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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profiling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Seismic Profiling Details Activities (4) Areas (3) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

2

Definition: Vertical Seismic Profiling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Profiling Profiling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Seismic Profiling Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) is a technique of seismic measurements used for high resolution seismic imaging. It can also be used for correlation with surface seismic data providing velocity information and information for processing such as deconvolution parameters. The defining characteristic of a VSP is that the detectors are in a borehole.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Advanced Borehole Seismology (ABS), Related Terms Seismic Techniques, High Resolution Imaging and Monitoring References ↑ Bob Hardage VSP Principles ↑ High resolution 3D seismic imaging using 3C data from large downhole seismic arrays Paulsson et al. (2004) ↑ Mueller Soroka Paulsson (2010)

3

Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Majer, 2003) (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

4

Simulation of anisotropic wave propagation in Vertical Seismic Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of elastic anisotropy on seismic wave propagation is often neglected for the sake of simplicity. However, ignoring anisotropy may lead to significant errors in the processing of seismic data and ultimately in a poor image of the subsurface. This is especially true in wide-aperture Vertical Seismic Profiles where waves travel both vertically and horizontally. Anisotropy has been neglected in wavefront construction methods of seismic ray-tracing until Gibson (2000), who showed they are powerful tools to simulate seismic wave propagation in three-dimensional anisotropic subsurface models. The code is currently under development using a C++ object oriented programming approach because it provides high flexibility in the design of new components and facilitates debugging and maintenance of a complex algorithm. So far, the code was used to simulate propagation in homogeneous or simple heterogeneous anisotropic velocity models mainly designed for testing purposes. In particular, it has never been applied to simulate a field dataset. We propose here an analytical method involving little algebra and that allows the design of realistic heterogeneous anisotropic models using the C++ object oriented programming approach. The new model class can model smooth multi-layered subsurface with gradients or models with many dip variations. It has been used to model first arrival times of a wide-aperture VSP dataset from the Gulf of Mexico to estimate the amount of anisotropy. The proposed velocity model is transversely isotropic. The anisotropy is constant throughout the model and is defined via Thomsen's parameters. Values in the final model are epsilon = 0.055 and delta = -0.115. The model is compatible with the a priori knowledge of the local geology and reduces the RMS average time difference between measured and computed travel times by 51% in comparison to the initial isotropic model. These values are realistic and are similar to other measurements of anisotropy in the Gulf of Mexico.

Durussel, Vincent Bernard

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (Feighner, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Vertical Seismic Profiling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In December 1997 LBNL obtained a VSP in well 46-28 to determine the seismic reflectivity in the area and to obtain velocity information for the design and potential processing of the proposed 3-D seismic survey Feighner et al. (1998). Because the results of the VSP indicated apparent reflections, TGI proceeded with the collection of 3.0 square miles of 3-D surface seismic data over the Rye Patch reservoir. References M. Feighner, R. Gritto, T. M. Daley, H. Keers, E. L. Majer (1999)

6

VSP [Vertical Seismic Profiling] and cross hole tomographic imaging for fracture characterization  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years LBL has been carrying out experiments at various fractured rock sites to determine the fundamental nature of the propagation of seismic waves in fractured media. These experiments have been utilizing high frequency (1000 to 10000 Hz.) signals in a cross-hole configuration at scales of several tens of meters. Three component sources and receivers are used to map fracture density, and orientation. The goal of the experiments has been to relate the seismological parameters to the hydrological parameters, if possible, in order to provide a more accurate description of a starting model for hydrological characterization. The work is ultimately aimed at the characterization and monitoring of the Yucca Mountain site for the storage of nuclear waste. In addition to these controlled experiments multicomponent VSP work has been carried out at several sites to determine fracture characteristics. The results to date indicate that both P-wave and S-wave can be used to map the location of fractures. In addition, fractures that are open and conductive are much more visible to seismic waves that non-conductive fractures. The results of these tests indicate direct use in an unsaturated environment. 12 refs., 10 figs.

Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Myer, L.R.; Karasaki, K.; Daley, T.M.; Long, J.C.S.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Vertically Rising Microstructure Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertically rising microstructure profiler was designed to measure temperature gradient and conductivity gradient microstructure in lakes, reservoirs and coastal seas. The instrument is totally independent of surface craft while collecting ...

G. D. Carter; J. Imberger

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Multi-offset vertical seismic profiles: fracture and fault identification for Appalachian basin reservoirs - two case examples  

SciTech Connect

Many Appalachian basin reservoirs occur in older rocks that are commonly fractured and faulted. These fractures and faults very often act as the reservoir trapping mechanism, especially in lithologies with no log-detectable matrix porosity. Traditional logging techniques, although possibly showing fault or fracture presence in the well bore, seldom provide clues to the extent of fracturing or location of nearby faults. Surface seismic data should show faults and perhaps even fracturing, but showing these features is often not possible in rugged terrain or in areas with thick coverings of unconsolidated surface material. Traditional seismic also has resolutions lower than that needed to detect small faults (less than 70 ft). Two case examples are shown from the northern Appalachian basin. The first example utilizes Schlumberger's slim hole seismic tool in cased holes in an area of thick unconsolidated glacial material along the Bass Island trend of western New York. The second example utilizes Schlumberger's SAT tool in an open-hole environment in an area of northwestern Pennsylvania with disturbed surface bedding and poor conventional surface seismic returns. The slim hole tool provides good data but with only slightly greater resolution than surface Vibroseis data. The SAT tool provides excellent resolution (down to 25 ft) in highly disturbed bedding.

Wyatt, D.E.; Bennett, B.A.; Walsh, J.J.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Seismic Behaviour of Vertical Mass Isolated Structures  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the seismic behaviour of vertical mass isolated structures against the earthquake is studied. These structures are assumed to be consisted of two subsystems. Mass subsystem possesses low lateral stiffness but carries the major part of mass of the system. Stiffness subsystem, however, controls the deformation of the mass subsystem and attributes with much higher stiffness. The isolator layer is, therefore, located in between the mass and the stiffness subsystems and assumed to be a viscous damper layer. The analytical model used for this investigation is a dual mass-spring model which is an extended form of the three element Maxwell model. In this study, the ability of mass isolation techniques in reducing earthquake effects on buildings with two approaches, parametric and numerical approaches, is shown. In the parametric approach, by definition an isolation factor for structure and determination the dynamic characteristics of system, the relative optimum value of the isolator damping coefficient is obtained. The results provide an insight on role of relative stiffness and mass ratio of the two subsystems. Finally, in the numerical approach, the spectral responses of these structures due to the earthquake are investigated. The results show a noticeable decrease in earthquake input force to vertical mass isolated structures in comparison with non-isolated structures.

Nekooei, M.; Ziyaeifar, M. [Structural Engineering Research Centre, International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (IIEES), P.O. Box 19395-3913, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

10

Fracture Detection and Water Sweep Characterization Using Single-well Imaging, Vertical Seismic Profiling and Cross-dipole Methods in Tight and Super-k Zones, Haradh II, Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work was conducted to help understand a premature and irregular water breakthrough which resulted from a waterflooding project in the increment II region of Haradh oilfield in Saudi Arabia using different geophysical methods. Oil wells cannot sustain the targeted oil production rates and they die much sooner than expected when water enters the wells. The study attempted to identify fracture systems and their role in the irregular water sweep. Single-well acoustic migration imaging (SWI), walkaround vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and cross-dipole shear wave measurements were used to detect anisotropy caused by fractures near and far from the borehole. The results from all the different methods were analyzed to understand the possible causes of water fingering in the field and determine the reasons for discrepancies and similarities of results of the different methods. The study was done in wells located in the area of the irregular water encroachment in Haradh II oilfield. Waterflooding was performed, where water was injected in the water injector wells drilled at the flanks of Harahd II toward the oil producer wells. Unexpected water coning was noticed in the west flank of the field. While cross-dipole and SWI measurements of a small-scale clearly identify a fracture oriented N60E in the upper tight zone of the reservoir, the VSP measurements of a large-scale showed a dominating fracture system to the NS direction in the upper highpermeability zone of the same reservoir. These results are consistent with the directions of the three main fracture sets in the field at N130E, N80E and N20E, and the direction of the maximum horizontal stress in the field varies between N50E and N90E. Results suggested that the fracture which is detected by cross-dipole at 2 to 4 ft from the borehole is the same fracture detected by SWI 65 ft away from the borehole. This fracture was described using the SWI as being 110 ft from top to bottom, having an orientation of N60E and having an angle of dip of 12 relative to the vertical borehole axis. The detected fracture is located in the tight zone of the reservoir makes a path for water to enter the well from that zone. On the Other hand, the fractures detected by the large-scale VSP measurements in the NS direction are responsible for the high-permeability in the upper zone of the reservoir.

Aljeshi, Hussain Abdulhadi A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Mean Vertical Motions Seen by Radar Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radar wind profilers have been used to measure directly the vertical motion above the radar site. Mean values of vertical motions in the troposphere and lower stratosphere reported at sites in and near mountains are often several centimeters per ...

G. D. Nastrom; T. E. VanZandt

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Remote Sensing of Cirrus Particle Size Vertical Profile Using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and shapes. The vertical variation of ice crystal size can alter the radiative heatingcooling profiles in cirrus cloudy atmospheres and hence is an important component in the...

13

Wirewalker: An Autonomous Wave-Powered Vertical Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive vertically profiling float that draws its energy from the ocean surface wavefield is described. Termed the Wirewalker, it is a generalized platform capable of supporting a variety of self-contained instruments. The motion of the ...

Luc Rainville; Robert Pinkel

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Profiler Measurements of Vertical Velocity Fluctuations in the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for measuring the vertical component of velocity fluctuations due to three-dimensional turbulence in the ocean from a freely falling microstructure profiler. The dynamic pressure measurement relies on a commercially ...

J. N. Moum

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Rapid-Sampling Vertical Profiler: An Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of the Rapid-Sampling Vertical Profiler, which was developed for sampling the hydrophysical fields in the upper ocean from a moving vessel, shows that the instrument is useful for near-microscale measurements of temperature and ...

D. R. Caldwell; T. M. Dillon; J. N. Moum

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter at Barrow. Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Aerosols Efforts are currently underway to run and evaluate the Broadband Heating Rate Profile project at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site for the time period March 2004 - February 2005. The Aerosol Best-Estimate (ABE) Value-Added Procedure (VAP) is to provide continuous estimates of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single-scatter albedo, and asymmetry parameter above the Northern Slopes of Alaska (NSA) facility. In the interest of temporal continuity, we have developed an algorithm that

17

A Lightweight NO2 Instrument for Vertical Height Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new lightweight NO2 instrument that can be flown from a tethered balloon to give vertical NO2 profiles is described. The detection principle is the chemiluminescent reaction between NO2 and a solution of luminol. The instrument is integrated ...

J. T. Pisano; J. W. Drummond; D. R. Hastie

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The External Scale of Clear Air Turbulence Derived from the Vertical Ozone Profile: Application to Vertical Transport Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a high-resolution stratospheric ozonometer it has been possible to obtain vertical ozone profiles in which microfluctuations may be interpreted as the consequence of eddy diffusion. Applying Kolmogoroff's theory to the signal, one can ...

J. Barat; P. Aimedieu

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Instrument Development Tethered Balloon Sounding System for Vertical Radiation Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tethered Balloon Sounding System Tethered Balloon Sounding System for Vertical Radiation Profiles C. D. Whiteman J. M. Alzheimer G. A. Anderson M. R. Garnich W. J. Shaw Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 platform is built on a triangular frame identical to the one on the Sky Platform, but the MSP carries no radiometric sensors, control loop, or leveling motors. Rather. the MSP is instrumented to measure the motions to which the Sky Platform will be subjected; the data provide engineering information to be used in the final design of the control loop and structural elements of the Sky Platform. An array of six miniature solid state accelerometers provides the raw data from which balloon motions are determined. Future plans call for the installation of a small attitude gyroscope on the

20

Effects of Small-Scale Vertical Motion on Radar Measurements of Wind and Temperature Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical velocities were observed during the month of June 1990 with two side-by-side wind profilers at Platteville, Colorado. Many of the observations reveal strong wave motion, probably mountain lee waves, that sometimes caused vertical ...

B. L. Weber; D. B. Wuertz; D. C. Law; A. S. Frisch; J. M. Brown

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Vertical Resolution of the Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Wind Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective vertical resolution of the Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler radar wind profiler is determined using vertical wavenumber spectra and temporal coherence. The resolution ranges from being Nyquist limited at 300 m to as coarse as 900 ...

Francis J. Merceret

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Kinematic Vertical Motion and Relative Vorticity Profiles in a Long-Lived Midlatitude Convective System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Average kinematic vertical motion and relative vorticity profiles are presented for a long-lived midlatitude convective complex. A breakdown into active convective and stratiform precipitation regions shows very good agreement in the vertical ...

Lance F. Bosart

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Wind Profiler Observations of Vertical Motion and Precipitation Microphysics of a Tropical Squall Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from a wind profiler located at Darwin, Australia, have been used to examine the vertical motions and precipitation microphysics in a well-developed squall line. Both a mature and developing convective cell are well sampled. The vertical ...

Peter T. May; Deepak K. Rajopadhyaya

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research...

25

Comparison of Radiosonde and GCM Vertical Temperature Trend Profiles: Effects of Dataset Choice and Data Homogenization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In comparisons of radiosonde vertical temperature trend profiles with comparable profiles derived from selected Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) general circulation models (GCMs) driven by major ...

John R. Lanzante; Melissa Free

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effect of Volcanic Eruptions on the Vertical Temperature Profile in Radiosonde Data and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both observed and modeled upper-air temperature profiles show the tropospheric cooling and tropical stratospheric warming effects from the three major volcanic eruptions since 1960. Detailed comparisons of vertical profiles of Radiosonde ...

Melissa Free; John Lanzante

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Principal Component Analysis of Vertical Profiles of Q1 and Q2 in the Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rotated Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to the combined vertical profiles of apparent heat source Q1 and apparent moisture sink Q2 from both disturbed and undisturbed periods of the Australian summer monsoon season. The data ...

G. David Alexander; George S. Young; David V. Ledvina

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Horizontal Divergence and Vertical Velocity Retrievals from Doppler Radar and Wind Profiler Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical motion profiles can be diagnosed with the mass continuity equation using horizontal divergence fields derived from various single-Doppler radar techniques such as EVAD (extended velocity-azimuth display), CEVAD (concurrent extended ...

Robert Cifelli; Steven A. Rutledge; Dennis J. Boccippio; Thomas Matejka

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Improving Multimodel Forecasts of the Vertical Distribution of Heating Using the TRMM Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project office made available a new product called the convectivestratiform heating (CSH). These are the datasets for vertical profiles ...

T. N. Krishnamurti; Arindam Chakraborty; A. K. Mishra

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An Evaluation and Comparison of Vertical Profile Data from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical procedures are used to compare vertical profiles of temperature and moisture derived from VAS with three different algorithms to those of corresponding rawinsonde measurements for a clear-cold environment. To account for time and ...

Gary J. Jedlovec

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Vertical Motion Structure in Maritime continent mesoscale Convective Systems: Results from a 50-MHz Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind profiler data wore used to determine the vertical motion structure in four tropical mcsoscale convective systems (MCSs), which occurred during the Down Under Doppler and Electricity Experiment (DUNDEE) near Darwin. Northern Territory, ...

Robert Cifelli; Steven A. Rutledge

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Bottom Stress Estimates from Vertical Dissipation Rate Profiles on the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the near-bottom distribution of the turbulent dissipation rate on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island are used to calculate bottom stress. A free-failing vertical profiler with microstructure shear probes was used to ...

Richard K. Dewey; William R. Crawford

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Retrieval of Vertical Profiles of Cirrus Cloud Microphysical Parameters from Doppler Radar and Infrared Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new method to retrieve vertical profiles of the parameters of cirrus cloud microphysics that are important for the estimation of climatic feedback. These parameters are the particle characteristic size and ice mass content. ...

S. Y. Matrosov; B. W. Orr; R. A. Kropfli; J. B. Snider

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Vertical Tracer Concentration Profiles Measured during the Joint Urban 2003 Dispersion Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric tracer dispersion study known as Joint Urban 2003 was conducted in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during July of 2003. As part of this field program, vertical concentration profiles were measured at approximately 1 km from the downtown ...

Julia E. Flaherty; Brian Lamb; K. Jerry Allwine; Eugene Allwine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Correction of Polarimetric Radar Reflectivity Measurements and Rainfall Estimates for Apparent Vertical Profile in Stratiform Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for correcting the vertical profile of reflectivity measurements and rainfall estimates (VPR) in plan position indicator (PPI) scans of polarimetric weather radars in the melting layer and the snow layer during stratiform rain is ...

John Kalogiros; Marios N. Anagnostou; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou; Mario Montopoli; Errico Picciotti; Frank S. Marzano

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Low profile, high load vertical rolling positioning stage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stage or support platform assembly for use in a synchrotron accurately positions equipment to be used in the beam line of the synchrotron. The support platform assembly includes an outer housing in which is disposed a lifting mechanism having a lifting platform or stage at its upper extremity on which the equipment is mounted. A worm gear assembly is located in the housing and is adapted to raise and lower a lifting shaft that is fixed to the lifting platform by an anti-binding connection. The lifting platform is moved vertically as the lifting shaft is moved vertically. The anti-binding connection prevents the shaft from rotating with respect to the platform, but does permit slight canting of the shaft with respect to the lifting platform so as to eliminate binding and wear due to possible tolerance mismatches. In order to ensure that the lifting mechanism does not move in a horizontal direction as it is moved vertically, at least three linear roller bearing assemblies are arranged around the outer-periphery of the lifting mechanism. One of the linear roller bearing assemblies can be adjusted so that the roller bearings apply a loading force against the lifting mechanism. Alternatively, a cam mechanism can be used to provide such a loading force.

Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Barraza, Juan (Aurora, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

38

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

39

How Does the Vertical Profile of Baroclinicity Affect the Wave Instability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth rate of baroclinic instability waves is generalized in terms of wavemean flow interactions, with an emphasis on the influence of the vertical profile of baroclinicity. The wave energy is converted from the zonal mean kinetic energy and ...

Toshiki Iwasaki; Chihiro Kodama

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A Balloonborne Instrument for the Measurement of Vertical Profiles of Supercooled Liquid Water Concentration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vibrating wire placed in the humidity duct of a standard U.S. rawinsonde is used to measure vertical profiles of the concentration of supercooled liquid water in clouds. The natural frequency of vibration varies according to the mass of ice ...

Geoffrey E. Hill; Duard S. Woffinden

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

GPS Dropwindsonde and WSR-88D Observations of Tropical Cyclone Vertical Wind Profiles and Their Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of tropical cyclone vertical wind profiles and their associated wind speed peaks below 1.5 km were examined through the use of a large number of GPS dropwindsondes (GPS sondes) and radar-derived velocityazimuth display (VAD) ...

Ian M. Giammanco; John L. Schroeder; Mark D. Powell

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

An Algorithm to Estimate the Heating Budget from Vertical Hydrometeor Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple algorithm to estimate the latent heating of cloud systems from their vertical hydrometer profiles is proposed. The derivation as well as the validation of the algorithm is based on output generated by a non-hydrostatic cloud model with ...

Wei-Kuo Tao; Joanne Simpson; Stephen Lang; Michael McCumber; Robert Adler; Richard Penc

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Wirewalker: A Vertically Profiling Instrument Carrier Powered by Ocean Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean wave energy is used to drive a buoyant instrument platform down a wire suspended from a surface float. At the lower terminus of the profiling range, the cam that rectifies wave vertical motion is released and the package, termed the ...

R. Pinkel; M. A. Goldin; J. A. Smith; O. M. Sun; A. A. Aja; M. N. Bui; T. Hughen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Precipitation Identification from Radar Wind Profiler Spectral Moment Data: Vertical Velocity Histograms, Velocity Variance, and Signal PowerVertical Velocity Correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correlations between range-corrected signal power Src and radial vertical velocity Vr, from the vertical beam of a UHF wind profiler can be used to distinguish between air- and precipitation-dominated echoes using an SrcVr correlation diagram. ...

F. Martin Ralph; Paul J. Neiman; Dominique Ruffieux

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Modelling the Vertical Wind Speed and Turbulence Intensity Profiles at Prospective Offshore Wind Farm Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monin-Obukhov theory predicts the well-known log-linear form of the vertical wind speed profile. A turbulence intensity profile can be estimated from this by assuming that the standard deviation of the wind speed is proportional to the friction velocity. Two parameters, namely the aerodynamic surface roughness length and the MoninObukhov length, are than needed to predict the vertical wind speed and turbulence intensity profiles from a measurement at one height. Different models to estimate these parameters for conditions important for offshore wind energy utilisation are compared and tested: Four models for the surface roughness and three methods to derive the Monin-Obukov-length from measurements. They have been tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rdsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind speed to 50 m height and comparing it with the measured 50 m wind speed.

Bernhard Lange; Sren Larsen; Jrgen Hjstrup; Rebecca Barthelmie; Ulrich Focken

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Direct Measurements of Vertical-Velocity Power Spectra with the Sousy-VHF-Radar Wind Profiler System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present power spectra of vertical velocities measured with the SOUSY-VHF-Radax wind profiler.over a 5-day period in October and November 1981. Most of the data consist of hourly vertical velocity profiles based on 12-rain averages, but, for ...

M. F. Larsen; J. Rutger; D. N. Holden

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Sensitivity of shortwave radiative flux density, forcing, and heating rates to the aerosol vertical profile  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the solar radiation profiles, for idealized and measured profiles of optical properties (extinction and single-scattering albedo (SSA)) during the May 2003 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Observation Period (AIOP), has been investigated using the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model Shortwave (RRTM_SW) code. Calculated profiles of down-welling and up-welling solar fluxes during the AIOP have been compared with the data measured by up- and down-looking solar broadband radiometers aboard a profiling research aircraft. The measured profiles of aerosol extinction, SSA, and water vapor obtained from the same aircraft that carried the radiometers served as the inputs for the model calculations. It is noteworthy that for this study, the uplooking radiometers were mounted on a stabilized platform that kept the radiometers parallel with respect to the earths horizontal plane. The results indicate that the shape of the aerosol extinction profiles has very little impact on direct radiative forcings at the top of atmosphere and surface in a cloud-free sky. However, as long as the aerosol is not purely scattering, the shape of the extinction profiles is important for forcing profiles. Identical extinction profiles with different absorption profiles drastically influence the forcing and heating rate profiles. Using aircraft data from 19 AIOP profiles over the Southern Great Plains (SGP), we are able to achieve broadband down-welling solar flux closure within 0.8% (bias difference) or 1.8% (rms difference), well within the expected measurement uncertainty of 1 to 3%. The poorer agreement in up-welling flux (bias -3.7%, rms 10%) is attributed to the use of inaccurate surface albedo data. The sensitivity tests reveal the important role accurate, vertically resolved aerosol extinction data plays in tightening flux closure. This study also suggests that in the presence of a strongly absorbing substance, aircraft flux measurements from a stabilized platform have the potential to determine heating rate profiles. These measurement-based heating rate profiles provide useful data for heating rate closure studies and indirect estimates of single scattering albedo assumed in radiative transfer calculations.

Guan, Hong; Schmid, Beat; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bergstrom, Robert

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Stability effects on the profiles of vertical velocity and its variance in katabatic flow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The atmospheric katabatic flow in the foothills of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains has been monitored by a network of towers and sodars for several years as part of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program. The dependence of the vertical component of motion, its variance, and the mean component of the wind perpendicular to the surface at the mouth of Coal Creek Canyon on surface cooling and channeling by winds above the canyon has been explored by using almost three years of data from the network. The magnitude of the near-surface temperature differences was found to decrease with increasing surface cooling in light winds, apparently because of increasing turbulence resulting when increasing winds interact with surface topography. The variance of vertical velocity exhibits three types of vertical profiles, corresponding to different cooling rates and external wind speeds. The mean variance was found to depend strongly on a locally derived Richardson number.

