National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for vertical sonic cross-section

  1. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  2. In situ oil shale retort with a generally T-shaped vertical cross section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1981-01-01

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale and has a production level drift in communication with a lower portion of the fragmented mass for withdrawing liquid and gaseous products of retorting during retorting of oil shale in the fragmented mass. The principal portion of the fragmented mass is spaced vertically above a lower production level portion having a generally T-shaped vertical cross section. The lower portion of the fragmented mass has a horizontal cross sectional area smaller than the horizontal cross sectional area of the upper principal portion of the fragmented mass above the production level.

  3. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03012016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004TU02 6Li(p, ): coincidence yields, deduced S-factors low 1, S-factors from ...

  4. 7Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12162015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997GO13 7Li(pol. p, ): total , S-factor for capture to third-excited state 0 - ...

  5. 9Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9Be(p, X) (Current as of 03012016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997ZA06 9Be(p, ), (p, d): S-factor 16 - 390 keV X4 01232013 1973SI27 9Be(p, ...

  6. 4He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03012016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1974KR07 4He(p, p): 0.5 - 3 X4 10232014 2004PU02 4He(p, p): ( 128.7) ...

  7. 19F Cross Section

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    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 19F(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 2008CO03 19F(p, γ): σ Ecm = 200 - 700 keV X4 05/14/2014 1979SU13 19F(p, γ): σ 0.2 - 1.2 X4 05/06/2014 2006COZY 19F(p, γ1): capture yield 200 - 800 keV thin target 12/08/2014 19F(p, γ): capture yield thick target 19F(p, α2γ): capture yield thin target, thick target 2008CO03 19F(p, γ1): reaction cross section Ecm = 200 - 800 keV thin target, thick target

  8. 10Be Cross Section

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    Be(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1970GO04 10Be(p, γ0): σ 0.6 - 6.3 θ = 0°, θ = 90° 06/05/2012 1987ERZY 10Be(p, n): σ 0.9 - 2 X4 05/15/2012 The following references may be related but not included. 1991GOZV Back to (p, X) Main Page Back to (α, X) Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 02 March 2016

  9. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1985NE05 6Li(α, γ): γ thick target yield resonance X4 02/15/2012 1966FO05 6Li(α, γ): σ 0.9 - 3.0 2 < Eγ < 4 MeV, 4 < Eγ < 7 MeV, thick target capture γ-ray yield, capture γ-ray yield of 2.43 MeV resonance 02/29/2012 1989BA24 6Li(α, γ): σ 1.085, 1.175 X4 02/15/2012 1979SP01 6Li(α, γ): thick target yield curve for 718 keV γ-rays 1140 - 1250 keV 1175 keV resonance 07/19/2011

  10. 10B Cross Section

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    α, X) (Current as of 01/21/2015) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1992MC03 10B(α, α): σ relative to Rutherford scattering 1 - 3.3 X4 05/02/2012 1969GA01 10B(α, p), (α α'): relative σ at θ = 90° for Eγ = 1.0 - 3.5 0.170 MeV, 3.088 MeV, 3.682 MeV, 3.852 MeV, 0.717 MeV 06/18/2012 1973VA25 10B(α, n): laboratory differential σ 1.0 - 5.0 for n0: θ = 0°, θ = 90°, θ = 160° X4 04/04/2011 for n1: θ = 0°, θ = 90° for n23: θ = 0°, θ = 90° 10B(α, n):

  11. 11B Cross Section

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    B(α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1991WA02 11B(α, n): thick-target yield of Eα = 411, 605 and 606 keV resonance 350 - 2400 keV 1 X4 04/04/2011 11B(α, n): for 606-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): for 411-keV resonance after subtraction of the 605-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): S-factor 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thick-target 400 - 500 keV 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thin-target 1 1966MA04, Errata 11B(α, n): excitation curve < 4.5 for

  12. 11C Cross Section

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    C(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013SO11 11C(p, γ): deduced astrophysical reaction rates and S-factors X4 12/14/2015 2003LI51 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor low X4 09/12/2011 2003TA02 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor 0 - 0.7 X4 09/12/2011 2003KU36 11C(p, p): elastic scattering σ ~ 0.2 - 3.2 θcm = 180° 09/08/2011 Back to (p, X) Main Page Back to (α, X) Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 02 March

  13. 12C Cross Section

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    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 12C(p, γ): σ, deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 10/28/2014 1993CH02 12C(p, X): σ for η production ≤ 0.9 GeV X4 03/07/2012 1974RO29 12C(p, γ): σ 150 - 3000 keV X4 08/27/2013 1951GO1B 12C(p, p): yield curve of elastic scattering 0.2 - 4.0 θ = 164° 11/05/2014 1976ME22 12C(p, p): absolute σ 0.3 - 2.0 X4 08/07/2013 2008BU19 12C(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factors. 354, 390, 460, 463, 565,

  14. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 13C(p, γ): σ, deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 09/12/2011 1994KI02 13C(p, γ): γ-ray yield, calculated S(E) 120 - 950 keV X4 09/12/2011 2008HE11 13C(p, γ): reaction yield at the resonance 448.5-keV for a fresh target and after an integrated charge of 1C 435 - 470 keV σ X4 11/07/2011 1991BR19 13C(p, γ): reaction yield near the resonance 0.44 - 0.6 483.3-keV, 0.55-MeV X4 11/07/2011

  15. 13C Cross Section

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    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2006JO11 13C(α, n): deduced S(E) ~ 0 - 1 from (1993BR17), from (1993DR08) X4 08/04/2011 2001HE22 13C(α, n): S(E) 0 - 2 S-factor 11/15/2011 2003KA51 13C(α, n): deduced S-factors, reaction rate Ecm ~ 200 - 800 keV X4 05/01/2012 1993DR08 13C(α, n): excitation function and S(E) ~ 275 - 1075 keV σ, S-factor X4 08/04/2011 2008HE11 13C(α, n): σ, reaction yields and S(E) Ecm = 320 - 700 keV σ, Table

  16. 14N Cross Section

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    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003MU12 14N(p, γ): deduced astrophysical S-factors < 600 keV X4 05/06/2013 1990WA10 14N(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 2005CO16, 2006BE50 14N(p, γ): σ, deduced astrophysical S-factors, resonance strength 70 - 228 keV X4 05/08/2013 2006LE13 14N(p, γ): σ, deduced astrophysical S-factors 70 - 228 keV X4 05/30/2013 2005BR04, 2005BR15 14N(p, γ): astrophysical S-factors ~ 0.1 - 2.5 1 08/15/2013 2004FO02,

  17. 14N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971CO27 14N(α, γ): thick target yield 0.5 - 1.2 1 08/04/2011 2000GO43 14N(α, γ): resonance yields, deduced astrophysical reaction rates 550 - 1300 keV X4 03/01/2012 1973RO03 14N(α, γ): γ-ray yield 1.0 - 3.2 1 04/30/2012 1980MA26 14N(α, α): σ 1.5, 1.6 X4 03/01/2012 2007CH25 14N(α, γ): deduced resonance parameters 1620 - 1775 keV X4 03/01/2012 1994YE11 14N(α, α): σ(θ)/σ(Rutherford) 2

  18. 16O Cross Section

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    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1973MC12 16O(p, α): σ threshold - 7.7 X4 10/17/2012 1981DY03 16O(p, pα): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 4.44-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 16O(p, p'): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1997MO27 16O(p, p), (p, γ): elastic, capture σ Ecm = 200 - 3750 keV X4 03/28/2013 1973RO34 16O(p, γ): S(E) 0.3 - 3.1 S-Factor X4 05/10/2011 16O(p, γ): differential σ for the DC → ground

  19. 18O Cross Section

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    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003DA19 18O(α, γ): deduced resonance strengths ~ 470 - 770 keV X4 02/13/2012 1978TR05 18O(α, γ): excitation function for the 1.27 MeV secondary γ-ray transition 0.6 - 2.3 θγ = 0° 02/29/2012 1990VO06 18O(α, γ): resonance γ yields < 0.78 X4 02/13/2012 1973BA10 18O(α, n): σ with target thickness 1 - 5 6 keV, 13 keV 06/06/2011 1956BO61 18O(α, n): neutron yields 1.8 - 5.3 0° - 30° X4

  20. 19F Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008UG01 19F(α, p): yield curves, σ 792 - 1993 keV X4 09/14/2011 2005UG04 19F(α, p1γ): excitation curve 1238 - 2009 keV 1 11/30/2011 19F(α, p0): excitation curve 1 19F(α, p1): excitation curve 1 1984CS01 19F(α, α): σ 1.5 - 3.7 X4 09/14/2011 1994CH36 19F(α, α): σ 1.5 - 4.5 X4 09/14/2011 2000WR01 19F(α, n): neutron yields and σ 2.28 - 3.10 X4 09/14/2011 1977VA10 19F(α, n): differential

  1. 20Ne Cross Section

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    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1981DY03 20Ne(p, p'γ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 1.63-MeV γ-rays X4 03/15/2011 20Ne(p, pαγ): σ for production of γ-rays threshold - 23 6.13-MeV γ-rays 1975RO08 20Ne(p, γ): S-factors 0.37 - 2.10 Direct Capture (DC) → 332-keV state, DC → 2425-keV state, tail of 2425-keV state X4 04/19/2011 20Ne(p, γ): differential σ at θγ = 90° DC → 332-keV state, 332-keV state →

  2. 3H Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3H(α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001TO07 3H(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.05 - 0.8 X4 01/09/2012 1994BR25 3H(α, γ): deduced σ and S-factor Ecm = 50 - 1200 keV X4 01/09/2012 1987SC18 3H(α, γ): σ, deduced S-factor Ecm = 79 - 464 keV X4 01/09/2012 1988SA13 3H(α, α): recoil σ 0.5 - 2.5 X4 01/09/2012 1987BU18 3H(α, γ): σ and S-factor 0.7 - 2 X4 01/09/2012 1968IV01 3H(α, α): elastic scattering σ 3 - 11 Table 9 X4

  3. 3He Cross Section

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    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1982KR05 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 107 - 1266 keV X4 01/05/2012 1969NA24 3He(α, γ): σ and S-factor 164 - 245 keV σ, S(E) X4 07/19/2011 1984OS03 3He(α, γ): σ 165 - 1169 keV X4 01/05/2012 1982OS02 3He(α, γ): S-factor 165 - 1170 keV S34(Ecm) X4 07/19/2011 1988HI06 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 195 - 686 keV X4 01/05/2012 2007CO17 3He(α, γ): deduced σ and S-factor 220, 250, 400 keV X4 01/05/2012

  4. 10B Cross Section

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    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010LA11 10B(p, α): deduced S(E) E(cm) = 0 - 0.15 1 11/30/2011 1993AN06 10B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/07/2011 1993AN09 10B(p, α): absolute fusion σ and S(E) E(cm) = 48 - 159 keV X4 11/07/2011 1972SZ02 10B(p, α): total reaction σ and S(E) 60 - 180 keV 1 X4 03/03/2011 1983WI09 10B(p, γ): γ yield, capture σ(E) 0.07 - 2.2 X4 11/07/2011 2003TO21 10B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced

  5. 11B Cross Section

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    p, X) (Current as of 12/17/2015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004RO27, 2004SP03 11B(p, α): deduced σ, S-factor Ecm ~ 0 - 1 X4 11/07/2012 2010LA11 11B(p, α): deduced S-factor E(cm) = 0 - 0.6 1 11/30/2011 2000KE10 11B(pol. p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor < 100 keV X4 11/07/2012 1993AN06 11B(p, α): α yield E(cm) = 17 - 134 keV X4 11/29/2012 1979DA03 11B(p, 3α): σ 35.4 - 1500 keV X4 07/30/2014 1992CE02 11B(p, γ): deduced S-factor 40 - 180 keV X4 03/07/2012

  6. 12C Cross Section

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    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2009MA70 12C(α, γ0): σ 0 - 2.27 X4 05/01/2012 2012OU01 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.3 - 3.5 X4 02/12/2015 1997KU18 12C(α, γ): analyzed S-factor Ecm = 0.9 - 3 X4 05/10/2012 1987RE02 12C(α, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 0.94 - 2.84 X4 05/09/2012 2001HA31 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factors Ecm = 0.95 - 2.78 E1, E2 06/18/2012 2001KU09 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.95 - 2.8 X4 05/09/2012

  7. 14C Cross Section

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    C(p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1969SI04 14C(p, γ): γ-rays yield for 230 - 690 keV Eγ ≥ 2.8 MeV 08/15/2013 1990GO25 14C(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 250 - 740 keV X4 10/28/2014 1968HE12 14C(p, γ): γ-ray yield 0.6 - 2.7 γ0 01/06/2015 1991WA02 14C(p, n): σ 1.0 - 1.55 X4 10/28/2014 1968HA27 14C(p, p): σ at θcm = 1.0 - 2.7 39.2°, 54.7°, 90°, 125.3°, 161.4° 08/15/2013 1971KU01 14C(p, γ0): excitation function at θ = 90° 1.3 - 2.6 1

  8. 15N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 15N(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 1982RE06 15N(p, α): σ 78 - 810 keV X4 09/12/2011 1979ZY02 15N(p, α0): σ, deduced S-factor 93 - 418 keV X4 09/12/2011 2010LE21, 2013DE03 15N(p, γ): σ, S-factors 130 - 1800 keV X4 05/01/2012 & 02/01/2016 2012IM02 15N(p, γ), (p, αγ): σ, S-factors 0.14 - 1.80 X4 02/01/2016 1974RO37 15N(p, γ), (p, αγ): σ 150 - 2500 keV X4 09/12/2011 1968GO07

  9. 15N Cross Section

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    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2002WI18 15N(α γ): σ 461 - 2642 keV X4 09/12/2011 1997WI12 15N(α γ): σ 0.65 - 2.65 X4 09/12/2011 1995WI26 15N(α γ): σ 0.67 - 0.69 X4 09/12/2011 1969AI01 15N(α γ): γ-ray excitation curve for 3.0 ≤ Eγ ≤ 7.0 MeV 2.5 - 3.2 1 11/30/2011 1977DI08 15N(α, γ): γ-ray excitation curve near Eα = 3.15 MeV for transitions to 3146 - 3158 keV five low-lying states, 4.65 MeV (13/2+) state

  10. 16O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6O(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971TO06 16O(α, γ): σ 0.85 - 1.8 X4 09/15/2011 1953CA44 16O(α, α): σ 0.94 - 4.0 X4 09/15/2011 1997KU18 16O(α, γ): analyzed S-factor 1 - 3.25 X4 05/10/2012 1980MA27 16O(α, α): σ 1.305 - 1.330; 2.950 - 3.075 X4 02/14/2012 16O(α, γ): σ 1.37, 2.6, 2.9, 3.036 1987HA24 16O(α, γ): σ Ecm = 1.7 - 2.35 X4 02/14/2012 1990LE06 16O(α, α): σ 1.8 - 5 X4 03/12/2011 1985JA17 16O(α, α): σ 2

  11. 17O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010SE11 17O(p, α): nuclear excitation function 0 - 0.7 1 06/22/2011 1973RO03 17O(p, γ): γ-ray yield 0.15 - 1.4 1 08/01/2012 2015BU02 17O(p, γ): total S(E)-factors 0.17 - 0.53 X4 03/03/2016 2012SC16, 2014DI01 17O(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factors Ecm = 0.2 - 0.4 X4 03/03/2016 1973RO34 17O(p, γ): S(E) 0.3 - 1.9 S-Factor X4 06/22/2011 17O(p, γ): σ for the γ-ray transition 0.94 → 0 MeV 17O(p, γ):

  12. 17O Cross Section

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    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013BE11; see also 2012BEZP 17O(α, n), (α, γ): σ, S-factors 0.8 - 2.3 X4 02/12/2015 1973BA10 17O(α, n): neutron yields with target thickness 0.9 - 5.3 ~ 2.5 keV, 6 keV, 13 keV, ~ 35 keV 06/06/2011 1976MC12 17O(α, n1): yield of 1.63-MeV γ's 1.4 - 2.3 θγ = 50° 04/28/2011 17O(α, n0): yield of neutrons θn = 120° 17O(α, n1): yield of 1.63-MeV γ's 1.825 - 1.885 θγ = 0° 05/03/2011 17O(α,

  13. 18O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8O(p, X) (Current as of 05/15/2012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008LA06 18O(p, α): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0 - 1.5 θα = 46° 12/03/2012 1990CH32 18O(p, α): σ < 2 X4 10/04/2012 1990VO06 18O(p, γ): resonance γ yields < 0.22 X4 02/13/2012 2008LA13 18O(p, α): deduced σ 0 - 250 keV X4 10/20/2014 1973BA31 18O(p, n): total neutron-production σ < 5 1 X4 05/10/2011 1990WA10 18O(p, n): σ < 30 X4 04/26/2012 1979LO01 18O(p, α): σ 72 - 935 keV X4

  14. 20Ne Cross Section

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    20Ne(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1983SC17 20Ne(α, γ): deduced S-factor of capture σ 0.55 - 3.2 X4 09/15/2011 1997WI12 20Ne(α, γ): deduced primary transitions yield 1.64 - 2.65 X4 09/15/2011 1999KO34 20Ne(α, γ): γ-ray yield for the transition 1.9 - 2.8 g.s. 01/03/2012 1369 keV g.s. 10917 keV g.s., 1369 keV 11016 keV g.s. 1975KU06 20Ne(α, γ): σ 2.5 - 20 X4 09/15/2011 1968HI02 20Ne(α, γ): σ 3 - 6 X4 09/15/2011

  15. Cross Sections for (p, X)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross Sections for (p, X) Reaction for Nuclei A = 3 - 20 Go to the Text Only below if you prefer to view the nuclides in a text list. 20Ne 19F 16O 17O 18O 14N 15N 11C 12C 13C 14C 10B 11B 7Be 9Be 10Be 6Li 7Li 3He 4He Note: Comments, and corrections are welcome. Please email us. List of available cross section data for A = 3 - 20 nuclides: Helium: 3He, 4He Lithium: 6Li, 7Li Beryllium: 7Be, 9Be, 10Be Boron: 10B, 11B Carbon: 11C, 12C, 13C, 14C Nitrogen: 14N, 15N Oxygen: 16O, 17O, 18O Fluorine: 19F

  16. Cross Sections for (α, X)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross Sections for (α, X) Reaction for Nuclei A = 3 - 20 Go to the Text Only below if you prefer to view the nuclides in a text list. 20Ne 19F 16O 17O 18O 14N 15N 12C 13C 10B 11B 9Be 10Be 6Li 7Li 3He 4He 3H Note: Comments, and corrections are welcome. Please email us. List of available cross section data for A = 3 - 20 nuclides: Hydrogen: 3H Helium: 3He, 4He Lithium: 6Li, 7Li Beryllium: 9Be, 10Be Boron: 10B, 11B Carbon: 12C, 13C Nitrogen: 14N, 15N Oxygen: 16O, 17O, 18O Fluorine: 19F Neon: 20Ne

  17. Elastic scattering and total cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahn, R.N.

    1990-03-01

    This report discusses concepts of elastic scattering and cross sections of proton-proton interactions. (LSP)

  18. Recommended Dosimetry Cross Section Compendium.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-07-11

    Version 00 The data is recommended for spectrum determination applications and for the prediction of neutron activation of typical radiation sensor materials. The library has been tested for consistency of the cross sections in a wide variety of neutron environments. The results and cautions from this testing have been documented. The data has been interfaced with radiation transport codes, such as TWODANT-SYS (CCC-547) and MCNP (CCC-200), in order to compare calculated and measured activities formore » benchmark reactor experiments.« less

  19. Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-11-01

    Version 00 The Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections, EPICS, provides the atomic data needed to perform coupled Electron-Photon transport calculations, to produce accurate macroscopic results, such as energy deposit and dose. Atomic data is provided for elements, Z = 1 to 100, over the energy range 10 eV to 100 GeV; note that nuclear data, such as photo-nuclear, and data for compounds, are not included. All data is in a simple computer independent text formatmore » that is standard and presented to a high precision that can be easily read by computer codes written in any computer language, e.g., C, C++, and FORTRAN. EPICS includes four separate data bases that are designed to be used in combination, these include, • The Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL), to describe the interaction of electrons with matter. • The Evaluated Photon Data Library (EPDL), to describe the interaction of photons with matter. • The Evaluated Atomic Data Library (EADL), to describe the emission of electrons and photons back to neutrality following an ionizing event, caused by either electron or photon interactions. • The Evaluated Excitation Data Library (EXDL), to describe the excitation of atoms due to photon interaction. All of these are available in the Extended ENDL format (ENDLX) in which the evaluations were originally performed. The first three are also available in the ENDF format; as yet ENDF does not include formats to handle excitation data (EXDL).« less

  20. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; VanDenburg, J.

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  1. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  2. MiniBooNE Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSECTIONS(AT)fnal.gov convenors: Alessandro Curioni (alessandro.curioni(AT)yale.edu) and Sam Zeller (gzeller(AT)fnal.gov) Cross Sections at MiniBooNE, Meetings, Reference Articles,...

  3. MODELING AND FISSION CROSS SECTIONS FOR AMERICIUM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROCHMAN, D.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2005-05-01

    This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on the modeling and fission cross section for americium isotopes (May 2004-June 2005). The purpose of the contract was to provide fission cross sections for americium isotopes with the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE 2.19. The following work was performed: (1) Fission calculations capability suitable for americium was implemented to the EMPIRE-2.19 code. (2) Calculations of neutron-induced fission cross sections for {sup 239}Am to {sup 244g}Am were performed with EMPIRE-2.19 for energies up to 20 MeV. For the neutron-induced reaction of {sup 240}Am, fission cross sections were predicted and uncertainties were assessed. (3) Set of fission barrier heights for each americium isotopes was chosen so that the new calculations fit the experimental data and follow the systematics found in the literature.

  4. QuickSite Cross Section Processing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-05-27

    This AGEM-developed system produces cross sections by inputting data in both standard and custom file formats and outputting a graphic file that can be printed or further modified in a commercial graphic program. The system has evolved over several years in order to combine and visualize a changing set of field data more rapidly than was possible with commercially available cross section software packages. It uses some commercial packages to produce the input and tomore » modify the output files. Flexibility is provided by a dynamic set of programs that are customized to accept varying input and accomodate varying output requirements. There are two basic types of routines: conversion routines and cross section generation routines. The conversion routines convery various data files to logger file format which is compatible with a standard file format for LogPlot 98, a commonly used commercial log plotting program. The cross section routines generate cross sections and apply topography to these cross sections. All of the generation routines produce a standard graphic DXF file, which is the format used in AutoCAD and can then be modified in a number of available graphics programs.« less

  5. IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Knowledge on Oscillation Knowledge on Oscillation Measurements Measurements M. Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and U. of Valencia) IDS-NF, RAL, Jan 16-17 2008 M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 2 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 3 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA Beta

  6. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negret, Alexandru

    2012-11-20

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  7. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  8. Testing (Validating?) Cross Sections with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, Albert C. III

    2012-06-28

    We discuss how to use critical benchmarks from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments to determine the applicability of specific cross sections to the end-user's problem of interest. Particular attention is paid to making sure the selected suite of benchmarks includes the user's range of applicability (ROA).

  9. Indirect ( n , γ ) cross sections of thorium cycle nuclei using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Indirect ( n , ) cross sections of thorium cycle nuclei using the surrogate method Title: Indirect ( n , ) cross sections of thorium cycle nuclei using the surrogate method ...

  10. New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New Arsenic Cross Section Calculations You are accessing a document from the Department of ...

  11. Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and Optical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and Optical Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimation of Anisotoropy from Total Cross Section and ...

  12. Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top quark pair production cross section at Tevatron You are accessing ...

  13. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  14. Averaging cross section data so we can fit it

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.

    2014-10-23

    The 56Fe cross section we are interested in have a lot of fluctuations. We would like to fit the average of the cross section with cross sections calculated within EMPIRE. EMPIRE is a Hauser-Feshbach theory based nuclear reaction code, requires cross sections to be smoothed using a Lorentzian profile. The plan is to fit EMPIRE to these cross sections in the fast region (say above 500 keV).

  15. Cross Sections for Nuclei A = 3 - 20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross Sections with Proton and Alpha Induced Reactions for Nuclei A = 3 - 20 I. Introduction: We have scanned the NSR from 1910-present for various articles with proton and alpha induced reactions. We have used the program Plot Digitizer 2.5.0 to extract the excitation functions from figures in the articles. In some cases the uncertainties are provided in the figures, we have noted this in comments, but we have made no attempt to extract the uncertainties. In cases where the data are given in

  16. Actinide Targets for Neutron Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Baker; Christopher A. McGrath

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and the Generation IV Reactor Initiative have demonstrated a lack of detailed neutron cross-sections for certain "minor" actinides, those other than the most common (235U, 238U, and 239Pu). For some closed-fuel-cycle reactor designs more than 50% of reactivity will, at some point, be derived from "minor" actinides that currently have poorly known or in some cases not measured (n,?) and (n,f) cross sections. A program of measurements under AFCI has begun to correct this. One of the initial hurdles has been to produce well-characterized, highly isotopically enriched, and chemically pure actinide targets on thin backings. Using a combination of resurrected techniques and new developments, we have made a series of targets including highly enriched 239Pu, 240Pu, and 242Pu. Thus far, we have electrodeposited these actinide targets. In the future, we plan to study reductive distillation to achieve homogeneous, adherent targets on thin metal foils and polymer backings. As we move forward, separated isotopes become scarcer, and safety concerns become greater. The chemical purification and electodeposition techniques will be described.

  17. Absolute photoneutron cross sections of Sm isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Filipescu, D.; Nyhus, H.-T.; Renstrom, T.; Tesileanu, O.; Shima, T.; Takahisa, K.; Miyamoto, S.

    2015-02-24

    Photoneutron cross sections for seven samarium isotopes, {sup 144}Sm, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 148}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 152}Sm and {sup 154}Sm, have been investigated near neutron emission threshold using quasimonochromatic laser-Compton scattering γ-rays produced at the synchrotron radiation facility NewSUBARU. The results are important for nuclear astrophysics calculations and also for probing γ-ray strength functions in the vicinity of neutron threshold. Here we describe the neutron detection system and we discuss the related data analysis and the necessary method improvements for adapting the current experimental method to the working parameters of the future Gamma Beam System of Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility.

  18. Experiments on Antiprotons: Antiproton-Nucleon Cross Sections

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Chamberlain, Owen; Keller, Donald V.; Mermond, Ronald; Segre, Emilio; Steiner, Herbert M.; Ypsilantis, Tom

    1957-07-22

    In this paper experiments are reported on annihilation and scattering of antiprotons in H{sub 2}O , D{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2}. From the data measured it is possible to obtain an antiproton-proton and an antiproton-deuteron cross section at 457 Mev (lab). Further analysis gives the p-p and p-n cross sections as 104 mb for the p-p reaction cross section and 113 mb for the p-n reaction cross section. The respective annihilation cross sections are 89 and 74 mb. The Glauber correction necessary in order to pass from the p-d to the p-n cross section by subtraction of the p-p cross section is unfortunately large and somewhat uncertain. The data are compared with the p-p and p-n cross sections and with other results on p-p collisions.

  19. Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 73; APPROXIMATIONS; CROSS SECTIONS; DECAY AMPLITUDES; DEFORMATION; FISSION; FLUCTUATIONS; INTERMEDIATE STRUCTURE; ...

  20. Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and determination the top quark mass using this measure Citation Details ...

  1. Positive Scattering Cross Sections using Constrained Least Squares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahl, J.A.; Ganapol, B.D.; Morel, J.E.

    1999-09-27

    A method which creates a positive Legendre expansion from truncated Legendre cross section libraries is presented. The cross section moments of order two and greater are modified by a constrained least squares algorithm, subject to the constraints that the zeroth and first moments remain constant, and that the standard discrete ordinate scattering matrix is positive. A method using the maximum entropy representation of the cross section which reduces the error of these modified moments is also presented. These methods are implemented in PARTISN, and numerical results from a transport calculation using highly anisotropic scattering cross sections with the exponential discontinuous spatial scheme is presented.

  2. Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Calculation of nuclear reaction cross sections on excited nuclei with the coupled-channels method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Calculation of nuclear reaction cross ...

  3. Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE Martin Tzanov University of Colorado PANIC 2008, 9-14 November, Eilat, ISRAEL Martin Tzanov, PANIC 2008 Neutrino Cross Sections Today * Precise knowledge needed for precise oscillation measurements. * Cross section well measured above 20 GeV. * Few measurements below 20 GeV. * 20-30 years old bubble chamber experiments (mostly H 2 , D 2 ). * Neutral current cross sections are even less understood. ν CC world data CC world data ν T2K, BooNE K2K,

  4. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements ... and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. ...

  5. Neutron Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry for Isotopes of Arsenic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, K; Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Mustafa, M

    2006-01-10

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Local systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for isotopes of Arsenic (Z = 33) in the mass range 71 {le} A {le} 77.

  6. Scaling properties of proton-nucleus total reaction cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Ibrahim, Badawy; Kohama, Akihisa

    2010-05-15

    We study the scaling properties of proton-nucleus total reaction cross sections for stable nuclei and propose an approximate expression in proportion to Z{sup 2/3}sigma{sub pp}{sup total}+N{sup 2/3}sigma{sub pn}{sup total}. Based on this expression, we can derive a relation that enables us to predict a total reaction cross section for any stable nucleus within 10% uncertainty at most, using the empirical value of the total reaction cross section of a given nucleus.

  7. Giant dipole resonance parameters with uncertainties from photonuclear cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plujko, V.A.; Capote, R.; Gorbachenko, O.M.

    2011-09-15

    Updated values and corresponding uncertainties of isovector giant dipole resonance (IVGDR or GDR) model parameters are presented that are obtained by the least-squares fitting of theoretical photoabsorption cross sections to experimental data. The theoretical photoabsorption cross section is taken as a sum of the components corresponding to excitation of the GDR and quasideuteron contribution to the experimental photoabsorption cross section. The present compilation covers experimental data as of January 2010. - Highlights: {yields} Experimental {sigma} ({gamma}, abs) or a sum of partial cross sections are taken as input to the fitting. {yields} Data include contributions from photoproton reactions. {yields} Standard (SLO) or modified (SMLO) Lorentzian approaches are used for formulating GDR models. {yields} Spherical or axially deformed nuclear shapes are used in GDR least-squares fit. {yields} Values and uncertainties of the SLO and SMLO GDR model parameters are tabulated.

  8. Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cross section of quark pair production top with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and determination the top quark mass using this measure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  9. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrts13 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the top quark...

  10. MiniBooNE QE Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Quasielastic Double Differential Cross section", arXiv:1002:2680 hep-ex, Phys. Rev. D81, 092005 (2010) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2010 CCQE cross...

  11. Preliminary Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the Casa Diablo...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Cross Sections of the Casa Diablo Geothermal Area, Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map:...

  12. Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2015-09-25

    The top quark, discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab, has undergone intense studies in the last 20 years. Currently, CDF and D0 converge on their measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections using the full Tevatron data sample. In these proceedings, the latest results on inclusive and differential measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections at the Tevatron are reported.

  13. Nucleon-nucleon cross sections in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, H.; Schnell, A.; Roepke, G.; Lombardo, U.

    1997-06-01

    We provide a microscopic calculation of neutron-proton and neutron-neutron cross sections in symmetric nuclear matter at various densities, using the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation scheme with the Paris potential. We investigate separately the medium effects on the effective mass and on the scattering amplitude. We determine average cross sections suitable for application in the dynamical simulation of heavy ion collisions, including a parametrization of their energy and density dependence. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. A Multigroup Reaction Cross-Section Collapsing Code and Library of 154-Group Fission-Product Cross Sections.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1983-03-23

    Version 01/02 The code reads multigroup cross sections from a compatible data file and collapses user-selected reaction cross sections to any few-group structure using one of a variety of user neutron flux spectrum options given below: Option Flux description 1 Built-in function including Maxwellian, fission, fusion and slowing-down regions and requiring user-specified parameters and energy-region boundaries. 2 Set of log-log flux-energy interpolation points read from input cross-section data file. 3 Set of log-log flux-energy interpolationmore » points read from user-supplied card input. 4 - 6 Histogram flux values read from user-supplied card input in arbitrary group structure in units of flux-per unit-energy, flux-per-unit lethargy, or integral group flux. LAFPX-E may be used to collapse any set of multigroup reaction cross sections furnished in the required format. However, the code was developed for, and is furnished with, a library of 154-group fission-product cross sections processed from ENDF/B-IV with a typical light water reactor (LWR) flux spectrum and temperature. Four-group radiative capture cross sections produced for LWR calculations are tabulated in the code documentation and are incorporated in the EPRI-CINDER data library, RSIC Code Package CCC-309.« less

  15. ACTIV87: Fast Neutron Activation Cross Section File

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-08-01

    4. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND AND INFORMATION ACTIV87 is a compilation of fast neutron induced activation reaction cross-sections. The compilation covers energies from threshold to 20 MeV and is based on evaluated data taken from other evaluated data libraries and individual evaluations. The majority of these evaluations were performed by using available experimental data. The aforementioned available experimental data were used in the selection of needed parameters for theoretical computations and for normalizing the results of suchmore » computations. Theoretical calculations were also used for interpolation and extrapolation of experimental cross-section data. All of the evaluated data curves were compared with experimental data that had been reported over the four year period preceding 1987. Only those cross-sections not in contradiction with experimental data that was current in 1987 were retained in the activation file, ACTIV87. In cases of several conflicting evaluations, that evaluation was chosen which best corresponded to the experimental data. A few evaluated curves were renormalized in accordance with the results of the latest precision measurements. 5. APPLICATION OF THE DATA 6. SOURCE AND SCOPE OF DATA The following libraries and individual files of evaluated neutron cross-section data were used for the selection of the activation cross-sections: the BOSPOR Library, the Activation File of the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, the Evaluated Neutron Data File (ENDF/B-V) Activation File, the International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-82), and individual evaluations carried out under various IAEA research contracts. The file of selected reactions contains 206 evaluated cross-section curves of the (n,2n), (n,p) and (n,a) reactions which lead to radioactive products and may be used in many practical applications of neutron activation analysis. Some competing activation reactions, usually with low cross-section values, are given for completeness.« less

  16. Experience With the SCALE Criticality Safety Cross Section Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, S.M.

    2000-08-21

    This report provides detailed information on the SCALE criticality safety cross-section libraries. Areas covered include the origins of the libraries, the data on which they are based, how they were generated, past experience and validations, and performance comparisons with measured critical experiments and numerical benchmarks. The performance of the SCALE criticality safety cross-section libraries on various types of fissile systems are examined in detail. Most of the performance areas are demonstrated by examining the performance of the libraries vs critical experiments to show general trends and weaknesses. In areas where directly applicable critical experiments do not exist, performance is examined based on the general knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the cross sections. In this case, the experience in the use of the cross sections and comparisons with the results of other libraries on the same systems are relied on for establishing acceptability of application of a particular SCALE library to a particular fissile system. This report should aid in establishing when a SCALE cross-section library would be expected to perform acceptably and where there are known or suspected deficiencies that would cause the calculations to be less reliable. To determine the acceptability of a library for a particular application, the calculational bias of the library should be established by directly applicable critical experiments.

  17. Dosimetry and cross section measurements at RTNS II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Kneff, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous measurements have been conducted at TRNS-II in order to map the neutron field for materials irradiations, to measure activation cross sections, and to measure helium production cross sections. Experiments of up to two weeks duration irradiated large numbers of activation dosimetry and helium samples both close to the source and throughout the target room. Many other samples have been irradiated in piggy-back positions over periods lasting many months. All of these experiments fall into four main classes, namely, fluence-mapping, activation dosimetry, the production of long-lived isotopes, and helium generation measurements. Radiometric dosimetry and activation cross section measurements were performed at Argonne National Laboratory; helium production was measured at Rockwell International Corporation. This paper briefly summarizes the principal results of our measurements at RTNS-II; references are given for more detailed publications. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Cross-Sectional Transport Imaging in a Multijunction Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haegel, Nancy M.; Ke, Chi-Wen; Taha, Hesham; Guthrey, Harvey; Fetzer, C. M.; King, Richard

    2015-06-14

    Combining highly localized electron-beam excitation at a point with the spatial resolution capability of optical near-field imaging, we have imaged carrier transport in a cross-sectioned multijunction (GaInP/GaInAs/Ge) solar cell. We image energy transport associated with carrier diffusion throughout the full width of the middle (GaInAs) cell and luminescent coupling from point excitation in the top cell GaInP to the middle cell. Supporting cathodoluminescence and near-field photoluminescence measurements demonstrate excitation-dependent Fermi level splitting effects that influence cross-sectioned spectroscopy results as well as transport limitations on the spatial resolution of cross-sectional measurements.

  19. Uncertainty quantification in fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tovesson, F.

    2015-01-09

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections have been measured for several isotopes of uranium and plutonium at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) over a wide range of incident neutron energies. The total uncertainties in these measurements are in the range 3–5% above 100 keV of incident neutron energy, which results from uncertainties in the target, neutron source, and detector system. The individual sources of uncertainties are assumed to be uncorrelated, however correlation in the cross section across neutron energy bins are considered. The quantification of the uncertainty contributions will be described here.

  20. Neutron capture cross section standards for BNL 325, Fourth Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    This report evaluates the experimental data and recommends values for the thermal neutron cross sections and resonance integrals for the neutron capture reactions: /sup 55/Mn(n,..gamma..), /sup 59/Co(n,..gamma..) and /sup 197/Au(n,..gamma..). The failure of lithium and boron as standards due to the natural variation of the absorption cross sections of these elements is discussed. The Westcott convention, which describes the neutron spectrum as a thermal Maxwellian distribution with an epithermal component, is also discussed.

  1. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Henderson, D.; et al

    2015-06-02

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work.

  2. RZ calculations for self shielded multigroup cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, M.; Sanchez, R.; Zmijarevic, I.; Stankovski, Z.

    2006-07-01

    A collision probability method has been implemented for RZ geometries. The method accounts for white albedo, specular and translation boundary condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the geometry and for a white albedo condition on the outer radial surface. We have applied the RZ CP method to the calculation of multigroup self shielded cross sections for Gadolinia absorbers in BWRs. (authors)

  3. Reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes incident on a proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Ibrahim, B.; Horiuchi, W.; Kohama, A.; Suzuki, Y.

    2008-03-15

    We systematically study total reaction cross sections of carbon isotopes with N=6-16 on a proton target for wide range of incident energies. An emphasis is put on the difference from the case of a carbon target. The calculations include the reaction cross sections of {sup 19,20,22}C at 40A MeV, the data of which have recently been measured at RIKEN. The Glauber theory is used to calculate the reaction cross sections. To describe the intrinsic structure of the carbon isotopes, we use a Slater determinant generated from a phenomenological mean-field potential, and construct the density distributions. To go beyond the simple mean-field model, we adopt two types of dynamical models: One is a core+n model for odd-neutron nuclei, and the other is a core+n+n model for {sup 16}C and {sup 22}C. We propose empirical formulas which are useful in predicting unknown cross sections.

  4. 70 Group Neutron Fast Reactor Cross Section Set and 25 Group Neutron Fast Reactor Cross Section Set.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1984-10-29

    Version 00 These multigroup cross sections are used in fast reactor calculations. The benchmark calculations for the 23 fast critical assemblies used in the benchmark tests of JFS-2 were performed with one-dimensional diffusion theory by using the JFS-3-J2 set.

  5. Vortex breakdown in closed containers with polygonal cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naumov, I. V. Dvoynishnikov, S. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Tsoy, M. A.

    2015-12-15

    The vortex breakdown bubble in the confined flow generated by a rotating lid in closed containers with polygonal cross sections was analysed both experimentally and numerically for the height/radius aspect ratio equal to 2. The stagnation point locations of the breakdown bubble emergence and the corresponding Reynolds number were determined experimentally and in addition computed numerically by STAR-CCM+ CFD software for square, pentagonal, hexagonal, and octagonal cross section configurations. The flow pattern and the velocity were observed and measured by combining the seeding particle visualization and the temporal accuracy of laser Doppler anemometry. The vortex breakdown size and position on the container axis were determined for Reynolds numbers, ranging from 1450 to 2400. The obtained results were compared with the flow structure in the closed container of cubical and cylindrical configurations. It is shown that the measured evolution of steady vortex breakdown is in close agreement with the numerical results.

  6. Accurate Development of Thermal Neutron Scattering Cross Section Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawari, Ayman; Dunn, Michael

    2014-06-10

    The objective of this project is to develop a holistic (fundamental and accurate) approach for generating thermal neutron scattering cross section libraries for a collection of important enutron moderators and reflectors. The primary components of this approach are the physcial accuracy and completeness of the generated data libraries. Consequently, for the first time, thermal neutron scattering cross section data libraries will be generated that are based on accurate theoretical models, that are carefully benchmarked against experimental and computational data, and that contain complete covariance information that can be used in propagating the data uncertainties through the various components of the nuclear design and execution process. To achieve this objective, computational and experimental investigations will be performed on a carefully selected subset of materials that play a key role in all stages of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  7. Laser stimulated emission cross sections of Nd glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, A.W.; Birnbaum, M.; Fincher, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    A laser-comparison method was used to determine the emission cross sections at 1060 nm of Nd glasses used in laser fusion systems. The values obtained for two phosphate glasses (LHG-8) and (Q-88) were 4.0 +- 0.8 x 10/sup -20/ cm/sup 2/ and 1.7 +- 0.5 x 10/sup -20/ cm/sup 2/ for a silicate glass (LG-650).

  8. Neutron Cross-Section Measurements on Structural Materials at ORELA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guber, Klaus H; Koehler, Paul; Wiarda, Dorothea; Harvey, John A

    2011-01-01

    Neutron capture experiments, using isotopically enriched and natural samples of chromium and titanium, were performed on flight paths 6 and 7 at the 40 m flight station of ORELA. The experimental data were acquired using a pair of deuterated benzene detectors employing the now well-established pulse-height-weighting technique. These data were complemented by new total cross-section measurements where no useful previous data were available.

  9. Radial Eigenmodes for a Toroidal Waveguide with Rectangular Cross Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rui Li

    2012-07-01

    In applying mode expansion to solve the CSR impedance for a section of toroidal vacuum chamber with rectangular cross section, we identify the eigenvalue problem for the radial eigenmodes which is different from that for cylindrical structures. In this paper, we present the general expressions of the radial eigenmodes, and discuss the properties of the eigenvalues on the basis of the Sturm-Liouville theory.

  10. Nuclear Astrophysics and Neutron Cross Section Measurements Using the ORELA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, R. R.

    2000-08-25

    This is the final report for a research program which has been continuously supported by the AEC, ERDA, or USDOE since 1973. The neutron total and capture cross sections for n + {sup 88}Sr have been measured over the neutron energy range 100 eV to 1 MeV. The report briefly summaries our results and the importance of this work for nucleosynthesis and the optical model.

  11. Overview of recent U235 neutron cross section evaluation work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubitz, C. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-10-01

    This report is an overview (through 1997) of the U235 neutron cross section evaluation work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), AEA Technology (Harwell) and Lockheed Martin Corp.-Schenectady (LMS), which has influenced, or appeared in, ENDF/B-VI through Release 5. The discussion is restricted to the thermal and resolved resonance regions, apart from some questions about the unresolved region which still need investigation. The important role which benchmark testing has played will be touched on.

  12. Inclusive jet cross-section measurement at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2007-05-01

    The CDF Collaboration has measured the inclusive jet cross section using 1992-93 collider data at 1.8 TeV. The CDF measurement is in very good agreement with NLO QCD predictions for transverse energies (E{sub T}) below 200 GeV. However, it is systematically higher than NLO QCD predictions for E{sub T} above 200 GeV.

