reduced sediment loss from train- ing areas by as much as 90 percent and improved the training areas? sustainability, Hoffman said. The compost project, federally funded through the NRCS, is an example of the military?s foresight and interest...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Chemical fate of Bunker C fuel oil in a subtropical marine environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On August 10, 1993, a major oil spill occurred when approximately 1.2 million liters of Bunker C (No. 6) fuel oil spilled from the fuel tanker Bouchard 155 after it collided with the phosphate freighter Balsa 37 in a shipping channel at the entrance to Tampa Bay, Florida. Although early hydrodynamic conditions with ebbing tides caused most of the oil to be carried several kilometers out of Tampa Bay and into the Gulf of Mexico, subsequent onshore winds and spring tides caused significant quantities of the oil to be deposited on nearby beaches and in mangrove, seagrass and estuarine habitats north of the mouth of Tampa Bay.

Wetzel, D.L.; Van Vleet, E.S. [Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 214 is located in Areas 5, 11, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). CAU 214 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as ''Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas,'' and is comprised of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): {sm_bullet} CAS 05-99-01, Fallout Shelters {sm_bullet} CAS 11-22-03, Drum {sm_bullet} CAS 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials {sm_bullet} CAS 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage {sm_bullet} CAS 25-34-03, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker) {sm_bullet} CAS 25-34-04, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker) {sm_bullet} CAS 25-34-05, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker) {sm_bullet} CAS 25-99-12, Fly Ash Storage {sm_bullet} CAS 25-99-18, Storage Area The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 11-22-03, 25-34-03, 25-34-04, 25-34-05, 25-99-12, and 25-99-18 is No Further Action. Closure activities included: {sm_bullet} Removing and disposing of the fly ash and surrounding wooden structure at CAS 25-99-12 as a best management practice The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CAS 05-99-01 in CAU 214 is Clean Closure. Closure activities included: {sm_bullet} Removing and disposing of soil contaminated with the pesticide dieldrin The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 25-23-01 and 25-23-19 is Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Closure activities included: {sm_bullet} Removing and disposing of soil contaminated with chromium and soil impacted with the pesticides chlordane and heptachlor {sm_bullet} Implementing use restrictions (UR) at both CASs as detailed in the CAU 214 Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2005) {sm_bullet} Posting UR warning signs around CASs 25-23-01 and 25-23-19 on the existing chain link fence

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Risk based corrective action: An application to closure of a fuel oil bunker site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the potential risk of adversely impacting the site ground water was conducted at a food processing facility in California. The facility stored fuel oil in a 50,000-gallon concrete bunker in addition to gasoline and kerosene tanks onsite. In response to an environmental impact assessment, a site remediation plan was implemented which consisted of removal of the concrete bunker and majority of the impacted soils to a depth of about 45 ft (13.72 m) below ground surface (bgs). Some of the soil samples collected at depths between 45 and 50 ft (13.72 and 15.24 m) indicated TPH levels as high as 5,275 mg/kg. A risk evaluation was conducted for a worst case scenario to document the fate and transport of the residual compounds reaching the shallow ground water flow system. It was demonstrated that the residual fuel oil present in the overlying soil did not impact the ground water at the time of investigation, and is not likely to have adverse impact on the shallow ground water beneath the site. Therefore, no further corrective action was needed and the site was closed.

Panigrahi, B.K.; Acharya, B.P.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Military Initiative | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Military Initiative Military Initiative Military Initiative 54% of the Tribes located in close proximity to military bases are located in the West, 18% in the Pacific Northwest, and 12% in New England and New York. Map from NREL 54% of the Tribes located in close proximity to military bases are located in the West, 18% in the Pacific Northwest, and 12% in New England and New York. Map from NREL The DOE Office of Indian Energy is working with the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to help it obtain 25% of its energy from renewable energy and promote energy security by educating tribal leaders and military leaders on partnership opportunities as well as providing technical assistance to Tribes working with local military installations. More than 50 Tribes are located adjacent to or near military installations,

34

Health assessment for Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex, Kellogg, Shoshone County, Idaho, Region 10. CERCLIS No. IDD048340921. Addenda. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bunker Hill site is listed, by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), on the National Priorities List (NPL). The 21 square-mile site includes the Bunker Hill mining and smelting complexes and the communities of Pinehurst, Page, Smelterville, Kellog, and Wardner, Idaho. Mining and smelting operations have occurred in the area (Silver Valley) since the 1880's. The Bunker Hill smelter discontinued operation in 1982. The former milling and smelting operation at the Bunker Hill Complex has left behind contaminated soils and deposits of slag, mine tailings, and other process residuals. Based upon the information reviewed, ATSDR has concluded that this site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the probable human exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to heavy metals is probably occurring via ingestion, dermal, or inhalation exposure to contaminated surface soils, mine wastes and tailings, surface waters, or contaminated foodstuffs.

Not Available

1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

Russia - Nato. The military balance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This project aims to explain how the military balancing of Russia against NATO can be explained from a neoclassical realist framework. The project consists in… (more)

Skarequist, Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The military aircraft gas turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of the gas turbine for use in military aircraft is discussed. The advancing fields of component technology and engine testing are also outlined

R.M. Denning; R.J. Lane

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Monitoring of Olympic National Park Beaches to determine fate and effects of spilled bunker C fuel oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 23, 1988, the barge Nestucca was accidentally struck by its tow, a Souse Brothers Towing Company tug, releasing approximately 230,000 gallons of Bunker C fuel oil and fouling beaches from Grays Harbor north to Vancouver Island. Affected beaches in Washington included a 40-mile-long strip that has been recently added to Olympic National Park. The purpose of the monitoring program documented in this report was to determine the fate of spilled Bunker C fuel oil on selected Washington coastal beaches. We sought to determine (1) how much oil remained in intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats following clean-up and weathering, (2) to what extent intertidal and/or shallow subtidal biotic assemblages have been contaminated, and (3) how rapidly the oil has left the ecosystem. 45 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

Strand, J.A.; Cullinan, V.I.; Crecelius, E.A.; Fortman, T.J.; Citterman, R.J.; Fleischmann, M.L.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Superfund at work: Hazardous waste cleanup efforts nationwide, Fall 1993 (Bunker Hill Site profile, Silver Valley, Northern Idaho)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residents in the communities surrounding the Bunker Hill smelter facility in northern Idaho faced a dangerous problem: extensive lead contamination from decades of refining mined ores. Stack emissions caused a variety of environmental and human health problems. Other organizations intervened to conduct a variety of activities including: A lead health screening and education program; Removal and replacement of contaminated soil at public parks and playgrounds; Removal and replacement of contaminated residential yard soil; and Efforts to rebuild the local economy following the facility's closure.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The influence of fracture properties on ground-water flow at the Bunker Hill Mine, Kellogg, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bunker Hill Mine in northern Idaho is a large underground lead-zinc mine located in Precambrian metaquartzite rocks with virtually no primary porosity. Ground-water flow through these types of rocks is largely dependent upon the properties of fractures such as joints, faults and relict bedding planes. Ground water that flows into the mine via the fractures is contaminated by heavy metals and by the production of acid water, which results in a severe acid mine drainage problem. A more complete understanding of how the fractures influence the ground-water flow system is a prerequisite to the evaluation of reclamation alternatives to reduce acid drainage from the mine. Fracture mapping techniques were used to obtain detailed information on the fracture properties observed in the New East Reed drift of the Bunker Hill Mine. The data obtained include: (a) fracture type, (b) orientation, (c) trace length, (d) the number of visible terminations, (e) roughness (small-scale asperities), (f) waviness (larger-scale undulations), (g) infilling material, and (h) a qualitative measure of the amount of water flowing through each fracture.

Lachmar, T.E. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

2013 Military Webinar | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 Military Webinar 2013 Military Webinar May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis This Office of Indian Energy webinar originally presented on May 15, 2013, features a panel of U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Superfund explanation of significant difference for the Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex, Smelterville, Shoshone County, ID, April 18, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the remedial design phase of cleanup, both EPA and DEQ identified revisions appropriate for the remedy identified in the Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex Record of Decision (ROD). These revisions are necessary for several reasons. They will ensure that the remedy is cost-effective, maximizes the benefit to the environment, and is responsive to community concerns.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Maximising Longwall performance and profitability by the introduction of moving car bunker systems into outbye haulage layouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to maximize the profitability of Longwall mining operations, outbye materials handling systems should be cost effectively engineered to both fully harmonize with cyclical surges in output and to maintain high levels of availability. With the introduction of new Longwall systems into existing mines, the upgrading of outbye haulage to handle peak production from the Longwall panel can prove to be extremely expensive and is often unnecessary. In addition, despite high levels of investment in new equipment, many mines are still failing to achieve planned gains in Longwall productivity due to persistent downtime on outbye haulage routes. This paper details the planning, production and engineering considerations necessary to maximize profitability by the introduction of moving car bunker systems to underground haulage layouts. It also examines case studies of recent installations within the North American coal mining industry and charts the significant success being achieved in improving profitability at these mines.

Barlow, P.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1997 report provides information, illustrations and state-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses. 24 tabs.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (December 2002, Revision No.: 0), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 204 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which include: 01-34-01, Underground Instrument House Bunker; 02-34-01, Instrument Bunker; 03-34-01, Underground Bunker; 05-18-02, Chemical Explosives Storage; 05-33-01, Kay Blockhouse; 05-99-02, Explosive Storage Bunker. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for Corrective Action Unit 204 collectively include radionuclides, beryllium, high explosives, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons, silver, warfarin, and zinc phosphide. The primary question for the investigation is: ''Are existing data sufficient to evaluate appropriate corrective actions?'' To address this question, resolution of two decision statements is required. Decision I is to ''Define the nature of contamination'' by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); Decision II is to ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. If PALs are not exceeded, the investigation is completed. If PALs are exceeded, then Decision II must be resolved. In addition, data will be obtained to support waste management decisions. Field activities will include radiological land area surveys, geophysical surveys to identify any subsurface metallic and nonmetallic debris, field screening for applicable contaminants of potential concern, collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples from biased locations, and step-out sampling to define the extent of contamination, as necessary. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NSO

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

45

Military and Reservist | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Military and Reservist Military and Reservist Military and Reservist Documents Available for Download March 10, 2010 Rights and Benefits of Reservists Called to Active Duty Detailed description of USERRA benefits and rights for Military employees called to active duty and the HR actions which need to occur. December 23, 2009 The Reemployment Checklist (USERRA) Reemployment works differently from service activation. To exercise reemployment right and benefits, the individual Federal employee leaving active service should use this checklist. December 23, 2009 National Service Activation Checklist Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act Career, Seniority, Pay, and Benefits information December 11, 2009 OPM Reservist Differential Briefing Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act Career,

46

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Errata Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's corrective action alternative recommendation for each of the corrective action sites (CASs) within Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. An evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of current and future operations at each CAS, and a detailed comparative analysis of potential corrective action alternatives were used to determine the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. There are six CASs in CAU 204, which are all located between Areas 1, 2, 3, and 5 on the NTS. The No Further Action alternative was recommended for CASs 01-34-01, 02-34-01, 03-34-01, and 05-99-02; and a Closure in Place with Administrative Controls recommendation was the preferred corrective action for CASs 05-18-02 and 05-33-01. These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated as well as applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 204.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to Vessel Bunkering Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","New Mexico Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to Vessel Bunkering Consumers (Thousand...

48

Massachusetts Military Reservation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts Military Reservation Massachusetts Military Reservation Jump to: navigation, search Name Massachusetts Military Reservation Facility Massachusetts Military Reservation Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Air Force Center for Engineering & the Environment Energy Purchaser Air Force Center for Engineering & the Environment Location Massachusetts Military Reservation MA Coordinates 41.690386°, -70.550108° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.690386,"lon":-70.550108,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Reactor vessel support system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Tow Vessel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vessel Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTowVessel&oldid596390" Category: Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type...

51

Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Oxygen-Enriched Combustion for Military Diesel Engine Generators Substantial increases in brake power and considerably lower peak...

52

Probing Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of a Joint Field Measurement Strategic Environmental Research and Probing Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of a...

53

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals May 30-31, 2013 Image of a speaker at...

54

War Upon the Map: The Politics of Military User Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While military personnel are often involved in the design of information technology, the literature on military innovation generally assumes defense contractors are the primary producers. Furthermore, general organizational ...

Lindsay, Jon R.

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

55

Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2010 Military...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2010 Military Energy and Alternative Fuels Conference Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2010 Military Energy and...

56

Reconnecting broken blood vessels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reconnecting broken blood vessels Reconnecting broken blood vessels Name: Catherine A Kraft Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: While watching the television program "Chicago Hope" the other day, I watched a doctor sew someone's ear back on using an elaborate microscope. I was wondering if a surgeon is required to reconnect all the broken blood vessels, and how you would accomplish this? Thanks for your time! Replies: I'm not a surgeon, but I think the answer to your question is "no." The blood will flow across the wound (out the end of one blood vessel and into the end of another), although not efficiently. I believe they sometimes use leeches sucking on the end of the reconnected part to help induce flow of blood in the right direction through the area. You probably do need to put the ends of the major vessels near each other, so the distribution of blood flow is reasonably like it was before the injury, and so the vessels can eventually reconnect. But probably the microscope is used mostly to be sure the various layers of muscle, connective tissue, and fat are connected together correctly.

57

Military Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security Administration Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Military Academic Collaborations Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Military Academic Collaborations Military Academic Collaborations The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense

58

Non-Military Threats to the Alliance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I have been given the opportunity to say a few words on what could become a dialogue between the EU and the U.S. concerning the rather difficult questions of non-military threats, also called global or transnatio...

Eric Danon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Chedabucto Bay 1992 shoreline oil conditions survey: Long-term fate of bunker C oil from the arrow spill in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a description of the activities related to and a summary of the information generated by a field survey carried out in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia, for Environment Canada from June to September 1992. The objective of the survey was to locate and document any residual oil on the shores of Chedabucto Bay. The grounding of the tanker Arrow in February 1970 resulted in the release of more than 11 million liters of Bunker C fuel oil. This oil was stranded over an estimated 305 km of shoreline in the Chedabucto Bay area.

Owens, E.H.; McGuire, B.E.; Humphrey, B.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Reactor vessel annealing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for annealing a vessel (14) in situ by heating the vessel (14) to a defined temperature, composed of: an electrically operated heater assembly (10) insertable into the vessel (14) for heating the vessel (14) to the defined temperature; temperature monitoring components positioned relative to the heater assembly (10) for monitoring the temperature of the vessel (14); a controllable electric power supply unit (32-60) for supplying electric power required by the heater assembly (10); a control unit (80-86) for controlling the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60); a first vehicle (2) containing the power supply unit (32-60); a second vehicle (4) containing the control unit (80-86); power conductors (18,22) connectable between the power supply unit (32-60) and the heater unit (10) for delivering the power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10); signal conductors (20,24) connectable between the temperature monitoring components and the control unit (80-86) for delivering temperature indicating signals from the temperature monitoring components to the control unit (80-86); and control conductors (8) connectable between the control unit (80-86) and the power supply unit (32-60) for delivering to the power supply unit (32-60) control signals for controlling the level of power supplied by the power supply unit (32-60) to the heater assembly (10).

Miller, Phillip E. (Greensburg, PA); Katz, Leonoard R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Nath, Raymond J. (Murrysville, PA); Blaushild, Ronald M. (Export, PA); Tatch, Michael D. (Randolph, NJ); Kordalski, Frank J. (White Oak, PA); Wykstra, Donald T. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kavalkovich, William M. (Monroeville, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NNSA's Military Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Military Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security Military Academic Collaborations | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > NNSA's Military Academic Collaborations NNSA's Military Academic Collaborations NNSA's Military Academic Collaborations The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Programs offers a suite of activities to enhance collaboration between NNSA's eight sites and the U.S. Military Academies and ROTC programs at other universities. These programs are administered at NNSA and executed at NNSA sites, including the labs, production facilities and the Nevada National Security Site. At each location, leading-edge research and development is carried out on key national security technologies critical to the United States and its allies.

62

Usage Codes Vessel name  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Vessel name Int'l radio call sign (IRCS) Generator Other: Max hoisting Sonar Power (Kw) KHz: KHz: VMS Usage Y / N GPS: Internal / external KHz: KHz: Ratio Accuracy (m Incinerator: Burned on board: Net sensors Hull mounted / towed Wired / wireless Y / N Y / N Usage Manufacturer

63

ARPA-E: Improving Military Energy Security  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The U.S. military has a vested interest in advancing microgrid technologies that can power forward operating bases. These technologies could not only help the military significantly reduce its energy demand both at home and abroad, but also they could reduce the number of fuel-supply convoys required on the battlefield and the number of troops killed in fuel-supply convoy attacks. This video highlights two ARPA-E projects that have formed strategic partnerships with the military to enable these microgrids at forward operating bases. Georgia Tech is developing an innovative absorption heat pump that utilizes exhaust heat to provide heating and cooling, which could cut the amount of energy used to heat and cool forward operating bases by 50%. Primus Power is developing a low-cost, energy-dense storage system that could store enough energy to operate a base for several days in the event of a disruption.

Willson, Bryan; Mahvi, Allison; Stepien, Tom; Wasco, Mick

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

64

HEART AND BLOOD VESSELS CARDIOVASCULARCARDIOVASCULAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEART AND BLOOD VESSELS CARDIOVASCULARCARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEMSYSTEM SYSTEM COMPONENTS · Heart pumps blood though blood vessels where exchanges can take place with the interstitial fluid (between cells) · Heart and blood vessels regulate blood flow according to the needs of the body

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

65

High pressure storage vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

Liu, Qiang

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

66

Reconstructing society-military relations in post-Soviet Russia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis examines society-military relations with a focus on the contemporary Russian case. In doing this, it develops the Society-Military Interface (SMI), created by Stephen… (more)

Robertshaw, Sam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

CULTURAL RESOURCES SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and structures · Integrated Cultural Resource Management Plans (ICRMPs) · Archaeological resource monitoringCULTURAL RESOURCES SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML | 1490) provides assistance to military land managers for technical support in cultural resources management

68

electricity rates for military bases | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electricity rates for military bases Home > Groups > Utility Rate Hi, I was hoping to find rates for military bases, but have been unable to find anything. Are they just charged as...

69

Corporate Gray Military Officer Job Fair | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Corporate Gray Military Officer Job Fair Corporate Gray Military Officer Job Fair September 11, 2014 8:00AM to 1:30PM EDT Location: 6715 Commerce Street, Springfield, VA 22150 POC:...

70

Nanowarriors: Military Nanotechnology and Comic Books  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanowarriors: Military Nanotechnology and Comic Books Colin Milburn U N I V E R S I T Y O F C A L I with nanotechnology. The Army Research Office had issued broad agency solicitations for such a center in October 2001 what became dubbed the MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN). MIT's proposal out- lined

71

Respiratory tract infections in the military environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Military personnel fighting in contemporary battlefields as well as those participating in combat training are at risk of contracting respiratory infections. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that soldiers deployed to the harsh environment have higher rates of newly reported respiratory symptoms than non-deployers. Acute respiratory diseases are the principle reason for outpatient treatment and hospitalization among military personnel, with an incidence exceeding that of the adult civilian population by up to three-fold. Adenoviruses, influenza A and B viruses, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, coronaviruses and rhinoviruses have been identified as the main causes of acute respiratory infections among the military population. Although infective pathogens have been extensively studied, a significant proportion of illnesses (over 40%) have been due to unknown causative agents. Other health hazards, which can lead to respiratory illnesses among troops, are extreme air temperatures, desert dust, emissions from burn pits, industrial pollutants, and airborne contaminants originating from degraded soil. Limited diagnostic capabilities, especially inside the area of operations, make it difficult to accurately estimate the exact number of respiratory diseases in the military environment. The aim of the study was to discuss the occurrence of respiratory tract infections in army personnel, existing risk factors and preventive measures.

Krzysztof Korzeniewski; Aneta Nitsch-Osuch; Monika Konior; Anna Lass

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Excellence in Energy Awards: Military Academies Leading by Example  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Federal Energy Management Program honors military academies with DOE Excellence in Energy Award for innovative capstone engineering design projects.

73

Recommendations to the NRC for review criteria for alternative methods of low-level radioactive waste disposal: Task 2b: Earth-mounded concrete bunkers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Army Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) and US Army Engineer Division, Huntsville (HNDED) have developed general design criteria and specific design review criteria for the earth-mounded concrete bunker (EMCB) alternative method of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal. An EMCB is generally described as a reinforced concrete vault placed below grade, underneath a tumulus, surrounded by filter-blanket and drainage zones. The tumulus is covered over with a low permeability cover layer and top soil with vegetation. Eight major review criteria categories have been developed ranging from the loads imposed on the EMCB structure through material quality and durability considerations. Specific design review criteria have been developed in detail for each of the eight major categories. 63 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Denson, R.H.; Bennett, R.D.; Wamsley, R.M.; Bean, D.L.; Ainsworth, D.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Cultural intelligence support for military operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has long been recognized that military success relies on knowledge of the enemy. In the context of standard warfare, adequate knowledge of the enemy may be gained by analyzing observable, measurable data. In the context of modern counterinsurgency operations and the global war on terror, the task of predicting the behavior of the enemy is vastly more complex and difficult. Without an understanding of the ways individuals in the host nation interpret and react to events, no amount of objective information can provide the insight required to accurately predict behavior. US military doctrine has begun to recognize the importance of the many ways that local culture can affect operation success. Increasingly military decision makers use cultural information in the service of operation planning, and troops are provided with pre-deployment cultural training. However, no amount of training can cover the breadth and depth of potentially useful cultural information, and no amount of careful planning can avoid the need to adapt as situations develop. Therefore, a critical challenge is to provide useful tools to US personnel in their efforts to collect, analyze, and utilize cultural information. Essential functions for cultural support tools include the following: (1) to narrow down a broad range of available data and focus the user's attention on context-relevant information, (2) to present cultural information in an easily understood form, (3) to prompt the user to seek relevant information in the environment, (4) to synthesize information, and (5) to predict outcomes based on possible courses of operation. In this paper, we begin by reviewing the ways in which military operations can benefit from cultural intelligence. We then discuss frameworks for analyzing cultural information in the context of a military operation. We conclude with a demonstration of our current efforts to develop a tool that meets the aforementioned functional challenges.

Guthormsen, Nay M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mac Kerrow, Edward P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merritt, Terence [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgart, Ruth E [INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Military Communities, Hawaii Military Communities, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search Name Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii Place Honolulu, HI Website http://www.fcnavyhawaii.com/ References Solar Technical Assistance Provided to Forest City Military Communities in Hawaii[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii is a company located in Honolulu, HI. References ↑ "Solar Technical Assistance Provided to Forest City Military Communities in Hawaii" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Forest_City_Military_Communities,_Hawaii&oldid=381670"

76

Military housing foam application and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in sustainable communities. This project consists of two activities conducted in Hawaii that focus on performance, integration and application of energy saving technologies. Hawaii has many energy challenges, making this location an excellent testbed for these activities. Under this project, spray foam technology was applied at military housing on Oahu and the consumption data collected. A cost benefit and operational analysis of the foam was completed. The second phase of this project included design, integration, and analysis of photovoltaic systems at a military community on Oahu. This phase of the project was conducted as part of Forest City's second Solar America Showcase Award.

Torres, J. J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Coal gasification vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vessel system (10) comprises an outer shell (14) of carbon fibers held in a binder, a coolant circulation mechanism (16) and control mechanism (42) and an inner shell (46) comprised of a refractory material and is of light weight and capable of withstanding the extreme temperature and pressure environment of, for example, a coal gasification process. The control mechanism (42) can be computer controlled and can be used to monitor and modulate the coolant which is provided through the circulation mechanism (16) for cooling and protecting the carbon fiber and outer shell (14). The control mechanism (42) is also used to locate any isolated hot spots which may occur through the local disintegration of the inner refractory shell (46).

Loo, Billy W. (Oakland, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

la. Supplies and repairs. - Bunker C. die-,el oib. and wateragricultur- Supplies. -No bunkers are available; in emergen·3, Vessel Arrival In- cies bunkers and lube oils may be

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL.

80

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Pressure Vessel Burst Program: Automated hazard analysis for pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design, development, and use of a Windows based software tool, PVHAZARD, for pressure vessel hazard analysis is presented. The program draws on previous efforts in pressure vessel research and results of a Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study. Prior papers on the Pressure Vessel Burst Test Study have been presented to the ASME, AIAA, JANNAF, NASA Pressure Systems Seminar, and to a DOD Explosives Safety Board subcommittee meeting. Development and validation is described for simplified blast (overpressure/impulse) and fragment (velocity and travel distance) hazard models. The use of PVHAZARD in making structural damage and personnel injury estimates is discussed. Efforts in-progress are reviewed including the addition of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) hydrodynamic code analyses to supplement the simplified models, and the ability to assess barrier designs for protection from fragmentation.

Langley, D.R. [Aerospace Corp., Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States); Chrostowski, J.D. [ACTA Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Goldstein, S. [Aerospace Corp., El Segundo, CA (United States); Cain, M. [General Physics Corp., Titusville, FL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

The construction of the Browns Bay Vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES. 10 19 The Site. National Historic Sites Service Excavation and Raising of the Vessel Vessel on Display. The Vessel in 1985. 19 20 27 28 Method of Recording III THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE VESSEL 31 36 The Keel 36 The Stem... A flat-bottomed boat being built. 17 9 Forelocked eye-bolts from the midship beam of the Browne Bay Vessel 21 10 Broad arrow stamped in an eye-bolt from the Browns Bay Vessel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 11 Pulley...

Amer, Christopher Francis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

84

Report: U.S. Military Accelerates Deployment of Clean Energy...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

(GW), enabling the military to meet its goal for the deployment of 3 GW of renewable energy by 2025. Currently, solar photovoltaic and biomass installations are forecast to...

85

The Vessel Schedule Recovery Problem (VSRP) – A MIP model for handling disruptions in liner shipping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Containerized transport by liner shipping companies is a multi billion dollar industry carrying a major part of the world trade between suppliers and customers. The liner shipping industry has come under stress in the last few years due to the economic crisis, increasing fuel costs, and capacity outgrowing demand. The push to reduce CO2 emissions and costs have increasingly committed liner shipping to slow-steaming policies. This increased focus on fuel consumption, has illuminated the huge impacts of operational disruptions in liner shipping on both costs and delayed cargo. Disruptions can occur due to adverse weather conditions, port contingencies, and many other issues. A common scenario for recovering a schedule is to either increase the speed at the cost of a significant increase in the fuel consumption or delaying cargo. Advanced recovery options might exist by swapping two port calls or even omitting one. We present the Vessel Schedule Recovery Problem (VSRP) to evaluate a given disruption scenario and to select a recovery action balancing the trade off between increased bunker consumption and the impact on cargo in the remaining network and the customer service level. It is proven that the VSRP is NP -hard. The model is applied to four real life cases from Maersk Line and results are achieved in less than 5 seconds with solutions comparable or superior to those chosen by operations managers in real life. Cost savings of up to 58% may be achieved by the suggested solutions compared to realized recoveries of the real life cases.

Berit D. Brouer; Jakob Dirksen; David Pisinger; Christian E.M. Plum; Bo Vaaben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Predicting Stenosis in Blood Vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of plaque Plaque is made up of cholesterol, calcium, and other blood components that stick to the vessel-flow loop is function of degree of stenosis, even at low degrees of stenosis So, stenosis may be detected

Petta, Jason

87

Changes in Russia's Military and Nuclear Doctrine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993, the Russian Federation set out a new military doctrine that would determine the direction of its armed forces until President Putin set out the next doctrine in 2000. The Russian Federation creating the doctrine was new; the USSR had recently collapsed, Gorbachev - the creator of the predecessor to this doctrine in 1987 - was out of office, and the new Russian military had only been formed in May, 1992.1 The analysis of the 1993 doctrine is as follows: a definition of how doctrine is defined; a short history of Russian military doctrine leading up to the 1993 doctrine (officially the Basic Provisions of the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation); and finally, what the doctrine established. An overview of the 1993 doctrine is: (1) Russia's 1993 doctrine was a return to older, more aggressive doctrine as a result of stability concerns surrounding the recent collapse of the USSR; (2) Russia turned from Gorbachev's 'defensive defense' in the 1987 doctrine to aggressive defense with the option of preempting or striking back against an aggressor; (3) Russia was deeply concerned about how nationalism would affect the former Soviet Republics, particularly in respect to the ethnic Russians still living abroad; and (4) Nuclear doctrine pledged to not be the first to use nuclear weapons but provided for the potential for escalation from a conventional to a nuclear war. The 2000 doctrine (officially the Russian Federation Military Doctrine) was created in a more stable world than the 1993 doctrine was. The Russian Federation had survived independence and the 'threat of direct military aggression against the Russian Federation and its allies' had diminished. It had secured all of the nuclear weapons from its neighbors Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, and had elected a new president, Vladimir Putin, to replace Boris Yeltsin. Yet, even as the doctrine took more defensive tones than the 1993 doctrine, it expanded its nuclear options. Below are a new definition of what doctrine meant in 2000 and an outline of the 2000 doctrine. An overview of the 2000 doctrine is: (1) The 2000 doctrine was a return to a more defensive posture; the threat of nuclear retaliation, rather than that of preemptive force, would be its deterrence; (2) In order to strengthen its nuclear deterrence, Russia extended and redefined the cases in which nuclear weapons could be used to include a wider range of conflict types and a larger spectrum of attackers; and (3) Russia's threats changed to reflect its latest fear of engaging in a limited conflict with no prospect of the use of nuclear deterrence. In 2006, the defense minister and deputy prime minister Sergei Ivanov announced that the government was starting on a draft of a future doctrine. Four years later, in 2010, the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation was put into effect with the intent of determining Russian doctrine until 2020. The 2010 doctrine, like all previous doctrines, was a product of the times in which it was written. Gone were many of the fears that had followed Russia for the past two decades. Below are an examination of the 2010 definition of doctrine as well as a brief analysis of the 2010 doctrine and its deviations from past doctrines. An overview of the 2010 doctrine is: (1) The new doctrine emphasizes the political centralization of command both in military policy and the use of nuclear weapons; (2) Nuclear doctrine remains the same in many aspects including the retention of first-use; (3) At the same time, doctrine was narrowed to using nuclear weapons only when the Russian state's existence is in danger; to continue strong deterrence, Russia also opted to follow the United States by introducing precision conventional weapons; (4) NATO is defined as Russia's primary external threat because of its increased global presence and its attempt to recruit states that are part of the Russian 'bloc'; and (5) The 2000 doctrine's defensive stance was left out of the doctrine; rumored options for use of nuclear weapons in local wars and in preemptive strikes were also left out.