Coulter, R.L.; Martin, T.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Interpretation of shallow crustal structure of the Imperial Valley, California, from seismic reflection profiles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight seismic reflection profiles (285 km total length) from the Imperial Valley, California, were provided to CALCRUST for reprocessing and interpretation. Two profiles were located along the western margin of the valley, five profiles were situated along the eastern margin and one traversed the deepest portion of the basin. These data reveal that the central basin contains a wedge of highly faulted sediments that thins to the east. Most of the faulting is strike-slip but there is evidence for block rotations on the scale of 5 to 10 kilometers within the Brawley Seismic Zone. These lines provide insight into the nature of the east and west edges of the Imperial Valley. The basement at the northwestern margin of the valley, to the north of the Superstition Hills, has been normal-faulted and blocks of basement material have ''calved'' into the trough. A blanket of sediments has been deposited on this margin. To the south of the Superstition Hills and Superstition Mountain, the top of the basement is a detachment surface that dips gently into the basin. This margin is also covered by a thick sequence sediments. The basement of the eastern margin consists of metamorphic rocks of the upper plate of the Chocolate Mountain Thrust system underlain by the Orocopia Schist. These rocks dip to the southeast and extend westward to the Sand Hills Fault but do not appear to cross it. Thus, the Sand Hills Fault is interpreted to be the southern extension of the San Andreas Fault. North of the Sand Hills Fault the East Highline Canal seismicity lineament is associated with a strike-slip fault and is probably linked to the Sand Hills Fault. Six geothermal areas crossed by these lines, in agreement with previous studies of geothermal reservoirs, are associated with ''faded'' zones, Bouguer gravity and heat flow maxima, and with higher seismic velocities than surrounding terranes.

Severson, L.K.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Vertical Profiles of Aerosol and Radiation and the Influence of a Temperature Inversion: Measurements and Radiative Transfer Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an airborne experiment performed near Mnchengladbach (Germany) in November 1993 are reported. Besides meteorological data, vertical profiles of aerosol properties (number concentration, size distribution) and radiation (...

M. Wendisch; S. Mertes; A. Ruggaber; T. Nakajima

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

An Estimate of the Vertical Ozone Profile Discrepancy between the Australian BrewerMast and Electrochemical Concentration Cell Ozonesondes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis is described that provides an additive correction for referencing the vertical ozone profiles of the Australian BrewerMast (BM; October 1984December 1990) ozonesonde to those of the electrochemical concentration cell (ECC; January ...

Paul Lehmann

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Extrapolation of Vertical Profiles of Wind Speed within the Marine Atmospheric Surface layer Using the p Formula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Values of p for the exponent-type wind profile formulation, used in vertical extrapolations of wind speed, were derived for the marine atmospheric surface layer. Nomograms were constructed providing p values as dependent on a single elevation ...

M. Segal; R. A. Pielke

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Characteristics of the Vertical Profiles of Dual-Frequency, Dual-Polarization Radar Data in Stratiform Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne dual-wavelength and dual-polarization radar data are analyzed for measurements taken in stratiform rain in the western Pacific during September 1990. The focus of the paper is on the vertical profiles of the linear depolarization ratio, ...

R. Meneghini; H. Kumagai

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Vertical Profile of Radar Reflectivity of Convective Cells: A Strong Indicator of Storm Intensity and Lightning Probability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflectivity data from Doppler radars are used to construct vertical profiles of radar reflectivity (VPRR) of convective cells in mesoscale convective systems (MCSS) in three different environmental regimes. The National Center for Atmospheric ...

Edward J. Zipser; Kurt R. Lutz

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

An Algorithm for Retrieving Vertical Wind Profiles from Satellite-Observed Winds over the Indian Ocean Using Complex EOF Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an aim to exploit current satellite observations for determining vertical wind profiles, the authors have carried out a complex empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) analysis of a large number of radiosonde observations of wind fields over ...

C. M. Kishtawal; Sujit Basu; F. C. Pandey

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Evolution of the Vertical Thermodynamic Profile during the Transition from Shallow to Deep Convection during CuPIDO 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of the vertical thermodynamic profile associated with two cases of deep orographic convection were studied with data from an instrumented aircraft, mobile surface based radiosondes, and stereo photogrammetric analyses. The data were ...

Joseph A. Zehnder; Jiuxiang Hu; Anshuman Radzan

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Retrieval of Vertical Profiles of Liquid Water and Ice Content in Mixed Clouds from Doppler Radar and Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to retrieve vertical profiles of liquid water content Mw(z), ice water content Mi(z), and ice particle size distribution Ni(D, z), (where D is the ice particle size and z the vertical coordinate) in mixed nonprecipitating clouds ...

Henri Sauvageot

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Reflection seismic profiling in Wabash Valley fault system in southwestern Indiana  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1988 common-depth-point (CDP) reflection seismic profiling was initiated by ARPEX in southwestern Indiana in the Wabash Valley fault system. A 2.2-im (1.4-mi) east-west profile was shot across the Mt. Vernon graben in Posey County. Minihole shooting in 21-m (68.9-ft) patterns using 3.4 kg (7.5 lb) of seismic explosives distributed in five 3-m (10-ft) holes provided the energy source. Most shotholes were made with a reversible air-driven penetrating tool that was effective in dense clays. The 12-geophone array length was 43 m (141 ft), and the nominal far-trace offset was 2.1 km (7,000 ft). A 48-channel recording yielded 24-CDP coverage at 11-m (36-ft) intervals. Data were enhanced by gapped deconvolution, bandpass filtering, and CDP stack. The strongest and most continuous reflections at 0.75 and 1.6 sec are associated with the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) and Eau Claire Formation (Cambrian), respectively. Within the Mt. Vernon graben and east of the Spenser Consolidated oil field, the depth to Eau Claire Formation apparently increases by approximately 60 m (197 ft) over a horizontal distance of 1.4 km (0.9 mi). Minor faulting east of the Spencer Consolidated field appears to be synthetic to the Hovey lake fault, which bounds the eastern side of the Mt. Vernon graben. Tentative interpretations of faulting and weak reflections from depths greater than 4.5 km (15,000 ft) may be clarified by additional data processing and by additional seismic profiling planned by ARPEX.

Rene, R.M.; Hester, N.C.; Stanonis, F.L. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Vertical Temperature Profiles at Maximum Entropy Production with a Net Exchange Radiative Formulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Like any fluid heated from below, the atmosphere is subject to vertical instability which triggers convection. Convection occurs on small time and space scales, which makes it a challenging feature to include in climate models. Usually sub-grid parameterizations are required. Here, we develop an alternative view based on a global thermodynamic variational principle. We compute convective flux profiles and temperature profiles at steady-state in an implicit way, by maximizing the associated entropy production rate. Two settings are examined, corresponding respectively to the idealized case of a gray atmosphere, and a realistic case based on a Net Exchange Formulation radiative scheme. In the second case, we are also able to discuss the effect of variations of the atmospheric composition, like a doubling of the carbon dioxide concentration.

Herbert, Corentin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations  

SciTech Connect

The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Interpretation of a seismic refraction profile across the Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and vicinity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In April 1977, a seismic refraction profile was recorded across the Milford Valley, the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, and the northern Mineral Mountains in southwestern Utah. Seven shot points were used to provide multiple subsurface seismic refraction coverage along the 30 km east-west profile line. Since an inspection of power spectrums revealed large components of 60 Hz noise on some traces, computer routines were used to low-pass filter all seismograms. Amplitude information was utilized by normalizing all traces that recorded the same blast. Subsurface structural modeling was conducted by means of first arrival P-wave delay-time analysis and ray tracing. Herglotz-Wiechert travel-time inversion was used for the velocity-depth distribution in the Mineral Mountains. The interpretation of the P-wave travel-times suggests that the Milford Valley fill consists of two units with a total thickness of at least 1.8 km. In the vicinity of the Roosevelt KGRA, a thin low velocity alluvial layer covers a basement igneous complex with a velocity of 5.2 km/s. Granite velocities between 3.3 km/s and 4.0 km/s were calculated from the travel-times in the Mineral Mountains.

Gertson, R.C.; Smith, R.B.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

63

Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques page? Borehole Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Borehole Seismic Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Borehole Seismic Techniques Add.png Add a new Borehole Seismic Techniques Technique Pages in category "Borehole Seismic Techniques" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total. S Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic V Vertical Seismic Profiling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Borehole_Seismic_Techniques&oldid=601962" Category: Downhole Techniques What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

64

Computation of Vertical Profiles of Longwave Radiative Cooling over the Equatorial Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important quantity whose magnitude has not been thoroughly examined is the vertical distribution of heating in the Tropics. The details of the vertical distribution of heating have a significant impact on a number of phenomena, including the ...

Perry G. Ramsey; Dayton G. Vincent

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Average Vertical Motions in the Tropical Atmosphere Observed by a Radar Wind Profiler on Pohnpei (7N Latitude, 157E Longitude)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Average vertical profiles of the vertical wind obtained under clear sky conditions as weal as under conditions of both light-to-moderate and heavy rainfall am presented from data obtained using a radar wind profiler located on the island of ...

B. B. Balsley; W. L. Ecklund; D. A. Carter; A. C. Riddle; K. S. Gage

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Vertical Structure of Precipitation and Related Microphysics Observed by NOAA Profilers and TRMM during NAME 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of the 2004 North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) field campaign, NOAA established and maintained a field site about 100 km north of Mazatln, Mexico, consisting of wind profilers, precipitation profilers, surface upwarddownward-...

Christopher R. Williams; Allen B. White; Kenneth S. Gage; F. Martin Ralph

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Vertical Temperature Profiles at Maximum Entropy Production with a Net Exchange Radiative Formulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Like any fluid heated from below, the atmosphere is subject to vertical instability which triggers convection. Convection occurs on small time and space scales, which makes it a challenging feature to include in climate models. Usually sub-grid ...

Corentin Herbert; Didier Paillard; Brengre Dubrulle

68

Calculation of Consistent Flux and Advective Terms from Adjusted Vertical Profiles of Divergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple framework is presented for adjusting the normal wind components in a polygon of data points which produces a vanishing vertical integral of horizontal divergence, allows correct calculation of flux and advective terms, and permits ...

John Molinari; Steven Skubis

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

NETL: News Release - Microhole "Designer" Seismic Testing Its Potential in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 24, 2007 April 24, 2007 Microhole "Designer" Seismic Testing Its Potential in the Field DOE-Funded Technology Offers Low-Cost Deployment of Vertical Seismic Profiling MORGANTOWN, WV - Using microhole technology developed in partnership with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to inexpensively deploy sensors for vertical seismic profiling (VSP) could dramatically enhance the oil and gas industry's ability to find and produce huge volumes of by-passed oil and natural gas. VSP's advantages over conventional surface seismic have long been known. Placing seismic recording devices in boreholes results in a much improved signal-to-noise ratio compared with surface seismic. VSP gives an especially high-resolution image of the immediate vicinity of the borehole.

70

Methods for the Reconstruction of Vertical Profiles from Surface Data: Multivariate Analyses, Residual GEM, and Variable Temporal Signals in the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different methods for the extrapolation of vertical profiles from sea surface measurements have been tested on 14 yr of conductivitytemperaturedepth (CTD) data collected within the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program at A Long-Term ...

Bruno Buongiorno Nardelli; Rosalia Santoleri

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Method for Estimation of Surface Roughness and Similarity Function of Wind Speed Vertical Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is aimed at identifying and refining a method suitable to estimate the surface roughness length (z0) and the universal similarity function of the wind speed profile (?M) based on ultrasonic anemometer measurements carried out at only ...

Roberto Sozzi; Maurizio Favaron; Teodoro Georgiadis

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Vertical Profile of Liquid and Ice Water Content in Midlatitude Mixed-Phase Altocumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microphysical properties of mixed-phase altocumulus clouds are investigated using in situ airborne measurements acquired during the ninth Cloud Layer Experiment (CLEX-9) over a midlatitude location. Approximately ? of the sampled profiles are ...

Lawrence D. Carey; Jianguo Niu; Ping Yang; J. Adam Kankiewicz; Vincent E. Larson; Thomas H. Vonder Haar

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A Summary of Convective Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a summary of deep convective updraft and downdraft core properties over the central plains of the United States, accomplished using a novel and now-standard ARM scanning mode for a commercial wind profiler system. A unique ...

Scott E. Giangrande; Scott Collis; Jerry Straka; Alain Protat; Christopher Williams; Steven Krueger

74

Mountain Waves in the Tropical Pacific Atmosphere: A Comparison of Vertical Wind Fluctuations over Pohnpei and Christmas Island Using VHF Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare vertical wind fluctuations observed by VHF radar wind profilers in the tropical troposphere over a large, mountainous island (Pohnpei, at 7N, 158E) and a large, low-profile atoll (Christmas Island, at 2N, 157W). The major ...

Ben B. Balsley; David A. Carter

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Identification of Vertical Profiles of Radar Reflectivity for Hydrological Applications Using an Inverse Method. Part I: Formulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical variability of reflectivity in the radar beam is one of the main sources of error in estimating rainfall intensity. This vertical variability, which has several origins, is characterized globally by a function called "vertical ...

Herv Andrieu; Jean Dominique Creutin

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Downflow heat transfer in a heated ribbed vertical annulus with a cosine power profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments designed to investigate downflow heat transfer in a heated, ribbed annulus test section simulating one of the annular coolant channels of a Savannah River Plant production reactor Mark 22 fuel assembly have been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The inner surface of the annulus was constructed of aluminum and was electrically heated to provide an axial cosine power profile and a flat azimuthal power shape. Data presented in this report are from the ECS-2c series, which was a follow on series to the ECS-2b series, conducted specifically to provide additional data on the effect of different powers at the same test conditions, for use in evaluation of possible power effects on the aluminum temperature measurements. Electrical powers at 90%, 100%, and 110% of the power required to result in the maximum aluminum temperature at fluid saturation temperature were used at each set of test conditions previously used in the ECS-2b series. The ECS-2b series was conducted in the same test rig as the previous ECS-2b series. Data and experimental description for the ECS-2b series is provided in a previous report. 18 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Anderson, J.L.; Condie, K.G.; Larson, T.K.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Analysis of P- and S-wave VSP (vertical seismic profile) data from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To understand any geophysical data, geologic information is necessary. This thesis will begin with a summary of the geology of the Salton Trough region and the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). The information available from the SSSDP will also be summarized. After the geologic summary, the design of the VSP will be discussed, including acquisition equipment and procedures. The data processing procedures and software used will be discussed as a separate section. Processing procedures will also be described at various times in the thesis where more specialized procedures are used. Data analysis makes up the bulk of the thesis and it is divided into a number of sections detailing the basic VSP interpretation, the anisotropy analysis and the fracture detection and orientation analysis. A combined interpretation of the results, with probable geologic causes for observed events, is presented as a separate section from the data analysis. Finally, a summary of results for each of the goals stated above will be given. The reader should note that a large volume of data were collected and various display methods were used (from the standard wiggle-trace to three-component hodographs). Much of these data are left in the appendices with important or representative figures given in the body of the thesis. Also given in the appendices are listings of FORTRAN programs developed in conjunction with the thesis work. 46 refs., 63 figs., 12 tabs.

Daley, T.M.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain  

SciTech Connect

Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more than the other. It was also observed that P-wave and S-wave do not always reflect from the same stratal boundaries. The utilization of full-elastic seismic wavefield needs to be maximized in oil and gas explorations in order to optimize the search for hydrocarbons.

Innocent Aluka

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Advanced Seismic While Drilling System  

SciTech Connect

A breakthrough has been discovered for controlling seismic sources to generate selectable low frequencies. Conventional seismic sources, including sparkers, rotary mechanical, hydraulic, air guns, and explosives, by their very nature produce high-frequencies. This is counter to the need for long signal transmission through rock. The patent pending SeismicPULSER{trademark} methodology has been developed for controlling otherwise high-frequency seismic sources to generate selectable low-frequency peak spectra applicable to many seismic applications. Specifically, we have demonstrated the application of a low-frequency sparker source which can be incorporated into a drill bit for Drill Bit Seismic While Drilling (SWD). To create the methodology of a controllable low-frequency sparker seismic source, it was necessary to learn how to maximize sparker efficiencies to couple to, and transmit through, rock with the study of sparker designs and mechanisms for (a) coupling the sparker-generated gas bubble expansion and contraction to the rock, (b) the effects of fluid properties and dynamics, (c) linear and non-linear acoustics, and (d) imparted force directionality. After extensive seismic modeling, the design of high-efficiency sparkers, laboratory high frequency sparker testing, and field tests were performed at the University of Texas Devine seismic test site. The conclusion of the field test was that extremely high power levels would be required to have the range required for deep, 15,000+ ft, high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) wells. Thereafter, more modeling and laboratory testing led to the discovery of a method to control a sparker that could generate low frequencies required for deep wells. The low frequency sparker was successfully tested at the Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (DOE RMOTC) field test site in Casper, Wyoming. An 8-in diameter by 26-ft long SeismicPULSER{trademark} drill string tool was designed and manufactured by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified for developing, utilizing, and exploiting the low-frequency SeismicPULSER{trademark} source in a

Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Vertical Velocity and Buoyancy Characteristics of Coherent Echo Plumes in the Convective Boundary Layer, Detected by a Profiling Airborne Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft and airborne millimeter-wave radar observations are used to interpret the dynamics of radar echoes and radar-inferred updrafts within the well-developed, weakly sheared continental convective boundary layer. Vertically pointing radar ...

Qun Miao; Bart Geerts; Margaret LeMone

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Direct Algorithm for Convective Adjustment of the Vertical Temperature Profile for an Arbitrary Critical Lapse Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An efficient direct algorithm of convective adjustment for an arbitrary critical value of the vertical temperature lapse rate ? is proposed. The algorithm provides an exact and unique solution of a standard convective adjustment problem for ...

R. A. Akmaev

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Biases of CO2 Storage in Eddy Flux Measurements pertinent to Vertical Configurations of a Profile System and CO2 Density Averaging  

SciTech Connect

CO2 storage in a 30-minute period in a tall forest canopy often makes significant contributions to net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in the early morning and at night. When CO2 storage is properly measured and taken into account, underestimations of NEE on calm nights can be greatly reduced. Using CO2 data from a 12-level profile, we demonstrate that the lower canopy layer (below the thermal inversion) is a disproportional contributor to the total CO2 storage. This is because time derivative of CO2 density ( c/ t) generally shows increasing magnitude of mean and standard deviation with decreasing heights at night and from sunrise to 1000 hr in both growing and dormant seasons. Effects of resolution and configuration in a profiling system on the accuracy of CO2 storage estimation are evaluated by comparing subset profiles to the 12-level benchmark profile. It is demonstrated that the effectiveness of a profiling system in estimating CO2 storage is not only determined by its number of sampling levels but, more importantly, by its vertical configuration. To optimize a profile, one needs to balance the influence of two factors, c/ t and layer thickness, among all vertical sections within a forest. As a key contributor to the total CO2 storage, the lower canopy (with relatively large means and standard deviations of c/ t) requires a higher resolution in a profile system than the layers above. However, if the upper canopy is over-sparsely sampled relative to the lower canopy, the performance of a profile system might be degraded since, in such a situation, the influence of layer thickness dominates over that of c/ t. We also find that, because of different level of complexity in canopy structure, more sampling levels are necessary at our site in order to achieve the same level of accuracy as at a boreal aspen site. These results suggest that, in order to achieve an adequate accuracy in CO2 storage measurements, the number of sampling levels in a profile and its design should be subject to the site properties, e.g., canopy architecture and the resulted thermodynamic and flow structures. If CO2 density from a single profile is averaged in time and then used in assessing CO2 storage to make this measurement more spatially representative, biases associated with this averaging procedure become inevitable. Generally, larger window sizes used in averaging CO2 density generate poorer estimates of CO2 storage. If absolute errors are concerned, it appears that the more significant the CO2 storage is during a period (nighttime and early morning hours versus late morning and afternoon, peak growing season versus early growing season), the larger effects the averaging procedure has.

Yang, Bai [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Riggs, Jeffery S [ORNL; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Heuer, Mark [ATDD, NOAA

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Intercomparison of Single-Frequency Methods for Retrieving a Vertical Rain Profile from Airborne or Spaceborne Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper briefly reviews several single-frequency rain profiling methods for an airborne or spaceborne radar. The authors describe the different methods from a unified point of view starting from the basic differential equation. This ...

Toshio Iguchi; Robert Meneghini

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Combined Wind Profiler/Polarimetric Radar Studies of the Vertical Motion and Microphysical Characteristics of Tropical Sea-Breeze Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment combining wind profiler and polarimetric radar analyses of intense, but shallow, tropical thunderstorms has been performed. These storms are important as they are very common along many tropical coasts and islands and are sometimes ...

Peter T. May; A. R. Jameson; Thomas D. Keenan; Paul E. Johnston; Chris Lucas

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Composite Vertical Structure of Vertical Velocity in Nonprecipitating Cumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical transects of Doppler vertical velocity data, obtained from an airborne profiling millimeter-wave cloud radar, are composited for a large number of cumulus clouds (Cu) at various stages of their life cycle, to examine typical circulations ...

Yonggang Wang; Bart Geerts

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Seismic CD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEISMIC CD Table of Contents INTRODUCTION Background Resource Findings and Recovery Timeline Oil Program ADIS Overview Gas Program ADIS Overview SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT...

87

Estimating Oceanic Turbulence Dissipation from Seismic Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic images of oceanic thermohaline finestructure record vertical displacements from internal waves and turbulence over large sections at unprecedented horizontal resolution. Where reflections follow isopycnals, their displacements can be used ...

W. Steven Holbrook; Ilker Fer; Raymond W. Schmitt; Daniel Lizarralde; Jody M. Klymak; L. Cody Helfrich; Robert Kubichek

88

Vertical Normal Mode Transforms: Theory and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The separation of the vertical structure of the, solutions of the primitive (hydrostatic) meteorological equations is formalized as a vertical normal-mode transform. The transform is implemented for arbitrary static stability profiles by the ...

Scott R. Fulton; Wayne H. Schubert

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Determining Vertical Water Velocities from Seaglider  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical velocities in the worlds oceans are typically small, less than 1 cm s?1, posing a significant challenge for observational techniques. Seaglider, an autonomous profiling instrument, can be used to estimate vertical water velocity in the ...

Eleanor Frajka-Williams; Charles C. Eriksen; Peter B. Rhines; Ramsey R. Harcourt

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Vertical Velocity Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Velocity Focus Group Velocity Focus Group ARM 2008 Science Team Meeting Norfolk, VA March 10-14 Background Vertical velocity measurements have been at the top of the priority list of the cloud modeling community for some time. Doppler measurements from ARM profiling radars operating at 915-MHz, 35-GHz and 94-GHz have been largely unexploited. The purpose of this new focus group is to develop vertical velocity ARM products suitable for modelers. ARM response to their request has been slow. Most ARM instruments are suitable for cloud observations and have limited capabilities in precipitation Using ARM datasets for evaluating and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically drastically limits opportunities

91

The Vertical Profile of Wind and Temperature in Cyclones and Anticyclones over the Eastern Two-Thirds of the United States: A Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatological analysis, based upon operational surface and upper-air data from 1957 to 1994, of the wind and temperature profiles composited with respect to each quadrant of surface cyclones and anticyclones, is presented for the eastern two-...