  13. Top Quark Production Cross Section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabalina, E.; /Chicago U.

    2006-05-01

    An overview of the preliminary results of the top quark pair production cross section measurements at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV carried out by the CDF and D0 collaborations is presented. The data samples used for the analyses are collected in the current Tevatron run and correspond to an integrated luminosity from 360 pb{sup -1} up to 760 pb{sup -1}.

  14. Top quark pair production cross section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortiana, Giorgio; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.

    2008-04-01

    Top quark pair production cross section has been measured at the Tevatron by CDF and D0 collaborations using different channels and methods, in order to test standard model predictions, and to search for new physics hints affecting the t{bar t} production mechanism or decay. Measurements are carried out with an integrated luminosity of 1.0 to 2.0 fb{sup -1}, and are found to be consistent with standard model expectations.

  15. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard; Hill, Richard J.

    2016-06-23

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, FA(q2), which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of FA from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of FA. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to rA2 = 0.46(22)fm2, with a much larger uncertainty than determined inmore » the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ(νμn → μ-p)|Ev=1GeV = 10.1(0.9)×10-39cm2. The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. Furthermore, these techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.« less

  16. Positive anisotropic group scattering cross sections for radiation transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DelGrande, J.M.

    1999-05-01

    In solving the Boltzmann transport equation, most discrete ordinates codes calculate the source term by first approximating the scattering cross section using a Legendre polynomial expansion. Such expansions are insufficient when scattering is anisotropic and the Legendre expansion is truncated prematurely. This can lead to nonphysical negative cross sections, negative source terms and negative angular fluxes. While negative sources are problematic for standard discrete ordinates methods leading to poor convergence or convergence to incorrect results, they are of particular concern to exponential methods, causing such calculations to fail. The authors` have developed and tested a new technique to solve this problem called the Monte Carlo Facet Method. This method is an extension of standard Monte Carlo techniques. It guarantees non-negative cross sections at all directional ordinates. It also ensures within group and next group scatter. This dissertation outlines previous attempts to handle anisotropic scattering to achieve non-negative sources. It develops the theory of the Monte Carlo facet method and its first angular moment conservation. Results are presented examining the scattering matrices for various materials, and finally demonstrating that these scattering matrices perform exceptionally well in a multi-group, anisotropic, unstructured mesh discrete ordinates transport code.

  17. Neutron Capture Cross Sections for the Re/Os Clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosconi, M.; Heil, M.; Kaeppeler, F.; Plag, R.; Voss, F.; Wisshak, K.; Mengoni, A.; Cennini, P.; Chiaveri, E.; Ferrari, A.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Kadi, Y.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wendler, H.; Aerts, G.; Andriamonje, S.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.

    2005-05-24

    The radioactive decay of 187Re {yields} 187Os (t1/2 = 43 Gyr) is suited for dating the onset of heavy-element nucleosynthesis. The radiogenic contribution to the 187Os abundance is the difference between the natural abundance and the corresponding s-process component. This component can be obtained via the well-established {sigma}N systematics using the neighboring s-only isotope 186Os, provided the neutron-capture cross sections of both isotopes are known with sufficient accuracy. We report on a new set of experiments performed with a C6D6 detector array at the n{sub T}OF neutron spallation facility of CERN. The capture cross sections of 186Os, 187Os, and 188Os have been measured in the neutron-energy range between 1 eV and 1 MeV, and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections were deduced for the relevant thermal energies from kT=5 keV to 100 keV.

  18. From ZZ to ZH : How Low Can These Cross Sections Go or Everybody, Let's Cross Section Limbo!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, Emanuel Alexandre; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2009-08-01

    We report on two searches performed at the D0 detector at the Fermi National Laboratory. The first is a search for Z di-boson production with a theoretical cross section of 1.4 pb. The search was performed on 2.6 fb{sup -1} of data and contributed to the first observation of ZZ production at a hadron collider. The second is a search for a low mass Standard Model Higgs in 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data. The Higgs boson is produced in association with a Z boson where the Higgs decays hadronically and the Z decays to two leptons. The ZZ search was performed in both the di-electron and di-muon channels. For the ZH search, we will focus on the muonic decays where we expanded the traditional coverage by considering events in which one of the two muons fails the selection requirement, and is instead reconstructed as an isolated track. We consider Higgs masses between 100 and 150 GeV, with theoretical cross sections ranging from 0.17 to 0.042 pb, and set upper limits on the ZH production cross-section at 95% confidence level.

  19. Radioactive targets for neutron-induced cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronenberg, A.; Bond, E. M.; Glover, S. E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Esch, E. I.; Reifarth, R.; Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, Robert C.; Rochmann, D.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements using radioactive targets are important for the determination of key reaction path ways associated with the synthesis of the elements in nuclear astrophysics (sprocess), advanced fuel cycle initiative (transmutation of radioactive waste), and stockpile stewardship. High precision capture cross-section measurements are needed to interpret observations, predict elemental or isotopical ratios, and unobserved abundances. There are two new detector systems that are presently being commissioned at Los Alamos National Laboratory for very precise measurements of (n,{gamma}) and (n,f) cross-sections using small quantities of radioactive samples. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments), a 4 {pi} gamma array made up of 160 BaF{sub 2} detectors, is designed to measure neutron capture cross-sections of unstable nuclei in the low-energy range (thermal to {approx}500 keV). The high granularity and high detection efficiency of DANCE, combined with the high TOF-neutron flux available at the Lujan Center provides a versatile tool for measuring many important cross section data using radioactive and isotopically enriched targets of about 1 milligram. Another powerful instrument is the Lead-slowing down spectrometer (LSDS), which will enable the measurement of neutron-induced fission cross-section of U-235m and other short-lived actinides in a energy range from 1-200 keV with sample sizes down to 10 nanograms. Due to the short half-life of the U-235m isomer (T{sub 1/2} = 26 minutes), the samples must be rapidly and repeatedly extracted from its {sup 239}Pu parent. Since {sup 239}Pu is itself highly fissile, the separation must not only be rapid, but must also be of very high purity (the Pu must be removed from the U with a decontamination factor >10{sup 12}). Once extracted and purified, the {sup 235m}U isomer would be electrodeposited on solar cells as a fission detector and placed within the LSDS for direct (n,f) cross section measurements. The

  20. Detailed photonuclear cross-section calculations and astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Hoff, R.W.

    1989-06-15

    We have investigated the role of an isomeric state and its coupling to the ground state (g.s.) via photons and neutron inelastic scattering in a stellar environment by making detailed photonuclear and neutron cross-section calculations for /sup 176/Lu and /sup 210/Bi. In the case of /sup 176/Lu, the g.s. would function as an excellent galactic slow- (s-) process chronometer were it not for the 3.7-h isomer at 123 keV. Our calculations predicted much larger photon cross sections for production of the isomer, as well as a lower threshold, than had been assumed based on earlier measurements. These two factors combine to indicate that an enormous correction, a factor of 10/sup 7/, must be applied to shorten the current estimate of the half-life against photoexcitation of /sup 176/Lu as a function of temperature. This severely limits the use of /sup 176/Lu as a stellar chronometer and indicates a significantly lower temperature at which the two states reach thermal equilibrium. For /sup 210/Bi, our preliminary calculations of the production and destruction of the 3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ y isomeric state by neutrons and photons suggest that the /sup 210/Bi isomer may not be destroyed by photons as rapidly as assumed in certain stellar environments. This leads to an alternate production path of /sup 207/Pb and significantly affects presently interpreted lead isotopic abundances. We have been able to make such detailed nuclear cross-section calculations using: modern statistical-model codes of the Hauser-Feshbach type, with complete conservation of angular momentum and parity; reliable systematics of the input parameters required by these codes, including knowledge of the absolute gamma-ray strength-functions for E1, M1, and E2 transitions; and codes developed to compute large, discrete, nuclear level sets, their associated gamma-ray branchings, and the presence and location of isomeric states. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  1. MOX Cross-Section Libraries for ORIGEN-ARP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2003-07-01

    The use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in commercial nuclear power reactors operated in Europe has expanded rapidly over the past decade. The predicted characteristics of MOX fuel such as the nuclide inventories, thermal power from decay heat, and radiation sources are required for design and safety evaluations, and can provide valuable information for non-destructive safeguards verification activities. This report describes the development of computational methods and cross-section libraries suitable for the analysis of irradiated MOX fuel with the widely-used and recognized ORIGEN-ARP isotope generation and depletion code of the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system. The MOX libraries are designed to be used with the Automatic Rapid Processing (ARP) module of SCALE that interpolates appropriate values of the cross sections from a database of parameterized cross-section libraries to create a problem-dependent library for the burnup analysis. The methods in ORIGEN-ARP, originally designed for uranium-based fuels only, have been significantly upgraded to handle the larger number of interpolation parameters associated with MOX fuels. The new methods have been incorporated in a new version of the ARP code that can generate libraries for low-enriched uranium (LEU) and MOX fuel types. The MOX data libraries and interpolation algorithms in ORIGEN-ARP have been verified using a database of declared isotopic concentrations for 1042 European MOX fuel assemblies. The methods and data are validated using a numerical MOX fuel benchmark established by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Working Group on burnup credit and nuclide assay measurements for irradiated MOX fuel performed as part of the Belgonucleaire ARIANE International Program.

  2. Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions, Induced Cross-Sections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-27

    EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined op0tical, Multistep Direct (TUL), Multistep Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus (Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha- particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions andmore »extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions.« less

  3. Regularization scheme independence and unitarity in QCD cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catani, S.; Seymour, M.H.; Trocsanyi, Z.

    1997-06-01

    When calculating next-to-leading order QCD cross sections, divergences in intermediate steps of the calculation must be regularized. The final result is independent of the regularization scheme used, provided that it is unitary. In this paper we explore the relationship between regularization scheme independence and unitarity. We show how the regularization scheme dependence can be isolated in simple universal components, and how unitarity can be guaranteed for any regularization prescription that can consistently be introduced in one-loop amplitudes. Finally, we show how to derive transition rules between different schemes without having to do any loop calculations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Comprehensive Nuclear Model Code, Nucleons, Ions, Induced Cross-Sections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-27

    EMPIRE-II is a flexible code for calculation of nuclear reactions in the frame of combined op0tical, Multistep Direct (TUL), Multistep Compound (NVWY) and statistical (Hauser-Feshbach) models. Incident particle can be a nucleon or any nucleus (Heavy Ion). Isomer ratios, residue production cross sections and emission spectra for neutrons, protons, alpha- particles, gamma-rays, and one type of Light Ion can be calculated. The energy range starts just above the resonance region for neutron induced reactions andmore » extends up to several hundreds of MeV for the Heavy Ion induced reactions.« less

  5. Proton radiography, nuclear cross sections and multiple Coulomb scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjue, Sky K.

    2015-11-04

    The principles behind proton radiography including multiple Coulomb scattering are discussed for a purely imaginary square well nucleus in the eikonal approximation. It is found that a very crude model can reproduce the angular dependence of the cross sections measured at 24 GeV/c. The largest differences are ~3% for the 4.56 mrad data, and ~4% for the 6.68 mrad data. The prospect of understanding how to model deterministically high-energy proton radiography over a very large range of energies is promising, but it should be tested more thoroughly.

  6. Final Report - Nucelar Astrophysics & Neutron Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, Robert F

    2009-12-01

    This enduring research program of 28 years has taken advantage of the excellent research facility of ORELA at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The fruitful collaborations include a number of scientists from ORNL and some from LASL. This program which has ranged from nuclear structure determinations to astrophysical applications has resulted in the identification and/or the refinement of the nuclear properties of more than 5,000 nuclear energy levels or compound energy states. The nuclei range from 30Si to 250Cf, the probes range from thermal to 50 MeV neutrons, and the studies range from capture gamma ray spectra to total and differential scattering and absorption cross sections. Specific target nuclei studied include the following: 120Sn 124Sn 125Sn 113Sn 115Sn 117Sn 119Sn 249Cf 33S 34S 249Bk 186Os 187Os 188Os 30Si 32S 40Ca 48Ca 60Ni 54Fe 86Kr 88Sr 40Ar 122Sn 90Zr 122Sn(n,?) 208Pb 204Pb 52Cr 54Cr 50Cr 53Cr As can be seen, we have studied, on average, more than one isotope per year of grant funding and have focused on exploiting those elements having multiple isotopes in order to investigate systematic trends in nuclear properties, for the purpose of providing more stringent tests of the nuclear spherical optical model with a surface imaginary potential. We have investigated an l-dependence of the real-well depth of the spherical optical model; we have used these measurements to deduce the existence of doorway states in the compound nucleus; and in the total cross section measurements we have, in addition to resonance energies and widths, obtained values for the level density and neutron strength function. Due to the high neutron energy resolution of the ORELA and in some cases the addition of differential scattering cross section data, we have been able to disaggregate the spin states and provide level spacing and strength function for each partial wave in the neutron-nucleus interaction, in some cases up to d5/2. In the following we will summarize the most recent

  7. Effect of strongly coupled plasma on photoionization cross section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Madhusmita

    2014-01-15

    The effect of strongly coupled plasma on the ground state photoionization cross section is studied. In the non relativistic dipole approximation, cross section is evaluated from bound-free transition matrix element. The bound and free state wave functions are obtained by solving the radial Schrodinger equation with appropriate plasma potential. We have used ion sphere potential (ISP) to incorporate the plasma effects in atomic structure calculation. This potential includes the effect of static plasma screening on nuclear charge as well as the effect of confinement due to the neighbouring ions. With ISP, the radial equation is solved using Shooting method approach for hydrogen like ions (Li{sup +2}, C{sup +5}, Al{sup +12}) and lithium like ions (C{sup +3}, O{sup +5}). The effect of strong screening and confinement is manifested as confinement resonances near the ionization threshold for both kinds of ions. The confinement resonances are very much dependent on the edge of the confining potential and die out as the plasma density is increased. Plasma effect also results in appearance of Cooper minimum in lithium like ions, which was not present in case of free lithium like ions. With increasing density the position of Cooper minimum shifts towards higher photoelectron energy. The same behaviour is also true for weakly coupled plasma where plasma effect is modelled by Debye-Huckel potential.

  8. Status of the International Neutron Cross-Section Standards File

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pronyaev, Vladimir G.; Badikov, Sergei A.; Gai, Evgeny V.; Chen Zhenpeng; Carlson, Allan D.; Hale, Gerald M.; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Hofmann, Hartmut M.; Larson, Nancy M.; Smith, Donald L.; Oh, Soo-Youl; Tagesen, Siegfried; Vonach, Herbert

    2005-05-24

    A report is given of the progress achieved in an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) to improve the cross-section standards. The objectives of the CRP, started in 2002, were initially the understanding of the origin of the strong uncertainty reduction in R-matrix model fits and the improvement of the evaluation methodology. These aims were extended in 2003 to the preparation of new evaluations for the standard 6Li(n,t), 10B(n,{alpha}), 10B(n,{alpha}1), 197Au(n,{gamma}), 235U(n,f), and 238U(n,f) reactions. The methodology, codes, and experimental database developed by Poenitz and Hale for the ENDF/B-VI standards evaluation were taken as the basis for the new evaluation. The major results achieved by the CRP participants include the testing and intercomparison of a number of codes that can be used in the standards evaluation, updating the database of experimental results, analysis of the reasons leading to the strong uncertainty reduction in model fits, and a study of the bias in evaluated data caused by the Peelles's Pertinent Puzzle (PPP) effect, which has been widely discussed in the nuclear data community since the ENDF/B-VI standards evaluation was completed. Preliminary results of the new standards evaluation are shown. The use of the new 235U(n,f) cross section leads to better consistency in calculations of some important integral experiments.

  9. Research on Fast-Doppler-Broadening of neutron cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.; Wang, K.; Yu, G.

    2012-07-01

    A Fast-Doppler-Broadening method is developed in this work to broaden Continuous Energy neutron cross-sections for Monte Carlo calculations. Gauss integration algorithm and parallel computing are implemented in this method, which is unprecedented in the history of cross section processing. Compared to the traditional code (NJOY, SIGMA1, etc.), the new Fast-Doppler-Broadening method shows a remarkable speedup with keeping accuracy. The purpose of using Gauss integration is to avoid complex derivation of traditional broadening formula and heavy load of computing complementary error function that slows down the Doppler broadening process. The OpenMP environment is utilized in parallel computing which can take full advantage of modern multi-processor computers. Combination of the two can reduce processing time of main actinides (such as {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U) to an order of magnitude of 1{approx}2 seconds. This new method is fast enough to be applied to Online Doppler broadening. It can be combined or coupled with Monte Carlo transport code to solve temperature dependent problems and neutronics-thermal hydraulics coupled scheme which is a big challenge for the conventional NJOY-MCNP system. Examples are shown to determine the efficiency and relative errors compared with the NJOY results. A Godiva Benchmark is also used in order to test the ACE libraries produced by the new method. (authors)

  10. Neutron cross section standards and instrumentation. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasson, O.A.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this interagency program is to provide accurate neutron interaction measurements for the US Department of Energy nuclear programs which include waste disposal, fusion, safeguards, defense, fission, and personnel protection. These measurements are also useful to other energy programs which indirectly use the unique properties of the neutron for diagnostic and analytical purposes. The work includes the measurement of reference cross sections and related neutron data employing unique facilities and capabilities at NIST and other laboratories as required; leadership and participation in international intercomparisons and collaborations; the preservation of standard reference deposits and the development of improved neutron detectors and measurement methods. A related and essential element of the program is critical evaluation of neutron interaction data including international coordinations. Data testing of critical data for important applications is included. The program is jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. This report from the National Institute of Standards and Technology contains a summary of the accomplishments of the Neutron Cross Section Standards and Instrumentation Project during the third year of this three-year interagency agreement. The proposed program and required budget for the following three years are also presented. The program continues the shifts in priority instituted in order to broaden the program base.

  11. Deeply virtual Compton Scattering cross section measured with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guegan, Baptistse

    2014-09-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provide a new description of nucleon structure in terms of its elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Including and extending the information provided by the form factors and the parton distribution functions, they describe the correlation between the transverse position and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the partons in the nucleon. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), the electroproduction of a real photon on a single quark in the nucleon eN --> e'N'g, is the exclusive process most directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has been carried out using a 5.9-GeV polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target, allowing us to collect DVCS events in the widest kinematic range ever explored in the valence region : 1.0 < Q2 < 4.6 GeV2, 0.1 < xB < 0.58 and 0.09 < -t < 2.0 GeV2. In this paper, we show preliminary results of unpolarized cross sections and of polarized cross section differences for the DVCS channel.

  12. CROSS SECTION EVALUATIONS FOR ENDF/B-VII.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERMAN, M.; ROCHMAN, D.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2006-06-05

    This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on neutron cross section evaluations for ENDF/B-VII (April 2005-May 2006). The purpose of the contract was to ensure seamless integration of the LANL neutron cross section evaluations in the new ENDF/B-VII library. The following work was performed: (1) LANL evaluated data files submitted for inclusion in ENDF/B-VII were checked and, when necessary, formal formatting errors were corrected. As a consequence, ENDF checking codes, run on all LANL files, do not report any errors that would rise concern. (2) LANL dosimetry evaluations for {sup 191}Ir and {sup 193}Ir were completed to match ENDF requirements for the general purpose library suitable for transport calculations. A set of covariances for both isotopes is included in the ENDF files. (3) Library of fission products was assembled and successfully tested with ENDF checking codes, processed with NJOY-99.125 and simple MCNP calculations. (4) KALMAN code has been integrated with the EMPIRE system to allow estimation of covariances based on the combination of measurements and model calculations. Covariances were produced for 155,157-Gd and also for 6 remaining isotopes of Gd.

  13. 102Pd(n, {gamma}) Cross Section Measurement Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatarik, R.; Alpizar-Vicente, A. M. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bredeweg, T. A.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2006-03-13

    The neutron capture cross section of the proton rich nucleus 102Pd was measured with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The target was a 2 mg Pd foil with 78% enriched 102Pd. It was held by a 0.9 {mu}m thick Mylar bag which was selected after comparing different thicknesses of Kapton and Mylar for their scattering background. To identify the contribution of the other Pd isotopes the data of a natural Pd sample was compared to the data of the 102Pd enriched sample. A 12C sample was used to determine the scattering background. The 102Pd(n, {gamma}) rate is of importance for the p-process nucleosynthesis.

  14. SCWR Once-Through Calculations for Transmutation and Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ganda, francesco

    2012-07-01

    It is the purpose of this report to document the calculation of (1) the isotopic evolution and of (2) the 1-group cross sections as a function of burnup of the reference Super Critical Water Reactor (SCWR), in a format suitable for the Fuel Cycle Option Campaign Transmutation Data Library. The reference SCWR design was chosen to be that described in [McDonald, 2005]. Super Critical Water Reactors (SCWR) are intended to operate with super-critical water (i.e. H2O at a pressure above 22 MPa and a temperature above 373oC) as a cooling – and possibly also moderating – fluid. The main mission of the SCWR is to generate lower cost electricity, as compared to current standard Light Water Reactors (LWR). Because of the high operating pressure and temperature, SCWR feature a substantially higher thermal conversion efficiency than standard LWR – i.e. about 45% versus 33%, mostly due to an increase in the exit water temperature from ~300oC to ~500oC – potentially resulting in a lower cost of generated electricity. The coolant remains single phase throughout the reactor and the energy conversion system, thus eliminating the need for pressurizers, steam generators, steam separators and dryers, further potentially reducing the reactor construction capital cost. The SCWR concept presented here is based on existing LWR technology and on a large number of existing fossil-fired supercritical boilers. However, it was concluded in [McDonald, 2005], that: “Based on the results of this study, it appears that the reference SCWR design is not feasible.” This conclusion appears based on the strong sensitivity of the design to small deviations in nominal conditions leading to small effects having a potentially large impact on the peak cladding temperature of some fuel rods. “This was considered a major feasibility issue for the SCWR” [McDonald, 2005]. After a description of the reference SCWR design, the Keno V 3-D single assembly model used for this analysis, as well as the

  15. Validation of a large activation cross-section library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, D.W.; Wilson, W.B.

    1994-06-01

    The 63-group neutron cross-section library used for neutron activation studies in the Nuclear Theory and Applications Group at Los Alamos has a variety of sources of widely varying levels of quality. This heterogeneous aspect, which is a common feature of all libraries used in activation studies, is a direct consequence of the need to quickly obtain data for up to 15,000 different excitation functions involving 750 different targets. Because of the need to assess the reliability of this library and ten to improve it, we have initiated a systematic comparison of this library with three main data sources, especially the large CSISRS online data system, maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We report on the results of extensive comparisons between the experimental data and the multigroup library. We briefly mention new theoretical approaches data evaluation that are suitable for meeting future data needs in this area.

  16. Prospects for a measurement of the 237U(n,f) cross section at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the 237U(n,f) cross section at the LANSCE Lujan Center Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prospects for a measurement of the 237U(n,f) cross section at the ...

  17. Partial gamma-ray cross section measurements in 109Ag(n, x n...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Partial gamma-ray cross section measurements in 109Ag(n, x n y p gamma) reactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Partial gamma-ray cross section ...

  18. The extraction of $\\phi-N$ total cross section from$d(\\gamma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: The extraction of phi-N total cross section from d(gamma,pK+K-)n Title: The extraction of phi-N total cross section from d(...

  19. Determining the 239Np(n,f) cross section using the surrogate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Determining the 239Np(n,f) cross section using the surrogate ratio method Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Determining the 239Np(n,f) cross section using ...

  20. The extraction of $\\phi-N$ total cross section from$d(\\gamma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The extraction of phi-N total cross section from d(gamma,pK+K-)n Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The extraction of phi-N total cross section from ...

  1. Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of t anti-t production cross-section with D0 experiment ...

  2. Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections (Dataset...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections Title: Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections Comprehensive catalogue of drill-hole data in ...

  3. Sonic spectrometer and treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slomka, Bogdan J.

    1997-06-03

    A novel system and method for treating an object with sonic waveforms. A traveling broad-band sonic waveform containing a broad-band of sonic frequencies is radiated at the object. A traveling reflected sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies reflected by the object is received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. A traveling transmitted sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies transmitted through the object is also received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. In a resonance mode, the frequency spectra of the broad-band and reflected sonic waveforms is analyzed so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate. An electrical resonance treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. In an absorption mode, the frequency spectra of the electrical broad-band, reflected, and transmitted sonic waveforms is compared so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object. An electrical absorption treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object.

  4. Sonic spectrometer and treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slomka, B.J.

    1997-06-03

    A novel system and method is developed for treating an object with sonic waveforms. A traveling broad-band sonic waveform containing a broad-band of sonic frequencies is radiated at the object. A traveling reflected sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies reflected by the object is received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. A traveling transmitted sonic waveform containing sonic frequencies transmitted through the object is also received in response to the traveling broad-band sonic waveform. In a resonance mode, the frequency spectra of the broad-band and reflected sonic waveforms is analyzed so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate. An electrical resonance treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that cause the object to resonate is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. In an absorption mode, the frequency spectra of the electrical broad-band, reflected, and transmitted sonic waveforms is compared so as to select one or more sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object. An electrical absorption treatment sonic waveform containing the sonic frequencies that are absorbed by the object is then radiated at the object so as to treat the object. 1 fig.

  5. Radar-cross-section reduction of wind turbines. part 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Billy C.; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob J.; Paquette, Joshua A.; Calkins, David A.; Miller, William K.; Allen, Steven E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Patitz, Ward E.

    2012-03-05

    In recent years, increasing deployment of large wind-turbine farms has become an issue of growing concern for the radar community. The large radar cross section (RCS) presented by wind turbines interferes with radar operation, and the Doppler shift caused by blade rotation causes problems identifying and tracking moving targets. Each new wind-turbine farm installation must be carefully evaluated for potential disruption of radar operation for air defense, air traffic control, weather sensing, and other applications. Several approaches currently exist to minimize conflict between wind-turbine farms and radar installations, including procedural adjustments, radar upgrades, and proper choice of low-impact wind-farm sites, but each has problems with limited effectiveness or prohibitive cost. An alternative approach, heretofore not technically feasible, is to reduce the RCS of wind turbines to the extent that they can be installed near existing radar installations. This report summarizes efforts to reduce wind-turbine RCS, with a particular emphasis on the blades. The report begins with a survey of the wind-turbine RCS-reduction literature to establish a baseline for comparison. The following topics are then addressed: electromagnetic model development and validation, novel material development, integration into wind-turbine fabrication processes, integrated-absorber design, and wind-turbine RCS modeling. Related topics of interest, including alternative mitigation techniques (procedural, at-the-radar, etc.), an introduction to RCS and electromagnetic scattering, and RCS-reduction modeling techniques, can be found in a previous report.

  6. Cross section measurements at LANSCE for defense, science and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Ronald O.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays, fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. In addition, highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.

  7. Cross section measurements at LANSCE for defense, science and applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Ronald O.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays,more » fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. In addition, highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.« less

  8. Application of nuclear models to neutron nuclear cross section calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear theory is used increasingly to supplement and extend the nuclear data base that is available for applied studies. Areas where theoretical calculations are most important include the determination of neutron cross sections for unstable fission products and transactinide nuclei in fission reactor or nuclear waste calculations and for meeting the extensive dosimetry, activation, and neutronic data needs associated with fusion reactor development, especially for neutron energies above 14 MeV. Considerable progress has been made in the use of nuclear models for data evaluation and, particularly, in the methods used to derive physically meaningful parameters for model calculations. Theoretical studies frequently involve use of spherical and deformed optical models, Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory, preequilibrium theory, direct-reaction theory, and often make use of gamma-ray strength function models and phenomenological (or microscopic) level density prescriptions. The development, application, and limitations of nuclear models for data evaluation are discussed, with emphasis on the 0.1 to 50 MeV energy range. (91 references).

  9. Partial cross sections of helium satellites at medium photon energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wehlitz, R.; Sellin, I.A.; Hemmers, O.

    1997-04-01

    Still of current interest is the important role of single ionization with excitation compared to single ionization alone. The coupling between the electrons and the incoming photon is a single-particle operator. Thus, an excitation in addition to an ionization, leading to a so-called satellite line in a photoelectron spectrum, is entirely due to electron-electron interaction and probes the electron correlation in the ground and final state. Therefore the authors have undertaken the study of the intensity of helium satellites He{sup +}nl (n = 2 - 6) relative to the main photoline (n = 1) as a function of photon energy at photon energies well above threshold up to 900 eV. From these results they could calculate the partial cross-sections of the helium satellites. In order to test the consistency of their satellite-to-1s ratios with published double-to-single photoionization ratios, the authors calculated the double-to-single photoionization ratio from their measured ratios using the theoretical energy-distribution curves of Chang and Poe and Le Rouzo and Dal Cappello which proved to be valid for photon energies below 120 eV. These calculated double-to-single ionization ratios agree fairly well with recent ion measurements. In the lower photon energy range the authors ratios agree better with the ratios of Doerner et al. while for higher photon energies the agreement is better with the values of Levin et al.

  10. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Sharpe, S. W.; Sams, R. L.; Johnson, T. J.

    2014-11-19

    Isoprene (C5H8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Isoprene is produced primarily by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, and its OH- and O3-initiated oxidations are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via remote or in situ infrared detection. We thus report absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600–6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298, and 323 Kmore » in a 19.94 cm path-length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker IFS 66v/S Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures, each at one of three temperatures, and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atm.« less

  11. Elastic Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Molecules Relevant to Plasma Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, J.-S.; Song, M.-Y.; Kato, H.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, S. J.; Cho, H.

    2010-09-15

    Absolute electron-impact cross sections for molecular targets, including their radicals, are important in developing plasma reactors and testing various plasma processing gases. Low-energy electron collision data for these gases are sparse and only the limited cross section data are available. In this report, elastic cross sections for electron-polyatomic molecule collisions are compiled and reviewed for 17 molecules relevant to plasma processing. Elastic cross sections are essential for the absolute scale conversion of inelastic cross sections, as well as for testing computational methods. Data are collected and reviewed for elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and, for each molecule, the recommended values of the cross section are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2010.

  12. Simultaneous evaluation of interrelated cross sections by generalized least-squares and related data file requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1984-10-25

    Though several cross sections have been designated as standards, they are not basic units and are interrelated by ratio measurements. Moreover, as such interactions as /sup 6/Li + n and /sup 10/B + n involve only two and three cross sections respectively, total cross section data become useful for the evaluation process. The problem can be resolved by a simultaneous evaluation of the available absolute and shape data for cross sections, ratios, sums, and average cross sections by generalized least-squares. A data file is required for such evaluation which contains the originally measured quantities and their uncertainty components. Establishing such a file is a substantial task because data were frequently reported as absolute cross sections where ratios were measured without sufficient information on which reference cross section and which normalization were utilized. Reporting of uncertainties is often missing or incomplete. The requirements for data reporting will be discussed.

  13. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.

  14. Total Cross Sections as a Surrogate for Neutron Capture: An Opportunity to Accurately Constrain (n,γ) Cross Sections for Nuclides Beyond the Reach of Direct Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koehler, Paul E.

    2014-03-05

    There are many (n,γ) cross sections of great interest to radiochemical diagnostics and to nuclear astrophysics which are beyond the reach of current measurement techniques, and likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. In contrast, total neutron cross sections currently are feasible for many of these nuclides and provide almost all the information needed to accurately calculate the (n,γ) cross sections via the nuclear statistical model (NSM). I demonstrate this for the case of 151Sm; NSM calculations constrained using average resonance parameters obtained from total cross section measurements made in 1975, are in excellent agreement with recent 151Sm (n,γ) measurements across a wide range of energy. Furthermore, I demonstrate through simulations that total cross section measurements can be made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for samples as small as 10μg. Samples of this size should be attainable for many nuclides of interest. Finally, I estimate that over half of the radionuclides identified ∼20 years ago as having (n,γ) cross sections of importance to s-process nucleosynthesis studies (24/43) and radiochemical diagnostics (11/19), almost none of which have been measured, can be constrained using this technique.

  15. Generation of Collapsed Cross Sections for Hatch 1 Cycles 1-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ade, Brian J

    2012-11-01

    Under NRC JCN V6361, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked to develop and run SCALE/TRITON models for generation of collapsed few-group cross sections and to convert the cross sections to PMAXS format using the GENPMAXS conversion utility for use in PARCS/PATHS simulations of Hatch Unit 1, cycles 1-3. This letter report documents the final models used to produce the Hatch collapsed cross sections.

  16. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  17. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurements for Uranium Isotopes and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Other Actinides at LANSCE (Conference) | SciTech Connect Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurements for Uranium Isotopes and Other Actinides at LANSCE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurements for Uranium Isotopes and Other Actinides at LANSCE A well established program of neutron-induced fission cross section measurement at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is supporting the Fuel Cycle Research program (FC R&D). The

  18. Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections (Dataset...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Comprehensive catalogue of drill-hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database ... area; Well Lithology Data; Drill-hole database; Geologic Cross-Sections; Gravity ...

  19. AMPX-II P3 123-Group Neutron Cross Section Master Interface Library.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-01-30

    Version 00 The cross section data can be used for criticality calculations. They have been tested with the KENO-IV Monte Carlo code.

  20. MiniBooNE Charged Current Charged Pion Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Muon Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Charged Pion Production Cross Sections on Mineral Oil at Enu~1 GeV", arXiv:1011.3572 [hep-ex], submitted to Phys. Rev. D. The following MiniBooNE information for the 2010 CC π+ cross section paper is made available to the public. Tables A root file containing histograms of all of the cross section results in the paper can be found here. A text file of the cross section results can be found here. The MiniBooNE muon neutrino flux distribution can be

  1. Measurements of Neutron Induced Cross Sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.

    1999-09-20

    We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and the fission cross sections of 233U in the energy range from 0.36 eV to ~700 keV. We report average fission and total cross sections. Also, we measured the neutron total cross sections of 27Al and Natural chlorine as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  2. Photoionization and photoabsorption cross sections for the aluminum iso-nuclear sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witthoeft, M.C.; Garca, J.; Kallman, T.R.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; INPAS, Universit de Lige, B-4000 Lige

    2013-01-15

    K-shell photoionization and photoabsorption cross sections are presented for Li-like to Na-like Al. The calculations are performed using the BreitPauli R-matrix method where the effects of radiation and Auger dampings are included. We provide electronic data files for the raw cross sections as well as those convolved with a Gaussian of width ?E/E=10{sup ?4}. In addition to total cross sections for photoabsorption and photoionization, partial cross sections are available for photoionization.

  3. Inclusive w and z cross section measurements at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Victoria; /Northwestern U.

    2004-12-01

    The present recent measurements of the inclusive cross section of W and Z bosons from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  4. New Tools to Prepare ACE Cross-section Files for MCNP Analytic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: New Tools to Prepare ACE Cross-section Files for MCNP Analytic Test Problems Authors: Brown, Forrest B. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

  5. PROBLEM DEPENDENT DOPPLER BROADENING OF CONTINUOUS ENERGY CROSS SECTIONS IN THE KENO MONTE CARLO COMPUTER CODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, S. W. D.; Maldonado, G. Ivan; Celik, Cihangir; Leal, Luiz C

    2014-01-01

    For many Monte Carlo codes cross sections are generally only created at a set of predetermined temperatures. This causes an increase in error as one moves further and further away from these temperatures in the Monte Carlo model. This paper discusses recent progress in the Scale Monte Carlo module KENO to create problem dependent, Doppler broadened, cross sections. Currently only broadening the 1D cross sections and probability tables is addressed. The approach uses a finite difference method to calculate the temperature dependent cross-sections for the 1D data, and a simple linear-logarithmic interpolation in the square root of temperature for the probability tables. Work is also ongoing to address broadening theS (alpha , beta) tables. With the current approach the temperature dependent cross sections are Doppler broadened before transport starts, and, for all but a few isotopes, the impact on cross section loading is negligible. Results can be compared with those obtained by using multigroup libraries, as KENO currently does interpolation on the multigroup cross sections to determine temperature dependent cross-sections. Current results compare favorably with these expected results.

  6. MUXS: a code to generate multigroup cross sections for sputtering calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, T.J.; Robinson, M.T.; Dodds, H.L. Jr.

    1982-10-01

    This report documents MUXS, a computer code to generate multigroup cross sections for charged particle transport problems. Cross sections generated by MUXS can be used in many multigroup transport codes, with minor modifications to these codes, to calculate sputtering yields, reflection coefficients, penetration distances, etc.

  7. Using a Time Projection Chamber to Measure High Precision Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, Brett

    2015-08-06

    2014 LANSCE run cycle data will provide a preliminary 239Pu(n,f) cross section and will quantify uncertainties: PID and Target/beam non-uniformities. Continued running during the 2015 LANSCE run cycle: Thin targets to see both fission fragments and 239Pu(n,f) cross section and fully quantified uncertainties

  8. Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton ... Title: Measurements of production cross sections of 10Be and 26Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV ...

  9. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used inmore » the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.« less

  10. Measurement of the inclusive and dijet cross-sections of b-jets in pp collisions at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, BS; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, JA; A

    2011-12-01

    The inclusive and dijet production cross-sections have been measured for jets containing b-hadrons (b-jets) in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 7 TeV, using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The measurements use data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 34 pb{sup -1}. The b-jets are identified using either a lifetime-based method, where secondary decay vertices of b-hadrons in jets are reconstructed using information from the tracking detectors, or a muon-based method where the presence of a muon is used to identify semileptonic decays of b-hadrons inside jets. The inclusive b-jet cross-section is measured as a function of transverse momentum in the range 20 < p{sub T} < 400 GeV and rapidity in the range |y| < 2.1. The b{bar b}-dijet cross-section is measured as a function of the dijet invariant mass in the range 110 < m{sub jj} < 760 GeV, the azimuthal angle difference between the two jets and the angular variable {chi} in two dijet mass regions. The results are compared with next-to-leading-order QCD predictions. Good agreement is observed between the measured cross-sections and the predictions obtained using POWHEG + Pythia. MC{at}NLO + Herwig shows good agreement with the measured b{bar b}-dijet cross-section. However, it does not reproduce the measured inclusive cross-section well, particularly for central b-jets with large transverse momenta.

  11. Covariance of Neutron Cross Sections for {sup 16}O through R-matrix Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.; Paris, M.; Hale, G.M.; Shibata, K.; Fukahori, T.

    2015-01-15

    Through the R-matrix analysis, neutron cross sections as well as the covariance are estimated for {sup 16}O in the resolved resonance range. Although we consider the current results are still preliminary, we present the summary of the cross section analysis and the results of data uncertainty/covariance, including those for the differential cross sections. It is found that the values obtained highlight consequences of nature in the theory as well as knowledge from measurements, which gives a realistic quantification of evaluated nuclear data covariances.

  12. MiniBooNE Neutral Current Elastic Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Neutrino Neutral-Current Elastic Differential Cross Section",arXiv:1007.4730 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. D82, 092005 (2010) The following MiniBooNE information for the 2010 neutral current elastic cross section paper is made available to the public. MiniBooNE neutral current elastic cross-section results in the "paper" are reported in the true energy after the unsmearing of detector resolution and efficiency effects. In addition, here we present alternative results in the

  13. Measurement of the antineutrino neutral-current elastic differential cross section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.  A.; Brown, B.  C.; Bugel, L.; Cheng, G.; Church, E.  D.; Conrad, J.  M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D.  A.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F.  G.; Garvey, G.  T.; Grange, J.; Huelsnitz, W.; Ignarra, C.; Imlay, R.; Johnson, R.  A.; Karagiorgi, G.; Katori, T.; Kobilarcik, T.; Louis, W.  C.; Mariani, C.; Marsh, W.; Mills, G.  B.; Mirabal, J.; Moore, C.  D.; Mousseau, J.; Nienaber, P.; Osmanov, B.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perevalov, D.; Polly, C.  C.; Ray, H.; Roe, B.  P.; Russell, A.  D.; Shaevitz, M.  H.; Spitz, J.; Stancu, I.; Tayloe, R.; Van de Water, R.  G.; Wascko, M.  O.; White, D.  H.; Wickremasinghe, D.  A.; Zeller, G.  P.; Zimmerman, E.  D.

    2015-01-08

    We report the measurement of the flux-averaged antineutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross section (dσν-barN→ν-barN/dQ2) on CH2 by the MiniBooNE experiment using the largest sample of antineutrino neutral current elastic candidate events ever collected. The ratio of the antineutrino to neutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross sections and a ratio of the antineutrino neutral current elastic to antineutrino charged current quasi elastic cross sections are also presented.

  14. Measurement of the antineutrino neutral-current elastic differential cross section

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.  A.; Brown, B.  C.; Bugel, L.; Cheng, G.; Church, E.  D.; Conrad, J.  M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D.  A.; Ford, R.; et al

    2015-01-08

    We report the measurement of the flux-averaged antineutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross section (dσν-barN→ν-barN/dQ2) on CH2 by the MiniBooNE experiment using the largest sample of antineutrino neutral current elastic candidate events ever collected. The ratio of the antineutrino to neutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross sections and a ratio of the antineutrino neutral current elastic to antineutrino charged current quasi elastic cross sections are also presented.

  15. Verification of the MCNP (TM) Perturbation Correction Feature for Cross-Section Dependent Tallies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. K. Hess; G. W. McKinney; J. S. Hendricks; L. L. Carter

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code MCNP version 4B perturbation capability has been extended to cross-section dependent tallies and to the track-length estimate of Iqff in criticality problems. We present the complete theory of the MCNP perturbation capability including the correction to MCNP4B which enables cross-section dependent perturbation tallies. We also present the MCNP interface as an upgrade to the MCNP4B manual. Finally, we present test results demonstrating the validity of the perturbation capability in MCNP, particularly cross-section dependent problems.

  16. Measurement of Cross Sections for the 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga Reaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Measurement of Cross Sections for the 63Cu(alpha,gamma)67Ga Reaction from 5.9-8.7 MeV Authors: Basunia, M S ; Norman, E B ; Shugart, H A ; Smith, A R ; Dolinski, M J ; ...

  17. MiniBooNE Charged Current Neutral Pion Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the central-value differential cross-section measurement as a function of 0 angle as found in Figure 14 and Table 11 of the paper. Contact Information For...

  18. Differential two-body compound nuclear cross section, including the width-fluctuation corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.; Herman, M.

    2014-09-02

    We figure out the compound angular differential cross sections, following mainly Fröbrich and Lipperheide, but with the angular momentum couplings that make sense for optical model work. We include the width-fluctuation correction along with calculations.

  19. ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta4 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-11-13

    Version 01 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature atmore » 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.« less

  20. Error Assessment of Homogenized Cross Sections Generation for Whole Core Neutronic Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hursin, Mathieu; Kochunas, Brendan; Downar, Thomas J.

    2007-10-26

    The objective of the work here was to assess the errors introduced by using 2D, few group homogenized cross sections to perform neutronic analysis of BWR problems with significant axial heterogeneities. The 3D method of characteristics code DeCART is used to generate 2-group assembly homogenized cross sections first using a conventional 2D lattice model and then using a full 3D solution of the assembly. A single BWR fuel assembly model based on an advanced BWR lattice design is used with a typical void distribution applied to the fuel channel coolant. This model is validated against an MCNP model. A comparison of the cross sections is performed for the assembly homogenized planar cross sections from the DeCART 3D and DeCART 2D solutions.

  1. Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of the t-tbar production cross section in lepton+jets final states in pp ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurements of the t-tbar production cross ...