Wolkov, Benjamin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balatsky, Galya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

88

Russian military in the year 2000. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the use of content analysis, this paper attempts to paint a picture of the Russian military in the year 2000 and its impact on the US national security strategy. The research begins by defining the origin of Russian national security policy and how that translates into military policy and doctrine. A framework for evaluating Russian military doctrines is provided with a chronology of the military reform process and the related doctrinal reforms that has its birth in the 1987 announcement of a defensive-defense. Following from the doctrinal variant framework the new strategic missions of the 1992 draft military doctrine are presented with an analysis that shows they are a clear departure from the past and truly represent a defensive-defense type doctrine. Additionally, a comparison is made with the current military reform ongoing in Russia with the historical precedent of the Russian military reform of 1924-25. A rough outline of the separate branches of the Russian military both present and future is provided based on the ongoing trends in the reform process. This thumbnail sketch of the Russian military then assists in the analysis and conclusion that even after a possible 50% cutback in US military spending, in the year 2000 the Russian military will not pose a threat to US national security. The major caveat to this conclusion is in the realm of nuclear weapons and this issue is therefore discussed in some length....Former Soviet Union, Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), Conventional Forces in Europe treaty (CFE), European Security, New National Security Strategy, Nuclear Weapons, Nuclear Strategy.

McIlmail, J.F.; Jaworski, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning Samuel Booth, John;Technical Report Net Zero Energy Military NREL/TP-7A2-48876 Installations: A Guide to August 2010 Assessment .......................................................................................................................................1 1 Introduction: Net Zero Energy In DoD Context

90

LINCOLN LABORATORY MILITARY FELLOWS PROGRAM APPLICATION Each year MIT Lincoln Laboratory supports active duty military officers by awarding Lincoln Laboratory Military  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

national security management courses at your chosen school. Potential Military Fellows must be either(s) of interest: (see detailed descriptions of mission areas) Communications Systems & Cyber Security ISR interests you? (i.e., cyber, satellite, ISR, BMD, etc

Reuter, Martin

91

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Military Personnel Claim Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2010 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2010 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve claims related to uniformed service members' pay, allowances, travel, transportation, retired pay, and survivor benefits Tags {"military personnel","government claims",pay,"military benefits","uniformed services",overpayment} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated V33 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4475

92

Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy Tribal and Military Leaders Come Together to Talk Renewable Energy June 12, 2013 - 7:06pm Addthis The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30–31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. The DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals" was held May 30-31 in Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. Attendees included tribal, DOE, and U.S. Department of Defense representatives. Photo by Brooke Oleen Tieperman, NCSL. Attendees included tribal, DOE, and U.S. Department of Defense

93

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LEVERAGING TRIBAL RENEWABLE RESOURCES TO LEVERAGING TRIBAL RENEWABLE RESOURCES TO SUPPORT MILITARY ENERGY GOALS May 30-31, 2013 WILD HORSE PASS HOTEL AND CASINO 5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd. Chandler, Arizona The seventh in a series of planned U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development forums, this Tribal Leader Forum is designed to provide information for western U.S. tribal leaders and military leaders on the renewable energy resource development potential on tribal lands, and the opportunities for partnerships between tribes and military installations to promote energy development on tribal lands to achieve military energy security goals. Tribal leaders will also have the opportunity to directly converse with each other and key military leadership by participating in a roundtable discussion to

94

Solar energy integrated at Hawaiian military housing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

energy integrated at Hawaiian military housing energy integrated at Hawaiian military housing Solar energy integrated at Hawaiian military housing December 9, 2009 - 11:27am Addthis What does this project do? Ohana Military Communities have applied for an additional award with the intention of installing photovoltaics on 2,317 military housing units on Oahu, as well as constructing a 3.6-megawatt solar photovoltaic farm to support 2,206 homes on the Big Island. If you ask most travelers, they would say Hawaii really is a very sunny chain of islands. Many Americans have enjoyed a relaxing day on the state's warm beaches or have been awe-inspired by its fascinating volcanoes. But that wealth of sunshine powers more than just the tourism economy - it's creating green jobs and clean, renewable solar energy.

95

United States military strategy in the Persian Gulf. Study project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of Persian Gulf oil, in the context of United States national security has been demonstrated in recent political, economic, and military terms. Substantial United States military resources have been devoted to maintain national security interests in the Persian Gulf region. This paper analyzes the United States military strategy designed to insure the US and its allies continued access to Persian Gulf oil and to suggest alternatives for possible improvement. Although the focus is on US military strategy in the Persian Gulf, it also covers others aspects of US national security policy and strategy. US military policy in the Persian Gulf is derived from a complex process that inextricably links the elements of national strategy with the elements of national power. Conclusions about US policy and strategy in the Persian Gulf that are properly focused and logical require an understanding of US interests and their priorities; US strategies and their feasibility; plus US capabilities and their limitations.

Whitehead, E.E.

1989-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

96

Pantex honors military at Armed Forces Day celebration | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

military at Armed Forces Day celebration | National Nuclear military at Armed Forces Day celebration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex honors military at Armed Forces Day celebration Pantex honors military at Armed Forces Day celebration Posted By Office of Public Affairs Erhart Will Pantex honored employees for their military service May 16 with a flag

97

Titanium in fatigue critical military aircraft structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the effect of fatigue requirements on titanium structure in military aircraft applications, specifically, fighter aircraft. The discussion covers how fatigue affects the design and analysis of detail parts, and how manufacturing processes affect the fatigue performance of titanium structure. Criteria for designing fighter aircraft have evolved from simple strength calculations to extremely complex computer generated analyses involving strength, durability, damage tolerance and fatigue. Fatigue life prediction is an important part of these analyses and dramatically affects the design and weight of fighter aircraft. Manufacturing processes affect fatigue performance both in a positive and negative manner. Designers must allow for the effect of these processes on titanium structure and consider the efficiency and economy of adding processes that increase fatigue life.

Gillespie, F.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - academic military treatment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

our military families. Need... System and DOD Military Treatment Facilities ... Source: New Hampshire, University of - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,...

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - army size military Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Professor Summary: years of ROTC. There is no military obligation for attending basic camp. The army provides... 198 Military Science Chair and Professor Lieutenant Colonel...

100

E-Print Network 3.0 - army military police Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the FY09 Military Construction, Army program... The contract includes one Engineer Unit Operations Facility for 26.7 million, one Unit Military Police (MP... Public...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1 and No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 214 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 11, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, CAU 214 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-99-01, Fallout Shelters; 11-22-03, Drum; 25-99-12, Fly Ash Storage; 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials; 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-99-18, Storage Area; 25-34-03, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); 25-34-04, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); and 25-34-05, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker). These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). The suspected contaminants and critical analyte s for CAU 214 include oil (total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel-range organics [TPH-DRO], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]), pesticides (chlordane, heptachlor, 4,4-DDT), barium, cadmium, chronium, lubricants (TPH-DRO, TPH-gasoline-range organics [GRO]), and fly ash (arsenic). The land-use zones where CAU 214 CASs are located dictate that future land uses will be limited to nonresidential (i.e., industrial) activities. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1996 report provides information, illustrations and State-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1996. 24 tabs.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Relationship between Grit and Academic, Military and Physical Performance at the United States Military Academy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Military Academy in the Class of 2008. They found that grit was related to self control (r= 0.63, p<.001) but that grit better predicted completion of summer training. However, when comparing academic performance at the end of the first-year, self...-control was a better predictor (self control r = .13, p<.001; grit r=.06, p<.05). Duckworth, et al, recognized the relationships between self-control and perseverance 17 but also concluded that the difference between the two was that earning good grades...

Buller, Eric F.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Military students access top R&D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Military students access top R&D Military students access top R&D Military students access top R&D Cadets and midshipmen spend summer expanding their scientific knowledge at world-class Los Alamos facilities August 27, 2013 Military students access top R&D Micah Dose, a midshipman at the U.S. Naval Academy and a SARA intern in the Laboratory's ARIES program, peers inside the glovebox where plutonium pits are dis-assembled at Los Alamos. ARIES is the only program in the nation that disassembles and destroys surplus plutonium pits. The pits are transformed into plutonium oxide powder suitable for being made into fuel for civilian nuclear reactors. "There are a lot of summer training programs out there, but most are class-like," said U.S. Air Force cadet Dale Becker, mentored by the Physics

105

Military Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program | National Nuclear Security Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Military Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Military Academic Collaborations > Military Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program Military Academy Cadet/Midshipman Program

106

Establishing a virtual manufacturing environment for military robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent advances in the robotics industry have given the military an opportunity to capitalize on industry's innovation. Not only has core robotics technology improved but robotics manufacturing technology has also made ...

Andersen, Ryan J. (Ryan John)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office Supports Military-Grade Biofuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Our Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is helping the U.S. military increase the nation’s #energy security, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and create jobs in #America by advancing renewable biofuels.

108

ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Environmental Database Development and Management · Storm Water Modeling #12;ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML of environmental managers. The Center provides assistance to environmental managers in compliance areas such as air

109

Title 10 USC 2917 Development of Geothermal Energy on Military...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of Geothermal Energy on Military Lands Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 10 USC 2917 Development...

110

Development Methodology for Power-Dense Military Diesel Engine  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Laboratory data and modeling results are presented on a military auxiliary power unit engine that has a peak efficiency of 35.3% at an output shaft power of 25 kW.

111

Shooting up : the impact of illicit economics on military conflict  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study explores the nexus between illicit economies and military conflicts. It investigates when and how access by belligerents to the production and trafficking of illicit substances affects the strength of belligerents ...

Felbab-Brown, Vanda

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Ukraine's Military Role in the Black Sea Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the territorial sea; • protection of merchant fleet, sea oil and gas industry and other state activity in the sea; • assistance to the Army in their conduct of operations (military actions) at sea directions; • participation in peacekeeping operations. 3...

Coffman, Amy Beth; Crump, James Andrew; Dickson, Robbi K.; Mueller, Meaghan; Pulis, Sarah L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

joint initiative to address military energy use by identifying specific actions to reduce energy demand and increase use of renewable energy on DoD installations. 48876.pdf More...

114

Military noise limits: Design criteria versus operational effectiveness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Noise requirements in military environments differ significantly from typical industrial or occupational situations. Both in combat and in training mission success requires offensive equipment and weapons to be more lethal and survivable than those used by the adversary. Higher muzzle velocities heavier projectiles and more powerful engines result in high levels of both steady-state and impulsive noise and an increased risk of hearing loss for the users. Weapons firing can expose the user to more energy in a single event than typically experienced in a working lifetime of occupational exposure. In addition military operations require effective speech communication while minimizing auditory detection of equipment by the adversary. Producing material suitable for various forms of military operations requires unique design criteria often exceeding civilian national or international standards. To meet these unique and often contradicting requirements the U.S. military developed a military design standard for noise limits. This standard (MIL-STD-1474) was last revised in 1997. This paper describes the effort of the U.S. Army Navy and Air Force to update the standard to permit production and fielding of military systems designed to maximize Warfighter effectiveness while minimizing hearing damage caused by their use.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Cyber Justice From the Bunker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and virus writers to make online scams more believable, a study released this month found. Scammers Ads by Google The Real Barack Obama The truth behind the canditate - "Barack Obama Exposed" - Free! www.HumanEvents.com Jesse Jackson News Full Story on Jesse Jackson's Crude Remark About Obama w/ News

Gupta, Minaxi

116

Development of Tritium Storage and Transport Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop tritium storage and transport vessels for industrial applications. Prototype tritium storage and transport vessels were designed and manufactured. Uranium and zirconium/cobalt (ZrCo) metals were selected for the storage materials. The prototype transport container for the vessel was designed on the basis of Type B transportation package standards. The transport container was composed of a steel drum, inner packing materials, and a storage vessel. A second refinement cap was installed on the prototype vessel to protect the valves on the 100 kCi vessel. The vessel is stored in a steel drum packed with a thermal barrier and a shock absorber. Structural, thermal, shielding, and confinement analyses have to be performed for this container based on Type B requirements. (authors)

Paek, S.; Lee, M.; Kim, K.R.; Ahn, D.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, K.M.; Shon, S.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

ENERGY STAR® Operation Change Out - The Military Challenge Campaign Launch  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

STAR® Operation Change Out - The Military Challenge STAR® Operation Change Out - The Military Challenge Campaign Launch ENERGY STAR® Operation Change Out - The Military Challenge Campaign Launch April 22, 2008 - 11:31am Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Colonel Flatau. It's a true honor and a pleasure to be here today and to be able to take part in your energy-saving efforts here on base. I want to thank all the members of our nation's armed forces, as well as their families, who are with us. And I'm especially pleased to welcome all the students who are here in celebration of Earth Day. When I think about Camp Lejeune and the United States Marine Corps one word comes to mind above all others excellence. The history of this base and the units who train and live here is long and distinguished and your

118

EM Helps Military Families in Need | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Helps Military Families in Need EM Helps Military Families in Need EM Helps Military Families in Need January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here are the Christmas gifts purchased with donations raised by EM staff for families of Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas. Pictured here are the Christmas gifts purchased with donations raised by EM staff for families of Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas. LAS VEGAS - Six families from Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas recently received nearly $4,000 in donations - funds that helped provide a welcome relief during the holidays. Donations raised by EM staff at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) went toward Christmas gifts for the families' 12 collective children, ranging from age 12 months to 8 years old. Donations also provided each

119

Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans May 31, 2012 - 4:43pm Addthis Gemini's Wind Turbine Tower Rescue courses provide wind technicians with training in safety at height, emergency escape systems and rescue. This course is designed to prepare wind technicians with the knowledge and emergency procedures specific to wind turbines. | Photo by Claudia Trevizo. Gemini's Wind Turbine Tower Rescue courses provide wind technicians with training in safety at height, emergency escape systems and rescue. This course is designed to prepare wind technicians with the knowledge and emergency procedures specific to wind turbines. | Photo by Claudia Trevizo. Debbie Schultheis Technical Project Officer, Wind and Water Power Program

120

EM Helps Military Families in Need | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Helps Military Families in Need Helps Military Families in Need EM Helps Military Families in Need January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here are the Christmas gifts purchased with donations raised by EM staff for families of Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas. Pictured here are the Christmas gifts purchased with donations raised by EM staff for families of Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas. LAS VEGAS - Six families from Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas recently received nearly $4,000 in donations - funds that helped provide a welcome relief during the holidays. Donations raised by EM staff at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) went toward Christmas gifts for the families' 12 collective children, ranging from age 12 months to 8 years old. Donations also provided each family with a $100 gift card to the Nellis Commissary as well as a $100

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money May 7, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner, CPS Energy Saver, to make energy efficiency upgrades to 189 single-family cottages. | Photo courtesy of CPS Energy. A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner, CPS Energy Saver, to make energy efficiency upgrades to 189 single-family cottages. | Photo courtesy of CPS Energy. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better

122

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2006 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve claims related to uniformed service members' pay, allowances, travel, transportation, retired pay, and survivor benefits Tags {"military personnel","government claims",pay,"military benefits","uniformed services",overpayment} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 05/29/2011 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4471 Public Access Level public

123

Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money Energy Efficiency Upgrades Help Retired Military Officers Save Money May 7, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner, CPS Energy Saver, to make energy efficiency upgrades to 189 single-family cottages. | Photo courtesy of CPS Energy. A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner, CPS Energy Saver, to make energy efficiency upgrades to 189 single-family cottages. | Photo courtesy of CPS Energy. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? A retirement community in San Antonio worked with a local Better

124

Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans Wind Industry Training for Our Military Veterans May 31, 2012 - 4:43pm Addthis Gemini's Wind Turbine Tower Rescue courses provide wind technicians with training in safety at height, emergency escape systems and rescue. This course is designed to prepare wind technicians with the knowledge and emergency procedures specific to wind turbines. | Photo by Claudia Trevizo. Gemini's Wind Turbine Tower Rescue courses provide wind technicians with training in safety at height, emergency escape systems and rescue. This course is designed to prepare wind technicians with the knowledge and emergency procedures specific to wind turbines. | Photo by Claudia Trevizo. Debbie Schultheis Technical Project Officer, Wind and Water Power Program

125

Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Law Data/Tools Law You are here Data.gov » Communities » Law » Data Defense Office of Hearings & Appeals Decisions- Military Personnel Claim Decisions - 2009 Dataset Summary Description decisions involve claims related to uniformed service members' pay, allowances, travel, transportation, retired pay, and survivor benefits Tags {"military personnel","government claims",pay,"military benefits","uniformed services",overpayment} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated V32 Publisher Department of Defense Contact Name Contact Email dohastatus@osdgc.osd.mil Unique Identifier DOD-4474 Public Access Level public

126

MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel Overseeing Organization Maine Maritime Academy Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Vessel Depth(m) 15.2 Water Type Saltwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Tug: 73 ft (2)16V-92 Detroits Barge: 43 ft by 230ft Research Vessel Friendship: 40 foot vessel w/ 6 cylinder Cummins diesel engine and A-Frame crane Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 5.1 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Full onbard Navigation, GPS, marine radar and depth plotter; standard PC onboard can be configured as needed for data acquisition needs

127

IWTU Construction Workers Set Largest Process Vessel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IWTU Construction Workers Set Largest Process Vessel IWTU Construction Workers Set Largest Process Vessel Click on image to enlarge Construction of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) took a major step forward on Sept. 2, 2009 as crews lifted into place the largest of the six process vessels that will be used to treat radioactive liquid waste stored at the site. The IWTU will use a steam reforming process to solidify the waste for eventual shipment out of Idaho. The vessel and its skid, or framework, were constructed at Premier Technologies in Blackfoot. (Premier is the main small business partner for CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI), the contractor for DOE's Idaho Cleanup Project.) The Carbon Reduction Reformer vessel and skid weigh approximately 60 tons (120,000 lbs.). Because of the weight of the vessel and the location of the

128

Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the CVs. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le}100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements.

Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, Jose I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons: Military effectiveness and collateral effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper begins with a general introduction and update to Fourth Generation Nuclear Weapons (FGNW), and then addresses some particularly important military aspects on which there has been only limited public discussion so far. These aspects concern the unique military characteristics of FGNWs which make them radically different from both nuclear weapons based on previous-generation nuclear-explosives and from conventional weapons based on chemical-explosives: yields in the 1 to 100 tons range, greatly enhanced coupling to targets, possibility to drive powerful shaped charged jets and forged fragments, enhanced prompt radiation effects, reduced collateral damage and residual radioactivity, etc.

Gsponer, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Nuvera fuel cells for Fincantieri marine vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

US-based Nuvera Fuel Cells is working with Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri on a programme to power luxury marine vessels with advanced hydrogen PEM fuel cell technology.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Device for inspecting vessel surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable, remotely-controlled inspection crawler for use along the walls of tanks, vessels, piping and the like. The crawler can be configured to use a vacuum chamber for supporting itself on the inspected surface by suction or a plurality of magnetic wheels for moving the crawler along the inspected surface. The crawler is adapted to be equipped with an ultrasonic probe for mapping the structural integrity or other characteristics of the surface being inspected. Navigation of the crawler is achieved by triangulation techniques between a signal transmitter on the crawler and a pair of microphones attached to a fixed, remote location, such as the crawler's deployment unit. The necessary communications are established between the crawler and computers external to the inspection environment for position control and storage and/or monitoring of data acquisition.

Appel, D. Keith (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Synchronization of system-of-systems interfaces in military satellite communications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Military systems continue to become more complex and nearly all are now part of one or more system of systems (SoS). Military satellite communications programs have expanded over the last decade from three distinct satellite ...

Davis, Mark J. (Mark Jeffrey)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated military unit Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and tools... .574.5700 | 310.574.5752 fax | info@ict.usc.edu Military Terrain for Games Pipeline 4.11 Commercial gaming... generated military terrain for use in virtual training...

134

THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK Continuation of Military Leave and Employer-Paid Health and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be paid their regular City University of New York salary (base pay) reduced by military pay (base pay plus housing and food allowances). The determination of rate of payment for the Military Leave at Reduced Pay

Rosen, Jay

135

Targeting Net Zero Energy for Military Installations (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Targeting Net Zero Energy for Military Installations in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. A net zero energy installation (NZEI) is one that produces as much energy from on-site renewable sources as it consumes. NZEI assessment provides a systematic approach to energy projects.

Burman, K.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Superior orders: when and how to dissent in the military  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for determining whether or not the order should be followed. Case studies from engineering ethics are examined to determine what avenues of dissent are available in that field. Military examples are then used to determine which of these avenues may be useful...

Hildahl, Jessica Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Poliheuristic Theory and Alliance Dependence: Understanding Military Coalitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iraq War (2003 -) was used as the reference in much of the dissertation, an implicit underlying claim of the current research is that the findings may be extended to any broad context wherein the development of a military coalition may be a possibility....

Park, Joon Guan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

Final report for confinement vessel analysis. Task 2, Safety vessel impact analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes two sets of finite element analyses performed under Task 2 of the Confinement Vessel Analysis Program. In each set of analyses, a charge is assumed to have detonated inside the confinement vessel, causing the confinement vessel to fail in either of two ways; locally around the weld line of a nozzle, or catastrophically into two hemispheres. High pressure gases from the internal detonation pressurize the inside of the safety vessel and accelerate the fractured nozzle or hemisphere into the safety vessel. The first set of analyses examines the structural integrity of the safety vessel when impacted by the fractured nozzle. The objective of these calculations is to determine if the high strength bolt heads attached to the nozzle penetrate or fracture the lower strength safety vessel, thus allowing gaseous detonation products to escape to the atmosphere. The two dimensional analyses predict partial penetration of the safety vessel beneath the tip of the penetrator. The analyses also predict maximum principal strains in the safety vessel which exceed the measured ultimate strain of steel. The second set of analyses examines the containment capability of the safety vessel closure when impacted by half a confinement vessel (hemisphere). The predicted response is the formation of a 0.6-inch gap, caused by relative sliding and separation between the two halves of the safety vessel. Additional analyses with closure designs that prevent the gap formation are recommended.

Murray, Y.D. [APTEK, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

1994-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

Evaluation of in-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling for integral reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) for a small integral reactor has been evaluated to determine the thermal margin for the prevention of a reactor vessel failure. A thermal load analysis from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel wall in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel has been performed to determine the heat flux distribution. The critical heat flux (CHF) on the outer reactor vessel wall has been determined to fix the maximum heat removal rate through the external coolant between the outer reactor vessel and the insulation of the reactor vessel. Finally, the thermal margin has been evaluated by comparison of the thermal load with the maximum heat removal rate of the CHF on the outer reactor vessel wall. The maximum heat flux from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel is estimated at approximately 0.25 MW/m{sup 2} in the metallic layer because of the focusing effect. The CHF of the outer reactor vessel is approximately 1.1 MW/m{sup 2} because of a two phase natural circulation mass flow. Since the thermal margin for the IVR-ERVC is sufficient, the reactor vessel integrity is maintained during a severe accident of a small integral reactor. (authors)

Park, R. J.; Lee, J. R.; Kim, S. B.; Jin, Y.; Kim, H. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - army military government Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Addresses Challenges Facing the Military Community WASHINGTON, Jan. ... Source: New Hampshire, University of - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2010 Military Energy and Alternative Fuels Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation by DOE's Sunita Satyapal was given at the Military Energy and Alternative Fuels Conference in March 2010.

142

Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

Spear, Jonathan D (San Francisco, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

143

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

144

Radiation embrittlement of PWR vessel supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several studies pertaining to radiation damage of PWR vessel supports were conducted between 1978 and 1987. During this period, apparently there was no reason to believe that low-temperature (<100/degree/C) MTR embrittlement data were not appropriate for evaluating embrittlement of PWR vessel supports. However, late in 1986, data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel surveillance program indicated that the embrittlement rates of the several HFIR vessel materials (A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II) were substantially greater than anticipated on the basis of MTR data. Further evaluation of the HFIR data suggested that a fluence-rate effect was responsible for the apparent discrepancy, and shortly thereafter it became apparent that this rate effect was applicable to the evaluation of LWR vessel supports. As a result, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) evaluate the impact of the apparent embrittlement rate effect on the integrity of light-water-reactor (LWR) vessel supports. The purpose of the study was to provide an indication of whether the integrity of reactor vessel supports is likely to be challenged by radiation-induced embrittlement. The scope of the evaluation included correlation of the HFIR data for application to the evaluation of LWR vessel supports; a survey and cursory evaluation of all US LWR vessel support designs, selection of two plants for specific-plant evaluation, and a specific-plant evaluation of both plants to determine critical flaw sizes for their vessel supports. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Robinson, G.C.; Pennell, W.E.; Nanstad, R.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

Mitlitsky, Fred (1125 Canton Ave., Livermore, CA 94550); Myers, Blake (4650 Almond Cir., Livermore, CA 94550); Magnotta, Frank (1206 Bacon Way, Lafayette, CA 94549)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent vessel sign Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

three-dimensional (3-D) data, which are vessel voxel projection probability, vessel detection... probability, false vessel probability, and vessel-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio...

148

Device for automating in vitro characterization of lymphatic vessel function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 22 Figure 14 exhibits the relationship between peak pressure and Emax for the three vessels. As peak pressure increases, Emax increases monotonically for vessel 3. Vessel 3 exhibits a linear relationship (R2=0.92). The trend is less apparent.... 22 Figure 14 exhibits the relationship between peak pressure and Emax for the three vessels. As peak pressure increases, Emax increases monotonically for vessel 3. Vessel 3 exhibits a linear relationship (R2=0.92). The trend is less apparent...

Rajagopalan, Shruti

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

Thermal wake/vessel detection technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A computer-automated method for detecting a vessel in water based on an image of a portion of Earth includes generating a thermal anomaly mask. The thermal anomaly mask flags each pixel of the image initially deemed to be a wake pixel based on a comparison of a thermal value of each pixel against other thermal values of other pixels localized about each pixel. Contiguous pixels flagged by the thermal anomaly mask are grouped into pixel clusters. A shape of each of the pixel clusters is analyzed to determine whether each of the pixel clusters represents a possible vessel detection event. The possible vessel detection events are represented visually within the image.

Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nandy, Prabal (Albuquerque, NM); Post, Brian N (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

HFIR vessel probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The life of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel is limited by a radiation induced reduction in the material`s fracture toughness. Hydrostatic proof testing and probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses are being used to meet the intent of the ASME Code, while extending the life of the vessel well beyond its original design value. The most recent probabilistic evaluation is more precise and accounts for the effects of gamma as well as neutron radiation embrittlement. This analysis confirms the earlier estimates of a permissible vessel lifetime of at least 50 EFPY (100 MW).

Cheverton, R.D. [Delta-21 Resources, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dickson, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings Proceedings from the forum, which took...

152

Arms and oil: US military strategy and the Persian Gulf  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the oil-rich Persian Gulf, a region crucial to the world's security and economic health, the United States confronts major challenges to its military and diplomatic skills. The Iranian revolution, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, and unpredictable turbulence have contributed to declining US influence in the area. In the United States, military questions about force size and strategy have sparked controversy over the proper US role in the Gulf. In this book Thomas L. McNaugher offers a military strategy for the Gulf that seeks to balance the risks of overinvolvement against the risks of neglect. The author, a research associate in the Brookings Foreign Policy Studies program, believes that the United States must cultivate the traditional security mechanisms of the states on the Arabian Peninsula, and he encourages cooperation with allies like Great Britain and France that historically have been involved in Gulf security. He argues that the United States should focus on protecting the Gulf states from external attack and on deterring further Soviet encroachment in the region, leaving internal security largely to the states themselves. 19 figs., 13 tabs.

McNaugher, T.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Diagnostic Approach to Acute Diarrheal Illness in a Military Population on Training Exercises in Thailand, a Region of Campylobacter Hyperendemicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cost. Military personnel are frequently...in antibiotic selection on the basis...S. military personnel have shown that...S. military training exercises were...the receiver operating characteristic...S. military personnel presenting with...city (base for training exercise) Nakhon...

David R. Tribble; Shahida Baqar; Lorrin W. Pang; Carl Mason; Huo-Shu H. Houng; Chittima Pitarangsi; Carlos Lebron; Adam Armstrong; Orntipa Sethabutr; John W. Sanders

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

156

International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Tsinghua University in Beijing co-hosted the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27–29, 2010 in Beijing, China. High pressure...

157

Final Vitrification Melter And Vessels Evaluation Documentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE has prepared final evaluations and made waste incidental to reprocessing determinations for the vitrification melter and feed vessels (the concentrator feed makeup tank and the melter feed hold...

158

Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

Particle Sizing using Passive Ultrasonic Measurement of Vessel Wall Vibrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle Sizing using Passive Ultrasonic Measurement of Vessel Wall Vibrations Gillian Carson for particle sizing using an ultrasonic transducer to measure vessel wall vibrations and 1 #12;considers in a stirred vessel, its subse- quent impact with the vessel wall, and the resulting flexural vibrations

Mottram, Nigel

160

A review of "English Military News Pamphlets, 1513-1637" by David Randall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Dutch military news, are relatively unknown to early modern English historians and literary scholars. #2;e authors of other texts, including Hugh Peters, George Gascoigne, and #2;omas Churchyard, are more familiar to those who work in the period... to the development of printed news pamphlets and corantos in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, in this col- lection of military news pamphlets the editor David Randall explores the evolution of the form and content of military news in England...

Greenspan, Nicole

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The occurrence of military coups in Latin America: some speculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Argentina and Brazil already. Honduran politics seem to be moving in the same direction as the army has become 1ncreasingly committed against the Liberal party; the Guatemalan military staged their coup 1n 1964 to prevent the return to power of Juan Jose... economic conditions worsen (1966, pp. 617-618). Other authors point out that it is in times of economic depres- sion that there have been armed rebellions in Argentina and major attempts to overthrow the Venezue1an government (Nerkx, 1968; Bonilla...