Howard B. Bluestein; Peter C. Banacos

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Balloon-Borne Continuous Cloud Particle Replicator for Measuring Vertical Profiles of Cloud Microphysical Properties: Instrument Design, Performance, and Collection Efficiency Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of a balloon-borne Formvar replicator that measures continuous profiles of cloud microphysical properties is investigated. The replicator measures the small particles (<100-?m diameter) that are undetectable or poorly resolved by ...

Larry M. Miloshevich; Andrew J. Heymsfield

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Self-consistent Method for Determining Vertical Profiles of Aerosol and Atmospheric Properties Using a High Spectral Resolution Rayleigh-Mie Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-consistent method of inverting high spectral resolution, Rayleigh-Mie lidar signals to obtain profiles of atmospheric state variables, as well as aerosol properties, is presented. Assumed are a known air pressure at a reference height, ...

D. A. Krueger; L. M. Caldwell; C. Y. She; R. J. Alvarez II

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Seismic Studies  

SciTech Connect

This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (2) For probabilistic analyses supporting the demonstration of compliance with preclosure performance objectives, provide a mean seismic hazard curve for the surface facilities area. Results should be consistent with the PSHA for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (3) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for postclosure analyses, provide site-specific seismic time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement) for the waste emplacement level. Time histories should be consistent with the PSHA and reflect available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain. (4) In support of ground-motion site-response modeling, perform field investigations and laboratory testing to provide a technical basis for model inputs. Characterize the repository block and areas in which important-to-safety surface facilities will be sited. Work should support characterization and reduction of uncertainties in inputs to ground-motion site-response modeling. (5) On the basis of rock mechanics, geologic, and seismic information, determine limits on extreme ground motion at Yucca Mountain and document the technical basis for them. (6) Update the ground-motion site-response model, as appropriate, on the basis of new data. Expand and enhance the technical basis for model validation to further increase confidence in the site-response modeling. (7) Document seismic methodologies and approaches in reports to be submitted to the NRC. (8) Address condition reports.

R. Quittmeyer

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Moored Profiling Instrument*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The specifications and performance of a moored vertical profiling instrument, designed to acquire near-full-ocean-depth profile time series data at high vertical resolution, are described. The 0.8-m-diameter by 0.4-m-wide device utilizes a ...

K. W. Doherty; D. E. Frye; S. P. Liberatore; J. M. Toole

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Vertical Circuits Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Circuits Inc Circuits Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Vertical Circuits, Inc. Place Scotts Valley, California Zip 95066 Sector Services Product Vertical Circuits Inc. is a global supplier of advanced die level vertical interconnect packaging technology, products, services and intellectual property for the manufacture of low cost ultra high-speed/high-density semiconductor components. References Vertical Circuits, Inc.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Vertical Circuits, Inc. is a company located in Scotts Valley, California . References ↑ "Vertical Circuits, Inc." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Vertical_Circuits_Inc&oldid=352802"

97

VERTICAL GARDEN DIY CHECKLIST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VERTICAL GARDEN DIY CHECKLIST Vertical greenery is not a new concept; it dates back thousands-growingvarietiesbecome established. Theneedforpermissionfromcouncil, strataetc. #12;VERTICAL GARDEN DIY CHECKLIST THE PLAN

Peters, Richard

98

Fracture detection, mapping, and analysis of naturally fractured gas reservoirs using seismic technology. Final report, November 1995  

SciTech Connect

Many basins in the Rocky Mountains contain naturally fractured gas reservoirs. Production from these reservoirs is controlled primarily by the shape, orientation and concentration of the natural fractures. The detection of gas filled fractures prior to drilling can, therefore, greatly benefit the field development of the reservoirs. The objective of this project was to test and verify specific seismic methods to detect and characterize fractures in a naturally fractured reservoir. The Upper Green River tight gas reservoir in the Uinta Basin, Northeast Utah was chosen for the project as a suitable reservoir to test the seismic technologies. Knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic geologic setting, the fracture azimuths, and estimates of the local in-situ stress field, were used to guide the acquisition and processing of approximately ten miles of nine-component seismic reflection data and a nine-component Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP). Three sources (compressional P-wave, inline shear S-wave, and cross-line, shear S-wave) were each recorded by 3-component (3C) geophones, to yield a nine-component data set. Evidence of fractures from cores, borehole image logs, outcrop studies, and production data, were integrated with the geophysical data to develop an understanding of how the seismic data relate to the fracture network, individual well production, and ultimately the preferred flow direction in the reservoir. The multi-disciplinary approach employed in this project is viewed as essential to the overall reservoir characterization, due to the interdependency of the above factors.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Program on Technology Innovation: Effect of Seismic Wave Incoherence on Foundation and Building Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Task S2.1 of the New Plant Seismic Issues Resolution Programa joint effort of EPRI and the Department of Energy (DOE)entails a research program into the effect of seismic wave incoherence on foundation and building response. The tasks objective is to systematically study seismic wave incoherence effects on structures/foundations similar to those being considered for advanced reactor designs. Seismic wave incoherence occurs because of horizontal spatial variation of both horizontal and vertical ground mot...

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

New Insights Into Deep Convective Core Vertical Velocities Using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insights Into Deep Convective Core Vertical Velocities Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govscience...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DRAFT Microwave Radiometer Profiler Handbook  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Radiometer Profiler Handbook Evaluation of a New Multi-Frequency Microwave Radiometer for Measuring the Vertical Distribution of Temperature, Water Vapor, and Cloud...

102

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Vertical arrays for fracture mapping in geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In collaboration with UNOCAL Geothermal Operations, Los Alamos National Laboratory assessed the feasibility of using vertical arrays of borehole seismic sensors for mapping of microseismicity in The Geysers geothermal field. Seismicity which arises from minute displacements along fracture or fault surfaces has been shown in studies of seismically active oil reservoirs to be useful in identifying fractures affected by and possibly contributing to production. Use of retrievable borehole seismic packages at The Geysers was found to reduce the threshold for detection of microearthquakes by an estimated 2--3 orders of magnitude in comparison to surface-based sensors. These studies led to the design, materials selection, fabrication, and installation of a permanent array of geophones intended for long term seismic monitoring and mapping of fractures in the vicinity of the array at The Geysers.

Albright, J.N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rutledge, J.T.; Fairbanks, T.D. [Nambe Geophysics, Inc. (United States); Thomson, J.C. [Lithos Inc. (United States); Stevenson, M.A. [Petroleum Geo-Services (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Principal Component Analysis of Wind Profiler Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to wind profiler observations to study the vertical profile of the wind field and its temporal evolution. The rationale for decomposing timeheight wind profiler data using PCA is twofold. The ...

Christopher R. Williams

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing for Earthquake Engineering Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downhole seismic testing is one field test that is commonly used to determine compression-wave (P) and shear-wave (S) velocity profiles in geotechnical earthquake engineering investigations. These profiles are required input in evaluations of the responses to earthquake shaking of geotechnical sites and structures at these sites. In the past, traditional downhole testing has generally involved profiling in the 30- to 150-m depth range. As the number of field seismic investigations at locations with critical facilities has increased, profiling depths have also increased. An improved downhole test that can be used for wave velocity profiling to depths of 300 to 600 m or more is presented.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh; Rohay, Alan C.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

106

Time-lapse crosswell seismic and VSP monitoring of injected CO2 ina brine aquifer  

SciTech Connect

Seismic surveys successfully imaged a small scale C02injection (1,600 tons) conducted in a brine aquifer of the Frio Formationnear Houston, Texas. These time-lapse bore-hole seismic surveys,crosswell and vertical seismic profile (VSP), were acquired to monitorthe C02 distribution using two boreholes (the new injection well and apre-existing well used for monitoring) which are 30 m apart at a depth of1500 m. The crosswell survey provided a high-resolution image of the C02distribution between the wells via tomographic imaging of the P-wavevelocity decrease (up to 500 mls). The simultaneously acquired S-wavetomography showed little change in S-wave velocity, as expected for fluidsubstitution. A rock physics model was used to estimate C02 saturationsof 10-20 percent from the P-wave velocity change. The VSP survey resolveda large (-70 percent) change in reflection amplitude for the Friohorizon. This C02 induced reflection amplitude change allowed estimationof the C02 extent beyond the monitor well and on 3 azimuths. The VSPresult is compared with numerical modeling of C02 saturations and isseismically modeled using the velocity change estimated in the crosswellsurvey.

Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Peterson, J.E.; Majer, E.L.; Hoversten,G.M.

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Seismic sources  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

Green, Michael A. (Oakland, CA); Cook, Neville G. W. (Lafayette, CA); McEvilly, Thomas V. (Berkeley, CA); Majer, Ernest L. (El Cirrito, CA); Witherspoon, Paul A. (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH Place Schwanau, Baden-Württemberg, Germany Zip 77961 Sector Geothermal energy Product Specialized company that builds vertical drilling equipment for the development of geothermal resources. References Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH is a company located in Schwanau, Baden-Württemberg, Germany . References ↑ "Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Herrenknecht_Vertical_GmbH&oldid=346498" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

109

TOPS: A Free-Fall Velocity and CTD Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A free-fall instrument, TOPS, measures vertical profiles of horizontal ocean velocity, conductivity and temperature. Profiling capability extends throughout the full water column (6000 db pressure limitation). Larger vertical wavelength (water ...

S. P. Hayes; H. B. Milburn; E. F. Ford

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Seismic Design Expectations Report (SDER) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the project seismic design activities prior to...

111

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012 Presenter: Jeffrey Kimball, Technical Specialist (Seismologist) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Topics Covered: Department of Energy Approach to Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design (Seismic) Design Basis and Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events Seismic Risk Implications - Key Parameters and Insights Conclusions Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk More Documents & Publications DOE's Approach to Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis and Management Results from Beyond Design Basis Event Pilots Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk

112

Equatorial Velocity Profiles. Part II: Zonal Component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical profiles of horizontal velocity made along 53E in the western Indian Ocean, during and after he onset of the southwest monsoon in 1976, show features in zonal velocity of relatively small vertical scale. Persistence of the features over ...

Kathleen O'Neill; James R. Luyten

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Single well seismic imaging of a gas-filled hydrofracture  

SciTech Connect

A single well seismic survey was conducted at the Lost Hills, Ca oil field in a monitoring well as part of a CO2 injection test. The source was a piezoelectric seismic source and the sensors were a string of hydrophones hanging below the source. The survey was processed using standard CMP reflection seismology techniques. A potential reflection event was observed and interpreted as being caused by a near vertical hydrofracture. The radial distance between the survey well and the hydrofracture is estimated from Kirchoff migration using a velocity model derived from cross well seismic tomography. The hydrofracture location imaged after migration agrees with the location of an existing hydrofracture.

Daley, Thomas M.; Gritto, Roland; Majer, Ernest L.

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

114

Downhole Seismic Monitoring at the Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 500-ft length, 6-level, 3-component, vertical geophone array was permanently deployed within the upper 800 ft of Unocal's well GDCF 63-29 during a plug and abandonment operation on April 7, 1998. The downhole array remains operational after a period of 1 year, at a temperature of about 150 C. Continuous monitoring and analysis of shallow seismicity (<4000 ft deep) has been conducted over that same 1-year period. The downhole array was supplemented with 4 surface stations in late-1998 and early-1999 to help constrain locations of shallow seismicity. Locations occurring within about 1 km ({approximately}3000 ft) of the array have been determined for a subset of high-frequency events detected on the downhole and surface stations for the 10-week period January 6 to March 16, 1999. These events are distinct from surface-monitored seismicity at The Geysers in that they occur predominantly above the producing reservoir, at depths ranging from about 1200 to 4000 ft depth (1450 to -1350 ft elevation). The shallow seismicity shows a northeast striking trend, similar to seismicity trends mapped deeper within the reservoir and the strike of the predominant surface lineament observed over the productive field.

Rutledge, J.T.; Anderson, T.D.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Albright, J.N.

1999-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Vertical axis wind turbines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

116

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

Vertical Diffusion in the Lower Atmosphere Using Aircraft Measurements of 222Rn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical profiles of 222Rn concentrations measured from 3 to 6 September 1995 in the northeastern United States, using a new radon instrument designed for aircraft measurements, are presented. A vertical diffusion model was employed to simulate ...

H. N. Lee; R. J. Larsen

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Determining Turbulent Vertical Velocity, and Fluxes of Heat and Salt with an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors show that vertical turbulent fluxes in the upper ocean can be measured directly with an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). A horizontal profile of vertical water velocity is obtained by applying a Kalman smoother to AUV motion data. ...

Daniel R. Hayes; James H. Morison

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Lidar Observations of the Vertical Aerosol Flux in the Planetary Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical aerosol transport in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is investigated with lidars. Profiles of the vertical wind velocity are measured with a 2-?m Doppler wind lidar. Aerosol parameters are derived from observations with an aerosol ...

Ronny Engelmann; Ulla Wandinger; Albert Ansmann; Detlef Mller; Egidijus eromskis; Dietrich Althausen; Birgit Wehner

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=425640"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian...

122

A Natural Seismic Isolating System: The Buried Mangrove Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Belleplaine test site, located in the island of Guadeloupe (French Lesser Antilles) includes a three-accelerometer vertical array, designed for liquefac- tion studies. The seismic response of the soil column at the test site is computed using three methods: the spectral ratio method using the vertical array data, a numerical method using the geotechnical properties of the soil column, and an operative fre- quency domain decomposition (FDD) modal analysis method. The Belleplaine test site is characterized by a mangrove layer overlaid by a stiff sandy deposit. This con- figuration is widely found at the border coast of the Caribbean region, which is exposed to high seismic hazard. We show that the buried mangrove layer plays the role of an isolation system equivalent to those usually employed in earthquake engineering aimed at reducing the seismic shear forces by reducing the internal stress within the structure. In our case, the flexibility of the mangrove layer reduces the distortion and the stress in the...

Gueguen, Philippe; Foray, Pierre; Rousseau, Christophe; Maury, Julie; 10.1785/0120100129

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Observations of Vertical Wind Shear Heterogeneity in Convective Boundary Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dual-Doppler wind syntheses from mobile radar observations obtained during the International H2O Project document some of the spatial variability of vertical wind profiles in convective boundary layers. Much of the variability of popular ...

Paul Markowski; Yvette Richardson

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Vertical Resolution and Accuracy of Atmospheric Infrared Sounding Spectrometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical analysis is performed to evaluate the accuracy and vertical resolution of atmospheric profiles obtained with the HIRS/2, GOES I/M, and HIS instruments. In addition, a linear simultaneous retrieval algorithm is used with aircraft ...

Hung-Lung Huang; William L. Smith; Harold M. Woolf

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Vertical Partition of Oceanic Horizontal Kinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To produce an interpretation of the surface kinetic energy as measured by altimeters, a survey is made of the vertical structure of kinetic energy profiles in a large number of globally distributed long current meter records. Although the data ...

Carl Wunsch

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Varieties of Fully Resolved Spectra of Vertical Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Multi-Scale profiler (MSP) resolves shear between vertical wavenumbers of 0.01 cpm and the viscous cutoff of small-scale turbulence. Observations from five sites reveal varied spectral shapes and amplitudes. Spectral amplitudes measured at ...

M. C. Gregg; D. P. Winkel; T. B. Sanford

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

How Much Energy Propagates Vertically in the Equatorial Oceans?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically propagating linear wave calculations using realistic equatorial buoyancy profiles are presented which show the percentage of the downward surface energy flux that reaches the deep equatorial oceans. The percentages vary widely ...

Peter R. Gent; James R. Luyten

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Vertical Velocity and Vertical Heat Flux Observed within Loop Current Eddies in the Central Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixteen months of observations from a surface-to-bottom mooring in the central Gulf of Mexico show that acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are useful for directly measuring the vertical velocity within mesoscale anticyclonic eddies, such ...

David Rivas; Antoine Badan; Julio Sheinbaum; Jos Ochoa; Julio Candela

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

IPEEE Seismic Insights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles and summarizes results of the seismic portion of the Individual Plant Examination for External Events (IPEEE) conducted for each U.S. nuclear plant. Utilities can use trends developed from these results -- together with their individual plant-specific results -- to address future seismic issues on a risk-informed basis.

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

Seismic Fragility Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Seismic Fragility Applications Guide" provides utilities with in-depth guidelines for performing fragility analysis as part of a seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA). These cost-effective and practical procedures and the resulting SPRA can support risk-informed/performance-based (RI/PB) applications. To download a pdf file of the product description for this report, click here.

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

Measurment and Interpretation of Seismic Attenuation for Hydrocarbon Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research project is the combined effort of several leading research groups. Advanced theoretical work is being conducted at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Here, the fundamental controls on loss mechanisms are being examined, primarily by use of numerical models of heterogeneous porous media. At the University of California, Berkeley, forward modeling is combined with direct measurement of attenuation. This forward modeling provides an estimate of the influence of 1/Q on the observed seismic signature. Direct measures of losses in Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSPs) indicate mechanisms to separate scattering versus intrinsic losses. At the Colorado School of Mines, low frequency attenuation measurements are combined with geologic models of deep water sands. ChevronTexaco is our corporate cosponsor and research partner. This corporation is providing field data over the Genesis Field, Gulf of Mexico. In addition, ChevronTexaco has rebuilt and improved their low frequency measurement system. Soft samples representative of the Genesis Field can now be measured for velocities and attenuations under reservoir conditions. Throughout this project we have: Assessed the contribution of mechanical compaction on time-lapse monitoring; Developed and tested finite difference code to model dispersion and attenuation; Heterogeneous porous materials were modeled and 1/Q calculated vs. frequency; 'Self-affine' heterogeneous materials with differing Hurst exponent modeled; Laboratory confirmation was made of meso-scale fluid motion influence on 1/Q; Confirmed theory and magnitude of layer-based scattering attenuation at Genesis and at a shallow site in California; Scattering Q's of between 40 and 80 were obtained; Measured very low intrinsic Q's (2-20) in a partially saturated vadose zone VSP; First field study to separate scattering and intrinsic attenuation in real data set; Revitalized low frequency device at ChevronTexaco's Richmond lab completed; First complete frequency dependent measurements on Berea sandstones from dry to various saturations (brine and decane); Frequency dependent forward modeling code is running, and tested on a couple of Cases--derives frequency dependent reflectivity from porosity based logs; Genesis seismic data obtained but is on hold until forward modeling is complete; Boundary and end effects modeled for soft material measurements at CSM; and Numerous papers published or submitted and presentations made.

Michael Batzle; Luca Duranti; James Rector; Steve Pride

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Combined seismic and hydraulic method of modeling flow in fractured low permeability rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modeling flow of ground water in hard rocks where a network of fractures provides the dominant flow paths is a major problem. This paper summarizes a program of investigations currently underway in this laboratory to characterize the geometry of fractured rocks and develop methods of handling flow in such systems. Numerical models have been developed to investigate flow behavior in two- and three-dimensional fracture networks. The results demonstrate the insights that can be gained from modeling studies of fractured rocks. A key problem is gathering the necessary data on fracture geometry. Investigations have been started to determine how vertical seismic profiling (VSP) might be improved and applied to this problem. A VSP experiment in The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, where fracture orientation is known, produced shear wave splitting and velocity anisotropy in agreement with theory. The results suggest the potential application of 3-component, multi-source VSP data in determining fracture orientation and average spacing. We believe a combination of seismic and hydraulic methods can greatly enhance an understanding of fluid flow and transport in low permeability rock systems where fractures provide the dominant paths. 40 refs, 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Witherspoon, P.A.; Long, J.C.S.; Majer, E.L.; Myer, L.R.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Seismic responses of unanchored electrode storage fixtures  

SciTech Connect

Two anchored electrode storage fixtures will be installed in the process cell of the Integral Fast Reactor`s Fuel Cycle Facility at ANL-W in Idaho. In addition to the concerns for structural integrity, the potential for uplifting and tipping of the fixtures during the design basis earthquake must also be examined. In the analysis, a response-spectrum method was employed to investigate tipping, while a static approach was used for the structural-integrity evaluations. The results show that the combined stresses from seismic and other loads are within the allowables permitted by the design codes. The overall vertical seismic reaction forces at the leveling pads are compressive, implying that the fixtures will remain in contact with the floor. No uplifting or tipping of the fixture will occur during the design basis earthquake.

Ting-shu Wu; Blomquist, C.A.; Haupt, H.J.; Herceg, J.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Ileana Tibuleac, Leiph Preston (2008) Regional Resource Area Mapping In Nevada Using The Usarray Seismic Network Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Central_Nevada_Seismic_Zone_Region_(Biasi,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=425638" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

135

Statistics of Storm Updraft Velocities from TWP-ICE Including Verification with Profiling Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons between direct measurements and modeled values of vertical air motions in precipitating systems are complicated by differences in temporal and spatial scales. On one hand, vertically profiling radars more directly measure the vertical ...

Scott Collis; Alain Protat; Peter T. May; Christopher Williams

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

ARM - Measurement - Vertical velocity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsVertical velocity govMeasurementsVertical velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Vertical velocity The component of the velocity vector, along the local vertical. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System KAZR : Ka ARM Zenith Radar MMCR : Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radar SODAR : Mini Sound Detection and Ranging

137

Method of migrating seismic records  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Third Quater Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, 16 local earthquakes were recorded during the third quarter of fiscal year 2007. The largest event (magnitude 2.0) occurred on April 16, 2007 and was located 4 km southwest of the 400 Area in the Columbia River basalts at a depth of approximately 3 km. Stratigraphically, 7 earthquakes occurred in the Columbia River basalts (approximately 0-5 km depth), 1 earthquake in the pre-basalt sediments (approximately 5-10 km depth), and 8 earthquakes in the crystalline basement (approximately 10-25 km depth). Geographically, 8 earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, and 8 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford SMA network was triggered on the 300 Area and the 400 Area SMA by the 2.0 Mc seismic event that occurred on April 16, 2007. The maximum vertical acceleration was 0.07 % g and the maximum horizontal acceleration was 0.05% g at the 300 Area SMA, 13.5 km from the event. At the 400 Area SMA, only 5.2 km from the event, the maximum vertical acceleration was 0.25 % g and the maximum horizontal acceleration was 0.23% g. These are the first recordings of a small local earthquake on the SMA network. The reportable action level of 2% g for Hanford facilities is approximately 8 times larger than the peak accelerations observed at the 400 Area and no action was required.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

139

Category:Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 subcategories, out of 2 total. A Active Seismic Techniques 2 pages P Passive Seismic Techniques 2 pages Pages in category "Seismic Techniques" The following 2...

140

Seismic Ruggedness of Relays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relay GERS (Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectra) provide utilities with generic seismic capability for more than 100 electrical relays most commonly used in nuclear power plants. The data can be used directly for the assessment of relays in the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-46, "Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Nuclear Plants" and for the Individual Plant Evaluation for External Events (IPEEE) for resolution of USNRC severe accident policy issues.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Azimuthal variation of radiation of seismic energy from cast blasts  

SciTech Connect

As part of a series of seismic experiments designed to improve the understanding of the impact of mining blasts on verifying a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, a sixteen station network of three-component seismic sensors were deployed around a large cast shot in the Black Thunder Mine. The seismic stations were placed, where possible, at a range of 2.5 kilometers with a constant inter-station spacing of 22.5 degrees. All of the data were recorded with the seismometers oriented such that the radial component pointed to the middle point of the approximately 2 kilometer long shot. High quality data were recorded at each station. Data were scaled to a range of 2.5 kilometers and the sum of the absolute value of the vertical, radial, and transverse channels computed. These observations were used to construct radiation patterns of the seismic energy propagating from the cast shot. It is obvious that cast shots do not radiate seismic energy isotropically. Most of the vertical motion occurs behind the highwall while radial and transverse components of motion are enhanced in directions parallel to the highwall. These findings have implications for local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and possibly for regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic observations of cast blasting. Locally, it could be argued that peak particle velocities could be scaled not only by range but also by azimuthal direction from the shot. This result implies that long term planning of pit orientation relative to sensitive structures could mitigate problems with vibration levels from future blasting operations. Regionally, the local radiation pattern may be important in determining the magnitude of large scale cast blasts. Improving the transparency of mining operations to international seismic monitoring systems may be possible with similar considerations.

Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Martin, R.L. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

3-D Seismic Methods for Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment--Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the challenge has been to separate the ''background'' natural complexity and heterogeneity of the matrix from the fracture/fault heterogeneity controlling the fluid flow. Ideally one not only wants to find the fractures, but the fractures that are controlling the flow of the fluids. Evaluated in this work is current state-of-the-art surface (seismic reflection) and borehole seismic methods (Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), Crosswell and Single Well) to locate and quantify geothermal reservoir characteristics. The focus is on active methods; the assumption being that accuracy is needed for successful well siting. Passive methods are useful for exploration and detailed monitoring for in-fill drilling, but in general the passive methods lack the precision and accuracy for well siting in new or step out areas. In addition, MEQ activity is usually associated with production, after the field has been taken to a mature state, thus in most cases it is assumed that there is not enough MEQ activity in unproduced areas to accurately find the permeable pathways. The premise of this review is that there may new developments in theory and modeling, as well as in data acquisition and processing, which could make it possible to image the subsurface in much more detail than 15 years ago. New understanding of the effect of fractures on seismic wave propagation are now being applied to image fractures in gas and oil environments. It now may be appropriate to apply these methods, with modifications, to geothermal applications. It is assumed that to implement the appropriate methods an industry coupled program tightly linked to actual field cases, iterating between development and application will be pursued. The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new geothermal resources and/or improve assessment of current ones.

Majer, E.L.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

Vertical Wavenumber Spectra of Gravity Waves in the Martian Atmosphere Obtained from Mars Global Surveyor Radio Occultation Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical wavenumber spectra of Martian gravity waves were obtained for the altitude range 332 km from temperature profiles acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation experiments. The spectra, which cover vertical wavelengths ...

Hiroki Ando; Takeshi Imamura; Toshitaka Tsuda

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Coherence Time of Midtropospheric Wind Features as a Function of Vertical Scale from 300 m to 2 km  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coherence between vertical wind profiles separated by a time lag is measured as a function of vertical scale from Doppler radar wind profiler data. Each profile covers altitudes from 6811 m to 16?261 m and is Fourier transformed over a ...

Francis J. Merceret

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Magnitude correlations in global seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

Sarlis, N. V. [Solid State Section and Solid Earth Physics Institute, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos GR-157 84, Athens (Greece)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Induced seismicity. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

Segall, P.

1997-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

147

Geothermal induced seismicity program plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan for a National Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program has been prepared in consultation with a panel of experts from industry, academia, and government. The program calls for baseline seismic monitoring in regions of known future geothermal development, continued seismic monitoring and characterization of earthquakes in zones of geothermal fluid production and injection, modeling of the earthquake-inducing mechanism, and in situ measurement of stresses in the geothermal development. The Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program (GISP) will have as its objectives the evaluation of the seismic hazard, if any, associated with geothermal resource exploitation and the devising of a technology which, when properly utilized, will control or mitigate such hazards.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Earthquake Experience Data on Anchored, Ground-Mounted Vertical Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earthquake experience data indicate that anchored, vertical storage tanks similar in structure to those used in nuclear power plant safety systems can survive greater ground motion than accounted for in most nuclear plant designs. Comparison of design parameters for nuclear and nonnuclear storage tanks confirmed the applicability of earthquake experience data to demonstrate the seismic adequacy of nuclear plant storage tanks.

1989-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

ARM - Evaluation Product - Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsVertical Air Motion during Large-Scale ProductsVertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain Site(s) NIM SGP General Description The Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain (VERVELSR) value-added product (VAP) uses the unique properties of a 95-GHz radar Doppler velocity spectra to produce vertical profiles of air motion during low-to-moderate (1-20 mm/hr) rainfall events It is designed to run at ARM sites that include a W-band ARM cloud radar (WACR) radar with spectra data processing. The VERVELSR VAP, based on the work of Giangrande et al. (2010), operates by exploiting a resonance effect that occurs in

150

Temperature Profiling with Neural Network Inversion of Microwave Radiometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A neural network is used to obtain vertical profiles of temperature from microwave radiometer data. The overall rms error in the retrieved profiles of a test dataset was only about 8% worse than the overall error using an optimized statistical ...

James H. Churnside; Thomas A. Stermitz; Judith A. Schroeder

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A 3-GHz Profiler for Precipitating Cloud Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3-GHz profiler has been developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations Aeronomy Laboratory to observe the evolution and vertical structure of precipitating cloud systems. The profiler is very portable, robust, and relatively ...

Warner L. Ecklund; Christopher R. Williams; Paul E. Johnston; Kenneth S. Gage

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Meteorological Education and Training Using A-Train Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NASA A-Train vertical profilers provide detailed observations of atmospheric features not seen in traditional imagery from other weather satellite data. CloudSat and CloudAerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) profiles ...

Thomas F. Lee; Richard L. Bankert; Cristian Mitrescu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Seismic Analysis of Existing Facilties and Evaluation of Risk...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* Develop Seismic Equipment List (SEL) * Perform seismic screening - Perform DOEEH-0545 seismic walkdowns - Perform structural and anchorage seismic analysis to DOEEH-...

154

Reconstructing Synthetic Profiles from Surface Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the extrapolation of vertical profiles of temperature (and/or steric heights) from measurements of sea surface elevation and sea surface temperature has been developed and is described here. The technique, called coupled pattern ...

Bruno Buongiorno Nardelli; Rosalia Santoleri

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Quantitative Interpretation of Laser Ceilometer Intensity Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have used a commercially available laser ceilometer to measure vertical profiles of the optical extinction in rain. This application requires special signal processing to correct the raw data for the effects of receiver noise, high-...

R. R. Rogers; M-F. Lamoureux; L. R. Bissonnette; R. M. Peters

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Equatorial Velocity Profiles. Part I: Meridional Component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time series or vertical profiles of horizontal velocity was collected in the western equatorial Indian Ocean during late spring of 1976. The meridional velocity component is examined here, the zonal component in Part II of this paper. The ...

Kathleen O'Neill

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Seismic design technology for breeder reactor structures. Volume 1. Special topics in earthquake ground motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is divided into twelve chapters: seismic hazard analysis procedures, statistical and probabilistic considerations, vertical ground motion characteristics, vertical ground response spectrum shapes, effects of inclined rock strata on site response, correlation of ground response spectra with intensity, intensity attenuation relationships, peak ground acceleration in the very mean field, statistical analysis of response spectral amplitudes, contributions of body and surface waves, evaluation of ground motion characteristics, and design earthquake motions. (DLC)

Reddy, D.P.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report March 2010 CD- This Rev of th Se -0 view Module w he overall Cons OFFICE O eismic De C CD-1 was used to dev struction Projec inco OF ENVIRO Standard esign Exp Critical Deci CD-2 M velop the Revie ct Review cond orporated in the ONMENTA Review Pla pectation ision (CD) A C March 2010 ew Plan for the ducted in 2009 e current versio AL MANAG an (SRP) ns Report Applicability D-3 e Oak Ridge Bl 9. Lessons lear on of the Modu GEMENT t (SDER) CD-4 ldg. 3019 60% rned from this r ule. ) Post Ope design review review have be eration w as part een Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

159

ELASTIC-WAVEFIELD SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY: A NEW SEISMIC IMAGING TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy research shifted from onshore prospects to marine environments during this report period. Four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4-C OBC) seismic data acquired in water depths of 2400 to 2500 feet across Green Canyon Block 237 in the Gulf of Mexico were processed and analyzed. The P-P and P-SV images of strata immediately below the seafloor exhibit amazing differences in P-P and P-SV seismic facies. These data may be one of the classic examples of the basic concepts of elastic-wavefield seismic stratigraphy.

Bob A. Hardage

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

160

Seismic scaling laws revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at fast speed Local energy balance Gc U Dc slip friction i n i Es = U Gc #12; Main result: Energy Mo= DSL3 D S L Moment Seismic energy ES=¿ D S L3 Es Mo Energy moment ratio #12; Thus Es ~ 105 Mo ~ U Summary of Observed Radiated Energy vs Moment log Mo=1.5 Mw9.6 Beroza et al, 2001 #12

Madariaga, Raúl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(10) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Geophysical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

162

Seismic analysis of lattice towers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the absence of specific guidelines for the seismic analysis of self-supporting telecommunication towers, designers may be tempted to apply simplified building code approaches to (more)

Khedr, Mohamed Abdel Halim.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Definition: Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electromagnetic Profiling Techniques Electromagnetic profiling techniques map lateral variations in subsurface resistivity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Exploration geophysics is the applied branch of geophysics which uses surface methods to measure the physical properties of the subsurface Earth, along with the anomalies in these properties, in order to detect or infer the presence and position of ore minerals, hydrocarbons, geothermal reservoirs, groundwater reservoirs, and other geological structures. Exploration geophysics is the practical application of physical methods (such as seismic, gravitational, magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic) to measure the physical properties of rocks, and in particular, to detect

164

INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A number of improvements in the processing of the survey were made compared to the original work. Pre-stack migration was employed, and some errors in muting in the original processing were found and corrected. In addition, improvements in computer hardware allowed interactive monitoring of the processing steps, so that parameters could be adjusted before completion of each step. The reprocessed survey was then loaded into SeisX, v. 3.5, for interpretation work. Interpretation was done on 2, 21-inch monitors connected to the work station. SeisX was prone to crashing, but little work was lost because of this. The program was developed for use under the Unix operating system, and some aspects of the design of the user interface betray that heritage. For example, printing is a 2-stage operation that involves creation of a graphic file using SeisX and printing the file with printer utility software. Because of problems inherent in using graphics files with different software, a significant amount of trial and error is introduced in getting printed output. Most of the interpretation work was done using vertical profiles. The interpretation tools used with time slices are limited and hard to use, but a number to tools and techniques are available to use with vertical profiles. Although this project encountered a number of delays and difficulties, some unavoidable and some self-inflicted, the result is an improved 3D survey and greater confidence in the interpretation. The experiences described in this report will be useful to those that are embarking on a 3D seismic interpretation project.

Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Mat Foundations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of building types including high-rise residential towers, healthcare, and ... bearing pressure for transient loads (wind or seismic ... Tower Seismic Force ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

Crosswell Seismic Tomography | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Crosswell Seismic Tomography Citation Schlumberger. Crosswell Seismic...

167

Induced Seismicity Impact | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity Impact Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleInducedSeismicityImpact&oldid612409" Category: NEPA Resources What links...

168

A Seismic Isolation Application Using Rubber Bearings; Hangar Project in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic isolation is an effective design strategy to mitigate the seismic hazard wherein the structure and its contents are protected from the damaging effects of an earthquake. This paper presents the Hangar Project in Sabiha Goekcen Airport which is located in Istanbul, Turkey. Seismic isolation system where the isolation layer arranged at the top of the columns is selected. The seismic hazard analysis, superstructure design, isolator design and testing were based on the Uniform Building Code (1997) and met all requirements of the Turkish Earthquake Code (2007). The substructure which has the steel vertical trusses on facades and RC H shaped columns in the middle axis of the building was designed with an R factor limited to 2.0 in accordance with Turkish Earthquake Code. In order to verify the effectiveness of the isolation system, nonlinear static and dynamic analyses are performed. The analysis revealed that isolated building has lower base shear (approximately 1/4) against the non-isolated structure.

Sesigur, Haluk; Cili, Feridun [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Architecture, Division of Theory of Structures 34434, Taskisla, Istanbul (Turkey)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Geophysics I. Seismic Methods  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on different seismic survey methods. Each of the 38 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Data Mining for Seismic Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic exploration plays an important role in petroleum industry. It is widely admitted that there are a lot of limitations of conventional data analysis ways in oil and gas industry. Traditional methods in petroleum engineering are knowledge-driven ... Keywords: seismic exploration, data mining, cluster analysis

Zhongbin Ouyang; Jing He; Keliang Zhang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Simple Model of Climatological Rainfall and Vertical Motion Patterns over the Tropical Oceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple model is developed that predicts climatological rainfall, vertical motion, and diabatic heating profiles over the tropical oceans given the sea surface temperature (SST), using statistical relationships deduced ...

Back, Larissa E.

172

A Simple Model of Climatological Rainfall and Vertical Motion Patterns over the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model is developed that predicts climatological rainfall, vertical motion, and diabatic heating profiles over the tropical oceans given the sea surface temperature (SST), using statistical relationships deduced from the 40-yr ECMWF Re-...

Larissa E. Back; Christopher S. Bretherton

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Association of the Laminated Vertical Ozone Structure with the Lower-Stratospheric Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the examination of the role of the atmospheric circulation in the lower stratosphere in relation to the laminated structure of ozone in the subtropical atmosphere is attempted. This analysis is based on the vertical ozone profile ...

C. Varotsos; P. Kalabokas; G. Chronopoulos

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Attenuation-Based Estimates of Rainfall Rates Aloft with Vertically Pointing Ka-Band Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach is suggested to retrieve low-resolution rainfall rate profiles and layer-averaged rainfall rates, Ra, from radar reflectivity measurements made by vertically pointing Ka-band radars. This approach is based on the effects of ...

Sergey Y. Matrosov

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Induced Seismicity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Induced Seismicity Induced Seismicity Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Induced Seismicity Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Induced Seismicity Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":14,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

176

A Simple Technique for Simultaneous Suspension of Multiple Drops in a Small Vertical Wind Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple technique is described by which multiple millimeter-size water drops can be simultaneously suspended in an air stream above the test section of a 12 12 cm cross section of a vertical wind tunnel. Horizontal profiles of the vertical air ...

A. K. Kamra; D. V. Ahire

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

178

Micromachined silicon seismic transducers  

SciTech Connect

Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Seismic event classification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

Dowla, Farid U. (Castro Valley, CA); Jarpe, Stephen P. (Brentwood, CA); Maurer, William (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Three Methods to Determine Profiles of Reflectivity from Volumetric Radar Data to Correct Precipitation Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical variability of radar reflectivity reduces the reliability of precipitation estimation by radar, especially in complex orography. This important source of error can, at least partially, be corrected for, if the vertical profile of ...

Bertrand Vignal; Gianmario Galli; Jrg Joss; Urs Germann

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES  

SciTech Connect

Improved ground-imaging capabilities have enormous potential to increase energy, environmental, and economic benefits by improving exploration accuracy and reducing energy consumption during the mining cycle. Seismic tomography has been used successfully to monitor and evaluate geologic conditions ahead of a mining face. A primary limitation to existing seismic tomography, however, is the placement of sensors. The goal of this project is to develop an array of 24 seismic sensors capable of being mounted in either a vertical or horizontal borehole. Development of this technology reduces energy usage in excavation, transportation, ventilation, and processing phases of the mining operation because less waste is mined and the mining cycle suffers fewer interruptions. This new technology benefits all types of mines, including metal/nonmetal, coal, and quarrying. The primary research tasks focused on sensor placement method, sensor housing and clamping design, and cabling and connector selection. An initial design is described in the report. Following assembly, a prototype was tested in the laboratory as well as at a surface stone quarry. Data analysis and tool performance were used for subsequent design modifications. A final design is described, of which several components are available for patent application. Industry partners have shown clear support for this research and demonstrated an interest in commercialization following project completion.

Erik C. Westman

2003-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site double-shell tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project--DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST system at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14, The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DSTs assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DSTs and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste.

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evaluation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Uplift Restraint for a Seismic Event During Repositioning Operations  

SciTech Connect

Insertion of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) assemblies into the Canister Storage Building (CSB) storage tubes involves the use of the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). During MCO storage tube insertion operations, inadvertent movement of the MHM is prevented by engaging seismic restraints (''active restraints'') located adjacent to both the bridge and trolley wheels. During MHM repositioning operations, the active restraints are not engaged. When the active seismic restraints are not engaged, the only functioning seismic restraints are non-engageable (''passive'') wheel uplift restraints which function only if the wheel uplift is sufficient to close the nominal 0.5-inch gap at the uplift restraint interface. The MHM was designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis reported seismic loads on the MHM uplift restraints and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations to demonstrate structural adequacy of the seismic uplift restraint hardware. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed for a parked MHM with the active seismic restraints engaged, resulting in uplift restraint loading only in the vertical direction. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the active seismic restraints are not engaged. If a seismic event occurs during MHM repositioning operations, a moving contact at a seismic uplift restraint would introduce a friction load on the restraint in the direction of the movement. These potential horizontal friction loads on the uplift restraints were not included in the existing restraint hardware design calculations. One of the purposes of the current evaluation is to address the structural adequacy of the MHM seismic uplift restraints with the addition of the horizontal friction associated with MHM repositioning movements.

SWENSON, C.E.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Trolley Seismic Uplift Constraint Design Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MCO Handling Machine (MHM) trolley moves along the top of the MHM bridge girders on east-west oriented rails. To prevent trolley wheel uplift during a seismic event, passive uplift constraints are provided as shown in Figure 1-1. North-south trolley wheel movement is prevented by flanges on the trolley wheels. When the MHM is positioned over a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) storage tube, east-west seismic restraints are activated to prevent trolley movement during MCO handling. The active seismic constraints consist of a plunger, which is inserted into slots positioned along the tracks as shown in Figure 1-1. When the MHM trolley is moving between storage tube positions, the active seismic restraints are not engaged. The MHM has been designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis (Reference 3) reported seismic uplift restraint loading and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed with the east-west seismic restraints activated and the uplift restraints experiencing only vertical loading. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the east-west trolley restraints are not engaged. For this case, the associated trolley movements would result in east-west lateral loads on the uplift constraints due to friction, as shown in Figure 1-2. During preliminary evaluations, questions were raised as to whether the EDERER calculations considered the latest ALSTHOM seismic analysis loads (See NCR No. 00-SNFP-0008, Reference 5). Further evaluation led to the conclusion that the EDERER calculations used appropriate vertical loading, but the uplift restraints would need to be re-analyzed and modified to account for lateral loading. The disposition of NCR 00-SNFP-0008 will track the redesign and modification effort. The purpose of this calculation is to establish bounding seismic loads (vertical and horizontal) for input into the uplift restraint hardware redesign calculations. To minimize iterations on the uplift redesign effort, efforts were made to assure that the final loading input was reasonable but unquestionably on the conservative side.

SWENSON, C.E.

2000-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

185

Vertical Coordinate Transformation of Vertically-Discretized Atmospheric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of transforming fields of atmospheric variables from one vertical coordinate system to another without altering their dynamic balance is discussed. A curve fitting scheme applied to the data points in each grid column is proposed ...

Rainer Bleck

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

Gregory, Danny L. (Corrales, NM); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smallwood, David O. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole. 4 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Hardee, H.C.; Smallwood, D.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Downhole hydraulic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole. 4 figs.

Gregory, D.L.; Hardee, H.C.; Smallwood, D.O.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, UTE Mountain UTE Reservation, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of this project were: (1) To enhance recovery of oil contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute tribal lands. (2) To promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American Oil production corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other Tribes. (3) To develop an understanding of multicomponent seismic data as it relates to the variations in permeability and porosity of algal mounds, as well as lateral facies variations, for use in both reservoir development and exploration. (4) To identify any undiscovered algal mounds for field-extension within the area of seismic coverage. (5) To evaluate the potential for applying CO{sub 2} floods, steam floods, water floods or other secondary or tertiary recovery processes to increase production. The technical work scope was carried out by: (1) Acquiring multicomponent seismic data over the project area; (2) Processing and reprocessing the multicomponent data to extract as much geological and engineering data as possible within the budget and time-frame of the project; (3) Preparing maps and data volumes of geological and engineering data based on the multicomponent seismic and well data; (4) Selecting drilling targets if warranted by the seismic interpretation; (5) Constructing a static reservoir model of the project area; and (6) Constructing a dynamic history-matched simulation model from the static model. The original project scope covered a 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) area encompassing two algal mound fields (Towaoc and Roadrunner). 3D3C seismic data was to acquired over this area to delineate mound complexes and image internal reservoir properties such as porosity and fluid saturations. After the project began, the Red Willow Production Company, a project partner and fully-owned company of the Southern Ute Tribe, contributed additional money to upgrade the survey to a nine-component (3D9C) survey. The purpose of this upgrade to nine components was to provide additional shear wave component data that might prove useful in delineating internal mound reservoir attributes. Also, Red Willow extended the P-wave portion of the survey to the northwest of the original 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) 3D9C area in order to extend coverage further to the northwest to the Marble Wash area. In order to accomplish this scope of work, 3D9C seismic data set covering two known reservoirs was acquired and processed. Three-dimensional, zero-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data was acquired to determine the shear wave velocities for processing the sh3Dseismic data. Anisotropic velocity, and azimuthal AVO processing was carried out in addition to the conventional 3D P-wave data processing. All P-, PS- and S-wave volumes of the seismic data were interpreted to map the seismic response. The interpretation consisted of conventional cross-plots of seismic attributes vs. geological and reservoir engineering data, as well as multivariate and neural net analyses to assess whether additional resolution on exploration and engineering parameters could be achieved through the combined use of several seismic variables. Engineering data in the two reservoirs was used to develop a combined lithology, structure and permeability map. On the basis of the seismic data, a well was drilled into the northern mound trend in the project area. This well, Roadrunner No.9-2, was brought into production in late April 2006 and continues to produce modest amounts of oil and gas. As of the end of August 2007, the well has produced approximately 12,000 barrels of oil and 32,000 mcf of gas. A static reservoir model was created from the seismic data interpretations and well data. The seismic data was tied to various markers identified in the well logs, which in turn were related to lithostratigraphy. The tops and thicknesses of the various units were extrapolated from well control based upon the seismic data that was calibrated to the well picks. The reservoir engineering properties were available from a number of wel

Joe Hachey

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

James Reeves

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequent-Interval Frequent-Interval Seismic CPTu D. Bruce Nothdurft, MSCE, PE, PG SRS Geotechnical Engineering Department Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Alec V. McGillivray, PhD, PE Geotechnical Consultant Brent J. Gutierrez, PhD, PE NPH Engineering Manager, DOE-SR Motivation  The seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) utilized at SRS because it provides rapid and thorough site characterization.  Evaluation of non-linear soil behavior...  detailed stratigraphy  small-strain velocity measurements  large-strain non-seismic measurements  Depth scale disparity  large-strain non-seismic measurements nearly continuous with depth  small-strain velocity measurements over 1 m depth intervals. 2 October 25-26, 2011 DOE NPH Conference

192

Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

193

Position paper: Seismic design criteria  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to document the seismic design criteria to be used on the Title 11 design of the underground double-shell waste storage tanks and appurtenant facilities of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) project, and to provide the history and methodologies for determining the recommended Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) anchors for site-specific seismic response spectra curves. Response spectra curves for use in design are provided in Appendix A.

Farnworth, S.K.

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

194

Experience Based Seismic Equipment Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines that can be used to perform an experience-based seismic equipment qualification for verification of seismic adequacy of active electrical and mechanical equipment consistent with requirements of American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)-7. The report summarizes what requirements are sufficient to ensure that an item of equipment can perform its intended safety function after a design earthquake. The report also provides additional guidance on ensuring that an item of equi...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquake detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.