  2. Empirical Fit to Inelastic Electron-Deuteron and Electron-Neutron Resonance Region Transverse Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Bosted; M. E. Christy

    2007-11-08

    An empirical fit is described to measurements of inclusive inelastic electron-deuteron cross sections in the kinematic range of four-momentum transfer $0 \\le Q^2<10$ GeV$^2$ and final state invariant mass $1.2<3$ GeV. The deuteron fit relies on a fit of the ratio $R_p$ of longitudinal to transverse cross sections for the proton, and the assumption $R_p=R_n$. The underlying fit parameters describe the average cross section for proton and neutron, with a plane-wave impulse approximation (PWIA) used to fit to the deuteron data. Pseudo-data from MAID 2007 were used to constrain the average nucleon cross sections for $W<1.2$ GeV. The mean deviation of data from the fit is 3\\%, with less than 5\\% of the data points deviating from the fit by more than 10\\%.

  3. Measurement of cross sections for the Cu-63(alpha,gamma)Ga-67...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Measurement of cross sections for the Cu-63(alpha,gamma)Ga-67 reaction from 5.9-8.7 MeV Authors: Basunia, M S ; Norman, E B ; Shugart, H A ; Smith, A R ; Dolinski, M J ; ...

  4. MiniBooNE NC 1π0 Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    νμ and ν̅μ induced neutral current single π0 production cross sections on mineral oil at Eν~O(1 GeV)", arXiv:0911.2063 [hep-ex], Phys. Rev. D81, 013005 (2010) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 NC 1π0 cross section paper is made available to the public: Neutrino Mode Running νμ NC 1π0 pπ0 Differential Cross Section 1D array of bin boundaries partitioning the momentum of the π0 1D array of the value of the differential cross section in each bin in units of 10-40

  5. Prospects for a measurement of the 237U(n,f) cross section at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prospects for a measurement of the 237U(n,f) cross section at the LANSCE Lujan Center Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prospects for a measurement of the 237U(n,f) cross ...

  6. Assessment of Fission Product Cross-Section Data for Burnup Credit Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Dunn, Michael E; Mueller, Don

    2007-12-01

    Past efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and others have provided sufficient technical information to enable the NRC to issue regulatory guidance for implementation of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup credit; however, consideration of only the reactivity change due to the major actinides is recommended in the guidance. Moreover, DOE, NRC, and EPRI have noted the need for additional scientific and technical data to justify expanding PWR burnup credit to include fission product (FP) nuclides and enable burnup credit implementation for boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The criticality safety assessment needed for burnup credit applications will utilize computational analyses of packages containing SNF with FP nuclides. Over the years, significant efforts have been devoted to the nuclear data evaluation of major isotopes pertinent to reactor applications (i.e., uranium, plutonium, etc.); however, efforts to evaluate FP cross-section data in the resonance region have been less thorough relative to actinide data. In particular, resonance region cross-section measurements with corresponding R-matrix resonance analyses have not been performed for FP nuclides. Therefore, the objective of this work is to assess the status and performance of existing FP cross-section and cross-section uncertainty data in the resonance region for use in burnup credit analyses. Recommendations for new cross-section measurements and/or evaluations are made based on the data assessment. The assessment focuses on seven primary FP isotopes (103Rh, 133Cs, 143Nd, 149Sm, 151Sm, 152Sm, and 155Gd) that impact reactivity analyses of transportation packages and two FP isotopes (153Eu and 155Eu) that impact prediction of 155Gd concentrations. Much of the assessment work was completed in 2005, and the assessment focused on the latest FP cross-section evaluations available in the

  7. ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta4 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-07-22

    Version 00 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature atmore » 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.« less

  8. ICSBEP Criticality Benchmark Eigenvalues with ENDF/B-VII.1 Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, Albert C. III; MacFarlane, Robert

    2012-06-28

    We review MCNP eigenvalue calculations from a suite of International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook evaluations with the recently distributed ENDF/B-VII.1 cross section library.

  9. Diboson cross sections at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askew, A.W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    A brief survey of the results on diboson production at the Tevatron is presented. Measured cross sections for W{gamma}, Z{gamma}, WW, and limits on WZ/ZZ are summarized.

  10. Average Neutron Total Cross Sections in the Unresolved Energy Range From ORELA High Resolutio Transmission Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, H

    2004-05-27

    Average values of the neutron total cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu have been obtained in the unresolved resonance energy range from high-resolution transmission measurements performed at ORELA in the past two decades. The cross sections were generated by correcting the effective total cross sections for the self-shielding effects due to the resonance structure of the data. The self-shielding factors were found by calculating the effective and true cross sections with the computer code SAMMY for the same Doppler and resolution conditions as for the transmission measurements, using an appropriate set of resonance parameters. Our results are compared to results of previous measurements and to the current ENDF/B-VI data.

  11. MiniBooNE NC 1?0 Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 production cross sections on mineral oil at EO(1 GeV)", arXiv:0911.2063 hep-ex, Phys. Rev. D81, 013005 (2010) The following MiniBooNE information from the 2009 NC 10...

  12. Subsurface cross section of lower Paleozoic rocks, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macke, D.L.

    1988-07-01

    The Powder River basin is one of the most actively explored Rocky Mountain basins for hydrocarbons, yet the lower Paleozoic (Cambrian through Mississippian) rocks of this interval remain little studied. As a part of a program studying the evolution of sedimentary basins, approximately 3200 km of cross section, based on more than 50 combined geophysical and lithologic logs, have been constructed covering an area of about 200,000 km/sup 2/. The present-day basin is a Cenozoic structural feature located between the stable interior of the North American craton and the Cordilleran orogenic belt. At various times during the early Paleozoic, the basin area was not distinguishable from either the stable craton, the Williston basin, the Central Montana trough, or the Cordilleran miogeocline. Both deposition and preservation in the basin have been greatly influenced by the relative uplift of the Transcontinental arch. Shows of oil and dead oil in well cuttings confirm that hydrocarbons have migrated through at least parts of the basin's lower Paleozoic carbonate section. These rocks may have been conduits for long-distance migration of hydrocarbons as early as Late Cretaceous, based on (1) the probable timing of thermal maturation of hydrocarbon-source rocks within the basin area and to the west, (2) the timing of Laramide structural events, (3) the discontinuous nature of the reservoirs in the overlying, highly productive Pennsylvanian-Permian Minnelusa Formation, and (4) the under-pressuring observed in some Minnelusa oil fields. Vertical migration into the overlying reservoirs could have been through deep fractures within the basin, represented by major lineament systems. Moreover, the lower Paleozoic rocks themselves may also be hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  13. Measuring n-N Deep Inelastic Cross Sections at MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    + Cross Section Results from MiniBooNE Mike Wilking TRIUMF / University of Colorado NuInt 22 May 2009 CCπ + in Oscillation Experiments  The next generation of ν oscillation experiments lie at low, mostly unexplored ν energies  CCQE is the signal process for oscillation measurements  At these energies, CCπ + is the dominant charged-current background T2K NOνA CCπ + CCQE DIS Charged Current Cross Sections Previous CCπ + Measurements  The plot shows previous absolute cross

  14. On two-parameter models of photon cross sections: Application to dual-energy CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Li Sicong; Devic, Slobodan; Whiting, Bruce R.; Lerma, Fritz A.

    2006-11-15

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the theoretically achievable accuracy in estimating photon cross sections at low energies (20-1000 keV) from idealized dual-energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. Cross-section estimation from dual-energy measurements requires a model that can accurately represent photon cross sections of any biological material as a function of energy by specifying only two characteristic parameters of the underlying material, e.g., effective atomic number and density. This paper evaluates the accuracy of two commonly used two-parameter cross-section models for postprocessing idealized measurements derived from dual-energy CT images. The parametric fit model (PFM) accounts for electron-binding effects and photoelectric absorption by power functions in atomic number and energy and scattering by the Klein-Nishina cross section. The basis-vector model (BVM) assumes that attenuation coefficients of any biological substance can be approximated by a linear combination of mass attenuation coefficients of two dissimilar basis substances. Both PFM and BVM were fit to a modern cross-section library for a range of elements and mixtures representative of naturally occurring biological materials (Z=2-20). The PFM model, in conjunction with the effective atomic number approximation, yields estimated the total linear cross-section estimates with mean absolute and maximum error ranges of 0.6%-2.2% and 1%-6%, respectively. The corresponding error ranges for BVM estimates were 0.02%-0.15% and 0.1%-0.5%. However, for photoelectric absorption frequency, the PFM absolute mean and maximum errors were 10.8%-22.4% and 29%-50%, compared with corresponding BVM errors of 0.4%-11.3% and 0.5%-17.0%, respectively. Both models were found to exhibit similar sensitivities to image-intensity measurement uncertainties. Of the two models, BVM is the most promising approach for realizing dual-energy CT cross-section measurement.

  15. Fission theory: Its relevance to the nuclear cross section data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The development of fission reaction theory in relation to its predictive power in the calculation of neutron cross-sections is reviewed. The topics covered include the transition state spectrum and the channel theory; the discovery of complex topography in the fission barrier and the consequences of intermediate structure in fission cross-sections; the evidence of experimental data in parameterizing the fission barrier; and the role of other aspects of collective nuclear motion in controlling fission reaction rates. 51 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Measurement of Muon Neutrino and Antineutrino Induced Single Neutral Pion Production Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement of Muon Neutrino and Antineutrino Induced Single Neutral Pion Production Cross Sections Colin E. Anderson 2011 Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the ef- forts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive sig- nal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understand- ing.

  17. Validity of Hansen-Roach cross sections in low-enriched uranium systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, R.D. ); O'Dell, R.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Within the nuclear criticality safety community, the Hansen-Roach 16 group cross section set has been the standard'' for use in k{sub eff} calculations over the past 30 years. Yet even with its widespread acceptance, there are still questions about its validity and adequacy, about the proper procedure for calculating the potential scattering cross section, {sigma}{sub p}, for uranium and plutonium, and about the concept of resonance self shielding and its impact on cross sections. This paper attempts to address these questions. It provides a brief background on the Hansen-Roach cross sections. Next is presented a review of resonances in cross sections, self shielding of these resonances, and the use of {sigma}{sub p} to characterize resonance self shielding. Three prescriptions for calculating {sigma}{sub p} are given. Finally, results of several calculations of k{sub eff} on low-enriched uranium systems are provided to confirm the validity of the Hansen-Roach cross sections when applied to such systems.

  18. Many-Group Cross-Section Adjustment Techniques for Boiling Water Reactor Adaptive Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessee, Matthew Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Computational capability has been developed to adjust multigroup neutron cross sections, including self-shielding correction factors, to improve the fidelity of boiling water reactor (BWR) core modeling and simulation. The method involves propagating multigroup neutron cross-section uncertainties through various BWR computational models to evaluate uncertainties in key core attributes such as core k{sub eff}, nodal power distributions, thermal margins, and in-core detector readings. Uncertainty-based inverse theory methods are then employed to adjust multigroup cross sections to minimize the disagreement between BWR core modeling predictions and observed (i.e., measured) plant data. For this paper, observed plant data are virtually simulated in the form of perturbed three-dimensional nodal power distributions with the perturbations sized to represent actual discrepancies between predictions and real plant data. The major focus of this work is to efficiently propagate multigroup neutron cross-section uncertainty through BWR lattice physics and core simulator calculations. The data adjustment equations are developed using a subspace approach that exploits the ill-conditioning of the multigroup cross-section covariance matrix to minimize computation and storage burden. Tikhonov regularization is also employed to improve the conditioning of the data adjustment equations. Expressions are also provided for posterior covariance matrices of both the multigroup cross-section and core attributes uncertainties.

  19. Calculation of cross sections for binary reactions between heavy ion projectiles and heavy actinide targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, D.C.; Hoffman, M.M.

    1990-11-01

    The computer program, described in this report, is identified as PWAVED5. It was developed to calculate cross sections for nucleon transfer reactions in low energy heavy ion bombardments. The objective was to calculate cross sections that agree with experimental results for ions of different charge and mass and to develop a predictive capability. It was undertaken because previous heavy ion calculations, for which programs were readily available, appeared to focus primarily on reactions resulting in compound nucleus formation and were not particularly applicable to calculations of binary reaction cross sections at low interaction energies. There are to principal areas in which this computation differs from several other partial wave calculations of heavy-ion reaction cross sections. First, this program is designed specifically to calculate cross sections for nucleon exchange interactions and to exclude interactions that are expected to result in fusion of the two nuclei. A second major difference in this calculation is the use of a statistical distribution to assign the total interaction cross section to individual final mass states.

  20. Mixed Legendre moments and discrete scattering cross sections for anisotropy representation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calloo, A.; Vidal, J. F.; Le Tellier, R.; Rimpault, G.

    2012-07-01

    This paper deals with the resolution of the integro-differential form of the Boltzmann transport equation for neutron transport in nuclear reactors. In multigroup theory, deterministic codes use transfer cross sections which are expanded on Legendre polynomials. This modelling leads to negative values of the transfer cross section for certain scattering angles, and hence, the multigroup scattering source term is wrongly computed. The first part compares the convergence of 'Legendre-expanded' cross sections with respect to the order used with the method of characteristics (MOC) for Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) type cells. Furthermore, the cross section is developed using piecewise-constant functions, which better models the multigroup transfer cross section and prevents the occurrence of any negative value for it. The second part focuses on the method of solving the transport equation with the above-mentioned piecewise-constant cross sections for lattice calculations for PWR cells. This expansion thereby constitutes a 'reference' method to compare the conventional Legendre expansion to, and to determine its pertinence when applied to reactor physics calculations. (authors)

  1. Sonic Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Sonic Corporation Place: Stratford, Connecticut Product: Provider of mixing equipment, high pressure homogenizers, emulsifying equipment, colloid mills...

  2. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beugelsdijk, Tony; Hollen, Robert M.; Erkkila, Tracy H.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.; Roybal, Jeffrey E.; Clark, Michael Leon

    1999-01-01

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  3. Cross section standards for neutron-induced gamma-ray production in the MeV energy range.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R. O. (Ronald O.); Fotiadis, N. (Nikolaos); Devlin, M. J. (Matthew J.); Becker, J. A. (John A.); Garrett, P. E. (Paul E.); Younes, W. (Walid)

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-ray cross section standards for neutron-induced reactions are important in enabling the accurate determination of absolute cross sections from relative measurements of gamma-ray production. In our work we observed a need for improvement in these standards. In particular there are large discrepancies between evaluations of the {sup nat}Fe(n,n{sub 1}'{gamma}) cross section for the 847-keV gamma ray. We have performed (1) absolute cross section measurements, (2) measurements relative to the {sup nat}Cr(n,n{sub 1}'{gamma}) 1434-keV gamma ray, and (3) comparisons using measured total and elastic scattering cross sections to refine our knowledge of the Fe cross section and the closely linked inelastic channel cross section for Fe. Calculation of integral tests of the cross section libraries may indicate that adjustment of the angular distributions of the neutron elastic and inelastic scattering may be needed.

  4. Code System to Calculate Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections by Evaporation Model.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-11-27

    Version: 00 Both STAPRE and STAPREF are included in this package. STAPRE calculates energy-averaged cross sections for nuclear reactions with emission of particles and gamma rays and fission. The models employed are the evaporation model with inclusion of pre-equilibrium decay and a gamma-ray cascade model. Angular momentum and parity conservation are accounted for. Major improvement in the 1976 STAPRE program relates to level density approach, implemented in subroutine ZSTDE. Generalized superfluid model is incorporated, boltzman-gasmore » modeling of intrinsic state density and semi-empirical modeling of a few-quasiparticle effects in total level density at equilibrium and saddle deformations of actinide nuclei. In addition to the activation cross sections, particle and gamma-ray production spectra are calculated. Isomeric state populations and production cross sections for gamma rays from low excited levels are obtained, too. For fission a single or a double humped barrier may be chosen.« less

  5. Cross sections for electron scattering by propane in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza, G. L. C. de; Lee, M.-T.; Sanches, I. P.; Rawat, P.; Iga, I.; Santos, A. S. dos; Machado, L. E.; Sugohara, R. T.; Brescansin, L. M.; Homem, M. G. P.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2010-07-15

    We present a joint theoretical-experimental study on electron scattering by propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges. Calculated elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer as well as total (elastic + inelastic) and total absorption cross sections are reported for impact energies ranging from 2 to 500 eV. Also, experimental absolute elastic cross sections are reported in the 40- to 500-eV energy range. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics. A theoretical method based on the single-center-expansion close-coupling framework and corrected by the Pade approximant is used to solve the scattering equations. The experimental angular distributions of the scattered electrons are converted to absolute cross sections using the relative flow technique. The comparison of our calculated with our measured results, as well as with other experimental and theoretical data available in the literature, is encouraging.

  6. Measurements of neutron capture cross section for {sup 207,208}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segawa, M.; Toh, Y.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Fukahori, T.; Iwamoto, N.; Iwamoto, O.; Oshima, M.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Igashira, M.; Kamada, S.; Tajika, M.

    2014-05-02

    The neutron capture cross sections for {sup 207,208}Pb have been measured in the neutron energy region from 10 to 110 keV. The ?-rays cascaded from a capture state to the ground state or low-lying states of {sup 208,209}Pb were observed for the first time, using an anti-Compton Nal(Tl) spectrometer and a TOF method. The observed discrete ?-ray energy spectra enabled us to determine neutron capture cross sections for {sup 207,208}Pb with small systematic errors, since we could distinguish ?-ray of {sup 207,208}Pb(n,?) reactions from background ?-ray with use of the ?-ray spectra. The obtained cross sections include both contributions of resonance and direct capture components different from the previous TOF measurements.

  7. Determination of Thermal Neutron Capture Cross-Sections at Budapest PGAA Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revay, Zsolt; Belgya, Tamas; Firestone, Richard B.

    2007-10-26

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) is a powerful nuclear analytical technique to determine the elemental and isotopic composition of materials. The PGAA facility at Budapest, Hungary is one of the leading laboratories of the world, determining spectroscopic data for chemical analysis to be used in other laboratories. These partial gamma-ray production cross-sections and k{sub 0} values, being proportional to the analytical sensitivities of the chemical elements, can be transformed into thermal neutron capture cross-sections, i.e. the probabilities of the (n,{gamma}) reactions, which are of broader interest in different fields of nuclear physics. Some preliminary results on thermal neutron capture cross-sections are presented.

  8. Empirical Fit to Precision Inclusive Electron-Proton Cross Sections in the Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.E. Christy; Peter Bosted

    2010-05-01

    An empirical fit is described to measurements of inclusive inelastic electron-proton cross sections in the kinematic range of four-momentum transfer $0 \\le Q^2<8$ GeV$^2$ and final state invariant mass $1.1<3.1$ GeV. The fit is constrained by the recent high precision longitudinal and transverse (L/T) separated cross section measurements from Jefferson Lab Hall C, un-separated Hall C measurements up to $Q^2$ $\\approx 7.5$ ${\\rm GeV}^2$, and photoproduction data at $Q^2 = 0$. Compared to previous fits, the present fit covers a wider kinematic range, fits both transverse and longitudinal cross sections, and features smooth transitions to the photoproduction data at $Q^2=0$ and DIS data at high $Q^2$ and $W$.

  9. PRACTICAL METHOD FOR ESTIMATING NEUTRON CROSS SECTION COVARIANCES IN THE RESONANCE REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Y.S.; Oblozinsky, P.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Mattoon,C.M.; Herman,M.

    2010-04-30

    Recent evaluations of neutron cross section covariances in the resolved resonance region reveal the need for further research in this area. Major issues include declining uncertainties in multigroup representations and proper treatment of scattering radius uncertainty. To address these issues, the present work introduces a practical method based on kernel approximation using resonance parameter uncertainties from the Atlas of Neutron Resonances. Analytical expressions derived for average cross sections in broader energy bins along with their sensitivities provide transparent tool for determining cross section uncertainties. The role of resonance-resonance and bin-bin correlations is specifically studied. As an example we apply this approach to estimate (n,{gamma}) and (n,el) covariances for the structural material {sup 55}Mn.

  10. First Measurement of Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic (CCQE) Double Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei; /MIT, LNS

    2009-09-01

    Using a high statistics sample of muon neutrino charged current quasielastic (CCQE) events, we report the first measurement of the double differential cross section (d{sup 2}{sigma}/dT{sub {mu}}d cos {theta}{sub {mu}}) for this process. The result features reduced model dependence and supplies the most complete information on neutrino CCQE scattering to date. Measurements of the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub v}{sup QE,RFG}]) and the single differential cross section (d{sigma}/dQ{sub QE}{sup 2}) are also provided, largely to facilitate comparison with prior measurements. This data is of particular use for understanding the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon as well as improving the simulation of low energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets, which is of particular relevance for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

  11. Absolute total and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine at electron and proton intermediate impact velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Wania Luna, Hugo; Sigaud, Lucas; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Tavares, Andre C.

    2014-02-14

    Absolute total non-dissociative and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine were measured for electron impact energies ranging from 70 to 400 eV and for proton impact energies from 125 up to 2500 keV. MOs ionization induced by coulomb interaction were studied by measuring both ionization and partial dissociative cross sections through time of flight mass spectrometry and by obtaining the branching ratios for fragment formation via a model calculation based on the Born approximation. The partial yields and the absolute cross sections measured as a function of the energy combined with the model calculation proved to be a useful tool to determine the vacancy population of the valence MOs from which several sets of fragment ions are produced. It was also a key point to distinguish the dissociation regimes induced by both particles. A comparison with previous experimental results is also presented.

  12. Hartree-Fock calculation of the differential photoionization cross sections of small Li clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitskiy, S. A.; Artemyev, A. N.; Jänkälä, K.; Lagutin, B. M.; Demekhin, Ph. V.

    2015-01-21

    Cross sections and angular distribution parameters for the single-photon ionization of all electron orbitals of Li{sub 2−8} are systematically computed in a broad interval of the photoelectron kinetic energies for the energetically most stable geometry of each cluster. Calculations of the partial photoelectron continuum waves in clusters are carried out by the single center method within the Hartree-Fock approximation. We study photoionization cross sections per one electron and analyze in some details general trends in the photoionization of inner and outer shells with respect to the size and geometry of a cluster. The present differential cross sections computed for Li{sub 2} are in a good agreement with the available theoretical data, whereas those computed for Li{sub 3−8} clusters can be considered as theoretical predictions.

  13. Measurement of the neutron capture cross section of {sup 15}N J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MeiBner, N.J.; Schatz, H.; Herndl, H.; Wiescher, M.

    1995-10-01

    Neutron capture reactions on fight nuclei may be of considerable importance for the s-process nucleosynthesis in red giant stars as well as in inhomogeneous big bang scenarios and high entropy supernovae neutrino bubbles. To determine the reaction rates for such different temperature conditions, the cross sections need to be known for a wide energy range. The reaction {sup 15}N(n,{gamma}) represents an important link in the reaction seququences for the production of heavier isotopes in such scenarios. At high temperature conditions, the cross section is not only influenced by a non resonant a-wave contribution but also by a non resonant p-wave contribution and higher energy resonances. The (n,{gamma}) cross section has been measured at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe for different neutron energies using a fast cyclic neutron activation technique. The technique and the results will be presented.

  14. Optimization of multi-group cross sections for fast reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, M. R.; Manalo, K. L.; Edgar, C. A.; Paul, J. N.; Molinar, M. P.; Redd, E. M.; Yi, C.; Sjoden, G. E.

    2013-07-01

    The selection of the number of broad energy groups, collapsed broad energy group boundaries, and their associated evaluation into collapsed macroscopic cross sections from a general 238-group ENDF/B-VII library dramatically impacted the k eigenvalue for fast reactor analysis. An analysis was undertaken to assess the minimum number of energy groups that would preserve problem physics; this involved studies using the 3D deterministic transport parallel code PENTRAN, the 2D deterministic transport code SCALE6.1, the Monte Carlo based MCNP5 code, and the YGROUP cross section collapsing tool on a spatially discretized MOX fuel pin comprised of 21% PUO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} with sodium coolant. The various cases resulted in a few hundred pcm difference between cross section libraries that included the 238 multi-group reference, and cross sections rendered using various reaction and adjoint weighted cross sections rendered by the YGROUP tool, and a reference continuous energy MCNP case. Particular emphasis was placed on the higher energies characteristic of fission neutrons in a fast spectrum; adjoint computations were performed to determine the average per-group adjoint fission importance for the MOX fuel pin. This study concluded that at least 10 energy groups for neutron transport calculations are required to accurately predict the eigenvalue for a fast reactor system to within 250 pcm of the 238 group case. In addition, the cross section collapsing/weighting schemes within YGROUP that provided a collapsed library rendering eigenvalues closest to the reference were the contribution collapsed, reaction rate weighted scheme. A brief analysis on homogenization of the MOX fuel pin is also provided, although more work is in progress in this area. (authors)

  15. POINT 2011: ENDF/B-VII.1 Beta2 Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullen, D E

    2011-04-07

    This report is one in the series of 'POINT' reports that over the years have presented temperature dependent cross sections for the then current version of ENDF/B. In each case I have used my personal computer at home and publicly available data and codes. I have used these in combination to produce the temperature dependent cross sections used in applications and presented in this report. I should mention that today anyone with a personal computer can produce these results. The latest ENDF/B-VII.1 beta2 data library was recently and is now freely available through the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), Brookhaven National Laboratory. This release completely supersedes all preceding releases of ENDF/B. As distributed the ENDF/B-VII.1 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in our applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin (the exception being 293.6 Kelvin, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures, 1, 10, 100 eV, 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. All results are in the computer independent ENDF-6 character format [R2], which allows the data to be easily transported between computers. In its processed form the POINT 2011 library is approximately 16 gigabyte in size and is distributed on one compressed DVDs (see, below for the details of the contents of each DVD).

  16. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrn-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; Fry, J.; Gericke, M.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hamblen, J.; Hayes, C.; Kucuker, S.; Mahurin, R.; Maldonado-Velzquez, M.; Martin, E.; McCrea, M.; Mueller, P. E.; Musgrave, M.; Nann, H.; Penttil, S. I.; Snow, W. M.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section d?/d? from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  17. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; et al

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dΩ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component)more » using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.« less

  18. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; Fry, J.; Gericke, M.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hamblen, J.; Hayes, C.; Kucuker, S.; Mahurin, R.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Martin, E.; McCrea, M.; Mueller, P. E.; Musgrave, M.; Nann, H.; Penttilä, S. I.; Snow, W. M.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dΩ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  19. Measurements of the breakup and neutron removal cross sections for {sup 16}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwood, N. I.; Freer, M.; Clarke, N.M.; Curtis, N.; Soic, N.; Ziman, V.A.; Angelique, J.C.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marques, F.M.; Normand, G.; Orr, N.A.; Timis, C.; Bouchat, V.; Hanappe, F.; Kerckx, Y.; Materna, T.; Catford, W.N.; Dorvaux, O.; Stuttge, L.

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of the breakup and the neutron removal reactions of {sup 16}C have been made at 46 MeV/A and the decay cross sections measured. A correlation between the cluster breakup channels and the reaction Q value suggests that the reaction mechanism is strongly linked to quasielastic processes. No enhancement of the two-body cluster breakup cross section is seen for {sup 16}C. This result would indicate that {sup 16}C does not have a well developed cluster structure in the ground state, in agreement with recent calculations.

  20. Neutron capture cross sections of {sup 148}Gd and the decay of {sup 149}Gd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rios, M. G.; Casperson, R. J.; Krane, K. S.; Norman, E. B.

    2006-10-15

    The thermal cross section and resonance integral were measured for radiative neutron capture by radioactive {sup 148}Gd. The deduced values are {sigma}=9600{+-}900 b and I=28,200{+-}2300. We also deduced upper limits for the n,p and n, {alpha} cross sections, respectively, 0.25 b and 13 b. The {gamma}-ray spectrum from the decay of {sup 149}Gd was studied in singles mode at high resolution to verify the previously determined energies and intensities. From the latter measurements, new transitions are proposed and upper limits are deduced for previously reported transitions.

  1. Solar fusion cross sections II: the pp chain and CNO cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelberger, E G; Bemmerer, D; Bertulani, C A; Chen, J -W; Costantini, H; Couder, M; Cyburt, R; Davids, B; Freedman, S J; Gai, M; Garcia, A; Gazit, D; Gialanella, L; Greife, U; Hass, M; Heeger, K; Haxton, W C; Imbriani, G; Itahashi, T; Junghans, A; Kubodera, K; Langanke, K; Leitner, D; Leitner, M; Marcucci, L E; Motobayashi, T; Mukhamedzhanov, A; Nollett, Kenneth M; Nunes, F M; Park, T -S; Parker, P D; Prati, P; Ramsey-Musolf, M J; Hamish Robertson, R G; Schiavilla, R; Simpson, E C; Snover, K A; Spitaleri, C; Strieder, F; Suemmerer, K; Trautvetter, R E; Tribble, R E; Typel, S; Uberseder, E; Vetter, P; Wiescher, M

    2011-04-01

    The available data on nuclear fusion cross sections important to energy generation in the Sun and other hydrogen-burning stars and to solar neutrino production are summarized and critically evaluated. Recommended values and uncertainties are provided for key cross sections, and a recommended spectrum is given for 8B solar neutrinos. Opportunities for further increasing the precision of key rates are also discussed, including new facilities, new experimental techniques, and improvements in theory. This review, which summarizes the conclusions of a workshop held at the Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle, in January 2009, is intended as a 10-year update and supplement to 1998, Rev. Mod. Phys. 70, 1265.

  2. Calculation of the extinction cross section and lifetime of a gold nanoparticle using FDTD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radhakrishnan, Archana; Murugesan, Dr V.

    2014-10-15

    The electromagnetic theory of light explains the behavior of light in most of the domains quite accurately. The problem arises when the exact solution of the Maxwell's equation is not present, in case of objects with arbitrary geometry. To find the extinction cross-section and lifetime of the gold nanoparticle, the software FDTD solutions 8.6 by Lumerical is employed. The extinction cross-sections and lifetimes of Gold nanospheres of different sizes and arrangements are studied using pulse lengths of the order of femtoseconds. The decay constant and other properties are compared. Further, the lifetimes are calculated using frequency and time domain calculations.

  3. e+ e- to Hadrons Cross-Sections at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, David; /SLAC

    2011-11-30

    We present an overview of cross-section measurements at BABAR. In e{sup {+-}} {yields} few-body processes at a center-of-mass energy E{sub CM} = 10.6 GeV we make new QCD tests and the first observation of two-virtual-photon annihilations into hadrons. Studies at lower {radical}s, using radiative return, yield new/improved data on spectroscopy, form factors and the total hadronic cross section, an important input to calculations of g{sub {mu}}-2 and {alpha}(M{sub Z}). We also present an inclusive measurement of the running of {alpha}.

  4. Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

  5. MiniBooNE Anti-Neutrino CCQE Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anti-Neutrino Double-Differential Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Cross Section", arXiv:1301.7067 [hep-ex] The following MiniBooNE information from the anti-neutrino CCQE cross section paper is made available to the public: νμ CCQE data: MiniBooNE flux table of MiniBooNE anti-neutrino mode flux by neutrino species (Figure 1 and Tables XI-XII). Note that, based on the constraints of the in situ measurements, the muon neutrino flux spectrum given here should be scaled by 0.77. flux-integrated

  6. Code System to Create Broad-Group Cross Sections with Resonance Interference and Self-Shielding from Fine-Group and Pointwise Cross Sections.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-10-31

    Version: 02 RSICC received MICROX‑2 through the NEADB (identifier is NEA‑1562/02.) This is an improved version of the original MICROX-2 two-region spectrum code, which was developed at General Atomic, to prepare broad group neutron cross sections for use in diffusion-and/or transport theory codes from an input library of fine group and pointwise cross sections. The MICROX-2 code can explicitly account for the overlap and interference effects between resonances in both the resonance and thermal neutronmore » energy ranges and allows the simulta?neous treatment of leakage and resonance self-shielding in doubly heterogeneous lattice cells. MICROR runs as a module of NJOY 89.62; the NJOY calling module is included in the package. This release has been changed in that the MODER module from NJOY 94.0, too, has been included as subprogramm of NJOY 89.62, so as to make the code system completely selfconsistent, i.e. without requiring the use of some NJOY version to convert pendf and gendf from coded to binary. Using data from pointwise and groupwise NJOY tapes, the stand-alone MICROR reformatting program produces files containing basic nuclear data to be used by MICROX-2. MICROR edits PENDF and GENDF data files from NJOY to create FDTAP?E, GGTA?PE and GARTA?PE input files for MICROX-2. NJOY is not included in this package. Some data libraries are included for example cases; these data were generated from data in 193 groups as well as from point-wise cross sections from NJOY (Edition 89.62).« less

  7. ENDF/B-VII.1 Final Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-03-03

    Version 00 For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 K and 2100 K, in steps of 300 K (the exception being 293.6 K, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 K is approximatelymore » 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 K. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. As distributed the original evaluated data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 K. For use in applications, this data has been processed using the 2012 version of the ENDF/B pre-processing codes PREPRO 2012 to produce temperature dependent, linearly interpolable in energy, tabulated cross sections, in the ENDF-6 format. The steps required and codes used to produce room temperature, linearly interpolable tabulated cross sections, in the ENDF-6 format, are described below; the name of each code in given in parenthesis; for details of each code see reference. Here are the steps, and PREPRO 2012 codes, used to process the data, in the order in which the codes were used. 1) Linearly interpolable, tabulated cross sections (LINEAR) 2) Including the resonance contribution (RECENT) 3) Doppler broaden all cross sections to temperature (SIGMA1) 4) Check data, define redundant cross sections by summation (FIXUP) 5) Update evaluation dictionary in MF/MT=1/451 (DICTIN) For the "cold" (0 K) data steps 1), 2) and 4), 5) were used (no Doppler broadening). For the data at other temperatures, after steps 1) and 2), the data was Doppler broadened to each temperature using step 3), and the results were then made consistent with the ENDF/B formats and conventions using steps 4) and 5), to

  8. Differential cross section for coherent photon scattering from /sup 4/He at 180 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, E.J.; Booth, E.C.; McIntyre, E.K.; Miller, J.P.; Roberts, B.L.; Whitehouse, D.A.; Dodson, G.

    1986-08-25

    We report the measurement of the differential scattering cross section for coherent photon scattering (nuclear Compton scattering) from /sup 4/He at an average energy of 180 MeV. This represents the first direct observation of the coherent process on a complex nucleus above the pion threshold. The results are compared with the predicton of a claculation utilizing the isobar-hole formalism.

  9. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; et al

    2016-04-21

    Here, the absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈ 6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n,γ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the crossmore » section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at the En,R = 2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4% of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30% lower than the evaluated data at En ≈ 1 keV and are approximately 2σ away from the previous measurement at En ≈ 20 keV.« less

  10. Total cross sections for positron scattering from benzene, cyclohexane, and aniline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zecca, Antonio; Moser, Norberto; Perazzolli, Chiara; Salemi, Alessandro; Brunger, Michael J.

    2007-08-15

    We use a linear transmission technique to measure total cross sections for positron scattering from benzene, cyclohexane, and aniline. In the case of cyclohexane, the energy range of the present study is 0.1-20 eV, while for benzene and aniline it is 0.2-20 eV. With respect to benzene and cyclohexane, comparison is made to the only other existing results we know of [Makochekanwa and co-workers, Phys. Rev. A 68, 032707 (2003); 72, 042705 (2005)]. Agreement with those data is only marginal, being particularly poor at the overlap lower energies. Unlike Kimura et al. [J. Phys. B 37, 1461 (2004)], we find the low-energy dependence of the positron-benzene total cross sections to be qualitatively similar to those found in the electron channel [Gulley et al., J. Phys. B 31, 2735 (1998)]. We believe that the present positron-aniline total cross sections represent the first time such data have been measured. These cross sections are almost identical to those we found for benzene, suggesting that substitution of hydrogen by the amine group on the aromatic ring is largely irrelevant to the scattering process in the energy regimes considered.

  11. Systematics of (n,2n) and (n,3n) Cross Sections.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-10-08

    Version 00 SC2N3N can be used to calculate the (n2n) and (n3n) cross section in the energy region from threshold to about 25 MeV with the systematics parameters which well reproduce the experiment in the mass region of 23.le.A.le.238 (especially between 45 and 197.)

  12. BOXER: Fine-flux Cross Section Condensation, 2D Few Group Diffusion and Transport Burnup Calculations

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-02-01

    Neutron transport, calculation of multiplication factor and neutron fluxes in 2-D configurations: cell calculations, 2-D diffusion and transport, and burnup. Preparation of a cross section library for the code BOXER from a basic library in ENDF/B format (ETOBOX).

  13. Dynamic interaction potential and the scattering cross sections of the semiclassical plasma particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Shalenov, E. O.; Gabdullina, G. L.

    2013-04-15

    The dynamic model of the charged particles interaction in non-ideal semiclassical plasma is presented. This model takes into account the quantum mechanical diffraction effect and the dynamic screening effect. On the basis of the dynamic interaction potential, the electron scattering cross sections are investigated. Comparison with the results obtained on the basis of other models and conclusions were made.

  14. Status of the top quark: Top production cross section and top properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boisvert, V.; /Rochester U.

    2006-08-01

    This report describes the latest cross section and property measurements associated with the top quark at the Tevatron Run II. The largest data sample used is 760 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Due to its large mass, the top quark might be involved in the process of electroweak symmetry breaking, making it a useful probe for signs of new physics.

  15. A Code to Produce Cell Averaged Cross Sections for Fast Critical Assemblies and Fast Power Reactors.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1987-05-14

    Version 00 SLAROM solves the neutron integral transport equations to determine the flux distribution and spectra in a fast reactor lattice and calculates cell averaged effective cross sections. The code uses multigroup data of the type in DLC-111/JFS that use Bondarenko factors for resonance effects.

  16. 70 Group Neutron Fast Reactor Cross Section Set Based on JENDL-2B.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1984-02-06

    Version 00 These multigroup cross sections are used in fast reactor calculations. The benchmark calculations for the 23 fast critical assemblies used in the benchmark tests of JFS-2 were performed with one-dimensional diffusion theory by using the JFS-3-J2 set.

  17. 137 and 26 Neutron Multigroup Cross Section Library with the Bondarenko Type Shielding Table.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1986-02-16

    Version 00 The basic function of MGCLIB is to generate effective neutron cross section sets in either 137 or 26 group structures for use in the discrete ordinates codes ANISN-JR or DOT 3.5 or in the Monte Carlo codes KENO-IV or MULTI-KENO.

  18. Cross section analyses in MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei

    2015-05-15

    The MiniBooNE experiment (2002-2012) and the SciBooNE experiment (2007-2008) are modern high statistics neutrino experiments, and they developed many new ideas in neutrino cross section analyses. In this note, I discuss selected topics of these analyses.

  19. Photodissociation in quantum chaotic systems: Random-matrix theory of cross-section fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fyodorov, Y.V. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet-GH Essen, D-45117 Essen (Germany)] [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet-GH Essen, D-45117 Essen (Germany); Alhassid, Y. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)] [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Using the random matrix description of open quantum chaotic systems we calculate in closed form the universal autocorrelation function and the probability distribution of the total photodissociation cross section in the regime of quantum chaos. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Measuring Cross-Section and Estimating Uncertainties with the fissionTPC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, N.; Manning, B.; Sangiorgio, S.; Seilhan, B.

    2015-01-30

    The purpose of this document is to outline the prescription for measuring fission cross-sections with the NIFFTE fissionTPC and estimating the associated uncertainties. As such it will serve as a work planning guide for NIFFTE collaboration members and facilitate clear communication of the procedures used to the broader community.

  1. Measurement of muon neutrino and antineutrino induced single neutral pion production cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Colin E.

    2011-05-01

    Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the efforts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive signal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understanding. Searches for νμ → νe oscillation - a channel that may yield insight into the vanishingly small mixing parameter θ13, CP violation, and the neutrino mass hierarchy - are particularly susceptible to contamination from neutral current single π0 (NC 1π0) production. Unfortunately, the available data concerning NC 1π0 production are limited in scope and statistics. Without satisfactory constraints, theoretical models of NC 1π0 production yield substantially differing predictions in the critical Eν ~ 1 GeV regime. Additional investigation of this interaction can ameliorate the current deficiencies. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation search operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). While the oscillation search is the principal charge of the MiniBooNE collaboration, the extensive data (~ 106 neutrino events) offer a rich resource with which to conduct neutrino cross section measurements. This work concerns the measurement of both neutrino and antineutrino NC 1π0 production cross sections at MiniBooNE. The size of the event samples used in the analysis exceeds that of all other similar experiments combined by an order of magnitude. We present the first measurements of the absolute NC 1π0 cross section as well as the first differential cross sections in both neutrino and antineutrino mode. Specifically, we measure single differential cross sections with respect to pion momentum and pion angle. We find the

  2. SENSIT: a cross-section and design sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code. [In FORTRAN for CDC-7600, IBM 360

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1980-01-01

    SENSIT computes the sensitivity and uncertainty of a calculated integral response (such as a dose rate) due to input cross sections and their uncertainties. Sensitivity profiles are computed for neutron and gamma-ray reaction cross sections of standard multigroup cross section sets and for secondary energy distributions (SEDs) of multigroup scattering matrices. In the design sensitivity mode, SENSIT computes changes in an integral response due to design changes and gives the appropriate sensitivity coefficients. Cross section uncertainty analyses are performed for three types of input data uncertainties: cross-section covariance matrices for pairs of multigroup reaction cross sections, spectral shape uncertainty parameters for secondary energy distributions (integral SED uncertainties), and covariance matrices for energy-dependent response functions. For all three types of data uncertainties SENSIT computes the resulting variance and estimated standard deviation in an integral response of interest, on the basis of generalized perturbation theory. SENSIT attempts to be more comprehensive than earlier sensitivity analysis codes, such as SWANLAKE.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell with transitioned cross-section for improved anode gas management at the open end

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Draper, Robert

    2012-01-17

    A solid oxide fuel cell (400) is made having a tubular, elongated, hollow, active section (445) which has a cross-section containing an air electrode (452) a fuel electrode (454) and solid oxide electrolyte (456) between them, where the fuel cell transitions into at least one inactive section (460) with a flattened parallel sided cross-section (462, 468) each cross-section having channels (472, 474, 476) in them which smoothly communicate with each other at an interface section (458).

  4. Design and optimization of a harmonic probe with step cross section in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Jiandong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Michael Yu

    2015-12-15

    In multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM), probe’s characteristic of assigning resonance frequencies to integer harmonics results in a remarkable improvement of detection sensitivity at specific harmonic components. The selection criterion of harmonic order is based on its amplitude’s sensitivity on material properties, e.g., elasticity. Previous studies on designing harmonic probe are unable to provide a large design capability along with maintaining the structural integrity. Herein, we propose a harmonic probe with step cross section, in which it has variable width in top and bottom steps, while the middle step in cross section is kept constant. Higher order resonance frequencies are tailored to be integer times of fundamental resonance frequency. The probe design is implemented within a structural optimization framework. The optimally designed probe is micromachined using focused ion beam milling technique, and then measured with an AFM. The measurement results agree well with our resonance frequency assignment requirement.

  5. Cross section sensitivity study for U. S. Fusion Engineering Device (FED)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelloni, S.; Cheng, E.T.