Cediel, Maria Cecilia Canals de

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Determining the return of energy efficiency investments in domestic and deployed military installations .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this research is to determine the return on energy efficiency investments in domestic installations and military forward operating bases. This research considers… (more)

Gammache, Nathan J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A holistic approach to human presence detection on man- portable military ground robots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disposal technician, 789th Ordnance Company (EOD), explainshow EOD personnel use the Talon robot to handle explosivesof military, tactical, eod, maars, cbrne, hazmat, swat and

Birchmore, Frederick Christopher

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

China’s Military Representatives: Striving Toward Professional Contracting and Procurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toward Professional Contracting and Procurement Susan M.Summary C hina’s military contracting and procurement systemMRO) system that oversees contracting and procurement under

Puska, Susan M; McReynolds, Joe; Geary, Debra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Linear chain tensioning of moored production vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 1 of this two-part series discussed the worldwide floating production vessel (FPV) market and evolution of the linear puller concept. The three principal types of chain jack systems - hollow ram, single and twin cylinders - were introduced. And advantages of this relatively new form of passive mooring were outlined. This concluding article covers applications of linear chain pullers on various vessels, including use on an example 35,000-t North Sea semi-submersible. Chain wear and how linear pullers avoid wear associated with windlass-type systems are discussed, along with the optimization possible through use of a swiveling chain fair-lead latch (SCFL).

Peters, B. (Bardex Corp., London (United Kingdom))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Unproven screening devices threaten the lives of police and military.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a world plagued with improvised explosive devices, drugs and dangerous people, the desire to field technology to protect our police and military is providing a fertile market for the proliferation of protection technologies that range from the unproven to the disproven. The market place is currently being flooded with detection equipment making inflated and inaccurate marketing claims of high reliably, high detection probabilities, and ease of operation - all while offering detection capabilities at safe distances. The manufacturers of these devices have found a willing global marketplace, which includes some of the most dangerous places in the world. Despite a wealth of contradictory performance and testing data available on the Internet, sales of these devices remain brisk and profitable. Rather than enhancing the security of police and military personnel, the reliance on these unproven and disproven devices is creating a sense of false security that is actually lowering the safety of front-line forces in places like Iraq and Afghanistan. This paper addresses the development and distribution history of some of these devices and describes the testing performed by Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, and other reputable testing agencies that illustrate the real danger in using this kind of unproven technology.

Murray, Dale W.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

EDS V25 containment vessel explosive qualification test report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The V25 containment vessel was procured by the Project Manager, Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) as a replacement vessel for use on the P2 Explosive Destruction Systems. It is the first EDS vessel to be fabricated under Code Case 2564 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which provides rules for the design of impulsively loaded vessels. The explosive rating for the vessel based on the Code Case is nine (9) pounds TNT-equivalent for up to 637 detonations. This limit is an increase from the 4.8 pounds TNT-equivalency rating for previous vessels. This report describes the explosive qualification tests that were performed in the vessel as part of the process for qualifying the vessel for explosive use. The tests consisted of a 11.25 pound TNT equivalent bare charge detonation followed by a 9 pound TNT equivalent detonation.

Rudolphi, John Joseph

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Adjusted Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Residential Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use/ Product: Residential - Distillate Fuel Oil Residential - No. 1 Residential - No. 2 Residential - Kerosene Commercial - Distillate Fuel Oil Commercial - No. 1 Distillate Commercial - No. 2 Distillate Commercial - No. 2 Fuel Oil Commercial - Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Commercial - Low Sulfur Diesel Commercial - High Sulfur Diesel Commercial - No. 4 Fuel Oil Commercial - Residual Fuel Oil Commercial - Kerosene Industrial - Distillate Fuel Oil Industrial - No. 1 Distillate Industrial - No. 2 Distillate Industrial - No. 2 Fuel Oil Industrial - Low Sulfur Diesel Industrial - High Sulfur Diesel Industrial - No. 4 Fuel Oil Industrial - Residual Fuel Oil Industrial - Kerosene Farm - Distillate Fuel Oil Farm - Diesel Farm - Other Distillate Farm - Kerosene Electric Power - Distillate Fuel Oil Electric Power - Residual Fuel Oil Oil Company Use - Distillate Fuel Oil Oil Company Use - Residual Fuel Oil Total Transportation - Distillate Fuel Oil Total Transportation - Residual Fuel Oil Railroad Use - Distillate Fuel Oil Vessel Bunkering - Distillate Fuel Oil Vessel Bunkering - Residual Fuel Oil On-Highway - No. 2 Diesel Military - Distillate Fuel Oil Military - Diesel Military - Other Distillate Military - Residual Fuel Oil Off-Highway - Distillate Fuel Oil Off-Highway - Distillate F.O., Construction Off-Highway - Distillate F.O., Non-Construction All Other - Distillate Fuel Oil All Other - Residual Fuel Oil All Other - Kerosene Period:

169

NEW HAMPSHIRE 4-H MILITARY PARTNERSHIP The Military 4-H Club Program is a component of the UNH Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth and Family Program.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Family Program invited everyone across the state and the country to join this NH initiative and wear branches of the military. It is a combination of Army green, Marine Red, and Air Force, Navy and Coast

New Hampshire, University of

170

Ensemble Classification System Applied for Retinal Vessel Segmentation on Child Images Containing Various Vessel Profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a new supervised method for segmentation of blood vessels in retinal images of multi ethnic school children. This method uses an ensemble classification system of boot strapped decision tr...

M. M. Fraz; P. Remagnino; A. Hoppe; B. Uyyanonvara…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

EM Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task Order EM Employee Serves Military in Afghanistan, Manages $5.8 Billion Army Task Order February 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis James Hawkins James Hawkins BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan - EM employee James Hawkins is currently serving the U.S. military in Afghanistan, where he is administering a $5.8 billion task order for the Army. A major in the U.S. Air Force Reserves, Hawkins is an administrative contracting officer for the Defense Contract Management Agency, a component of the Defense Department that directly contributes to the military readiness of the U.S. and its allies. Hawkins is an acquisition planning manager and procurement analyst in the Office of Procurement Planning in EM's Office of Acquisition and Project

172

The Shanghai Six:The Shanghai Six: Milit Th t E i Alli ?Milit Th t E i Alli ?Military Threat or Economic Alliance?Military Threat or Economic Alliance?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or Economic Alliance?Military Threat or Economic Alliance? Anna BrownAnna Brown #12;Maps courtesy of Google

New Hampshire, University of

173

Application of discrete event simulation techniques for prioritization of U.S. Air Force Military Family Housing Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study, through the use of discrete event simulation and modeling, explores various prioritization disciplines for U.S. Air Force Military Family Housing maintenance, repair, and renovation projects. Actual data from the Military Family Housing...

Krukenberg, Harry J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The role of cemeteries in the development of municipal and national military parks: the cemetery-park connection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines how cemeteries, both municipal and military, have developed in America based on internal and external influences and the role that they have played in the development of municipal and national military parks, respectively...

White, Carlton J

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Simulations of Design Modifications in Military Health Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the military population. Civilian medical 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 50+ 40-49 30-39 20-29 1-19 N u m b e r o f Faci litie s Age (years) 6 leadership, such as former Assistant Secretaries of Defense for Health Affairs, Dr. W... --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ENGLISH MULTIPLIED BY GIVES METRIC MULTIPLIED BY GIVES ENGLISH 1 1.000000 1.000000 2 1.000000 1.000000 3 BTU 0.293000 WH 3.412969 BTU 4 BTU/HR 0.293000 WATT 3.412969 BTU/HR 5 BTU/LB-F 4183.830078 J/KG-K 0.000239 BTU/LB-F 6 BTU/HR-SQFT-F 5.678260 W/M2-K 0...

Kiss, Christopher William

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

INDUSTRIAL/MILITARY ACTIVITY-INITIATED ACCIDENT SCREENING ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Impacts due to nearby installations and operations were determined in the Preliminary MGDS Hazards Analysis (CRWMS M&O 1996) to be potentially applicable to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of the potential activities ongoing on or off the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is intended that the Industrial/Military Activity-Initiated Accident Screening Analysis provided herein will meet the requirements of the ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987) in establishing whether this external event can be screened from further consideration or must be included as a design basis event (DBE) in the development of accident scenarios for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis only considers issues related to preclosure radiological safety. Issues important to waste isolation as related to impact from nearby installations will be covered in the MGR performance assessment.

D.A. Kalinich

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels for U.S. Offshore Wind Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels for U.S. Offshore Wind October 1,...

178

Liquid metal systems development: reactor vessel support structure evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of an evaluation of support structures for the reactor vessel are reported. The U ring, box ring, integral ring, tee ring and tangential beam supports were investigated. The U ring is the recommended vessel support structure configuration.

McEdwards, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Microsoft PowerPoint - Mod 10a - Vessel System - final.ppt [Compatibil...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(for residual heat removal) * Heat exchanger vessels insulated (to minimize parasitic heat loss) 6 Outline * Vessel System functions and requirements Vessel System functions...

180

Forum Agenda: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Agenda for the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum held Sept. 27-29, 2010, in Beijing, China

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Blood vessel segmentation methodologies in retinal images - A survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Retinal vessel segmentation algorithms are a fundamental component of automatic retinal disease screening systems. This work examines the blood vessel segmentation methodologies in two dimensional retinal images acquired from a fundus camera and a survey ... Keywords: Blood vessel segmentation, Image segmentation, Medical imaging, Retinal images, Retinopathy, Survey

M. M. Fraz; P. Remagnino; A. Hoppe; B. Uyyanonvara; A. R. Rudnicka; C. G. Owen; S. A. Barman

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of domiciliation, number of vessels). In addition, a specific country effect is identified for Greek shipEA 4272 Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management Pierre Cariou* Francois-Charles Wolff,version1-17May2011 #12;Ship-owners' decisions to outsource vessel management Pierre CARIOU Corresponding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

183

Sustainable Military Lands Enroll in this one-of-a-kind online educational program to learn the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Military Lands Management Enroll in this one-of-a-kind online educational program. Designed for both civilian and military land management professionals, the Sustainable Military Lands Management (SMLM) certificate program gives you the key concepts for conservation and sustainable management

184

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Boron determinations in pressure vessel steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several studies have suggested that low-energy neutrons contribute to reactor pressure vessel (PV) embrittlement through interactions with boron impurities in the steel. Until now, the available information on boron contents in pressure vessel steels has been based on nominal concentrations or estimates provided by the materials manufacturers. To help resolve the question of boron contribution to PV steel embrittlement, samples of 38 different PV steels were analyzed by high-sensitivity gas mass spectrometry for their helium and boron contents. The boron contents were determined by measuring the increase in helium content in each material as a result of additional thermal neutron exposure. The results of these analyses showed natural boron contents that ranged from 0.23 to 5.11 wt. ppm in the various alloys.

Oliver, B.M. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.; McElroy, W.N. [Consultants and Technology Services, Richland, WA (United States); Kellogg, L.S. [Battelle-Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Farrar, H. IV

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Life cycle considerations in propulsion alternatives for fast vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast vessels are being built and operated for a large range of passenger-carrying applications. Fast cargo-carrying vessels are being considered in a variety of sizes as well. A major decision in design and construction of these vessels is the propulsion system; this decision has major impacts on the operation economics as well as the operational capabilities of the vessels. Factors involved in consideration of propulsion alternatives for fast vessels are examined, with emphasis upon the total life cycle operating implications of these factors. A methodology for considering the factors is suggested, and an example is presented with results of the consideration tradeoffs.

Luck, D.L. [General Electric Co., Evendale, OH (United States). GE Marine and Industrial Engines

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Special Audit Report on the Department of Energy's Arms and Military-type Equipment, IG-0385  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 1, 1996 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-1 SUBJECT: INFORMATION: "Special Audit Report on the Department of Energy's Arms and Military-Type Equipment" TO: The Secretary BACKGROUND: The Department of Energy is responsible for over 50 major facilities across the United States, many of which use and store nuclear and other sensitive materials. The Department maintains a large inventory of arms and military-type equipment to use in protecting its nuclear weapons, materials, facilities, and classified information against theft, sabotage, espionage, and terrorist activity. The Department's inventory of arms and military-type equipment included handguns, rifles, submachine guns, grenade

189

MAGNESIUM ALLOYS IN US MILITARY APPLICATIONS: PAST, CURRENT AND FUTURE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the 1940’s Mg-alloys have been used for military applications, from aircraft components to ground vehicles. The drive for usage was primarily availability and lightweighting of military systems. But the promise of widespread military usage was not met largely based on corrosion and flammability concerns, poor mechanical behavior and inferior ballistic response. This review paper will cover historical, current and potential future applications with a focus on scientific, engineering and social barriers relevant to integration of Mg-alloy. It will also present mechanical and physical property improvements solutions which are currently being developed to address these issues.

Mathaudhu, Suveen N.; Nyberg, Eric A.

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

190

Russian Military and Security Forces: A Postulated Reaction to a Nuclear Detonation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we will examine how Russia's military and security forces might react to the detonation of a 10-kiloton nuclear weapon placed next to the walls surrounding the Kremlin. At the time of this 'big bang,' Putin is situated outside Moscow and survives the explosion. No one claims responsibility for the detonation. No other information is known. Numerous variables will determine how events ultimately unfold and how the military and security forces will respond. Prior to examining these variables in greater detail, it is imperative to elucidate first what we mean by Russia's military and security forces.

Ball, D

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

191

Confinement Vessel Assay System: Calibration and Certification Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1 to 2 inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the vessels. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of SNM in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le} 100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The system was calibrated in three different mass regions (low, medium, and high) to cover the entire plutonium mass range that will be assayed. The low mass calibration and medium mass calibration were verified for material positioned in the center of an empty vessel. The systematic uncertainty due to position bias was estimated using an MCNPX model to simulate the response of the system to material localized at various points along the inner surface of the vessel. The background component due to cosmic ray spallation was determined by performing measurements of an empty vessel and comparing to measurements in the same location with no vessel present. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements of CVs before and after cleanout.

Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gomez, Cipriano [Retired CMR-OPS: OPERATIONS; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

192

GRR/Section 13-FD-b - Military Land Evaluation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b - Military Land Evaluation b - Military Land Evaluation < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-FD-b - Military Land Evaluation 13FDBMilitaryLandEvaluationProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies United States Department of Defense Fish and Wildlife Service Regulations & Policies Sikes Act 10 USC 2684a - Agreements to limit encroachments and other constraints on military training, testing and operations Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13FDBMilitaryLandEvaluationProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative

193

EA-1606: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

06: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military 06: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, South Carolina EA-1606: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, South Carolina Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security to use the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina, for military training purposes. For more information, contact: Mr. Andrew R. Grainger NEPA Compliance Officer U. S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office Building 730-1B, Room 3150 Aiken, SC 29808 Telephone: 803-952-8001 Fax/telephone: 1-800-881-7292 Electronic mail: nepa@srs.gov Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - active duty military Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

military leave to employees who are called to active duty in accordance with the terms described below... of the two for the remainder of the active duty period. (See...

195

A versatile simulation tool for the design and verification of military vehicle power systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modes of operation and system scenarios) and system performance in a dynamic, realistic environment. This thesis proposes a new tool to analyze and design military vehicle platforms: the Advanced Mobile Integrated Power System (AMPS). This tool is useful...

Lipscomb, Melissa Anne

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Report: U.S. Military Accelerates Deployment of Clean Energy Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Deployment of clean energy technologies is accelerating across military installations operated by the U.S. Department of Defense, according to a report released by The Pew Charitable Trusts.

197

Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

In 2008, DoD and DOE defined a joint initiative to address military energy use by identifying specific actions to reduce energy demand and increase use of renewable energy on DoD installations.

198

The Military Health Care System May Have the Potential to Prevent Health Care Disparities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The existence of health disparities in military populations has become an important topic of research. However, to our knowledge, this is the first study to examine health disparities, as related to access to ...

Bosny J. Pierre-Louis; Angelo D. Moore…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

In Silico Investigation of Intracranial Blast Mitigation with Relevance to Military Traumatic Brain Injury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blast-induced traumatic brain injury is the most prevalent military injury in Iraq and Afghanistan, yet little is known about the mechanical effects of blasts on the human head, and still less is known about how personal ...

Nyein, Michelle K.

200

Development of rapidly deployable structures for military applications : a system based approach to command post facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Today's battlespace is the most dynamic in recorded history. Accompanying other military improvements, Command and Control (C2) technology has also been modernized. In spite of advances in technology, it currently takes ...

Hopping, Jakob A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Meeting Our Partners in Saudi Arabia and U.S. Military Forces...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

was made possible by working diligently to identify common-sense ways to reduce energy usage and successfully spreading the word among the nearly 8,000 U.S. military...

202

Optimization-based routing and scheduling of IED-detection assets in contemporary military operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improvised Explosive Devices, or IEDs, have become a familiar and lethal part of contemporary military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, producing more casualties than any other weapons system. One reason for their success ...

Marks, Christopher E. (Christopher Edward)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Francis H. Smith: architect of antebellum southern military schools and educational reform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

succeeded in Vermont, his attempts to create similar academies in the South all failed as they could not compete with VMI and other subsequent schools utilizing Smith’s model. In sum, the success of Southern military education should be credited... succeeded in Vermont, his attempts to create similar academies in the South all failed as they could not compete with VMI and other subsequent schools utilizing Smith’s model. In sum, the success of Southern military education should be credited...

Wineman, Bradford Alexander

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

United States military involvement and the armed forces in the Dominican Republic, 1916 to 1966  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and the macrosociological attempt by Germani (1974), to provide generalizable interpretations of the relationships between political development, social structures, and military elite behavior in Latin America. A brief conceptual suggestion made by Weaver (1973... be then advanced that the core combination is controlled by military groups when the use of coercion must be made and other groups are unable to maintain predominance . The concept of "institutional vaccuum" is used by Germani and Silvert (1976:35), to identify...

Jimenez, Luis Augusto

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005 (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

H.R. 4837, The Military Construction Appropriations and Emergency Hurricane Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2005, was signed into law on October 13, 2004. The Act provides for construction to support the operations of the U.S. Armed Forces and for military family housing. It also provides funds to help citizens in Florida and elsewhere in the aftermath of multiple hurricanes and other natural disasters. In addition, it authorizes construction of an Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A critical appraisal of Byzantine military strategy, 400 - 1000 A.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of England, and Richard Lionheart, among others, and his precepts were studied by all serious military leaders. " His writings were translated into French, English, and Bulgarian throughout the Middle Ages, and a printed edition was published in Utrecht... of England, and Richard Lionheart, among others, and his precepts were studied by all serious military leaders. " His writings were translated into French, English, and Bulgarian throughout the Middle Ages, and a printed edition was published in Utrecht...

Bacon, Peter Kirk

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

207

Characterization, Weathering, and Application of Sesquiterpanes to Source Identification of Spilled Lighter Petroleum Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Finally, two case studies are presented to illustrate the unique utility of sesquiterpanes for fingerprinting and identifying unknown diesel spills. ... A thick layer of oil (Sample 2) was found between a bunker boat and the quay next to the bunker center, and it was suspected that something had gone wrong during the bunkering of the vessel. ... Employees of the ship and the bunker center, however, both disclaimed responsibility for the spill. ...

Zhendi Wang; Chun Yang; Merv Fingas; Bruce Hollebone; Xianzhi Peng; Asger B. Hansen; Jan H. Christensen

2005-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

Water Quality Impacts of Bunker Silos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:1 with fresh water when applying to growing crops to avoid burn-out. Pump to manure pit and land spread. Due

Balser, Teri C.

209

Autonomous Radiation Monitoring of Small Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small private vessels are one avenue by which nuclear materials may be smuggled across international borders. While one can contemplate using the terrestrial approach of radiation portal monitors on the navigable waterways that lead to many ports, these systems are ill-suited to the problem. They require vehicles to pass at slow speeds between two closely-spaced radiation sensors, relying on the uniformity of vehicle sizes to space the detectors, and on proximity to link an individual vehicle to its radiation signature. In contrast to roadways where lanes segregate vehicles, and motion is well controlled by inspection booths; channels, inlets, and rivers present chaotic traffic patterns populated by vessels of all sizes. We have developed a unique solution to this problem based on our portal-less portal monitor instrument that is designed to handle free-flowing traffic on roadways with up to five-traffic lanes. The instrument uses a combination of visible-light and gamma-ray imaging to acquire and link radiation images to individual vehicles. It was recently tested in a maritime setting. In this paper we present the instrument, how it functions, and the results of the recent tests.

Fabris, Lorenzo [ORNL; Hornback, Donald Eric [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) Vessel Relocated after 50 years.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Printer Friendly Printer Friendly Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) Vessel Relocated Engineering Test Reactor Vessel Pre-startup 1957 Click on image to enlarge. Image 1 of 5 Gantry jacks attached to ETR vessel. Initial lift starts. - Click on image to enlarge. Image 2 of 5 ETR vessel removed from substructure. Vessel lifted approximately 40 ft. - Click on image to enlarge. On Monday, September 24, 2007 the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) vessel was removed from its location and delivered to the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). The long history of the ETR began for this water-cooled reactor with its start up in 1957, after taking only 2 years to build. According to "Proving the Principles," by Susan M. Stacy: When the Engineering Test Reactor started up at the Test Reactor Area in

211

Application of Computational Physics: Blood Vessel Constrictions and Medical Infuses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of computation in many fields are growing fast in last two decades. Increasing on computation performance helps researchers to understand natural phenomena in many fields of science and technology including in life sciences. Computational fluid dynamic is one of numerical methods which is very popular used to describe those phenomena. In this paper we propose moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) and molecular dynamics (MD) to describe different phenomena in blood vessel. The effect of increasing the blood pressure on vessel wall will be calculate using MD methods, while the two fluid blending dynamics will be discussed using MPS. Result from the first phenomenon shows that around 80% of constriction on blood vessel make blood vessel increase and will start to leak on vessel wall, while from the second phenomenon the result shows the visualization of two fluids mixture (drugs and blood) influenced by ratio of drugs debit to blood debit. Keywords: molecular dynamic, blood vessel, fluid dynamic, movin...

Suprijadi,; Subekti, Petrus; Viridi, Sparisoma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as international marine bunker fuel. For the remaining 5% ofOf the distillate fuel consumed by all marine vessels, weresidual fuel oil from international marine travel. However,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Design and dimensioning of pressure vessel for a marine substation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis presents the mechanical design and dimensioning of a pressure vessel, which is to be used as housing for a marine substation in… (more)

Eriksson, Lars

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Webinar: Material Characterization of Storage Vessels for Fuel Cell Forklifts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording of the webinar titled, Material Characterization of Storage Vessels for Fuel Cell Forklifts, originally presented on August 14, 2012.

215

A Xenon Condenser with a Remote Liquid Storage Vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the design and operation of a system for xenon liquefaction in which the condenser is separated from the liquid storage vessel. The condenser is cooled by a pulse tube cryocooler, while the vessel is cooled only by the liquid xenon itself. This arrangement facilitates liquid particle detector research by allowing easy access to the upper and lower flanges of the vessel. We find that an external xenon gas pump is useful for increasing the rate at which cooling power is delivered to the vessel, and we present measurements of the power and efficiency of the apparatus.

S. Slutsky; Y. -R. Yen; H. Breuer; A. Dobi; C. Hall; T. Langford; D. S. Leonard; L. J. Kaufman; V. Strickland; N. Voskanian

2009-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

216

Gays and Lesbians at War: Military Service in Iraq and Afghanistan Under “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AT WAR: MILITARY SERVICE IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN UNDER “DON’wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Despite widespread knowledgeused before sites in Iraq and Afghanistan were improved, as

Frank, Nathaniel

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

Graves, Van B [ORNL; Dayton, Michael J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso geothermal field in southern California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An overview of industry-military cooperation in the development of power operations at the Coso geothermal field in southern California Abstract The Coso Geothermal Field, located in east central California, hosts a world-class power-generating project that has been in continuous operation for the past 15 years. The project is located on the test and evaluation ranges of the Naval Air Weapons Station, China Lake-the Navy's premier research and development (R&D) facility for air-to-air and air-to-ground ordnance. Fully financed by private investment, the Coso geothermal power

220

ARPA-E and the Military Team Up on New Technologies and Summit Partnerships  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and the Military Team Up on New Technologies and Summit and the Military Team Up on New Technologies and Summit Partnerships ARPA-E and the Military Team Up on New Technologies and Summit Partnerships January 31, 2013 - 1:06pm Addthis Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus speaks to attendees at the 2011 Energy Innovation Summit in Washington, DC. | Energy Department photo. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus speaks to attendees at the 2011 Energy Innovation Summit in Washington, DC. | Energy Department photo. Alexa McClanahan Communications Support Contractor to ARPA-E What are the key facts? ARPA-E and the Navy are funding development of HVAC technology that could achieve 20-50% better fuel efficiency for soldiers in extreme conditions. Learn more about Defense Department and ARPA-E collaborations at the 2013 Energy Innovation Summit, held Feb. 25-27 outside Washington, DC.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Net Zero Energy Military Net Zero Energy Military Installations: A Guide to Assessment and Planning Samuel Booth, John Barnett, Kari Burman, Josh Hambrick and Robert Westby Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-48876 August 2010 Technical Report Net Zero Energy Military NREL/TP-7A2-48876 Installations: A Guide to August 2010 Assessment and Planning Samuel Booth, John Barnett, Kari Burman, Josh Hambrick and Robert Westby Prepared under Task No. IDOD.1010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

222

Second highest-ranking U.S. military officer gets classified briefings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. military officer gets classified briefings U.S. military officer gets classified briefings Second highest-ranking U.S. military officer gets classified briefings Winnefield was at Los Alamos to receive a wide variety of classified briefings that covered the broad spectrum of national security science at the Lab. November 17, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

223

Military confidence building on the Korean Peninsula: possible first steps toward cooperation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Korean Peninsula is one of the world`s most tense military confrontational sites. Nearly 2 million North Korean, South Korean, and U.S. troops face each other along the 255-km long military demarcation line. Confidence building measures (CBMs), particularly military ones, that address the security needs of both countries could decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment where a peace regime might be negotiated. In spite of the present high level of mutual distrust, steps can still be taken to prepare for future development and implementation of CBMs. This paper defines some simple and specific first steps toward CBMs that might be useful on the Korean Peninsula.

Vannoni, M.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Th' invisible artilery: military images in the poems of Andrew Marvell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"TH' INVISIBLE ARTILERY": MILITARY IMAGES IN THE POEMS OF ANDREW MARVELL A Thesis by GEORGE ROBERT GAGNON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Hniversity in partial fuli'illment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS... DECEMBER 1985 Ma)or Sub)ect: English "TH' INVISIBLE ARTILERYe. MILITARY IMAGES IN THE POEMS OF ANDREW MARVELL A Thesis by GEORGE ROBERT GAGNON Approved as to style and content by: St ley L. rcher (Chairman of Committee) Paul A. P rish (Membe...

Gagnon, George Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Three Military Bases Partner with Energy Department to Train Veterans for Solar Jobs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Today, the first class of Marine trainees at Camp Pendleton will graduate from the Energy Department’s solar job training pilot program, which is aimed at preparing service members for careers in the solar industry as solar photovoltaic system installers, sales representatives, system inspectors, and other solar-related opportunities. Camp Pendleton is one of three military bases partnering with the Department’s SunShot Initiative to train 200 transitioning military service members during the pilot period for employment opportunities in the rapidly growing U.S. solar energy industry. Training courses will also begin at Fort Carson and Naval Station Norfolk this spring.

226

Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Wuerzburg Military Community. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report is submitted in accordance with the Schedule of Title I Services for Contract DACA 90-81-C-0094 Energy Engineering Analysis Program FY 81 OMA, EEAP 007, Aschaffenburg, Wuerzburg, and Schweinfurt Military Communities, and as amended by Addenda Nos. 1, 2, and 3 to Appendix A and the resume of Negotiations. The purpose of the Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) is to develop a comprehensive plan for the use of energy and to identify energy conservation projects at each of the military communities.

NONE

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Packaging & Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Head replacements have come to the forefront due to erosion/corrosion and wastage problems resulting from the susceptibility of the RPV Head alloy steel material to water/boric acid corrosion from reactor coolant leakage through the various RPV Head penetrations. A case in point is the recent Davis-Besse RPV Head project, where detailed inspections in early 2002 revealed significant wastage of head material adjacent to one of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzles. In lieu of making ASME weld repairs to the damaged head, Davis-Besse made the decision to replace the RPV Head. The decision was made on the basis that the required weld repair would be too extensive and almost impractical. This paper presents the packaging, transport, and disposal considerations for the damaged Davis-Besse RPV Head. It addresses the requirements necessary to meet Davis Besse needs, as well as the regulatory criteria, for shipping and burial of the head. It focuses on the radiological characterization, shipping/disposal package design, site preparation and packaging, and the transportation and emergency response plans that were developed for the Davis-Besse RPV Head project.

Wheeler, D. M.; Posivak, E.; Freitag, A.; Geddes, B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

228

Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

Johnson, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Lipinski, R.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reactor Vessel and Reactor Vessel Internals Segmentation at Zion Nuclear Power Station - 13230  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) is a dual-unit Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, in the city of Zion, Illinois approximately 64 km (40 miles) north of Chicago, Illinois and 67 km (42 miles) south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Each PWR is of the Westinghouse design and had a generation capacity of 1040 MW. Exelon Corporation operated both reactors with the first unit starting production of power in 1973 and the second unit coming on line in 1974. The operation of both reactors ceased in 1996/1997. In 2010 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the transfer of Exelon Corporation's license to ZionSolutions, the Long Term Stewardship subsidiary of EnergySolutions responsible for the decommissioning of ZNPS. In October 2010, ZionSolutions awarded Siempelkamp Nuclear Services, Inc. (SNS) the contract to plan, segment, remove, and package both reactor vessels and their respective internals. This presentation discusses the tools employed by SNS to remove and segment the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) and Reactor Vessels (RV) and conveys the recent progress. SNS's mechanical segmentation tooling includes the C-HORCE (Circumferential Hydraulically Operated Cutting Equipment), BMT (Bolt Milling Tool), FaST (Former Attachment Severing Tool) and the VRS (Volume Reduction Station). Thermal segmentation of the reactor vessels will be accomplished using an Oxygen- Propane cutting system. The tools for internals segmentation were designed by SNS using their experience from other successful reactor and large component decommissioning and demolition (D and D) projects in the US. All of the designs allow for the mechanical segmentation of the internals remotely in the water-filled reactor cavities. The C-HORCE is designed to saw seven circumferential cuts through the Core Barrel and Thermal Shield walls with individual thicknesses up to 100 mm (4 inches). The BMT is designed to remove the bolts that fasten the Baffle Plates to the Baffle Former Plates. The FaST is designed to remove the Baffle Former Plates from the Core Barrel. The VRS further volume reduces segmented components using multiple configurations of the 38i and horizontal reciprocating saws. After the successful removal and volume reduction of the Internals, the RV will be segmented using a 'First in the US' thermal cutting process through a co-operative effort with Siempelkamp NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH using their experience at the Stade NPP and Karlsruhe in Germany. SNS mobilized in the fall of 2011 to commence execution of the project in order to complete the RVI segmentation, removal and packaging activities for the first unit (Unit 2) by end of the 2012/beginning 2013 and then mobilize to the second unit, Unit 1. Parallel to the completion of the segmentation of the reactor vessel internals at Unit 1, SNS will segment the Unit 2 pressure vessel and at completion move to Unit 1. (authors)

Cooke, Conrad; Spann, Holger [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)] [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):251260, Fall 2014 Wildlife strikes with U.S. military rotary-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but unstudied, physical hazard to military rotary-wing aircraft used in conducting overseas flight operations to military rotary-wing aircraft during these operations has been conducted. The objectives of this project deployed overseas to conduct a variety of noncombat and combat missions. Our objective was to conduct

231

PERFORMANCE OF A CONTAINMENT VESSEL CLOSURE FOR RADIOACTIVE GAS CONTENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a summary of the design and testing of the containment vessel closure for the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP). This package is a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The containment vessel closure incorporates features specifically designed for the containment of tritium when subjected to the normal and hypothetical conditions required of Type B radioactive material shipping Packages. The paper discusses functional performance of the containment vessel closure of the BTSP prototype packages and separate testing that evaluated the performance of the metallic C-Rings used in a mock BTSP closure.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

232

Nondestructive Technique Survey for Assessing Integrity of Composite Firing Vessel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The repeated use and limited lifetime of a composite tiring vessel compel a need to survey techniques for monitoring the structural integrity of the vessel in order to determine when it should be retired. Various nondestructive techniques were researched and evaluated based on their applicability to the vessel. The methods were visual inspection, liquid penetrant testing, magnetic particle testing, surface mounted strain gauges, thermal inspection, acoustic emission, ultrasonic testing, radiography, eddy current testing, and embedded fiber optic sensors. It was determined that embedded fiber optic sensor is the most promising technique due to their ability to be embedded within layers of composites and their immunity to electromagnetic interference.