Wang, J; Templeton, D C

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

196

Definition: Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Techniques Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Active Seismic Techniques Active seismic techniques study the behavior of artificially-generated elastic waves in the subsurface. A seismic wave or pulse is generated at the surface by an active seismic source which can be a vibration, mechanical impact, or near-surface explosion.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismic waves are waves of energy that travel through the Earth's layers, and are a result of an earthquake, explosion, or a volcano that imparts low-frequency acoustic energy. Many other natural and anthropogenic sources create low amplitude waves commonly referred to as ambient vibrations. Seismic waves are studied by geophysicists called seismologists. Seismic wave fields are recorded by a seismometer,

197

Evaluation of seismic capacity of glovebox windows using deformation tests  

SciTech Connect

With the increasing emphasis on worker safety, gloveboxes are being relied upon in Safety Analyses to be a confinement boundary. Many of the accident scenarios result in a requirement that these gloveboxes be seismically qualified. Since there is currently no validated experience data category for gloveboxes, the qualification has generally been done by analysis. The weak link in assuring confinement integrity by analysis is in characterizing the glass and glass-to-glovebox seal in the analytical models. engineering judgement as to whether the windows will survive a seismic event based on total calculated deflection at the window. Most often the windows are assumed to lose their confinement capability during an earthquake. A quantitative basis is needed in order to evaluate the seismic capacity of these windows. A series of deformation tests are being performed at the Savannah River Site on glovebox mock-ups. This paper presents the results of the first two of these tests, including displacement profiles and leak rate data. Methods for using this data for evaluating the windows for seismic loads are proposed.

Hargett, S.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Definition: Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Definition: Vertical Flowmeter Test Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Flowmeter Test A well testing...

199

Vertical Flowmeter Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Vertical Flowmeter Logging Citation U.S. Geological Survey. Vertical...

200

Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method  

SciTech Connect

Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia [Department of Geotechnics and Transportation, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai. Johor (Malaysia); Saad, Rosli [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes Speaker(s): Pierre S. Farrugia Date: November 18, 2010 - 12:05pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Lorenzetti Thermal plumes have been widely investigated in a variety of scenarios, including natural convection and stratified environments. The resulting theory may be used to predict ventilation flow rates in, for example, natural and displacement ventilation, and under-floor air distribution (UFAD) systems. However, there has been little effort in investigating how uniform upward flows affect the plume velocity, rate of growth, and thermal profile. Such situations can arise if, for example, the diffusers of a UFAD system are evenly distributed. In order to study such situations, analytical expressions for the velocity and temperature profiles of a plume

202

Near-inertial internal wave field in the Canada Basin from Ice-Tethered Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salinity and temperature profiles from drifting Ice-Tethered Profilers in the Beaufort Gyre region of the Canada Basin are used to characterize and quantify the regional near-inertial internal wave field over one year. Vertical displacements of ...

Hayley V. Dosser; Luc Rainville; John M. Toole

203

New portable sensor system for rotational seismic motion measurements  

SciTech Connect

A new mechanical sensor system for recording the rotation of ground velocity has been constructed. It is based on measurements of differential motions between paired sensors mounted along the perimeter of a rigid (undeformable) disk. The elementary sensors creating the pairs are sensitive low-frequency geophones currently used in seismic exploration to record translational motions. The main features of the new rotational seismic sensor system are flat characteristics in the wide frequency range from 1 to 200 Hz and sensitivity limit of the order of 10{sup -8} rad/s. Notable advantages are small dimensions, portability, easy installation and operation in the field, and the possibility of calibrating the geophones in situ simultaneously with the measurement. An important feature of the instrument is that it provides records of translational seismic motions together with rotations, which allows many important seismological applications. We have used the new sensor system to record the vertical rotation velocity due to a small earthquake of M{sub L}=2.2, which occurred within the earthquake swarm in Western Bohemia in autumn 2008. We found good agreement of the rotation record with the transverse acceleration as predicted by theory. This measurement demonstrates that this device has a much wider application than just to prospecting measurements, for which it was originally designed.

Brokesova, Johana [Department of Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Malek, Jiri [Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics, Czech Academy of Sciences, V Holesovickach 41, 18209 Prague (Czech Republic)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Seismic studies of a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment carried out at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, 850 microearthquakes, ranging in magnitudes from -3 to 0, were located reliably using arrival times recorded at a set of 5 downhole geophone stations. A subset of these events were located using an upgraded hodogram technique. The seismicity defines a tabular zone with horizontal extent of 900 m, vertical extent of 800 m, and thickness of 150 m. This zone strikes N340/sup 0/E, and dips 75/sup 0/ to the east; its position indicates that no hydraulic connection between the two predrilled wells could be achieved by the fracturing. The distribution of locations obtained from arrival times shows good agreement with those derived from hodograms. Well constrained fault plane solutions were determined for 26 of the larger microearthquakes observed at a surface seismic net. Most solutions display one nearly vertical nodal plane that strikes close to N - S, and a T axis that trends roughly E - W, in agreement with regional indicators of the least principal stress direction. 9 refs., 6 figs.

House, L.; Keppler, H.; Kaieda, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Hydrodynamics of a vertical hydraulic fracture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed a numerical algorithm, HUBBERT, to simulate the hydrodynamics of a propagating vertical, rectangular fracture in an elastic porous medium. Based on the IFD method, this algorithm assumes fracture geometry to be prescribed. The breakdown and the creation of the incipient fracture is carried out according to the Hubbert-Willis theory. The propagation of the fracture is based on the criterion provided by Griffith, based on energy considerations. The deformation properties of the open fracture are based on simple elasticity solutions. The fracture is assumed to have an elliptical shape to a distance equal to the fracture height, beyond which the shape is assumed to be parallel plate. A consequence of Griffith's criterion is that the fracture must propagate in discrete steps. The parametric studies carried out suggest that for a clear understanding of the hydrodynamics of the hydraulic fracture many hitherto unrecognized parameters must be better understood. Among these parameters one might mention, efficiency, aperture of the newly formed fracture, stiffness of the newly formed fracture, relation between fracture aperture and permeability, and well bore compliance. The results of the studies indicate that the patterns of pressure transients and the magnitudes of fracture length appear to conform to field observations. In particular, the discrete nature of fracture propagation as well as the relevant time scales of interest inferred from the present work seem to be corroborated by seismic monitoring in the field. The results suggest that the estimation of least principal stress can be reliably made either with shut in data or with reinjection data provided that injection rates are very small.

Narasimhan, T.N.

1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

Cloud Layers, Particle Identification, and Rain-Rate Profiles from ZRVf Measurements by Clear-Air Doppler Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Networks of radars that point almost vertically and continuously measure the vertical profile of the horizontal wind will, in the future, be operated at many locations around the world. Although such radars are designed to measure the Doppler-...

E. E. Gossard; R. G. Strauch; D. C. Welsh; S. Y. Matrosov

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Megaregional seismic lines as indicators of oil and gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One way to quickly identify the most attractive plays in a given basin is through interpretation of regional seismic profiles in combination with adjacent well data and other geologic data. Such transects can provide insights into: (1) the location of economic basement, (2) maturation history and migration pathways, and (3) regional structure and stratigraphy and can thereby help understand present plays and recognize new plays. This poster session presents seismic data from the Megaregional Project and includes examples from the Magallanes, Oriente and Maranon basins. These foreland basins, located east of the Andes, underwent extension followed by a compression which resulted in east-vergent thrusting or high angle reverse faulting. Each basin includes productive plays although reserves depend largely on reservoir quality and size of structures. Future exploration in these basins will focus on deeper objectives and in the structurally complex areas near their western boundaries.

Bertagne, A.J.; Smith, N.G. [CGG American Services, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Anomalous Spiking in Spectra of XCTD Temperature Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high vertical resolution of temperature and salinity measurements from expendable conductivitytemperaturedepth (XCTD) instruments can be useful for inferring small-scale mixing rates in the ocean. However, XCTD temperature profiles show ...

Sarah T. Gille; Aaron Lombrozo; Janet Sprintall; Gordon Stephenson; Richard Scarlet

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A Global Profiling System for Improved Weather and Climate Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new long-term global observing system is proposed that would provide routine, detailed vertical profiles of measurements in the atmosphere and oceans. The system, which would need to be designed, developed, and operated by a consortium of ...

Alexander E. MacDonald

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Interpretation of Flux-Profile Observations at ITCE (1976)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At an International Turbulence Comparison Experiment (ITCE) in Australia (1976), wind, temperature and humidity profiles, plus vertical fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat were measured for a limited range of unstable conditions, ...

R. J. Francey; J. R. Garratt

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Parameterization of Radiative Flux Profiles within Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical structure of radiative flux profiles within clouds can have a significant impact on the thermodynamic processes that maintain and dissipate the clouds, particularly in the case of marine stratus and stratocumulus. However, dynamic ...

Howard P. Hanson; Vernon E. Derr

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Development of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology for Geothermal Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization. Also described is a 3-D seismic data-processing effort to create images of Rye Patch geothermal reservoir from 3-D sign-bit data recorded over the geothermal prospect. Two seismic sources were developed and tested in this study that can be used to illuminate geothermal reservoirs with S-waves. The first was an explosive package that generates a strong, azimuth-oriented, horizontal force vector when deployed in a conventional shot hole. This vector-explosive source has never been available to industry before. The second source was a dipole formed by operating two vertical vibrators in either a force or phase imbalance. Field data are shown that document the strong S-wave modes generated by these sources.

B. A. Hardage; J. L. Simmons, Jr.; M. DeAngelo

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A Conductivity Sensor for Nearbed Sediment Concentration Profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new sensor that measures the vertical profile of nearbed sediment concentration is described. The conductivity-based sensor is composed of eight electrode pairs separated in the vertical by 2.5 10?3 m. Electrode pairs are sampled at 16 Hz, ...

Jack A. Puleo; Joe Faries; Michael Davidson; Betsy Hicks

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Seismic Isolation of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With increasing public concern for seismic safety in general and research findings that indicate that seismic hazards may be larger than expected in many parts of the world, it would be prudent for the nuclear industry to consider more fully the potential benefits, costs, and impediments associated with applying seismic isolation more widely and to identify actions needed to develop practical and cost-effective guidelines for the application of seismic isolation to nuclear power plants (NPPs) and ...

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

215

FAST Simulation of Seismic Wind Turbine Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses recent additions to the computer simulation code FAST that allow a user to consider seismic loads.

Prowell, I.; Elgamal, A.; Jonkman, J.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Nuclear Renaissance & the NRC Seismic Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Existing and New Reactor Licensing Offices ... Seismic Isolation Small Modular Reactors SSI modeling of NPPs under non-traditional loads ...

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model (GMM) Review Project: Shear Wave Velocity Measurements at Seismic Recording Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site characterization studies for the EPRI (2004, 2006) Ground-Motion Model Review Project. The primary purpose of this investigation was to develop S-wave velocity (VS) profiles to a depth of 30 m, or more, and to estimate the average shear wave velocity of the upper 30 m (VS30) at thirty three (33) seismic instrument sites located in the Central and Eastern United States. Results are presented in individual seismic recording station site ...

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Seismic Regionalization In Northeast Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to characterize seismicity in support of nuclear explosion monitoring for the continental regions of northeast Russia, we have been analyzing information obtained from regional seismic network operators. Our goal is to merge catalog, bulletin, waveform, and other ground truth data from several regional networks into a comprehensive data set that we will use for various seismic research projects. To date we have compiled a bulletin from published and unpublished event data of about 200,000 events and over 150,000 arrival times. We have also determined that the Russian regional network catalogs are contaminated with mining-explosion events. Hence, one of our primary efforts is to identify mining events when possible and move them into a separate bulletin from the natural earthquakes. We have extended our preliminary analysis of explosion contamination of Russian seismicity catalogs using temporal analysis into the Irkutsk and Chita districts and the Buryat Republic. Based on analysis of epicenters and origin times reported in Material po Seismichnost' Sibiri for 1970 -- 1993, it is likely that considerable explosion contamination occurs in the gold (Bodaibo, northern Irkutsk Region, and in the Chita region), mica (Vitim, northern Irkutsk Region), and other mining areas (Bushulei, Nerchinsk, and Petrovsk in the Buryat and Chita areas). Explosion contamination is also observed in northernmost Mongolia in the mining and industrial district near Darkhan. Explosions associated with the construction of the Baikal-Amur Mainline Railroad are likely, as was observed in the Amur district; however, the amount of natural seismicity dominates the activity and makes it impossible to resolve the railroad separately. In conjunction with the Magadan Seismic Network operators,...

Kevin Mackey Kazuya; Kazuya Fujita; Lee K. Steck; Hans E. Hartse

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

Hans Jordan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Vertical Structure of the Seasonal Cycle in the Central Equatorial Atlantic Ocean: XBT Sections from 1980 to 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of temperature profiles from expendable bathythermographs collected from 1980 to April 1988 along two ship routes transecting the equatorial Atlantic from 11N to 11S is analyzed to inter the vertical structure of the annual variability of ...

G. Reverdin; P. Rual; Y. Du Penhoat; Y. Gouriou

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Regional and Diurnal Variability of the Vertical Structure of Precipitation Systems in Africa Based on Spaceborne Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 2A25 radar reflectivity profiles and derived surface rain rates are used to describe the vertical structure of precipitation systems in Africa. Five years of data are used in both the boreal and ...

Bart Geerts; Teferi Dejene

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Active Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Seismic Techniques Active Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

223

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Details Activities (33) Areas (18) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Map geothermal reservoir geometry. Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

224

Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passive Seismic Techniques Passive Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Passive Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(4) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

225

Micromachined silicon seismic accelerometer development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of seismic monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily deployable sensor arrays. Our ultimate goal is to fabricate seismic sensors with sensitivity and noise performance comparable to short-period seismometers in common use. We expect several phases of development will be required to accomplish that level of performance. Traditional silicon micromachining techniques are not ideally suited to the simultaneous fabrication of a large proof mass and soft suspension, such as one needs to achieve the extreme sensitivities required for seismic measurements. We have therefore developed a novel {open_quotes}mold{close_quotes} micromachining technology that promises to make larger proof masses (in the 1-10 mg range) possible. We have successfully integrated this micromolding capability with our surface-micromachining process, which enables the formation of soft suspension springs. Our calculations indicate that devices made in this new integrated technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach the 10{sup -10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S. [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsenseismic anisotropy parameters for polar media  

SciTech Connect

Sayers and Kachanov (1991) defined crack-influence parameters that are shown to be directly related to Thomsen (1986) weak-anisotropy seismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crack/fracture density is small enough. These results are then applied to the problem of seismic wave propagation in polar (i.e., non-isotropic) reservoirs having HTI seismic wave symmetry due to the presence of aligned vertical fractures and resulting in azimuthal seismic wave symmetry at the earth's surface. The approach presented suggests one method of inverting for fracture density from wave-speed data. It is also observed that the angular location {theta}{sub ex} of the extreme value (peak or trough) of the quasi-SV-wave speed for VTI occurs at an angle determined approximately by the formula tan{sup 2} {theta}{sub ex} {approx_equal} tan {theta}{sub m} = [(c{sub 33} - c{sub 44})/(c{sub 11}-c{sub 44})]{sup 1/2}, where {theta}{sub m} is an angle determined directly (as shown) from the c{sub ij} elastic stiffnesses, whenever these are known from either quasi-static or seismic wave measurements. Alternatively, {theta}{sub ex} is given in terms of the Thomsen seismic anisotropy parameters by tan {theta}{sub ex} {approx_equal} ([v{sub p}{sup 2}(0)-v{sub s}{sup 2}(0)]/[(1 + 2{epsilon})v{sub p}{sup 2}(0)-v{sub s}{sup 2}(0)]){sup 1/4}, where {epsilon} = (c{sub 11}-c{sub 33})/2c{sub 33}, v{sub p}{sup 2}(0) = c{sub 33}/{rho}, and v{sub s}{sup 2}(0) = c{sub 44}/{rho}, with {rho} being the background inertial mass density. The axis of symmetry is always treated here as the x{sub 3}-axis for either VTI symmetry (due, for example, to horizontal cracks), or HTI symmetry (due to aligned vertical cracks). Then the meaning of the stiffnesses is derived from the fracture analysis in the same way for VTI and HTI media, but for HTI the wave speeds relative to the earth's surface are shifted by 90{sup o} in the plane perpendicular to the aligned vertical fractures. Skempton's (1954) coefficient is used as a general means of quantifying the effects of fluids inside the fractures. Explicit formulas for Thomsen's parameters are also obtained for either drained or undrained fractures resulting in either VTI or HTI symmetry of the reservoir.

Berryman, James G.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

227

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

228

Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices  

SciTech Connect

The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

Paul Mattione

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Vertical Flow Wetland Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an interim report to present the preliminary results of a study conducted by Duke Energy to test the potential effectiveness of vertical flow wetlands (VFWs) for the removal of selenium, mercury, and other related compounds from a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) discharge. These compounds commonly are found in and regulated for coal-fired utility water discharges. There is a widespread need for a cost-effective alternative to physiochemical treatment to maintain compliance for these parameters, on...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

230

A Multisodar Approach to Wind Profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of a multisodar mode from a five-beam sodar whereby a wind speed vector is found for sets of three acoustic beams. If the vertical beam is used, this mode enables the profiling of four wind speed measurements ...

Paul Behrens; Stuart Bradley; Travis Wiens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Vertically Aligned Nanocomposite Thin Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vertically aligned nanocomposite (VAN) thin films have recently stimulated significant research interest to achieve better material functionality or multifunctionalities. In VAN thin films, both phases grow epitaxially in parallel on given substrates and form a unique nano-checkerboard structure. Multiple strains, including the vertical strain which along the vertical interface and the substrate induced strain which along the film and substrate interface, exist in VAN thin films. The competition of these strains gives a promise to tune the material lattice structure and future more the nanocomposite film physical properties. Those two phases in the VAN thin films are selected based on their growth kinetics, thermodynamic stability and epitaxial growth ability on given substrates. In the present work, we investigated unique epitaxial two-phase VAN (BiFeO3)x:(Sm2O3)1-x and (La0.7Sr0.3MnO3)x:(Mn3O4)1-x thin film systems by pulsed laser deposition. These VAN thin films exhibit a highly ordered vertical columnar structure with good epitaxial quality. The strain of the two phases can be tuned by deposition parameters, e.g. deposition frequency and film composition. Their strain tunability is found to be related directly to the systematic variation of the column widths and domain structures. Their physical properties, such as dielectric loss and ferromagnetisms can be tuned systematically by this variation. The growth morphology, microstructure and material functionalities of VAN thin films can be varied by modifying the phase ratio, substrate orientation or deposition conditions. Systematic study has been done on growing (SrTiO3)0.5:(MgO)0.5 VAN thin films on SrTiO3 and MgO substrates, respectively. The variation of column width demonstrates the substrate induced strain plays another important role in the VAN thin film growth. The VAN thin films also hold promise in achieving porous thin films with ordered nanopores by thermal treatment. We selected (BiFeO3)0.5:(Sm2O3)0.5 VAN thin films as a template and get uniformly distributed bi-layered nanopores. Controllable porosity can be achieved by adjusting the microstructure of VAN (BiFeO3):(Sm2O3) thin films and the annealing parameters. In situ heating experiments within a transmission electron microscope column provide direct observations into the phases transformation, evaporation and structure reconstruction during the annealing. Systematic study in this dissertation demonstrate that the vertically aligned nanocomposite microstructure is a brand new architecture in thin films and an exciting approach that promises tunable material functionalities as well as novel nanostructures.

Bi, Zhenxing

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Vertical Motion of Neutrally Buoyant Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical motion of a neutrally buoyant float is determined from the solution to the nonlinear forced harmonic oscillator equation originally set forth by Voorhis. Float response to forced vertical oscillations is characterized by the response ...

Louis Goodman; Edward R. Levine

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Vertically Aligned and Periodically Distributed Carbon Nanotube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Vertically Aligned and Periodically Distributed Carbon Nanotube (CNT) ... Application of Carbon Nanotubes Energy to Bioelectronic Sensor.

234

Comparison of Rainfall Profiles in the West African Monsoon as Depicted by TRMM PR and the LMDZ Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical rainfall profiles obtained with TRMM-PR 2A25 standard products are compared with rain profiles deduced from the Laboratoire de Mtorologie Dynamique second generation global climate model (LMDZ, the Z stands for zoom capability) with ...

Samo Diatta; Frdric Hourdin; Amadou Thierno Gaye; Nicolas Viltard

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Concept Tests for a New Wire Flying Vehicle Designed to Achieve High Horizontal Resolution Profiling in Deep Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficiently profiling the water column to achieve both high vertical and horizontal resolution from a moving vessel in deep water is difficult. Current solutions, such as CTD tow-yos, moving vessel profilers, and undulating tow bodies, are limited ...

Chris Roman; Dave Hebert

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

MHK Technologies/Vertical Axis Venturi System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Axis Venturi System Axis Venturi System < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage 275px Technology Profile Primary Organization Warrior Girl Corporation Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The proprietary venturi system uses two venturies one on the upstream side of the vertical axis turbine to force the water flow into the turbine and one at the downstream side of the turbine which creates a lower pressure region that pulls the water through the turbine The vertical axis orientation of the turbine is believed by the company to allow for efficiency gains

237

Contrast between the vertical and horizontal mercury discharge lamps  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the thermal behavior of a high pressure mercury lamp in a horizontal position, compared with that of a vertical lamp. The model adopted is three-dimensional, steady, and powered DC. After the model validation, we analyzed temperature fields and velocities for the case of the lamp in a horizontal position by comparing it with those of a lamp in vertical position. This setting initially fixed the wall temperature equal to 1000 K. However, the morphology of the temperature profile in the case of the horizontal lamp indicates that the temperature of the wall cannot be uniform. Thus, we have, in a second time, performed an energy balance at the wall to calculate its temperature. This aims to understand the influence of convection on the thermal properties of the source.

Ben Hamida, M. B.; Helali, H.; Araoud, Z.; Charrada, K. [Unite d'Etude des Milieux Ionises et Reactifs, IPEIM, 5019 route de Kairouan Monastir (Tunisia)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Statistical Physics Approaches to Seismicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This entry in the Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science, Springer present a summary of some of the concepts and calculational tools that have been developed in attempts to apply statistical physics approaches to seismology. We summarize the leading theoretical physical models of the space-time organization of earthquakes. We present a general discussion and several examples of the new metrics proposed by statistical physicists, underlining their strengths and weaknesses. The entry concludes by briefly outlining future directions. The presentation is organized as follows. I Glossary II Definition and Importance of the Subject III Introduction IV Concepts and Calculational Tools IV.1 Renormalization, Scaling and the Role of Small Earthquakes in Models of Triggered Seismicity IV.2 Universality IV.3 Intermittent Periodicity and Chaos IV.4 Turbulence IV.5 Self-Organized Criticality V Competing mechanisms and models V.1 Roots of complexity in seismicity: dynamics or heterogeneity? V.2 Critical earthquakes ...

Sornette, D

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Tube-wave seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mentor Profile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mentor Profile Mentor Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentee from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Do you want a student or intern mentee? Do you have a preference on mentee? For example, male, female, particular career field or other? If so, what or state name of pre selected mentee? Do you want a mentee in your career field? What are your hobbies?

243

Mentee Profile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mentee Profile Mentee Profile The information you provide on this form will assist us in providing you with a list of prospective mentor from which to choose the most appropriate match. Once you've completed the form, please email it to doementoringprogram@hq.doe.gov . Thank you for your interest in the DOE Mentoring Program. Name (last/first): Phone Number: Job Title/Series/Grade: Organization (indicate HQ or field - complete address): Email Address: Are you a Veteran? If yes, do want a veteran mentee? If yes, which branch of the service? Are you student or intern? Do you have a preference on mentor? For example, male, female, particular career field, specific person or other? If so, what or who? Do you want a mentor in your career field? What are your career goals?