    1983-09-01

    The U.S. Fusion Engineering Device (FED) was used as a basis to investigate the uncertainties of several neutronics performance parameters that arise due to nuclear data uncertainties. The neutron flux distribution was calculated using the discrete-ordinates transport code ANISN. Nuclear data considered were from the VITAMIN-C (DLC-41) library. Atomic displacement rate in the TF coil copper stabilizer, nuclear heating in the epoxybased insulation material and TF coil, and energy multiplication were estimated. The cross section sensitivity study was performed using the sensitivity analysis code SWANLAKE. It shows that the copper atomic displacement rate in the inboard TF coil is known within + or - 24%. The nuclear heating in the inboard insulation material and TF coil are known within + or - 21% and + or - 12.5%, respectively. The uncertainties are primarily due to the iron inelastic scattering cross sections in the 14 MeV energy range.

  6. Absolute differential cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons from pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maljkovic, J. B.; Milosavljevic, A. R.; Sevic, D.; Marinkovic, B. P.; Blanco, F.

    2009-05-15

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for elastic scattering of electrons from pyrimidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}) are presented for incident energies from 50 to 300 eV. The measurements were performed using a cross beam technique, for scattering angles from 20 deg. to 110 deg. The relative DCSs were measured as a function of both the angle and incident energy and the absolute DCSs were determined using the relative flow method. The calculations of electron interaction cross sections are based on a corrected form of the independent-atom method, known as the screen corrected additivity rule procedure and using an improved quasifree absorption model. Calculated results agree very well with the experiment.

  7. An Algorithm for Decomposition of the Charged Particle Scattering Cross Sections into Singular and Regular Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inanc, Feyzi

    2005-04-09

    Any radiography simulation effort that involves high energy photons should also address charged particle transport problem as well. The scattering cross sections with the charged particles, namely electrons and positrons, go through elastic and inelastic scattering interactions that are highly anisotropic. The conventional Boltzmann operator used in the transport computations can not represent the highly anisotropic scattering interactions. One way is to implement Fokker-Planck operators. The implementation of Fokker-Planck operators requires decomposition of scattering kernels into singular and regular components. This paper introduces an algorithm on how to decompose the elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections into singular and regular components and how to compute momentum transfer and stopping power coefficients from singular components.

  8. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Barsov, S.; Gebel, R.; Gou, B.; Hartmann, M.; Kacharava, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; et al

    2016-02-03

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam kinetic energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12°-16° to 25°-30°, depending on the energy. A precision in the overall normalisation of typically 3% was achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon the results of a partial wave analysis.more » Furthermore, after extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.« less

  9. Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2011-03-15

    Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements (Sc, Y, and Gd) in the impact energy range of 30 to 1000 eV were measured for the first time. The experiments were performed with a crossed-beam apparatus that featured primary ion production by photoionization with a tunable dye laser. Comparing the cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements ({sigma}{sub Sc}, {sigma}{sub Y}, and {sigma}{sub Gd}) with those of alkali metals or helium {sigma}{sub 0}, we found that {sigma}{sub 0{approx_equal}{sigma}Sc}<{sigma}{sub Y}<{sigma}{sub Gd{approx_equal}}2{sigma}{sub 0}at an impact energy of 1000 eV.

  10. CC-inclusive cross section measured with the T2K near detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Alfons

    2015-05-15

    T2K has performed the first measurement of muon neutrino inclusive charged current interactions on carbon at neutrino energies of ?1 GeV where the measurement is reported as a flux-averaged double differential cross section in muon momentum and angle. The flux is predicted by the beam Monte Carlo and external data, including the results from the NA61/SHINE experiment. The data used for this measurement were taken in 2010 and 2011, with a total of 1.08*10{sup 20} protons-on-target. The analysis is performed on 4485 inclusive charged current interaction candidates selected in the most upstream fine-grained scintillator detector of the near detector. The flux-averaged total cross section is = (6.910.13(stat)0.84(syst)) 10{sup ?39} cm{sup 2}/nucleon for a mean neutrino energy of 0.85 GeV.

  11. POINT 2015: ENDF/B-VII.1 Final Temperature Dependent Cross Section Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    Version 00 For use in applications the ENDF/B-VII.1 library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 K and 2100 K, in steps of 300 K (the exception being 293.6 K, for exact room temperature at 20 Celsius). It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures—1, 10, and 100 eV; and 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 K is approximatelymore » 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 K. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy.« less

  12. Exciton Model Code System for Calculating Preequilibrium and Direct Double Differential Cross Sections.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-07-09

    Version 02 PRECO-2006 is a two-component exciton model code for the calculation of double differential cross sections of light particle nuclear reactions. PRECO calculates the emission of light particles (A = 1 to 4) from nuclear reactions induced by light particles on a wide variety of target nuclei. Their distribution in both energy and angle is calculated. Since it currently only considers the emission of up to two particles in any given reaction, it ismore » most useful for incident energies of 14 to 30 MeV when used as a stand-alone code. However, the preequilibrium calculations are valid up to at least around 100 MeV, and these can be used as input for more complete evaporation calculations, such as are performed in a Hauser-Feshbach model code. Finally, the production cross sections for specific product nuclides can be obtained« less

  13. Cross sections calculated for cold fusion reactions for producing superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolanczuk, Robert

    2008-08-15

    We propose a handy formula for calculating the formation cross sections for optimal bombarding energies for transactinides (superheavy elements). By means of the proposed formula the cross sections for asymmetric and symmetric cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out reactions) are calculated. The fusion barrier and its position are calculated by using the folding heavy-ion potential that for spherical reaction partners has the form of a seventh-order polynomial of the radial coordinate with built-in dependence on the thickness of the nuclear surface, as well as on the separation energy of the least bound nucleon. Possibilities of further experimental exploitation of cold fusion in producing the superheavy nuclei are briefly discussed.

  14. Consistent generation and functionalization of one-dimensional cross sections for TRAC-BF1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Verdu, G.; Pereira, C.; Escriva, A.; Rodenas, J. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering); Castrillo, F.; Serra, J. )

    1994-08-01

    A method of calculation of correct functionalized cross sections and diffusion coefficients for TRAC-BF1, based on the one-dimensional kinetic files of the tridimensional simulator SIMULATE-3, is developed. The method allows the user to obtain first the consistent one-dimensional cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and bucklings, which upon being inserted into TRAC-BF1 conserve the three-dimensional eigenvalues, the planar reaction rates, and the fast and thermal radially averaged fluxes at each axial node. This method also compensates for the differences between the thermal-hydraulic models of the three-dimensional simulator and the transient analysis code. The errors obtained with this method are very small.

  15. Determination of partial (n,xngamma) cross-sections in 193-Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talou, P; Chadwick, M B; Nelson, R; Fotiades, N; Devlin, M; Garrett, P E; Younes, W; Becker, J A

    2003-10-15

    The {sup 193}Ir(n,n'){sup 193m}Ir cross section for the production of the 80-keV isomer in {sup 193}Ir is evaluated using a combination of experimental data and nuclear reaction modeling, from threshold to about 20 MeV. Four discrete {gamma} lines feeding the isomer were recently observed with the GEANIE {gamma}-ray detector at LANSCE. Theoretical calculations of the nuclear reaction mechanisms in play are then carried out to evaluate the contributions not accounted for in the experimental setup (direct population; fraction of {gamma}-lines not observed in the experiment; etc). Experiment and modeling are then combined to provide a total cross section for the production of the Iridium isomer. We finally compare our result with activation measurement data available for a few energy points.

  16. Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections Database at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Reaction Cross Sections Database at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  17. Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Effects from Time-Height Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Effects from Time-Height Cross Sections C. Hannay and R. Pincus National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Diagnostics Center Boulder, Colorado K. F. Evans Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction Clouds in the atmosphere are finite in extent and variable in every direction and in time. Long data sets from ground-based profilers, such as lidars or cloud radars, could

  18. MCNP Continuous-Energy Neutron Cross Section Libraries for Temperatures from 300 to 1365K.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-04-19

    Version 00 UTXS is a project whereby continuous-energy cross section libraries in ACE format suitable for the MCNP code were generated using the NJOY94.105 processing code. Libraries for various materials were generated at typical operating temperatures of the US Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), and the Russian PWR (VVER) as well as libraries for other non-reactor applications such as nuclear medicine.

  19. New approach to analyzing and evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.

    2012-11-15

    The presence of substantial systematic discrepancies between the results of different experiments devoted to determining cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions-first of all, ({gamma}, n), ({gamma}, 2n), and ({gamma}, 3n) reactions-is a strong motivation for studying the reliability and authenticity of these data and for developing methods for taking into account and removing the discrepancies in question. In order to solve the first problem, we introduce objective absolute criteria involving transitional photoneutron-multiplicity functions F{sub 1}, F{sub 2}, F{sub 3}, Horizontal-Ellipsis ; by definition, their values cannot exceed 1.0, 0.5, 0.33, Horizontal-Ellipsis , respectively. With the aim of solving the second problem, we propose a new experimental-theoretical approach. In this approach, reaction cross sections are evaluated by simultaneously employing experimental data on the cross section for the total photoneutron yield, {sigma}{sup expt}({gamma}, xn) = {sigma}{sup expt}({gamma}, n) + 2{sigma}{sup expt}({gamma}, 2n) + 3{sigma}{sup expt}({gamma}, 3n) + Horizontal-Ellipsis , which are free from drawbacks plaguing experimental methods for sorting neutrons in multiplicity, and the results obtained by calculating the functions F{sub theor}{sup 1}, F{sub theor}{sup 2}, F{sub theor}{sup 3}, Horizontal-Ellipsis on the basis of the modern model of photonuclear reactions. The reliability and authenticity of data on the cross sections for ({gamma}, n), ({gamma}, 2n), and ({gamma}, 3n) partial reactions-{sigma}{sup eval}({gamma}, in) = F{sub i}{sup theor}{sigma}{sup expt}({gamma}, xn)-were evaluated for the {sup 90}Zr, {sup 115}In, {sup 112,114,116,117,118,119,120,122,124}Sn, {sup 159}Tb, and {sup 197}Au nuclei.

  20. Particle-driven gravity currents in non-rectangular cross section channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zemach, T.

    2015-10-15

    We consider a high-Reynolds-number gravity current generated by suspension of heavier particles in fluid of density ρ{sub i}, propagating along a channel into an ambient fluid of the density ρ{sub a}. The bottom and top of the channel are at z = 0, H, and the cross section is given by the quite general −f{sub 1}(z) ≤ y ≤ f{sub 2}(z) for 0 ≤ z ≤ H. The flow is modeled by the one-layer shallow-water equations obtained for the time-dependent motion which is produced by release from rest of a fixed volume of mixture from a lock. We solve the problem by the finite-difference numerical code to present typical height h(x, t), velocity u(x, t), and volume fraction of particles (concentration) ϕ(x, t) profiles. The methodology is illustrated for flow in typical geometries: power-law (f(z) = z{sup α} and f(z) = (H − z){sup α}, where α is positive constant), trapezoidal, and circle. In general, the speed of propagation of the flows driven by suspensions decreases compared with those driven by a reduced gravity in homogeneous currents. However, the details depend on the geometry of the cross section. The runout length of suspensions in channels of power-law cross sections is analytically predicted using a simplified depth-averaged “box” model. The present approach is a significant generalization of the classical gravity current problem. The classical formulation for a rectangular channel is now just a particular case, f(z) = const., in the wide domain of cross sections covered by this new model.

  1. Beauty production cross section measurements at E(cm) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Onofrio, Monica; /Geneva U.

    2005-05-01

    The RunII physics program at the Tevatron started in spring 2001 with protons and antiprotons colliding at an energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, and it is carrying on with more than 500 pb{sup -1} of data as collected by both the CDF and D0 experiments. Recent results on beauty production cross section measurements are here reported.

  2. W/Z production cross sections and asymmetries at E(CM) = 2-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellavance, Angela M.; /Nebraska U.

    2005-06-01

    The most recent results for W and Z boson production cross sections and asymmetries are presented from the CDF and D0 collaborations using Run II data taken at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) Tevatron. Data set sizes range from 72 pb{sup -1} to 226 pb{sup -1}, and results range from published to preliminary. Results presented agree with the Standard Model and world averages within errors.

  3. Covariant Methods for Calculating Differential Cross Sections and Polarization Characteristics of Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikach, S.M.

    2005-06-01

    A covariant method for calculating reaction amplitudes in the diagonal spin basis is presented. In this basis, amplitudes represent the spin kinematics of the interacting particles in the simplest and most adequate manner. A matrix is obtained such that differential cross sections for polarized particles and amplitude combinations that are required to calculate various polarization characteristics of reactions can be expressed in an arbitrary basis in terms of the amplitudes calculated in one basis.

  4. JEF 2.2 Cross Section Library for the MCNP Monte Carlo Code.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-11-24

    Version 01 This continuous energy cross-section data library for MCNP is based on the JEF-2.2 evaluated nuclear data library (ACE format). The present library was satisfactorily tested in thermal and fast criticality benchmarks. For analyses below 20 MeV, MCJEF22NEA.BOLlB was applied also in cell and core calculations dedicated to the study of the subcritical accelerator driven systems (ADS).

  5. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorman, Mark Edward; /University Coll. London

    2008-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented.

  6. Measurements of the W production cross sections in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-02-19

    This paper presents cross sections for the production of a W boson in association with jets, measured in proton–proton collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 7\\) TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider. With an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb-1, this data set allows for an exploration of a large kinematic range, including jet production up to a transverse momentum of 1TeV and multiplicities up to seven associated jets. The production cross sections for W bosons are measured in both the electron and muon decay channels. Differential cross sections for many observables are also presented including measurements of the jetmore » observables such as the rapidities and the transverse momenta as well as measurements of event observables such as the scalar sums of the transverse momenta of the jets. As a result, the measurements are compared to numerous QCD predictions including next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations, resummation calculations and Monte Carlo generators.« less

  7. Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for fission reactor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B.; Downes, L.; Girgis, J.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; Schniederjan, J.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A. J.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevz, F. M.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Watts, D.; Yates, S. W.

    2013-04-19

    Nuclear data important for the design and development of the next generation of light-water reactors and future fast reactors include neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections on important structural materials, such as Fe, and on coolant materials, such as Na. These reaction probabilities are needed since neutron reactions impact fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of reactors. While neutron scattering cross sections from these materials are available for certain incident neutron energies, the fast neutron region, particularly above 2 MeV, has large gaps for which no measurements exist, or the existing uncertainties are large. Measurements have been made at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory to measure neutron scattering cross sections on both Fe and Na in the region where these gaps occur and to reduce the uncertainties on scattering from the ground state and first excited state of these nuclei. Results from measurements on Fe at incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV will be presented and comparisons will be made to model calculations available from data evaluators.

  8. Copper K-shell emission cross sections for lasersolid experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, J. R.; Betti, R.; Nilson, P. M.; Solodov, A. A.

    2013-08-15

    Published measurements and models of the cross section for electrons causing K-shell emission from copper are reviewed to find a suitable expression to use when analyzing K{sub ?}-emission measurements in lasersolid experiments at peak intensities above 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Few measurements exist in the 0.1- to 10-MeV electron energy range currently of interest, leaving a number of possible suitable models that are summarized here with a number of typing errors corrected. Two different limiting forms for the cross section at relativistic energies are used, and existing measurements do not give a clear indication as to which is correct. Comparison with the limiting form of electron stopping power indicates an alternative relativistic form and also that the density-effect correction will be important in copper above 10 MeV. For data analysis relying on relative K{sub ?} emission caused by electrons with energy much greater than the K-shell binding energy, the existing uncertainty in cross sections is unimportant, but it will be a source of uncertainty when using absolute values and for electron energies up to ?6 the binding energy. K-shell emission caused by photons and protons is also briefly reviewed.

  9. Measurement of the Neutrino Neutral-Current Elastic Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Anderson, C.E.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Argonne

    2010-07-01

    We report a measurement of the flux-averaged neutral-current elastic differential cross section for neutrinos scattering on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}) as a function of four-momentum transferred squared, Q{sup 2}. It is obtained by measuring the kinematics of recoiling nucleons with kinetic energy greater than 50 MeV which are readily detected in MiniBooNE. This differential cross-section distribution is fit with fixed nucleon form factors apart from an axial mass, M{sub A}, that provides a best fit for M{sub A} = 1.39 {+-} 0.11 GeV. Using the data from the charged-current neutrino interaction sample, a ratio of neutral-current to charged-current quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of Q{sup 2} has been measured. Additionally, single protons with kinetic energies above 350 MeV can be distinguished from neutrons and multiple nucleon events. Using this marker, the strange quark contribution to the neutral-current axial vector form factor at Q{sup 2} = 0, {Delta}s, is found to be {Delta}s = 0.08{+-} 0.26.

  10. SENSIT-2D: a two-dimensional cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Embrechts, M.J.

    1982-10-01

    SENSIT-2D is a computer program that calculates the sensitivity and/or uncertainty for an integral response (e.g., heating, radiation damage), obtained from the two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport code TRIDENT-CTR, to the cross sections and cross-section uncertainties. A design-sensitivity option allows one to calculate the integral response when the cross sections in certain regions are changed. A secondary-energy-distribution sensitivity- and uncertainty-analysis capability is included. SENSIT-2D incorporates all the essential features of TRIDENT-CTR (r,z geometry option, triangular mesh, nonorthogonal boundaries, group-dependent quadrature sets) and is aimed at the needs of the fusion community. The structure of SENSIT-2D is similar to the structure of the SENSIT code, a one-dimensional sensitivity- and uncertainty-analysis code. This report covers the theory used in SENSIT-2D, outlines the code structure, and gives detailed input specifications. Where appropriate, parts of the SENSIT report are taken over in this write-up. Two sample problems which illustrate the use of SENSIT-2D are explained.

  11. Nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections, and the nuclear interaction radius

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Ibrahim, Badawy

    2011-04-15

    We study the nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections for stable nuclei, in the energy region from 30A MeV to about 1A GeV, and find them to be in proportion to ({radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 1}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 1}{sup 2/3})+{radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 2}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 2}{sup 2/3})) {sup 2} in the mass range 8 to 100. Also, we find a parameter-free relation that enables us to predict a total reaction cross section for any nucleus-nucleus within 10% uncertainty at most, using the experimental value of the total reaction cross section of a given nucleus-nucleus. The power of the relation is demonstrated by several examples. The energy dependence of the nuclear interaction radius is deduced; it is found to be almost constant in the energy range from about 200A MeV to about 1A GeV; in this energy range and for nuclei with N=Z, R{sub I}(A)=(1.14{+-}0.02)A{sup 1/3} fm.

  12. Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Samarium, Europium, and Gadolinium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2004-11-30

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron and proton induced nuclear reaction cross sections in the mass region of samarium, europium and gadolinium (62 {le} Z {le} 64, 82 {le} N {le} 96).

  13. Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Iodine and Xenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Kelley, K; Mustafa, M

    2004-09-20

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron and proton induced nuclear reaction cross sections in the mass region of iodine and xenon (52 {<=} Z {<=} 54, 71 {<=} N {<=} 76).

  14. Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Bromine and Krypton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R; Dietrich, F; Bauer, R; Kelley, K; Mustafa, M

    2004-07-23

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron and proton induced nuclear reaction cross sections in the mass region of bromine and krypton (34 {le} Z {le} 37, 40 {le} N {le} 47).

  15. Neutron total and scattering cross sections of /sup 6/Li in the few MeV region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.; Guenther, P.; Whalen, J.

    1980-02-01

    Neutron total cross sections of /sup 6/Li are measured from approx. 0.5 to approx. 4.8 MeV at intervals of approx.< 10 keV. Neutron differential elastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at approx.> 10 scattering angles and at incident-neutron intervals of approx.< 100 keV. Neutron differential inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured in the incident-energy range 3.5 to 4.0 MeV. The experimental results are extended to lower energies using measured neutron total cross sections recently reported elsewhere by the authors. The composite experimental data (total cross sections from 0.1 to 4.8 MeV and scattering cross sections from 0.22 to 4.0 MeV) are interpreted in terms of a simple two-level R-matrix model which describes the observed cross sections and implies the reaction cross section in unobserved channels; notably the (n;..cap alpha..)t reaction (Q = 4.783 MeV). The experimental and calculational results are compared with previously reported results as summarized in the ENDF/B-V evaluated nuclear data file.

  16. Measurement of production cross sections for negative pions, kaons, and protons at 10, 18, and 24 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amann, J.F.; Macek, R.J.; Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-10-01

    We report here on a measurement of the 0/sup 0/-production cross sections for low-energy negative secondaries from 10-, 18-, and 24-GeV protons on a variety of targets. Special emphasis is given to determining the dependence of the cross sections on incident proton energy.

  17. Excitation Cross Section Measurement for n=3 to n=2 Line Emission in Fe17+ to Fe23+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Gu, M F; Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Scofield, J H

    2006-02-08

    The authors report the measurement of electron impact excitation cross sections for the strong iron L-shell 3 {yields} 2 lines of Fe XVIII through Fe XXIV at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap using a crystal spectrometer and a 6 x 6 pixel array microcalorimeter. The cross sections were determined by direct normalization to the well established cross section of radiative electron capture through a sophisticated model analysis which results in the excitation cross section for 48 lines at multiple electron energies. They also studied the electron density dependent nature of the emission lines, which is demonstrated by the effective excitation cross section of the 3d {yields} 2p transition in Fe XXI.

  18. Fermi-LAT constraints on dark matter annihilation cross section from observations of the Fornax cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Nagai, Daisuke E-mail: daisuke.nagai@yale.edu

    2012-07-01

    We analyze 2.8-yr data of 1–100 GeV photons for clusters of galaxies, collected with the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi satellite. By analyzing 49 nearby massive clusters located at high Galactic latitudes, we find no excess gamma-ray emission towards directions of the galaxy clusters. Using flux upper limits, we show that the Fornax cluster provides the most stringent constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section. Stacking a large sample of nearby clusters does not help improve the limit for most dark matter models. This suggests that a detailed modeling of the Fornax cluster is important for setting robust limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section based on clusters. We therefore perform the detailed mass modeling and predict the expected dark matter annihilation signals from the Fornax cluster, by taking into account effects of dark matter contraction and substructures. By modeling the mass distribution of baryons (stars and gas) around a central bright elliptical galaxy, NGC 1399, and using a modified contraction model motivated by numerical simulations, we show that the dark matter contraction boosts the annihilation signatures by a factor of 4. For dark matter masses around 10 GeV, the upper limit obtained on the annihilation cross section times relative velocity is (σν)∼<(2–3) × 10{sup −25} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, which is within a factor of 10 from the value required to explain the dark matter relic density. This effect is more robust than the annihilation boost due to substructure, and it is more important unless the mass of the smallest subhalos is much smaller than that of the Sun.

  19. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  20. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the ???(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egiyan, H.; Langheinrich, J.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Holtrop, M.; Lu, H.; Mattione, P.; Mutchler, G.; Park, K.; Smith, E. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Zhao, Z. W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Contalbrigo, M.; DAngelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niculescu, G.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabati, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.

    2012-01-30

    We searched for the ???(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the ????-decay channel using CLAS. The invariant-mass spectrum of the ???? system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M=1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90%-confidence-level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of ???(1860) with a consecutive decay into???? in the photon-energy range 4.5GeV?<5.5GeV.

  1. Evidence for quark-hadron duality in gamma*-p helicity cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. P. Malace, W. Melnitchouk, A. Psaker

    2011-03-01

    Combining data on unpolarized and polarized inclusive proton structure functions, we perform the first detailed study of quark-hadron duality in individual helicity-1/2 and 3/2 virtual photoproduction cross sections. We find that duality is realized more clearly in the helicity-1/2 channel, with duality violating corrections < 10% over the entire nucleon resonance region, while larger, < 20% corrections are found in the helicity-3/2 sector. The results are in general agreement with quark model expectations, and suggest that data above the Delta resonance region may be used to constrain both spin-averaged and spin-dependent parton distributions.

  2. Measurement of low $p_{T}$ $D^{0}$ meson production cross section at CDF II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mussini, Manuel; /Bologna U.

    2011-05-01

    In this thesis we present a study of the production of D{sup 0} meson in the low transverse momentum region. In particular the inclusive differential production cross section of the D{sup 0} meson (in the two-body decay channel D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) is obtained extending the published CDF II measurement to p{sub T} as low as 1.5 GeV/c. This study is performed at the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab with the CDF II detector.

  3. Neutron cross-section libraries in the AMPX master interface format for thermal and fast reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjerke, M.A.; Webster, C.C.

    1981-12-01

    Neutron cross-section libraries in the AMPX master interface format have been created for three reactor types. Included are an 84-group library for use with light-water reactors, a 27-group library for use with heavy-water CANDU reactors and a 126-group library for use with liquid metal fast breeder reactors. In general, ENDF/B data were used in the creation of these libraries, and the nuclides included in each library should be sufficient for most neutronic analyses of reactors of that type. Each library has been used successfully in fuel depletion calculations.

  4. Convergence of Legendre Expansion of Doppler-Broadened Double Differential Elastic Scattering Cross Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbanas, Goran; Dunn, Michael E; Larson, Nancy M; Leal, Luiz C; Williams, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    Convergence properties of Legendre expansion of a Doppler-broadened double-differential elastic neutron scattering cross section of {sup 238}U near the 6.67 eV resonance at temperature 10{sup 3} K are studied. A variance of Legendre expansion from a reference Monte Carlo computation is used as a measure of convergence and is computed for as many as 15 terms in the Legendre expansion. When the outgoing energy equals the incoming energy, it is found that the Legendre expansion converges very slowly. Therefore, a supplementary method of computing many higher-order terms is suggested and employed for this special case.

  5. Sensitivity of silicon 1-MeV damage function to cross-section evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.; Danjaji, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    The electronics radiation hardness-testing community uses the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E722-93 Standard Practice to define the energy dependence of the nonionizing neutron damage to silicon semiconductors. This neutron displacement damage response function is defined to be equal to the silicon displacement kerma. An Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) {sup 28}Si cross-section evaluation and the NJOY code are used to define the standard response function to be used in reporting 1-MeV (silicon) neutron damage and in determining neutron damage equivalence between test facilities. This paper provides information for the precision and bias section of the E722 standard.

  6. Fine-Group Cross Section Library Based on JEFF3.1 for Nuclear Fission Applications.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-10-16

    Version 00 The NJOY-99.160 data processing system was used for the MATJEFF31.BOLIB library generation to assure the consistency with the previous generation of the VITJEFF31.BOLIB /6/ twin library, based on the same GENDF cross section data file. In particular it used a revised version of the GROUPR /7/ module, originally developed in ENEA-Bologna before the free release of an analogous GROUPR revised version with NJOY-99.161, in order to correctly deal with the non-Cartesian interpolation schemes,more » contained in 69 JEFF-3.1 evaluated nuclear data files. The TRANSX-2.15 /8/ code was then used to obtain the total (prompt + delayed) fission spectra for U-235, U-238 and Pu-239. These data, contained in the MATJEFF31.BOLIB package, are available in tabulated form as in the VITJEFF31.BOLIB library package. On the contrary the VITAMIN-B6, VITJEF22.BOLIB /9/ and MATJEF22.BOLIB /10/ similar library packages contain in tabulated form only the prompt components. MATJEFF31.BOLIB is a pseudo-problem-independent library based on the Bondarenko /11/ (f-factor) method for the treatment of neutron resonance self-shielding and temperature effects. The library contains 176 nuclides at 4 temperatures, obtained for the most part with 6 to 8 values for the background cross section. Thermal scattering cross sections were processed at all temperatures available in the JEFF-3.1 thermal scattering law data file for 6 additional bound nuclides (H-1 in light water (H-H2O), H-1 in polyethylene (H-CH2), H-1 in zirconium hydride (H-ZrH) (not contained in VITAMIN-B6, VITJEF22.BOLIB and MATJEF22.BOLIB), H-2 in heavy water (H2-D2O), C in graphite (C-GPH) and Be in beryllium metal (Be-TH)). From MATJEFF31.BOLIB it is easily possible to generate, with the use of the TRANSX code, working libraries of collapsed and self-shielded cross sections in GOXS or FIDO-ANISN format for calculations with the DOORS /12/, DANTSYS /13/ and PARTISN /14/ deterministic transport systems and the MORSE /15/ Monte

  7. Electron elastic differential cross sections for free atoms using a scientific visualization package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flox, L.; Ughrin, J.; Ozturk, N.

    1992-12-01

    Differential cross sections (DCS) of electron elastic scattering by free indium and antimony atoms are presented. The DCS were calculated using the method of partial waves and the optical model. The optical potential consists of static, polarization and exchange terms. Comparisons of experimental data for argon and mercury are used to establish the credibility of the model. The elastic data for indium and antimony covers the range from a few hundred eV`s to a few KeV. The data are presented in a Spyglass{reg_sign} scientific visualization package format.

  8. Measurement of the inclusive B sup * cross section above the. Upsilon. (4 S )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akerib, D.S.; Barish, B.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Stroynowski, R.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Morrison, R.; Schmidt, D.; Procario, M.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lewis, J.D.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Nandi, S.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; O'Grady, C.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yelton, J.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Haas, P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; A

    1991-09-23

    Using the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have determined the inclusive {ital B}{sup *} cross section above the {Upsilon}(4{ital S}) resonance in the energy range from 10.61 to 10.70 GeV. We also report a new measurement of the energy of the {ital B}{sup *}{r arrow}{ital B}{gamma} transition photon of 46.2{plus minus}0.3{plus minus}0.8 MeV.

  9. On the radar cross section (RCS) prediction of vehicles moving on the ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabihi, Ahmad

    2014-12-10

    As readers should be aware, Radar Cross Section depends on the factors such as: Wave frequency and polarization, Target dimension, angle of ray incidence, Targets material and covering, Type of radar system as monostatic or bistatic, space in which contains target and propagating waves, and etc. Having moved or stationed in vehicles can be effective in RCS values. Here, we investigate effective factors in RCS of moving targets on the ground or sea. Image theory in electromagnetic applies to be taken into account RCS of a target over the ground or sea.

  10. MICROX-2 cross section library based on ENDF/B-VII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, J.; Ivanov, K.; Choi, H.

    2012-07-01

    New cross section libraries of a neutron transport code MICROX-2 have been generated for advanced reactor design and fuel cycle analyses. A total of 386 nuclides were processed, including 10 thermal scattering nuclides, which are available in ENDF/B-VII release 0 nuclear data. The NJOY system and MICROR code were used to process nuclear data and convert them into MICROX-2 format. The energy group structure of the new library was optimized for both the thermal and fast neutron spectrum reactors based on Contributon and Point-wise Cross Section Driven (CPXSD) method, resulting in a total of 1173 energy groups. A series of lattice cell level benchmark calculations have been performed against both experimental measurements and Monte Carlo calculations for the effective/infinite multiplication factor and reaction rate ratios. The results of MICROX-2 calculation with the new library were consistent with those of 15 reference cases. The average errors of the infinite multiplication factor and reaction rate ratio were 0.31% {delta}k and 1.9%, respectively. The maximum error of reaction rate ratio was 8% for {sup 238}U-to-{sup 235}U fission of ZEBRA lattice against the reference calculation done by MCNP5. (authors)

  11. Measurement of the cross section of charmed hadrons and the nuclear dependence alpha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco-Covarrubias, E.Alejandro; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2009-12-01

    With data from the SELEX experiment we study charm hadro-production. We report the differential production cross sections as function of the longitudinal and transverse momentum, as well as for two different target materials, of 14 charmed hadron and/or their decay modes. This is the most extensive study to date. SELEX is a fixed target experiment at Fermilab with high forward acceptance; it took data during 1996-1997 with 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -} and {pi}{sup -}, and 540 GeV/c proton and {pi}{sup +} beams. It used 5 target foils (two copper and three diamond). We use the results to determine {alpha}, used in parametrizing the production cross section as {infinity} A{sup {alpha}}, where A is the mass number of the target nuclei. We found within our statistics that {alpha} is independent of the longitudinal momentum fraction x{sub F} in the interval 0.1 < x{sub F} < 1.0, with {alpha} = 0.778 {+-} 0.014. The average value of {alpha} for charm production by pion beams is {alpha}{sub meson} = 0.850 {+-} 0.028. This is somewhat larger than the corresponding average {alpha}{sub baryon} = 0.755 {+-} 0.016 for charm production by baryon beams ({Sigma}{sup -} and protons).

  12. Measurement of the $WW+WZ$ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurwitz, Martina; /Chicago U.

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode is presented. The measurement is carried out with 4.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. The main experimental challenge is identifying the signal in the overwhelming background from W+jets production. The modeling of the W+jets background is carefully studied and a matrix element technique is used to build a discriminant to separate signal and background. The cross section of WW + WZ production is measured to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WW + WZ) = 16.5{sub -3.0}{sup +3.3} pb, in agreement with the next-to-leading order theoretical prediction of 15.1 {+-} 0.9 pb. The significance of the signal is evaluated to be 5.4{sigma}. This measurement is an important milestone in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron.

  13. Measurement of the hadronic cross section in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-11-01

    This thesis describes the most precise measurement to date of the ratio R, the hadronic cross section in lowest order electron-positron annihilation to the cross section for muon pair production in lowest order electron-positron annihilation. This experiment is of interest because R is a fundamental parameter that tests in a model independent way the basic assumptions of strong interaction theories. According to the assumptions of one of these theories the value of R is determined simply from the electric charges, spin, and color assignments of the produced quark-pairs. The experiment was carried out with the MAgnetic Calorimeter using collisions of 14.5 GeV electrons and positrons at the 2200m circumference PEP storage ring at SLAC. The MAC detector is one of the best-suited collider detectors for measuring R due to its nearly complete coverage of the full angular range. The data for this experiment were accumulated between February 1982 and April 1983 corresponding to a total event sample of about 40,000 hadronic events. About 5% of the data were taken with 14 GeV beams and the rest of the data were taken with 14.5 GeV beams. A description of particle interactions and experimental considerations is given.

  14. Analyticity constraints on the Landshoff-Donnachie fit to total cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, M. M.; Halzen, F.

    2006-12-01

    Landshoff and Donnachie [A. Donnachie and P. V. Landshoff, Phys. Lett. B 296, 227 (1992).; P. V. Landshoff, hep-ph/0509240] parametrize the energy behavior of pp and pp scattering cross sections with five parameters, using: {sigma}{sup +}=56.08s{sup -0.4525}+21.70s{sup 0.0808} for pp, {sigma}{sup -}=98.39s{sup -0.4525}+21.70s{sup 0.0808} for pp. Using the four analyticity constraints of Block and Halzen [M. M. Block and F. Halzen, Phys. Rev. D 72, 036006 (2005).], we simultaneously fit the Landshoff-Donnachie form to the same sieved set of pp and pp cross section and {rho} data that Block and Halzen used for a very good fit to a ln{sup 2}s parametrization. We show that the satisfaction of the analyticity constraints will require modification of the Landshoff-Donnachie parametrization for lower energies, thus altering its inherent appeal of simplicity and universality.

  15. Studies of combustion reactions at the state-resolved differential cross section level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, P.L.; Suits, A.G.; Bontuyan, L.S.; Whitaker, B.J.

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved differential reaction cross sections provide perhaps the most detailed information about the mechanism of a chemical reaction, but heretofore they have been extremely difficult to measure. This program explores a new technique for obtaining differential cross sections with product state resolution. The three-dimensional velocity distribution of state-selected reaction products is determined by ionizing the appropriate product, waiting for a delay while it recoils along the trajectory imparted by the reaction, and finally projecting the spatial distribution of ions onto a two dimensional screen using a pulsed electric field. Knowledge of the arrival time allows the ion position to be converted to a velocity, and the density of velocity projections can be inverted mathematically to provide the three-dimensional velocity distribution for the selected product. The main apparatus has been constructed and tested using photodissociations. The authors report here the first test results using crossed beams to investigate collisions between Ar and NO. Future research will both develop further the new technique and employ it to investigate methyl radical, formyl radical, and hydrogen atom reactions which are important in combustion processes. The authors intend specifically to characterize the reactions of CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO; of HCO with O{sub 2}; and of H with CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}.

  16. Method and apparatus for determination of temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vagelatos, Nicholas; Steinman, Donald K.; John, Joseph; Young, Jack C.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear method and apparatus determines the temperature of a medium by injecting fast neutrons into the medium and detecting returning slow neutrons in three first energy ranges by producing three respective detection signals. The detection signals are combined to produce three derived indicia each systematically related to the population of slow neutrons returning from the medium in a respective one of three second energy ranges, specifically exclusively epithermal neutrons, exclusively substantially all thermal neutrons and exclusively a portion of the thermal neutron spectrum. The derived indicia are compared with calibration indicia similarly systematically related to the population of slow neutrons in the same three second energy ranges returning from similarly irradiated calibration media for which the relationships temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power to such calibration indicia are known. The comparison indicates the temperature at which the calibration indicia correspond to the derived indicia and consequently the temperature of the medium. The neutron absorption cross section and moderating power of the medium can be identified at the same time.

  17. Measurements of the $ZZ$ production cross sections in the $$2\\ell2\

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-29

    Measurements of the ZZ production cross sections in proton–proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are presented. We found that candidate events for the leptonic decay mode ZZ → 2l2ν, where l denotes an electron or a muon, are reconstructed and selected from data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 (19.6)fb-1 at 7 (8) TeV collected with the CMS experiment. The measured cross sections, σ(pp → ZZ)=5.1+1.5-1.4(stat)+1.4-1.1(syst)±0.1(lumi)pb at 7 TeV, and 7.2+0.8-0.8(stat)+1.9-1.5(syst)±0.2(lumi)pb at 8 TeV, are in good agreement with the standard model predictions with next-to-leading-order accuracy. Furthermore, the selected data are analyzed to search formore » anomalous triple gauge couplings involving the ZZ final state. In the absence of any deviation from the standard model predictions, limits are set on the relevant parameters. As a result, these limits are then combined with the previously published CMS results for ZZ in 4l final states, yielding the most stringent constraints on the anomalous couplings.« less

  18. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator having non-circular cross-section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2003-11-11

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow piezoelectric crystal which has been formed with a cylindrical cross-section to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. By deforming the circular cross-section of the transducer, the acoustic force is concentrated along axial regions parallel to the axis of the transducer. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. The concentrated regions of acoustic force cause particles in the fluid to concentrate within the regions of acoustic force for separation from the fluid.

  19. Calculation of photodetachment cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions of negative ions using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yuan; Ning, Chuangang

    2015-10-14

    Recently, the development of photoelectron velocity map imaging makes it much easier to obtain the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) experimentally. However, explanations of PADs are only qualitative in most cases, and very limited works have been reported on how to calculate PAD of anions. In the present work, we report a method using the density-functional-theory Kohn-Sham orbitals to calculate the photodetachment cross sections and the anisotropy parameter β. The spherical average over all random molecular orientation is calculated analytically. A program which can handle both the Gaussian type orbital and the Slater type orbital has been coded. The testing calculations on Li{sup −}, C{sup −}, O{sup −}, F{sup −}, CH{sup −}, OH{sup −}, NH{sub 2}{sup −}, O{sub 2}{sup −}, and S{sub 2}{sup −} show that our method is an efficient way to calculate the photodetachment cross section and anisotropy parameter β for anions, thus promising for large systems.

  20. Influence of projectile neutron number on cross section in cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragojevic, Irena; Dragojevic, I.; Gregorich, K.E.; Dullmann, Ch.E.; Folden III, C.M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gates, J.M.; Nelson, S.L.; Sudowe, R.; Nitsche, H.

    2007-09-01

    Elements 107-112 [1,2] have been discovered in reactions between {sup 208}Pb or {sup 209}Bi targets and projectiles ranging from {sup 54}Cr through {sup 70}Zn. In such reactions, the compound nucleus can be formed at excitation energies as low as {approx}12 MeV, thus this type of reaction has been referred to as 'cold fusion'. The study of cold fusion reactions is an indispensable approach to gaining a better understanding of heavy element formation and decay. A theoretical model that successfully predicts not only the magnitudes of cold fusion cross sections, but also the shapes of excitation functions and the cross section ratios between various reaction pairs was recently developed by Swiatecki, Siwek-Wilczynska, and Wilczynski [3,4]. This theoretical model, also referred to as Fusion by Diffusion, has been the guide in all of our cold fusion studies. One particularly interesting aspect of this model is the large predicted difference in cross sections between projectiles differing by two neutrons. The projectile pair where this difference is predicted to be largest is {sup 48}Ti and {sup 50}Ti. To test and extend this model, {sup 208}Pb({sup 48}Ti,n){sup 255}Rf and {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti,n){sup 257}Rf excitation functions were recently measured at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) 88-Inch Cyclotron utilizing the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS). The {sup 50}Ti reaction was carried out with thin lead targets ({approx}100 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}), and the {sup 48}Ti reaction with both thin and thick targets ({approx}470 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}). In addition to this reaction pair, reactions with projectile pairs {sup 52}Cr and {sup 54}Cr [5], {sup 56}Fe and {sup 58}Fe [6], and {sup 62}Ni [7] and {sup 64}Ni [8] will be discussed and compared to the Fusion by Diffusion predictions. The model predictions show a very good agreement with the data.

  1. Recent joint developments in cross-section uncertainty analysis at Los Alamos and EIR (Eidgenoessiches Institut fuer Reaktorforschung)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, J.W.; Dudziak, D.J.; Muir, D.W.; Stepanek, J.; Higgs, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses recent developments and future plans for the SENSIBL code (the successor to the SENSIT(6) and SENSIT-2D(7) codes), along with associated covariance data and cross section libraries. 34 refs. (DWL)

  2. A Temperature-Dependent, Linearly Interpolable, Tabulated Cross Section Library Based on ENDF/B-VI, Release 4.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-09-09

    Version 00 As distributed, the original evaluated data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications, these ENDF/B-VI, Release 4 data were processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight temperatures between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolablemore » in energy. The library contains data for 321 evaluations. The CCC-638/TART96 code package is recommended for use with these data. Codes within TART96 can be used to display these data or to run calculations using these data.« less

  3. Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry for Isotopes of Scandium, Titanium, Vanadium, Chromium, Manganese, and Iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, K; Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2004-11-30

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Local systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron and proton induced nuclear reaction cross sections in the mass region of scandium, titanium, vanadium, chromium, manganese, and iron (21 {le} Z {le} 26, 20 {le} N {le} 32).

  4. Top quark pair production cross section in the lepton+jets channel using b-tagging at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, H.D.; /Brown U.

    2008-05-01

    The top quark pair production cross section measurement in the lepton+jets channel with b-tagging algorithm is described. About 900 pb{sup -1} data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron are used for this analysis. In this thesis, event selection, background estimation, and cross section calculation are discussed in detail. In addition, calibration of the Luminosity Monitor readout electronics and a new b-tagging algorithm, the SLTNN tagger, are also discussed in this thesis.

  5. A-Priori and A-Posteriori Covariance Data in Nuclear Cross Section Adjustments: Issues and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Salvatores, Massimo; Aliberti, G.

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide useful feedback to evaluators a set of criteria are established for assessing the robustness and reliability of the cross section adjustments that make use of integral experiment information. Criteria are also provided for accepting the “a posteriori” cross sections, both as new “nominal” values and as “trends”. Some indications of the use of the “a posteriori” covariance matrix are indicated, even though more investigation is needed to settle this complex subject.

  6. A-priori and A-posteriori Covariance Data in Nuclear Cross Section Adjustments: Issues and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Aliberti, G.

    2015-01-15

    In order to provide useful feedback to evaluators a set of criteria are established for assessing the robustness and reliability of the cross section adjustments that make use of integral experiment information. Criteria are also provided for accepting the “a posteriori” cross sections, both as new “nominal” values and as “trends”. Some indications of the use of the “a posteriori” covariance matrix are indicated, even though more investigation is needed to settle this complex subject.