Tran, A.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Berth allocation considering fuel consumption and vessel emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a more elaborate model on berth allocation considering fuel consumption than before, and overcome the nonlinear complexity by casting it as a mixed integer second order cone programming model. Furthermore, we conduct the vessel emission (in sailing periods) calculation with the widely-used emission factors. Besides, vessel emissions in mooring periods are also analyzed through a post-optimization phase on waiting time. Experimental results demonstrate that the new berth allocation strategy, reflected by the proposed model, is competent to significantly reduce fuel consumption and vessel emissions, while simultaneously retaining the service level of the terminal.

Yuquan Du; Qiushuang Chen; Xiongwen Quan; Lei Long; Richard Y.K. Fung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

Powell, James G. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

Powell, J.G.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

236

Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

237

Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY)

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

238

E-Print Network 3.0 - anca-associated small vessel Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health Vessel... of the Vessel Sanitation Program The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's ... Source: National...

239

Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Sector: Executive Summary Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind Sector: Executive Summary Executive summary of the Assessment of Vessel Requirements for...

240

Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 10,706,479 8,341,552 6,908,028 7,233,765 6,358,120 6,022,115 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 5,527,235 4,043,975 2,972,575 2,994,245 2,397,932 2,019,294 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 614,965 435,262 281,895 218,926 150,462 101,957 1984-2012 Connecticut 88,053 33,494 31,508 41,686 6,534 5,540 1984-2012 Maine 152,082 110,648 129,181 92,567 83,603 49,235 1984-2012 Massachusetts 300,530 230,057 59,627 52,228 34,862 30,474 1984-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Assessing biodiversity conservation conflict on military installations Grace D. Lee Jenni a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing biodiversity conservation conflict on military installations Grace D. Lee Jenni a, , M for biodiversity conservation given the US mili- tary alone manages over 12 million ha of land providing habitat can be addressed by both acknowledging biodiversity conservation conflict exists and allowing dissent

Peterson, M. Nils

242

Sponsor a youth-focused program such as a Military Family Day, which  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Army Youth Development Project under Kansas State University special project # 2007-48661-03868. All programs include many types of OMK events for military kids and families. 4-H Project workshops, camping experi These backpacks are filled with stationery, journals, Liberty Bear and a variety of other items for children

Florida, University of

243

Energy Department Joins Navy and Agriculture Departments to Invest in Drop-In Biofuel for Military  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman joined Tom Vilsack, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Secretary Ray Mabus of the U.S. Department of Navy, on September 19, 2014, to announce awards for three commercial-scale biorefinery projects that will help meet the transportation needs of the U.S. military and private sector.

244

U.S. military action in Panama: justifying OPERATION JUST CAUSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The project of this thesis is a moral evaluation of OPERATION JUST CAUSE, the United States' use of military force in Panama in 1989. I begin by arguing that just war theory, both in its classic and contemporary forms, needs to be revised...

Reich, Theodore Herman

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

245

US military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in order to bring the price of oil closer to its marginal social cost. There is in fact a long historyUS military expenditures to protect the use of Persian Gulf oil for motor vehicles Mark A. Delucchi l e i n f o Article history: Received 7 May 2007 Accepted 3 March 2008 Available online 21 April

Murphy, James J.

246

Experiment Hazard Class 5.3 High Pressure Vessels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 High Pressure Vessels 3 High Pressure Vessels Applicability This hazard classification applies to working with pressure vessels and systems. Other hazard classifications and associated controls may apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls are catergorized as medium risk experiments. Experiments involving new equipment, processes or materials, or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk experiments. Hazard Control Plan Verification Statements Engineered Controls - The establishment of applicable controls in accordance with the (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ASME Boiler and Pressure Code, ASME B.31 Piping Code and applicable federal, state, and local codes. Verify vessel is stampled with ASME Code Symbol or allowable

247

NETL: News Release - Ocean Research Vessel Returns with Undersea 'Treasure'  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

23, 2002 23, 2002 Ocean Research Vessel Returns with Undersea 'Treasure' of Methane Hydrates Largest Amount of Marine Hydrate Core Ever Recovered - The R/V JOIDES Resolution - The R/V JOIDES Resolution VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA - An internationally funded ocean research vessel has returned to port after a two-month expedition off the Oregon coast, bringing with it the largest amount of marine methane hydrate core samples ever recovered for scientific study. The R/V JOIDES Resolution, the world's largest scientific drillship, docked at Victoria, British Columbia earlier this month and began offloading pressure vessels containing methane hydrates recovered 50 miles offshore of Oregon from an area known as Hydrate Ridge. The pressure vessels, each six feet long and four inches in diameter, will

248

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from

249

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations, which govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants, require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including

250

Index of /research/alcator/facility/Procedures/IN-VESSEL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IN-VESSEL ICO Name Last modified Size Description DIR Parent Directory - Checklist of tasks before closing up.old.pdf 17-Apr-2008 09:28 9.6K Checklist of tasks before...

251

Hydrodynamic evaluation of high-speed semi-SWATH vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-speed semi-displacement vessels have enjoyed rapid development and widespread use over the past 25 years. Concurrent with their growth as viable commercial and naval platforms, has been the advancement of three-dimensional ...

Guttenplan, Adam (Adam David)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Simple program calculates partial liquid volumes in vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on a simple calculator program which solves problems of partial liquid volumes for a variety of storage and process vessels, including inclined cylindrical vessels and those with conical heads. Engineers in the oil refining and chemical industries are often confronted with the problem of estimating partial liquid volumes in storage tanks or process vessels. Cistern, the calculator program presented here, allows fast and accurate resolution of problems for a wide range of vessels without user intervention, other than inputting the problem data. Running the program requires no mathematical skills. Cistern is written for Hewlett-Packard HP 41CV or HP 41CX programmable calculators (or HP 41C with extended memory modules).

Koch, P.

1992-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

253

Reducing fishing vessel fuel consumption and NOX emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a growing concern with the impact of marine operations on the environment. This requires reducing fuel consumption and vessel pollution during operation. On-board computers and satellite communications will enable the operator to reduce fuel consumption and NOX emissions during vessel operations. This paper presents the results of a study on this problem and how such an on-board system could be implemented to reduce fuel consumption and engine NOX emissions.

Robert Latorre

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

LNG Imports by Vessel into the U.S. Form | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vessel into the U.S. Form LNG Imports by Vessel into the U.S. Form Excel Version of LNG Imports by Vessel into the U.S. Form.xlsx PDF Version of LNG Imports by Vessel into the U.S....

255

Neutron Assay System for Con?nement Vessel Disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste will be removed from confinement vessels remaining from 1970s-era experiments. Los Alamos has 9+ spherical confinement vessels remaining from experiments. Each vessel contains {approx} 500 lbs of radioactive debris such as actinide metals and oxides, metals, powdered silica, graphite, and wires and hardware. In order to dispose of the vessels, debris and contamination must be removed. Neutron assay system was designed to assay vessels before and after cleanout. System requirements are: (1) Modular and moveable; (2) Capable of detecting {approx}100g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a 2-inch thick steel sphere with 6 foot diameter; and (3) Capable of safeguards-quality assays. Initial design parameters arethe use of 4-atm {sup 3}He tubes with length of 6 feet, and {sup 3}He tubes embedded in polyethelene for moderation. This paper describes the calibration of the Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) and quantification of its uncertainties. Assay uncertainty depends on five factors: (1) Statistical uncertainty in the assay measurement; (2) Statistical uncertainty in the background measurement; (3) Statistical uncertainty in the isotopics determination - This should be much smaller than the other uncertainties; (4) Systematic uncertainty due to position bias; and (5) Systematic uncertainty due to fluctuations in cosmic ray spallation. This one can be virtually eliminated by performing the background measurement with an empty vessel - but that may not be possible. We used modeling and experiments to quantify the systematic uncertainties. The calibration assumes a uniform distribution of material, but reality will be different. MCNPX modeling was used to quantify the positional bias. The model was benchmarked to build confidence in its results. Material at top of vessel is 44% greater than amount assayed, according to singles. Material near 19-tube detector is 38% less than amount assayed, according to singles. Cosmic ray spallation contributes significantly to the background. Comparing rates with and without a vessel showed that spallation adds an average of 27.27 singles/s and 5.45 doubles/s to background. Errors in the background rates were estimated at 20%.

Frame, Katherine C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourne, Mark M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crooks, William J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Louise [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miko, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, Jose I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vigil, Georgiana M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

256

them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figu  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figure 11. Petroleum Production and Consumption them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figure 11. Petroleum Production and Consumption Duquesne (now the site of Pittsburgh) set fire to an oil-slicked creek as part of a religious ceremony. As settlement by Europeans proceeded, oil' was discovered in many places in northwestern Pennsylvania and western New York-to tile frequent dismay of the well-owners, who were drilling for salt brine./ >' Cons umption/ In the mid-1800s expanding uses for oil extracted from coal and shale began to hint at the value of rock oil and encouraged the search for readily accessible A Production supplies. This impetus launched the modem petroleum age, which began on a t 10 - Sunday afternoon in August 1859 at Oil Creek, near Titusville in northwestern-\

257

REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION, PRATT & WHITNEY MILITARY ENGINES, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION, PRATT & UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION, PRATT & WHITNEY MILITARY ENGINES, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FORE IGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER UT-BATTELLE, LLC SUBCONTRACT NO. 40001Q288 UNDER PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-000R22725; DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (D OE) WAIVER DOCKET W(A)201 0-051 [OR0-800] Uniteo Technolog ies , Pratt & Whitney Military Eng ines (Petitioner) has made a timely request for an advance wa iver to worldwide rights in Su bject Inventions made in the course of or under UT -Battelle , LLC Subcontract No. 400010288 entitled , and "Bulk Amorphous Alum inum Program" unde r UT -Battelle Prime Contract No . DE-AC05-000R22725 . The scope of work involves the production of eng ine components using a conventional powder metallurgy

258

A Highly Agile Ground Assessment Robot (HAGAR) for military battlefield and support missions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mobile robotic vehicle with potential for use in military field applications is described. Based on a Sandia design intended for use in exploration of the Lunar surface, the Highly Agile Ground Assessment Robot (HAGAR) is a four wheeled all-wheel-drive dual-body vehicle. A uniquely simple method of chassis articulation is employed which allows all four wheels to remain in contact with the ground, even while operating in very rough terrain and climbing over obstacles as large as a wheel diameter. Skid steering and modular construction are used to produce a simple, rugged, lightweight, highly agile mobility chassis with a reduction in the number of parts required when compared to conventional vehicle designs for military battlefield and support missions. The design configuration, mobility parameters, potential mission configurations, and performance of existing and proposed HAGAR prototypes are discussed.

Klarer, P.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy Projects at Military Installations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lessons Learned from Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy Projects at Military Installations Michael Callahan, Kate Anderson, Sam Booth, Jessica Katz, and Tim Tetreault Technical Report NREL/TP-7A40-51598 Revised September 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy Projects at Military Installations Michael Callahan, Kate Anderson, Sam Booth, Jessica Katz, and Tim Tetreault

260

Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) Power Down Exemption Request Regulations implementing the requirements for the vessel monitoring system (VMS) within the NMFS Northeast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) Power Down Exemption Request Regulations implementing consecutive hours. (2) A vessel with a valid multispecies limited access, scallop limited access or surfclam/ocean period of 30 consecutive days. Vessel owners or operators may sign out of the VMS program by first

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Ethics of Interrogation — The U.S. Military's Ongoing Use of Psychiatrists  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...questions, or advising authorities on the use of specific techniques of interrogation with particular detainees." A few weeks later, the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs of the American Medical Association (AMA) issued a similar opinion, stating that "physicians must neither conduct nor directly... In May 2006, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) adopted a position statement prohibiting psychiatrists from “direct participation” in the interrogation of any person in military or civilian detention — including “being present in the interrogation ...

Marks J.H.; Bloche M.G.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Lead Poisoning of Seabirds:? Environmental Risks from Leaded Paint at a Decommissioned Military Base  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here we utilized lead isotopic fingerprinting to investigate sources of elevated lead exposure to Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) chicks in the Midway Island National Wildlife Refuge, which was established on the site of a decom missioned military base that previously had undergone lead remediation. ... Midway has had multiple uses over the past century and was the center of a major battle during World War II. ...

Myra E. Finkelstein; Roberto H. Gwiazda; Donald R. Smith

2003-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

263

Identifying and estimating the distributional effects of unionization and the long-term consequences of military service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with the economic consequences for individuals of two important U.S. labor market institutions: unionization and the military draft. The first chapter develops an econometric procedure for estimating ...

Frandsen, Brigham R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Secure Military Social Networking and Rapid Sensemaking in Domain Specific Concept Systems: Research Issues and Future Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper identifies the need for a secure military social networking site and the underlying research issues linked to the successful development of such sites. The paper further proposes a solution to the most basic ...

Garside, Debbie

265

Acculturation and Transformation among Female Immigrant Military Spouses in an ESL Learning Program at a Community College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and internal forces that influenced the acculturation process. External (structural) forces included community, workforce, the military, and an educational institution. The secondary forces included racial discrimination, cultural differences, and social...

Darnell, Patricia

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fritz Heyer: Review of Erich Günther’s Military Physics. A Handbook for Teachers [April 18, 1938  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Günther, Dr. Erich:[2]Military Physics. A Handbook for Teachers. 212 text illustrations, a color cloud table, two weather maps. Frankfort-on-Main, M. Diesterweg, 1936. 189 pp., 5.80 R[eich]M[arks].

Klaus Hentschel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Forum Agenda: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FORUM AGENDA FORUM AGENDA U.S. Department of Energy and Tsinghua University International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum Tsinghua University Beijing, PRC September 27 - 29, 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Tsinghua University in Beijing co-hosted the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010 in Beijing, China. High pressure vessel experts gathered to share lessons learned from CNG and hydrogen vehicle deployments, and to identify R&D needs to aid the global harmonization of regulations, codes and standards to enable the successful deployment of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Forum Objectives: * Address and share data and information on specific technical topics discussed at the workshop in

268

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort that works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operation of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging

269

Risk of collision between service vessels and offshore wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore wind farms are growing in size and are situated farther and farther away from shore. The demand for service visits to transfer personnel and equipment to the wind turbines is increasing, and safe operation of the vessels is essential. Currently, collisions between service vessels and offshore wind turbines are paid little attention to in the offshore wind energy industry. This paper proposes a risk assessment framework for such collisions and investigates the magnitude of the collision risk and important risk-influencing factors. The paper concludes that collisions between turbines and service vessels even at low speed may cause structural damage to the turbines. There is a need for improved consideration of this kind of collision risk when designing offshore wind turbines and wind farms.

Lijuan Dai; Sören Ehlers; Marvin Rausand; Ingrid Bouwer Utne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

,"U.S. Total Adjusted Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"KD0VABNUS1","KPRVABNUS1" "Date","U.S. Total Distillate Adj SalesDeliveries to Vessel Bunker Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Adj SalesDeliveries to Vessel...

271

Acrolein generation stimulates hypercontraction in isolated human blood vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increased risk of vasospasm, a spontaneous hyperconstriction, is associated with atherosclerosis, cigarette smoking, and hypertension-all conditions involving oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and inflammation. To test the role of the lipid peroxidation- and inflammation-derived aldehyde, acrolein, in human vasospasm, we developed an ex vivo model using human coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) blood vessels and a demonstrated acrolein precursor, allylamine. Allylamine induces hypercontraction in isolated rat coronary artery in a semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity (SSAO) dependent manner. Isolated human CABG blood vessels (internal mammary artery, radial artery, saphenous vein) were used to determine: (1) vessel responses and sensitivity to acrolein, allylamine, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure (1 {mu}M-1 mM), (2) SSAO dependence of allylamine-induced effects using SSAO inhibitors (semicarbazide, 1 mM; MDL 72274-E, active isomer; MDL 72274-Z, inactive isomer; 100 {mu}M), (3) the vasoactive effects of two other SSAO amine substrates, benzylamine and methylamine, and (4) the contribution of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} to hypercontraction. Acrolein or allylamine but not H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, benzylamine, or methylamine stimulated spontaneous and pharmacologically intractable hypercontraction in CABG blood vessels that was similar to clinical vasospasm. Allylamine-induced hypercontraction and blood vessel SSAO activity were abolished by pretreatment with semicarbazide or MDL 72274-E but not by MDL 72274-Z. Allylamine-induced hypercontraction also was significantly attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free buffer. In isolated aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rat, allylamine-induced an SSAO-dependent contraction and enhanced norepinephrine sensitivity but not in Sprague-Dawley rat aorta. We conclude that acrolein generation in the blood vessel wall increases human susceptibility to vasospasm, an event that is enhanced in hypertension.

Conklin, D.J. [Institute of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States) and Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI 54701 (United States)]. E-mail: dj.conklin@louisville.edu; Bhatnagar, A. [Institute of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Cowley, H.R. [Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI 54701 (United States); Johnson, G.H. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Luther Hospital/Midelfort Clinic, Eau Claire, WI 54702 (United States); Wiechmann, R.J. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Luther Hospital/Midelfort Clinic, Eau Claire, WI 54702 (United States); Sayre, L.M. [Department of Chemistry, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Trent, M.B. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX 77555-0609 (United States); Boor, P.J. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX 77555-0609 (United States)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

DHCVIM: A direct heating containment vessel interactions module  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models for prediction of direct containment heating phenomena as implemented in the DHCVIM computer module are described. The models were designed to treat thermal, chemical and hydrodynamic processes in the three regions of the Sandia National Laboratory Surtsey DCH test facility: the melt generator, cavity and vessel. The fundamental balance equations, along with constitutive relations are described. A combination of Eulerian treatment for the gas phase and Lagrangian treatment for the droplet phase is used in the modeling. Comparisons of calculations and DCH-1 test results are presented. Reasonable agreement is demonstrated for the vessel pressure rise, melt generator pressure decay and particle size distribution.

Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Design Criteria vs. Operational Effectiveness: Update of U.S. Military Standard 1474 - Design Criteria for Noise Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Noise requirements in military environments differ significantly from typical industrial or occupational situations. Both in combat and in training mission success requires offensive equipment and weapons to be more lethal and survivable than those used by the adversary. Higher muzzle velocities heavier projectiles and more powerful engines result in high levels of both steady-state and impulsive noise and an increased risk of hearing loss for the users. Weapons firing can expose the user to more energy in a single event than typically experienced in a working lifetime of occupational exposure. In addition military operations require effective speech communication while minimizing auditory detection of equipment by the adversary. Producing material suitable for various forms of military operations requires unique design criteria often exceeding civilian national or international standards. To meet these unique and often contradicting requirements the U.S. military developed a military design standard for noise limits. This standard (MIL-STD-1474) was last revised in 1997. This paper describes the effort of the U.S. Army Navy and Air Force to update the standard to permit production and fielding of military systems designed to maximize Warfighter effectiveness while minimizing hearing damage caused by their use.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

Holmes, Michael Jerome (Thompson, ND); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh (Allentown, PA)

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Usage Codes Observer code Vessel code Trip ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Observer code Vessel code Trip ID Permit holder name/address Permit / N MMSI No. Y / N Present? Usage Water capacity (m3): Fuel capacity: m3 / tonnes Other: Other: Kw all that apply & note types of materials for each) Capacity: Usage Incinerator: Net mensuration Y / N

276

Usage Codes Observer code Vessel code Trip ID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Sonar Observer code Vessel code Trip ID Additional Information KHz: RPM / Other _______________Global Registry ID:MMSI No. Permit expiration (dd-mm- yy): Y / N Present? Usage contact Diver / dive equipment Usage Manufacturer Hull mounted / towed Catch Y / N Other: Y / N Y / NOther

277

Beryllium pressure vessels for creep tests in magnetic fusion energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beryllium has interesting applications in magnetic fusion experimental machines and future power-producing fusion reactors. Chief among the properties of beryllium that make these applications possible is its ability to act as a neutron multiplier, thereby increasing the tritium breeding ability of energy conversion blankets. Another property, the behavior of beryllium in a 14-MeV neutron environment, has not been fully investigated, nor has the creep behavior of beryllium been studied in an energetic neutron flux at thermodynamically interesting temperatures. This small beryllium pressure vessel could be charged with gas to test pressures around 3, 000 psi to produce stress in the metal of 15,000 to 20,000 psi. Such stress levels are typical of those that might be reached in fusion blanket applications of beryllium. After contacting R. Powell at HEDL about including some of the pressure vessels in future test programs, we sent one sample pressure vessel with a pressurizing tube attached (Fig. 1) for burst tests so the quality of the diffusion bond joints could be evaluated. The gas used was helium. Unfortunately, budget restrictions did not permit us to proceed in the creep test program. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the lessons learned to date, including photographs of the test pressure vessel that show the tooling necessary to satisfactorily produce the diffusion bonds. This document can serve as a starting point for those engineers who resume this task when funds become available.

Neef, W.S.

1990-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

Thrust allocation with power management functionality on dynamically positioned vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

world-wide. The main benefits of diesel-electric propulsion and thrusters are reduced power consumptionThrust allocation with power management functionality on dynamically positioned vessels Aleksander to assist the power management system on dynamically positioned ships is proposed in this paper. Its main

Johansen, Tor Arne

279

Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Response of a vessel to waves at zero ship speed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Response of a vessel to waves at zero ship speed: preliminary full scale experiments By: Kim Klaka of experiment were conducted ­ free roll decay tests and irregular wave tests. An inclining test was also with and without the mainsail hoisted, in very light winds. The irregular wave tests were conducted again in very

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sampling and Analysis Plan for PUREX canyon vessel flushing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sampling and analysis plan is necessary to provide direction for the sampling and analytical activities determined by the data quality objectives. This document defines the sampling and analysis necessary to support the deactivation of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility vessels that are regulated pursuant to Washington Administrative Code 173-303.

Villalobos, C.N.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - arch vessel transposition Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the effect of applying local vacuum pressure on the temperatures of the epidermis and small vessels during... of skin and blood vessels with different diameters (10-60 mm) at...

283

Application of a newly built semi-submersible vessel for transportation of a tension leg platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transportation of tension leg platform (TLP) structures for a long distance ... been associated with the use of a heavy semi-transport vessel. The requirements of this type ... vessel-Hai Yang Shi You 278. This semi

Dagang Zhang; Weiying Sun; Zhixia Fan

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

NONE

1991-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

The United States Military Assistance Advisory Group in French Indochina, 1950-1956  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Group in French Indochina, 1950-1956. (December 2010) Nathaniel R. Weber, B.A., Westminster College Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Brian Linn This thesis examines the American Military Assistance Advisory Group (MAAG) sent to French Indochina... assistance abroad does not address American support of the French in the early 1950s, except to discuss US security policy in South East Asia.7 Of major relevance to this thesis is Chester J. Pach?s Arming the Free World, which examines the origins of US...

Weber, Nathaniel R.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Implications of military stabilization efforts on economic development and security: The case of Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The United States used a combination of economic, political, and military means to effect change in Iraq. Most notably, the United States used a buildup of security forces, the “surge”, as an intervention to stabilize Iraq. This article uses structural change tests to determine the effect of the intervention on security and economic metrics of success. There appears to be compelling evidence that several events may have had a direct influence on security variables with the surge being one of the events. There is little to suggest that the surge was the primary intervention that enhanced economic development and political order.

Jomana Amara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The implications of the Anglo-French military conversations, 1905-1914  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sources has been weak. Thus, the M. A. candidate must rely on Inter-Library Loan services. In conducting any study of pre-War World I diplomatic relations between Great Britain and France a few notable sources must always be consulted. G. P. Gooch... was f1lled w1th various incidents characteristic of this neuros1s: Fashoda, the Dogger Bank incident, Al geci ras, Agadi r, the Dreadnought race, and the Anglo-French military conversations. Incidents such as these reinforced the need for mil1tary...

Gargotta, Craig Anthony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

288

RIS-M-2186 INTERPRETATIOM OF STRAIN HBASUREMEMTS ON NUCLEAR PRESSURE VESSELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressure loadings of the vessel seen to be the reason in other regions. INIS-descriptors; BUR TYPE REACTORS

289

LNG Exports by Vessel out of the U.S. Form | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

out of the U.S. Form LNG Exports by Vessel out of the U.S. Form Excel Version of LNG Exports by Vessel out of the U.S. Form.xlsx PDF Version of LNG Exports by Vessel out of the...

290

LNG Exports by Vessel in ISO Containers out of the U.S. Form...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vessel in ISO Containers out of the U.S. Form LNG Exports by Vessel in ISO Containers out of the U.S. Form Excel Version of LNG Exports by Vessel in ISO Container out of the U.S....

291

Berth and quay-crane allocation problem considering fuel consumption and emissions from vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Resolving the berth and quay-crane allocation problem improves the efficiency of seaside operations by optimally allocating berthing spaces and quay cranes to vessels, typically by considering a vessel’s sailing speed and arrival time at a port as constant parameters, while ignoring the impact of arrival times on fuel consumption and emissions when sailing. This work applied a novel nonlinear multi-objective mixed-integer programming model that considered a vessel’s fuel consumption and emissions, and then transformed this model into a second-order mixed-integer cone programming model to solve the problem’s computational intractability. Furthermore, the impact of number of allocated quay cranes on port operational cost, and a vessel’s fuel consumption and emissions was analyzed. Additionally, a vessel’s emissions while moored are also calculated based on wait time. Experimental results demonstrate that the new berth and quay-crane allocation strategy with a vessel’s arrival time as a decision variable can significantly improve vessels’ fuel consumption and emissions, the air quality around ports and utilization of berths and quay cranes without reducing service quality.

Qing-Mi Hu; Zhi-Hua Hu; Yuquan Du

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from 40y to 80y implies a doubling of the neutron exposure for the RPV. Thus,

293

Inexpensive Delivery of Compressed Hydrogen with Advanced Vessel Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

delivery of compressed hydrogen delivery of compressed hydrogen with advanced vessel technology Gene Berry Andrew Weisberg Salvador M. Aceves Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (925) 422-0864 saceves@LLNL.GOV DOE and FreedomCar & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop Washington, DC January 25, 2006 LLNL is developing innovative concepts for efficient containment of hydrogen in light duty vehicles concepts may offer advantages for hydrogen delivery Conformable containers efficiently use available space in the vehicle. We are pursuing multiple approaches to conformability High Strength insulated pressure vessels extend LH 2 dormancy 10x, eliminate boiloff, and enable efficiencies of flexible refueling (compressed/cryogenic H 2 /(L)H 2 ) The PVT properties of H

294

Solution of the Boussinesq equation using evolutionary vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we present a solution of the Boussinesq equation. The derived formulas include solitons, Schwartz class solutions and solutions, possessing singularities on a closed set Z of the (x,t) domain, obtained from the zeros of the tau function. The idea for solving the Boussinesq equation is identical to the (unified) idea of solving the KdV and the evolutionary NLS equations: we use a theory of evolutionary vessels. But a more powerful theory of non-symmetric evolutionary vessels is presented, inserting flexibility into the construction and allowing to deal with complex-valued solutions. A powerful scattering theory of Deift-Tomei-Trubowitz for a three dimensional operator, which is used to solve the Boussinesq equation, fits into our setting only in a particular case. On the other hand, we create a much wider class of solutions of the Boussinesq equation with singularities on a closed set $Z$.

Andrey Melnikov

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

295

Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Lightweight pressure vessels and unitized regenerative fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy storage systems have been designed using lightweight pressure vessels with unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs). The vessels provide a means of storing reactant gases required for URFCs; they use lightweight bladder liners that act as inflatable mandrels for composite overwrap and provide a permeation barrier. URFC systems have been designed for zero emission vehicles (ZEVs); they are cost competitive with primary FC powered vehicles that operate on H/air with capacitors or batteries for power peaking and regenerative braking. URFCs are capable of regenerative braking via electrolysis and power peaking using low volume/low pressure accumulated oxygen for supercharging the power stack. URFC ZEVs can be safely and rapidly (<5 min.) refueled using home electrolysis units. Reversible operation of cell membrane catalyst is feasible without significant degradation. Such systems would have a rechargeable specific energy > 400 Wh/kg.

Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Weisberg, A.H.

1996-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations that govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In the irradiated condition, however, the fracture toughness of the RPV may be severely

298

IMPACT OF NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLUTION ON VESSEL CORROSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different nuclear materials require different processing conditions. In order to maximize the dissolver vessel lifetime, corrosion testing was conducted for a range of chemistries and temperature used in fuel dissolution. Compositional ranges of elements regularly in the dissolver were evaluated for corrosion of 304L, the material of construction. Corrosion rates of AISI Type 304 stainless steel coupons, both welded and non-welded coupons, were calculated from measured weight losses and post-test concentrations of soluble Fe, Cr and Ni.

Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.; Clifton, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Plastic instabilities in statically and dynamically loaded spherical vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant changes were made in design limits for pressurized vessels in the 2007 version of the ASME Code (Section VIII, Div. 3) and 2008 and 2009 Addenda. There is now a local damage-mechanics based strain-exhaustion limit as well as the well-known global plastic collapse limit. Moreover, Code Case 2564 (Section VIII, Div. 3) has recently been approved to address impulsively loaded vessels. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the plastic collapse limit as it applies to dynamically loaded spherical vessels. Plastic instabilities that could potentially develop in spherical shells under symmetric loading conditions are examined for a variety of plastic constitutive relations. First, a literature survey of both static and dynamic instabilities associated with spherical shells is presented. Then, a general plastic instability condition for spherical shells subjected to displacement controlled and impulsive loading is given. This instability condition is evaluated for six plastic and visco-plastic constitutive relations. The role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability point is investigated. Calculations for statically and dynamically loaded spherical shells are presented, illustrating the formation of instabilities as well as the role of imperfections. Conclusions of this work are that there are two fundamental types of instabilities associated with failure of spherical shells. In the case of impulsively loaded vessels, where the pulse duration is short compared to the fundamental period of the structure, one instability type is found not to occur in the absence of static internal pressure. Moreover, it is found that the specific role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability strain depends on the form of the constitutive relation assumed.

Duffey, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Potential market for LNG-fueled marine vessels in the United States ; Potential market for liquefied natural gas fueled marine vessels in the United States .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The growing global concern over ship emissions in recent years has driven policy change at the international level toward more stringent vessel emissions standards. The… (more)

Brett, Bridget C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Applications of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Risk Data to Military Combat Risk Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Risks to personnel engaged in military operations include not only the threat of enemy firepower but also risks from exposure to other hazards such as radiation. Combatant commanders of the U. S. Army carefully weigh risks of casualties before implementing battlefield actions using an established paradigm that take these risks into consideration. As a result of the inclusion of depleted uranium (DU) anti-armor ammunition in the conventional (non-nuclear) weapons arsenal, the potential for exposure to DU aerosols and its associated chemical and radiological effects becomes an element of the commanders’ risk assessment. The Capstone DU Aerosol Study measured the range of likely DU oxide aerosol concentrations created inside a combat vehicle perforated with a DU munition, and the Capstone Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) estimated the associated doses and calculated risks. This paper focuses on the development of a scientific approach to adapt the risks from DU’s non uniform dose distribution within the body using the current U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) radiation risk management approach. The approach developed equates the Radiation Exposure Status (RES) categories to the estimated radiological risks of DU and makes use of the Capstone-developed Renal Effects Group (REG) as a measure of chemical risk from DU intake. Recommendations are provided for modifying Army guidance and policy in order to better encompass the potential risks from DU aerosol inhalation during military operations.

Daxon, Eric G.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Melanson, Mark A.; Roszell, Laurie E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Energy performance of fishing vessels and potential savings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Commercial fishing is heavily fuel dependant. The increase in the fuel price, together with the stock decline, occupational risks of fishing, the possibilities of finding a different future for new generations, are some of the reasons that have made fishing arrive at its ‘survival limits’, in many parts of Europe. This contribution aims at providing shipowners and researcher with the experience of undertaking energy audits, to reduce the fuel bill of fishing vessels. In order to do so, 3 fishing vessels were assessed comprehensively, for 2010–2012, to determine their energy consumption flow. The results indicate that energy consumption depends upon: (a) the structure and size of the vessel; (b) the engine conditions and use patterns; (c) the fishing gears used; (d) the fishing and trip patterns; (e) the distance to the fishing ground; (f) target species and their migration routes; and (g) the traditions onboard. Likewise, no generalisation can be made regarding the way energy is consumed by onboard equipment/machinery when different fishing gears are compared. Energy audits will need to be site-specific and to include sufficient data to obtain representative results; these are likely to be more than in land-based industries, due to the peculiarities of this sector.

Oihane C. Basurko; Gorka Gabiña; Zigor Uriondo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residual Fuel Imports by State Residual Fuel Imports by State Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Imports Receipts of crude oil and petroleum products into the 50 States and the District of Columbia from foreign countries, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and other U.S. possessions and territories. Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) Districts Geographic aggregations of the 50 States and the District of Columbia into five districts by the Petroleum Administration for Defense in 1950. These districts were originally defined during World War II for purposes of administering oil allocation. Description and maps of PAD Districts and Refining Districts. Residual Fuel Oil A general classification for the heavier oils, known as No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils, that remain after the distillate fuel oils and lighter hydrocarbons are distilled away in refinery operations. It conforms to ASTM Specifications D396 and D975 and Federal Specification VV-F-815C. No. 5, a residual fuel oil of medium viscosity, is also known as Navy Special and is defined in Military Specification MIL-F-859E, including Amendment 2 (NATO Symbol F-770). It is used in steam-powered vessels in government service and inshore powerplants. No. 6 fuel oil includes Bunker C fuel oil and is used for the production of electric power, space heating, vessel bunkering, and various industrial purposes.

304

GRR/Section 6-HI-e - Boiler Pressure Vessel Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 6-HI-e - Boiler Pressure Vessel Permit GRR/Section 6-HI-e - Boiler Pressure Vessel Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 6-HI-e - Boiler Pressure Vessel Permit 06HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Regulations & Policies Boiler and Pressure Vessel Regulations Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 06HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Boiler/Pressure Vessel Permit

305

Tuesday, April 15, 2014 New Hampshire military youth are resilient and take pride in their service to our Country. They deserve our  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, invites you to join us for the 4th annual Purple Up! for Military Kids celebration by wearing purple green, Marine red, and Coast Guard, Navy and Air Force blue. Help us turn New Hampshire purple on April to show their support for NH military youth by wearing purple on April 15th Ask stores and restaurants

New Hampshire, University of

306

The New Hampshire Military Youth and Family Program, part of UNH Cooperative Extension, invites you to join us for the 4th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to join us for the 4th annual Purple Up! for Military Kids celebration by wearing purple on Tuesday, April 15th . Wearing purple is a very visible way to show support and thank military youth green, Marine red, and Coast Guard, Navy and Air Force blue. Phone: (603) 862-0876 Email: ce

New Hampshire, University of

307

Terror Organizations Politics and Military The modules in this class will examine how terror organizations can morph into legitimate political entities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Terror Organizations Politics and Military The modules in this class will examine how terror. Leadership 3. Guiding Principles & Strategic Objectives 4. Campaign of Terror 5. Popular Support 6. Ulster Freedom Fighters: the Irish Citizen's Counter-Terror Group 7. The Political and Military Wings of the IRA

Rhode Island, University of

308

ANUDISflM-37 SMART BRIDGE: A TOOL FOR ESTIMATING THE MILITARY LOAD CLASSIFICATION OF BRIDGES  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ANUDISflM-37 ANUDISflM-37 SMART BRIDGE: A TOOL FOR ESTIMATING THE MILITARY LOAD CLASSIFICATION OF BRIDGES USING VARYING LEVELS OF INFORMATION Decision and Information Sciences Division Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory, with facilities in the states of Illinois and Idaho, is owned by the United States Government, and operated by the University of Chicago under the provisions of a contract with the Department of Energy. This technical memo is a product of Argonne's Decision and Information Sciences (DE) Division. For information on the division's scientific and engineering activities, contact: Director, Decision and Information

309

Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Sustainable Military Installations (Presentation), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Sustainable Military Installations NDIA Joint Service Power Expo Mike Simpson Mike.Simpson@NREL.gov 5 May 2011 NREL/PR-5400-51519 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Agenda 2 1. NREL Transportation Research 2. Net Zero Energy Installations (NZEI) 3. Fort Carson as a Case Study - Vehicles On-Site - Utility Operations - Vehicle Charge Management 4. Full Fleet Simulation 5. Continuing Work NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY NREL is the only national laboratory solely dedicated to advancing renewable energy and energy efficiency. Our employees are committed to building a cleaner, sustainable world. Photo Credits: NREL 3 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY What is Electric Vehicle Grid Integration (EVGI)? 4 Cross Cutting Enablers Grid / Renewables

310

Emissions from Small-Scale Burns of Simulated Deployed U.S. Military Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Piles of simulated military waste were constructed, burned, and emissions sampled at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Open Burn Testing Facility (OBTF), Research Triangle Park, NC. ... The lack of sufficient and safe off-base waste treatment methods in the deployed environment, combined with limited numbers of waste management devices such as incinerators, have forced continued reliance on open burning in “burn pits” as an expedient method of volume reduction and treatment for solid waste during the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. ... (4) In response, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) has published guidance regulating burn pit operations, including limiting their use and prohibiting the burning of recyclable plastics. ...

Brian D. Woodall; Dirk P. Yamamoto; Brian K. Gullett; Abderrahmane Touati

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Fast neutron fluxes in pressure vessels using Monte Carlo methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of calculating the fast neutron flux in the pressure vessel of a pressurized water reactor by Monte Carlo methods. Neutron reactions reduce the ductility of the steel and thus limit the useful life of this important reactor component. This work was performed for Virginia Power (VEPCO). VIM is a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code which provides a versatile geometrical capability and a neutron physics data base closely representing the EDNF/B-IV data from which it was derived.

Edlund, M.C.; Thomas, J.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessel Repair Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of reactor pressure vessels. This work indicates that the large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the repair ends. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using high sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing, validation by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and complemented by destructive testing.

Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A cog-like vessel from the Netherlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE NETHERLANDS A Thesis by ALEYDIS MARIA P. A. VAN DE MOORTEL Submitted to the Graduate Col 1 ege of Texas AB, M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS December 1987 Major Sub. iect: Anthropology ABSTRACT... A Cog-Like Vessel From the Netherlands. (December 1987) Aleydis Maria P. A. Van de Moortel, B. A. , Katholfeke Unlversfteit Leuven Chairman of Advisory Committee: J. Richard SteFfy The meticulous excavation of a small, well-preserved shipwreck...

Van de Moortel, Aleydis Maria P. A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ? Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ? W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ? W–Ni–Co induces a greater oxidative burst response than W–Ni–Fe in lung macrophages.

Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Figure 1.-Map of McGregor Range, Fort Bliss Military Base depicting the locations of trapping census lines (closed circles) utilized in this study. Numbers refer to census lines 1-24, which are described in Table  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, grama grassland, and nonstabilized sand dune) identified on the Fort Bliss Military Base. Small mammal 1998. #12;CHECKLIST OF MAMMALs FROM TWELVE IlABITAT TYPES AT FORT BLISS MILITARY BASE; 1997. LOCKE, ROBERTJ. BAKER, AND ROBERTD. BRADLEY The Fort Bliss Military Base is located in Dona Afia

Baker, Robert J.

316

Scaling analysis for a reactor vessel mixing test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse AP600 advanced pressurized water reactor design uses a gravity-forced safety injection system with two nozzles in the reactor vessel downcomer. In the event of a severe overcooling transient such as a steam-line break, this system delivers boron to the core to offset positive reactivity introduced by the negative moderator defect. To determine if the system design is capable of successfully terminating this type of reactivity transient, a test of the system has been initiated. The test will utilize a 1:9 scale model of the reactor vessel and cold legs. The coolant will be modeled with air, while the safety injection fluid will be simulated with a dense gas. To determine the necessary parameters for this model, a scaling analysis was performed. The continuity, diffusion, and axial Navier-Stokes equations for the injected fluid were converted into dimensionless form. A Boussinesq formulation for turbulent viscosity was applied in these equations. This procedure identified the Richardson, mixing Reynolds, diffusion Fourier, and Euler numbers as dimensionless groups of interest. Order-of-magnitude evaluation was used to determine that the Richardson and mixing Reynolds numbers were the most significant parameters to match for a similar experiment.

Radcliff, T.D.; Parsons, J.R.; Johnson, W.S. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Ekeroth, D.E. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Gamma ray-induced embrittlement of pressure vessel alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-energy gamma rays emitted from the core of a nuclear reactor produce displacement damage in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The contribution of gamma damage to RPV embrittlement has in the past been largely ignored. However, in certain reactor designs the gamma flux at the RPV is sufficiently large that its contribution to displacement damage can be substantial. For example, gamma rays have been implicated in the accelerated RPV embrittlement observed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In the present study, mechanical property changes induced by 10-MeV electron irradiation of a model Fe alloy and an RPV alloy of interest to the HFIR were examined. Mini-tensile specimens were irradiated with high-energy electrons to reproduce damage characteristic of the Compton recoil-electrons induced by gamma bombardment. Substantial increases in yield and ultimate stress were observed in the alloys after irradiation to doses up to 5.3x10{sup {minus}3} dpa at temperatures ({approximately}50{degrees}C) characteristic of the HFIR pressure vessel. These measured increases were similar to those previously obtained following neutron irradiation, despite the highly disparate nature of the damage generated during electron and neutron irradiation.

Alexander, D.E.; Rehn, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Farrell, K.; Stoller, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Impacts of reducing shipboard NOx? and SOx? emissions on vessel performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The international maritime community has been experiencing tremendous pressures from environmental organizations to reduce the emissions footprint of their vessels. In the last decade, air emissions, including nitrogen ...

Caputo, Ronald J., Jr. (Ronald Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - allantochorial placental vessels Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

do not sustain flow. In this paper we develop the first multiscale model... and tissue scale dynamics of multiple cell populations. Simulations show that vessel pruning, due to...

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - axicell vacuum vessel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Theory Department Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 34 LET: a cold neutron chopper spectrometer on ISIS TS2 Summary: Jaws Vacuum Vessel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High-pressure Storage Vessels for Hydrogen, Natural Gas and Hydrogen-Natural Gas Blends  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 – 29, 2010, in Beijing, China.

322

High-pressure Storage Vessels for Hydrogen, Natural Gas andHydrogen...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Gas and Blends - Materials Testing and Design Requirements for Hydrogen Components and Tanks International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings Hydrogen...

323

Technical Forum Participants at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Photo of the Technical Forum Participants at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum, which was held on September 27–29, 2010, in Beijing, China.

324

Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel. 5 figures.

Ekeroth, D.E.; Orr, R.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel.

Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA); Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

R&D of Large Stationary Hydrogen/CNG/HCNG Storage Vessels | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks Status and Progress in Research, Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen-Compressed...

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic vessel control Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a complete copy of the USCG Abstract of Title For an undocumented vessel Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries Review Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 15 Revision: 100609...

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal blood vessels Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Summary: ) the blood vessels, which also helps to lower blood pressure. Commonly used brand names in the United States... to treat high blood pressure, heart disease and...

329

E-Print Network 3.0 - active in-vessel coils Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EXPERIMENT SYSTEM INTEGRATION * Summary: requirements in an arrangement that allows remote maintenance of in-vessel components and hands-on maintenance... to expose the core...

330

Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petrolem Reports Petrolem Reports Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales With Data for 2012 | Release Date: November 15, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 2012 report provides information, illustrations and State-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No.1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off-highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales

331

ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation.

GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Kiteships, sailing vessels pulled and powered with a kite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current windpower technology and future petroleum supply scenarios make it likely that it will become desirable to consider sailing vessels again for the merchant marine. For the wind-powered propulsion it seems possible to use tethered kites, instead of the traditional combination of masts and booms supporting a system of sails. This may be both safer and more cost-effective. The authors are on boat No. 2 in an R and D program aimed at this large scale application, and the present paper represents a progress report. Boat No. 1 was used to achieve speed and power, achieving a speed of 33 knots (over 60 km per hour), and sailing speeds at times of twice the wind velocity. Boat No. 2 will not be used for speed, but for the development of kite deployment and retrieval techniques, with kites of up to 300 sq ft (28 sq m) in surface area.

Winter, F. de; Swenson, R.B.; Culp, D.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Disruption of Vessel-Spanning Bubbles with Sloped Fins in Flat-Bottom and 2:1 Elliptical-Bottom Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive sludge was generated in the K-East Basin and K-West Basin fuel storage pools at the Hanford Site while irradiated uranium metal fuel elements from the N Reactor were being stored and packaged. The fuel has been removed from the K Basins, and currently, the sludge resides in the KW Basin in large underwater Engineered Containers. The first phase to the Sludge Treatment Project being led by CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is to retrieve and load the sludge into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport the sludge to T Plant for interim storage. The STSCs will be stored inside T Plant cells that are equipped with secondary containment and leak-detection systems. The sludge is composed of a variety of particulate materials and water, including a fraction of reactive uranium metal particles that are a source of hydrogen gas. If a situation occurs where the reactive uranium metal particles settle out at the bottom of a container, previous studies have shown that a vessel-spanning gas layer above the uranium metal particles can develop and can push the overlying layer of sludge upward. The major concern, in addition to the general concern associated with the retention and release of a flammable gas such as hydrogen, is that if a vessel-spanning bubble (VSB) forms in an STSC, it may drive the overlying sludge material to the vents at the top of the container. Then it may be released from the container into the cell’s secondary containment system at T Plant. A previous study demonstrated that sloped walls on vessels, both cylindrical coned-shaped vessels and rectangular vessels with rounded ends, provided an effective approach for disrupting a VSB by creating a release path for gas as a VSB began to rise. Based on the success of sloped-wall vessels, a similar concept is investigated here where a sloped fin is placed inside the vessel to create a release path for gas. A key potential advantage of using a sloped fin compared to a vessel with a sloped wall is that a small fin decreases the volume of a vessel available for sludge storage by a very small fraction compared to a cone-shaped vessel. The purpose of this study is to quantify the capability of sloped fins to disrupt VSBs and to conduct sufficient tests to estimate the performance of fins in full-scale STSCs. Experiments were conducted with a range of fin shapes to determine what slope and width were sufficient to disrupt VSBs. Additional tests were conducted to demonstrate how the fin performance scales with the sludge layer thickness and the sludge strength, density, and vessel diameter based on the gravity yield parameter, which is a dimensionless ratio of the force necessary to yield the sludge to its weight.( ) Further experiments evaluated the difference between vessels with flat and 2:1 elliptical bottoms and a number of different simulants, including the KW container sludge simulant (complete), which was developed to match actual K-Basin sludge. Testing was conducted in 5-in., 10-in., and 23-in.-diameter vessels to quantify how fin performance is impacted by the size of the test vessel. The most significant results for these scale-up tests are the trend in how behavior changes with vessel size and the results from the 23-in. vessel. The key objective in evaluating fin performance is to determine the conditions that minimize the volume of a VSB when disruption occurs because this reduces the potential for material inside the STSC from being released through vents.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Chun, Jaehun; Russell, Renee L.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Mastor, Michael M.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

334

Is there a future role for tactical nuclear weapon systems in the national military strategy. Study project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the purpose and role that tactical nuclear weapon systems can provide in supporting the National Military Strategy (NMS), and recommends requirements be determined using a strategy based upon political, economic and military national interests versus the current target-based strategy. To draw implications for the NMS, the analysis reviews current strategic policy guidance, summarizes the current definition of deterrence theory, and provides rationales for maintaining tactical nuclear weapon systems for deterrence and warfighting in regional contingency operations against nuclear-capable forces. Based upon this analysis, recommendations are provided for joint planning, doctrine, and training initiatives needed to enhance the efficacy of the armed services in achieving national security policy objectives.

Stobbs, E.E.

1992-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

335

Simulación termodinámica de un motor diesel usando combustible Bunker.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A continuación sigue una breve descripción de los capítulos de este trabajo: El capítulo I presenta la introducción y los objetivos de este trabajo. El… (more)

Vargas Machuca Bueno, Juan Pablo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Development of a Fluxless Flip Chip Bonding Process for Optical Military Electronics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As military electronics tend to become lighter, smaller, thinner, and lower cost, the use of flip chip technology is becoming more common place to meet system requirements, yet survive environments. This paper explores the development of an optical flip chip application and details the selection/qualification of the substrate. The selected assembly consists of a procured 1x12 Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) die, having 80um diameter eutectic AuSn solder bumps at 250um pitch and flip chip bonded to a .006” thick 99.6% alumina substrate with .006” diameter thru holes and metallized with 500Å WTi, under minimum 2.0-3.0?m (80-120?”) thin film deposited Au. An 8 run, 3 factor, 2 level Full Factorial Design of Experiments (DOE) was completed on procured detector arrays and procured ceramic substrates using the Suss Microtec FC150. The optimum settings for the peak temperature, peak time and final die z-height were selected using the ANOVA results and interaction plots. Additional studies were completed to qualify in-house produced substrates. An epoxy glob-top encapsulant was selected to dissipate stress on the flip chip solder joints and to enhance thermal shock performance.

Girardi, Michael

2007-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

337

ROUTEMAP model for predicting aircraft noise exposure along military training routes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model and PC?based computer program has been prepared to calculate noise levels along low?altitude high?speed military training routes. The program is designed for use by environmental planning personnel who are familiar with MTR operations and with noise but are not necessarily expert. The program provides options for selecting general types of operations (visual or instrument navigation) aircraft types and speeds altitudes and nominal track centerlines. Up to 20 track/altitude/aircraft types may be defined within a 20?mi?wide corridor. Aircraft on each track have a Gaussian lateral distribution about the centerline. The program contains nominal standard deviations based on the type of operations or the user may specify a site?specific value. Aircraft noise emission levels are derived from the USAF NOISEFILE database. The program calculates L eq L dn and L dnmr where L dnmr is L dn with an adjustment to account for the onset rate of MTR aircraft noise. Program output is available in tabular form or in graphs suitable for inclusion in reports. [This work was sponsored by USAF AAMRL/BBE.

Michael J. Lucas; Kenneth J. Plotkin

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Final report for LDRD project 11-0783 : directed robots for increased military manpower effectiveness.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this LDRD is to develop technology allowing warfighters to provide high-level commands to their unmanned assets, freeing them to command a group of them or commit the bulk of their attention elsewhere. To this end, a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) was developed, incorporating novel and uniquely capable feature creation and reinforcement learning algorithms. BECCA was demonstrated on both a mobile manipulator platform and on a seven degree of freedom serial link robot arm. Existing military ground robots are almost universally teleoperated and occupy the complete attention of an operator. They may remove a soldier from harm's way, but they do not necessarily reduce manpower requirements. Current research efforts to solve the problem of autonomous operation in an unstructured, dynamic environment fall short of the desired performance. In order to increase the effectiveness of unmanned vehicle (UV) operators, we proposed to develop robots that can be 'directed' rather than remote-controlled. They are instructed and trained by human operators, rather than driven. The technical approach is modeled closely on psychological and neuroscientific models of human learning. Two Sandia-developed models are utilized in this effort: the Sandia Cognitive Framework (SCF), a cognitive psychology-based model of human processes, and BECCA, a psychophysical-based model of learning, motor control, and conceptualization. Together, these models span the functional space from perceptuo-motor abilities, to high-level motivational and attentional processes.

Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Wagner, John S.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Morrow, James Dan

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Performance of improved dynamic source routing algorithm for military communication logistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobile ad-hoc networks (MANETs) are autonomous, self-configuring and dynamic networks that operate without the support of any fixed infrastructure. Such networks are excellent candidates for military logistics which requires identification of location of sensitive frights and other communication need. Ad hoc routing protocol supports nodes mobility with multi-hop routing overwhelming the limitations of radio coverage in remote locations. Most of the present routing protocols are not designed to adapt congestion which is the dominant reason for packet loss, longer delay and jitter. In this paper, the original DSR protocol was modified to monitor the occurrence of congestion by using multiple resource utilisation thresholds as QoS attributes and trigger multi-path-routing during the periods of congestion to improve QoS. This paper also deals with the effects of mobility on the modified routing protocol. The NS-2 simulation results showed that a significant improvement in performance of modified DSR was achieved and decreases the network congestion with the use of multi-path routing.

A. Valarmathi; R.M. Chandrasekaran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Managing change: students' perceptions of the assimilation of women at Virginia Military Institute  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In September of 1996, women were admitted to Virginia Military Institute (VMI) for the first time in 158 years. This article discusses the results of a qualitative study which examined student perspectives of the assimilation process. Five men and five women ranging from sophomore to senior were interviewed. One administrator who was closely involved in planning and administering the change was also interviewed for the study. From the students' perspectives, VMI's move from a monolithic to a plural organisation was successful. Their perceptions of effectiveness seemed related to how the change was managed by VMI. As part of the assimilation process, VMI researched other schools that had experienced similar changes, carefully planned for the change, required participation on all levels, focused on a vision of what they wanted to become, included follow-up evaluation in all areas affected by the change, and asked all students involved to feel personally responsible for the effectiveness of the change. Problems that emerged in the interviews are explored as reflections of the limitations of plural organisations.

April Clark; Melinda L. Costello; Robert Yearout

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

D0 Silicon Upgrade: Gas Helium Storage Tank Pressure Vessel Engineering Note  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is to certify that Beaird Industries, Inc. has done a white metal blast per SSPC-SP5 as required per specifications on the vessel internal. Following the blast, a black light inspection was performed by Beaird Quality Control personnel to assure that all debris, grease, etc. was removed and interior was clean prior to closing vessel for helium test.

Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

1996-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

Study Reveals Challenges and Opportunities Related to Vessels for U.S. Offshore Wind  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The installation of offshore wind farms requires a highly specialized fleet of vessels--but no such fleet currently exists in the United States. As part of a broader DOE initiative to accelerate the growth of the U.S. offshore wind industry, energy research group Douglas-Westwood identified national vessel requirements under several offshore wind industry growth scenarios.

343

Productivity and Profitability of South Carolina Shrimp Vessels, 1971-75  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hI' the transformed fuel consumption variahle (the hest pruxr for I'essel utilization). shuI Productivity and Profitability of South Carolina Shrimp Vessels, 1971-75 T M JONES, J W. HUBBARD with overcapi- talization are possible. A BSTRACT-This stud\\' uses data [rom a 45-vessel sample 0/ South Caro

344

Berth and quay-crane allocation problem considering fuel consumption and emissions from vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resolving the berth and quay-crane allocation problem improves the efficiency of seaside operations by optimally allocating berthing spaces and quay cranes to vessels, typically by considering a vessel's sailing speed and arrival time at a port as constant ... Keywords: Berth and quay crane allocation problem, Emission, Fuel consumption, Nonlinear optimization, Second-order cone programming

Qing-Mi Hu, Zhi-Hua Hu, Yuquan Du

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Deployment related mental health care seeking behaviors in the U.S. military and the use of telehealth to mitigate their impacts on access to care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interviewees report that groups of service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan often require substantial amounts of mental health care, causing surges in demand at military hospitals. These hospitals have difficulty ...

Hess, John (John Thomas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Expanded Safety and Immunogenicity of a Bivalent, Oral, Attenuated Cholera Vaccine, CVD 103-HgR Plus CVD 111, in United States Military Personnel Stationed in Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...States Military Personnel Stationed in Panama J. R. McGhee David...Southern Command, 4 Panama; Center for Vaccine Development, University...partially-immune American soldiers stationed in Panama received one of the following five formulations...

David N. Taylor; José L. Sanchez; José M. Castro; Carlos Lebron; Carlos M. Parrado; David E. Johnson; Carol O. Tacket; Genevieve A. Losonsky; Steven S. Wasserman; Myron M. Levine; Stanley J. Cryz

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

EA-1999: Proposal to Permit 750 Acres at the Savannah River Site for Use by the State of South Carolina Military Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts from a proposal by South Carolina Military Department (SCMD) to permit the use of 750 acres at SRS for military training exercises and permanent facilities to support training. This proposal, if implemented, would further the purposes of the Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Department of the Army and DOE concerning the Use of SRS Lands for Military Training Activities, signed in 2007. SCMD has requested permitting two tracts of land, one near B-Area and one west of L-Lake and north of South Carolina Route 125, to establish facilities for military training purposes. SCMD does not propose to conduct live-fire training or to use tracked vehicles at SRS.

348

Marine Casualty and Pollution Database - Vessel Events for 2002 to 2010 |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vessel Events for 2002 to 2010 Vessel Events for 2002 to 2010 Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Marine Casualty and Pollution Database - Vessel Events for 2002 to 2010 Dataset Summary Description The Marine Casualty and Pollution Data files provide details about marine casualty and pollution incidents investigated by Coast Guard Offices throughout the United States. The database can be used to analyze marine accidents and pollution incidents by a variety of factors including vessel or facility type, injuries, fatalities, pollutant details, location, and date. The data collection period began in 1982 for marine casualties and 1973 for polluting incidents, and is ongoing. Documentation includes entity and attribute descriptions along with suggested solutions to general marine pollution, vessel casualty, and personnel injury and death questions.

349

,"U.S. Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil by End Use...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Total Distillate Adj SalesDeliveries to Vessel Bunker Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. No 2 Diesel Adj SalesDeliveries to On-Highway...

350

Creep of A508/533 Pressure Vessel Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Evaluation of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels has been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design studies. These design studies have generally focused on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Initially, three candidate materials were identified by this process: conventional light water reactor (LWR) RPV steels A508 and A533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and Grade 91 steel. The low strength of 2¼Cr-1Mo at elevated temperature has eliminated this steel from serious consideration as the VHTR RPV candidate material. Discussions with the very few vendors that can potentially produce large forgings for nuclear pressure vessels indicate a strong preference for conventional LWR steels. This preference is based in part on extensive experience with forging these steels for nuclear components. It is also based on the inability to cast large ingots of the Grade 91 steel due to segregation during ingot solidification, thus restricting the possible mass of forging components and increasing the amount of welding required for completion of the RPV. Grade 91 steel is also prone to weld cracking and must be post-weld heat treated to ensure adequate high-temperature strength. There are also questions about the ability to produce, and very importantly, verify the through thickness properties of thick sections of Grade 91 material. The availability of large components, ease of fabrication, and nuclear service experience with the A508 and A533 steels strongly favor their use in the RPV for the VHTR. Lowering the gas outlet temperature for the VHTR to 750°C from 950 to 1000°C, proposed in early concept studies, further strengthens the justification for this material selection. This steel is allowed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear service up to 371°C (700°F); certain excursions above that temperature are allowed by Code Case N-499-2 (now incorporated as an appendix to Section III Division 5 of the Code). This Code Case was developed with a rather sparse data set and focused primarily on rolled plate material (A533 specification). Confirmatory tests of creep behavior of both A508 and A533 are described here that are designed to extend the database in order to build higher confidence in ensuring the structural integrity of the VHTR RPV during off-normal conditions. A number of creep-rupture tests were carried out at temperatures above the 371°C (700°F) Code limit; longer term tests designed to evaluate minimum creep behavior are ongoing. A limited amount of rupture testing was also carried out on welded material. All of the rupture data from the current experiments is compared to historical values from the testing carried out to develop Code Case N-499-2. It is shown that the A508/533 basemetal tested here fits well with the rupture behavior reported from the historical testing. The presence of weldments significantly reduces the time to rupture. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize and record the experimental results in a single document.