244

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Seismicity and seismic stress in the Coso Range, Coso geothermal field, and Indian Wells Valley region, Southeast-Central California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The temporal and spatial distribution of seismicity in the Coso Range, the Coso geothermal field, and the Indian Wells Valley region of southeast-central California are discussed in this paper. An analysis of fault-related seismicity in the region led us to conclude that the Little Lake fault and the Airport Lake fault are the most significant seismogenic zones. The faulting pattern clearly demarcates the region as a transition

245

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

246

Nonlinear seismic ground response analysis: code usage protocols and verification against vertical array data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Geotech. and Geoenvir. Eng. , ASCE, 131(4), Page 24of Geotech. and Geoenvir. Eng. , ASCE, Masing, G. (1926). J. of Geotech. Eng. , ASCE, 119(11), 1805-1822 Melchers,

Stewart, Jonathan P; Kwok, Annie O.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Probabilistic economic evaluation of substation seismic upgrade  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a methodology for deciding whether or not to implement seismic design modifications at Southern California Edison's (SCE) Substation facilities. The method considers the potential for substation capability loss resulting from earthquake damage, cost of seismic modification made today, the cost of damage restoration after that modification is made, the cost of doing nothing now, and the site specific earthquake probability. Based on these findings, recommendations for seismic modifications of substation facilities could be made.

Ong, T.L.; Ensign, R.L.; Martin, D.F.; Richter, H.L. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Seismic refraction investigation of the Salton Sea geothermal area, Imperial Valley, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seven seismic refraction profiles and four long-distance refraction shots have been used to investigate the Salton Sea geothermal area. From these data, two models of the geothermal and adjacent area are proposed. Model 1 proposes a basement high within the geothermal area trending parallel to the axis of the Imperial Valley. Model 2 assumes a horizontal basement in the E-W direction, and proposes a seismic velocity gradient that increases the apparent basement velocity from east to west approximately 15% within the geothermal area. Both models propose basement dip of 3 degrees to the south, yielding a thickness of sediments of 6.6 km near Brawley, California, in the center of the Imperial Valley. Based on offsets inferred in the sedimentary seismic layers of the geothermal area, two NW-SE trending fault zones are proposed.

Frith, R.B.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Borehole Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Seismic Techniques Borehole Seismic Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities

250

HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND INDUCED SEISMICITY IN KANSAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For some time the public has asked questions about seismic activity related to hydraulic fracturing and other oil-field related activities. In particular, there is concern that the energy that goes into the subsurface during hydraulic fracturing is sufficient to cause felt earthquakes. The following is a response to those questions. 1) Seismic activity that is related to human activities is generally referred to as induced seismicity or triggered seismicity. Induced seismicity is defined as seismic events attributable to human activities (National Research Council, 2012). The term triggered seismicity is also used to describe situations in which human activities could potentially trigger large and potentially damaging earthquakes (Shemeta et al., 2012). The following discussion uses only the term induced seismicity to refer to seismic activity in which human activity plays a role. 2) Because it uses energy to fracture rocks to release oil or natural gas, hydraulic fracturing does create microseismic events (of a magnitude less than 2.0). Felt earthquake activity (generally greater than a magnitude 3.0) resulting from hydraulic fracturing has been confirmed from only one location in the world (National Research Council, 2012). In the

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

252

Tentative Framework for Development of Advanced Seismic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3-30 4. Conceptual Reformulation of Seismic Design Parameters ..... ... 4-5 4.4.1 Maximum Considered Earthquake Basis for the RM Factor ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

253

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Summit Area (Chouet...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10). References Bernard Chouet, Kehti Aki (1981) Seismic Structure And Seismicity Of The Cooling Lava Lake Of Kilauea Iki, Hawaii Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

254

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At New...

255

Category:Passive Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Passive Seismic Techniques page? For detailed information on Passive Seismic Techniques,...

256

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic baseline and...

257

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Effects of Vertically-Resolved Solar Heating, Snow Aging, and Black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE Effects of Vertically-Resolved Solar Heating, Snow Aging formats: Committee Chair University of California, Irvine 2007 ii #12;To my parents, John and Cindy. iii, albedo, snow grain size, and absorbing impurities. . 8 2.1 Solar absorption profiles prescribed by CLM

Zender, Charles

258

The Vertical Distribution of Radon in Clear and Cloudy Daytime Terrestrial Boundary Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon (222Rn) is a powerful natural tracer of mixing and exchange processes in the atmospheric boundary layer. The authors present and discuss the main features of a unique dataset of 50 high-resolution vertical radon profiles up to 3500 m above ...

Alastair G. Williams; Wlodek Zahorowski; Scott Chambers; Alan Griffiths; Jrg M. Hacker; Adrian Element; Sylvester Werczynski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Vertical Velocity Statistics in Fair-Weather Cumuli at the ARM TWP Nauru Climate Research Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fair-weather cumuli are fundamental in regulating the vertical structure of water vapor and entropy in the lowest 23 km of the earths atmosphere over vast areas of the oceans. In this study, a long record of profiling cloud radar observations ...

Pavlos Kollias; Bruce Albrecht

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Seismic monitoring at The Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Non-linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction Method for Developing Nonlinear Seismic SSI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Justin Coleman, P.E. October 25th, 2011 E102003020BDS Presentation Outline  Purpose of Presentation  Linear versus Non-Linear Seismic SSI  Non-Linear seismic Soil Structure Interaction (NLSSI) Studies  The NLSSI Introduction  Non-Linearity in Seismic SSI Analysis  Commercial Software Elements  Commercial Software Non-Linear Constitutive Models  Non-Linear Seismic SSI Damping  Demonstration of Time Domain 2D Model  NLSSI Validation Approach  NLSSI Implementation  Need For NLSSI  Conclusions E102003020BDS Purpose of Presentation  The purpose of the presentation is to establish the need for using non-linear analysis

262

Seismic Studies of Substation Equipment: Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEEE Standard 693, Recommended Practice for Seismic Design of Substations, is used by electric power utilities to qualify substation equipment for seismic movements. Deficiencies exist in the present standard, and information is unavailable for dynamic response that may be used to better analyze equipment and permit equipment evaluation in case of limited configuration changes, such as insulator substitution.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundThis report provides updates to the guidelines and approaches for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) that were published in the initial Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide (1002989) in 2003. It provides practical guidelines for SPRA development to support a variety of uses, including risk-informed applications.It is intended that a probabilistic risk ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

Apparatus and method for detecting seismic waves  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is an apparatus for transducing seismic signals and a method for placing said apparatus for detecting seismic signals. The apparatus comprises at least one geophone preferably embedded in a polymeric material contained in a tubular member. A lower portion of the tubular member preferably contains ballast. The tubular member is preferably cemented into a borehole.

O' Brien, T.T.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-04NT15508 Oct 2004 - Sep 2007 Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 A large amount of oil, perhaps billions of barrels, remains trapped, and demonstrate a method of using crosswell seismic profiling for identification of trapped oil, bypassed

266

ARM - PI Product - SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsSGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical ProductsSGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities 1997.01.01 - 2010.12.31 Site(s) SGP TWP General Description Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

267

Seismicity in Azerbaijan and Adjacent Caspian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

So far no general view on the geodynamic evolution of the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea region is elaborated. This is associated with the geological and structural complexities of the region revealed by geophysical, geochemical, petrologic, structural, and other studies. A clash of opinions on geodynamic conditions of the Caucasus region, sometimes mutually exclusive, can be explained by a simplified interpretation of the seismic data. In this paper I analyze available data on earthquake occurrences in Azerbaijan and the adjacent Caspian Sea region. The results of the analysis of macroseismic and instrumental data, seismic regime, and earthquake reoccurrence indicate that a level of seismicity in the region is moderate, and seismic event are concentrated in the shallow part of the lithosphere. Seismicity is mostly intra-plate, and spatial distribution of earthquake epicenters does not correlate with the plate boundaries.

Panahi, Behrouz M. [Geology Institute, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, 29-A H. Javid Ave., Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

268

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian...

269

The Vertical Turn: Topographies of Metropolitan Modernism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Its Discontents: Essays on the New Mobility of People and214 Although this new vertical mobility was largely embracedhave produced new possibilities for mobility, simultaneity,

Haacke, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1983-1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1983 - 1985 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To study anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust Notes V s and V p wave amplitudes were measured from vertical component seismograms of earthquakes that occurred in the Coso-southern Sierra Nevada region from July 1983 to 1985. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles, indicating strong lateral variations in S wave attenuation in the

271

Comparing Occurrences and Vertical Structures of Hydrometeors between Eastern China and the Indian Monsoon Region Using CloudSat/CALIPSO Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal variations in the occurrence frequency, vertical location, and radar reflectivity factor (dBZ) of hydrometeors covering eastern China and the Indian monsoon region are described using two CloudSat standard products [Geometrical Profiling ...

Yali Luo; Renhe Zhang; Hui Wang

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

An Assessment of the WKBJ Approximation to the Vertical Structure of Linear Mountain Waves: Implications for Gravity-Wave Drag Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical structure of topographically induced, infinitesimal amplitude internal waves in atmospheres with varying wind and static stability profiles is studied with a numerical model. Despite its simplifications, this model nevertheless ...

J. P. Ren Laprise

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Vertical Moist Thermodynamic Structure of the MaddenJulian Oscillation in Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Retrievals: An Update and a Comparison to ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large-scale vertical moist thermodynamic structure of the MaddenJulian oscillation (MJO) was documented using the first 2.5 yr (200205) of version 4 atmospheric specific humidity and temperature profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared ...

Baijun Tian; Duane E. Waliser; Eric J. Fetzer; Yuk L. Yung

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Choice of a Vertical Grid in Incorporating Condensation Heating into an Isentropic Vertical Coordinate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advantages of using an isentropic vertical coordinate in atmospheric models are well recognized. In particular, the use of an isentropic coordinate virtually eliminates discretization errors for vertical advection since isentropic surfaces are ...

Celal S. Konor; Akio Arakawa

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Vertical two chamber reaction furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

Blaugher, R.D.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

Vertical Contracts and Mandatory Universal Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vertical Contracts and Mandatory Universal Distribution Larry S. Karp Jeffrey M. Perloff July 2012 vendor. If a monopoly uses a single vendor, the government may impose a mandatory universal distribution consumer welfare. Keywords: vertical restrictions, mandatory universal distribution, new product oligopoly

Kammen, Daniel M.

277

Parallel implementation of stochastic inversion of seismic tomography data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper parallel implementation of stochastic inversion of seismic tomography data was presented. Classical approach to travel time tomography assumes straight line of seismic rays between sources and receives points and isotropy of geological ... Keywords: inverse problem, master-slave paradigm, seismic anisotropy, seismic tomography

Maciej Dwornik; Anna Pi?ta

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Seismic stimulation for enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pore-scale effects of seismic stimulation on two-phase flow are modeled numerically in random 2D grain0pack geometries. Seismic stimulation aims to enhance oil production by sending seismic waves across a reservoir to liberate immobile patches of oil. For seismic amplitudes above a well-defined (analytically expressed) dimensionless criterion, the force perturbation associated with the waves indeed can liberate oil trapped on capillary barriers and get it flowing again under the background pressure gradient. Subsequent coalescence of the freed oil droplets acts to enhance oil movement further because longer bubbles overcome capillary barriers more efficiently than shorter bubbles do. Poroelasticity theory defines the effective force that a seismic wave adds to the background fluid-pressure gradient. The lattice-Boltzmann model in two dimensions is used to perform pore-scale numerical simulations. Dimensionless numbers (groups of material and force parameters) involved in seismic stimulation are defined carefully so that numerical simulations can be applied to field-scale conditions. Using the analytical criteria defined in the paper, there is a significant range of reservoir conditions over which seismic stimulation can be expected to enhance oil production.

Pride, S.R.; Flekkoy, E.G.; Aursjo, O.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Use of a Maximum Entropy Method as a Regularization Technique during the Retrieval of Trace Gas Profiles from Limb Sounding Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The retrieval of trace gas profiles from radiance measurements of limb sounding instruments represents an inverse problem: vertical profiles of mixing ratios have to be extracted from sequences of horizontally measured radiances recorded by a ...

J. Steinwagner; G. Schwarz; S. Hilgers

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Flowmeter Test Vertical Flowmeter Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Flowmeter Test Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Define permeable zones within a well Thermal: Dictionary.png Vertical Flowmeter Test: A well testing technique done upon completion of a well to identify locations of permeable zones within the well and to quantify the relative permeability of each zone. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction A vertical flowmeter test is also known as a spinner test and is preformed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ARM - Evaluation Product - Convective Vertical Velocity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsConvective Vertical Velocity ProductsConvective Vertical Velocity Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Convective Vertical Velocity 2011.04.25 - 2011.05.23 Site(s) SGP General Description Convective processes play an important role in Earth's energy balance by distributing heat and moisture throughout the atmosphere. In particular, vertical air motions associated with these processes are inherently linked to the life cycle of these convective systems and are therefore directly tied to their energy budget. However, direct measurements of vertical air motions (e.g., in situ aircraft observations) are sparse, making it difficult to compare them with numerical model output, which relies on convective parameterization schemes that have yet to be extensively

282

Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a process for etching a material such as LiNbO{sub 3} by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

Arnold, G.W. Jr.; Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.

1988-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

Advanced Methods for Determination of Seismic Fragilities: Seismic Fragilities Using Scenario Earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) is an increasingly important means of assessing the seismic safety of nuclear power plants. The standard approach for incorporating the seismic hazard into an SPRA is to use the uniform hazard spectra (UHS), which is computed independently at each spectral frequency, resulting in an equal probability of exceeding the ground motion at any frequency. As a result, the UHS may not be representative of an actual earthquake spectrum, and is a potential source of con...

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

Seismic Pulses Derivation from the Study of Source Signature Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with a deterministic technique for the derivation of seismic pulses by the study of source characteristics. The spectral characteristics of the directly or the nearest detected seismic signal is analyzed and considered as the principle source signature. Using this signature seismic pulses are derived with accurate time position in the seismic traces. The technique is applied on both synthetic and field refraction seismic traces. In both cases it has estimated that the accurate time shifts along with amplitude coefficients.

Rahman, Syed Mustafizur; Nawawi, M. N. Mohd.; Saad, Rosli [School of Physics, Univeristi Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Seismic amplitude and coherency response of channel sand, offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological drilling hazards are a major concern in the ics. drilling and development of offshore reservoirs. Some of these hazards may display high amplitudes on seismic profiles and some may be associated with stratigraphic features. Seismic amplitude anomalies associated with channel sand deposits may indicate potential accumulations of hydrocarbons in reservoirs. However, shallow hydrocarbon accumulations are rarely of production size. More often, they are potential geological drilling hazards that could inhibit the development of petroleum resources from deeper hydrocarbon-bearing layers. Traditionally, existing and potential geologic hazards are identified by interpretation of high-resolution site survey data, acquired specifically for drilling hazard delineation. This paper describes a new technique for drilling hazard identification using a conventional 3D seismic amplitude dataset. An event coherence calculation program is applied to a 3D seismic dataset to derive seismic attributes sufficient to highlight structural and stratigraphic discontinuities in the area. A resultant 3D difference cube is used to establish fault framework and to detect spatial distribution of channel deposits in the area and their geometries. Superposition of the difference cube on seismic amplitude data allows simultaneous display of structural and stratigraphic discontinuities and reflectivity information. Therefore, it is used for the delineation of channels, which show anomalous amplitudes, identification of their dimensions and spatial locations, and implication of gas-charged sand distribution within the detected channel. The paper gives a detailed description of a workflow, which was found sufficient for delineation of likely gas-charged sand channels, and discusses the ways to adjust the proposed workbox to specific objectives.

Fischer, Elena Mikhaylovna

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Dynamic Stability of a Three-Layer Model with Discontinuous Profiles of Wind and Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical three-layer model for tropospheric gravity waves with discontinuous vertical profiles of both wind and temperature is examined. The asymmetry of the model increases the difficulty in solving the equations but allows a more accurate ...

Sebastin Monserrat; Clemente Ramis

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Measurements of Detailed Temperature Profiles within the Radar Range Gate Using the Range Imaging Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study applies the range imaging (RIM) technique to radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) measurements in an attempt to improve the vertical resolution of temperature profiles obtained by RASS measurements.

Jun-ichi Furumoto; Tomonori Shinoda; Atsushi Matsugatani; Toshitaka Tsuda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Performance of a Wind-Profiling Lidar in the Region of Wind Turbine Rotor Disks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the wind energy sector continues to grow, so does the need for reliable vertical wind profiles in the assessment of wind resources and turbine performance. In situ instrumentation mounted on meteorological towers can rarely probe the atmosphere ...

Matthew L. Aitken; Michael E. Rhodes; Julie K. Lundquist

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Retrieval of Atmospheric Parameters from Hydrometeor Backscatter Measured with Doppler Radar Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaluation of backscatter spectra of clouds and precipitation measured with Doppler radar profilers allows the retrieval of a number of important atmospheric parameters. This retrieval leads to inaccurate results if vertical wind parameters ...

Dirk Klugmann

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Extending the Antarctic Meteorological Record Using Ice-Sheet Temperature Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two vertical ice temperature profiles from locations in the Antarctic Peninsula unaffected by meltwater are presented. A simple time-dependent heat diffusion-advection model is used to infer broad surface temperature variations in the Antarctic ...

K. W. Nicholls; J. G. Paren

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Retrieval of Clear Sky Moisture Profiles using the 183 GHz Water Vapor Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for retrieving vertical moisture profiles from downlooking radiometric measurements of atmospheric radiation near the 183 GHz water vapor line is described. A simulation experiment utilizing this retrieval technique and temperature ...

Ramesh K. Kakar

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Uncertainties in Climatological Tropical Humidity Profiles: Some Implications for Estimating the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical profile of water vapor, the principal infrared-absorbing gas in the atmosphere, is an important factor in determining the energy balance of the climate system. This study examines uncertainties in calculating a climatologicai ...

Dayid S. Gutzler

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Monitoring the Reflectivity Calibration of a Scanning Radar Using a Profiling Radar and a Disdrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a method of absolutely calibrating and routinely monitoring the reflectivity calibration from a scanning weather radar using a vertically profiling radar that has been absolutely calibrated using a collocated surface ...

Christopher R. Williams; Kenneth S. Gage; Wallace Clark; Paul Kucera

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Empirical Determination of the Basic Modes of Cumulus Heating and Drying Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The constraint on the coupled vertical profiles of cumulus heating and drying, which can be used as a partial closure in cumulus parameterization, is examined using observational data from convectively active regions in the summertime. The data ...

Chichung Lin; Akio Arakawa

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Mesocyclone Evolution Associated with Varying Shear Profiles during the 24 June 2003 Tornado Outbreak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The morphology of mesocyclones associated with the regional tornado outbreak on 24 June 2003 is examined to illustrate the effects of changing vertical wind profiles. The large-scale environment supported deep moist convection, with forcing for ...

Philip N. Schumacher; Joshua M. Boustead

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

POPUP: A Prototype Bottom-Moored Long-Term Current Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-contained, bottom-mounted instrument for measuring high-resolution vertical profiles of horizontal current in the deep ocean over long time periods (up to a year) has been designed, constructed and successfully tested. It employs an ...

Arthur D. Voorhis; Albert M. Bradley

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Use of a Large Crane for Wind and Tracer Profiles in an Urban Setting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although measured vertical profiles of wind, turbulence, and tracer concentrations are critical for understanding the urban boundary layer, it is problematic to field a sounding system or a tall structure to support anemometers in a densely ...

Frank J. Gouveia; Martin J. Leach; Joseph H. Shinn; William E. Ralph

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Retrieving Horizontal Temperature Gradients and Advections from Single-Station Wind Profiler Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical wind shears measured by the Plattevilie, Colorado wind profiler were used in conjunction with the geostrophic thermal wind equation to retrieve the horizontal thermal gradients and associated advections for a case involving an upper-...

Paul J. Neiman; M. A. Shapiro

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency Active and Passive Microwave Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (...

Mircea Grecu; William S. Olson; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Clustering a Global Field of Atmospheric Profiles by Mixture Decomposition of Copulas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work focuses on the clustering of a large dataset of atmospheric vertical profiles of temperature and humidity in order to model a priori information for the problem of retrieving atmospheric variables from satellite observations. Here, each ...

Mathieu Vrac; Alain Chdin; Edwin Diday

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Climatology of High Cloud Dynamics Using Profiling ARM Doppler Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice cloud properties are influenced by cloud-scale vertical air motion. Dynamical properties of ice clouds can be determined via Doppler measurements from ground-based, profiling cloud radars. Here, the decomposition of the Doppler velocities into ...

Heike Kalesse; Pavlos Kollias

302

The Application of Radar?Gauge Comparisons to Operational Precipitation Profile Corrections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses of data recorded during the past eight years with two Swiss radars, a network of rain gauges, and river flow measurements have helped to quantify the vertical profile of reflectivity and the influences of topography, meteorology, and ...

Jrg Joss; Robert Lee

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Piezotube Borehole Seismic Source for Continuous Crosswell ...  

Tom Daley and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have invented a seismic source that can be operated while fluid is being injected or withdrawn from an aquifer or oil well.

304

Seismic retrofitting of deficient Canadian buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many developed countries such as Canada and the United States are facing a significant infrastructure crisis. Most of their facilities have been built with little consideration of seismic design and durability issues. As ...

Gemme, Marie-Claude

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Seismic assessment strategies for masonry structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Masonry structures are vulnerable to earthquakes, but their seismic assessment remains a challenge. This dissertation develops and improves several strategies to better understand the behavior of masonry structures under ...

DeJong, Matthew J. (Matthew Justin)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Seismic design verification of LMFBR structures  

SciTech Connect

The report provides an assessment of the seismic design verification procedures currently used for nuclear power plant structures, a comparison of dynamic test methods available, and conclusions and recommendations for future LMFB structures.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

PETERSON SW

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

308

Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature

309

Coexistence of Strategic Vertical Separation and Integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives conditions under which vertical separation is chosen by some upstream firms, while vertical integration is chosen by others in the equilibrium of a symmetric model. A vertically separating firm trades off fixed contracting costs against the strategic benefit of writing a (two-part tariff, exclusive dealership) contract with its retailer. Equilibrium coexistence emerges when observable and non-renegotiable contracts are offered to downstream Cournot oligopolists that supply close substitutes. The scope for equilibrium coexistence diminishes when assumptions on contract observability and commitment are relaxed.

Jos Jansen; Jos Jansen; Coexistence Strategic; Vertical Separation; Jos Jansen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fluid driven torsional dipole seismic source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compressible fluid powered oscillating downhole seismic source device capable of periodically generating uncontaminated horizontally-propagated, shear waves is provides. A compressible fluid generated oscillation is created within the device which imparts an oscillation to a housing when the device is installed in a housing such as the cylinder of an existing downhole tool, thereby a torsional seismic source is established. Horizontal waves are transferred to the surrounding bore hole medium through downhole clamping. 4 figs.

Hardee, H.C.

1990-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

311

Seismic analysis of piping with nonlinear supports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling and results of nonlinear time-history seismic analyses for three sizes of pipelines restrained by mechanical snubbes are presented. Numerous parametric analyses were conducted to obtain sensitivity information which identifies relative importance of the model and analysis ingredients. Special considerations for modeling the pipe clamps and the mechanical snubbers based on experimental characterization data are discussed. Comparisions are also given of seismic responses, loads and pipe stresses predicted by standard response spectra methods and the nonlinear time-history methods.