  7. Di-photon and photon + b/c production cross sections at Ecm = 1.96- TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gajjar, Anant; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    Measurements of the di-photon cross section have been made in the central region and are found to be in good agreement with NLO QCD predictions. The cross section of events containing a photon and additional heavy flavor jet have also been measured, as well as the ratio of photon + b to photon + c. The statistically limited sample shows good agreement with Leading Order predictions.

  8. Wideband radar cross section reduction using two-dimensional phase gradient metasurfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yongfeng; Qu, Shaobo; Wang, Jiafu; Chen, Hongya; Zhang, Jieqiu; Xu, Zhuo; Zhang, Anxue

    2014-06-02

    Phase gradient metasurface (PGMs) are artificial surfaces that can provide pre-defined in-plane wave-vectors to manipulate the directions of refracted/reflected waves. In this Letter, we propose to achieve wideband radar cross section (RCS) reduction using two-dimensional (2D) PGMs. A 2D PGM was designed using a square combination of 49 split-ring sub-unit cells. The PGM can provide additional wave-vectors along the two in-plane directions simultaneously, leading to either surface wave conversion, deflected reflection, or diffuse reflection. Both the simulation and experiment results verified the wide-band, polarization-independent, high-efficiency RCS reduction induced by the 2D PGM.

  9. Characterization of industrially produced galvannealed coating using cross-sectional specimen in TEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, A.; Saha, R.; Ray, R.K.

    2009-08-15

    Galvannealed coated sheet steels are extensively used in the automotive industry due to their inherent advantages, as compared to other zinc based coating, such as excellent spot weldability, good corrosion resistance and better paintability. Despite the above advantages, galvannealed coating suffers from poor formability due to the presence of hard and brittle Fe-Zn intermetallic phases. The formability of the coating depends on the amount and orientation of different Fe-Zn intermetallic phases. The present study deals with the characterization of an industrially produced galvannealed coating using cross-sectional specimen in a Transmission Electron Microscope. From the selected area diffraction patterns obtained in Transmission Electron Microscope, the orientations of the delta phase were calculated.

  10. Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Data: Temperature profile, logs, schematic model and cross section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This dataset contains a variety of data about the Fort Bliss geothermal area, part of the southern portion of the Tularosa Basin, New Mexico. The dataset contains schematic models for the McGregor Geothermal System, a shallow temperature survey of the Fort Bliss geothermal area. The dataset also contains Century OH logs, a full temperature profile, and complete logs from well RMI 56-5, including resistivity and porosity data, drill logs with drill rate, depth, lithology, mineralogy, fractures, temperature, pit total, gases, and descriptions among other measurements as well as CDL, CNL, DIL, GR Caliper and Temperature files. A shallow (2 meter depth) temperature survey of the Fort Bliss geothermal area with 63 data points is also included. Two cross sections through the Fort Bliss area, also included, show well position and depth. The surface map included shows faults and well spatial distribution. Inferred and observed fault distributions from gravity surveys around the Fort Bliss geothermal area.

  11. Preparation of iridium targets by electrodeposition for neutron capture cross section measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bond, Evelyn M.; Moody, W. Allen; Arnold, Charles; Bredeweg, Todd A.; Jandel, Marian; Rusev, Gencho Y.

    2015-11-18

    Here, the preparation of 191Ir and 193Ir electrodeposits for neutron capture cross-section measurements at the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments located at the at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is described. The electrodeposition of iridium in the desired thickness of 0.4–1 mg/cm2 is challenging. Better yields and thicknesses were obtained using electrodeposition from isopropyl alcohol solutions than from ammonium sulfate solutions. 191Ir and 193Ir targets were initially prepared using the standard single-sided electrodeposition cell. Iridium electrodepositions using a double-sided electrodeposition cell were developed and were optimized, resulting in thick, uniform iridium deposits. LA UR 15-22475.

  12. Vibrational spectra of light and heavy water with application to neutron cross section calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damian, J. I. Marquez; Granada, J. R.; Malaspina, D. C.

    2013-07-14

    The design of nuclear reactors and neutron moderators require a good representation of the interaction of low energy (E < 1 eV) neutrons with hydrogen and deuterium containing materials. These models are based on the dynamics of the material, represented by its vibrational spectrum. In this paper, we show calculations of the frequency spectrum for light and heavy water at room temperature using two flexible point charge potentials: SPC-MPG and TIP4P/2005f. The results are compared with experimental measurements, with emphasis on inelastic neutron scattering data. Finally, the resulting spectra are applied to calculation of neutron scattering cross sections for these materials, which were found to be a significant improvement over library data.

  13. Columbia River monitoring: Summary of chemical monitoring along cross sections at Vernita Bridge and Richland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirkes, R.L.; Patton, G.W.; Tiller, B.L.

    1993-05-01

    This report presents the results of the chemical monitoring performed by the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) along cross sections of the Columbia River established at Vernita Bridge and the Richland Pumphouse. Potential Hanford-origin chemical constituents of interest were selected based on their presence in ground water near the river, past surveillance efforts that have documented their entry into the river, and reviews of special study reports, CERCIA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) documentation, RCRA facility investigation/corrective measure (FI/CW) study plans, and preliminary risk assessments. Results presented in this report include volatile organic compounds, metals, and anions. The data were generated as part of the routine Columbia River monitoring program currently conducted as part of the SESP.

  14. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neves, R. F. C.; Jones, D. B.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Ratnavelu, K.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15–250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties.

  15. Synthesis and Raman spectrum of crystalline indium oxide micro-rods with rectangular cross-section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Kavita Mehta, B. R. Singh, J. P.

    2014-04-24

    Indium oxide (IO) micro-rods with rectangular cross section were synthesized without catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system by carbothermal reduction of indium oxide at 900 °C. The rectangular micro-rods (RMRs) were grown on Si substrate in presence of water vapors and Ar atmosphere. Water was used as oxidizing reagent which controls the In/O stoichiometry in RMRs. The IO RMRs have dimensions of about 20 μm in length and about 1 μm width. The growth process involved in formation of RMRs is vapor-solid (VS) mechanism. Raman analysis was performed to obtain the phonon modes of the RMRs and the peaks of Raman spectrum were indexed to the modes being associated with bcc−In{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  16. Differential cross sections and recoil polarizations for the reaction γp→K+Σ0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; McCracken, M. E.; Williams, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; et al

    2010-08-06

    Here, high-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and recoil polarizations for the reactionmore » $$\\gamma p \\rightarrow K^+ \\Sigma^0$$ have been obtained using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies ($$\\sqrt{s}$$) from 1.69 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the $K^+$ production angle. Independent measurements were made using the $$K^{+}p\\pi^{-}$$($$\\gamma$$) and $$K^{+}p$$($$\\pi^-,\\gamma$$) final-state topologies, and were found to exhibit good agreement. Our differential cross sections show good agreement with earlier CLAS, SAPHIR and LEPS results, while offering better statistical precision and a 300-MeV increase in $$\\sqrt{s}$$ coverage. Above $$\\sqrt{s} \\approx 2.5$$ GeV, $t$- and $u$-channel Regge scaling behavior can be seen at forward- and backward-angles, respectively. Our recoil polarization ($$P_\\Sigma$$) measurements represent a substantial increase in kinematic coverage and enhanced precision over previous world data. At forward angles we find that $$P_\\Sigma$$ is of the same magnitude but opposite sign as $$P_\\Lambda$$, in agreement with the static SU(6) quark model prediction of $$P_\\Sigma \\approx -P_\\Lambda$$. This expectation is violated in some mid- and backward-angle kinematic regimes, where $$P_\\Sigma$$ and $$P_\\Lambda$$ are of similar magnitudes but also have the same signs. In conjunction with several other meson photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, the present data will help constrain the partial wave analyses being performed to search for missing baryon resonances.« less

  17. Measurements of the $ZZ$ production cross sections in the $2\\ell2\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-29

    Measurements of the ZZ production cross sections in proton–proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are presented. We found that candidate events for the leptonic decay mode ZZ → 2l2ν, where l denotes an electron or a muon, are reconstructed and selected from data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 (19.6)fb-1 at 7 (8) TeV collected with the CMS experiment. The measured cross sections, σ(pp → ZZ)=5.1+1.5-1.4(stat)+1.4-1.1(syst)±0.1(lumi)pb at 7 TeV, and 7.2+0.8-0.8(stat)+1.9-1.5(syst)±0.2(lumi)pb at 8 TeV, are in good agreement with the standard model predictions with next-to-leading-order accuracy. Furthermore, the selected data are analyzed to search for anomalous triple gauge couplings involving the ZZ final state. In the absence of any deviation from the standard model predictions, limits are set on the relevant parameters. As a result, these limits are then combined with the previously published CMS results for ZZ in 4l final states, yielding the most stringent constraints on the anomalous couplings.

  18. Synchrotron radiation based cross-sectional scanning photoelectron microscopy and spectroscopy of n-ZnO:Al/p-GaN:Mg heterojunction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kai-Hsuan; Chen, Chia-Hao; Chang, Ping-Chuan; Chen, Tse-Pu; Chang, Sheng-Po; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Kuang-Fu Rd. 101, 30013 Hsinchu, Taiwan

    2013-02-18

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) deposited by radio frequency co-sputtering is formed on epitaxial Mg-doped GaN template at room temperature to achieve n-AZO/p-GaN heterojunction. Alignment of AZO and GaN bands is investigated using synchrotron radiation based cross-sectional scanning photoelectron microscopy and spectroscopy on the nonpolar side-facet of a vertically c-axis aligned heterostructure. It shows type-II band configuration with valence band offset of 1.63 {+-} 0.1 eV and conduction band offset of 1.61 {+-} 0.1 eV, respectively. Rectification behavior is clearly observed, with a ratio of forward-to-reverse current up to six orders of magnitude when the bias is applied across the p-n junction.

  19. Temperature-Dependent, Linearly Interpolable, Tabulated Cross Section Library Based on ENDF/B-VI, Release 8.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-02-21

    Version 00 As distributed, the original evaluated data include cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications this library has been processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin. It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures,more » 1, 10, 100 eV, 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. POINT2004 contains all of the evaluations in the ENDF/B-VI general purpose library, which contains evaluations for 328 materials (isotopes or naturally occurring elemental mixtures of isotopes). No special purpose ENDF/B-VI libraries, such as fission products, thermal scattering, or photon interaction data are included. The majority of these evaluations are complete, in the sense that they include all cross sections over the energy range 10-5 eV to at least 20 MeV. However, the following are only partial evaluations that either contain only single reactions and no total cross section (Mg24, K41, Ti46, Ti47, Ti48, Ti50 and Ni59), or do not include energy dependent cross sections above the resonance region (Ar40, Mo92, Mo98, Mo100, In115, Sn120, Sn122 and Sn124). The CCC-638/TART20002 code package is recommended for use with these data. Codes within TART can be used to display these data or to run calculations using these data.« less

  20. A Temperature-Dependent, Linearly Interpolable, Tabulated Cross Section Library Based on ENDF/B-VI, Release 7.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-06-13

    Version 00 As distributed, the original evaluated data include cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in applications, these ENDF/B-VI, Release 7 data were processed into the form of temperature dependent cross sections at eight temperatures between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolablemore » in energy. POINT2000 contains all of the evaluations in the ENDF/B-VI general purpose library, which contains evaluations for 324 materials (isotopes or naturally occurring elemental mixtures of isotopes). No special purpose ENDF/B-VI libraries, such as fission products, thermal scattering, photon interaction data are included. The majority of these evaluations are complete, in the sense that they include all cross sections over the energy range 10-5 eV to at least 20 MeV. However, the following are only partial evaluations that either only contain single reactions and no total cross section (Mg24, K41, Ti46, Ti47, Ti48, Ti50 and Ni59), or do not include energy dependent cross sections above the resonance region (Ar40, Mo92, Mo98, Mo100, In115, Sn120, Sn122 and Sn124). The CCC-638/TART96 code package will soon be updated to TART2000, which is recommended for use with these data. Codes within TART2000 can be used to display these data or to run calculations using these data.« less

  1. Cross-sectional relationships of exercise and age to adiposity in60,617 male runners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Paul T.; Pate, Russell R.

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this report is to assess in men whether exercise affects the estimated age-related increase in adiposity, and contrariwise, whether age affects the estimated exercise-related decrease in adiposity. Cross-sectional analyses of 64,911 male runners who provided data on their body mass index (97.6 percent), waist (91.1 percent), hip (47.1 percent), and chest circumferences (77.9 percent). Between 18 to 55 years old, the decline in BMI with weekly distance run (slope+-SE) was significantly greater in men 25-55 years old (slope+-:-0.036+-0.001 kg/m2 per km/wk) than in younger men (-0.020+-0.002 kg/m 2 per km/wk). Declines in waist circumference with running distance were also significantly greater in older than younger men (P<10-9 for trend),i.e., the slopes decreased progressively from -0.035+-0.004 cm per km/wk in 18-25 year old men to -0.097+-0.003 cm per km/wk in 50-55 year old men. Increases in BMI with age were greater for men who ran under 16km/wk than for longer distance runners. Waist circumference increased with age at all running levels, but the increase appeared to diminish by running further (0.259+-0.015 cm per year if running<8 km/wk and 0.154+-0.003 cm per year for>16 km/wk). In men over 50 years old, BMI declined -0.038+-0.001 kg/m2 per km/wk run when adjusted for age and declined -0.054+-0.003 kg/m2 (increased 0.021+-0.007 cm) per year of age when adjusted for running distance. Their waist circumference declined-0.096+-0.002 cm per km/wk run when adjusted for age and increased 0.021+-0.007 cm per year of age when adjusted for running distance. These cross-sectional data suggest that age and vigorous exercise interact with each other in affecting mens adiposity, and support the proposition that vigorous physical activity must increase with age to prevent middle-age weight gain. We estimate that a man who ran 16 km/wk at age 25 would need to increase their weekly running distance by 65.7 km/wk by age 50 in order to maintain his same waist

  2. Gadolinium-148 production cross section measurements for 600-and 800-MEV protons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, K. C.; Devlin, M. J.; Pitcher, E. J.; Mashnik, S. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2004-01-01

    In a series of experiments at LANSCE's WNR facility, {sup 148}Gd production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 {mu}m thin W, Ta, and Au foils and 10 {mu}m thin Al activation foils. Gadolinium spallation yields were determined from these foils using alpha spectroscopy and compared with the LANL codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. When heavy metal targets, such as tungsten, are bombarded with protons greater than a few hundred MeV many different nuclides are produced. These nuclides are both stable and radioactive and are created by spallation, proton activation, or secondary reactions with neutrons and other nuclear particles made in the target. These products are distributed somewhat heterogeneously throughout a thick target because of the energy dependence of the cross sections and energy loss of the proton beam within the target. From this standpoint, it is difficult to measure nuclide production cross sections for a given energy proton in a thick target. At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility and 1L target at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. DOE requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on radionuclide inventories in the target as a means of determining the 'nuclear facility' category level. Presently, WNR's Target 4 is a non-nuclear facility while the Lujan 1L target is classified as a Category 3 nuclear facility. Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten and other heavy elements. Allowable isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of {sup 148}Gd is generally low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total inhalation dose burden in an accident

  3. COMBINE7.0 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2008-09-01

    COMBINE7.0 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.0 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 finegroup cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B-3 or B-1 approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko selfshielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. The fine group cross sections in the thermal energy range are replaced by those selfshielded with the Amouyal/Benoist/Horowitz method in the three region geometry when this option is requested. COMBINE7.0 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constant may be output in any of several standard formats including ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a onedimensional, discrete

  4. COMBINE7.1 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2009-08-01

    COMBINE7.1 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.1 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 fine-group cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B-3 or B-1 approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko self-shielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. The fine group cross sections in the thermal energy range are replaced by those self-shielded with the Amouyal/Benoist/Horowitz method in the three region geometry when this option is requested. COMBINE7.1 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constant may be output in any of several standard formats including ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a one-dimensional, discrete

  5. Upsilon production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7  TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2011-06-15

    The Υ(1S), Υ(2S), and Υ(3S) production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV are measured using a data sample collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.1±0.3 pb⁻¹. Integrated over the rapidity range |y|<2, we find the product of the Υ(1S) production cross section and branching fraction to dimuons to be σ(pp→Υ(1S)X) · B(Υ(1S)→μ⁺μ⁻)=7.37±0.13+0.61-0.42±0.81 nb, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is associated with the estimation of the integrated luminosity of the data sample. This cross section is obtained assuming unpolarized Υ(1S) production. With themore » assumption of fully transverse or fully longitudinal production polarization, the measured cross section changes by about 20%. We also report the measurement of the Υ(1S), Υ(2S), and Υ(3S) differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity.« less

  6. Correction of the near threshold behavior of electron collisional excitation cross-sections in the plane-wave Born approximation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Brookes, S.

    2013-08-19

    The modeling of NLTE plasmas requires the solution of population rate equations to determine the populations of the various atomic levels relevant to a particular problem. The equations require many cross sections for excitation, de-excitation, ionization and recombination. Additionally, a simple and computational fast way to calculate electron collisional excitation cross-sections for ions is by using the plane-wave Born approximation. This is essentially a high-energy approximation and the cross section suffers from the unphysical problem of going to zero near threshold. Various remedies for this problem have been employed with varying degrees of success. We present a correction procedure formore » the Born cross-sections that employs the Elwert–Sommerfeld factor to correct for the use of plane waves instead of Coulomb waves in an attempt to produce a cross-section similar to that from using the more time consuming Coulomb Born approximation. We compare this new approximation with other, often employed correction procedures. Furthermore, we also look at some further modifications to our Born Elwert procedure and its combination with Y.K. Kim's correction of the Coulomb Born approximation for singly charged ions that more accurately approximate convergent close coupling calculations.« less

  7. Measurement of the Inclusive Upsilon production cross section in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-06-01

    The Upsilon production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is measured using a data sample collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.1 +/- 0.3 inverse picobarns. Integrated over the rapidity range |y|<2, we find the product of the Upsilon(1S) production cross section and branching fraction to dimuons to be sigma(pp to Upsilon(1S) X) B(Upsilon(1S) to mu+ mu-) = 7.37 +/- 0.13^{+0.61}_{-0.42}\\pm 0.81 nb, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is associated with the estimation of the integrated luminosity of the data sample. This cross section is obtained assuming unpolarized Upsilon(1S) production. If the Upsilon(1S) production polarization is fully transverse or fully longitudinal the cross section changes by about 20%. We also report the measurement of the Upsilon(1S), Upsilon(2S), and Upsilon(3S) differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity.

  8. LWR First Recycle of TRU with Thorium Oxide for Transmutation and Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Alfonsi; Gilles Youinou

    2012-07-01

    Thorium has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (thorium is approximately three times more plentiful than uranium) and as a result of concerns about proliferation and waste management (e.g. reduced production of plutonium, etc.). Since the average composition of natural Thorium is dominated (100%) by the fertile isotope Th-232, Thorium is only useful as a resource for breeding new fissile materials, in this case U-233. Consequently a certain amount of fissile material must be present at the start-up of the reactor in order to guarantee its operation. The thorium fuel can be used in both once-through and recycle options, and in both fast and thermal spectrum systems. The present study has been aimed by the necessity of investigating the option of using reprocessed plutonium/TRU, from a once-through reference LEU scenario (50 GWd/ tIHM), mixed with natural thorium and the need of collect data (mass fractions, cross-sections etc.) for this particular fuel cycle scenario. As previously pointed out, the fissile plutonium is needed to guarantee the operation of the reactor. Four different scenarios have been considered: • Thorium – recycled Plutonium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium/Americium; • Thorium – recycled Transuranic. The calculations have been performed with SCALE6.1-TRITON.

  9. LWR First Recycle of TRU with Thorium Oxide for Transmutation and Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Alfonsi; Gilles Youinou; Sonat Sen

    2013-02-01

    Thorium has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (thorium is approximately three times more plentiful than uranium) and as a result of concerns about proliferation and waste management (e.g. reduced production of plutonium, etc.). Since the average composition of natural Thorium is dominated (100%) by the fertile isotope Th-232, Thorium is only useful as a resource for breeding new fissile materials, in this case U-233. Consequently a certain amount of fissile material must be present at the start-up of the reactor in order to guarantee its operation. The thorium fuel can be used in both once-through and recycle options, and in both fast and thermal spectrum systems. The present study has been aimed by the necessity of investigating the option of using reprocessed plutonium/TRU, from a once-through reference LEU scenario (50 GWd/ tIHM), mixed with natural thorium and the need of collect data (mass fractions, cross-sections etc.) for this particular fuel cycle scenario. As previously pointed out, the fissile plutonium is needed to guarantee the operation of the reactor. Four different scenarios have been considered: • Thorium – recycled Plutonium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium; • Thorium – recycled Plutonium/Neptunium/Americium; • Thorium – recycled Transuranic. The calculations have been performed with SCALE6.1-TRITON.

  10. MENDF71x. Multigroup Neutron Cross Section Data Tables Based upon ENDF/B-VII.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Parsons, Donald Kent; Gardiner, Steven J.; Gray, Mark Girard; Lee, Mary Beth; White, Morgan Curtis

    2015-12-17

    A new multi-group neutron cross section library has been released along with the release of NDI version 2.0.20. The library is named MENDF71x and is based upon the evaluations released in ENDF/B-VII.1 which was made publicly available in December 2011. ENDF/B-VII.1 consists of 423 evaluations of which ten are excited states evaluations and 413 are ground state evaluations. MENDF71x was created by processing the 423 evaluations into 618-group, downscatter only NDI data tables. The ENDF/B evaluation files were processed using NJOY version 99.393 with the exception of 35Cl and 233U. Those two isotopes had unique properties that required that we process the evaluation using NJOY version 2012. The MENDF71x library was only processed to room temperature, i.e., 293.6 K. In the future, we plan on producing a multi-temperature library based on ENDF/B-VII.1 and compatible with MENDF71x.

  11. Differential cross sections for gamma + p --> K^+ + Y for Lambda and Sigma^0 hyperons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Bradford; R.A. Schumacher; J.W.C. McNabb; L. Todor; et. Al.

    2005-09-29

    High-statistics cross sections for the reactions {gamma} + p {yields} K{sup +} + {Lambda} and {gamma} + p {yields} K{sup +} + {Sigma}{sup 0} have been measured using CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies W between 1.6 and 2.53 GeV, and for -0.85 < cos {theta}{sub K{sup +}}{sup c.m.} < +0.95. In the K{sup +}{Lambda} channel we confirm a resonance-like structure near W=1.9 GeV at backward kaon angles. The position and width of this structure change with angle, indicating that more than one resonance is likely playing a role. The K{sup +} {Lambda} channel at forward angles and all energies is well described by a t-channel scaling characteristic of Regge exchange, while the same scaling applied to the K{sup +} {Sigma}{sup 0} channel is less successful. Several existing theoretical models are compared to the data, but none provide a good representation of the results.

  12. Review and Assessment of Neutron Cross Section and Nubar Covariances for Advanced Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maslov,V.M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman, M.

    2008-12-01

    In January 2007, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) produced a set of preliminary neutron covariance data for the international project 'Nuclear Data Needs for Advanced Reactor Systems'. The project was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Paris, under the Subgroup 26 of the International Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). These preliminary covariances are described in two recent BNL reports. The NNDC used a simplified version of the method developed by BNL and LANL that combines the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances, the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE and the Bayesian code KALMAN with the experimental data used as guidance. There are numerous issues involved in these estimates of covariances and it was decided to perform an independent review and assessment of these results so that better covariances can be produced for the revised version in future. Reviewed and assessed are uncertainties for fission, capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and (n,2n) cross sections as well as prompt nubars for 15 minor actinides ({sup 233,234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,240,241,242}Pu, {sup 241,242m,243}Am and {sup 242,243,244,245}Cm) and 4 major actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U and {sup 239}Pu). We examined available evaluations, performed comparison with experimental data, taken into account uncertainties in model parameterization and made use state-of-the-art nuclear reaction theory to produce the uncertainty assessment.

  13. The use of balanced cross sections to design the Cymric/McKittrick area Tulare steamfloods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J.F. )

    1991-02-01

    Recently developed techniques of cross section balancing by the kink method are being used to precisely define the structure of the Tulare Formation fold belt in one area of the Cymric/McKittrick Oil field, San joaquin Valley, California. The Tulare fold belt is a series of northeast-verging, fault-propagation folds that are detached near the base of the Tulare Formation. Good sand continuity and a detailed understanding of the reservoir structural geometry is necessary for successful steamflooding, requiring a rigorous method of structural interpretation to precisely define this highly-folded area. Because of reservoir depletion over the crest of anticlines in Cymric, experience has shown that the most successful steamflood configuration is a staggered line drive with both the producers and injectors located as close to the synclinal axes as possible. This promotes maximum heating and drainage of the reservoir. This configuration is most effective in steeply-dipping reservoirs, although producers downdip of injectors produce the most oil and experience the least amount of steam break-through even in fairly moderately dipping (20{degree}) reservoirs.

  14. The T2K CCQE selection and prospects for CCQE, NCE cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruterbories, Daniel

    2015-05-15

    A better understanding of the charge current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interaction channel will lead to a more precise ?{sub e} appearance and ?{sub ?} disappearance measurement at T2K. Measurements looking at the CCQE interaction using the near detector complex (ND280) help constrain cross-section uncertainties as well as the flux prediction at the far detector, Super-Kamiokande. The presented CCQE analysis is derived from a CC-inclusive selection using the tracking portion of ND280. The inclusive sample is broken into a CCQE-enhanced and CC non-QE like sample and each sample is used to constrain various parameters used for the far detector prediction. Future CCQE analyses using the tracker will either use the current selection or investigate newer selections for 2 track topologies. The neutral current equivalent to CCQE, neutral current elastic scattering (NCE), is being investigated using the pi-zero detector (POD). The NCE analysis selects a contained single track sample using muon/proton particle identification.

  15. Gamma-ray production cross sections from neutron interactions with iron.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R. O.; Laymon, C. M.; Wender, S. A.; Drake, D. M.; Drosg, Manfred; Bobias, S. G.; McGrath, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    The initial purpose of this experiment was to provide a consistent data base of neutron-induced gamma-ray production cross sections over a large energy range for use in estimating elemental composition of the martian surface by observing gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions on the planet's surface [Bo02]. However, these data should be useful for other projects such as oil-well logging, accelerator transmutation of nuclear waste, shielding calculations, gamma-ray heating for nuclear reactors and verification of nuclear model calculations and databases. The goal of the measurements was to collect data on the strongest gamma rays from many samples of interest. Because of the available beam time this meant that many of the measurcments were rather short. Despite the short running time the large samples used and the good beam intensity resulted in very satisfactory results. The samples, chosen mainly as common constituents of rock and soil and measured in the same few week period, include: B&, BN, C, Al, Mg, Si, S, Cay Ti, Cr, Mn, and Fe. Be was also used as a neutron scatterer that only produces one gamma ray (478 keV from 7Li) with appreciable intensity. Thus Be can serve as a measure of neutron-induced backgrounds. In this first paper we present results for Fe.

  16. Processing of Double-Differential Cross Sections in the New ENDF-VI Format.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1987-08-28

    Version 00 GROUPXS does file handling and processing of the double-differential continuum-emission cross sections stored in the new MF6 format of ENDF/VI. It treats the energy-angle data that are supposed to be represented by a Legendre-polynomial expansion in the center-of-mass system and can do the following: (1) Conversion of MF6 data from center-of-mass system to the laboratory system, with the possibility to continue the calculation with the options (2), (3), and (4). (2) Conversion ofmore » Legendre-polynomial representation into point-wise angular data, in MF6 format. (3) Conversion of data from MF6 into MF4 + MF5 (ENDF-V). (4) Calculation of group constants, scattering matrices and transfer matrices for arbitrary group structures with a fusion micro-flux weighting spectrum (PN-approximation). The code treats only continuum reaction types that are stored in the MF6 format with the restrictions as specified for the European Fusion File (EFF1). These restrictions are not inconvenient for the purpose of fusion neutronics calculations and they facilitate relatively simple processing .« less

  17. Cross-sectional electrostatic force microscopy of thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballif, C.; Moutinho, H. R.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2001-01-15

    In a recent work, we showed that atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful technique to image cross sections of polycrystalline thin films. In this work, we apply a modification of AFM, namely, electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), to investigate the electronic properties of cleaved II--VI and multijunction thin-film solar cells. We cleave the devices in such a way that they are still working with their nominal photovoltaic efficiencies and can be polarized for the measurements. This allows us to differentiate between surface effects (work function and surface band bending) and bulk device properties. In the case of polycrystalline CdTe/CdS/SnO{sub 2}/glass solar cells, we find a drop of the EFM signal in the area of the CdTe/CdS interface ({+-}50 nm). This drop varies in amplitude and sign according to the applied external bias and is compatible with an n-CdS/p-CdTe heterojunction model, thereby invalidating the possibility of a deeply buried n-p CdTe homojunction. In the case of a triple-junction GaInP/GaAs/Ge device, we observe a variation of the EFM signal linked to both the material work-function differences and to the voltage bias applied to the cell. We attempt a qualitative explanation of the results and discuss the implications and difficulties of the EFM technique for the study of such thin-film devices.

  18. Anisotropic fibrous thermal insulator of relatively thick cross section and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Carl D.; Ardary, Zane L.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an anisotropic thermal insulator formed of carbon-bonded organic or inorganic fibers and having a thickness or cross section greater than about 3 centimeters. Delaminations and deleterious internal stresses generated during binder curing and carbonizing operations employed in the fabrication of thick fibrous insulation of thicknesses greater than 3 centimeters are essentially obviated by the method of the present invention. A slurry of fibers, thermosetting resin binder and water is vacuum molded into the selected insulator configuration with the total thickness of the molded slurry being less than about 3 centimeters, the binder is thermoset to join the fibers together at their nexaes, and then the binder is carbonized to form the carbon bond. A second slurry of the fibers, binder and water is then applied over the carbonized body with the vacuum molding, binder thermosetting and carbonizing steps being repeated to form a layered insulator with the binder providing a carbon bond between the layers. The molding, thermosetting and carbonizing steps may be repeated with additional slurries until the thermal insulator is of the desired final thickness. An additional feature of the present invention is provided by incorporating opacifying materials in any of the desired layers so as to provide different insulating properties at various temperatures. Concentration and/or type of additive can be varied from layer-to-layer.

  19. Differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of phenol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neves, R. F. C.; Jones, D. B.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L.; Silva, G. B. da; Duque, H. V.; Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; and others

    2015-03-14

    We report results from a joint theoretical and experimental investigation into electron scattering from the important organic species phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH. The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 15–40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10{sup ∘} and 90{sup ∘}. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ∼80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potentials calculations, with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were conducted at the static exchange plus polarisation (SEP)-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOBSCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was typically fair, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOBSCI.

  20. Graphene based tunable fractal Hilbert curve array broadband radar absorbing screen for radar cross section reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xianjun; Hu, Zhirun; Liu, Peiguo

    2014-11-15

    This paper proposes a new type of graphene based tunable radar absorbing screen. The absorbing screen consists of Hilbert curve metal strip array and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene sheet. The graphene based screen is not only tunable when the chemical potential of the graphene changes, but also has broadband effective absorption. The absorption bandwidth is from 8.9GHz to 18.1GHz, ie., relative bandwidth of more than 68%, at chemical potential of 0eV, which is significantly wider than that if the graphene sheet had not been employed. As the chemical potential varies from 0 to 0.4eV, the central frequency of the screen can be tuned from 13.5GHz to 19.0GHz. In the proposed structure, Hilbert curve metal strip array was designed to provide multiple narrow band resonances, whereas the graphene sheet directly underneath the metal strip array provides tunability and averagely required surface resistance so to significantly extend the screen operation bandwidth by providing broadband impedance matching and absorption. In addition, the thickness of the screen has been optimized to achieve nearly the minimum thickness limitation for a nonmagnetic absorber. The working principle of this absorbing screen is studied in details, and performance under various incident angles is presented. This work extends applications of graphene into tunable microwave radar cross section (RCS) reduction applications.

  1. Calculation of complete fusion cross sections of heavy ion reactions using the Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghodsi, O. N.; Mahmoodi, M.; Ariai, J.

    2007-03-15

    The nucleus-nucleus potential for the fusion reactions {sup 40}Ca+{sup 48}Ca, {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb, and {sup 48}Ca+{sup 48}Ca has been calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The results obtained indicate that the technique employed for the calculation of the nucleus-nucleus potential is an efficient one. The effects of the spin and the isospin terms have also been studied using the same technique. The analysis of the results obtained for the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 48}Ca reaction reveal that the isospin-dependent term in the nucleon-nucleon potential causes the nuclear potential to drop by an amount of 0.5 MeV. The analytical calculations of the fusion cross section, particularly those at energies less than the fusion barrier, are in good agreement with the experimental data. In these calculations the effective nucleon-nucleon potential chosen is of the M3Y-Paris potential form and no adjustable parameter has been used.

  2. Deducing the 237U(n,f) cross-section using the Surrogate Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, J T; Bernstein, L A; Escher, J; Ahle, L; Church, J A; Dietrich, F; Moody, K J; Norman, E B; Phair, L W; Fallon, P; Clark, R; Delaplanque, M; Descovich, M; Cromaz, M; Lee, I Y; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moretto, L G; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Stephens, F S

    2005-08-16

    The authors have deduced the {sup 237}U(n,f) cross-section over an equivalent neutron energy range of 0 to 20 MeV using the Surrogate Ratio method. A 55 MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+} beam from the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was used to induce fission in the following reactions {sup 238}U({alpha},{alpha}'f) and {sup 236}U({alpha},{alpha}'f). The {sup 238}U reaction was a surrogate for {sup 237}U(n,f) and the {sup 236}U reaction was used as a surrogate for {sup 235}U(n,f). The energies of the scattered alpha particles were detected in a fully depleted segmented silicon telescope array (STARS) over an angle range of 35{sup o} to 60{sup o} with respect to the beam axis. The fission fragments were detected in a third independent silicon detector located at backward angles between 106{sup o} to 131{sup o}.

  3. Prediction of the energy dependence of molecular fragmentation cross sections for collisions of swift protons with ethane and acetylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, Remigio; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, Erik; Oehrn, Yngve

    2005-04-01

    We report the energy-dependent fragmentation cross sections for several of the more likely fragmentation channels for protons with up to 10 keV impact energy colliding with acetylene and ethane. We find that the predominant channels are those which involve the dissociation of a carbon-hydrogen bond, and we find that the cross sections for these channels are maximum in the low-projectile-energy region. The cross sections for fragmentation involving dissociation of a C-C bond are an order of magnitude smaller and peak at somewhat higher projectile energy. Although there are no experimental values with which to compare, it appears that selection of projectile energy can be used to influence branching ratios in proton-hydrocarbon collisions and, by implication, in other ion-molecule and atom-molecule collisions.

  4. Measurement of the B⁰ Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2011-06-20

    Measurements of the differential production cross sections dσ/dpBT and dσ/dyB for B⁰ mesons produced in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV are presented. The data set used was collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 40 pb⁻¹. The production cross section is measured from B⁰ meson decays reconstructed in the exclusive final state J/ψK0S, with the subsequent decays J/ψ→μ⁺μ⁻ and K0S→π⁺π⁻. The total cross section for pBT>5 GeV and |yB|<2.2 is measured to be 33.2±2.5±3.5 μb, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  5. The extraction of Φ–N total cross section from d(γ,pK+K-)n

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qian, X.; Chen, W.; Gao, H.; Hicks, K.; Kramer, K.; Laget, J. M.; Mibe, T.; Stepanyan, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Xu, W.; et al

    2009-10-01

    We report on the first measurement of the differential cross section ofmore » $$\\phi$$-meson photoproduction for the $$d(\\gamma,pK^{+}K^{-})n$$ exclusive reaction channel. The experiment was performed using a \\textcolor{black}{tagged-photon} beam and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. A combined analysis using data from the $$d(\\gamma,pK^{+}K^{-})n$$ channel and those from a previous publication on coherent $$\\phi$$ production on the deuteron has been carried out to extract the $$\\phi-N$$ total cross section, $$\\sigma_{\\phi N}$$. The extracted $$\\phi-N$$ total cross section favors a value above 20 mb. This value is larger than the value extracted using vector-meson dominance models for $$\\phi$$ photoproduction on the proton.« less

  6. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-07-01

    The authors present a new measurement of the production cross section σ(pp = ZZ) at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, obtained from the analysis of the four charged lepton final state ℓ+ℓ-ℓ`+ℓ`-(ℓ, ℓ` = e or μ). They observe ten candidate events with an expected background of 0.37 ± 0.13 events. The measured cross section σ(pp =ZZ) = 1.26-0.37+0.47 (stat) ± 0.14 (syst) pb is in agreement with NLO QCD predictions. This result is combined with a previous result from the ZZ = ℓ+ℓ- νν channel resulting in a combined cross section of σ(pp = ZZ) = 1.40-0.37-0.43more » (stat) ±0.14 (syst) pb.« less

  7. Inclusive b-hadron production cross section with muons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    A measurement of the b-hadron production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV is presented. The dataset, corresponding to 85 inverse nanobarns, was recorded with the CMS experiment at the LHC using a low-threshold single-muon trigger. Events are selected by the presence of a muon with transverse momentum greater than 6 GeV with respect to the beam direction and pseudorapidity less than 2.1. The transverse momentum of the muon with respect to the closest jet discriminates events containing b hadrons from background. The inclusive b-hadron production cross section is presented as a function of muon transverse momentum and pseudorapidity. The measured total cross section in the kinematic acceptance is sigma(pp to b+X to mu + X') =1.32 +/- 0.01 (stat) +/- 0.30 (syst) +/- 0.15 (lumi) microbarns.

  8. Cross section for the reaction ({gamma},n) on heavy nuclei in the energy region of the giant quadrupole resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaev, S.N.; Vasiliev, O.V.; Nechkin, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    The yields of photoneutrons from {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi nuclei are measured in experiments with a bremsstrahlung beam whose endpoint energy lies in the range 7-26 MeV. The data in the range 20-26 MeV are analyzed to obtain information about the structure and parameters of the giant quadrupole resonance. The parameters of Gaussians approximating the shape of cross sections are determined. This makes it possible to estimate the contributions of states forming structures in the integrated cross sections. Experimental cross sections for {sup 208}Pb are compared with the strength functions of photoexcitation of 1{sup {minus}} and 2{sup +} states. These strength functions are calculated in the quasiparticle-phonon model. 43 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Integral cross section measurement of the U 235 ( n , n ' ) U 235 m reaction in a pulsed reactor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bélier, G.; Bond, E. M.; Vieira, D. J.; Authier, N.; Becker, J. A.; Hyneck, D.; Jacquet, X.; Jansen, Y.; Legendre, J.; Macri, R.; et al

    2015-04-08

    The integral measurement of the neutron inelastic cross section leading to the 26-minute half-life 235mU isomer in a fission-like neutron spectrum is presented. The experiment has been performed at a pulsed reactor, where the internal conversion decay of the isomer was measured using a dedicated electron detector after activation. The sample preparation, efficiency measurement, irradiation, radiochemistry purification, and isomer decay measurement will be presented. We determined the integral cross section for the ²³⁵U(n,n')235mU reaction to be 1.00±0.13b. This result supports an evaluation performed with TALYS-1.4 code with respect to the isomer excitation as well as the total neutron inelastic scatteringmore » cross section.« less

  10. Updated Users' Guide for RSAP -- A Code for Display and Manipulation of Neutron Cross Section Data and SAMMY Fit Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayer, R.O.

    2003-07-29

    RSAP [1] is a computer code for display and manipulation of neutron cross section data and selected SAMMY output. SAMMY [2] is a multilevel R-matrix code for fitting neutron time-of-flight cross-section data using Bayes' method. This users' guide provides documentation for the recently updated RSAP code (version 6). The code has been ported to the Linux platform, and several new features have been added, including the capability to read cross section data from ASCII pointwise ENDF files as well as double-precision PLT output from SAMMY. A number of bugs have been found and corrected, and the input formats have been improved. Input items are parsed so that items may be separated by spaces or commas.

  11. Experimental Cross Sections for Reactions of Heavy Ions and 208Pb, 209Bi, 238U, and 248Cm Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patin, Joshua B.

    2002-05-24

    The study of the reactions between heavy ions and {sup 208}Pb, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 238}U, and {sup 248} Cm targets was performed to look at the differences between the cross sections of hot and cold fusion reactions. Experimental cross sections were compared with predictions from statistical computer codes to evaluate the effectiveness of the computer code in predicting production cross sections. Hot fusion reactions were studied with the MG system, catcher foil techniques and the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS). 3n- and 4n-exit channel production cross sections were obtained for the {sup 238}U({sup 18}O,xn){sup 256-x}Fm, {sup 238}U({sup 22}Ne,xn){sup 260-x}No, and {sup 248}Cm({sup 15}N,xn){sup 263-x}Lr reactions and are similar to previous experimental results. The experimental cross sections were accurately modeled by the predictions of the HIVAP code using the Reisdorf and Schaedel parameters and are consistent with the existing systematics of 4n exit channel reaction products. Cold fusion reactions were examined using the BGS. The {sup 208}Pb({sup 48}Ca,xn){sup 256-x}No, {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti,xn){sup 258-x}Rf, {sup 208}Pb({sup 51}V,xn){sup 259-x}Db, {sup 209}Bi({sup 50}Ti,xn){sup 259-x}Db, and {sup 209}Bi({sup 51}V,xn){sup 260-x}Sg reactions were studied. The experimental production cross sections are in agreement with the results observed in previous experiments. It was necessary to slightly alter the Reisdorf and Schaedel parameters for use in the HIVAP code in order to more accurately model the experimental data. The cold fusion experimental results are in agreement with current 1n- and 2n-exit channel systematics.

  12. Measurement of the Inclusive Jet Cross Section in pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2011-09-19

    The inclusive jet cross section is measured in pp collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider using the CMS experiment. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 34 pb⁻¹. The measurement is made for jet transverse momenta in the range 18–1100 GeV and for absolute values of rapidity less than 3. The measured cross section extends to the highest values of jet pT ever observed and, within the experimental and theoretical uncertainties, is generally in agreement with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD predictions.

  13. Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section at ?s=57 TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almeda, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anti?i?, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Buml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belltoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blmer, H.; Boh?ov, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceio, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; del Ro, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Daz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; DOlivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; DUrso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filip?i?, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Frhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garca, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gmez Berisso, M.; Gonalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hrandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsk, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kgl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krmer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leo, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lpez, R.; Lopez Agera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martnez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mi?anovi?, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostaf, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mller, G.; Mnchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Noka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlger, J.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; P?kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.

    2012-08-10

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [50522(stat)+28-36(syst)] mb is found.

  14. Compact Cross-Dipole Sonic (CXD) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sonic (CXD) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Compact Cross-Dipole Sonic (CXD) Author Weatherford Published Publisher Not...

  15. DSI Dipole Shear Sonic Imager | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for DSI Dipole Shear Sonic Imager Citation Schlumberger. DSI Dipole Shear Sonic...