Richard Wright

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Effects of military-authorized activities on the San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of military-authorized activities on San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes velox macrotis) were investigated at Camp Roberts Army National Guard Training Site from 1988 to 1991. Military-authorized activities included military training exercises, facilities maintenance, new construction, controlled burning, livestock grazing, and public-access hunting. Positive effects of the military included habitat preservation, preactivity surveys, and natural resources management practices designed to conserve kit foxes and their habitat. Perceived negative effects such as entrapment in dens, shootings during military exercises, and accidental poisoning were not observed. Foxes were observed in areas being used simultaneously by military units. Authorized activities were known to have caused the deaths of three of 52 radiocollared foxes recovered dead: one became entangled in concertina wire, one was believed shot by a hunter, and one was struck by a vehicle. Entanglement in communication wire may have contributed to the death of another radiocollared fox that was killed by a predator. Approximately 10% of kit fox dens encountered showed evidence of vehicle traffic, but denning sites did not appear to be a limiting factor for kit foxes.

Berry, W.H.; Standley, W.G.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Assessing homeland chemical hazards outside the military gates: industrial hazard threat assessments for department of defense installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of comprehensive joint medical surveillance measures outlined by the Department of Defense, the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) is beginning to assess environmental health threats to continental US military installations. A common theme in comprehensive joint medical surveillance, in support of Force Health Protection, is the identification and assessment of potential environmental health hazards, and the evaluation and documentation of actual exposures in both a continental US and outside a continental US setting. For the continental US assessments, the USACHPPM has utilized the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) database for risk management plans in accordance with Public Law 106-40, and the toxic release inventory database, in a state-of the art geographic information systems based program, termed the Consequence Assessment and Management Tool Set, or CATS, for assessing homeland industrial chemical hazards outside the military gates. As an example, the US EPA toxic release inventory and risk management plans databases are queried to determine the types and locations of industries surrounding a continental US military installation. Contaminants of concern are then ranked with respect to known toxicological and physical hazards, where they are then subject to applicable downwind hazard simulations using applicable meteorological and climatological data sets. The composite downwind hazard areas are mapped in relation to emergency response planning guidelines (ERPG), which were developed by the American Industrial Hygiene Association to assist emergency response personnel planning for catastrophic chemical releases. In addition, other geographic referenced data such as transportation routes, satellite imagery and population data are included in the operational, equipment, and morale risk assessment and management process. These techniques have been developed to assist military medical planners and operations personnel in determining the industrial hazards, vulnerability assessments and health risk assessments to continental United States military installations. These techniques and procedures support the Department of Defense Force Protection measures, which provides awareness of a terrorism threat, appropriate measures to prevent terrorist attacks and mitigate terrorism's effects in the event that preventive measures are ineffective.

Jeffrey S Kirkpatrick; Jacqueline M Howard; David A Reed

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Trade Off Under Low-Carbon Economy: Ocean Shipping Vessel Speed, Carbon Emission or Shipowner’s Profit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The total fuel consumption per vessel per voyage equals to the sum of fuel consumed by both main engine and auxiliary engine, so the equation represents the fuel consumption per vessel per round voyage is as foll...

Gang Li; Huan Xu; Wei Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Investigation of downward facing critical heat flux with water-based nanofluids for In-Vessel Retention applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-Vessel Retention ("IVR") is a severe accident management strategy that is power limiting to the Westinghouse AP1000 due to critical heat flux ("CHF") at the outer surface of the reactor vessel. Increasing the CHF level ...

DeWitt, Gregory L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) vessel architecture is linked to chilling and salinity tolerance in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

architecture may influence mangrove chilling and salinity tolerance. We surveyed populations of A. germinans throughout the Gulf to determine if vessel architecture was linked to field environmental conditions. We measured vessel density, hydraulically weighted...

Madrid, Eric N.; Armitage, Anna R.; Lopez-Portillo, Jorge

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

356

Method for forming a bladder for fluid storage vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

Mitlitsky, Fred (Livermore, CA); Myers, Blake (Livermore, CA); Magnotta, Frank (Lafayette, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

U.S. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2010 International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27–29, 2010, in Beijing, China.

358

Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel (Dollars...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013...

359

Anatomic study of the external pudenal vessels to the anterior scrotal region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?The aim of this study was to examine the anatomy of the external pudendal vessels as they supply the anterior scrotal region. Twenty cadavers were dissected and a catheter was used to inject India ink into th...

M. Castro; E. Brenda; A. Marques; M. D. Pereira

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Assessment of Vessel Requirements for the U.S. Offshore Wind Sector  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report that investigates the anticipated demand for various vessel types associated with offshore wind development in the United States through 2030 and assesses related market barriers and mitigating policy options.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Symmetry Properties of the Flow in a Nuclear Reactor Vessel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The turbulent flow in a Pressurized Water Reactor vessel is modeled in a small scale experiment. Careful observations and flow control experiments, driven by considerations of symmetry, show that this flow of ...

Pierre Albaréde

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Fast neutron fluence of yonggwang nuclear unit 1 reactor pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50, Appendix H, requires that the neutron dosimetry be present to monitor the reactor vessel throughout plant life. The Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry System has been installed for Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 1 after complete withdrawal of all six in-vessel surveillance capsules. This system has been installed in the reactor cavity annulus in order to measure the fast neutron spectrum coming out through the reactor pressure vessel. Cycle specific neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain the energy dependent neutron flux throughout the reactor geometry including dosimetry positions. Comparisons between calculations and measurements were performed for the reaction rates of each dosimetry sensors and results show good agreements. (authors)

Yoo, C.; Km, B.; Chang, K.; Leeand, S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., 150 Dukjin-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J. [Chungnam National Univ., 220 Gung-dong, Yuseung-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

R&D of Large Stationary Hydrogen/CNG/HCNG Storage Vessels  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

hydrogen accelerates crack propagation rate of the material and leads to brittle fracture. International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010Beijing, P.R. China R&D...

364

Research on hydrogen environment fatigue test system and correlative fatigue test of hydrogen storage vessel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 70MPa hydrogen environment fatigue test system has been designed and applied in the manufacture of a hydrogen storage vessel. Key equipment is the 80MPa flat steel ribbon wound high pressure hydrogen storage ve...

Rong Li ? ?; Chuan-xiang Zheng ???…

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, and Wave Modeling in Stented Vessels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arterial hypertension (PAH), to identify the hemodynamic attributes which could be altered to ameliorate the progression of these diseases. We then simulated blood flow through five, simple finite element vessel models to determine the effects of stents...

Peters, Andrew

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

366

ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY OF DOMESTIC GROUNDFISH HARVEST FROM WESTERN ALASKA WATERS: A COMPARISON OF VESSEL TYPES,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to changes in fuel price. A $0.026/1 ($0.10/gallon) increase in fuel price increased the break-even ex currentiy offered by two joint venture firms and a fuel price of $0.277/1 ($1.05/gallon), break-even catch% less and fuel efficiency was 28% higher for the smaller of the two vessels. Costs for either vessel

367

Energy performance evaluation of fishing vessels by fuel mass flow measuring system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new fuel consumption monitoring system was set up for research purpose in order to evaluate the energy performance of fishing vessels under different operating conditions. The system has been tested on two semi-pelagic pair trawlers in the Adriatic Sea with an engine power of around 900 kW, and with length overall of around 30 m. Both vessels work with a gear of similar design and size, the differences between the two vessels are in the propeller design and the hull material: the first with a controllable pitch propeller (CPP) and a metal hull, the second with a fixed pitch propeller (FPP) and a wooden hull. The fuel monitoring system conceived at CNR-ISMAR Ancona (Italy) consists of two mass flow sensors, one multichannel recorder and one GPS data logger. The working time duration, the vessel speed, the total fuel consumption and the instant fuel rate were logged by the system. A typical commercial round trip for a semi-pelagic trawler consists of several fishing operations (steaming, trawling sailing, etc.). Fuel consumption rate and vessel speed data were used to identify energy performance under different vessel-operating conditions. The highest fuel demands were during the trawling (130 l/h at 4.4 kn) and the steaming (100–130 l/h at 11 kn) phases. Fuel savings of up to 15% could be obtained by reducing the navigation speed of half a knot.

Antonello Sala; Francesco De Carlo; Gabriele Buglioni; Alessandro Lucchetti

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Today`s thermal imaging systems: Background and applications for civilian law enforcement and military force protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal (infrared) imagers can solve many security assessment problems associated with the protection of high-value assets at military bases, secure installations, or commercial facilities. Thermal imagers can provide surveillance video from security areas or perimeters both day and night without expensive security lighting. In the past, thermal imagers required cryogenic cooling to operate. The high cost and maintenance requirements restricted their use. However, recent developments in reliable, linear drive cryogenic coolers and uncooled infrared imagers have dramatically reduced system cost. These technology developments are resulting in greater accessibility and practicality for military as well as civilian security and force protection applications. This paper discusses recent advances in thermal imaging technology including uncooled and cryo-cooled. Applications of Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) systems are also discussed, including integration with a high-speed pan/tilt mount and remote control, video frame storage and recall, low-cost vehicle-mounted systems, and hand-held devices. Other facility installation topics will be discussed, such as site layout, assessment ranges, imager positioning, fields-of-view, sensor and alarm reporting systems, and communications links.

Bisbee, T.L.; Pritchard, D.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Evaluation of low-residue soldering for military and commercial applications: A report from the Low-Residue Soldering Task Force  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LRSTF combined the efforts of industry, military, and government to evaluate low-residue soldering processes for military and commercial applications. These processes were selected for evaluation because they provide a means for the military to support the presidential mandate while producing reliable hardware at a lower cost. This report presents the complete details and results of a testing program conducted by the LRSTF to evaluate low-residue soldering for printed wiring assemblies. A previous informal document provided details of the test plan used in this evaluation. Many of the details of that test plan are contained in this report. The test data are too massive to include in this report, however, these data are available on disk as Excel spreadsheets upon request. The main purpose of low-residue soldering is to eliminate waste streams during the manufacturing process.

Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burress, R.V. [SEHO (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Assessment of typical BWR (boiling water reactor) vessel configurations and examination coverage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Even though boiling water reactors (BWRs) are not susceptible to the kind of incident known as pressurized thermal shock that must be considered in the design and operation of pressurized water reactors, BWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) have experienced higher than expected embrittlement caused by fast neutron irradiation. This has required the vessel to be at a higher temperature than originally projected before the plant can be taken to power operation. In addition, many BWR plants have received exemption from the 10-year volumetric nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the vessel as required by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B PV) Code Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components,'' because NDE access is severely restricted. Since many RPV welds have not been examined after being placed in service and the potential for service-induced flaws exists, regulatory authorities are looking closely at examination relief requests. BWR reactor vessel examination coverage is typically limited by plant design. Most BWR plants were designed when inservice examination codes were in the early stages of development, and very little consideration was give to designing for NDE access. Consequently, there is restricted access for many areas of the RPV. Since an increase in examination requirements has been placed in ASME B PV Code Section XI in these areas, efforts have begun on a thorough analysis of the vessel weld volumes examined during inservice examination and an evaluation of possibility expanding the RPV examination coverage. Because of these concerns, an investigation of the accessibility of the reactor vessel for NDE was performed to define the present status and to determine the improvements in coverage that can be accomplished in the near future. 7 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Walker, S.M. (EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation Center, Charlotte, NC (USA)); Feige, E.J.; Ingamells, J.R. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA)); Calhoun, G.L.; Davis, J.; Kapoor, A. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Thermal Behavior of SST-1 Vacuum Vessel and Plasma Facing Components during Baking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For plasma physics experiment, the baking of vacuum vessel (VV) as well as plasma facing components (PFC) of Steady-state Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is very essential. SST-1 vacuum vessel consists of ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible sixteen sectors in which U-shaped baking channels are embedded on inner surfaces of each of them. Similarly, \\{PFCs\\} are comprised of modular graphite diverters and movable graphite based limiters and stainless steel (SS 304L) tubes are brazed on the back plate of PFC for baking. Baking of SST-1 vacuum vessel and plasma facing components are carried out using nitrogen gas heating and supply system. SST-1 main vacuum vessel is baked at 150 °C by circulating hot nitrogen gas at 250 °C at 4.5 bar gauge (g) pressure through these U-shaped channels. The plasma facing components (PFC) are baked at 250 °C or more in the similar fashion by passing hot nitrogen gas through these SS brazed tubes. Thermal analysis shows that the temperature of 150 °C at the vacuum vessel is achieved within ten hours if hot nitrogen gas is passed at the ramp rate of 50 °C/h while thermal shields are maintained at 85 K. It is also observed that the baking of either of them at a given temperature could be possible through radiation if one of them is maintained at desired temperature. The vacuum vessel at room temperature could be baked to 150 °C due to radiation from PFC after 40 hours when PFC alone is baked at 150 °C. The mass flow rate required to bake SST-1 vacuum vessel at 150 °C is 1.074 kg/s while that for raising \\{PFCs\\} temperature to 150 °C is 0.57 kg/s. The mass flow rate required to bake \\{PFCs\\} at 250 °C is 0.80 kg/s.

Ziauddin Khan; Yuvakiran Paravastu; Subrata Pradhan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Adaptive approach to accurate analysis of small-diameter vessels in cineangiograms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In coronary vessels smaller than 1 mm in diameter, it is difficult to accurately identify lumen borders using existing border detection techniques. Computer-detected diameters of small coronary vessels are often severely overestimated due to the influence of the imaging system point spread function and the use of an edge operator designed for a broad range of vessel sizes. Computer-detected diameters may be corrected if a calibration curve for the X-ray system is available. Unfortunately, the performance of this postprocessing diameter correction approach is severely limited by the presence of image noise. The authors report here a new approach that uses a two-stage adaption of edge operator parameters to optimally match the edge operator to the local lumen diameter. In the first stage, approximate lumen diameters are detected using a single edge operator in a half-resolution image. Depending on the approximate lumen size, one of three edge operators is selected for the second full-resolution stage in which left and right coronary borders are simultaneously identified. The method was tested in a set of 72 segments of nine angiographic phantom vessels with diameters ranging from 0.46 to 4.14 mm and in 82 clinical coronary angiograms. Performance of the adaptive simultaneous border detection method was compared to that of a conventional border detection method and to that of a postprocessing diameter correction border detection method. Adaptive border detection yielded significantly improved accuracy in small phantom vessels and across all vessel sizes in comparison to the conventional and postprocessing diameter correction methods. Adaptive simultaneous coronary border detection provides both accurate and robust quantitative analysis of coronary vessels of all sizes.

Sonka, M.; Winniford, M.D.; Collins, S.M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Reddy, G.K. [Cemax-Icon, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States)] [Cemax-Icon, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Interagency Process in Support & Stability Operations: Integrating and Aligning the Roles and Missions of Military and Civilian Agencies in Conflict and Post-Conflict Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-long graduate Capstone course in the Bush School of Government‘s Masters Program in International Affairs. The course provides a research experience for students in the final semester of the two-year program, as they operate in teams to address an important... needed in short term and the long term? 5. Does the U.S. government have a means for rating the effectiveness of civil-military coordination? Military veterans of Iraq note that they were not fully prepared with the skills needed for support...

Baetjer, Patrick; Cline, Chris; Hernandorena, Carlos; Polley, Brian; Rogers, Kate; Smith, Amanda; Voelkel, Tyson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Embolization of Collateral Vessels Using Mechanically Detachable Coils in Young Children with Congenital Heart Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of embolizing collateral vessels using mechanically detachable coils (MDCs) in children aged 3 years or younger with congenital heart disease. The subjects were 8 children with congenital heart disease featuring collateral vessels (age 18 days-3 years): 3 with a single ventricle, 2 with the tetralogy of Fallot, 2 with pulmonary atresia, and 1 with a ventricular septal defect. The embolized vessels were the major aortopulmonary collateral artery (MAPCA) in 5 patients, the persistent left superior vena cava in 2, and the coronary arteriovenous fistula in 1. A 4 or a 5 F catheter was used as the guiding device, and embolization was performed using MDCs and other conventional coils introduced through the microcatheter. One patient had growth of new MAPCAs after embolization, and these MAPCAs were also embolized with MDCs. Thus, a total of 9 embolization procedures were performed in 8 patients. Complete occlusion of the collateral vessels was achieved in 8 of 9 procedures (89%). Seven of 8 patients (88%) had uneventful courses after embolization, and MDC procedures appeared to play important roles in avoiding coil migration and achievement of safe coil embolization. One patient who underwent MAPCA embolization showed no improvement in heart function and died 2 months and 19 days later. Embolization of collateral vessels using MDCs in young children with congenital heart disease can be an effective procedure and a valuable adjunct to surgical management.

Sato, Y.; Ogino, H.; Hara, M.; Satake, M.; Oshima, H.; Banno, T. [Nagoya City University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Nagoya) (Japan); Mizuno, K. [Nagoya City University Medical School, Department of Pediatrics (Nagoya) (Japan); Mishima, A. [Nagoya City University Medical School, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Nagoya) (Japan); Shibamoto, Y. [Nagoya City University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Nagoya) (Japan)

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Structural integrity assessment of type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic pressure vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee approved the Code Case 2123 in 1992 which allows the use of Type 201LN stainless steel in the construction of ASME Section VIII, Division 1 and Division 2 pressure vessels for -320{degrees}F applications. Type 201LN stainless steel is a nitrogen strengthened modified version of ASTM A240, Type 201 stainless steel with a restricted chemistry. The Code allowable design stresses for Type 201LN for Division 1 vessels are approximately 27% higher than Type 304 stainless steel and equal to that of the 5 Ni and 9 Ni steels. This paper discusses the important features of the Code Case 2123 and the structural integrity assessment of Type 201LN stainless steel cryogenic vessels. Tensile, Charpy-V-notch and fracture properties have been obtained on several heats of this steel including weldments. A linear-elastic fracture mechanics analysis has been conducted to assess the expected fracture mode and the fracture-critical crack sizes. The results have been compared with Type 304 stainless steel, 5 Ni and 9 Ni steel vessels.

Rana, M.D.; Zawierucha, R. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Grey-box modeling of an ocean vessel for operational optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Operational optimization of ocean vessels, both off-line and in real-time, is becoming increasingly important due to rising fuel cost and added environmental constraints. Accurate and efficient simulation models are needed to achieve maximum energy efficiency. In this paper a grey-box modeling approach for the simulation of ocean vessels is presented. The modeling approach combines conventional analysis models based on physical principles (a white-box model) with a feed forward neural-network (a black-box model). Two different ways of combining these models are presented, in series and in parallel. The results of simulating several trips of a medium sized container vessel show that the grey-box modeling approach, both serial and parallel approaches, can improve the prediction of the vessel fuel consumption significantly compared to a white-box model. However, a prediction of the vessel speed is only improved slightly. Furthermore, the results give an indication of the potential advantages of grey-box models, which is extrapolation beyond a given training data set and the incorporation of physical phenomena which are not modeled in the white-box models. Finally, included is a discussion on how to enhance the predictability of the grey-box models as well as updating the neural-network in real-time.

Leifur Þ. Leifsson; Hildur Sævarsdóttir; Sven Þ. Sigurðsson; Ari Vésteinsson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Modular Inspection System for a Complete IN-Service Examination of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel, Including Beltline Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report for a DOE Phase II Contract Describing the design and fabrication of a reactor inspection modular rover prototype for reactor vessel inspection.

David H. Bothell

2000-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

In-Vessel Coil Material Failure Rate Estimates for ITER Design Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ITER international project design teams are working to produce an engineering design for construction of this large tokamak fusion experiment. One of the design issues is ensuring proper control of the fusion plasma. In-vessel magnet coils may be needed for plasma control, especially the control of edge localized modes (ELMs) and plasma vertical stabilization (VS). These coils will be lifetime components that reside inside the ITER vacuum vessel behind the blanket modules. As such, their reliability is an important design issue since access will be time consuming if any type of repair were necessary. The following chapters give the research results and estimates of failure rates for the coil conductor and jacket materials to be used for the in-vessel coils. Copper and CuCrZr conductors, and stainless steel and Inconel jackets are examined.

L. C. Cadwallader

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Nuclear analysis and shielding optimisation in support of the ITER In-Vessel Viewing System design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The In-Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) units proposed for ITER are deployed to perform in-vessel examination. During plasma operations, the IVVS is located beyond the vacuum vessel, with shielding blocks envisaged to protect components from neutron damage and reduce shutdown dose rate (SDR) levels. Analyses were conducted to determine the effectiveness of several shielding configurations. The neutron response of the system was assessed using global variance reduction techniques and a surface source, and shutdown dose rate calculations were undertaken using MCR2S. Unshielded, the absorbed dose to piezoelectric motors (PZT) was found to be below stable limits, however activation of the primary closure plate (PCP) was prohibitively high. A scenario with shielding blocks at probe level showed significantly reduced PCP contact dose rate, however still marginally exceeded port cell requirements. The addition of shielding blocks at the bioshield plug demonstrated PCP contact dose rates below project requirements. SDR l...

Turner, A; Loughlin, M J; Ghani, Z; Hurst, G; Bue, A Lo; Mangham, S; Puiu, A; Zheng, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Monte Carlo approach to forecasting the demand for offshore supply vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the near future, the demand for offshore supply vessels in Brazil will be driven by the activities induced by the bids carried out by the regulatory agency, ANP. The likely tendency is to increase the number of bids and consequently, the demand for vessels in the coming years. The proposed model consists of a Monte Carlo simulation of the offshore oil exploration and production projects. The model considers some parameters that aim at capturing the effect of the operators patterns, water depth, duration of seismic research and exploration and drilling work, number of wells, geographic location and geological risk. An estimate is obtained for the additional offshore supply vessels demand, for the period of 2006-2008.

Jr">Floriano C.M. Pires Jr; Augusto R. Antoun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

382

DOE, NREL Help DoD Enhance Energy Security (Fact Sheet), Integrated Deployment: Military, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NREL Help DoD Enhance NREL Help DoD Enhance Energy Security The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are helping the U.S. government, including the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), deploy large-scale energy efficiency measures and renewable energy technologies to reduce costs, increase energy security, and meet federal mandates. As the largest energy consumer within the U.S. federal government, DoD has long recognized the strategic impor- tance of energy to its mission and is particularly challenged to address energy security, reliability, and cost concerns. DoD has more than 500 military installations encompassing nearly 2 billion square feet of space, and had an annual installations energy bill of more than $4 billion in 2010.

383

RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN NEAR JUNCTION OF HIGHWAY 3I AND MILITARY ROAD IN NIAGARA FALLSI NEI{ YOR  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7At 7At a z'/a tlYr'/ ORNL/RASA-85/ 42 RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN NEAR JUNCTION OF HIGHWAY 3I AND MILITARY ROAD IN NIAGARA FALLSI NEI{ YOR Accesr to thc inlormalion in thlt rcport is limitcd to tho!. indacatod on the di3tribution lilt and to oopartmont ot Encrgy lnd Oeplrtmcnt of Enorgy Contracton vd' This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U nited States Government. N€ither the U nited States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied' or assum€s any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness' or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not inf ringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

384

Departments of the Navy, Energy and Agriculture Invest in Construction of Three Biorefineries to Produce Drop-In Biofuel for Military  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As part of a 2011 Presidential directive, the Departments of Navy, Energy, and Agriculture announced today that three companies have been awarded contracts to construct and commission biorefineries capable of producing “drop-in” biofuels to meet the transportation needs of the military and private sector.

385

Multidimensional shielding analysis of the JASPER in-vessel fuel storage experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The In-Vessel Fuel Storage (IVFS) experiments analyzed in this report were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR) as part of the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER). These IVFS experiments were designed to study source multiplication and three-dimensional effects related to in-vessel storage of spent fuel elements in liquid metal reactor (LMR) systems. The present report describes the 2-D and 3-D models, analyses, and calculated results corresponding to a limited subset of those IVFS experiments in which the US LMR program has a particular interest.

Bucholz, J.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Protective interior wall and attach8ing means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An array of connected plates mounted on the inside wall of the vacuum vessel of a magnetic confinement reactor in order to provide a protective surface for energy deposition inside the vessel. All fasteners are concealed and protected beneath the plates, while the plates themselves share common mounting points. The entire array is installed with torqued nuts on threaded studs; provision also exists for thermal expansion by mounting each plate with two of its four mounts captured in an oversize grooved spool. A spool-washer mounting hardware allows one edge of a protective plate to be torqued while the other side remains loose, by simply inverting the spool-washer hardware.

Phelps, Richard D. (Greeley, CO); Upham, Gerald A. (Valley Center, CA); Anderson, Paul M. (San Diego, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

An evaluation of life extension of the HFIR pressure vessel. Supplement 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary analyses were performed in 1994 to determine the remaining useful life of the HFIR pressure vessel. The estimated total permissible life was {approximately} 50 EFPY (100 MW). More recently, the analyses have been updated, including a more precise treatment of uncertainties in the calculation of the hydrostatic-proof-test conditions and also including the contribution of gammas to the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness. These and other refinements had essentially no effect on the predicted useful life of the vessel or on the specified hydrostatic proof-test conditions.

Cheverton, R.D.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A new method to predict vessel/platform critical dynamics in a realistic seaway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...shing vessel and a very large semi- submersible platform due to pseudo-random...that, in general, for typical semi-submersibles, the roll axis is not the critical...dredge Patti-B. NTSB Marine Accident Report. Newman, J. 1982 Marine...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Proceedings of PVP2007 2007 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of PVP2007 2007 ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference July 22-26, 2007 either to fatigue or environmentally-assisted cracking exacerbated by residual stresses introduced during can have significant effects on the susceptibility of a material to degradation mechanisms

Cambridge, University of

390

A Novel Methodology for Robust Dynamic Positioning of Marine Vessels: Theory and Experiments*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in the offshore, oil, and gas industries many applications are only possible with the use of DP systems operated ship, the Cybership III, under different sea conditions in a towing tank equipped with a hydraulic of the Shell Oil Company. Nowadays, DP systems are used with a wide range of vessel types and in different

Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

391

MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

392

Honeywell UOP technology is used to clean natural gas on FPSO vessels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modec Inc, which supplies offshore production systems to the oil and gas industry, has commissioned a Separex membrane system from UOP Llc, a Honeywell company that is based in Des Plaines, Illinois, USA, for processing natural gas on board a new floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) vessel.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Characterization of Gas?Liquid Flows in Stirred Vessels Using Pressure and Torque Fluctuations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas?liquid flows in a stirred vessel exhibit different flow regimes and demonstrate complex interaction of transport processes with varying spatio-temporal scales. The knowledge of key space and time scales of fluid dynamics is important for designing and ...

A. R. Khopkar; S. S. Panaskar; A. B. Pandit; V. V. Ranade

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

395

First International Symposium on Fishing Vessel Energy Efficiency E-Fishing, Vigo, Spain, May 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First International Symposium on Fishing Vessel Energy Efficiency E-Fishing, Vigo, Spain, May 2010 automatic optimisation tools to design efficient trawls in terms of energy consumption. The developed tool should provide a substantial gain on the fuel consumed of actual fishing devices while maintaining

Lewandowski, Roger

396

Bevacizumab Has Differential and Dose-Dependent Effects on Glioma Blood Vessels and Tumor Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...injection of 5 105 U87-RFP cells was carried out after drilling a borehole. Cells were injected 1 mm lateral to the sagittal...of tortuous blood vessels with fluctuating, often large diameters, a high vascular density, and lack of a...

Louisa von Baumgarten; David Brucker; Anca Tirniceru; Yvonne Kienast; Stefan Grau; Steffen Burgold; Jochen Herms; and Frank Winkler

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

V1.6 Development of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies for Low Cost Hydrogen Storage Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop an innovative manufacturing process for Type IV high-pressure hydrogen storage vessels, with the intent to significantly lower manufacturing costs. Part of the development is to integrate the features of high precision AFP and commercial FW. Evaluation of an alternative fiber to replace a portion of the baseline fiber will help to reduce costs further.

Leavitt, Mark; Lam, Patrick; Nelson, Karl M.; johnson, Brice A.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Ruiz, Antonio; Adams, Jesse

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Numerical analysis of docking operation between service vessels and offshore wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Offshore renewable wind energy market is expected to expand dramatically in the next 5–10 years. Reduction of downtime is crucial to the competitiveness of this new sector. One important part of the research efforts is the evaluation of operational limits (weather limits) of different vessel/access concepts for transportation of maintenance personnel, equipment, and spare parts to the offshore wind turbines. This paper gives a brief description of possible types of service vessel and access system. It presents methodologies for numerical analysis of docking operation by an active motion compensated access device and a simple fender. The proposed frequency–domain approach to the analysis of docking operation with fender is new and highly efficient compared to time–domain simulation. The methods have been applied to two vessel/access concepts in this paper and they can be used in docking operability assessments for a variety of vessels that employ an active motion compensated device or a fender as access system to offshore wind turbines.

MingKang Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent data from the HFIR vessel surveillance program indicate a substantial radiation embrittlement rate effect at low irradiation temperatures (/approximately/120/degree/F) for A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II, and corresponding welds. PWR vessel supports are fabricated of similar materials and are subjected to the same low temperatures and fast neutron fluxes (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 9/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s, E > 1.0 MeV) as those in the HFIR vessel. Thus, the embrittlement rate of these structures may be greater than previously anticipated. A study sponsored by the NRC is under way at ORNL to determine the impact of the rate effect on PWR vessel-support life expectancy. The scope includes the interpretation and application of the HFIR data, a survey of all light-water-reactor vessel support designs, and a structural and fracture-mechanics analysis of the supports for two specific PWR plants of particular interest with regard to a potential for support failure as a result of propagation of flaws. Calculations performed thus far indicate best-estimate critical flaw sizes, corresponding to 32 EFPY, of /approximately/0.2 in. for one plant and /approximately/0.4 in. for the other. These flaw sizes are small enough to be of concern. However, it appears that low-cycle fatigue is not a viable mechanism for creation of flaws of this size, and thus, presumably, such flaws would have to exist at the time of fabrication. 59 refs., 128 figs., 49 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

In-vessel Retention Strategy for High Power Reactors - K-INERI Final Report (includes SBLB Test Results for Task 3 on External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) Boiling Data and CHF Enhancement Correlations)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe PWR (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a collaborative, three-year, U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was completed in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) investigated the performance of ERVC and an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) to determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe.