Barta, D.A.; Huang, S.N.; Severud, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Forecasting Seismic Signatures of Stellar Magnetic Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the Sun, a tight correlation between various activity measures and oscillation frequencies is well documented. For other stars, we have abundant data on magnetic activity and its changes but not yet on its seismic signature. A prediction of the activity induced frequency changes in stars based on scaling the solar relations is presented. This seismic signature of the activity should be measurable in the data expected within few years.

W. A. Dziembowski

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Effects of Heterogeneities on Seismic Wave Propagation in the Climax Stock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty requires the ability to detect low-yield (less than 150kton) nuclear events. This kind of monitoring can only be done seismically on a regional scale (within 2000km). At this level, it is difficult to distinguish between low-yield nuclear events and non-nuclear events of similar magnitude. In order to confidently identify a nuclear event, a more detailed understanding of nuclear seismic sources is needed. In particular, it is important to know the effects of local geology on the seismic signal. This study focuses on P-wave velocity in heterogeneous granitoid. The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is currently performing low-yield tests with chemical explosives at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The exact test site was chosen to be in the Climax Stock, a cretaceous granodiorite and quartz-monzonite pluton located in Area 15 of the NNSS. It has been used in the past for the Hard Hat and Pile Driver nuclear tests, which provided legacy data that can be used to simulate wave propagation. The Climax Stock was originally chosen as the site of the SPE partly because of its assumed homogeneity. It has since been discovered that the area of the stock where the SPE tests are being performed contains a perched water table. In addition, the stock is known to contain an extensive network of faults, joints, and fractures, but the exact effect of these structural features on seismic wave velocity is not fully understood. The SPE tests are designed to seismically capture the explosion phenomena from the near- to the far-field transition of the seismic waveform. In the first SPE experiment, 100kg of chemical explosives were set off at a depth of 55m. The blast was recorded with an array of sensors and diagnostics, including accelerometers, geophones, rotational sensors, short-period and broadband seismic sensors, Continuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time Experiment, Time of Arrival, Velocity of Detonation, and infrasound sensors. The focus of this study is two-fold: (1) the geophone array that was focused over the SPE shot and (2) a high-resolution seismic profile that was recently acquired at the field site. The geophone array was placed radially around the SPE shot in five directions with 100m spacing and out to a distance of 2 km. The high-resolution profile was about 475m in length with station and shot spacing of 5m using a 7000lb mini-vibe as a source. In both data sets, the first arrivals will be used to develop velocity models. For the geophone array, 1-D P-wave velocity models will be developed to determine an average apparent velocity of the Climax Stock. The high-resolution data will be used to develop a 2-D P-wave velocity model along the seismic profile. This is in an effort to elucidate the water table in more detail and provide additional information on the near-surface structure. These results will be used in the overall modeling effort to fully characterize the test bed and develop a physics-based model to simulate seismic energy from the SPE events.

Hagan Webb, C., Snelson, C. M., White, R., Emmitt, R., Barker, D., Abbott, R., Bonal, N.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak  

SciTech Connect

This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

Sheffield, George V. (Hopewell, NJ)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Vertical Glider Robots for Subsea Equipment Delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed an underwater vehicle that offers significant performance improvements over existing sub sea elevators. Our Vertical Glider Robot falls under its own weight to a precise location on the seafloor, employing ...

Reed, Brooks L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Relating River Plume Structure to Vertical Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure of a river plume is related to the vertical mixing using an isohaline-based coordinate system. Salinity coordinates offer the advantage of translating with the plume as it moves or expanding as the plume grows. This coordinate ...

Robert D. Hetland

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Statistics on Vertical Wind Shear over Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistics on boundary layer vertical wind shear were gathered from rawinsonde soundings taken from three small islands and one weather ship. These soundings show a high correlation between surface and 1829 m altitude wind directions. Wind speeds ...

Donald P. Wylie; Barry B. Hinton; Kellie M. Millett

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Vertical Turn: Topographies of Metropolitan Modernism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

superpower of the atomic age, these vertical structures andPan-Romanticism in the Atomic Age before turning to myand the emergence of the atomic age. 228 Dos Passos, John.

Haacke, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

Lodde, P.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Accuracy of Vertical Air Velocities from Doppler Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight methods of calculating vertical air velocity in a column are compared. Each method requires some or all of the following data: horizontal divergence, vertical precipitation velocity, hydrometeor terminal fall speed, and vertical air ...

Thomas Matejka; Diana L. Bartels

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

FLSmidth Titan Teaming Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency, processes, mechanical operation and controls for the crushing and vertical coal mill systems at the Titan Florida Cement - Pennsuco Plant. Project Summary FLS provided...

322

Joint Inversion of Reservoir Production Measurements and 3D Pre-Stack Seismic Data: Proof Carlos Torres-Verdn, Zhan Wu, Omar J. Varela, Mrinal K. Sen, and Indrajit G. Roy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint Inversion of Reservoir Production Measurements and 3D Pre-Stack Seismic Data: Proof for estimating three-dimensional (3D) reservoir parameters and initial fluid saturations jointly from pre good lateral and vertical control on lithology and fluid distributions. The proposed joint inversion

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

323

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site...

324

Evaluation of methods for seismic analysis of mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plants  

SciTech Connect

Guidelines are needed for selecting appropriate methods of structural analyses to evaluate the seismic hazard of mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plants. This study examines the different available methods and their applicability to fabrication plants. These results should provide a basis for establishing guidelines recommending methods of analysis to ensure safe design against seismic hazards. Using the Westinghouse Recycle Fuels Plant as representative of future mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plants, critical structures and equipment (systems, components, and piping/ducting) were identified. These included the manufacturing building and 11 different pieces of equipment. After examination of the dynamic response characteristics of the building and the different methods available to analyze equipment, appropriate methods of analyses were recommended. Because critical equipment analysis and test methods generally use floor-response spectra as their seismic input loading, several methods used to generate floor spectra were also examined. These include the time-history approach and the Kapur and Biggs approximate methods. The examination included the effect of site characteristics and both horizontal and vertical structural response. (auth)

Tokarz, F.J.; Arthur, D.F.; Murray, R.C.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Evaluation Of Models For The Vertical Extrapolation Of Wind Speed Measurements At Offshore Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monin-Obukhov theory predicts the well-known log-linear form of the vertical wind speed profile. Two parameters, namely the aerodynamic surface roughness length and the Monin-Obukhov-length, are needed to predict the vertical wind speed profile from a measurement at one height. Different models to estimate these parameters for conditions important for offshore wind energy utilisation are discussed and tested: Four models for the surface roughness and three methods to derive the Monin-Obukov-length from measurements are compared. They have been tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rdsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind speed to 50 m height and comparing it with the measured 50 m wind speed. The mean

Bernhard Lange; Jrgen Hjstrup; Sren Larsen; Rebecca Barthelmie

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Automatic multi-interface management through profile handling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the recent years, wireless communication systems have received increased interest in commercial applications. Different kind of wireless public access have become increasingly available in various areas like airports, stations and shopping centers ... Keywords: heterogeneous networks, profile management, ubiquitous computing, vertical handover middleware

Jean-Marie Bonnin; Imed Lassoued; Zied Ben Hamouda

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

User_TalentProfile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Accessing and Modifying Talent Profile Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of accessing their talent profiles, adding information to their profiles, and editing existing talent profile information. Task A. Access Talent Profile Enter the web address (URL) of the user application into your browser Address field and press the Enter key. Enter your user ID in the User ID textbox. Enter your password in the Password textbox. Click Sign In. Access Talent Profile 4 Steps Task A Add Information to Talent Profile Sections 5 Steps Task B Edit Talent Profile Sections

328

Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence analysis with seismic probes close to the detector. The primary aim of this study was to identify noisy machines which seismically affect the ITF environment and thus require mitigation attention. Analyzed machines are located at various distances from the experimental halls, ranging from 10m to 100m. An attempt is made to measure the attenuation of emitted noise at the ITF and correlate it to the distance from the source and to seismic attenuation models in soil.

The Virgo Collaboration; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; P. Astone; G. Ballardin; F. Barone; M. Barsuglia; A. Basti; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; M. G. Beker; A. Belletoile; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; M. Blom; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; V. Boschi; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; M. Branchesi; T. Briant; A. Brillet; V. Brisson; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; B. Canuel; F. Carbognani; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; E. Chassande-Mottin; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; E. Cuoco; S. DAntonio; V. Dattilo; M. Davier; R. Day; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; A. Dietz; M. Drago; G. Endroczi; V. Fafone; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; L. A. Forte; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; C. Greverie; G. M. Guidi; J. -F. Hayau; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; P. Jaranowski; I. Kowalska; A. Krolak; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; G. Losurdo; E. Majorana; I. Maksimovic; N. Man; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; J. Marque; F. Martelli; A. Masserot; C. Michel; L. Milano; Y. Minenkov; M. Mohan; N. Morgado; A. Morgia; S. Mosca; B. Mours; L. Naticchioni; F. Nocera; G. Pagliaroli; L. Palladino; C. Palomba; F. Paoletti; M. Parisi; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; G. Persichetti; F. Piergiovanni; M. Pietka; L. Pinard; R. Poggiani; M. Prato; G. A. Prodi; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. S. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; V. Re; T. Regimbau; F. Ricci; F. Robinet; A. Rocchi; L. Rolland; R. Romano; D. Rosinska; P. Ruggi; B. Sassolas; D. Sentenac; L. Sperandio; R. Sturani; B. Swinkels; M. Tacca; L. Taffarello; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; O. Torre; E. Tournefier; F. Travasso; G. Vajente; J. F. J. van den Brand; C. Van Den Broeck; S. van der Putten; M. Vasuth; M. Vavoulidis; G. Vedovato; D. Verkindt; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; J. -Y. Vinet; S. Vitale; H. Vocca; R. L. Ward; M. Was; M. Yvert; A. Zadrozny; J. -P. Zendri

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Vertical sampling flights in support of the 1981 ASCOT cooling tower experiments: field effort and data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the month of August 1981, three nights of experimental sampling of tracers released into the cooling tower plume of a geothermal power plant were conducted. In these experiments a tethered balloon was used to lift a payload so as to obtain vertical profiles of the cooling tower plume and the entrained tracers. A description of the equipment used, the field effort and the data acquired are presented here.

Gay, G.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Seismic tests for solar models with tachocline mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have computed accurate 1-D solar models including both a macroscopic mixing process in the solar tachocline as well as up-to-date microscopic physical ingredients. Using sound speed and density profiles inferred through primary inversion of the solar oscillation frequencies coupled with the equation of thermal equilibrium, we have extracted the temperature and hydrogen abundance profiles. These inferred quantities place strong constraints on our theoretical models in terms of the extent and strength of our macroscopic mixing, on the photospheric heavy elements abundance, on the nuclear reaction rates such as $S_{11}$ and $S_{34}$ and on the efficiency of the microscopic diffusion. We find a good overall agreement between the seismic Sun and our models if we introduce a macroscopic mixing in the tachocline and allow for variation within their uncertainties of the main physical ingredients. From our study we deduce that the solar hydrogen abundance at the solar age is $X_{\\rm inv}=0.732\\pm 0.001$ and that based on the $^9$Be photospheric depletion, the maximum extent of mixing in the tachocline is 5% of the solar radius. The nuclear reaction rate for the fundamental $pp$ reaction is found to be $S_{11}(0)=4.06\\pm 0.07$ $10^{-25}$ MeV barns, i.e., 1.5% higher than the present theoretical determination. The predicted solar neutrino fluxes are discussed in the light of the new SNO/SuperKamiokande results.

A. S. Brun; H. M. Antia; S. M. Chitre; J. -P. Zahn

2002-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

331

Seismic tests for solar models with tachocline mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have computed accurate 1-D solar models including both a macroscopic mixing process in the solar tachocline as well as up-to-date microscopic physical ingredients. Using sound speed and density profiles inferred through primary inversion of the solar oscillation frequencies coupled with the equation of thermal equilibrium, we have extracted the temperature and hydrogen abundance profiles. These inferred quantities place strong constraints on our theoretical models in terms of the extent and strength of our macroscopic mixing, on the photospheric heavy elements abundance, on the nuclear reaction rates such as $S_{11}$ and $S_{34}$ and on the efficiency of the microscopic diffusion. We find a good overall agreement between the seismic Sun and our models if we introduce a macroscopic mixing in the tachocline and allow for variation within their uncertainties of the main physical ingredients. From our study we deduce that the solar hydrogen abundance at the solar age is $X_{\\rm inv}=0.732\\pm 0.001$ and that ba...

Brun, A S; Chitre, S M; Zahn, J P

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Author William Wills Published Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge Citation William Wills. Hostile wells: the borehole seismic challenge [Internet]. 2013. Oil and Gas Engineer - Subsea & Seismic. [cited 2013/10/01]. Available from: http://www.engineerlive.com/content/22907 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hostile_wells:_the_borehole_seismic_challenge&oldid=690045" Categories: References Geothermal References

333

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging of the Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,Seismic Survey, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County,

Feighner, Mark A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

An Energy and Angular-Momentum Conserving Vertical Finite-Difference Scheme and Hybrid Vertical Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy and angular-momentum conserving vertical finite-difference scheme is introduced for a general terrain-following vertical coordinate which is a function of pressure and its surface value. A corresponding semi-implicit time scheme is also ...

A. J. Simmons; D. M. Burridge

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Cost reduction through improved seismic design  

SciTech Connect

During the past decade, many significnt seismic technology developments have been accomplished by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) programs. Both base technology and major projects, such as the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) plant, have contributed to seismic technology development and validation. Improvements have come in the areas of ground motion definitions, soil-structure interaction, and structural analysis methods and criteria for piping, equipment, components, reactor core, and vessels. Examples of some of these lessons learned and technology developments are provided. Then, the highest priority seismic technology needs, achievable through DOE actions and sponsorship are identified and discussed. Satisfaction of these needs are expected to make important contributions toward cost avoidances and reduced capital costs of future liquid metal nuclear plants. 23 references, 12 figures.

Severud, L.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Seismic hazard analysis overview and executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Site Specific Spectra Project (SSSP) described in this report was a multi-year study funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of NRC's Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP). The main objective of this project was to provide assistance to the NRC by developing estimates of the seismic hazard at the nine oldest nuclear power plant sites east of the Rocky Mountains which were included in the SEP. This volume gives brief overview of the SEP and the SSSP including a discussion of the formal elicitation of expert opinion used to obtain a subjective representation of parameters that affect seismic hazard and the development of the seismic hazard at the nine SEP facilities.

Bernreuter, D.L.; Minichino, C.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Weapons test seismic investigations at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, located on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, is being characterized as part of an ongoing effort to identify a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. This site will be subjected to seismic ground motions induced by underground nuclear explosions. A knowledge of expected ground motion levels from these tests will enable the designers to provide for the necessary structural support in the designs of the various components of the repository. The primary objective of the Weapons Test Seismic Investigation project is to develop a method to predict the ground motions expected at the repository site as a result of future weapons tests. This paper summarizes the data base presently assembled for the Yucca Mountain Project, characteristics of expected ground motions, and characterization of the two-dimensional seismic properties along paths between Yucca Mountain and the testing areas of the Nevada Test Site.

Phillips, J.S.; Shephard, L.E.; Walck, M.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Definition: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sounding Configurations Sounding Configurations Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations A vertical electrical sounding (VES) is a DC resistivity survey which provides information regarding the change in apparent resistivity with depth. A quantitative interpretation of the results from VES measurements enable determination of the parameters for the geoelectric section.[1] Also Known As VES; Schlumberger Sounding References ↑ http://www.nga.com/Flyers_PDF/NGA_DC_Resistivity.pdf http://www.amazon.com/Principles-Electric-Borehole-Geophysics-Geochemistry/dp/0444529942 Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Vertical_Electrical_Sounding_Configurations&oldid=596183

339

Seismic Qualification Case Study for a New Inverter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews and compares methods used for the seismic qualification of safety related equipment at nuclear power plants and examines an alternative, hybrid approach. The report investigates the costs and lead times for each seismic qualification approach and also discusses the seismic capacity definitions that result from the application of each qualification approach. The report includes a case study that applies the new approach to the seismic qualification of an inverter.

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

340

Workshop on the Seismic Rehabilitation of Lightly Reinforced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR5741 Proceedings, Workshop on the Seismic Rehabilitation of Lightly Reinforced Concrete Frames Gaithersburg, MD ...

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

342

Fine Structure of Vertical Motion in the Stratiform Precipitation Region Observed by a VHF Doppler Radar Installed in Sumatra, Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical motion W profiles in the stratiform precipitation region of mesoscale cloud clusters were investigated using wind data observed by VHF Doppler radar installed in western Sumatra Island (0.2S, 100.32E). A special mode for W observations ...

Noriyuki Nishi; Masayuki K. Yamamoto; Toyoshi Shimomai; Atsushi Hamada; Shoichiro Fukao

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Fundamental and effective Yang-Mills vertices  

SciTech Connect

Calorons and plane waves within and in between them collectively give rise to a thermal ground state. The latter provides a homgeneous energy density and a negative pressure, and it induces quasiparticle masses to part of the propagating spectrum of deconfining SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics (dynamical gauge-symmetry breaking). In the present talk we discuss the role of a single caloron in inducing effective local vertices, characterized by powers of h, mediating the interaction of plane waves which propagate over large distances. The constraints on momentum transfers through effective 4-vertices are revisited.

Hofmann, Ralf [ITP, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

344

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

Seismic isolation systems with distinct multiple frequencies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure such as a building, bridge, or power plant such that it is isolated from seismic vibratory ground motion. More particularly, the present invention relates to a method and apparatus for supporting a structure by an isolation system which will not allow large dynamic loads to be transmitted to the supported structure due to seismic motions which have damaging energy at frequencies at or near the natural frequency of the structure and the overall structural systems. 4 figs.

Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

346

Advanced motor driven clamped borehole seismic receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A borehole seismic tool is described including a borehole clamp which only moves perpendicular to the borehole. The clamp is driven by an electric motor, via a right angle drive. When used as a seismic receiver, the tool has a three part housing, two of which are hermetically sealed. Accelerometers or geophones are mounted in one hermetically sealed part, the electric motor in the other hermetically sealed part, and the clamp and right angle drive in the third part. Preferably the tool includes cable connectors at both ends. Optionally a shear plate can be added to the clamp to extend the range of the tool.

Engler, B.P.; Sleefe, G.E.; Striker, R.P.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

A low order model for vertical axis wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new computational model for initial sizing and performance prediction of vertical axis wind turbines

Drela, Mark

348

Evolution of vertical drafts and cloud-to-ground lightning within the convective region of a mesoscale convective complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evolution of the area-averaged vertical velocity within the objectively defined convective region of the 4 June 1985 PRE-STORM (Preliminary Regional Experiment for Stormscale Operational and Research Meteorology-Central Phase) mesoscale convective complex (MCC) was examined over a 100 minute period during the storm's mature stage and compared to that of a squall line. The area-averaged vertical velocity profiles from twenty dual-Doppler analyses indicated significant differences in convective intensity both spatially and temporally. The peak magnitudes of the mid-to-upper level area-averaged vertical velocity were initially comparable to those from a squall line but became much weaker. The distribution of vertical velocities at mid-to-upper levels was consistent with weakening convection as the percentage of weak updrafts and downdrafts grew at the expense of stronger vertical motions. Typically the non-squall MCC had a much larger percentage of strong downdrafts than did the squall line. Horizontal and vertical cross-sections of both vertical velocity and reflectivity confirmed that the MCC was evolving toward a state with fewer and less intense updraft cores while cross-sections of storm relative flow revealed a descending rear-to-front inflow at later analysis times which reached the surface near locations of active convection. The relationship of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning to the kinematic structure of the MCC was also studied. For mesoscale regions there was a 10-20 minute time lag between the peak convective intensity and the peak CG flash rate. A similar delay was found on the convective scale for some convective cells, however, other apparently similar cells had little CG lightning throughout their evolution. An analysis of the vertical profiles of the vertical velocity, reflectivity and their gradients above CG lightning suggested a preferred vertical structure of these fields for CG lightning. CG lightning occurred beneath greater than average vertical velocities at mid-to-upper levels and greater than average vertical velocity gradients and reflectivity at all levels. CG lightning also occurred beneath greater than average reflectivity gradients at mid and upper-levels but beneath smaller than average reflectivity gradients at low-levels due to its avoidance of the highest reflectivity gradient regions.

Saul, Scott Henry

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Location of Vertical Wells: Decomposition Approach M. G. Ierapetritou and C. A. Floudas®elopment plan with well locations, gi®en a reser®oir property map and a set of infrastructure constraints, represents a ®ery challenging prob- lem. The problem of selecting the optimal ®ertical well locations

350

Vertical Structure of Dissipation in the Nearshore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical structure of the dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy was observed in the nearshore region (3.2-m mean water depth) with a tripod of three acoustic Doppler current meters off a sandy ocean beach. Surface and bottom boundary layer ...

Falk Feddersen; J. H. Trowbridge; A. J. Williams III

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hedging and Vertical Integration in Electricity Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the interactions between competitive (wholesale) spot, retail, and forward markets and vertical integration in electricity markets. We develop an equilibrium model with producers, retailers, and traders to study and quantify the impact ... Keywords: asset pricing, corporate finance, electric--electronic, financial institutions, industries, markets

Ren Ad; Gilles Chemla; Arnaud Porchet; Nizar Touzi

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Vertical pump with free floating check valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical pump with a bottom discharge having a free floating check valve isposed in the outlet plenum thereof. The free floating check valve comprises a spherical member with a hemispherical cage-like member attached thereto which is capable of allowing forward or reverse flow under appropriate conditions while preventing reverse flow under inappropriate conditions.

Lindsay, Malcolm (O' Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

3D seismic interpretation, reservoir characteristics and petroleum prospects for South Marsh Island OCS Blocks, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The South Marsh OCS Blocks, located approximately 150 miles southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana, contain a 100-million-barrel oil field. In recent years, exploration in this area has focused on plays in Pleistocene salt-related rollover structures with reservoirs of fluvial-deltaic sandstones and proven high oil-producing potential. After more than twenty years of exploration, exploitation and producing, this area remains an attractive target for exploration with its potentially high-quality reservoirs that have not been drilled. The I, K and L reservoirs of the Pleistocene have contributed to the majority of the production of over 100 million barrels of oil and near 200 billion cubic feet of natural gas. More than 90 well penetrations in these sands show great stratigraphic diversity within short distances, making the ability to accurately determine whether sand lenses have been adequately produced or bypassed essential for production opportunities for operators. New 3D seismic processing and interpretation techniques have been applied to interpret 3D seismic data with significantly improved accuracy. This has led to a renewed interest in the South Marsh area in an attempt to identify new plays and prospects. An interactive 3D-seismic interpretation has been carried out for the entire area. The objectives of this study are to conduct 3D seismic interpretation, to build a depositional environment model that encompasses the different sedimentary facies and sequence stratigraphic framework by using the prestack time migrated 3D volume and existing well control, to study rock properties using seismic modeling and well data to explain seismic attribute response, and to study the hydrocarbon potential of the area. Three horizons were mapped from well, seismic, and petrophysical data for the I, K and L formation tops respectively. Structure styles were well-defined by the 3D seismic interpretation. Well correlation has been completed for I, K and L formations throughout the study area. Reservoirs were studied vertically and horizontally. Reservoir types and properties were identified. One prospect related to the proven play of fault-bounded anticline structures was identified within the area. The plays involve the stratigraphic pinch out of basal transgressive sands deposited in the flank of the structure.