  16. Report on 240Am(n,x) surrogate cross section test measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ressler, J J; Burke, J T; Gostic, J; Bleuel, D; Escher, J E; Henderson, R A; Koglin, J; Reed, T; Scielzo, N D; Stoyer, M A

    2012-02-01

    The main goal of the test measurement was to determine the feasibility of the {sup 243}Am(p,t) reaction as a surrogate for {sup 240}Am(n,f). No data cross section data exists for neutron induced reactions on {sup 240}Am; the half-life of this isotope is only 2.1 days making direct measurements difficult, if not impossible. The 48-hour experiment was conducted using the STARS/LIBERACE experimental facility located at the 88 Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in August 2011. A description of the experiment and results is given. The beam energy was initially chosen to be 39 MeV in order to measure an equivalent neutron energy range from 0 to 20 MeV. However, the proton beam was not stopped in the farady cup and the beam was deposited in the surrounding shielding material. The shielding material was not conductive, and a beam current, needed for proper tuning of the beam as well as experimental monitoring, could not be read. If the {sup 240}Am(n,f) surrogate experiment is to be run at LBNL, simple modifications to the beam collection site will need to be made. The beam energy was reduced to 29 MeV, which was within an energy regime of prior experiments and tuning conditions at STARS/LIBERACE. At this energy, the beam current was successfully tuned and measured. At 29 MeV, data was collected with both the {sup 243}Am and {sup 238}U targets. An example particle identification plot is shown in Fig. 1. The triton-fission coincidence rate for the {sup 243}Am target and {sup 238}U target were measured. Coincidence rates of 0.0233(1) cps and 0.150(6) cps were observed for the {sup 243}Am and {sup 238}U targets, respectively. The difference in count rate is largely attributed to the available target material - the {sup 238}U target contains approximately 7 times more atoms than the {sup 243}Am. A proton beam current of {approx}0.7 nA was used for measurements on both targets. Assuming a full experimental run under similar conditions, an estimate for the

  17. Measurement of Differential Cross-Sections in the ttbar -> l+jets Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvita, J.; /Charles U.

    2009-04-01

    The analysis presented in this thesis focuses on kinematic distributions in the t{bar t} system and studies in detail selected differential cross sections of top quarks as well as the reconstructed t{bar t} pair, namely the top quark transverse momentum and the t{bar t} system mass. The structure of the thesis is organized as follows: first the Standard Model of the particle physics is briefly introduced in Chapter 1, with relevant aspects of electroweak and strong interactions discussed. The physics of the top quark and its properties are then outlined in Chapter 2, together with the motivation for measuring the transverse top quark momentum and other kinematic-related variables of the t{bar t} system. The concepts of present-day high energy physics collider experiments and the explicit example of Fermilab Tevatron collider and the D0 detector in Chapters 3 and 4 are followed by the description of basic detector-level objects, i.e. tracks, leptons and jets, in Chapter 5; their identification and calibration following in next chapter with the emphasis on the jet energy scale in Chapter 6 and jet identification at the D0. The analysis itself is outlined in Chapter 7 and is structured so that first the data and simulation samples and the basic preselection are described in Chapter 8 and 9, followed by the kinematic reconstruction part in Chapter 10. Chapter 11 on background normalization and Chapter 12 with raw reconstructed spectra results (at the detector-smeared level) are followed by the purity-based background subtraction method and examples of signal-level corrected spectra in Chapter 13. Next, the procedure of correcting measured spectra for detector effects (unfolding) is described in Chapters 14-15, including migration matrix studies, acceptance correction determination as well as the regularized unfolding procedure itself. Final differential cross sections are presented in Chapter 16 with the main results in Figures 16.19-16.20. Summary and discussion close

  18. Measurement of the top pair production cross section at CDF using neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marginean, Radu

    2004-11-01

    In the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab protons and antiprotons are collided at a 1.96 TeV center of mass energy. CDF and D0 are the two experiments currently operating at the Tevatron. At these energies top quark is mostly produced via strong interactions as a top anti-top pair (t{bar t}). The top quark has an extremely short lifetime and according to the Standard Model it decays with {approx} 100% probability into a b quark and a W boson. In the ''lepton+jets'' channel, the signal from top pair production is detected for those events where one of the two W bosons decays hadronically in two quarks which we see as jets in the detector, and the other W decays into an electrically charged lepton and a neutrino. A relatively unambiguous identification in the detector is possible when we require that the charged lepton must be an electron or muon of either charge. The neutrino does not interact in the detector and its presence is inferred from an imbalance in the transverse energy of the event. They present a measurement of the top pair production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV, from a data sample collected at CDF between March 2002 and September 2003 with an integrated luminosity of 193.5 pb{sup -1}. In order to bring the signal to background ratio at manageable levels, measurements in this channel traditionally use precision tracking information to identify at least one secondary vertex produced in the decay of a long lived b hadron. A different approach is taken here. Because of the large mass of the top quark, t{bar t} events tend to be more spherical and more energetic than most of the background processes which otherwise mimic the t{bar t} signature in the ''lepton+jets'' channel. A number of energy based and event shape variables can be used to statistically discriminate between signal and background events. Monte Carlo simulation is used to model the kinematics of t{bar t} and most of the background processes. A neural network technique is

  19. COMBINE7.1 - A Portable ENDF/B-VII.0 Based Neutron Spectrum and Cross-Section Generation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo Y. Yoon; David W. Nigg

    2011-09-01

    COMBINE7.1 is a FORTRAN 90 computer code that generates multigroup neutron constants for use in the deterministic diffusion and transport theory neutronics analysis. The cross-section database used by COMBINE7.1 is derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0). The neutron energy range covered is from 20 MeV to 1.0E-5 eV. The Los Alamos National Laboratory NJOY code is used as the processing code to generate a 167 fine-group cross-section library in MATXS format for Bondarenko self-shielding treatment. Resolved resonance parameters are extracted from ENDF/B-VII.0 File 2 for a separate library to be used in an alternate Nordheim self-shielding treatment in the resolved resonance energy range. The equations solved for energy dependent neutron spectrum in the 167 fine-group structure are the B3 or B1 zero-dimensional approximations to the transport equation. The fine group cross sections needed for the spectrum calculation are first prepared by Bondarenko self-shielding interpolation in terms of background cross section and temperature. The geometric lump effect, when present, is accounted for by augmenting the background cross section. Nordheim self-shielded fine group cross sections for a material having resolved resonance parameters overwrite correspondingly the existing self-shielded fine group cross sections when this option is used. COMBINE7.1 coalesces fine group cross sections into broad group macroscopic and microscopic constants. The coalescing is performed by utilizing fine-group fluxes and/or currents obtained by spectrum calculation as the weighting functions. The multigroup constants may be output in any of several standard formats including INL format, ANISN 14** free format, CCCC ISOTXS format, and AMPX working library format. ANISN-PC, a one-dimensional (1-D) discrete-ordinate transport code, is incorporated into COMBINE7.1. As an option, the 167 fine-group constants generated by zero-dimensional COMBINE portion in the program can be

  20. A Temperature-Dependent, Linearly Interpolable, Tabulated Cross Section Library Based on released ENDF/B-VII.0.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-06-15

    Version 00 As distributed, the ENDF/B-VII.0 data includes cross sections represented in the form of a combination of resonance parameters and/or tabulated energy dependent cross sections, nominally at 0 Kelvin temperature. For use in our applications the ENDF/B-VII.0 library has been processed into cross sections at eight neutron reactor like temperatures, between 0 and 2100 Kelvin, in steps of 300 Kelvin. It has also been processed to five astrophysics like temperatures: 1, 10, 100 eV,more » 1 and 10 keV. For reference purposes, 300 Kelvin is approximately 1/40 eV, so that 1 eV is approximately 12,000 Kelvin. At each temperature the cross sections are tabulated and linearly interpolable in energy. CCC-638/TART2005 is recommended for use with these data. Codes within TART can be used to display these data or to run calculations using these data.« less

  1. Theoretical and experimental quantification of doubly and singly differential cross sections for electron-induced ionization of isolated tetrahydrofuran molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele A.; Bug, Marion U.; Baek, Woon Y.; Weck, Philippe F.

    2014-07-29

    Electron-induced ionization of the commonly used surrogate of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, namely, the tetrahydrofuran molecule, is here theoretically described within the 1st Born approximation by means of quantum-mechanical approach. Comparisons between theory and recent experiments are reported in terms of doubly and singly differential cross sections.

  2. Theoretical and experimental quantification of doubly and singly differential cross sections for electron-induced ionization of isolated tetrahydrofuran molecules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Champion, Christophe; Quinto, Michele A.; Bug, Marion U.; Baek, Woon Y.; Weck, Philippe F.

    2014-07-29

    Electron-induced ionization of the commonly used surrogate of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, namely, the tetrahydrofuran molecule, is here theoretically described within the 1st Born approximation by means of quantum-mechanical approach. Comparisons between theory and recent experiments are reported in terms of doubly and singly differential cross sections.

  3. Total Hadron Cross Section, New Particles, and Muon Electron Events in e{sup +}e{sup -} Annihilation at SPEAR

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Richter, B.

    1976-01-01

    The review of total hadron electroproduction cross sections, the new states, and the muon--electron events includes large amount of information on hadron structure, nine states with width ranging from 10's of keV to many MeV, the principal decay modes and quantum numbers of some of the states, and limits on charm particle production. 13 references. (JFP)

  4. R-Matrix Evaluation of {sup 16}O neutron cross sections up to 6.3 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayer, R.O.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.; Spencer, R.R.; and Wright, R.Q.

    2000-08-01

    In this paper the authors describe an evaluation of {sup 16}O neutron cross sections in the resolved resonance region with the multilevel Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. Resonance analyses were performed with the computer code SAMMY [LA98] which utilizes Bayes' method, a generalized least squares technique.

  5. Dye lasing arrangement including an optical assembly for altering the cross-section of its pumping beam and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Neil, Richard W.; Sweatt, William C.

    1992-01-01

    An optical assembly is disclosed herein along with a method of operation for use in a dye lasing arrangement, for example a dye laser oscillator or a dye amplifier, in which a continuous stream of dye is caused to flow through a given zone in a cooperating dye chamber while the zone is being illuminated by light from a pumping beam which is directed into the given zone. This in turn causes the dye therein to lase and thereby produce a new dye beam in the case of a dye laser oscillator or amplify a dye beam in the case of a dye amplifier. The optical assembly so disclosed is designed to alter the pump beam such that the beam enters the dye chamber with a different cross-sectional configuration, preferably one having a more uniform intensity profile, than its initially produced cross-sectional configuration. To this end, the assembly includes a network of optical components which first act on the beam while the latter retains its initially produced cross-sectional configuration for separating it into a plurality of predetermined segments and then recombines the separated components in a predetermined way which causes the recombined beam to have the different cross-sectional configuration.

  6. Micro-sonicator for spore lysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Robin R.; Belgrader, Phillip; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-sonicator for spore lysis. Using micromachining technology, the micro-sonicator uses ultrasonic excitation of spores to perform spore and cell lysis. The micro-sonicator comprises a container with a cavity therein for retaining the sample in an ultrasonic transmission medium, the cavity being closed by a silicon membrane to which an electrode and piezoelectric material are attached, with the electrode and piezoelectric material being electrically connected to an AC signal generator which causes the membrane to flex and vibrate at the frequency of the applied voltage.

  7. Formation mechanical properties and the sonic log

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elphick, R.Y.

    1988-11-01

    A program is presented that calculates the mechanical properties of reservoir rocks from sonic logs. The program was written in Microsoft BASIC and the source code for MS-DOS, Apple Macintosh, and Amiga personal computers is given.

  8. Measurement of the ratios of the Z/gamma* + >= n jet production cross sections to the total inclusive Z/gamma* cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-08-01

    We present a study of events with Z bosons and jets produced at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data sample consists of nearly 14,000 Z/{gamma}* {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} candidates corresponding to the integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1} collected using the D0 detector. Ratios of the Z/{gamma}* + {ge} n jet cross sections to the total inclusive Z/{gamma}* cross section have been measured for n = 1 to 4 jet events. Our measurements are found to be in good agreement with a next-to-leading order QCD calculation and with a tree-level QCD prediction with parton shower simulation and hadronization.

  9. The 209Bi(nth,{gamma})210Bi and 209Bi(nth,{gamma})210m,gBi Cross Sections Determined at the Budapest Neutron Centre

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borella, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Molnar, G.; Belgya, T.; Revay, Zs.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Berthoumieux, E.; Gunsing, F.; Letourneau, A.; Marie, F.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron total capture cross section of 209Bi together with the cross sections to the ground state and the isomeric state were determined at the cold neutron beam PGAA-NIPS facilities at the Budapest Neutron Centre. For the measurements we used a coaxial HPGe detector with Compton suppression. The partial {gamma}-ray production cross sections were deduced relative to the partial capture cross section for the 4055 keV transition following 209Bi(n,{gamma}). This partial cross section was measured with a bismuth nitrate sample with respect to nitrogen as a comparator. The total capture cross section resulting from the primary transitions is lower than the one deduced from the transitions feeding the isomeric and the ground state. Since the multipolarity of the main transition feeding the ground state is not known, the uncertainty on the capture cross section to the ground state is rather large. We also compare the total capture thermal cross section with the value deduced from resonance parameters and discuss the impact of the branching ratio on the analysis of prompt capture cross section measurements using the total energy detection principle.

  10. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from pp¯ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scale withmore » integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of σtt¯ = 7.64 ± 0.57 (stat + syst) ± 0.45 (luminosity) pb.« less

  11. Cross sections for the reaction /sup 4/He(. gamma. ,. gamma. ) /sup 4/He in the. delta. (1232)-resonance region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, E.J.; Booth, E.C.; Delli Carpini, D.; Gall, K.P.; McIntyre, E.K.; Miller, J.P.; Warner, D.; Whitehouse, D.A.; Dodson, G.

    1988-10-24

    We have measured the differential cross sections for coherent Compton photon scattering in the reaction /sup 4/He(..gamma..,..gamma..) /sup 4/He at laboratory angles of 24/sup 0/, 30/sup 0/, 45/sup 0/, and 60/sup 0/ with an average laboratory photon energy of 320 MeV, at 22/sup 0/ with 358 MeV, and at 30/sup 0/ with 260 MeV. These measurements are the first unambiguous test of the ..delta..-hole formalism for this reaction near the peak of the cross section for the ..delta.. resonance. The results are compared to theoretical calculations in the isobar-hole model. Agreement is good for data at the energy corresponding to the ..delta.. peak.

  12. Measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ cross section at the Run II Tevatron using Support Vector Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehouse, Benjamin Eric

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation measures the t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section at the Run II CDF detector using data from early 2001 through March 2007. The Tevatron at Fermilab is a p$\\bar{p}$ collider with center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. This data composes a sample with a time-integrated luminosity measured at 2.2 ± 0.1 fb-1. A system of learning machines is developed to recognize t$\\bar{t}$ events in the 'lepton plus jets' decay channel. Support Vector Machines are described, and their ability to cope with a multi-class discrimination problem is provided. The t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section is then measured in this framework, and found to be σt$\\bar{t}$ = 7.14 ± 0.25 (stat)-0.86+0.61(sys) pb.

  13. Comparative studies of actinide and sub-actinide fission cross section calculation from MCNP6 and TALYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkasa, Y. S.; Waris, A. Kurniadi, R. Su'ud, Z.

    2014-09-30

    Comparative studies of actinide and sub-actinide fission cross section calculation from MCNP6 and TALYS have been conducted. In this work, fission cross section resulted from MCNP6 prediction will be compared with result from TALYS calculation. MCNP6 with its event generator CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 have been validated and verified for several intermediate and heavy nuclides fission reaction data and also has a good agreement with experimental data for fission reaction that induced by photons, pions, and nucleons at energy from several ten of MeV to about 1 TeV. The calculation that induced within TALYS will be focused mainly to several hundred MeV for actinide and sub-actinide nuclides and will be compared with MCNP6 code and several experimental data from other evaluator.

  14. The effect of self-shielding of resonance cross-sections on lotus fusion-fission device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelloni, S.; Cheng, E.T.

    1985-07-01

    The LOTUS Swiss fusion fission hybrid test facility was used to investigate the influence of the self-shielding of resonance cross sections on the tritium breeding and on the thorium ratios. Nucleonic analyses were performed using some deterministic codes and the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the self-shielding of resonance cross sections results in a decrease of the thorium capture rate and in an increase of the tritium breeding of about 6%. Therefore for hybrid blanket calculations it is important to define an adequate energy group structure with many groups within the resonances of the fissile-fertile material and the self-shielding should be included in neutronics calculations.

  15. On Baryon-Antibaryon Cross Sections from Initial State Radiation Processes at BABAR and their Surprising Threshold Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacetti, Simone

    2015-04-14

    BABAR has measured with unprecedented accuracy the e+e- → pp-bar and e+e- → ΛΛ-bar cross sections by means of the initial state radiation technique, which has the advantages of good efficiency and energy resolution, and full angular acceptance in the threshold region. A striking feature of these cross sections is their non-vanishing values at threshold. In the case of charged baryons, the phenomenon is well understood in terms of the Coulomb interaction between the outgoing baryon and antibaryon. However, such an effect is not expected for neutral baryons. We suggest a simple explanation for both charged and neutral baryon pairs based on Coulomb interactions at the valence quark level.

  16. Fusion Cross Section in the {sup 4,6}He+{sup 64}Zn Collisions Around the Coulomb Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisichella, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Marchetta, C.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Scuderi, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Milin, M.; Skukan, N.; Zadro, M.

    2011-10-28

    New fusion data for the {sup 4}He+{sup 64}Zn system at sub-barrier energies are measured to cover the same energy region of previous measurements for {sup 6}He+{sup 64}Zn. Aim of the experiment was to compare the fusion excitation functions for the two system to investigate on the effects of the {sup 6}He neutron-halo structure on the fusion reaction mechanism at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The fusion cross section was measured by using an activation technique. Comparing the two systems, we observe an enhancement of the fusion cross section in the reaction induced by {sup 6}He, at and below the Coulomb barrier.

  17. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Blumlein, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Garzelli, M. -V.; Guzzi, M.; Kuprash, O.; Moch, S. -O.; Nadolsky, P.; Placakyte, R.; Rabbertz, K.; Schienbein, I.; Starovoitov, P.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by other experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.

  18. Impact of heavy-flavour production cross sections measured by the LHCb experiment on parton distribution functions at low x

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zenaiev, O.; Geiser, A.; Lipka, K.; Blumlein, J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Garzelli, M. -V.; Guzzi, M.; Kuprash, O.; Moch, S. -O.; Nadolsky, P.; et al

    2015-08-01

    The impact of recent measurements of heavy-flavour production in deep inelastic ep scattering and in pp collisions on parton distribution functions is studied in a QCD analysis in the fixed-flavour number scheme at next-to-leading order. Differential cross sections of charm- and beauty-hadron production measured by LHCb are used together with inclusive and heavy-flavour production cross sections in deep inelastic scattering at HERA. The heavy-flavour data of the LHCb experiment impose additional constraints on the gluon and the sea-quark distributions at low partonic fractions x of the proton momentum, down to x~5×10-6. This kinematic range is currently not covered by othermore » experimental data in perturbative QCD fits.« less

  19. Observation of tilting activities in translated field reversed configuration plasma using computer tomography at two different cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, Satoru; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Okada, Shigefumi

    2007-11-15

    Tilting activities of field reversed configuration (FRC) plasma were observed in translation experiments using computer tomography (CT) at two different cross sections in the FRC injection experiment (FIX) machine [S. Okada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 677 (2007)]. In these experiments, two sets of CT devices were installed at the upstream and downstream sides of the confinement chamber of the FIX. Each CT device was composed of three arrays of detectors sensitive to the near-infrared radiation. The peak of the reconstructed emission profile at one side was displaced from the center of the cross section of the chamber. On the other hand, the reconstructed profile at the other side was located around the center. This result suggests that the FRC plasma was tilting in the axial direction. The occurrence of the observed tilting activities had almost no effect on the lifetime of the FRC plasma.

  20. Electron drift velocities in He and water mixtures: Measurements and an assessment of the water vapour cross-section sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urquijo, J. de; Juárez, A. M.; Basurto, E.; Ness, K. F.; Robson, R. E.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-07-07

    The drift velocity of electrons in mixtures of gaseous water and helium is measured over the range of reduced electric fields 0.1–300 Td using a pulsed-Townsend technique. Admixtures of 1% and 2% water to helium are found to produce negative differential conductivity (NDC), despite NDC being absent from the pure gases. The measured drift velocities are used as a further discriminative assessment on the accuracy and completeness of a recently proposed set of electron-water vapour cross-sections [K. F. Ness, R. E. Robson, M. J. Brunger, and R. D. White, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 024318 (2012)]. A refinement of the momentum transfer cross-section for electron-water vapour scattering is presented, which ensures self-consistency with the measured drift velocities in mixtures with helium to within approximately 5% over the range of reduced fields considered.

  1. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from p p? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scale with integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of ?tt? = 7.64 0.57 (stat + syst) 0.45 (luminosity) pb.

  2. Measurement of the Isolated Prompt Photon Production Cross Section in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-02-01

    The differential cross section for the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons has been measured as a function of the photon transverse energy E_T-gamma in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV using data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 inverse picobarns. Photons are required to have a pseudorapidity |eta_gamma|<1.45 and E_T-gamma > 21 GeV, covering the kinematic region 0.006 < x_T < 0.086. The measured cross section is found to be in agreement with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  3. Experimental differential cross sections, level densities, and spin cutoffs as a testing ground for nuclear reaction codes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Voinov, Alexander V.; Grimes, Steven M.; Brune, Carl R.; Burger, Alexander; Gorgen, Andreas; Guttormsen, Magne; Larsen, Ann -Cecilie; Massey, Thomas N.; Siem, Sunniva

    2013-11-08

    Proton double-differential cross sections from 59Co(α,p)62Ni, 57Fe(α,p)60Co, 56Fe(7Li,p)62Ni, and 55Mn(6Li,p)60Co reactions have been measured with 21-MeV α and 15-MeV lithium beams. Cross sections have been compared against calculations with the empire reaction code. Different input level density models have been tested. It was found that the Gilbert and Cameron [A. Gilbert and A. G. W. Cameron, Can. J. Phys. 43, 1446 (1965)] level density model is best to reproduce experimental data. Level densities and spin cutoff parameters for 62Ni and 60Co above the excitation energy range of discrete levels (in continuum) have been obtained with a Monte Carlo technique. Furthermore,more » excitation energy dependencies were found to be inconsistent with the Fermi-gas model.« less

  4. Evaluation of the γn→π⁻p differential cross section in the Δ-isobar region

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Briscoe, W. J.; Kudryavtsev, A. E.; Pedroni, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Tarasov, V. E.; Workman, R. L.

    2012-12-20

    Differential cross sections for the process γn→π⁻p have been extracted from MAMI-B measurements of γd→π⁻pp, accounting for final-state interaction effects, using a diagrammatic technique taking into account the NN and πN final-state interaction amplitudes. Results are compared to previous measurements of the inverse process, π⁻p→nγ, and recent multipole analyses.

  5. Communication: State-to-state differential cross sections for H{sub 2}O(B-tild) photodissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Bin; Xie Daiqian; Guo Hua

    2011-06-21

    Quantum state-to-state differential cross sections, along with the absorption spectrum and product internal state distributions, have been calculated for the photodissociation of H{sub 2}O in its B band on a new set of ab initio potential energy surfaces in a diabatic representation. The theoretical attributes are in good agreement with the recent experimental data, shedding light on the non-adiabatic dissociation dynamics.

  6. Measurement of the nu(mu) Charged Current pi+ Production to Quasi-elastic Scattering Cross Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Jaroslaw A.; /Louisiana State U.

    2009-09-01

    Using high statistics samples of charged current interactions, MiniBooNE reports a model independent measurement of the single charged pion production to quasi-elastic cross section ratio on mineral oil without corrections for pion re-interactions in the target nucleus [1]. The result is provided as a function of neutrino energy in the range 0.4 GeV < E < 2.4 GeV with 11% precision in the region of highest statistics.

  7. Cross-Section Measurements of Star Configurations in Neutron-Deuteron Breakup at 16.0 MeV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alexander S. Crowell 2001 Cross-Section Measurements of Star Configurations in Neutron-Deuteron Breakup at 16.0 MeV by Alexander S. Crowell Department of Physics Duke University Date Approved: Calvin R. Howell, Supervisor Robert P. Behringer Mark C. Kruse Roxanne P. Springer Werner Tornow Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics in the Graduate School of Duke University 2001 Abstract (Physics - TUNL)

  8. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ production cross section using dilepton events in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector. We consider final states with at least two jets and two leptons (ee, e{mu}, {mu}{mu}), and events with one jet for the the e{mu} final state as well. The measured cross section is {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.36{sub -0.79}{sup +0.90} (stat + syst) pb. This result combined with the cross section measurement in the lepton + jets final state yields {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.56{sub -0.56}{sup +0.63}(stat + syst) pb, which agrees with the standard model expectation. The relative precision of 8% of this measurement is comparable to the latest theoretical calculations.

  9. HARP targets pion production cross section and yield measurements. Implications for MiniBooNE neutrino flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickremasinghe, Don Athula Abeyarathna

    2015-07-01

    The prediction of the muon neutrino flux from a 71.0 cm long beryllium target for the MiniBooNE experiment is based on a measured pion production cross section which was taken from a short beryllium target (2.0 cm thick - 5% nuclear interaction length) in the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment at CERN. To verify the extrapolation to our longer target, HARP also measured the pion production from 20.0 cm and 40.0 cm beryllium targets. The measured production yields, d2Nπ± (p; θ )=dpd Ω, on targets of 50% and 100% nuclear interaction lengths in the kinematic rage of momentum from 0.75 GeV/c to 6.5 GeV/c and the range of angle from 30 mrad to 210 mrad are presented along with an update of the short target cross sections. The best fitted extended Sanford-Wang (SW) model parameterization for updated short beryllium target π+ production cross section is presented. Yield measurements for all three targets are also compared with that from the Monte Carlo predictions in the MiniBooNE experiment for different SW parameterization. The comparisons of vμ flux predictions for updated SW model is presented.

  10. Measurements of inclusive W and Z cross sections in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.; et al.,

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of inclusive W and Z boson production cross sections in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV are presented, based on 2.9 inverse picobarns of data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurements, performed in the electron and muon decay channels, are combined to give sigma(pp to WX) times B(W to muon or electron + neutrino) = 9.95 \\pm 0.07(stat.) \\pm 0.28(syst.) \\pm 1.09(lumi.) nb and sigma(pp to ZX) times B(Z to oppositely charged muon or electron pairs) = 0.931 \\pm 0.026(stat.) \\pm 0.023(syst.) \\pm 0.102(lumi.) nb. Theoretical predictions, calculated at the next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD using recent parton distribution functions, are in agreement with the measured cross sections. Ratios of cross sections, which incur an experimental systematic uncertainty of less than 4%, are also reported.

  11. A measurement of the neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic cross section at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, David Christopher; /Indiana U.

    2008-02-01

    The neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic interaction {nu} N {yields} {nu} N is a fundamental process of the weak interaction ideally suited for characterizing the structure of the nucleon neutral weak current. This process comprises {approx}18% of neutrino events in the neutrino oscillation experiment, MiniBooNE, ranking it as the experiment's third largest process. Using {approx}10% of MiniBooNE's available neutrino data, a sample of these events were identified and analyzed to determine the differential cross section as a function of the momentum transfer of the interaction, Q{sup 2}. This is the first measurement of a differential cross section with MiniBooNE data. From this analysis, a value for the nucleon axial mass M{sub A} was extracted to be 1.34 {+-} 0.25 GeV consistent with previous measurements. The integrated cross section for the Q{sup 2} range 0.189 {yields} 1.13 GeV{sup 2} was calculated to be (8.8 {+-} 0.6(stat) {+-} 0.2(syst)) x 10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}.

  12. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in the dilepton channel using lepton+track selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Robert Emil; /Princeton U.

    2008-09-01

    The production cross section for t{bar t} pairs decaying into two lepton final states was measured using data from the D0 detector at Fermilab. The measurement was made using a lepton+track selection, where one lepton is fully identified and the second lepton is observed as an isolated track. This analysis is designed to complement similar studies using two fully identified leptons [1]. The cross section for the lepton+track selection was found to be {sigma} = 5.2{sub -1.4}{sup +1.6}(stat){sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(syst) {+-} 0.3(lumi) pb. The combined cross section using both the lepton+track data and the data from the electron+electron, electron+muon, and muon+muon samples is: {sigma} = 6.4{sub -0.9}{sup +0.9}(stat){sub -0.7}{sup +0.8}(syst) {+-} 0.4(lumi) pb.

  13. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation-theory calculations of photoionization cross sections from quasicontinuum oscillator strengths

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Savukov, I. M.; Filin, D. V.

    2014-12-29

    Many applications are in need of accurate photoionization cross sections, especially in the case of complex atoms. Configuration-interaction relativistic-many-body-perturbation theory (CI-RMBPT) has been successful in predicting atomic energies, matrix elements between discrete states, and other properties, which is quite promising, but it has not been applied to photoionization problems owing to extra complications arising from continuum states. In this paper a method that will allow the conversion of discrete CI-(R)MPBT oscillator strengths (OS) to photoionization cross sections with minimal modifications of the codes is introduced and CI-RMBPT cross sections of Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe are calculated. A consistent agreementmore » with experiment is found. RMBPT corrections are particularly significant for Ar, Kr, and Xe and improve agreement with experimental results compared to the particle-hole CI method. As a result, the demonstrated conversion method can be applied to CI-RMBPT photoionization calculations for a large number of multivalence atoms and ions.« less

  14. Measurements of the W production cross sections in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-02-19

    This paper presents cross sections for the production of a W boson in association with jets, measured in proton–proton collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 7\\) TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider. With an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb-1, this data set allows for an exploration of a large kinematic range, including jet production up to a transverse momentum of 1TeV and multiplicities up to seven associated jets. The production cross sections for W bosons are measured in both the electron and muon decay channels. Differential cross sections for many observables are also presented including measurements of the jet observables such as the rapidities and the transverse momenta as well as measurements of event observables such as the scalar sums of the transverse momenta of the jets. As a result, the measurements are compared to numerous QCD predictions including next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations, resummation calculations and Monte Carlo generators.

  15. Measurement of Neutrino and Antineutrino Charged-Current Inclusive Cross Sections with the MINERvA Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devan, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are a nearly massless, neutral particle in the Standard Model that only interact via the weak interaction. Experimental confirmation of neutrino oscillations, in which a neutrino created as a particular type (electron, muon or tau) can be observed as a different type after propagating some distance, earned the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics. Neutrino oscillation experiments rely on accurate measurements of neutrino interactions with matter, such as that presented here. Neutrinos also provide a unique probe of the nucleus, complementary to electron scattering experiments. This thesis presents a measurement of the charged-current inclusive cross section for muon neutrinos and antineutrinos in the energy range 2 to 50 GeV with the MINERvA detector. MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab, near Chicago. A cross section measures the probability of an interaction occurring, measured here as a function of neutrino energy. To extract a cross section from data, the observed rate of interactions is corrected for detector efficiency and divided by the number of scattering nucleons in the target and the flux of neutrinos in the beam. The neutrino flux is determined with the low-$\

  16. Effect of shell drilling stiffness on response calculations of rectangular plates and tubes of rectangular cross-section under compression.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, Jhana; Hales, Jason Dean; Corona, Edmundo

    2010-05-01

    This report considers the calculation of the quasi-static nonlinear response of rectangular flat plates and tubes of rectangular cross-section subjected to compressive loads using quadrilateralshell finite element models. The principal objective is to assess the effect that the shell drilling stiffness parameter has on the calculated results. The calculated collapse load of elastic-plastic tubes of rectangular cross-section is of particular interest here. The drilling stiffness factor specifies the amount of artificial stiffness that is given to the shell element drilling Degree of freedom (rotation normal to the plane of the element). The element formulation has no stiffness for this degree of freedom, and this can lead to numerical difficulties. The results indicate that in the problems considered it is necessary to add a small amount of drilling tiffness to obtain converged results when using both implicit quasi-statics or explicit dynamics methods. The report concludes with a parametric study of the imperfection sensitivity of the calculated responses of the elastic-plastic tubes with rectangular cross-section.

  17. ENDF/B-VII.1 Nuclear Data for Science and Technology: Cross Sections, Covariances, Fission Product Yields and Decay Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti

    2011-12-01

    The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is our latest recommended evaluated nuclear data file for use in nuclear science and technology applications, and incorporates advances made in the five years since the release of ENDF/B-VII.0. These advances focus on neutron cross sections, covariances, fission product yields and decay data, and represent work by the US Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in nuclear data evaluation that utilizes developments in nuclear theory, modeling, simulation, and experiment. The principal advances in the new library are: (1) An increase in the breadth of neutron reaction cross section coverage, extending from 393 nuclides to 418 nuclides; (2) Covariance uncertainty data for 185 of the most important nuclides, as documented in companion papers in this edition; (3) R-matrix analyses of neutron reactions on light nuclei, including isotopes of He, Li, and Be; (4) Resonance parameter analyses at lower energies and statistical high energy reactions at higher energies for isotopes of F, Cl, K, Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zr and W; (5) Modifications to thermal neutron reactions on fission products (isotopes of Mo, Tc, Rh, Ag, Cs, Nd, Sm, Eu) and neutron absorber materials (Cd, Gd); (6) Improved minor actinide evaluations for isotopes of U, Np, Pu, and Am (we are not making changes to the major actinides 235,238U and 239Pu at this point, except for delayed neutron data, and instead we intend to update them after a further period of research in experiment and theory), and our adoption of JENDL-4.0 evaluations for isotopes of Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Fm, and some other minor actinides; (7) Fission energy release evaluations; (8) Fission product yield advances for fission-spectrum neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons incident on 239Pu; and (9) A new Decay Data sublibrary. Integral validation testing of the ENDF/B-VII.1 library is provided for a variety of quantities: For nuclear criticality, the VII.1 library maintains the generally-good performance seen for VII.0 for a wide

  18. Measurement of the Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Cross-Section for Electron Neutrinos on a Hydrocarbon Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments, which observe the transition from muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos, promise to help answer some of the fundamental questions surrounding physics in the post-Standard-Model era. Because they wish to observe the interactions of electron neutrinos in their detectors, and because the power of current results is typically limited by their systematic uncertainties, these experiments require precise estimates of the cross-section for electron neutrino interactions. Of particular interest is the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) process, which gures signi cantly in the composition of the reactions observed at the far detector. However, no experimental measurements of this crosssection currently exist for electron neutrinos; instead, current experiments typically work from the abundance of muon neutrino CCQE cross-section data and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for electron neutrinos. Veri cation of these predictions is challenging due to the di culty of constructing an electron neutrino beam, but the advent of modern high-intensity muon neutrino beams|together with the percent-level electron neutrino impurity inherent in these beams| nally presents the opportunity to make such a measurement. We report herein the rst-ever measurement of a cross-section for an exclusive state in electron neutrino scattering, which was made using the MINER A detector in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We present the electron neutrino CCQE di erential cross-sections, which are averaged over neutrinos of energies 1-10 GeV (with mean energy of about 3 GeV), in terms of various kinematic variables: nal-state electron angle, nal-state electron energy, and the square of the fourmomentum transferred to the nucleus by the neutrino , Q2. We also provide a total cross-section vs. neutrino energy. While our measurement of this process is found to be in agreement with the predictions of the GENIE

  19. Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

    2005-12-31

    The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: • Laboratory studies • Mathematical modeling • Sonic tool design and development • Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40°C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale

  20. Modeled Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Yttrium, Zirconium, Niobium, and Molybdenum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M G

    2006-06-13

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron, proton, and deuteron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from strontium (Z = 38) to rhodium (Z = 45).

  1. A 2.5D boundary element formulation for modeling damped waves in arbitrary cross-section waveguides and cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzotti, M.; Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering Department, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 ; Bartoli, I.; Marzani, A.; Viola, E.

    2013-09-01

    Highlights: Dispersive properties of viscoelastic waveguides and cavities are computed using a regularized 2.5D BEM. Linear viscoelasticity is introduced at the constitutive level by means of frequency dependent complex moduli. A contour integral algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear eigenvalue problem. The Sommerfeld radiation condition is used to select the permissible Riemann sheets. Attenuation of surface waves in cavities approaches the attenuation of Rayleigh waves. -- Abstract: A regularized 2.5D boundary element method (BEM) is proposed to predict the dispersion properties of damped stress guided waves in waveguides and cavities of arbitrary cross-section. The wave attenuation, induced by material damping, is introduced using linear viscoelastic constitutive relations and described in a spatial manner by the imaginary component of the axial wavenumber. The discretized dispersive wave equation results in a nonlinear eigenvalue problem, which is solved obtaining complex axial wavenumbers for a fixed frequency using a contour integral algorithm. Due to the singular characteristics and the multivalued feature of the wave equation, the requirement of holomorphicity inside the contour region over the complex wavenumber plane is fulfilled by the introduction of the Sommerfeld branch cuts and by the choice of the permissible Riemann sheets. A post processing analysis is developed for the extraction of the energy velocity of propagative guided waves. The reliability of the method is demonstrated by comparing the results obtained for a rail and a bar with square cross-section with those obtained from a 2.5D Finite Element formulation also known in literature as Semi Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method. Next, to show the potential of the proposed numerical framework, dispersion properties are predicted for surface waves propagating along cylindrical cavities of arbitrary cross-section. It is demonstrated that the attenuation of surface waves approaches

  2. Differential cross sections for the reactions γp→pη and γp→pη'

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, M.; Krahn, Z.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; Meyer, C. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; et al

    2009-10-29

    In high-statistics differential cross sections for the reactions γ p -> p η and γ p -> p η' the CLAS at Jefferson Lab was used to measure the center-of-mass energies from near threshold up to 2.84 GeV. The eta-prime results are the most precise to date and provide the largest energy and angular coverage. The eta measurements extend the energy range of the world's large-angle results by approximately 300 MeV. These new data, in particular the η' measurements, are likely to help constrain the analyses being performed to search for new baryon resonance states.

  3. Fusion cross sections for the {sup 9}Be+{sup 124}Sn reaction at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkar, V. V.; Palit, R.; Sharma, Sushil K.; Naidu, B. S.; Santra, S.; Mahata, K.; Ramachandran, K.; Joshi, P. K.; Rath, P. K.; Trivedi, T.; Raghav, A.

    2010-11-15

    The complete and incomplete fusion cross sections for {sup 9}Be+{sup 124}Sn reaction have been deduced using the online {gamma}-ray measurement technique. Complete fusion at energies above the Coulomb barrier was found to be suppressed by {approx}28% compared to the coupled-channels calculations and is in agreement with the systematics of L. R. Gasques et al. [Phys. Rev. C 79, 034605 (2009)]. Study of the projectile dependence for fusion on a {sup 124}Sn target shows that, for {sup 9}Be nuclei, the enhancement at below-barrier energies is substantial compared to that of tightly bound nuclei.

  4. Elastic and Related Transport Cross Sections, Charge Transfer: Data from the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center (CFADC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krstic, P. S; Schultz, D. R.

    Data files available in this section of the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center (CFADC) are found under the following headings: • Isotopomers of hydrogen ions, atoms and molecules and helium • Vibrationally excited states of hydrogen molecule with proton, and hydrogen molecular ion with hydrogen • Isotopomers of hydrogen ions with carbon • Isotopomers of hydrogen ions with argon • Hydrogen ions with neon • Hydrogen ions with krypton • Hydrogen ions with xenon • Elastic and other cross sections from ApJ xxx, yyyy (2008) Each heading is a link to more information, the data, and customized interfaces. (Specialized Interface)

  5. Verification study of thorium cross section in MVP calculation of thorium based fuel core using experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, V. T.; Fujii, T.; Wada, K.; Kitada, T.; Takaki, N.; Yamaguchi, A.; Watanabe, H.; Unesaki, H.

    2012-07-01

    Considering the importance of thorium data and concerning about the accuracy of Th-232 cross section library, a series of experiments of thorium critical core carried out at KUCA facility of Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst. have been analyzed. The core was composed of pure thorium plates and 93% enriched uranium plates, solid polyethylene moderator with hydro to U-235 ratio of 140 and Th-232 to U-235 ratio of 15.2. Calculations of the effective multiplication factor, control rod worth, reactivity worth of Th plates have been conducted by MVP code using JENDL-4.0 library [1]. At the experiment site, after achieving the critical state with 51 fuel rods inserted inside the reactor, the measurements of the reactivity worth of control rod and thorium sample are carried out. By comparing with the experimental data, the calculation overestimates the effective multiplication factor about 0.90%. Reactivity worth of the control rods evaluation using MVP is acceptable with the maximum discrepancy about the statistical error of the measured data. The calculated results agree to the measurement ones within the difference range of 3.1% for the reactivity worth of one Th plate. From this investigation, further experiments and research on Th-232 cross section library need to be conducted to provide more reliable data for thorium based fuel core design and safety calculation. (authors)

  6. GaN nanowires with pentagon shape cross-section by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Yong; Leung, Benjamin; Li, Qiming; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-07-14

    In this study, ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) was used to grow catalyst-assisted GaN nanowires on (11¯02) r-plane sapphire substrates. Dislocation free [112¯0] oriented nanowires are formed with pentagon shape cross-section, instead of the usual triangular shape facet configuration. Specifically, the cross-section is the result of the additional two nonpolar {101¯0} side facets, which appear due to a decrease in relative growth rate of the {101¯0} facets to the {101¯1} and {101¯1} facets under the growth regime in NH3-MBE. Compared to GaN nanowires grown by Ni-catalyzed metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, the NH3-MBE grown GaN nanowires show more than an ordermore » of magnitude increase in band-edge to yellow luminescence intensity ratio, as measured by cathodoluminescence, indicating improved microstructural and optical properties.« less

  7. B-spline algebraic diagrammatic construction: Application to photoionization cross-sections and high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Decleva, P.

    2014-10-28

    We present the first implementation of the ab initio many-body Green's function method, algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC), in the B-spline single-electron basis. B-spline versions of the first order [ADC(1)] and second order [ADC(2)] schemes for the polarization propagator are developed and applied to the ab initio calculation of static (photoionization cross-sections) and dynamic (high-order harmonic generation spectra) quantities. We show that the cross-section features that pose a challenge for the Gaussian basis calculations, such as Cooper minima and high-energy tails, are found to be reproduced by the B-spline ADC in a very good agreement with the experiment. We also present the first dynamic B-spline ADC results, showing that the effect of the Cooper minimum on the high-order harmonic generation spectrum of Ar is correctly predicted by the time-dependent ADC calculation in the B-spline basis. The present development paves the way for the application of the B-spline ADC to both energy- and time-resolved theoretical studies of many-electron phenomena in atoms, molecules, and clusters.

  8. Neutron-induced fission cross section measurements for uranium isotopes {sup 236}U and {sup 234}U at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laptev, A. B.; Tovesson, F.; Hill, T. S.

    2013-04-19

    A well established program of neutron-induced fission cross section measurement at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is supporting the Fuel Cycle Research program (FC R and D). The incident neutron energy range spans from sub-thermal up to 200 MeV by combining two LANSCE facilities, the Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR). The time-of-flight method is implemented to measure the incident neutron energy. A parallel-plate fission ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. The event rate ratio between the investigated foil and a standard {sup 235}U foil is converted into a fission cross section ratio. In addition to previously measured data new measurements include {sup 236}U data which is being analyzed, and {sup 234}U data acquired in the 2011-2012 LANSCE run cycle. The new data complete the full suite of Uranium isotopes which were investigated with this experimental approach. Obtained data are presented in comparison with existing evaluations and previous data.