F. B. Cheung; J. Yang; M. B. Dizon; J. Rempe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A re-assembly and reconstruction of the 9th-century AD vessel wrecked off the coast of Bozburun, Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or nearly-whole amphorae, personal items, palynological material, and approximately 35 percent of the vessel??s wooden hull. This dissertation is a record of the curation, cataloging, analysis and re-assembly of the preserved elements of the Bozburun vessel...

Harpster, Matthew Benjamin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Design Analysis and Manufacturing Studies for ITER In-Vessel Coils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ITER is incorporating two types of In Vessel Coils (IVCs): ELM Coils to mitigate Edge Localized Modes and VS Coils to provide Vertical Stabilization of the plasma. Strong coupling with the plasma is required so that the ELM and VS Coils can meet their performance requirements. Accordingly, the IVCs are in close proximity to the plasma, mounted just behind the Blanket Shield Modules. This location results in a radiation and temperature environment that is severe necessitating new solutions for material selection as well as challenging analysis and design solutions. Fitting the coil systems in between the blanket shield modules and the vacuum vessel leads to difficult integration with diagnostic cabling and cooling water manifolds.

Kalish, M.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Neumeyer, C.; Titus, P.; Zhai, Y.; Zatz, I.; Messineo, M.; Gomez, M.; Hause, C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States); Daly, E.; Martin, A. [ITER Organization, St. Paul-lez-Duranace (France); Wu, Y.; Jin, J.; Long, F.; Song, Y.; Wang, Z.; Yun, Zan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Anhui (China). Institute of Plasma Physics; Hsiao, J. [Vector Resources, Annandale, VA (United States); Pillsbury, J. R. [Sherbrooke Consulting, Arlington, VA (United States); Bohm, T.; Sawan, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States). Fustion Technology Institute; Jiang, NFN [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China)

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF{sub 6} freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF{sub 6} in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % {sup 235}U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

Jordan, W.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Calculational criticality analyses of 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculational criticality analyses have been performed for 10- and 20-MW UF[sub 6] freezer/sublimer vessels. The freezer/sublimers have been analyzed over a range of conditions that encompass normal operation and abnormal conditions. The effects of HF moderation of the UF[sub 6] in each vessel have been considered for uranium enriched between 2 and 5 wt % [sup 235]U. The results indicate that the nuclearly safe enrichments originally established for the operation of a 10-MW freezer/sublimer, based on a hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratio of 0.33, are acceptable. If strict moderation control can be demonstrated for hydrogen-to-uranium moderation ratios that are less than 0.33, then the enrichment limits for the 10-MW freezer/sublimer may be increased slightly. The calculations performed also allow safe enrichment limits to be established for a 20-NM freezer/sublimer under moderation control.

Jordan, W.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Passive air cooling of liquid metal-cooled reactor with double vessel leak accommodation capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive and inherent shutdown heat removal method with a backup air flow path which allows decay heat removal following a postulated double vessel leak event in a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The improved reactor design incorporates the following features: (1) isolation capability of the reactor cavity environment in the event that simultaneous leaks develop in both the reactor and containment vessels; (2) a reactor silo liner tank which insulates the concrete silo from the leaked sodium, thereby preserving the silo's structural integrity; and (3) a second, independent air cooling flow path via tubes submerged in the leaked sodium which will maintain shutdown heat removal after the normal flow path has been isolated.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

USING A CONTAINMENT VESSEL LIFTING APPARATUS FOR REMOTE OPERATIONS OF SHIPPING PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 9977 and the 9975 shipping packages are used in various nuclear facilities within the Department of Energy. These shipping packages are often loaded in designated areas with designs using overhead cranes or A-frames with lifting winches. However, there are cases where loading operations must be performed in remote locations where these facility infrastructures do not exist. For these locations, a lifting apparatus has been designed to lift the containment vessels partially out of the package for unloading operations to take place. Additionally, the apparatus allows for loading and closure of the containment vessel and subsequent pre-shipment testing. This paper will address the design of the apparatus and the challenges associated with the design, and it will describe the use of the apparatus.

Loftin, Bradley [Savannah River National Laboratory; Koenig, Richard [Savannah River National Laboratory

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

407

Integrity management of a HIC-damaged pipeline and refinery pressure vessel through hydrogen permeation measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen permeation measurements were used in the successful operation of a sour gas pipeline subsequent to a hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) failure in September 1992. Two joints of HIC-resistant pipe were used to repair the failed section and adjacent cut-outs. The pipeline has been operated for five years with no further instances of HIC failure. Hydrogen permeation monitoring was chosen as an integrity management tool because no techniques are currently available to inspect for HIC damage in a pipeline this size. Self-powered electrochemical devices installed on the pipeline were employed to monitor and control the effectiveness of a batch inhibition program in maintaining diffusing hydrogen atom concentrations below the laboratory-measured threshold for initiation of HIC damage. Permeation monitoring of a HIC-damaged refinery pressure vessel indicated very high hydrogen atom flux, despite attempts to inhibit corrosion with ammonium polysulfide injection. In this instance it was decided that replacement of the vessel was necessary.

Hay, M.G.; Rider, D.W. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A barge-mounted hydrogen-fueled proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system has the potential to reduce emissions and fossil fuel use of maritime vessels in and around ports. This study determines the technical feasibility of this concept and examines specific options on the U.S. West Coast for deployment practicality and potential for commercialization.The conceptual design of the system is found to be straightforward and technically feasible in several configurations corresponding to various power levels and run times.The most technically viable and commercially attractive deployment options were found to be powering container ships at berth at the Port of Tacoma and/or Seattle, powering tugs at anchorage near the Port of Oakland, and powering refrigerated containers on-board Hawaiian inter-island transport barges. Other attractive demonstration options were found at the Port of Seattle, the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, the California Maritime Academy, and an excursion vessel on the Ohio River.

Pratt, Joseph William; Harris, Aaron P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Interim Report: Coiled Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using Cost Effective Vessel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOCUMENT TITLE: DOCUMENT TITLE: Self Supporting Riser Technology to Enable Coiled Tubing Intervention for Deepwater Wells Document No.: 08121-1502-12 RPSEA PROJECT TITLE: Coil Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using a Cost Effective Vessel RPSEA Project No.: 08121-1502 01 April 2011 Charles R. Yemington, PE Project Manager Nautilus International 400 North Sam Houston Parkway East, Suite 105 Houston, Texas 77060 RPSEA Project No.: 08121-1502 Coiled Tubing Drilling and Intervention System Using a Cost Effective Vessel RPSEA Project 08121-1502 01 April 2011 Page 2 of 91 LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Nautilus International, LLC. as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA). RPSEA members, the

410

Analysis of the ANL Test Method for 6CVS Containment Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the fall of 2010, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) contracted with vendors to design and build 6CVS containment vessels as part of their effort to ship Fuel Derived Mixed Fission Product material. The 6CVS design is based on the Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) design for 9975 and 9977 six inch diameter containment vessels. The main difference between the designs is that the 6CVS credits the inner O-ring seal as the containment boundary while the SRNL design credits the outer O-ring seal. Since the leak test must be done with the inner O-ring in place, the containment vessel does not have a pathway for getting the helium into the vessel during the leak test. The leak testing contractor was not able to get acceptable leak rates with the specified O-ring, but they were able to pass the leak test with a slightly larger O-ring. ANL asked the SRNL to duplicate the leak test vendor's method to determine the cause of the high leak rates. The SRNL testing showed that the helium leak indications were caused by residual helium left within the 6CVS Closure Assembly by the leak test technique, and by helium permeation through the Viton O-ring seals. After SRNL completed their tests, the leak testing contractor was able to measure acceptable leak rates by using the slightly larger O-ring size, by purging helium from the lid threads, and by being very quick in getting the bell jar under a full vacuum. This paper describes the leak test vendor's test technique, and other techniques that could be have been used to successfully leak test the 6CVS's.

Trapp, D.; Crow, G.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

411

A methodology for determining fabrication flaws in a reactor pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a program with the major objective of estimating the rate of occurrence of fabrication flaws in US light-water reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). In this study, RPV mate4rial was examined using the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique for Ultrasonic Testing (SAFT-UT) to detect and characterize flaws created during fabrication. The inspection data obtained in this program has been analyzed to address the rates of flaw occurrence.

Schuster, G.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Simonen, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

File:06HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:06HIGBoilerPressureVesselPermit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 47 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:08, 24 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 09:08, 24 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (47 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 12:32, 23 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:32, 23 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (47 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 16:30, 24 July 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:30, 24 July 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (44 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs)

413

Investigation and analysis on ITER in-vessel coils’ raw-materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The ITER in-vessel coils (IVCs) consist of 27 coils edge localized modes (ELM) and 2 coils vertical stabilization (VS) which are all mounted on the vacuum vessel wall behind the shield modules. The \\{IVCs\\} design and manufacturing work is being conducted in between Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP) and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Because the position of ELM and VS coils is close and face to the plasma, the \\{IVCs\\} must undergo a severe environment, such as the high dose of radiation and high operation temperature, thus the conventional electrical insulation materials cannot be used. And the technology of “Stainless Steel Jacketed Mineral Insulated Conductor” (SSMIC) is deemed as the best choice to provide the necessary radiation resistance and compatibility strength in ITER's vacuum vessel. While mineral insulated conductor technology is not new, and is similar to the mineral insulated cable used in industrial. Some difficulties still need to be solved, such as searching for the proper raw-materials to make sure that the conductor have the properties of high current carrying capability, the necessary radiation resistance, the proper strength, at the same time, it must be come true in manufacture technology. This paper described the analysis of the materials for VS and ELM coil conductor.

Huan Jin; Yu Wu; Feng Long; Min Yu; Qiyang Han; Huajun Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A model for assessing the impact of vessel noise on odontocete communication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Offshore industrial noisesources ensonify marine mammal habitat and may mask detection of social signals and important environmental sounds. A probabilistic model of sound detection was developed for assessing the impact of underwater icebreaker noise on signal detection by beluga whales and narwhals. The probability of detecting sample signals in the absence of vessel noise was compared to that of detecting the same signals in ship noise using the MV arctic as a sample noisesource.Analysis of signal detection probabilities showed that loud signals centered on the 5?kHz critical band were more severely masked by ship noise than were quiet 5?kHz signals or loud 2?kHz signals. Thus long?range calls seem to be more susceptible to masking by ship noise than are short?range calls. The model could also be applied to other critical bands of interest. Changes in the probability of detecting vessel noise as estimated by the model were also correlated with changes in beluga and narwhal behavior observed in response to the vessel in operation.

Susan E. Cosens

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

DESIGN OF A CONTAINMENT VESSEL CLOSURE FOR SHIPMENT OF TRITIUM GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a design summary of the containment vessel closure for the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP). This new package is a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The new design is based on changes in the regulatory requirements. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials that enhance the package's ability to withstand dynamic loading and thermal effects. This paper will specifically summarize the design philosophy and engineered features of the BTSP containment vessel closure. The closure design incorporates a concave closure lid, metallic C-Ring seals for containing tritium gas, a metal bellows valve and an elastomer O-Ring for leak testing. The efficient design minimizes the overall vessel height and protects the valve housing from damage during postulated drop and crush scenarios. Design features will be discussed.

Eberl, K; Paul Blanton, P

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

416

Refractory lining system for high wear area of high temperature reaction vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A refractory-lined high temperature reaction vessel comprises a refractory ring lining constructed of refractory brick, a cooler, and a heat transfer medium disposed between the refractory ring lining and the cooler. The refractory brick comprises magnesia (MgO) and graphite. The heat transfer medium contacts the refractory brick and a cooling surface of the cooler, and is composed of a material that accommodates relative movement between the refractory brick and the cooler. The brick is manufactured such that the graphite has an orientation providing a high thermal conductivity in the lengthwise direction through the brick that is higher than the thermal conductivity in directions perpendicular to the lengthwise direction. The graphite preferably is flake graphite, in the range of about 10 to 20 wt %, and has a size distribution selected to provide maximum brick density. The reaction vessel may be used for performing a reaction process including the steps of forming a layer of slag on a melt in the vessel, the slag having a softening point temperature range, and forming a protective frozen layer of slag on the interior-facing surface of the refractory lining in at least a portion of a zone where the surface contacts the layer of slag, the protective frozen layer being maintained at or about the softening point of the slag. 10 figs.

Hubble, D.H.; Ulrich, K.H.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

W. H. M. Christie 18771882 E. W. Maunder 18811887  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ......................................... 242 Brown, T. ............................................. 325 Bunker, A

Crowther, Paul

419

Investigation of the use of nanofluids to enhance the In-Vessel Retention capabilities of Advanced Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofluids at very low concentrations experimentally exhibit a substantial increase in Critical Heat Flux (CHF) compared to water. The use of a nanofluid in the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) severe accident management strategy, ...

Hannink, Ryan Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Analysis of Mass Flow and Enhanced Mass Flow Methods of Flashing Refrigerant-22 from a Small Vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mass flow characteristics of flashing Refrigerant-22 from a small vessel were investigated. A flash boiling apparatus was designed and built. It was modeled after the flashing process encountered by the accumulator of air-source heat pump...

Nutter, Darin Wayne

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Structural integrity assessment of carbon and low-alloy steel pressure vessels using a simplified fracture mechanics procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a simplified fracture analysis procedure which was developed by Pellini to quantify fracture critical-crack sizes and crack-arrest temperatures of carbon and low-alloy steel pressure vessels. Fracture analysis diagrams have been developed using the simplified analysis procedure for various grades of carbon and low-alloy steels used in the construction of ASME, Section VIII, Division 1 pressure vessels. Structural integrity assessments have been conducted from the analysis diagrams.

Rana, M.D. (Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Research and Development Dept.)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A Review of Proposed Upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Potential Impacts to Reactor Vessel Integrity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was scheduled in October 2000 to implement design upgrades that include the enlargement of the HB-2 and HB-4 beam tubes. Higher dose rates and higher radiation embrittlement rates were predicted for the two beam-tube nozzles and surrounding vessel areas. ORNL had performed calculations for the upgraded design to show that vessel integrity would be maintained at acceptable levels. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was requested by the U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE/HQ) to perform an independent peer review of the ORNL evaluations. PNNL concluded that the calculated probabilities of failure for the HFIR vessel during hydrostatic tests and for operational conditions as estimated by ORNL are an acceptable basis for selecting pressures and test intervals for hydrostatic tests and for justifying continued operation of the vessel. While there were some uncertainties in the embrittlement predictions, the ongoing efforts at ORNL to measure fluence levels at critical locations of the vessel wall and to test materials from surveillance capsules should be effective in dealing with embrittlement uncertainties. It was recommended that ORNL continue to update their fracture mechanics calculations to reflect methods and data from ongoing research for commercial nuclear power plants. Such programs should provide improved data for vessel fracture mechanics calculations.

Simonen, Fredric A.

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to estimate military marine vessels’ fuel consumption. ThisIPCC as “fuels sold to and consumed by air or marine vessels

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Novel Steel/Concrete Composite Vessel for Stationary Storage of High-Pressure Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel, low-cost, high-pressure, steel/concrete composite vessel (SCCV) technology for stationary storage of compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH2) is currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) sponsored by DOE s Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program. The SCCV technology uses commodity materials including structural steels and concretes for achieving cost, durability and safety requirements. In particular, the hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength low-alloy steels, a major safety and durability issue for current industry-standard pressure vessel technology, is mitigated through the use of a unique layered steel shell structure. This report presents the cost analysis results of the novel SCCV technology. A high-fidelity cost analysis tool is developed, based on a detailed, bottom-up approach which takes into account the material and labor costs involved in each of the vessel manufacturing steps. A thorough cost study is performed to understand the SCCV cost as a function of the key vessel design parameters, including hydrogen pressure, vessel dimensions, and load-carrying ratio. The major conclusions include: The SCCV technology can meet the technical/cost targets set forth by DOE s FCT Program for FY2015 and FY2020 for all three pressure levels (i.e., 160, 430 and 860 bar) relevant to the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. Further vessel cost reduction can benefit from the development of advanced vessel fabrication technologies such as the highly automated friction stir welding (FSW). The ORNL-patented multi-layer, multi-pass FSW can not only reduce the amount of labor needed for assembling and welding the layered steel vessel, but also make it possible to use even higher strength steels for further cost reductions and improvement of vessel structural integrity. It is noted the cost analysis results demonstrate the significant cost advantage attainable by the SCCV technology for different pressure levels when compared to the industry-standard pressure vessel technology. The real-world performance data of SCCV under actual operating conditions is imperative for this new technology to be adopted by the hydrogen industry for stationary storage of CGH2. Therefore, the key technology development effort in FY13 and subsequent years will be focused on the fabrication and testing of SCCV mock-ups. The static loading and fatigue data will be generated in rigorous testing of these mock-ups. Successful tests are crucial to enabling the near-term impact of the developed storage technology on the CGH2 storage market, a critical component of the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure. In particular, the SCCV has high potential for widespread deployment in hydrogen fueling stations.

Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

SPACEWAR WIRE MILITARY SPACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arrest officer from Azerbaijan over brutal murder NATO chief hopes Putin will attend bloc's June summit

426

BWR In-Core Monitor Housing Replacement Under Dry Condition of Reactor Pressure Vessel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method of In-Core Monitor Housing replacement has been successfully applied to Tokai Unit 2 (BWR with 1100 MWe) in April of 2001. It was designed to replace a housing under dry condition of reactor pressure vessel (RPV): this enabled the elimination of water filled-up and drained processes during the replacement procedure resulting in the reduction of implementation schedule. To realize the dry condition, the radiation shields were placed in the RPV and the hollow guide pipe (GP) was adopted to transfer the apparatuses from the top to the bottom work area. (authors)

Tatsuo Ishida; Shoji Yamamoto; Fujitoshi Eguchi [Japan Atomic Power Company (Japan); Motomasa Fuse; Kouichi Kurosawa; Sadato Shimizu; Minoru Masuda [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan); Shinya Fujii; Junji Tanaka [General Electric International Inc. (Japan); Jacobson, Bryce A. [General Electric Company (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Minimizing fuel emissions by optimizing vessel schedules in liner shipping with uncertain port times  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the problem of designing an optimal vessel schedule in the liner shipping route to minimize the total expected fuel consumption (and emissions) considering uncertain port times and frequency requirements on the liner schedule. The general optimal scheduling problem is formulated and tackled by simulation-based stochastic approximation methods. For special cases subject to the constraint of 100% service level, we prove the convexity and continuous differentiability of the objective function. Structural properties of the optimal schedule under certain conditions are obtained with useful managerial insights regarding the impact of port uncertainties. Case studies are given to illustrate the results.

Xiangtong Qi; Dong-Ping Song

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Nonlinear Response and Stability Analysis of Vessel Rolling Motion in Random Waves Using Stochastic Dynamical Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of intact stability based on the stochastic and probabilistic approach with dynamic effect. The sub-committee on Stability, Load Lines and on Fishing Vessels (SLF) of IMO is discussing the next generation of stability criterion during recent SLF meetings... (SLF50/4, 2006; SLF51/4, 2008; SLF52/3, 2009) and proposed four main intact stability failure modes. • Dead Ship Condition, i.e. ship without speed, exposed to environment • Pure-loss of Stability • Parametric Roll • Surf-riding and Broaching...

Su, Zhiyong

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

429

An analysis of the relationship between selected socio-economic factors and student preferences to pursue military training beyond the sophomore year in college  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there is too little ezithusiasm among American college students foz a life oi' serv' ce to th" commznity or the nation. This attitude 's particularly zorceful vhen applied to the military professzon. For most students. the ROTC is, at nest, azi elternat... appreciation goes to Mrs. La Jean Gates for s. ssistance in typi. ng this manuscript. The author gratei'ully acknovledges his wife, Blancl'e, or her assistance in the preparation oi different drai'ts of this manuscript, and for her patience...

Sanders, Horace M., Jr

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evaluation of Suitability of Selected Set of Department of Defense Military Bases and Department of Energy Facilities for Siting a Small Modular Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the approach that ORNL developed for screening a sample set of US Department of Defense (DOD) military base sites and DOE sites for possible powering with an SMR; the methodology employed, including spatial modeling; and initial results for several sample sites. The objective in conducting this type of siting evaluation is demonstrate the capability to characterize specific DOD and DOE sites to identify any particular issues associated with powering the sites with an SMR using OR-SAGE; it is not intended to be a definitive assessment per se as to the absolute suitability of any particular site.

Poore III, Willis P [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Monte Carlo uncertainty estimation for an oscillating-vessel viscosity measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the initial design and evaluation of a high temperature viscosity measurement system with the focus on the uncertainty assessment. Numerical simulation of the viscometer is used to estimate viscosity uncertainties through the Monte Carlo method. The simulation computes the system response for a particular set of inputs (viscosity, moment of inertia, spring constant and hysteretic damping), and the viscosity is calculated using two methods: the Roscoe approximate solution and a numerical-fit method. For numerical fitting, a residual function of the logarithmic decay of oscillation amplitude and oscillation period is developed to replace the residual function of angular oscillation, which is mathematically stiff. The results of this study indicate that the method using computational solution of the equations and fitting for the parameters should be used, since it almost always out-performs the Roscoe approximation in uncertainty. The hysteretic damping and spring stiffness uncertainties translate into viscosity uncertainties almost directly, whereas the moment of inertial and vessel-height uncertainties are magnified approximately two-fold. As the hysteretic damping increases, so does the magnification of its uncertainty, therefore it should be minimized in the system design. The result of this study provides a general guide for the design and application of all oscillation-vessel viscosity measurement systems.

K. Horne; H. Ban; R. Fielding; R. Kennedy

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Consequence evaluation of radiation embrittlement of Trojan reactor pressure vessel supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a consequence evaluation to address safety concerns raised by the radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports for the Trojan nuclear power plant. The study comprises a structural evaluation and an effects evaluation and assumes that all four reactor vessel supports have completely lost the load carrying capability. By demonstrating that the ASME code requirements governing Level D service limits are satisfied, the structural evaluation concludes that the Trojan reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping is capable of transferring loads to the steam generator (SG) supports and the reactor coolant pump (RCP) supports. A subsequent design margins to accommodate additional loads transferred to them through the RCL piping. The effects evaluation, employing a systems analysis approach, investigates initiating events and the reliability of the engineered safeguard systems as the RPV is subject to movements caused by the RPV support failure. The evaluation identifies a number of areas of additional safety concerns, but further investigation of the above safety concerns, however, concludes that a hypothetical failure of the Trojan RPV supports due to radiation embrittlement will not result in consequences of significant safety concerns.

Lu, S.C.; Sommer, S.C.; Johnson, G.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Lambert, H.E. (FTA Associates, Oakland, CA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Pressure vessels and piping codes and standards: Volume 2. PVP-Volume 339  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of Codes and Standards for pressure vessels and piping has increased significantly over the past decade. More and more, developments in Codes and Standards are accommodating the increasing sophistication of analysis methods, the need to address post-construction and operating plant issues, and the efficiencies that may be gained by focusing codes and standards on the areas that present the greatest risk. Codes and Standards for new construction also have had to accommodate greater challenges and more extreme environments imposed by more escalating requirements on piping and pressure vessel design and fabrication. This volume has focused on these challenges faced by Codes and Standards development. The topics in this volume include: (1) International Code Developments; (2) Seismic Developments in Codes and Standards; (3) Fabrication, Repairs, and Installation Issues Relating to Codes and Standards; (4) Application of Risk Based Criteria to In-Service Inspections; (5) Risk Based Codes and Standards; (6) The Code--Then and Now; (7) Reactor Water Fatigue: Fitness for Service; and (8) Two ASME Pressure Technology Code Issues: Post-Construction Codes and Metrication. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in this volume.

Esselman, T.C. [ed.] [Altran Corp., Boston, MA (United States); Balkey, K. [ed.] [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chao, K.K.N. [ed.] [Consumers Power Co., Jackson, MI (United States); Gosselin, S. [ed.] [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC (United States); Hollinger, G. [ed.] [Babcock and Wilcox, Barberton, OH (United States); Lubin, B.T. [ed.] [ABB Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States); Mohktarain, K. [ed.] [CB and I Technical Services, Plainfield, IL (United States); O`Donnell, W. [ed.] [O`Donnell Consulting Engineers, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rao, K.R. [ed.] [Entergy Operations, Inc, Jackson, MI (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

In-vessel coolability and retention of a core melt. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficacy of external flooding of a reactor vessel as a severe accident management strategy is assessed for an AP600-like reactor design. The overall approach is based on the Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), and the assessment includes consideration of bounding scenarios and sensitivity studies, as well as arbitrary parametric evaluations that allow the delineation of the failure boundaries. Quantification of the input parameters is carried out for an AP600-like design, and the results of the assessment demonstrate that lower head failure is physically unreasonable. Use of this conclusion for any specific application is subject to verifying the required reliability of the depressurization and cavity-flooding systems, and to showing the appropriateness (in relation to the database presented here, or by further testing as necessary) of the thermal insulation design and of the external surface properties of the lower head, including any applicable coatings. The AP600 is particularly favorable to in-vessel retention. Some ideas to enhance the assessment basis as well as performance in this respect, for applications to larger and/or higher power density reactors are also provided.

Theofanous, T.G.; Liu, C.; Additon, S.; Angelini, S.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Salmassi, T. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Risk Studies and Safety

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

An Approach to Understanding Cohesive Slurry Settling, Mobilization, and Hydrogen Gas Retention in Pulsed Jet Mixed Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. Some of these vessels have mixing-system requirements to maintain conditions where the accumulation of hydrogen gas stays below acceptable limits, and the mixing within the vessels is sufficient to release hydrogen gas under normal conditions and during off-normal events. Some of the WTP process streams are slurries of solid particles suspended in Newtonian fluids that behave as non-Newtonian slurries, such as Bingham yield-stress fluids. When these slurries are contained in the process vessels, the particles can settle and become progressively more concentrated toward the bottom of the vessels, depending on the effectiveness of the mixing system. One limiting behavior is a settled layer beneath a particle-free liquid layer. The settled layer, or any region with sufficiently high solids concentration, will exhibit non-Newtonian rheology where it is possible for the settled slurry to behave as a soft solid with a yield stress. In this report, these slurries are described as settling cohesive slurries.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

436

Effects of 50/degree/C surveillance and test reactor irradiations on ferritic pressure vessel steel embrittlement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of surveillance tests on the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory revealed that a greater than expected embrittlement had taken place after about 17.5 effective full-power years of operation and an operational assessment program was undertaken to fully evaluate the vessel condition and recommend conditions under which operation could be resumed. A research program was undertaken that included irradiating specimens in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Specimens of the A212 grade B vessel shell material were included, along with specimens from a nozzle qualification weld and a submerged-arc weld fabricated at ORNL to reproduce the vessel seam weld. The results of the surveillance program and the materials research program performed in support of the evaluation of the HFIR pressure vessel are presented and show the welds to be more radiation resistant than the A212B. Results of irradiated tensile and annealing experiments are described as well as a discussion of mechanisms which may be responsible for enhanced hardening at low damage rates. 20 refs., 22 figs., 5 tabs.

Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Corwin, W.R.; Odette, G.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Impact of an apparent radiation embrittlement rate on the life expectancy of PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) vessel supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent data from the HFIR vessel surveillance program indicate a substantial radiation embrittlement rate effect at low irradiation temperatures (/approximately/120/degree/F) for A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II and corresponding welds. PWR vessel supports are fabricated of similar materials and are subjected to the same low temperatures and fast neutron fluxes (10/sup 8/ /minus/ 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2//center dot/s, E > 1.0 MeV) as those in the HFIR vessel. Thus, the embrittlement rate of these structures may be greater than previously anticipated. A study sponsored by the NRC is under way at ORNL to determine the impact of the rate effect on PWR vessel support life expectancy. The scope includes the interpretation and application of the HFIR data, a survey of all LWR vessel support designs, and a structural and fracture-mechanics analysis of the supports for two specific PWR plants of particular interest with regard to a potential for support failure as a result of propagation of flaws. Calculations performed for one of the plants indicate best-estimate critical flaw size corresponding to 32 EFPY, of /approximately/0.4 in. It appears that low-cycle fatigue is not a viable mechanism for creation of flaws of this size. Thus, presumably such flaws would have to exist at the time of fabrication. 19 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Thermal Analysis to Calculate the Vessel Temperature and Stress in Alcator C-Mod Due to the Divertor Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alcator C-Mod is planning an upgrade to its outer divertor. The upgrade is intended to correct the existing outer divertor alignment with the plasma, and to operate at elevated temperatures. Higher temperature operation will allow study of edge physics behavior at reactor relevant temperatures. The outer divertor and tiles will be capable of operating at 600oC. Longer pulse length, together with the plasma and RF heat of 9MW, and the inclusion of heater elements within the outer divertor produces radiative energy which makes the sustained operation much more difficult than before. An ANSYS model based on ref. 1 was built for the global thermal analysis of C-Mod. It models the radiative surfaces inside the vessel and between the components, and also includes plasma energy deposition. Different geometries have been simulated and compared. Results show that steady state operation with the divertor at 600oC is possible with no damage to major vessel internal components. The differential temperature between inner divertor structure, or "girdle" and inner vessel wall is ~70oC. This differential temperature is limited by the capacity of the studs that hold the inner divertor backing plates to the vessel wall. At a 70oC temperature differential the stress on the studs is within allowable limits. The thermal model was then used for a stress pass to quantify vessel shell stresses where thermal gradients are significant.

Han Zhang, Peter H. Titus, Robert Ellis, Soren Harrison and Rui Vieira

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

439

Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Electrical insulation system for the shell-vacuum vessel and poloidal field gap in the ZTH machine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrical insulation systems for the ZTH machine have many unusual design problems. The poloidal field gap insulation must be capable of conforming to poloidal and toroidal contours, provide a 25 kV hold off, and sufficiently adhere to the epoxy back fill between the overlapping conductors. The shell-vacuum vessel system will use stretchable and flexible insulation along with protective hats, boots and sleeves. The shell-vacuum vessel system must be able to withstand a 12.5 kV pulse with provision for thermal insulation to limit the effects of the 300{degrees}C vacuum vessel during operation and bakeout. Methodology required to provide the electrical protection along with testing data and material characteristics will be presented. 7 figs.

Reass, W.A.; Ballard, E.O.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP) Conferences. This work is also relevant to the ongoing efforts of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section XI, Working Group on Operating Plant Criteria (WGOPC) efforts to incorporate nozzle fracture mechanics solutions into a revision to ASME B&PV Code, Section XI, Nonmandatory Appendix G.