  9. Cross sections for proton-induced reactions on Pd isotopes at energies relevant for the {gamma} process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillmann, I.; Coquard, L.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Kaeppeler, F.; Marganiec, J.; Uberseder, E.; Giesen, U.; Heiske, A.; Feinberg, G.; Hentschel, D.; Hilpp, S.; Leiste, H.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2011-07-15

    Proton-activation reactions on natural and enriched palladium samples were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range of E{sub p}=2.75-9 MeV, close to the upper end of the respective Gamow window of the {gamma} process. We have determined cross sections for {sup 102}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 103}Ag, {sup 104}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 105}Ag, and {sup 105}Pd(p, n){sup 105}Ag, as well as partial cross sections of {sup 104}Pd(p, n){sup 104}Ag{sup g}, {sup 105}Pd(p, {gamma}){sup 106}Ag{sup m}, {sup 106}Pd(p, n){sup 106}Ag{sup m}, and {sup 110}Pd(p, n){sup 110}Ag{sup m} with uncertainties between 3% and 15% for constraining theoretical Hauser-Feshbach rates and for direct use in {gamma}-process calculations.

  10. GaN nanowires with pentagon shape cross-section by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yong; Leung, Benjamin; Li, Qiming; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-07-14

    In this study, ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) was used to grow catalyst-assisted GaN nanowires on (11¯02) r-plane sapphire substrates. Dislocation free [112¯0] oriented nanowires are formed with pentagon shape cross-section, instead of the usual triangular shape facet configuration. Specifically, the cross-section is the result of the additional two nonpolar {101¯0} side facets, which appear due to a decrease in relative growth rate of the {101¯0} facets to the {101¯1} and {101¯1} facets under the growth regime in NH3-MBE. Compared to GaN nanowires grown by Ni-catalyzed metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, the NH3-MBE grown GaN nanowires show more than an order of magnitude increase in band-edge to yellow luminescence intensity ratio, as measured by cathodoluminescence, indicating improved microstructural and optical properties.

  11. Expectations for {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O induced fusion cross sections at energies of astrophysical interest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Back, B. B.; Janssens, R.V.F; Physics

    2007-01-12

    The extrapolations of cross sections for fusion reactions involving {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O nuclei down to energies relevant for explosive stellar burning have been reexamined. Based on a systematic study of fusion in heavier systems, it is expected that a suppression of the fusion process will also be present in these light heavy-ion systems at extreme sub-barrier energies due to the saturation properties of nuclear matter. Previous phenomenological extrapolations of the S factor for light heavy-ion fusion based on optical model calculations may therefore have overestimated the corresponding reaction rates. A new 'recipe' is proposed to extrapolate S factors for light heavy-ion reactions to low energies taking the hindrance behavior into account. It is based on a fit to the logarithmic derivative of the experimental cross section which is much less sensitive to overall normalization discrepancies between different data sets than other approaches. This method, therefore, represents a significant improvement over other extrapolations. The impact on the astrophysical reaction rates is discussed.

  12. Expectations for {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O induced fusion cross sections at energies of astrophysical interest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Back, B. B.; Janssens, R. V. F. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2007-01-15

    The extrapolations of cross sections for fusion reactions involving {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O nuclei down to energies relevant for explosive stellar burning have been reexamined. Based on a systematic study of fusion in heavier systems, it is expected that a suppression of the fusion process will also be present in these light heavy-ion systems at extreme sub-barrier energies due to the saturation properties of nuclear matter. Previous phenomenological extrapolations of the S factor for light heavy-ion fusion based on optical model calculations may therefore have overestimated the corresponding reaction rates. A new ''recipe'' is proposed to extrapolate S factors for light heavy-ion reactions to low energies taking the hindrance behavior into account. It is based on a fit to the logarithmic derivative of the experimental cross section which is much less sensitive to overall normalization discrepancies between different data sets than other approaches. This method, therefore, represents a significant improvement over other extrapolations. The impact on the astrophysical reaction rates is discussed.

  13. Measurement of the Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering Cross Section at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, hope to measure charge-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. In order to do this, they must dramatically reduce their current levels of uncertainty, particularly those due to neutrino-nucleus interaction models. As CP violation is a measure of the difference between the oscillation properties of neutrinos and antineutrinos, data about how the less-studied antineutrinos interact is especially valuable. We present the MINERvA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on scintillator, in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We also present total antineutrino-scintillator quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of energy, which we compare to measurements from previous experiments. As well as being useful to help reduce oscillation experiments' uncertainty, our data can also be used to study the prevalence of various cor relation and final-state interaction effects within the nucleus. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models.

  14. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production cross section at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deluca Silberberg, Carolina; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2009-04-01

    In this thesis we present the measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section with a total integrated luminosity of 2.5 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF Run II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The prompt photon cross section is a classic measurement to test perturbative QCD (pQCD) with potential to provide information on the parton distribution function (PDF), and sensitive to the presence of new physics at large photon transverse momentum. Prompt photons also constitute an irreducible background for important searches such as H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, or SUSY and extra-dimensions with energetic photons in the final state. The Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, U.S.A.) is currently the hadron collider that operates at the highest energies in the world. It collides protons and antiprotons with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The CDF and the D0 experiments are located in two of its four interaction regions. In Run I at the Tevatron, the direct photon production cross section was measured by both CDF and DO, and first results in Run II have been presented by the DO Collaboration based on 380 pb{sup -1}. Both Run I and Run II results show agreement with the theoretical predictions except for the low p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} region, where the observed and predicted shapes are different. Prompt photon production has been also extensively measured at fixed-target experiments in lower p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} ranges, showing excess of data compared to the theory, particularly at high x{sub T}. From an experimental point of view, the study of the direct photon production has several advantages compared to QCD studies using jets. Electromagnetic calorimeters have better energy resolution than hadronic calorimeters, and the systematic uncertainty on the photon absolute energy scale is smaller. Furthermore, the determination of the photon kinematics does not require the use of jet algorithms. However, the measurements using photons require a

  15. Measurements of electron-proton elastic cross sections for 0.4 < Q{sup 2} < 5.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.E. Christy; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Christopher Armstrong; John Arrington; Razmik Asaturyan; Steven Avery; O. Baker; Douglas Beck; Henk Blok; C.W.Bochna; Werner Boeglin; Peter Bosted; Maurice Bouwhuis; Herbert Breuer; D.S.Brown; Antje Bruell; Roger Carlini; Nicholas Chant; Anthony Cochran; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; James Dunne; Dipangkar Dutta; Rolf Ent; Howard Fenker; B.Fox; Liping Gan; Haiyan Gao; Kenneth Garrow; David Gaskell; Ashot Gasparian; Don Geesaman; Paul Gueye; Mark Harvey; Roy Holt; Xiaodong Jiang; Cynthia Keppel; Edward Kinney; Yongguang Liang; Wolfgang Lorenzon; Allison Lung; Pete Markowitz; J.W.Martin; Kevin McIlhany; Daniella Mckee; David Meekins; M.A.Miller; Richard Milner; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Robert Mueller; Alan Nathan; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Thomas O'neill; Vassilios Papavassiliou; Stephen Pate; Buz Piercey; David Potterveld; Ronald Ransome; Joerg Reinhold; E.Rollinde; Philip Roos; Adam Sarty; Reyad Sawafta; Elaine Schulte; Edwin Segbefia; C.Smith; Stepan Stepanyan; Steffen Strauch; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Raphael Tieulent; Alicia Uzzle; William Vulcan; Stephen Wood; Feng Xiong; Lulin Yuan; Markus Zeier; Benedikt Zihlmann; Vitaliy Ziskin

    2004-01-01

    We report on precision measurements of the elastic cross section for electron-proton scattering performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The measurements were made at 28 unique kinematic settings covering a range in momentum transfer of 0.4 < Q{sup 2} < 5.5 (/rm GeV/c){sup 2}. These measurements represent a significant contribution to the world's cross section data set in the Q{sup 2} range where a large discrepancy currently exists between the ratio of electric to magnetic proton form factors extracted from previous cross section measurements and that recently measured via polarization transfer in Hall A at Jefferson Lab.

  16. A Modified Version of XLACS-II for Processing ENDF Data into Multigroup Neutron Cross Sections in AMPX Master Library Format.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1982-05-07

    XLACS-IIA calculates fine-group averaged neutron cross sections from ENDF data. Its primary purpose is to produce full range multigroup libraries for the XSDRN-PM program. It also serves this purpose in the AMPX system. Provisions are included for treating fast, resonance, and thermal ENDF/B data. Fine-group energy structures and expansion orders used to represent differential cross sections for XSDRN can be arbitrarily specified by the user. Cross sections can be averaged over an arbitrary user-supplied weightingmore » function or by any of several built-in weighting functions.« less

  17. Measurements of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 235/U fission cross sections and their ratio for neutron energies from 100 ev to 50 kev

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, A.A.; Kolosovskii, A.G.; Kuznetsov, S.P.; Medvedev, A.N.; Samsonov, A.E.; Tolstikov, V.A.

    1980-07-01

    Values for the ratio of the /sup 239/Pu and /sup 235/U fission cross sections over the energy intervals are in good agreement with Carlson's data. Carlson's data were normalized by the threshold method and also to Lemmel's data, which in turn were normalized to the thermal region. The totality of the data listed on the /sup 235/U fission cross section, Carlson's data, and our results for the ratio of the fission cross sections are inconsistent with the average energy dependence of /sigma/sub //f (/sup 239/Pu) reported in recent papers by Gwin, Gayther, and Ryabov.

  18. Test plan for sonic drilling at the Hanford Site in FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, G.W.

    1993-07-08

    This test plan describes the field demonstration of the sonic drilling system being conducted as a coordinated effort between the VOC-Arid ID (Integrated Demonstration) and the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride ERA (Expedited Response Action) programs at Hanford. The purpose of this test is to evaluate the Water Development Corporation`s drilling system, modify components as necessary and determine compatible drilling applications for the sonic drilling method for use at facilities in the DOE complex. The sonic demonstration is being conducted as the first field test under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) which involves the US Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Hanford Company and Water Development Corporation. The sonic drilling system will be used to drill a 45 degree vadose zone well, two vertical wells at the VOC-Arid ID site, and several test holes at the Drilling Technology Test Site north of the 200 Area fire station. Testing at other locations will depend on the performance of the drilling method. Performance of this technology will be compared to the baseline drilling method (cable-tool).

  19. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Koji; /Tsukuba U.

    2009-03-01

    Top quarks are predominantly produced in pairs via the strong interaction in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV . The top quark has a weak isospin 1/2, composing a weak isospin doublet with the bottom quark. This characteristic predicts not only top quark pair production via strong interaction but also single production together with a bottom quark via weak interaction. However, finding single top quark production is challenging since it is rarely produced ({sigma}{sub singletop} = 2.9 pb) against background processes with the same final state like W+jets and t{bar t}. A measurement of electroweak single top production probes the W-t-b vertex, which provides a direct determination of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |V{sub tb}|. The sample offers a source of almost 100% polarized top quarks. This thesis describes an optimized search for s-channel single top quark production and a measurement of the single top production cross section using 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data accumulated with the CDF detector. We are using events with one high-p{sub T} lepton, large missing E{sub T} and two identified b-quark jets where one jet is identified using a secondary vertex tagger, called SecVtx, and the other jet is identified using SecVtx or a jet probability tagger, called JetProb. In this analysis we have developed a kinematics fitter and a likelihood-based separator between signal and background. As a result, we found that the probability (p-value) that the candidate events originate from a background fluctuation in the absence of single top s-channel production is 0.003, which is equivalent to 2.7 {sigma} deviations in Gaussian statistics, and this excess corresponds to the single top s-channel cross section of 2.38{sub -0.84}{sup +1.01} pb. An observed value of |V{sub tb}| is 1.43{sub -0.26}{sup +0.38}(experimental) {+-} 0.11(theory). We also set the 95% CL. upper limit of {sigma}{sub s} = 4.15 pb for the s-channel production cross section.

  20. Measurement of the single top production cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; /Buenos Aires U.

    2010-05-01

    This thesis describes a search for singly produced top quarks via an electroweak vertex in head-on proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The analysis uses a total of 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at Fermilab, corresponding to two different run periods of the Tevatron collider. Two channels contribute to single top quark production at the Tevatron, the s-channel and the t-channel. In the s-channel, a virtual W boson is produced from the aniquilation of a quark and an antiquark and a top and a bottom quarks are produced from the W decay. The top quark decays almost exclusively into a W boson and a bottom quark. Final states are considered in which the W boson decays leptonically into an electron or a muon plus a neutrino. Thus, at the detector level, the final state characterizing the s-channel contains one lepton, missing energy accounting for the neutrino, and two jets from the two bottom quarks. In the t-channel, the final state has an additional jet coming from a light quark. Clearly, a precise reconstruction of the events requires a precise measurement of the energy of the jets. A multivariate technique, Bayesian neural networks, is used to extract the single top signal from the overwhelming background still left after event selection. A Bayesian likelihood probability is then computed to measure the single top cross section. Assuming the observed excess is due to single top events, the measured single top quark production cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.70{sub -0.93}{sup +1.18} pb. The observed excess is associated with a p-value of (3.2 {+-} 2.3) x 10{sup -8}, assuming the background-only hypothesis. This p-value corresponds to an excess over background of 5.4 standard deviations for a Gaussian density. The p-value computed using the standard model signal cross section of 3.46 pb is (22.7 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -6}, corresponding to an expected significance of 4

  1. Charged-pion cross sections and double-helicity asymmetries in polarized p+p collisions at ?s =200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-02-02

    We present midrapidity charged-pion invariant cross sections, the ratio of the ??to ?? cross sections and the charge-separated double-spin asymmetries in polarized p+p collisions at ?s = 200 GeV. While the cross section measurements are consistent within the errors of next-to-leadingorder (NLO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics predictions (pQCD), the same calculations over estimate the ratio of the charged-pion cross sections. This discrepancy arises from the cancellation of the substantial systematic errors associated with the NLO-pQCD predictions in the ratio and highlights the constraints these data will place on flavor dependent pion fragmentation functions. The charge-separated pion asymmetries presented here sample anmorex range of ~0.030.16 and provide unique information on the sign of the gluon-helicity distribution.less

  2. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section with an in situ Calibration of $b$-jet Identification Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-07-01

    A measurement of the top-quark pair-production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.12 fb{sup -1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab is presented. Decays of top-quark pairs into the final states e{nu} + jets and {mu}{nu} + jets are selected, and the cross section and the b-jet identification efficiency are determined using a new measurement technique which requires that the measured cross sections with exactly one and multiple identified b-quarks from the top-quark decays agree. Assuming a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, a cross section of 8.5 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst.) pb is measured.

  3. Charged-pion cross sections and double-helicity asymmetries in polarized p+p collisions at s=200??GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Taani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; et al

    2015-02-02

    We present midrapidity charged-pion invariant cross sections, the ratio of the ?? to ?? cross sections and the charge-separated double-spin asymmetries in polarized p+p collisions at ?s = 200 GeV. While the cross section measurements are consistent within the errors of next-to-leadingorder (NLO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics predictions (pQCD), the same calculations over estimate the ratio of the charged-pion cross sections. This discrepancy arises from the cancellation of the substantial systematic errors associated with the NLO-pQCD predictions in the ratio and highlights the constraints these data will place on flavor dependent pion fragmentation functions. Thus, the charge-separated pion asymmetries presented heremoresample an x range of ~0.030.16 and provide unique information on the sign of the gluon-helicity distribution.less

  4. Charged-pion cross sections and double-helicity asymmetries in polarized p + p collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Appelt, E.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belmont, R.; Ben-Benjamin, J.; Bennett, R.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Broxmeyer, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; D’Orazio, L.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En’yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, I.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harper, C.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; John, D.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotov, D.; Král, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O’Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rubin, J. G.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Savastio, M.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shim, H. H.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Sodre, T.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Togawa, M.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Utsunomiya, K.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.

    2015-02-02

    We present midrapidity charged-pion invariant cross sections, the ratio of the π⁻ to π⁺ cross sections and the charge-separated double-spin asymmetries in polarized p+p collisions at √s = 200 GeV. While the cross section measurements are consistent within the errors of next-to-leadingorder (NLO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics predictions (pQCD), the same calculations over estimate the ratio of the charged-pion cross sections. This discrepancy arises from the cancellation of the substantial systematic errors associated with the NLO-pQCD predictions in the ratio and highlights the constraints these data will place on flavor dependent pion fragmentation functions. Thus, the charge-separated pion asymmetries presented here sample an x range of ~0.03–0.16 and provide unique information on the sign of the gluon-helicity distribution.

  5. Charged-pion cross sections and double-helicity asymmetries in polarized p + p collisions at √s = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Ta’ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Andrews, K. R.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; et al

    2015-02-02

    We present midrapidity charged-pion invariant cross sections, the ratio of the π⁻ to π⁺ cross sections and the charge-separated double-spin asymmetries in polarized p+p collisions at √s = 200 GeV. While the cross section measurements are consistent within the errors of next-to-leadingorder (NLO) perturbative quantum chromodynamics predictions (pQCD), the same calculations over estimate the ratio of the charged-pion cross sections. This discrepancy arises from the cancellation of the substantial systematic errors associated with the NLO-pQCD predictions in the ratio and highlights the constraints these data will place on flavor dependent pion fragmentation functions. Thus, the charge-separated pion asymmetries presented heremore » sample an x range of ~0.03–0.16 and provide unique information on the sign of the gluon-helicity distribution.« less

  6. Measurement of charged and neutral current {ital e}{sup {minus}}{ital p} deep inelastic scattering cross sections at high {ital Q}{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R.L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.; Katz, U.F.; Mari, S.M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, C.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G.P.; Heath, H.F.; Llewellyn, T.J.; Morgado, C.J.S.; Norman, D.J.P.; O`Mara, J.A.; Tapper, R.J.; Wilson, S.S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R.R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J.A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P.B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jelen, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajac, J.; Kotanski, A.; Przybycien, M.; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J.K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasinski, M.; Gilkinson, D.J.; Glasman, C.; Goettlicher, P.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hessling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Koepke, L.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Loehr, B.; Loewe, M.; Lueke, D.; Manczak, O.; Ng, J.S.T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.

    1995-08-07

    Deep inelastic {ital e}{sup {minus}}{ital p} scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared {ital Q}{sup 2} above 400GeV{sup 2} using the ZEUS detector at the HERA {ital ep} collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections {ital d}{sigma}/{ital dQ}{sup 2} are presented. From the {ital Q}{sup 2} dependence of the CC cross section, the mass term in the CC propagator is determined to be {ital M}{sub {ital W}}=76{plus_minus}16{plus_minus}13 GeV.

  7. Measurement of the proton-air cross-section at $\\sqrt{s}=57$ TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration, Auger

    2012-08-01

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [505 {+-} 22(stat){sub -36}{sup +28}(syst)] mb is found.

  8. Measurement of the $s$-channel Single Top Quark Cross Section at the CDF Experiment and Contributions to the Evidence of $H\\rightarrow bb$ at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hao

    2014-08-01

    In this thesis, we present the measurement of the s-channel single top quark production cross section. In the cross section measurement we use data generated by protonantiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF Run II detector. The total data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1.

  9. Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section at √s=57 TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almeda, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; et al

    2012-08-10

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [505±22(stat)+28-36(syst)] mb is found.

  10. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the Φ⁻⁻(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egiyan, H.; Langheinrich, J.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Holtrop, M.; Lu, H.; Mattione, P.; Mutchler, G.; Park, K.; Smith, E. S.; et al

    2012-01-30

    We searched for the Φ⁻⁻(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the Ξ⁻π⁻-decay channel using CLAS. The invariant-mass spectrum of the Ξ⁻π⁻ system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M=1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90%-confidence-level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of Φ⁻⁻(1860) with a consecutive decay intoΞ⁻π⁻ in the photon-energy range 4.5GeVγ<5.5GeV.

  11. Elastic scattering and total reaction cross section for the {sup 6}He+{sup 58}Ni system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morcelle, V.; Lichtenthler, R.; Lpine-Szily, A.; Guimares, V.; Gasques, L.; Scarduelli, V.; Condori, R. Pampa; Leistenschneider, E.; Mendes Jr, D. R.; Faria, P. N. de; Pires, K. C. C.; Barioni, A.; Morais, M. C.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Zamora, J. C.

    2014-11-11

    Elastic scattering measurements of {sup 6}He + {sup 58}Ni system have been performed at the laboratory energy of 21.7 MeV. The {sup 6}He secondary beam was produced by a transfer reaction {sup 9}Be ({sup 7}Li, {sup 6}He) and impinged on {sup 58}Ni and {sup 197}Au targets, using the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, RIBRAS, installed in the Pelletron Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the University of So Paulo, Brazil. The elastic angular distribution was obtained in the angular range from 15 to 80 in the center of mass frame. Optical model calculations have been performed using a hybrid potential to fit the experimental data. The total reaction cross section was derived.

  12. AN INTEGRAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT TO INFER ACTINIDE CAPTURE CROSS-SECTIONS FROM THORIUM TO CALIFORNIUM WITH ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Youinou; M. Salvatores; M. Paul; R. Pardo; G. Palmiotti; F. Kondev; G. Imel

    2010-04-01

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 248Cm.

  13. Code System for Producing Pointwise and Multigroup Neutron and Photon Cross Sections from ENDF/B Data.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    Version 04 The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a comprehensive computer code package for producing pointwise and multigroup neutron and photon cross sections from ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data. This is the last NJOY-91 series. It uses the same module structure as the earlier versions and its graphics options depend on DISSPLA. This new release, designated NJOY91.119, includes bug fixes, improvements in several modules, and some new capabilities. Information on the changes is included inmore » the README file. A new test problem was added to test some ENDF-6 features, including Reich-Moore resonance reconstruction, energy-angle matrices in GROUPR, and energy-angle distributions in ACER. The 91.119 release is basically configured for UNIX.« less

  14. Measurement of the Single Top Quark Production Cross Section at $\\sqrt {s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla, Mark Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Within the standard model top quarks are predicted to be most often produced in pairs via the strong interaction. However they can also be produced singly through the weak interation. This is a rarer process with many experimental challenges. It is interesting because it provides a new window to search for evidence of physics beyond the standard model picture, such as a fourth generation of quarks or to search for insight into the Higgs Mechanism. Single top production also provides a direct way to calculate the CKM matrix element Vtb. This thesis presents new measurements for single top quark production in the s+t, s and t channels using 5.4 fb-1 of data collected at the DØ detector at Fermilab in Batavia, IL. The analysis was performed using Boosted decision trees to separate signal from background and Bayesian statistcs to calculate all the cross sections.

  15. Measurement of the Neutron Induced Fission Cross Section on Transuranic (TRU) Elements at the n_TOF Facility at CERN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastinu, P. F.; Koehler, Paul Edward; Collaboration, n_TOF

    2007-01-01

    During the 2004 campaign, the n{_}TOF collaboration measured neutron fission cross sections for 233U, 241,243Am, 245Cm, as well as the fission standards 235,238U, using a sealed Fission Ionization Chamber (FIC). The setup included a total of 16 targets and 18 electrodes mounted together in a 50-cm length chamber, allowing the measurements of all isotopes at the same time, thus in the same experimental conditions. A brief description of the facility and of the detector setup will be presented followed by the preliminary results of the analysis of 235U, 233U, and 245Cm from thermal energies up to some tenths of MeV

  16. Energy dependence of the /sup 238/U thermal capture cross section. [25 to 450/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, N.P.; Owais, M.

    1980-01-01

    Integral activation measurements supported the thermal neutron energy dependence of /sup 238/U assumed in the ENDF/B-IV evaluation. The activation measurements were conducted in a thermally insulated graphite block at the side of the SP Reactor. The block was thermally heated to temperatures up to 450/sup 0/C. In addition to heating, gasolinium filters were used to tailor the neutron spectra incident on the foils. The metallic foils consisted of copper and depleted uranium. Copper served as the 1/v reference. Activation ratios of /sup 238/U to /sup 63/Cu in the tailored spectrum were compared with corresponding ratios in a well thermalized flux at room temperature. The difference in this ratio is strongly dependent on the energy dependence of the /sup 238/U cross section. 8 figures, 1 table.

  17. Measurement of the WW+WZ Production Cross Section Using the Lepton+Jets Final State at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-11-01

    We report two complementary measurements of the diboson (WW + WZ) cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The first method uses the dijet invariant mass distribution while the second method uses more of the kinematic information in the event through matrix-element calculations of the signal and background processes and has a higher sensitivity. The result from the second method has a signal significance of 5.4{sigma} and is the first observation of WW + WZ production using this signature. Combining the results from both methods gives {sigma}{sub WW+WZ} = 16.0 {+-} 3.3 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  18. Precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, R.E.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-03-01

    A precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (A{sub LR}) for Z boson production by e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions has been attained at the Slac Linear Collider with the SLD detector. We describe this measurement for the 1993 data run, emphasizing the significant improvements in polarized beam operation which took place for this run, where the luminosity-weighted electron beam polarization averaged 62.6 {plus_minus} 1.2 %. Preliminary 1993 results for A{sub LR} are presented. When combined with the (less precise) 1992 result, the preliminary result for the effective weak mixing angle is sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W {sup eff}} = 0.2290 {plus_minus} 0.0010.

  19. Nuclear Data Uncertainty Propagation in Depletion Calculations Using Cross Section Uncertainties in One-group or Multi-group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Díez, C.J.; Cabellos, O.; Martínez, J.S.

    2015-01-15

    Several approaches have been developed in last decades to tackle nuclear data uncertainty propagation problems of burn-up calculations. One approach proposed was the Hybrid Method, where uncertainties in nuclear data are propagated only on the depletion part of a burn-up problem. Because only depletion is addressed, only one-group cross sections are necessary, and hence, their collapsed one-group uncertainties. This approach has been applied successfully in several advanced reactor systems like EFIT (ADS-like reactor) or ESFR (Sodium fast reactor) to assess uncertainties on the isotopic composition. However, a comparison with using multi-group energy structures was not carried out, and has to be performed in order to analyse the limitations of using one-group uncertainties.

  20. ENDF/B-VI Release 3 Cross Section Library for Use with the MCNP Monte Carlo Code.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-12-16

    Version 00 This continuous energy cross-section data library for MCNP is in ACE format. The present library was satisfactorily tested in thermal and fast criticality benchmarks. For analyses below 20 MeV, MCB63NEA.BOLlB was applied also in cell and core calculations dedicated to the study of the subcritical accelerator driven systems (ADS). This library provides users an additional ENDF/B-VI based, continuous-energy and multi-temperature library for MCNP with an important feature: there is a perfect consistency withmore » the twin library MCJEFF22NEA.BOLIB already released, in terms of nuclear data processing calculation methodology. Both libraries are based on the NJOY-94.66 data processing system. This may be important, in particular, for the users involved in nuclear data validation who have already used the MCJEF22NEA.BOLIB library.« less

  1. Status report on multigroup cross section generation code development for high-fidelity deterministic neutronics simulation system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, W. S.; Lee, C. H.

    2008-05-16

    Under the fast reactor simulation program launched in April 2007, development of an advanced multigroup cross section generation code was initiated in July 2007, in conjunction with the development of the high-fidelity deterministic neutron transport code UNIC. The general objectives are to simplify the existing multi-step schemes and to improve the resolved and unresolved resonance treatments. Based on the review results of current methods and the fact that they have been applied successfully to fast critical experiment analyses and fast reactor designs for last three decades, the methodologies of the ETOE-2/MC{sup 2}-2/SDX code system were selected as the starting set of methodologies for multigroup cross section generation for fast reactor analysis. As the first step for coupling with the UNIC code and use in a parallel computing environment, the MC{sup 2}-2 code was updated by modernizing the memory structure and replacing old data management package subroutines and functions with FORTRAN 90 based routines. Various modifications were also made in the ETOE-2 and MC{sup 2}-2 codes to process the ENDF/B-VII.0 data properly. Using the updated ETOE-2/MC{sup 2}-2 code system, the ENDF/B-VII.0 data was successfully processed for major heavy and intermediate nuclides employed in sodium-cooled fast reactors. Initial verification tests of the MC{sup 2}-2 libraries generated from ENDF/B-VII.0 data were performed by inter-comparison of twenty-one group infinite dilute total cross sections obtained from MC{sup 2}-2, VIM, and NJOY. For almost all nuclides considered, MC{sup 2}-2 cross sections agreed very well with those from VIM and NJOY. Preliminary validation tests of the ENDF/B-VII.0 libraries of MC{sup 2}-2 were also performed using a set of sixteen fast critical benchmark problems. The deterministic results based on MC{sup 2}-2/TWODANT calculations were in good agreement with MCNP solutions within {approx}0.25% {Delta}{rho}, except a few small LANL fast assemblies

  2. Cs/sup +/ + Cs/sup +/ charge-transfer and ionization cross-section measurements by a plasma-target technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stalder, K.R.

    1982-05-01

    A Q machine plasma target using cesium was constructed to serve as a target for a beam of Cs/sup +/ ions. The sum of charge transfer and ionization cross sections was determined by measuring the growth of the Cs/sup + +/ component of the beam as a function of the plasma radial line density. The measured cross section varies approximately linearly with energy between 50 and 110 keV. This loss cross section is 0.47 +- .11 x 10/sup -16/ cm/sup 2/ at 110 keV. These results have been compared to the cross section determined by a crossed-beam technique. The agreement between the results of the experiments is good at energies above 75 keV. A discrepancy between the results at lower energies indicated a systematic error in one of the techniques. Theoretical estimates of the cross section recently have begun to agree with the magnitude of the cross section but have not fully explained the energy dependence.

  3. A measurement of the top pair production cross-section in the dilepton channel using lepton plus track selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Corrinne Elaine; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-06-01

    Using 1.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron, they measure the t{bar t} production cross section in events with two leptons, significant missing transverse energy, and {ge} 2 jets. As the Run II dataset grows, more stringent tests of Standard Model predictions for the top quark sector are becoming possible. The dilepton channel, where both top quarks decay t {yields} Wb {yields} {ell}{nu}b, is of particular interest due to its high purity even in the absence of a b jet 'tagging' requirement. Use of an isolated track as the second lepton significant increases the dilepton acceptance, at the price of some increase in background, particular from W + jets events where one of the jets is identified as a lepton. With the amount of data available, it has been possible to improve the estimate of the contribution from that background, reflected in a reduced systematic uncertainty. Assuming a branching ratio of BR(W {yields} {ell}{nu}) = 10.8% and a top mass of m{sub t} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, the measured cross-section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t}) = 8.3 {+-} 1.3(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst.) {+-} 0.5(lumi.) pb. The result is consistent with the Standard Model prediction of 6.7{sub -0.9}{sup +0.7} pb and represents a significant improvement in precision over previous results using this selection.

  4. Measurement and Basic Physics Committee of the US cross-section evaluation working group. Annual report 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.L.; McLane, V.

    1996-11-01

    The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with the responsibility for organizing and overseeing the U.S. cross-section evaluation effort. It`s main product is the official U.S. evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. The current version of this file is Version VI. All evaluations included in ENDF are reviewed and approved by CSEWG and issued by the U.S. Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. CSEWG is comprised of volunteers from the U.S. nuclear data community who possess expertise in evaluation methodologies and who collectively have been responsible for producing most of the evaluations included in ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the U.S. were declining at an alarming rate and needed all possible encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain a network of experimentalists in the U.S. that would provide needed encouragement to the national nuclear data measurement effort through improved communication and facilitation of collaborative activities. In 1994, an additional charge was added to the responsibilities of this Committee, namely, to serve as an interface between the more applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. This annual report is the second such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from eleven laboratories in the U.S. which have been prepared by members of the Committee and submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing. It is hoped that the information provided here on the work that is going on at the reporting laboratories will prove interesting and stimulating to the readers.

  5. R-Matrix Evaluation of 16O Neutron Cross Sections up to 6.3 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayer, R.O.

    2000-08-21

    In this paper we describe an evaluation of {sup 16}O neutron cross sections in the resolved resonance region with the multilevel Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. Resonance analyses were performed with the computer code SAMMY [LA98] which utilizes Bayes method, a generalized least squares technique. Over the years the nuclear community has developed a collection of evaluated nuclear data for applications in thermal, fast reactor, and fusion systems. However, typical neutron spectra in criticality safety applications are different from the spectra relevant to thermal, fast reactor, and fusion systems. In fact, the neutron spectra important for these non-reactor systems appear to peak in the epithermal energy range. Nuclear data play a major role in the calculation of the criticality safety margins for these systems. A thorough examination of how the present collection of nuclear data evaluations behaves in criticality safety calculations is needed. Many older evaluations will probably need to be revised, and new evaluations will be needed. Oxygen is an important element in criticality safety applications where oxides are present in significant abundance. The existing ENDF/B-VI.5 evaluation is expressed in terms of point-wise cross sections derived from the analysis of G. Hale [HA91]. Unfortunately such an evaluation is not directly useful for resonance analysis of data from samples in which oxygen is combined with other elements; for that purpose, Reich-Moore resonance parameters are needed. This paper addresses the task of providing those parameters. In the following sections we discuss the data, resonance analysis procedure, and results.

  6. 7Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7Li(, '): emission yield 1.0 - 3.4 1 01182012 2011YA02 7Li(, ): elastic scattering differential 1.0 - 4.5 cm 170 07192011 7Li(, p): differential...

  7. 4He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    File X4 Dataset Date Added 1978HI04 4He(, ): elastic scattering excitation function 32.6 - 35.4 30.5, 53.7, 54.7, 71.5, 90.0 0424...

  8. 3He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3He(pol. p, +): differential 200, 300, 400 X4 10302014 1985EP01 3He(p, 2p), (p, pd): 300, 450 X4 10302014 1977FR05 3He(p, p): differential 415, 600, 800 cm ...

  9. Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MB preliminary CCQE results (hep-ex0602050) : - from 12 of current data set ... is currently being performed with full data set and improved MCevent reconstruction. ...

  10. 9Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S-factor Ecm 0.16 - 1.87 S(E) X4 01242012 2011GI05 9Be(, n): for n1 0.3 - 7.9 linear scale, log scale 06182012 1968DA05 9Be(, n): excitation function at 0...

  11. Cross-Section Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section Measurement of 2 H(n,np)n at 16 MeV in Symmetric Constant Relative Energy Configurations Alexander Hoff Couture A dissertation submitted to the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Chapel Hill 2011 Approved by: T. B. Clegg, Advisor C. R. Howell, Advisor H. J. Karwowski, Reader J. Lu, Reader J. Engel, Reader c 2011 Alexander Hoff Couture ALL

  12. Sonic Temperature Sensor for Food Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akers, D. W.; Porter, A. M.; Tow, D. M.

    1997-09-01

    The lack of adequate temperature measurement is the major barrier to the development of more efficient and better quality food processing methods. The objective of the sonic temperature sensor for food processing project is to develop a prototype sensor system to noninvasively measure the interior temperature of particulate foods during processing. The development of the prototype sensor is a collaborative project with the National Food Processors Association. The project is based on the property of materials that involves a change in the temperature of a material having a corresponding change in the speed of sound. The approach for the sonic sensor system is to determine the speed of sound through particulate foods using a tomographic reconstruction process.

  13. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S.F.

    2012-12-15

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  14. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Mittag, G.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Strologas, J.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Biasotto, M.; Branca, A.; Dall’Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Fantinel, S.; Fanzago, F.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell’Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D’imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Moon, D. H.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D’Alfonso, M.; d’Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Guida, R.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rojo, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W. -S.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R. -S.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A. -M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Wu, Z.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D’Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O’Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y. -J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Smith, G.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, The CMS

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton–proton collision data at √s = 8TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60–120GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 ± 8 (exp) ± 25 (theo) ± 30 (lumi)\\,pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section dσ/dm in the dilepton mass range 15–2000GeV is measured and corrected to the full phase space. The double-differential cross section d2σ/dmd|y| is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at √s = 7 and 8TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. Furthermore, the measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.

  15. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; et al

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton–proton collision data at √s = 8TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60–120GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 ± 8 (exp) ± 25 (theo) ± 30 (lumi)\\,pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section dσ/dm in the dilepton mass range 15–2000GeV is measured and corrected to the fullmore » phase space. The double-differential cross section d2σ/dmd|y| is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at √s = 7 and 8TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. Furthermore, the measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.« less

  16. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ - 8 TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60-120 GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 +/- 8 (exp) +/- 25 (theo) +/- 30 (lumi) pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section $d\\sigma/dm$ in the dilepton mass range 15 to 2000moreGeV is measured and corrected to the full phase space. The double-differential cross section $d^2 \\sigma / d(m) d(abs(y))$ is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500 GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. The measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.less

  17. Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part II: Prismatic Reactor Cross Section Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent Descotes

    2011-03-01

    The deep-burn prismatic high temperature reactor is made up of an annular core loaded with transuranic isotopes and surrounded in the center and in the periphery by reflector blocks in graphite. This disposition creates challenges for the neutronics compared to usual light water reactor calculation schemes. The longer mean free path of neutrons in graphite affects the neutron spectrum deep inside the blocks located next to the reflector. The neutron thermalisation in the graphite leads to two characteristic fission peaks at the inner and outer interfaces as a result of the increased thermal flux seen in those assemblies. Spectral changes are seen at least on half of the fuel blocks adjacent to the reflector. This spectral effect of the reflector may prevent us from successfully using the two step scheme -lattice then core calculation- typically used for light water reactors. We have been studying the core without control mechanisms to provide input for the development of a complete calculation scheme. To correct the spectrum at the lattice level, we have tried to generate cross-sections from supercell calculations at the lattice level, thus taking into account part of the graphite surrounding the blocks of interest for generating the homogenised cross-sections for the full-core calculation. This one has been done with 2 to 295 groups to assess if increasing the number of groups leads to more accurate results. A comparison with a classical single block model has been done. Both paths were compared to a reference calculation done with MCNP. It is concluded that the agreement with MCNP is better with supercells, but that the single block model remains quite close if enough groups are kept for the core calculation. 26 groups seems to be a good compromise between time and accu- racy. However, some trials with depletion have shown huge variations of the isotopic composition across a block next to the reflector. It may imply that at least an in- core depletion for the

  18. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullmann, John Leonard; Kawano, Toshihiko; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Haight, Robert Cameron; Jandel, Marian; Mosby, Shea Morgan; O'Donnell, John M.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.; Becker, John A.; Wu, Ching-Yen; Krticka, Milan

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  19. Geometrical and band-structure effects on phonon-limited hole mobility in rectangular cross-sectional germanium nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, H. Mori, S.; Morioka, N.; Suda, J.; Kimoto, T.

    2014-12-21

    We calculated the phonon-limited hole mobility in rectangular cross-sectional [001], [110], [111], and [112]-oriented germanium nanowires, and the hole transport characteristics were investigated. A tight-binding approximation was used for holes, and phonons were described by a valence force field model. Then, scattering probability of holes by phonons was calculated taking account of hole-phonon interaction atomistically, and the linearized Boltzmann's transport equation was solved to calculate the hole mobility at low longitudinal field. The dependence of the hole mobility on nanowire geometry was analyzed in terms of the valence band structure of germanium nanowires, and it was found that the dependence was qualitatively reproduced by considering an average effective mass and the density of states of holes. The calculation revealed that [110] germanium nanowires with large height along the [001] direction show high hole mobility. Germanium nanowires with this geometry are also expected to exhibit high electron mobility in our previous work, and thus they are promising for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) applications.

  20. Cross Section Measurements of High-p(T) Dilepton Final-State Processes Using a Global Fitting Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria U., Santander /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2006-12-01

    The authors present a new method for studying high-p{sub T} dilepton events (e{sup {+-}}e{sup {-+}}, {mu}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}, e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}) and simultaneously extracting the production cross sections of p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t}, p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}, and p{bar p} {yields} Z{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. They perform a likelihood fit to the dilepton data in a parameter space defined by the missing transverse energy and the number of jets in the event. The results, which use 360 pb{sup -1} of data recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, are {sigma}(t{bar t}) = 8.5{sub -2.2}{sup +2.7} pb, {sigma}(W{sup +}W{sup -}) = 16.3{sub -4.4}{sup +5.2} pb, and {sigma}(Z{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) = 291{sub -46}{sup +50} pb.

  1. Validation of nuclear criticality safety software and 27 energy group ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B.L. Jr.; D`Aquila, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    The original validation report, POEF-T-3636, was documented in August 1994. The document was based on calculations that were executed during June through August 1992. The statistical analyses in Appendix C and Appendix D were completed in October 1993. This revision is written to clarify the margin of safety being used at Portsmouth for nuclear criticality safety calculations. This validation gives Portsmouth NCS personnel a basis for performing computerized KENO V.a calculations using the Lockheed Martin Nuclear Criticality Safety Software. The first portion of the document outlines basic information in regard to validation of NCSS using ENDF/B-IV 27-group cross sections on the IBM3090 at ORNL. A basic discussion of the NCSS system is provided, some discussion on the validation database and validation in general. Then follows a detailed description of the statistical analysis which was applied. The results of this validation indicate that the NCSS software may be used with confidence for criticality calculations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. For calculations of Portsmouth systems using the specified codes and systems covered by this validation, a maximum k{sub eff} including 2{sigma} of 0.9605 or lower shall be considered as subcritical to ensure a calculational margin of safety of 0.02. The validation of NCSS on the IBM 3090 at ORNL was extended to include NCSS on the IBM 3090 at K-25.

  2. New Opportunity for Improved Nuclear Forensics, Radiochemical Diagnostics, and Nuclear Astrophysics: Need for a Total-Cross-Section Apparatus at the LANSCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koehler, Paul E.; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna C.; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Couture, Aaron J.; Engle, Jonathan; Keksis, August L.; Nortier, Francois M.; Ullmann, John L.

    2014-03-12

    Total-cross-section measurements are feasible on a much wider range of radioactive samples than (n,?) cross-section measurements, and information extracted from the former can be used to set tight constraints on the latter. There are many (n,?) cross sections of great interest to radiochemical diagnostics, nuclear forensics, and nuclear astrophysics which are beyond the reach of current direct measurement, that could be obtained in this way. Our simulations indicate that measurements can be made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for samples as small as 10?g. There are at least 40 high-interest nuclides which should be measurable, including 88Y,167,168,170,171Tm, 173,174Lu, and189,190,192Ir.

  3. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section in p p̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-07-06

    The authors present a new measurement of the production cross section σ(pp̄ = ZZ) at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, obtained from the analysis of the four charged lepton final state ℓ+ℓ-ℓ`+ℓ`- (ℓ, ℓ` = e or μ). They observe ten candidate events with an expected background of 0.37 ± 0.13 events. The measured cross section σ(pp̄ =ZZ) = 1.26-0.37+0.47 (stat) ± 0.14 (syst) pb is in agreement with NLO QCD predictions. This result is combined with a previous result from the ZZ = ℓ+ℓ- νν̄ channel resulting in a combined cross section of σ(pp̄ = ZZ) =more » 1.40-0.37+0.43 (stat) ±0.14 (syst) pb.« less

  4. Comparison of the Z$/\\gamma^{*}$ + jets to $\\gamma$ + jets cross sections in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-20

    In this study, a comparison of the differential cross sections for the processes Z/γ * + jets and photon (γ)+jets is presented. The measurements are based on data collected with the CMS detector at √s = 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1. The differential cross sections and their ratios are presented as functions of pT. The measurements are also shown as functions of the jet multiplicity. Differential cross sections are obtained as functions of the ratio of the Z/γ* pT to the sum of all jet transverse momenta and of the ratio of the Z/γ* pT to the leading jet transverse momentum. The data are corrected for detector effects and are compared to simulations based on several QCD calculations.

  5. Measurement of the ttbar production cross section in the all-jets final state in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-22

    The cross section for tt production in the all-jets final state is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the LHC with the CMS detector, in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.4 fb-1. The inclusive cross section is found to be 275.6 6.1 (stat) 37.8 (syst) 7.2 (lumi) pb. The normalized differential cross sections are measured as a function of the top quark transverse momenta, pT, and compared to predictions from quantum chromodynamics. The results are reported at detector, parton, and particle levels. In all cases, the measured top quark pT spectra are significantly softer than theoretical predictions.

  6. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? and Z?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.

  7. Measurement of the WZ and ZZ production cross sections using leptonic final states in 8.6 fb? of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Oteroy y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.

    2012-06-12

    We study the processes pp??WZ?l?l?l? and pp??ZZ?l?l???, where l=e or ?. Using 8.6 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we measure the WZ production cross section to be 4.50+0.630.66 pb which is consistent with, but slightly larger than, the prediction of the standard model. The ZZ cross section is measured to be 1.640.46 pb, in agreement with a prediction of the standard model. Combination with an earlier analysis of the ZZ?l?l?l?l? channel yields a ZZ cross section of 1.44+0.350.34 pb.

  8. Measurement of the ttbar production cross section in the all-jets final state in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$=8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-03-08

    The cross section for tt production in the all-jets final state is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the LHC with the CMS detector, in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.4 fb-1. The inclusive cross section is found to be 275.6 ±6.1 (stat) ± 37.8 (syst) ± 7.2 (lumi) pb. The normalized differential cross sections are measured as a function of the top quark transverse momenta, pT, and compared to predictions from quantum chromodynamics. The results are reported at detector, parton, and particle levels. In all cases, the measured top quark pTmore » spectra are significantly softer than theoretical predictions.« less

  9. Comparison of the Z$$/\\gamma^{*}$$ + jets to $$\\gamma$$ + jets cross sections in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-20

    In this study, a comparison of the differential cross sections for the processes Z/γ * + jets and photon (γ)+jets is presented. The measurements are based on data collected with the CMS detector at √s = 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1. The differential cross sections and their ratios are presented as functions of pT. The measurements are also shown as functions of the jet multiplicity. Differential cross sections are obtained as functions of the ratio of the Z/γ* pT to the sum of all jet transverse momenta and of the ratio of the Z/γ* pTmore » to the leading jet transverse momentum. The data are corrected for detector effects and are compared to simulations based on several QCD calculations.« less

  10. Measurement of the WZ and ZZ production cross sections using leptonic final states in 8.6 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-06-12

    We study the processes pp̄→WZ→l±νl⁺l⁻ and pp̄→ZZ→l⁺l⁻νν¯, where l=e or μ. Using 8.6 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we measure the WZ production cross section to be 4.50+0.63–0.66 pb which is consistent with, but slightly larger than, the prediction of the standard model. The ZZ cross section is measured to be 1.64±0.46 pb, in agreement with a prediction of the standard model. Combination with an earlier analysis of the ZZ→l⁺l⁻l⁺l⁻ channel yields a ZZ cross section of 1.44+0.35–0.34 pb.

  11. Next-to-leading log resummation of scalar and pseudoscalar Higgs boson differential cross sections at the CERN LHC and Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, B.

    2004-09-01

    The region of small transverse momentum in qq- and gg-initiated processes must be studied in the framework of resummation to account for the large, logarithmically enhanced contributions to physical observables. In this paper, we will calculate the fixed order next-to-leading order perturbative total and differential cross sections for both a Standard Model scalar Higgs boson and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model's pseudoscalar Higgs boson in the Heavy Quark Effective Theory where the mass of the top quark is taken to be infinite. Resummation coefficients B{sub g}{sup (2)},C{sub gg}{sup (2)} for the total cross-section resummation for the pseudoscalar case are given, as well as C{sub gg}{sup (1)} for the differential cross section.

  12. Measurement of the Zγ production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Zγ in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. Furthermore, the differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. These observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. As a result, limits on anomalous triple gaugemore » couplings of ZZγ and Zγγ are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.« less

  13. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? andmoreZ?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.less

  14. Measurement of the production cross-section of a single top quark in association with a W boson at 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-11

    The cross-section for the production of a single top quark in association with a W boson in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 is measured. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Events containing two leptons and one central b-jet are selected. The Wt signal is separated from the backgrounds using boosted decision trees, each of which combines a number of discriminating variables into one classifier. Production of Wt events is observed with a significance of 7.7σ. The cross-section is extracted in amore » profile likelihood fit to the classifier output distributions. The Wt cross-section, inclusive of decay modes, is measured to be 23.0±1.3(stat.)-3.5+3.2(syst.)±1.1(lumi.) pb. The measured cross-section is used to extract a value for the CKM matrix element |Vtb| of 1.01 ± 0.10 and a lower limit of 0.80 at the 95% confidence level. Furthermore, the cross-section for the production of a top quark and a W boson is also measured in a fiducial acceptance requiring two leptons with p T > 25 GeV and |η| < 2.5, one jet with pT > 20 GeV and |η| < 2.5, and ETmiss >20 GeV, including both Wt and top-quark pair events as signal. The measured value of the fiducial cross-section is 0.85 ± 0.01(stat.) -0.07 +0.06 (syst.)±0.03(lumi.) pb.« less

  15. {sup 48}Ti(n,xnpa{gamma}) reaction cross sections using spallation neutrons for E{sub n} = 1 to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Cooper, J R; Hoffman, R D; Younes, W; Devlin, N; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O

    2005-01-06

    {gamma}-ray excitation functions have been measured for the interaction of fast neutrons with {sup 48}Ti (neutron energy from 1 MeV to 250 MeV). The Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source, at the LANSCE/WNR facility, provided a ''white'' neutron beam which is produced by bombarding a natural W target with a pulsed proton beam. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were measured with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Ge spectrometer, GEANIE. Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections, taking into account the dead-time correction, the target thickness, the detector efficiency, and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). The data analysis is presented here for neutron energies between 1 to 20 MeV. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections for transitions in {sup 47,48}Ti, {sup 48}Sc, and {sup 45}Ca have been determined. These results are compared to Hauser-Feshbach predictions calculated using the STAPRE code, which includes compound nuclear and pre-equilibrium emission. The partial cross sections for {gamma} rays, whose discrete {gamma}-ray cascade path leads to the ground state in {sup 48}Ti, {sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Sc, and {sup 45}Ca have been summed to obtain estimates of the lower limits for reaction cross sections. Partial cross sections for unobserved {gamma}-rays are predicted from the STAPRE code. These lower limits are combined with Hauser-Feshbach calculations to deduce {sup 48}Ti(n,n'){sup 48}Ti, {sup 48}Ti(n,2n){sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Ti(n,p){sup 48}Sc, and {sup 48}Ti(n,{alpha}){sup 45}Ca reaction channel cross sections.

  16. (n,2n) and (n,3n) cross sections of neutron-induced reactions on 150Sm for En from threshold to 35 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dashdorj, D; Mitchell, G; Kawano, T; Becker, J; Wu, C; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R; Kunieda, S

    2009-03-16

    Cross-section measurements were made of prompt discrete {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 35 MeV) on a {sup 150}Sm sample fo 1550 mg/cm{sup 2} of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} enriched to 95.6% in {sup 150}Sm. Results are compared with enhanced Hauser-Feshbach model calculations including the pre-equilibrium reactions. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Incident neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions for thirteen individual {gamma}-rays up to E{sub x} = 0.8 MeV in {sup 149}Sm and one {gamma}-ray transition between the first excited and ground state in {sup 148}Sm were measured. Partial {gamma}-ray cross sections were calculated using GNASH, an enhanced Hauser-Feshbach statistical nuclear reaction model code, and compared with the experimental results. The particle transmission coefficients were calculated with new systematic 'global' optical model potential parameters. The coupled-channel optical model based on the soft rotor model was employed to calculate the particle transmission coefficients. The pre-equilibrium part of the spin distribution in {sup 150}Sm was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshbach, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK) and incorporated into the GNASH reaction model code. the partial cross sections for discrete {gamma}-ray cascade paths leading to the ground state in {sup 149}Sm and {sup 148}Sm have been summed (without double counting) to estimate lower limits for reaction cross sections. These lower limits are combined with Hauser-Feshbach model calculations to deduce the reaction channel cross sections. These reaction channel cross sections agree with previously measured experimental and ENDF/B-VII evaluations.

  17. Measurement of the keV-neutron capture cross section and capture gamma-ray spectrum of isotopes around N=82 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Igashira, Masayuki

    2012-11-12

    The keV-neutron capture cross section and capture {gamma}-ray spectra of nuclides with a neutron magic number N= 82, {sup 139}La and {sup 142}Nd, were newly measured by the time-of-flight method. Capture {gamma}-rays were detected with an anti-Compton NaI(T1) spectrometer, and the pulse-height weighting technique was applied to derive the neutron capture cross section. The results were provided with our previous measurements of other nuclides around N= 82, {sup 140}Ce, {sup 141}Pr, {sup 143}Nd and {sup 145}Nd.

  18. Longitudinal double-spin asymmetry and cross section for inclusivejet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-08-10

    We report a measurement of the longitudinal double-spinasymmetry A_LL and the differential cross section for inclusivemidrapidity jet production in polarized proton collisions at sqrt(s)=200GeV. The cross section data cover transverse momenta 5

  19. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-18

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured for the first time in proton-proton collisions at √s= 13 TeV by theCMS experiment at the CERN LHC, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 42 pb-1. The measurement is performed by analyzing events with at least one electron and one muon of opposite charge, and at least two jets. We then measured the cross section and found that was 769 ± 60 (stat) ± 55 (syst) ± 92 (lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectation from the standard model.

  20. Atmospheric lifetimes and global warming potentials of hydrofluoroethers: Reactivity toward OH, UV spectra, and IR absorption cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orkin, V.L.; Villenave, E.; Huie, R.E.; Kurylo, M.J.

    1999-12-02

    The rate constants for the reactions of OH radicals with the fluorinated ethers, CHF{sub 2}-O-CHF{sub 2} (HFOC-134) and CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}-O-CH{sub 2}CF{sub 3} (HFOC-356mff), were measured using the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique over the temperature range 277--370 K to give the following Arrhenius expressions: k{sub HFOC-356mff}(T) = (2.32{sub {minus}0.41}{sup +0.46}) x 10{sup {minus}12} exp{l{underscore}brace}{minus}(790 {+-} 47)/T{r{underscore}brace} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. On the basis of the analysis of the available experimental results, the following Arrhenius expression can be recommended for the rate constant of the reaction between OH and HFOC-134: k{sub HFOC-134}(T) = (0.82{sub {minus}0.24}{sup +0.34}) x 10{sup {minus}12} exp{l{underscore}brace}{minus}(1,730 {+-} 110)/T{r{underscore}brace} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Atmospheric lifetimes were estimated to be 24.8 years for HFOC-134 (23.8 years based on the results of this study alone) and 0.3 years for HFOC-356mff. Infrared absorption cross sections of HFOC-134, HFOC-356mff, and HFOC-125 (CHF{sub 2}-O-CF{sub 3}) were measured at T = 295 K from 500 to 1,600 cm{sup {minus}1} and the global warming potentials of the three compounds were estimated. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of the ethers were measured between 160 and 220 nm. The general pattern of reactivity of hydrofluoroethers toward OH is discussed.

  1. QSO ABSORPTION SYSTEMS DETECTED IN Ne VIII: HIGH-METALLICITY CLOUDS WITH A LARGE EFFECTIVE CROSS SECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meiring, J. D.; Tripp, T. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Werk, J. K.; Prochaska, J. X. [University of California Observatories-Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [University of California Observatories-Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Howk, J. C. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Jenkins, E. B. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)] [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Lehner, N.; Sembach, K. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    Using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ultraviolet spectra of the z{sub em} = 0.9754 quasar PG1148+549 obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, we study the physical conditions and abundances of Ne VIII+O VI absorption line systems at z{sub abs} = 0.68381, 0.70152, 0.72478. In addition to Ne VIII and O VI, absorption lines from multiple ionization stages of oxygen (O II, O III, O IV) are detected and are well aligned with the more highly ionized species. We show that these absorbers are multiphase systems including hot gas (T Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5.7} K) that produces Ne VIII and O VI, and the gas metallicity of the cool phase ranges from Z = 0.3 Z{sub Sun} to supersolar. The cool ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4} K) phases have densities n{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} and small sizes (<4 kpc); these cool clouds are likely to expand and dissipate, and the Ne VIII may be within a transition layer between the cool gas and a surrounding, much hotter medium. The Ne VIII redshift density, dN/dz{approx}7{sup +7}{sub -3}, requires a large number of these clouds for every L > 0.1 L* galaxy and a large effective absorption cross section ({approx}> 100 kpc), and indeed, we find a star-forming {approx}L {sup *} galaxy at the redshift of the z{sub abs} = 0.72478 system, at an impact parameter of 217 kpc. Multiphase absorbers like these Ne VIII systems are likely to be an important reservoir of baryons and metals in the circumgalactic media of galaxies.

  2. First Measurement of the Ratio sigma_(t-tbar) / sigma_(Z/\\gamma*->ll) and Precise Extraction of the t-tbar Cross Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-04-01

    We report a measurement of the ratio of the t{bar t} to Z/{gamma}* production cross sections in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 4.6 fb{sup -1}, collected by the CDF II detector. The t{bar t} cross section ratio is measured using two complementary methods, a b-jet tagging measurement and a topological approach. By multiplying the ratios by the well-known theoretical Z/{gamma}* {yields} ll cross section predicted by the standard model, the extracted t{bar t} cross sections are effectively insensitive to the uncertainty on luminosity. A best linear unbiased estimate is used to combine both measurements with the result {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.70 {+-} 0.52 pb, for a top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  3. Measurement of the inelastic cross section in proton-lead collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_\\mathrm{NN}}}=$ 5.02 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-15

    The inelastic hadronic cross section in proton-lead collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV is measured with the CMS detector at the LHC. Our data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L = 12.6 0.4 nb-1, has been collected with an unbiased trigger for inclusive particle production. The cross section is obtained from the measured number of proton-lead collisions with hadronic activity produced in the pseudorapidity ranges 3 < ? < 5 and/or -5 < ? < -3, corrected for photon-induced contributions, experimental acceptance, and other instrumental effects. The inelastic cross section is measured to be ?inel(pPb) = 2061 3 (stat) 34 (syst) 72 (lumi) mb. Various Monte Carlo generators, commonly used in heavy ion and cosmic ray physics, are found to reproduce the data within uncertainties. Furthermore, the value of ?inel(pPb) is compatible with that expected from the proton-proton cross section at 5.02 TeV scaled up within a simple Glauber approach to account for multiple scatterings in the lead nucleus, indicating that further net nuclear corrections are small.

  4. The (3He,tf) as a surrogate reaction to determine (n,f) cross sections in the 10 to 20 MeV energy range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basunia, M. S.; Clark, R. M.; Goldblum, B. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Phair, L.; Burke, J. T.; Beausang, C. W.; Bleuel, D. L.; Darakchieva, B.; Dietrich, F. S.; Evtimova, M.; Fallon, P.; Gibelin, J.; Hatarik, R.; Jewett, C. C.; Lesher, S. R.; McMahan, M. A.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Wiedeking, M.

    2009-02-25

    The surrogate reaction 238U(3He,tf) is used to determine the 237Np(n,f) cross section indirectly over an equivalent neutron energy range from 10 to 20 MeV. A self-supporting ~;;761 mu g/cm2 metallic 238U foil was bombarded with a 42 MeV 3He2+ beam from the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Outgoing charged particles and fission fragments were identified using the Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies (STARS), consists of two 140 mu m and one 1000 mu m Micron S2 type silicon detectors. The 237Np(n,f) cross sections, determined indirectly, were compared with the 237Np(n,f) cross section data from direct measurements, the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-VII.0), and the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL 3.3) and found to closely follow those datasets. Use of the (3He,tf) reaction as a surrogate to extract (n,f) cross section in the 10 to 20 MeV equivalent neutron energy is found to be suitable.

  5. Impact of the In-medium Nucleon-nucleon Cross Section Modification on Early-reaction-phase Dynamics Below 100 A MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basrak, Z.; Zoric, M.; Eudes, P.; Sebille, F.

    2009-08-26

    With a semi-classical transport model studied is the impact of the in-medium NN cross section modifications on the early energy transformation, dynamical emission and quasiprojectile properties of the Ar+Ni and Ni+Ni reactions at 52, 74 and 95(90) A MeV.

  6. Measurement of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections are presented using an integrated luminosity of 4.5(4.8) inverse femtobarns in the dimuon (dielectron) channel of proton-proton collision data recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z-peak region (60-120 GeV) is \\sigma(\\ell \\ell) = 986.4 +/- 0.6 (stat.) +/- 5.9 (exp. syst.) +/- 21.7 (th. syst.) +/- 21.7 (lum.) pb for the combination of the dimuon and dielectron channels. Differential cross sections $d\\sigma/dm$ for the dimuon, dielectron, and combined channels are measured in the mass range 15 to 1500 GeV and corrected to the full phase space. Results are also presented for the measurement of the double-differential cross section d^2\\sigma/dm d |y| in the dimuon channel over the mass range 20 to 1500 GeV and absolute dimuon rapidity from 0 to 2.4. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading orders using various sets of parton distribution functions.

  7. Precision Measurement of Charged Pion and Kaon Differential Cross Sections in e⁺e⁻ Annihilation at √s=10.52 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leitgab, M.; Seidl, R.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Vossen, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; et al

    2013-08-06

    Measurements of inclusive differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production in e⁺e⁻ annihilation have been carried out at a center-of-mass energy of √s=10.52 GeV. The measurements were performed with the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider using a data sample containing 113×106 e⁺e⁻→qq¯ events, where q={u,d,s,c}. We present charge-integrated differential cross sections dσh±/dz for h±={π±,K±} as a function of the relative hadron energy z=2Eh/√s from 0.2 to 0.98. The combined statistical and systematic uncertainties for π± (K±) are 4% (4%) at z~0.6 and 15% (24%) at z~0.9. The cross sections are the first measurements of the zmore » dependence of pion and kaon production for z>0.7 as well as the first precision cross section measurements at a center-of-mass energy far below the Z⁰ resonance used by the experiments at LEP and SLC.« less

  8. Method of sustaining a radial electric field and poloidal plasma rotation over most of the cross-section of a tokamak

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Douglass S.; Ono, Masayuki

    1990-01-01

    A radial electric field of a desired magnitude and configuration is created hroughout a substantial portion of the cross-section of the plasma of a tokamak. The radial electric field is created by injection of a unidirectional electron beam. The magnitude and configuration of the radial electric field may be controlled by the strength of the toroidal magnetic field of the tokamak.

  9. Calculations of atomic sputtering and displacement cross-sections in solid elements by electrons with energies from threshold to 1. 5 MV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, C.R.

    1988-12-01

    The kinetics of knock-on collisions of relativistic electrons with nuclei and details of the numerical evaluation of differential, recoil, and total Mott cross-sections are reviewed and discussed. The effects of electron beam induced displacement and sputtering, in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) environment, on microanalysis are analyzed with particular emphasis placed on the removal of material by knock-on sputtering. The mass loss predicted due to transmission knock-on sputtering is significant for many elements under conditions frequently encountered in microanalysis. Total Mott cross-sections are tabulated for all naturally occurring solid elements up to Z = 92 at displacement energies of one, two, four, and five times the sublimation energy and for accelerating voltages accessible in the transmission electron microscope. Fortran source code listings for the calculation of the differential Mott cross-section as a function of electron scattering angle (dMottCS), as a function of nuclear recoil angle (RECOIL), and the total Mott cross-section (TOTCS) are included. 48 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. Copper fine-structure K-shell electron impact ionization cross sections for fast-electron diagnostic in laser-solid experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Batani, D.

    2015-03-15

    The K-shell electron impact ionization (EII) cross section, along with the K-shell fluorescence yield, is one of the key atomic parameters for fast-electron diagnostic in laser-solid experiments through the K-shell emission cross section. In addition, copper is a material that has been often used in those experiments because it has a maximum total K-shell emission yield. Furthermore, in a campaign dedicated to the modeling of the K lines of astrophysical interest (Palmeri et al., 2012), the K-shell fluorescence yields for the K-vacancy fine-structure atomic levels of all the copper isonuclear ions have been calculated. In this study, the K-shell EII cross sections connecting the ground and the metastable levels of the parent copper ions to the daughter ions K-vacancy levels considered in Palmeri et al. (2012) have been determined. The relativistic distorted-wave (DW) approximation implemented in the FAC atomic code has been used for the incident electron kinetic energies up to 10 times the K-shell threshold energies. Moreover, the resulting DW cross sections have been extrapolated at higher energies using the asymptotic form proposed by Davies et al. (2013)

  11. Precision Measurement of Charged Pion and Kaon Differential Cross Sections in e?e? Annihilation at ?s=10.52 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitgab, M.; Seidl, R.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Vossen, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhuyan, B.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Drsal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Jacobs, W. W.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kody, P.; Kouzes, R. T.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Nisar, N. K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, A.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Rhrken, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, G.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, J.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

    2013-08-06

    Measurements of inclusive differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production in e?e? annihilation have been carried out at a center-of-mass energy of ?s=10.52 GeV. The measurements were performed with the Belle detector at the KEKB e?e? collider using a data sample containing 113106 e?e??qq events, where q={u,d,s,c}. We present charge-integrated differential cross sections d?h/dz for h={?,K} as a function of the relative hadron energy z=2Eh/?s from 0.2 to 0.98. The combined statistical and systematic uncertainties for ? (K) are 4% (4%) at z~0.6 and 15% (24%) at z~0.9. The cross sections are the first measurements of the z dependence of pion and kaon production for z>0.7 as well as the first precision cross section measurements at a center-of-mass energy far below the Z? resonance used by the experiments at LEP and SLC.

  12. Tevatron combination of single-top-quark cross sections and determination of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element $\\bf V_{tb}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2015-10-07

    In this study, we present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1 per experiment. The t-channel cross section is measured to be σt= 2.25-0.31+0.29 pb. We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the s- vs t-channel cross section. In addition, we give the combination of the s+t channel cross section measurement resulting in σs+t= 3.30-0.40+0.52 pb, without assuming the standard model value for the ratio σst. The resulting value of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is |Vtb|= 1.02-0.05+0.06, corresponding to |Vtb| > 0.92 at the 95% C.L.

  13. Tevatron combination of single-top-quark cross sections and determination of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element $$\\bf V_{tb}$$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki

    2015-10-07

    In this study, we present the final combination of CDF and D0 measurements of cross sections for single-top-quark production in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to total integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1 per experiment. The t-channel cross section is measured to be σt= 2.25-0.31+0.29 pb. We also present the combinations of the two-dimensional measurements of the s- vs t-channel cross section. In addition, we give the combination of the s+t channel cross section measurement resulting in σs+t= 3.30-0.40+0.52 pb, without assuming the standard model value for the ratio σs/σt. The resulting valuemore » of the magnitude of the top-to-bottom quark coupling is |Vtb|= 1.02-0.05+0.06, corresponding to |Vtb| > 0.92 at the 95% C.L.« less

  14. Updates to the ORIGEN-S Cross-Section Libraries Using ENDF-VI, EAF-99, and FENDL-2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, B.D.

    2004-11-04

    The standard cross-section library for light-water reactor (LWR) analyses used by the ORIGEN-S depletion and decay code has been extensively updated. This work entailed the development of broad multigroup neutron cross sections for ORIGEN-S from several sources of pointwise continuous-energy cross-section evaluations, including the U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data Files ENDF/B-VI Release 7, the Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library FENDL-2.0, and the European Activation File EAF-99. The pointwise cross sections were collapsed to a three-group structure using a continuous-energy neutron flux spectrum representative of the typical neutronic conditions of typical LWR fuel and formatted for use by ORIGEN-S. In addition, the fission-product library has been expanded to include ENDF/B-VI fission yield data for 30 fissionable actinides. The processing codes and procedures are explained. Preliminary verification studies using the updated libraries were performed using the modules of the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) system. Comparisons between the previous basic ORIGEN-S libraries and the updated libraries developed in this work are presented.

  15. Method of sustaining a radial electric field and poloidal plasma rotation over most of the cross-section of a tokamak

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Douglass S.; Ono, Masayuki

    1990-03-06

    A radial electric field of a desired magnitude and configuration is created throughout a substantial portion of the cross-section of the plasma of a tokamak. The radial electric field is created by injection of a unidirectional electron beam. The magnitude and configuration of the radial electric field may be controlled by the strength of the toroidal magnetic field of the tokamak.

  16. Measurement of cross section of quark pair production top with the D0 experiment at the Tevatron and determination the top quark mass using this measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chevalier-Thery, Solene; /Paris U., VI-VII /Saclay

    2010-06-01

    The top quark has been discovered by CDF and D0 experiments in 1995 at the proton-antiproton collider Tevatron. The amount of data recorded by both experiments makes it possible to accurately study the properties of this quark: its mass is now known to better than 1% accuracy. This thesis describes the measurement of the top pair cross section in the electron muon channel with 4, 3 fb{sup -1} recorded data between 2006 and 2009 by the D0 experiment. Since the final state included a muon, improvements of some aspects of its identification have been performed : a study of the contamination of the cosmic muons and a study of the quality of the muon tracks. The cross section measurement is in good agreement with the theoretical calculations and the other experimental measurements. This measurement has been used to extract a value for the top quark mass. This method allows for the extraction of a better defined top mass than direct measurements as it depends less on Monte Carlo simulations. The uncertainty on this extracted mass, dominated by the experimental one, is however larger than for direct measurements. In order to decrease this uncertainty, the ratio of the Z boson and the top pair production cross sections has been studied to look for some possible theoretical correlations. At the Tevatron, the two cross sections are not theoretically correlated: no decrease of the uncertainty on the extracted top mass is therefore possible.

  17. ANSL-V: ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor studies. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, R.Q.; Renier, J.P.; Bucholz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    The original ANSL-V cross-section libraries (ORNL-6618) were developed over a period of several years for the physics analysis of the ANS reactor, with little thought toward including the materials commonly needed for shielding applications. Materials commonly used for shielding applications include calcium barium, sulfur, phosphorous, and bismuth. These materials, as well as {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li, and the naturally occurring isotopes of hafnium, have been added to the ANSL-V libraries. The gamma-ray production and gamma-ray interaction cross sections were completely regenerated for the ANSL-V 99n/44g library which did not exist previously. The MALOCS module was used to collapse the 99n/44g coupled library to the 39n/44g broad- group library. COMET was used to renormalize the two-dimensional (2- D) neutron matrix sums to agree with the one-dimensional (1-D) averaged values. The FRESH module was used to adjust the thermal scattering matrices on the 99n/44g and 39n/44g ANSL-V libraries. PERFUME was used to correct the original XLACS Legendre polynomial fits to produce acceptable distributions. The final ANSL-V 99n/44g and 39n/44g cross-section libraries were both checked by running RADE. The AIM module was used to convert the master cross-section libraries from binary coded decimal to binary format (or vice versa).

  18. Measurement of the $$B_c^{\\pm}$$ production cross section in $$p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=1.96$$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2016-03-01

    Here, we describe a measurement of the ratio of the cross sections times branching fractions of the Bc+ meson in the decay mode Bc+ → J/ψμ+ν to the B+ meson in the decay mode B+ → J/ψK+ in proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement is based on the complete CDF Run II data set, which comes from an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb-1. The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions for Bc+ and B+ mesons with momentum transverse to the beam greater than 6 GeV/c and rapidity magnitude smaller than 0.6 ismore » 0.211 ± 0.012(stat)-0.020+0.021(syst). Using the known B+ → J/ψK+ branching fraction, the known B+ production cross section, and a selection of the predicted Bc+ → J/ψμ+ν branching fractions, the range for the total Bc+ production cross section is estimated.« less

  19. Evidence for non-exponential elastic proton–proton differential cross-section at low |t| and s=8TeV by TOTEM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Antchev, G.

    2015-08-15

    The TOTEM experiment has made a precise measurement of the elastic proton–proton differential cross-section at the centre-of-mass energy √s = 8 TeV based on a high-statistics data sample obtained with the β* = 90 m optics. Both the statistical and systematic uncertainties remain below 1%, except for the t -independent contribution from the overall normalisation. This unprecedented precision allows to exclude a purely exponential differential cross-section in the range of four-momentum transfer squared 0.027 < |t| < 0.2 GeV2 with a significance greater than 7 σ. Two extended parametrisations, with quadratic and cubic polynomials in the exponent, are shown tomore » be well compatible with the data. As a result, using them for the differential cross-section extrapolation to t=0, and further applying the optical theorem, yields total cross-section estimates of (101.5 ± 2.1) mb and (101.9 ± 2.1) mb, respectively, in agreement with previous TOTEM measurements.« less

  20. Measurement of cross sections for inelastic cold-neutron scattering in metals and polymers by the method of (n, {gamma}) analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arzumanov, S. S.; Bondarenko, L. N.; Geltenbort, P.; Morozov, V. I.; Panin, Yu. N.; Chernyavsky, S. M.

    2008-11-15

    The results obtained by measuring the cross sections for the inelastic scattering of very cold neutrons for a number of metals and polymers by the method of a neutron-irradiation analysis are presented. The method is based on simultaneously measuring events of inelastic scattering and neutron capture in the sample under investigation via recording gamma radiation with a semiconductor germanium detector. Neutron capture by a nucleus of the sample is accompanied by the prompt radiation of gamma rays having a known spectrum. Upon inelastic scattering, a neutron acquires thermal energy. Upon leaving the sample, this neutron is absorbed in a special converter that contains the isotope {sup 10}B. The capture of the neutron by a {sup 10}B nucleus is followed by the emission of a 477-keV gamma ray. The probabilities of capture and inelastic scattering are proportional to the respective neutron-interaction cross sections, and the ratio of the recorded detector counts corresponding to events of the two types does not depend on the spectrum of the incident flux of very cold neutrons or on the trajectory of neutron motion in the sample. The sought inelastic-scattering cross section at a fixed sample temperature is calculated by using this ratio and the known cross section for neutron capture by the sample isotope having a known gamma-radiation spectrum.

  1. Measurements of cross-section of charge current inclusive of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using carbon, iron, lead and scintillator at MINER$\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza

    2015-08-18

    Neutrino physics is one of the most active fields in the domaine of high energy physics during the last century. The need of precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus interactions required by the neutrino oscillation experiments is a an exiting step. These measurements of cross-section are more than essential for neutrino oscillation experiment. Over the year, many measurements from varieties of experiments have been presented. MINERνA is one of the world leaders in measuring cross-section of neutrino and antineutrino -nucleus interactions. MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. In order to study nuclear dependence, MINERνA is endowed with different types of solid nuclear targets as well are liquid targets such as helium and water. This thesis presents measurements of cross-section of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using a variety of solid nuclear targets, carbon, iron, lead and also polystyrene scintillator (CH). The data set of antineutrino used for this analysis was taken between March and July 2010 with a total of 1.60X1020 protons on target. Charged current inclusive interactions were selected by requiring a positive muon and kinematics limitation of acceptance of the muon spectrometer are applied. The analysis requires neutrino energy between 2GeV et 20GeV and the angle of muon θmu < 17degree . The absolute cross-section # as function of neutrino energy and the differential cross-section dσ/ dxbj measured and shown the corresponding systematics for each nuclear targets. Data results are compared with prediction of the models implemented in the neutrino events generators GENIE 2.6.2 used by the experiment.

  2. Measurement of J/psi meson and b-hadron production cross section at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamashita, Tomohiro

    2006-03-01

    A new measurement of the inclusive and differential production cross sections of J/{psi} mesons and b-hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV is presented. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 39.7 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF Run II detector. The integrated cross section for inclusive J/{psi} production for all transverse momenta from 0 to 20 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 is found to be 4.08 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.33}{sup +0.36}(syst) {mu}b. The fraction of J/{psi} events from the decay of the long-lived b-hadrons is separated by using the lifetime distribution in all events with p{sub T}(J/{psi}) > 1.25 GeV/c. The total cross section for b-hadrons, including both hadrons and anti-hadrons, decaying to J/{psi} with transverse momenta greater than 1.25 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y(J/{psi})| < 0.6, is found to be 0.330 {+-} 0.005(stat){sub -0.033}{sup +0.036}(syst) {mu}b. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the decay kinematics of b-hadrons to all final states containing a J/{psi}, the first measurement of the total single b-hadron cross section down to zero transverse momentum is extracted at sqrts = 1960 GeV. The total single b-hadron cross section integrated over all transverse momenta for b-hadrons in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 is found to be 17.6 {+-} 0.4(stat){sub -2.3}{sup +2.5}(syst) {mu}b.

  3. The Discrete Equation Method (DEM) for Fully Compressible, Two-Phase Flows in Ducts of Spatially Varying Cross-Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Berry; R. Saurel; O. LeMetayer

    2010-11-01

    -conservative terms are correctly approximated. Some of the closure relations missing from the traditional approach are automatically obtained. Lastly, the continuous equation system resulting from the discrete equations can be identified by taking the continuous limit with weak-wave assumptions. In this work, this approach is tested by constructing a DEM model for the flow of two compressible phases in 1-D ducts of spatially varying cross-section with explicit time integration. An analytical equation of state is included for both water vapor and liquid phases, and a realistic interphase mass transfer model is developed based on interphase heat transfer. A robust compliment of boundary conditions are developed and discussed. Though originally conceived as a first step toward implict time integration of the DEM method (to relieve time step size restrictions due to stiffness and to achieve tighter coupling of equations) in multidimensions, this model offers some unique capabilities for incorporation into next generation light water reactor safety analysis codes. We demonstrate, on a converging-diverging two-phase nozzle, that this well-posed, 2-pressure, 2-velocity DEM model can be integrated to a realistic and meaningful steady-state with both phases treated as compressible.

  4. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C.; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-09-15

    This article reports a measurement of the production cross section of prompt isolated photon pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.36 fb⁻¹. The cross section is presented as a function of kinematic variables sensitive to the reaction mechanisms. The results are compared with three perturbative QCD calculations: (1) a leading-order parton shower Monte Carlo, (2) a fixed next-to-leading-order calculation and (3) a next-to-leading-order/next-to-next-to-leading-log resummed calculation. The comparisons show that, within their known limitations, all calculations predict the main features of the data, but no calculation adequately describes all aspects of the data.

  5. Measurement of the cross section for prompt isolated diphoton production in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-09-15

    This article reports a measurement of the production cross section of prompt isolated photon pairs in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.36 fb⁻¹. The cross section is presented as a function of kinematic variables sensitive to the reaction mechanisms. The results are compared with three perturbative QCD calculations: (1) a leading-order parton shower Monte Carlo, (2) a fixed next-to-leading-order calculation and (3) a next-to-leading-order/next-to-next-to-leading-log resummed calculation. The comparisons show that, within their known limitations, all calculations predict the main features of themore » data, but no calculation adequately describes all aspects of the data.« less

  6. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV in dilepton final states containing a τ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2012-06-19

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured in dilepton events with one electron or muon, and one hadronically decaying τ lepton from the decay tt¯→(lνl)(τhντ)bb¯, (l=e,μ). The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.0 fb⁻¹ for the electron channel and 2.2 fb⁻¹ for the muon channel, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. This is the first measurement of the tt¯ cross section explicitly including τ leptons in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV. The measured value σtt¯=143±14(stat)±22(syst)±3(lumi) pb is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  7. Measurement of the $t \\bar{t}$ production cross section in the dilepton channel in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-12-29

    The top-antitop quark (t t-bar) production cross section is measured in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 inverse femtobarns. The measurement is performed by analysing events with a pair of electrons or muons, or one electron and one muon, and at least two jets, one of which is identified as originating from hadronisation of a bottom quark. The measured cross section is 239 +/- 2 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) +/- 6 (lum.) pb, for an assumed top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV,morein agreement with the prediction of the standard model.less

  8. Measurement of the W+ W- production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) =1.96-TeV using dilepton events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Arguin, J.-F.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U.

    2005-01-01

    We present a measurement of the W{sup +}W{sup -} production cross section using 184 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Using the dilepton decay channel W{sup +}W{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{ell}{sup -}{ovr {nu}}, where the charged leptons can be either electrons or muons, we find 17 candidate events compared to an expected background of 5.0{sub -0.8}{sup +2.2} events. The resulting W{sup +}W{sup -} production cross section measurement of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) = 14.6{sub -5.1}{sup +5.8}(stat){sub -3.0}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.9(lum) pb agrees well with the Standard Model expectation.

  9. Measurement of the differential cross section for top quark pair production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-20

    The normalized differential cross section for top quark pair (tt¯) production is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV at the CERN LHC using the CMS detector in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measurements are performed in the lepton+jets (e/μ +jets) and in the dilepton (e+e–, μ+μ–, and e±μ∓) decay channels. The tt¯ cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the charged leptons, the jets associated to b quarks, the top quarks, and the tt¯ system. The data are compared with several predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamic upmore » to approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order precision. Furthermore, no significant deviations are observed relative to the standard model predictions.« less

  10. First Measurement of the Cross Section for Top-Quark Pair Production in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-01-01

    The first measurement of the cross section for top-quark pair production in pp collisions at the LHC at center-of-mass energy sqrt(s)= 7 TeV has been performed using 3.1 {\\pm} 0.3 inverse pb of data recorded by the CMS detector. This result utilizes the final state with two isolated, highly energetic charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and two or more jets. Backgrounds from Drell-Yan and non-W/Z boson production are estimated from data. Eleven events are observed in the data with 2.1 {\\pm} 1.0 events expected from background. The measured cross section is 194 {\\pm} 72 (stat.) {\\pm} 24 (syst.) {\\pm} 21 (lumi.) pb, consistent with next-to-leading order predictions.

  11. Transverse momentum cross section of e?e? pairs in the Z-boson region from pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.

    2012-09-26

    The transverse momentum cross section of e?e? pairs in the Z-boson mass region of 66116 GeV/c is precisely measured using Run II data corresponding to 2.1 fb? of integrated luminosity recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The cross section is compared with two quantum chromodynamic calculations. One is a fixed-order perturbative calculation at O(?2s), and the other combines perturbative predictions at high transverse momentum with the gluon resummation formalism at low transverse momentum. Comparisons of the measurement with calculations show reasonable agreement. The measurement is of sufficient precision to allow refinements in the understanding of the transverse momentum distribution.

  12. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Gillberg D.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J-F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Hegeman J. G.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Makovec N.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-20

    We present a measurement of the inclusive jet cross section using the Run II cone algorithm and data collected by the D0 experiment in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.70 fb{sup -1}. The jet energy calibration and the method used to extract the inclusive jet cross section are described. We discuss the main uncertainties, which are dominated by the jet energy scale uncertainty. The results cover jet transverse momenta from 50 GeV to 600 GeV with jet rapidities in the range -2.4 to 2.4 and are compared to predictions using recent proton parton distribution functions. Studies of correlations between systematic uncertainties in transverse momentum and rapidity are presented.

  13. Cross section for bb¯ production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; et al

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  14. MANTA. An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of Actinides and Fission Products in Fast and Epithermal Spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    Neutron cross-sections characterize the way neutrons interact with matter. They are essential to most nuclear engineering projects and, even though theoretical progress has been made as far as the predictability of neutron cross-section models, measurements are still indispensable to meet tight design requirements for reduced uncertainties. Within the field of fission reactor technology, one can identify the following specializations that rely on the availability of accurate neutron cross-sections: (1) fission reactor design, (2) nuclear fuel cycles, (3) nuclear safety, (4) nuclear safeguards, (5) reactor monitoring and neutron fluence determination and (6) waste disposal and transmutation. In particular, the assessment of advanced fuel cycles requires an extensive knowledge of transuranics cross sections. Plutonium isotopes, but also americium, curium and up to californium isotope data are required with a small uncertainty in order to optimize significant features of the fuel cycle that have an impact on feasibility studies (e.g. neutron doses at fuel fabrication, decay heat in a repository, etc.). Different techniques are available to determine neutron cross sections experimentally, with the common denominator that a source of neutrons is necessary. It can either come from an accelerator that produces neutrons as a result of interactions between charged particles and a target, or it can come from a nuclear reactor. When the measurements are performed with an accelerator, they are referred to as differential since the analysis of the data provides the cross-sections for different discrete energies, i.e. σ(Ei), and for the diffusion cross sections for different discrete angles. Another approach is to irradiate a very pure sample in a test reactor such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after

  15. Measurement of the W⁺W⁻ Cross Section in √s=7 TeV pp Collisions with ATLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2011-07-20

    This Letter presents a measurement of the W⁺W⁻ production cross section in √s=7 TeV pp collisions by the ATLAS experiment, using 34 pb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity produced by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Selecting events with two isolated leptons, each either an electron or a muon, 8 candidate events are observed with an expected background of 1.7±0.6 events. The measured cross section is 41+20-16(stat)±5(syst)±1(lumi) pb, which is consistent with the standard model prediction of 44±3 pb calculated at next-to-leading order in QCD.

  16. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 2.76\\,\\text {TeV}$$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-05-12

    The double-differential inclusive jet cross section is measured as a function of jet transverse momentummore » $$p_{\\mathrm {T}}$$ and absolute rapidity $|y |$ , using proton-proton collision data collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a center-of-mass energy of $$\\sqrt{s} = 2.76\\,{\\mathrm{TeV}}$$ and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.43 $$\\,\\text {pb}^{-1}$$ . Jets are reconstructed within the $$p_{\\mathrm {T}}$$ range of 74 to 592 $$\\,\\text {GeV}$$ and the rapidity range $|y |<3.0$ . The reconstructed jet spectrum is corrected for detector resolution. The measurements are compared to the theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order QCD using different sets of parton distribution functions. Furthermore, this inclusive cross section measurement explores a new kinematic region and is consistent with QCD predictions.« less

  17. Measurement of four-jet differential cross sections in √s = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-12-16

    Differential cross sections for the production of at least four jets have been measured in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider using the ATLAS detector. Events are selected if the four anti-k t R = 0.4 jets with the largest transverse momentum (pT) within the rapidity range |y| < 2.8 are well separated (ΔR 4j min > 0.65), all have pT > 64 GeV, and include at least one jet with pT > 100 GeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. As a result, the cross sections, corrected for detectormore » effects, are compared to leading-order and next-to-leading-order calculations as a function of the jet momenta, invariant masses, minimum and maximum opening angles and other kinematic variables.« less

  18. Measurement of the Three-jet Mass Cross Section in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubacek, Zdenek

    2010-06-01

    This thesis describes the measurement of the inclusive three-jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV measured at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois, USA. The cross section as a function of three-jet invariant mass is provided in three regions of the third jet transverse momentum and three regions of jet rapidities. It utilizes a data sample collected in the so called Run IIa data taking period (2002-2006) corresponding to the integrated luminosity of about 0.7 fb{sup -1}. The results are used to test the next-to-leading order predictions of Quantum chromodynamics computed using the latest parton distribution functions.

  19. Measurement of the B+ production cross-section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1960-GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-12-01

    The authors present a new measurement of the B{sup +} meson differential cross section d{sigma}/dP{sub T} at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 739 pb{sup -1} collected with the upgraded CDF detector (CDF II) at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. B{sup +} candidates are reconstructed through the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi} K{sup +}, with J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The integrated cross section for producing B{sup +} mesons with p{sub T} {ge} 6 GeV/c and |y| {le} 1 is measured to be 2.78 {+-} 0.24 {mu}b.

  20. A measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-12-02

    In this study, the ratio of the production cross sections for W and Z bosons in association with jets has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement is based on the entire 2011 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb–1. Inclusive and differential cross-section ratios for massive vector bosons decaying to electrons and muons are measured in association with jets with transverse momentum pT > 30GeV and jet rapidity |y| < 4.4. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations and to predictions from different Monte Carlo generators implementing leading-order matrix elements supplemented by parton showers.