Walter, Matthew [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Stevens, Gary [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Sommerville, Daniel [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Palm, Nathan [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA; Heinecke, Carol [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL SHIPPING PACKAGINGS AND METAL TO METAL SEALS FOUND IN THE CLOSURES OF CONTAINMENT VESSELS INCORPORATING CONE SEAL CLOSURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The containment vessels for the Model 9975 radioactive material shipping packaging employ a cone-seal closure. The possibility of a metal-to-metal seal forming between the mating conical surfaces, independent of the elastomer seals, has been raised. It was postulated that such an occurrence would compromise the containment vessel hydrostatic and leakage tests. The possibility of formation of such a seal has been investigated by testing and by structural and statistical analyses. The results of the testing and the statistical analysis demonstrate and procedural changes ensure that hydrostatic proof and annual leakage testing can be accomplished to the appropriate standards.

Loftin, B; Glenn Abramczyk, G; Allen Smith, A

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

443

Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

D. W. Nigg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-0501 3-0501 Unlimited Release Printed February 2013 Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility Joseph W. Pratt and Aaron P. Harris Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. 2 Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the

445

Cells Forming Blood Vessels Send Their Copper to the Edge | Advanced Photon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Molecular Cause for One Form of Deafness A Molecular Cause for One Form of Deafness Water Theory is Watertight Nanowire Micronetworks from Carbon-Black Nanoparticles A Key Step in Repairing DNA Double-Strand Breaks An X-ray Rainbow Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Cells Forming Blood Vessels Send Their Copper to the Edge FEBRUARY 20, 2007 Bookmark and Share Areas at the tips of HMVEC filopodia extensions were scanned by XFM at high resolution. The optical image is shown to the right and metal maps are shown to the left. False color images of P, Cu, and Zn are shown in the red, green and blue images respectively, and their overlay is shown to the lower right, demonstrating a transfer of cellular copper across the cell

446

In-vessel Zircaloy oxidation/hydrogen generation behavior during severe accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-vessel Zircaloy oxidation and hydrogen generation data from various US Nuclear Regulatory Commission severe-fuel damage test programs are presented and compared, where the effects of Zircaloy melting, bundle reconfiguration, and bundle quenching by reflooding are assessed for common findings. The experiments evaluated include fuel bundles incorporating fresh and previously irradiated fuel rods, as well as control rods. Findings indicate that the extent of bundle oxidation is largely controlled by steam supply conditions and that high rates of hydrogen generation continued after melt formation and relocation. Likewise, no retardation of hydrogen generation was noted for experiments which incorporated control rods. Metallographic findings indicate extensive oxidation of once-molten Zircaloy bearing test debris. Such test results indicate no apparent limitations to Zircaloy oxidation for fuel bundles subjected to severe-accident coolant-boiloff conditions. 46 refs., 22 figs., 12 tabs.

Cronenberg, A.W. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A Laser Metrology/Viewing System for ITER In-Vessel Inspection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper identifies the requirements for a remotely operated precision laser ranging system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The inspection system is used for metrology and viewing, and must be capable of achieving submillimeter accuracy and operation in a reactor vessel that has high gamma radiation, high vacuum, elevated temperature, and magnetic field levels. A coherent, frequency modulated laser radar system is under development to meet these requirements. The metrology/viewing sensor consists of a compact laser-optic module linked through fiberoptics to the laser source and imaging units, located outside the harsh environment. The deployment mechanism is a remotely operated telescopic mast. Gamma irradiation up to 10{sup 7} Gy was conducted on critical sensor components with no significant impact to data transmission, and analysis indicates that critical sensor components can operate in a magnetic field with certain design modifications. Plans for testing key components in a magnetic field are underway.

Spampinato, P.T.; Barry, R.E.; Chesser, J.B.; Menon, M.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dagher, M.A. [Boeing Rocketdyne Div., Canoga Park, CA (United States); Slotwinski, A. [Coleman Research Corp., Springfield, VA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

A note on “Berth allocation considering fuel consumption and vessel emissions”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Du et al. [Du, Y., Chen, Q., Quan, X., Long, L., Fung, R.Y.K., 2011. Berth allocation considering fuel consumption and vessel emissions. Transportation Research Part E 47, 1021–1037] dealt with a berth allocation problem incorporating ship’ fuel consumption minimization. To address the difficulty posed by the power function between fuel consumption rate and sailing speed, they formulated a tractable mixed-integer second-order cone programming model. We propose two quadratic outer approximation approaches that can handle general fuel consumption rate functions more efficiently. In the static quadratic outer approximation approach, the approximation lines are generated a priori. In the dynamic quadratic outer approximation approach, the approximation lines are generated dynamically. Numerical experiments demonstrate the advantages of the two approaches.

Shuaian Wang; Qiang Meng; Zhiyuan Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Research and Development Roadmaps for Nondestructive Evaluation of Cables, Concrete, Reactor Pressure Vessels, and Piping Fatique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address these research needs, the MAaD Pathway supported a series of workshops in the summer of 2012 for the purpose of developing R&D roadmaps for enhancing the use of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technologies and methodologies for detecting aging and degradation of materials and predicting the remaining useful life. The workshops were conducted to assess requirements and technical gaps related to applications of NDE for cables, concrete, reactor pressure vessels (RPV), and piping fatigue for extended reactor life. An overview of the outcomes of the workshops is presented here. Details of the workshop outcomes and proposed R&D also are available in the R&D roadmap documents cited in the bibliography and are available on the LWRS Program website (http://www.inl.gov/lwrs).

Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bakhtiari, Sasan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL] [ORNL; Simmons, Kevin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Coble, Jamie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Brenchley, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Meyer, Ryan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

ORNL/TM-2012/380 Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2/380 2/380 Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program September 2012 Prepared by Cyrus Smith Randy Nanstad Robert Odette Dwight Clayton Katie Matlack Pradeep Ramuhalli Glenn Light DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900

451

Experimental confirmation of the propulsion of marine vessels employing guided flexural waves in attached elastic fins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of the first experimental verification of the idea of wave-like aquatic propulsion of manned marine vessels first published by the first author in 1994. The idea is based on employing the unique type of guided flexural elastic waves propagating along edges of immersed wedge-like structures attached to a body of a small ship or a submarine as keels or wings and used for the propulsion. The principle of employing such guided flexural waves as a source of aquatic propulsion is similar to that used in nature by stingrays. It is vitally important for the application of this idea to manned vessels that, in spite of vibration of the fins, the main body of the craft remains undisturbed as the energy of guided elastic waves is concentrated away from it. The main expected advantages of this new propulsion method over the existing ones, e.g. jets and propellers, are the following: it is quiet, and it is environmentally friendly and safe for people and wildlife. To verify the idea experimentally, the first working prototype of a small catamaran using the above-mentioned wave-like propulsion via the attached rubber keel has been built and tested. The test results have shown that the catamaran was propelled efficiently and could achieve the speed of 36 cm/s, thus demonstrating that the idea of wave-like propulsion of manned craft is viable. The reported proof of the viability of this idea may open new opportunities for marine craft propulsion, which can have far-reaching implications.

V.V. Krylov; G.V. Pritchard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Besluitenlijst van de 1466e vergadering van het College van Bestuur d.d. 29 juni 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studentenverenigingen in de Bunker Het College besluit de culturele studentenverenigingen in de Bunker te huisvesten

Franssen, Michael

453

Conceptual Blends and Critical Awareness in Teaching Cultural Narratives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fischer Taschenbuch. Bunker, N. (2010). Making Haste fromsee Fischer 1989 and Bunker 2010). Illuminating these

howell, tes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Up-Regulation of Endothelial Delta-like 4 Expression Correlates with Vessel Maturation in Bladder Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...susceptible to antiangiogenic therapies. Benjamin et al. (41) studied vessel maturation...e45. 24 Poulsom R, Longcroft JM, Jeffery RE, Rogers LA, Steel JH. A robust...Circulation 2002;105:112-7. 41 Benjamin LE, Golijanin D, Itin A, Pode D...

Nilay S. Patel; Michael S. Dobbie; Mark Rochester; Graham Steers; Richard Poulsom; Karena Le Monnier; David W. Cranston; Ji-Liang Li; and Adrian L. Harris

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Gaussian Process Regression for Vessel Performance Monitoring Benjamin Pjedsted Pedersen, FORCE Technology, Copenhagen/Denmark, bpp@force.dk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fouling has been evaluated by comparing e.g. the actual fuel consumption with a theoretical estimate basedGaussian Process Regression for Vessel Performance Monitoring Benjamin Pjedsted Pedersen, FORCE of the energy consumption on a ship. Using different data sets, from five sister container ships, the method

456

Validation of vessel-based registration for correction of brain shift I. Reinertsen a,*, M. Descoteaux b,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Validation of vessel-based registration for correction of brain shift I. Reinertsen a,*, M April 2007 Abstract The displacement and deformation of brain tissue is a major source of error in image-guided neurosurgery systems. We have designed and implemented a method to detect and correct brain shift using pre

Siddiqi, Kaleem

457

Vacuum Vessel Analysis and Design For The ARIES-ACT1 Fusion Power Plant H. H. Toudeshki, F. Najmabadi, X. R. Wang and the ARIES Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vacuum Vessel Analysis and Design For The ARIES-ACT1 Fusion Power Plant H. H. Toudeshki, F will lead us towards the ribbed structure model analysis. Ribbed structure, increases the strength on the port and door (the largest area of vacuum vessel) is to be determined which includes ribs thickness

458

High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic Materials for Military Hydrogen-Storage Materials (New Joint Miami U/NREL DoD/DLA Project) (presentation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Miami University/NREL DoD/DLA Project Miami University/NREL DoD/DLA Project High throughput combinatorial screening of biomimetic metal-organic materials for military hydrogen-storage applications Philip Parilla - NREL Joe Zhou, Dan Zhao - Miami U, Ohio Jeff Blackburn, Kevin O'Neill, Lin Simpson, Mike Heben - NREL Outline * Miami/NREL Project - Synthesis (Miami) - High Throughput Characterization (NREL) - Other Characterization * Other High Throughput Activities (NREL) - Parallel Sieverts - Parallel Gravimetric * Final Comments Overview of Miami/NREL Project * Goals - Development of H 2 storage materials based on MOFs, targeting 15 kJ/mole binding energy and high density of H 2 sites - Development of optical-based detection of adsorbed H 2 allowing rapid screening of samples * Approach - Combinatorial MOFs synthesis involving 8

459

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 5.15 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales, Selected Years, 1984-2010 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Distillate Fuel Oil Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power 1 Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Diesel Military Off-Highway Diesel Other Total 1984 534 360 166 55 208 42 192 115 1,093 46 114 46 2,971 1985 504 291 159 45 202 34 182 111 1,127 43 99 11 2,809 1990 475 260 169 49 222 50 203 135 1,393 46 118 (s) 3,120 1991 442 246 151 48 206 39 188 133 1,336 53 107 (s) 2,949 1992 474 245 150 43 228 35 206 144 1,391 42 114 (s) 3,075 1993 475 241 139 46 222 36 196 141 1,485 32 137 (s) 3,150 1994 472 246 148 44 213 43 205 143 1,594 40 140 (s) 3,289 1995 447 237 146 45 227 39 224 153 1,668 30 142 - - 3,357 1996 450 234 149 48 234 43 224 162 1,754 30 146 - - 3,472 1997 426 216 151 56 231 41 214 168 1,867 28 149 - - 3,546 1998

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

On-Site Oxy-Lance Size Reduction of South Texas Project Reactor Vessel Heads - 12324  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of mildly radioactive large components has been accomplished at other operating plants. On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of more radioactive components like Reactor Vessel Heads had previously been limited to decommissioning projects. Building on past decommissioning and site experience, subcontractors for South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) developed an innovative integrated system to control smoke, radioactive contamination, worker dose, and worker safety. STP's innovative, easy to use CEDM containment that provided oxy lance access, smoke control, and spatter/contamination control was the key to successful segmentation for cost-effective and ALARA packaging and transport for disposal. Relative to CEDM milling, STP oxy-lance segmentation saved approximately 40 person- REM accrued during 9,000 hours logged into the radiological controlled area (RCA) during more than 3,800 separate entries. Furthermore there were no personnel contamination events or respiratory uptakes of radioactive material during the course of the entire project. (authors)

Posivak, Edward [WMG, inc. (United States); Keeney, Gilbert; Wheeler, Dean [Shaw Group (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

COMPUTER SIMULATIONS TO ADDRESS PU-FE EUTECTICISSUE IN 3013 STORAGE VESSEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On November 22, 2005, the Manager of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) in Richland, WA issued an Occurrence Report involving a potential Pu-Fe eutectic failure mechanism for the stainless steel (SS) 3013 cans containing plutonium (Pu) metal. Four additional reports addressed nuclear safety concerns about the integrity of stainless steel containers holding plutonium during fire scenarios. The reports expressed a belief that the probability and consequences of container failure due to the formation of a plutonium-iron eutectic alloy had been overlooked. Simplified thermal model to address the Pu-Fe eutectic concerns using axisymmetric model similar to the models used in the 9975 SARP were performed. The model uses Rocky Flats configuration with 2 stacked Pu buttons inside a 3013 assembly. The assembly has an outer can, an inner can, and a convenience can, all stainless steel. The boundary conditions are similar to the regulatory 30 minutes HAC fire analyses. Computer simulations of the HAC fire transients lasting 4 hours of burn time show that the interface between the primary containment vessel and the Pu metal in the 9975 package will not reach Pu-Fe eutectic temperature of 400 C.

Gupta, N; Allen Smith, A

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

463

SPOILAGE OF WET DISTILLERS GRAINS PLUS SOLUBLES WHEN STORED IN A BUNKER.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Five studies evaluated the impact of spoilage of wet distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS) on nutrient composition, nutrient losses, and cattle performance. Exp. 1 and… (more)

Harding, Jana L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R- AND P-REACTOR VESSELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS&T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a significant margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. The R-reactor vessel contains significantly less aluminum and thus a Portland cement grout may be considered as well. For example, if the grout fill rate is less than 1 inch/min and the grout temperature is maintained at 70 C or less, the risk of hydrogen accumulation in the R-reactor vessel is very low for the Portland cement. Alternatively, if the grout fill rate is less than 0.5 inch/min and the grout is maintained at a temperature of 80 C, the risk will again be very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, grout temperatures less than 100 C should provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. For R-reactor, grout temperatures less than 70 C or 80 C will provide an adequate safety margin for the Portland cement. The other grout formulations are also viable options for R-reactor. (2) Minimize the grout fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min for the ceramicrete and the silica fume grouts will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen accumulation. For R-reactor, fill rates less than 1 inch/min will again minimize the risk of hydrogen accumulation. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates in the P-reactor vessel, however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, (i.e., less than 0.32 ft{sup 3}/min). If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

Wiersma, B.

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

465

Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path.

Lund, A.L.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Prediction of failure behavior of a welded pressure vessel containing flaws during a hydrogen-charged burst test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An industry-government collaborative program was carried out with an aim to promoting the acceptance of fracture mechanics based fitness-for-service assessment methodology for a service-damaged pressure vessel. A collaborative round robin exercise was carried out to predict the fracture behavior of a vessel containing hydrogen damage, fabrication related lack-of-fusion defects, an artificially induced fatigue crack and a localized thinned area. The fracture assessment procedures used include the US ASME Material Property Council`s PREFIS Program based on the British Standard (BS) Published Document (PD) 6493, ASME Section XI and The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) R6 approach; The welding Institute (TWI) CRACKWISE program (based on BS PD6493 Level 2 approach), a variant of the R6 approach, J-tearing instability approaches, various J-estimation schemes, LEFM approach and simplified stress analysis. Assessments were compared with the results obtained from a hydrogen charged burst test of the vessel. Predictions, based on the J-tearing approach, compared well with the actual burst test results. Actual burst pressure was about five times the operating pressure.

Bhuyan, G.S. [Powertech Labs. Inc., Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Sperling, E.J. [Amoco Corp., Naperville, IL (United States); Shen, G. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Metals Technology Labs.; Yin, H. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Farmers Branch, TX (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Prediction of failure behavior of a welded pressure vessel containing flaws during a hydrogen-charged burst test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An industry-government collaborative program was carried out with an aim to promoting the acceptance of fracture mechanics-based fitness-for-service assessment methodology for a service-damaged pressure vessel. A collaborative round robin exercise was carried out to predict the fracture behavior of a vessel containing hydrogen damage, fabrication-related lack-of-fusion defects, an artificially induced fatigue crack, and a localized thinned area. The fracture assessment procedures used include the US ASME Material Property Council`s PREFIS Program based on the British Standard (BS) Published Document (PD) 6493, ASME Section XI and The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) R6 approach, The Welding Institute (TWI) CRACKWISE program (based on BS PD6493 Level 2 approach), a variant of the R6 approach, J-tearing instability approaches, various J-estimation schemes, LEFM approach, and simplified stress analysis. Assessments were compared with the results obtained from a hydrogen-charged burst test of the vessel. Predictions, based on the J-tearing approach, compared well with the actual burst test results. Actual burst pressure was about five times the operating pressure.

Bhuyan, G.S. [Powertech Labs Inc., Surrey, British Columbia (Canada); Sperling, E.J. [BP-Amoco, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Shen, G. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Metals Technology Labs.; Yin, H. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States); Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Imaging large vessels using cosmic-ray muon energy-loss techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Imaging the internal structure of large vessels (2–20 m in diameter) is not possible with most traditional imaging methods. The sheer size renders gamma-ray and other high-energy photon, neutron, electrical and acoustic techniques useless, whilst the use of high-energy accelerators required to produce charged-particles of sufficient energy are impractical in most industrial situations. The use of naturally occurring high-energy (?GeV) cosmic-ray mu-mesons (muons) provides an effective solution to the penetration problem. The problems of low intensity at near-horizontal angles with the cosmic-ray muon flux are addressed by using energy-loss imaging methods. In other methodologies, using charge-particle energy-loss imaging techniques, only a few events are needed compared to many thousands required if attenuation measurements were to be employed. The energies of horizontal cosmic-ray muons are distributed largely between 0.1 and 1000 GeV with a mean energy of about 50 GeV. Radiation Transport Monte-Carlo methods (GEANT4) have been used to calculate the energy loss for a selection of industrial materials in the energy range of interest. The energy loss of the muons along a ray-sum are modelled and compared to attenuation losses along the ray-sum using energy resolving detectors in coincidence before and after the sample. The energy-loss spectra across different samples are measured, demonstrating that embedded materials can be identified with as few as 10 muons passing through the sample. It is proposed that the imaging modality can be extended into a full tomographic modality allowing material identification within each voxel.

P.M. Jenneson; W.B. Gilboy; S.J.R. Simons; S.J. Stanley; D. Rhodes

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE`s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE`s Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute`s Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454{degrees}C [850`F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about {plus_minus}5% (23.6{degrees}C [42.5{degrees}F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes.

Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Experimental manifestation of vortices and Rossby wave blocking at the MHD excitation of quasi-two-dimensional flows in a rotating cylindrical vessel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments on the excitation of counterpropagating zonal flows by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) method in a rotating cylindrical vessel with ... moving cyclones in the main stream. The diagram of regimes is plot...

A. E. Gledzer; E. B. Gledzer; A. A. Khapaev; O. G. Chkhetiani

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport calculations of neutron fluxes for beginning-of-cycle at several pressure vessel surveillance positions in the high flux isotope reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to determine improved thermal, epithermal, and fast fluxes and several responses at mechanical test surveillance location keys 2, 4, 5, and 7 of the pressure vessel of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for the beginning of the fuel cycle. The purpose of the research was to provide essential flux data in support of radiation embrittlement studies of the pressure vessel shell and beam tubes at some of the important locations.

Pace, J.V. III; Slater, C.O.; Smith, M.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

W?a?t?e?r?s?c?h?i?p? NZ42i: a late medieval fishing vessel from Flevoland, The Netherlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATERSCHIP NZ42i: A LATE MEDIEVAL FISHING VESSEL FROM FLEVOLAND. THE NETHERLANDS A Thesis RALPH KENNETH PEDERSEN Submitted to the Off ice of Graduate Stucf les of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF ARTS May 1991 Major Subject: Anthropology WATERSCHIP NZ42(: A LATE MEDIEVAL FISHING VESSEL FROM FLEVOLAND, THE NETHERLANDS A Thesis by RALPH KENNETH PEDERSEN Approved as to style and content by: F. H. van Doorninck, Jr. (Chair...

Pedersen, Ralph Kenneth

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

The DOS 1 neutron dosimetry experiment at the HB-4-A key 7 surveillance site on the HFIR pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive neutron dosimetry experiment was made at one of the prime surveillance sites at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel to aid radiation embrittlement studies of the vessel and to benchmark neutron transport calculations. The thermal neutron flux at the key 7, position 5 site was found, from measurements of radioactivation of four cobalt wires and four silver wires, to be 2.4 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux derived from two helium accumulation monitors was 2.3 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux estimated by neutron transport calculations was 3.7 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. The fast flux, >1 MeV, determined from two nickel activation wires, was 1.5 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}, in keeping with values obtained earlier from stainless steel surveillance monitors and with a computed value of 1.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The fast fluxes given by two reaction-product-type monitors, neptunium-237 and beryllium, were 2.6 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s {sup {minus}1} and 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Follow-up experiments indicate that these latter high values of fast flux are reproducible but are false; they are due to the creation of greater levels of reaction products by photonuclear events induced by an exceptionally high ratio of gamma flux to fast neutron flux at the vessel.

Farrell, K.; Kam, F.B.; Baldwin, C.A. [and others

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: • Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions. • Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process. • Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens. • Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds. • Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life . • Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates. • Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses. • Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage. • Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength. • Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads. • Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

475

An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Impact of Sugarcane Renewable Fuel on In-Use Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions from a Marine Vessel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In-use emissions aboard a Stalwart class vessel, the T/S State of Michigan, were measured from a four-stroke marine diesel generator operating on two fuels: ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel and ULSD mixed with Amyris renewable diesel (S33; 33% by volume) produced from sugarcane feedstocks with 67% by volume ULSD. ... A model 6V92TA Detroit Diesel Corporation diesel engine (9.0 L) was fueled on blends of 10, 20, 30 and 40% soydiesel-diesel fuel. ... Fueling with biodiesel/diesel fuel blends reduced particulate matter (PM), total hydrocarbons (THC) and CO, while increasing NOx. ...

Nicholas R. Gysel; Robert L. Russell; William A. Welch; David R. Cocker; III; Sujit Ghosh

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

477

Design and development of a special purpose SAFT system for nondestructive evaluation of nuclear reactor vessels and piping components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the design details of a special purpose system for real-time nondestructive evaluation of reactor vessels and piping components. The system consists of several components and the report presents the results of the research aimed at the design of each component and recommendations based on the results. One major component of the NDE system, namely the real-time SAFT processor, was designed with sufficient details to enable the fabrications of a prototype by GARD Inc. under a subcontract from The University of Michigan and the report includes their results and conclusions.

Ganapathy, S.; Schmult, B.; Wu, W.S.; Dennehy, T.G.; Moayeri, N.; Kelly, P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS and T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D and D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or Portland cement groupt (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. The R-reactor vessel cotnains significantly less aluminum based on current facility process knowledge, surface observations, and drawings. Therefore, a Portland cement grout may be considered for grouting operations as well as the other grout formulations. For example, if the grout fill rate is less than 1 inch/min and the grout temperature is maintained at 70 C or less, the risk of hydrogen accumulation during fill operations in the R-reactor vessel is low for the Portland cement. Alternatively, if the grout fill rate is less than 0.5 inch/min and the grout is maintained at a temperature of 80 C, the risk is again low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, grout temperatures less than 100 C should provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. For R-reactor, grout temperatures less than 70 C or 80 C will provide an adequate safety margin for the Portland cement. The other grout formulations are also viable options for R-reactor. (2) Minimize the grout fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min for the ceramicrete and the silica fume grouts will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen accumulation. For R-reactor, fill rates less than 1 inch/min will again minimize the risk of hydrogen accumulation. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates in the P-reactor vessel, however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, (i.e., less than 0.97 ft{sup 3}/min). If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

Wiersma, B.

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

479

ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS&T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or portland cement grout (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Conservative calculations estimate that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. Grout temperatures less than 100 C should however, still provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. (2) Minimize the fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. Fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen build-up. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, i.e., less than 0.32 ft{sup 3}/min. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a significant margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

Wiersma, B.

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

480

Nebraskaphobia and Other Stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bunker .and hang up the phone. The Bunker I Leona and I were marriedSiberia. I called it the bunker and I was damn proud of the

Harmon, Nicholas Dale

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vessel bunkering military" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Phantom, mirage, fosforo imperial: Guerre virtuali e guerre reali nell'ultima poesia italiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

125. 67. Virilio. Paul. Bunker Arcìiéoìoiiie. Paris: CentreFabio. all'inferno, "Der blaue Bunker (ipotesi sul nemico^"spettrale Dcr blaiic .vii/ Bunker Hciiìico) (ipotesi Letti

Cortellessa, Andrea

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basis (e.g. , to remove bunker fuels, cement production,+ imports ?exports ? bunkers ? non ? fuel uses ? stockMarland and Rotty, 1984). Bunker fuels are fuels used in

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Reinventing Infrastructure: The 101 Freeway and the Revisioning of Downtown Los Angeles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high-rise developments at Bunker Hill, still largely definethe redevelopment of Bunker Hill were used to substantiatelike the Bonaventure and Bunker Hill at large represented,

Samuels, Linda C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

various data sets, estimates of bunker fuel consumption forvarious data sets, estimates of bunker fuel consumption foras international marine bunker fuel. For the remaining 5% of

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Real Proper :  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

already beholden to a “bunker” ideology, a self-preservinglabel of artist. 20 The “bunker” of art and artist persists,about the “art context” ( / bunker). “Reproduction, Mimicry,

Vierkant, Arthur Benjamin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

A synthesis of carbon in international trade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N. : International Marine Bunkers: An Attempt to Assign itsto the United Nations. Bunker fuels used for internationalfor the allocation of bunker fuels, which are used for

Peters, G. P; Davis, S. J; Andrew, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Life History, Abundance, and Distribution of the Spotted Ratfish, Hydrolagus colliei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maisey 1979). Halstead and Bunker (1952) indicated that thetissue. Halstead and Bunker (1952) described the spine asGoodrich 1909; Halstead and Bunker 1952). Based on the

Barnett, Lewis A.K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

The Other Urban Designers: The Role of Private Sector Consultants in Shaping Policy and Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the  Civic  Center  and  Bunker  Hill  proposals,  were  actively  facing  urban  renewal  such  as   Bunker  Hill  and  Bunker  Hill  East,  as  well  as  those  seen  as  

Linovski, Orly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a lower estimate for the bunker inventory: Comment on “Transport: Aviation and Marine (Bunker Fuels),” see http://commonly referred to as “bunker fuels” to differentiate them

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level Revising “Aviation Bunker” Fuel estimates Revising “level Revising “Aviation Bunker” Fuel estimates Revising “Production Import Export Bunkers Stock Withdrawal Stat.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Safeguardsing Our Military Space Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...situations, for warning, for cmniaon, for weather ;;informatio for nanvigation, and for...typically in vcry high orbits. Surveillance,Weather, and sateites, which need to see detils...Not all componentry would be on any one satllite and t are otier kinds. Ihc ones own in...

MICHAEL M. MAY

1986-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

492

On the move Advancing military  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, does business with some 24,000 suppliers and handles over 5.2 million stock-keeping units (SKUs). 2 (As is not isolated to the United States; the United Kingdom's Royal Air Force stocks approximately 2 million items, peace-keeping, nation-building or disaster relief efforts ­ at any given time. Unexpected events can

493

BWRSAR (Boiling Water Reactor Severe Accident Response) calculations of reactor vessel debris pours for Peach Bottom short-term station blackout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes recent analyses performed by the BWR Severe Accident Technology (BWRSAT) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to estimate the release of debris from the reactor vessel for the unmitigated short-term station blackout accident sequence. Calculations were performed with the BWR Severe Accident Response (BWRSAR) code and are based upon consideration of the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. The modeling strategies employed within BWRSAR for debris relocation within the reactor vessel are briefly discussed and the calculated events of the accident sequence, including details of the calculated debris pours, are presented. 4 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Hodge, S.A.; Ott, L.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Development of Improved Composite Pressure Vessels for Hydrogen Storage - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Norman Newhouse (Primary Contact), Jon Knudsen, John Makinson Lincoln Composites, Inc. 5117 NW 40 th Street Lincoln, NE 68524 Phone: (402) 470-5035 Email: nnewhouse@lincolncomposites.com DOE Managers HQ: Ned Stetson Phone: (202) 586-9995 Email: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-09GO19004 Project Start Date: February 1, 2009 Project End Date: June 30, 2014 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Improve the performance characteristics, including * weight, volumetric efficiency, and cost, of composite pressure vessels used to contain hydrogen in adsorbants. Evaluate design, materials, or manufacturing process *

495

Effect of temperature on the fracture toughness in the nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel (SA508-3)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The elastic-plastic fracture toughness J{sub IC} of the Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (SA508-3) which has high toughness was obtained at three temperatures (room temperature, {minus}20 C, 200 C) using a 1/2 CT specimen. Especially the two methods recommended in ASTM and JSME were compared. It was found that difficulty exists in obtaining J{sub IC} by ASTM R-curve method, while JSME R-curve method yielded good results. The stretched zone width method gave slightly larger J{sub IC} values than those by the R-curve method for SA508-3 steel and the blunting line was not affected by the test temperatures. The relation between SZW and J, SZW and J/E and SZW and J/{sigma}{sub ys} before initiation of a stable crack growth in the fracture toughness test at three temperatures is described.

Oh, S.W.; Lim, M.B. [Dong-A Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, H.K. [Dong-Eui Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

496

CONTAINMENT VESSEL TEMPERATURE FOR PU-238 HEAT SOURCE CONTAINER UNDER AMBIENT, FREE CONVECTION AND LOW EMISSIVITY COOLING CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EP-61 primary containment vessel of the 5320 shipping package has been used for storage and transportation of Pu-238 plutonium oxide heat source material. For storage, the material in its convenience canister called EP-60 is placed in the EP-61 and sealed by two threaded caps with elastomer O-ring seals. When the package is shipped, the outer cap is seal welded to the body. While stored, the EP-61s are placed in a cooling water bath. In preparation for welding, several containers are removed from storage and staged to the welding booth. The significant heat generation of the contents, and resulting rapid rise in component temperature necessitates special handling practices. The test described here was performed to determine the temperature rise with time and peak temperature attained for an EP-61 with 203 watts of internal heat generation, upon its removal from the cooling water bath.

Gupta, N.; Smith, A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z