Duan, Ling

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Measurement of Water Vapor Flux Profiles in the Convective Boundary Layer with Lidar and Radar-RASS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A remote-sensing method to retrieve vertical profiles of water vapor flux in the convective boundary layer by using a differential absorption lidar and a radar-radio acoustic sounding system is described. The system's height range presently ...

Christoph Senff; Jens Bsenberg; Gerhard Peters

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

An Alternative Mass Flux Profile in the KainFritsch Convective Parameterization and Its Effects in Seasonal Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have altered the vertical profile of updraft mass flux detrainment in an implementation of the KainFritsch2 (KF2) convective parameterization within the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State UniversityNational Center for Atmospheric ...

Christopher J. Anderson; Raymond W. Arritt; John S. Kain

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Constraints on the Profiles of Total Water PDF in AGCMs from AIRS and a High-Resolution Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) cloud parameterizations generally include an assumption about the subgrid-scale probability distribution function (PDF) of total water and its vertical profile. In the present study, the Atmospheric ...

Andrea Molod

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Retrieval of Atmospheric Profiles from Satellite Radiance Data by Typical Shape Function Maximum a Posteriori Simultaneous Retrieval Estimators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The retrieval of vertical profiles of temperature and water vapor from atmospheric radiances is an ill-posed, nonlinear inversion problem. A linear retrieval estimator must be cast in a form which both minimizes the effects of unmodeled nonlinear ...

Michael J. Uddstrom

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer...

359

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High precision earthquake locations and subsurface velocity structure provide potential insights into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir management. We analyze 16 years of seismicity to improve hypocentral locations and simultaneously invert for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously

360

Distributed computing of Seismic Imaging Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary use of technical computing in the oil and gas industries is for seismic imaging of the earth's subsurface, driven by the business need for making well-informed drilling decisions during petroleum exploration and production. Since each oil/gas well in exploration areas costs several tens of millions of dollars, producing high-quality seismic images in a reasonable time can significantly reduce the risk of drilling a "dry hole". Similarly, these images are important as they can improve the position of wells in a billion-dollar producing oil field. However seismic imaging is very data- and compute-intensive which needs to process terabytes of data and require Gflop-years of computation (using "flop" to mean floating point operation per second). Due to the data/computing intensive nature of seismic imaging, parallel computing are used to process data to reduce the time compilation. With introducing of Cloud computing, MapReduce programming model has been attracted a lot of attention in parallel and di...

Emami, Masnida; Jaberi, Nasrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

RISC-3 Seismic Assessment Guidelines: Preliminary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for establishing reasonable confidence that structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of nuclear plants, categorized as RISC-3 under the 10 CFR 50.69 Risk Informed Safety Categorization Process, will perform their required functions under design basis seismic conditions.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "SPRA Implementation Guide" provides utilities with in-depth guidelines for seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs). These cost-effective and practical procedures for SPRA support a variety of purposes, including risk-informed/performance-based (RI/PB) applications.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Nevada Test Site seismic: telemetry measurements  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility and limitations of surface-to-tunnel seismic telemetry at the Nevada Test Site were explored through field measurements using current technology. Range functions for signaling were determined through analysis of monofrequency seismic signals injected into the earth at various sites as far as 70 km (43 mi) from installations of seismometers in the G-Tunnel complex of Rainier Mesa. Transmitted signal power at 16, 24, and 32 Hz was measured at two locations in G-Tunnel separated by 670 m (2200 ft). Transmissions from 58 surface sites distributed primarily along three azimuths from G-Tunnel were studied. The G-Tunnel noise environment was monitored over the 20-day duration of the field tests. Noise-power probability functions were calculated for 20-s and 280-s seismic-record populations. Signaling rates were calculated for signals transmitted from superior transmitter sites to G-Tunnel. A detection threshold of 13 dB re 1 nm/sup 2/ displacement power at 95% reliability was demanded. Consideration of field results suggests that even for the frequency range used in this study, substantially higher signaling rates are likely to be obtained in future work in view of the present lack of information relevant to hardware-siting criteria and the seismic propagation paths at the Nevada Test Site. 12 references.

Albright, J N; Parker, L E; Horton, E H

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Accelerator beam profile analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beam profile analyzer employing sector or quadrant plates each servo controlled to outline the edge of a beam.

Godel, Julius B. (Bayport, NY); Guillaume, Marcel (Grivegnee, BE); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Withnell, Ronald (East Setauket, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Trade and Reliability; All Reports See all Electricity Reports State Electricity Profiles. ... Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010:

366

Borehole seismic monitoring of seismic stimulation at OccidentalPermian Ltd's -- South Wason Clear Fork Unit  

SciTech Connect

Seismic stimulation is a proposed enhanced oil recovery(EOR) technique which uses seismic energy to increase oil production. Aspart of an integrated research effort (theory, lab and field studies),LBNL has been measuring the seismic amplitude of various stimulationsources in various oil fields (Majer, et al., 2006, Roberts,et al.,2001, Daley et al., 1999). The amplitude of the seismic waves generatedby a stimulation source is an important parameter for increased oilmobility in both theoretical models and laboratory core studies. Theseismic amplitude, typically in units of seismic strain, can be measuredin-situ by use of a borehole seismometer (geophone). Measuring thedistribution of amplitudes within a reservoir could allow improved designof stimulation source deployment. In March, 2007, we provided in-fieldmonitoring of two stimulation sources operating in Occidental (Oxy)Permian Ltd's South Wasson Clear Fork (SWCU) unit, located near DenverCity, Tx. The stimulation source is a downhole fluid pulsation devicedeveloped by Applied Seismic Research Corp. (ASR). Our monitoring used aborehole wall-locking 3-component geophone operating in two nearbywells.

Daley, Tom; Majer, Ernie

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES IN GEOTHERMAL FIELDS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large velocity contrasts are regularly encountered in geothermal fields due to poorly consolidated and hydro-thermally altered rocks. The appropriate processing of seismic data is therefore crucial to delineate the geological structure. To assess the benefits of surface seismic surveys in such settings, we applied different migration procedures to image a synthetic reservoir model and seismic data from the Coso Geothermal Field. We have shown that the two-dimensional migration of synthetic seismic data from a typical reservoir model resolves the geological structure very well

368

Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the effectiveness of the EGS operations and shed light on the mechanics of the reservoir.

Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

The vertical-mill stage : design of a vertical movement stage for surface machining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To allow the widespread use of three dimensional patterns on walls, the manufacturing cost must be reduced. The goal of this project is to design a machine for vertical axis movement which can be measured and controlled. ...

Herrera, Juan, Jr

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids  

SciTech Connect

Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole â?? including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite â?? at 1152â??2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4â??1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6â??1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Category:Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations page? For detailed information on Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Add.png Add a new Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Technique Pages in category "Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations" The following 2 pages are in this category, out of 2 total.

372

Modelling strong seismic ground motion: three-dimensional loading path versus wavefield polarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seismic waves due to strong earthquakes propagating in surficial soil layers may both reduce soil stiffness and increase the energy dissipation into the soil. To investigate seismic wave amplification in such cases, past studies have been devoted to one-directional shear wave propagation in a soil column (1D-propagation) considering one motion component only (1C-polarization). Three independent purely 1C computations may be performed ('1D-1C' approach) and directly superimposed in the case of weak motions (linear behaviour). This research aims at studying local site effects by considering seismic wave propagation in a 1-D soil profile accounting for the influence of the 3-D loading path and non-linear hysteretic behaviour of the soil. In the proposed '1D-3C' approach, the three components (3C-polarization) of the incident wave are simultaneously propagated into a horizontal multilayered soil. A 3-D non-linear constitutive relation for the soil is implemented in the framework of the Finite Element Method in th...

D'Avila, Maria Paola Santisi; Semblat, Jean-Franois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Dynamics of a vertical water bridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A vertical connection of water is formed when a high voltage electrode is dipped in and pulled out of a container of deionized water. We considered the formation and dynamical characteristics of this vertical water bridge. For the first time in this field, instabilities were observed in the bridge that led to an oscillatory behaviour which we categorized them into three dynamical regimes. some explanations were supplied on the physics behind these dynamics. We report the formation of macroscopic droplets during our experiments, which their dynamics revealed that they are electrically charged. In some cases the droplets levitated in the air due to the equality of gravity and electrical force (acting in the opposite direction). Our results shed light on the physics behind this phenomenon and the horizontal water bridge, which explanations regarding its underlying physics have led to controversial theories and discussions before.

Reza Montazeri Namin; Zahra Karimi

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

374

5h Other Seismic Stakeholder InteractionsGlenn Kelly- Appendix 5 Seismic.wpd Page 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decommissioning plants. During the course of the workshop, presentations by the NRC and the industry concluded that spent fuel pools possess substantial capability beyond their design basis to with stand seismic events but that variations in seismic capacity existed due to plant specific designs and locations. The consensus was that the risk was low enough that precise quantification was not necessary to support exemption requests but that this needed to be confirmed on a plant specific basis with deterministic criteria. It was recommended that a simple spent fuel pool (SFP) vulnerability check list be developed to provide additional assurance that no beyond-design-basis seismic structural vulnerabilities exist at decommissioning plants. Enclosed for your review is the "Seismic Screening Criteria For Assessing Potential Pool Vulnerabilities At Decommissioning Plants." Please contact me at (202) 739-8110 or by e-mail (apn@.nei.org) if you have any questions or if a meeting should be scheduled to discuss the enclosed seismic checklist.

Glenn Kelly Aee Attached; George Hubbard; Aee Attached; Glenn Kelly; Alan Nelson; Alan Nelson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Seismic Emissions Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Surveys Emissions Surveys Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic Emissions Surveys Abstract With recent improvements in acquiring, processing and interpreting data, seismic ground noise provides a valuable tool for geothermal exploration. A time domain beam steering array processing technique is employed. This process eliminates the occurrence of false anomalies caused by local geologic amplification effects. Surveys of this type are used to located naturally fractured reservoirs. Results form Dixie Valley and Desert Peak, Nevada correlate well with the location of productive wells or known geology. Authors Katz and Lewis J. Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1984 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

376

Definition: Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Techniques Techniques Seismic methods provide information regarding the elastic properties of the subsurface through the measurement of the propagation velocity of elastic waves.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Seismology /saɪzˈmɒlədʒi/ is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies. The field also includes studies of earthquake effects, such as tsunamis as well as diverse seismic sources such as volcanic, tectonic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes (such as explosions). A related field that uses geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is called a seismogram. A seismologist

377

Seismic monitoring at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the efforts of LBL to utilize MEQ data in reservoir definition as well as in evaluating its performance. Results of the study indicate that the velocity and attenuation variations correlate with the known geology of the field. At the NW Geysers, high velocity anomalies correspond to metagraywacke and greenstone units while low velocity anomalies seem to be associated with Franciscan melanges. Low Vp/Vs and high attenuation delineate the steam reservoir suggesting undersaturation of the reservoir rocks. Ongoing monitoring of Vp/Vs may be useful in tracking the expansion of the steam zone with time. Spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity exhibit compelling correlation with geothermal exploitation. Clusters of MEQs occur beneath active injection wells and appear to shift with changing injection activities. High resolution MEQ locations hold promise for inferring fluid flow paths, especially in tracking injectate. This study has demonstrated that continuous seismic monitoring may be useful as an active reservoir management tool.

Romero, A.E. Jr.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Seismic behavior of geogrid reinforced slag wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible retaining structures are known with their high performance under earthquake loads. In geogrid reinforced walls the performance of the fill material and the interface of the fill and geogrid controls the performance. Geosynthetic reinforced walls in seismic regions must be safe against not only static forces but also seismic forces. The objective of this study is to determine the behavior of a geogrid reinforced slag wall during earthquake by using shaking table experiments. This study is composed of three stages. In the first stage the physical properties of the material to be used were determined. In the second part, a case history involving the use of slag from steel industry in the construction of geogrid reinforced wall is presented. In the third stage, the results of shaking table tests conducted using model geogrid wall with slag are given. From the results, it is seen that slag can be used as fill material for geogrid reinforced walls subjected to earthquake loads.

Edincliler, Ayse [Bogazici University, Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute, Department of Earthquake Engineering, Cengelkoey-Istanbul (Turkey); Baykal, Gokhan; Saygili, Altug [Bogazici University, Department of Civil Engineering, Bebek-Istanbul (Turkey)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

379

Impact of Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observation and representation in general circulation models (GCMs) of cloud vertical overlap are the objects of active research due to their impacts on the earths radiative budget. Previous studies have found that vertically contiguous ...

Catherine M. Naud; Anthony Del Genio; Gerald G. Mace; Sally Benson; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Pavlos Kollias

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Vertical axis wind turbine with continuous blade angle adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author presents a concept for a vertical axis wind turbine that utilizes each blade's entire rotational cycle for power generation. Each blade has its own vertical axis of rotation and is constrained to rotate at the ...

Weiss, Samuel Bruce

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Movement and Vertical Coupling of Adiabatic Baroclinic Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical coupling and movement of an adiabatic baroclinic tropical cyclone (TC) are investigated through two numerical experiments in which the TC is affected by either a vertical environmental shear or a differential beta drift. In both ...

Liguang Wu; Bin Wang

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Moisture Vertical Structure, Column Water Vapor, and Tropical Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical structure of the relationship between water vapor and precipitation is analyzed in 5 yr of radiosonde and precipitation gauge data from the Nauru Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site. The first vertical principal component of ...

Christopher E. Holloway; J. David Neelin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Vertical Velocities in a Thunderstorm Gust Front and Outflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous vertically pointing measurements of a thunderstorm outflow, including its gust front, were obtained with a Doppler radar near New Salem, North Dakota. The measurements provide a high-resolution depiction of the vertical structure of ...

Brooks E. Martner

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

On Deriving Vertical Air Motions from Cloud Radar Doppler Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for deriving vertical air motions from cloud radar Doppler spectrum measurements is introduced. The method is applicable to cloud volumes containing small particles, in this case liquid droplets, which are assumed to trace vertical air ...

Matthew D. Shupe; Pavlos Kollias; Michael Poellot; Edwin Eloranta

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Numerical Modeling of the Atmosphere with an Isentropic Vertical Coordinate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In constructing a numerical model of the atmosphere, we must choose an appropriate vertical coordinate. Among the various possibilities, isentropic vertical coordinates such as the ?-coordinate seem to have the greatest potential, in spite of the ...

Yueh-Jiuan G. Hsu; Akio Arakawa

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Evaluation of Vertical Motion: Past, Present, and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential impact of gridded output from numerical models on operational forecasting of vertical motion is examined. A review of historical techniques for operational vertical motion evaluation is presented. An attempt is made to relate ...

Lawrence B. Dunn

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Statistical Model of Vertical Shear from Moored Current Meters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive a statistical model or shear to predict how measurement of mean-square shear vary with stratification and with vertical separation ?z between moored current meters. Our model is based on a simplified version of the vertical wavenumber-...

David Rubenstein; Fred Newman; Walt Grabowski

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Environmental Vertical Wind Shear with Hurricane Bertha (1996)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Bertha (1996) was influenced by vertical wind shear with highly variable direction and magnitude. The paper describes a unique method for determining the vertical tilt of a tropical cyclone vortex using satellite and aircraft data. ...

Raymond M. Zehr

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Vertical Structure of the Anomalous 2002 Antarctic Ozone Hole  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ozone estimates from observations by the NOAA-16 Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) instrument and Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS-N) Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) are used to describe the vertical structure of ozone ...

S. Kondragunta; L. E. Flynn; A. Neuendorffer; A. J. Miller; C. Long; R. Nagatani; S. Zhou; T. Beck; E. Beach; R. McPeters; R. Stolarski; P. K. Bhartia; M. T. DeLand; L.-K. Huang

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings' position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M[sub w] < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Savannah River Site disaggregated seismic spectra  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical note is to characterize seismic ground motion at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by postulated earthquakes that may impact facilities at the site. This task is accomplished by reviewing the deterministic and probabilistic assessments of the seismic hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard to establish the earthquakes that control the hazard at the site and then evaluate the associated seismic ground motions in terms of response spectra. For engineering design criteria of earthquake-resistant structures, response spectra serve the function of characterizing ground motions as a function of period or frequency. These motions then provide the input parameters that are used in the analysis of structural response. Because they use the maximum response, the response spectra are an inherently conservative design tool. Response spectra are described in terms of amplitude, duration, and frequency content, and these are related to source parameters, travel path, and site conditions. Studies by a number of investigators have shown by statistical analysis that for different magnitudes the response spectrum values are different for differing periods. These facts support Jennings` position that using different shapes of design spectra for earthquakes of different magnitudes and travel paths is a better practice than employing a single, general-purpose shape. All seismic ground motion characterization results indicate that the PGA is controlled by a local event with M{sub w} < 6 and R < 30km. The results also show that lower frequencies are controlled by a larger, more distant event, typically the Charleston source. The PGA of 0.2 g, based originally on the Blume study, is consistent with LLNL report UCRL-15910 (1990) and with the DOE position on LLNL/EPRI.

Stephenson, D.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Diagnosis of Radiosonde Vertical Temperature Trend Profiles: Comparing the Influence of Data Homogenization versus Model Forcings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements from radiosonde temperatures have been used in studies that seek to identify the human influence on climate. However, such measurements are known to be contaminated by artificial inhomogeneities introduced by changes in instruments ...

John R. Lanzante

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Magnetic depth profile in GaMnAs layers with vertically graded ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the sample, so we must orient the magnetization to the in-plane direction using a saturating magnetic field (in the case of this sample, 100 mT) . ...

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

394

Modeling Tidal Current Profiles and Vertical Mixing beneath FilchnerRonne Ice Shelf, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the warmest water masses beneath FilchnerRonne Ice Shelf (FRIS) is dense, high salinity shelf water (HSSW) that flows into the sub-ice-shelf cavity from the ice front and occupies the lower portion of the water column. A one-dimensional ...

Keith Makinson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a summary of the properties of deep convective updraft and downdraft cores over the central plains of the United States, accomplished using a novel and now-standard Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) scanning mode ...

Scott E. Giangrande; Scott Collis; Jerry Straka; Alain Protat; Christopher Williams; Steven Krueger

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Using the Inverted Echo Sounder to Measure Vertical Profiles of Gulf Stream Temperature and Geostrophic Velocity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The methodology for converting the travel time measurement of the inverted echo sounder (IES) into an amplitude of the first baroclinic dynamical mode, A1, is presented. For a Gulf Stream IES record the so-generated A1(t) time series is used to ...

Robert S. Pickart; D. Randolph Watts

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Texas Crop Profile: Onions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This profile of onion production in Texas gives an overview of basic commodity information; discusses insect, disease and weed pests; and covers cultural and chemical control methods.

Hall, Kent D.; Holloway, Rodney L.; Smith, Dudley

2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

398

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology For Geothermal Applications Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and reservoir characterization. Also described is a 3-D seismic data-processing effort to create images of Rye Patch geothermal reservoir from 3-D sign-bit data recorded over the geothermal prospect. Two seismic sources were developed and tested in this study that can be used to illuminate geothermal reservoirs with S-waves.

399

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity

400

Use of experience data for DOE seismic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

As dictated by DOE Order 5480.28, seismic evaluations of essential systems and components at DOE facilities will be conducted over the next several years. For many of these systems and components, few, if any, seismic requirements applied to the original design, procurement, installation, and maintenance process. Thus the verification of the seismic adequacy of existing systems and components presents a difficult challenge. DOE has undertaken development of the criteria and procedures for these seismic evaluations that will maximize safety benefits in a timely and cost effective manner. As demonstrated in previous applications at DOE facilities and by the experience from the commercial nuclear power industry, use of experience data for these evaluations is the only viable option for most existing systems and components. This paper describes seismic experience data, the needs at DOE facilities, the precedent of application at nuclear power plants and DOE facilities, and the program being put in place for the seismic verification task ahead for DOE.

Barlow, M.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Budnitz, R. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Eder, S.J. [EQE Engineering Consultants, San Francisco, CA (United States); Eli, M.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Short-Period Seismic Noise in Vorkuta (Russia)  

SciTech Connect

Cultural development of new subpolar areas of Russia is associated with a need for detailed seismic research, including both mapping of regional seismicity and seismic monitoring of specific mining enterprises. Of special interest are the northern territories of European Russia, including shelves of the Kara and Barents Seas, Yamal Peninsula, and the Timan-Pechora region. Continuous seismic studies of these territories are important now because there is insufficient seismological knowledge of the area and an absence of systematic data on the seismicity of the region. Another task of current interest is the necessity to consider the seismic environment in the design, construction, and operation of natural gas extracting enterprises such as the construction of the North European Gas Pipeline. Issues of scientific importance for seismic studies in the region are the complex geodynamical setting, the presence of permafrost, and the complex tectonic structure. In particular, the Uralian Orogene (Fig. 1) strongly affects the propagation of seismic waves. The existing subpolar seismic stations [APA (67,57{sup o}N; 33,40{sup o}E), LVZ (67,90{sup o}N; 34,65{sup o}E), and NRIL (69,50{sup o}N; 88,40{sup o}E)] do not cover the extensive area between the Pechora and Ob Rivers (Fig. 1). Thus seismic observations in the Vorkuta area, which lies within the area of concern, represent a special interest. Continuous recording at a seismic station near the city of Vorkuta (67,50{sup o}N; 64,11{sup o}E) [1] has been conducted since 2005 for the purpose of regional seismic monitoring and, more specifically, detection of seismic signals caused by local mining enterprises. Current surveys of local seismic noise [7,8,9,11], are particularly aimed at a technical survey for the suitability of the site for installation of a small-aperture seismic array, which would include 10-12 recording instruments, with the Vorkuta seismic station as the central element. When constructed, this seismic array will considerably improve the recording capacity of regional and local seismic events. It will allow detection of signatures of seismic waves propagating in submeridional and sublatitudinal directions. The latter is of special interest not only to access the influence of the Urals on propagation patterns of seismic waves, but also to address other questions, such as the structure and dynamic characteristics of the internal dynamo of the Earth [9,13]. Recording seismic waves at low angular distances from seismically active subpolar zones will allow us to collect data on vortical and convective movements in subpolar lithosphere blocks and at the boundary of the inner core of the Earth, possibly giving essential clues to the modeling of the Earth's electromagnetic field [3,13]. The present study considers basic features of seismic noise at the Vorkuta station obtained through the analysis of seismic records from March, 2006 till December, 2007.

Kishkina, S B; Spivak, A A; Sweeney, J J

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Particle swarm optimization applied to vertical traffic scheduling in buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical traffic scheduling is significant in evaluating the quality of property management. An excellent vertical traffic scheduling approach aims at enhancing the system handling capacity and reducing the waiting time, journey time and energy consumption, ... Keywords: dynamic zoning, elevator group control system, particle swarm optimization, round-trip time, vertical traffic scheduling

Zhonghua Li; Hong-Zhou Tan; Yunong Zhang

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1988) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Coso Geothermal Area (1988) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date 1988 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To analyze three-dimensional Vp/Vs variation Notes A tomographic inversion for the 3D variations of the Vp/V s, the ratio of compressional to shear velocity, was performed. Iterative back projection of 2966 shear and compressional wave travel time residuals from local earthquakes recorded on vertical instruments reveals that Vp/Vs is generally high at the surface and decreases systematically to 10 km depth. Near Devil's Kitchen in the Coso Geothermal Area, Vp/Vs values are very low near the surface, consistent with measured values for steam-dominated

404

Metrology for x-ray telescope mirrors in a vertical configuration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mirrors used in x-ray telescope systems for observations outside of the earth`s atmosphere are usually made of several thin nested shells, each formed by a pair of paraboloidal and hyperboloidal surfaces. The thin shells are very susceptible to self-weight deflection caused by gravity and are nearly impossible to test by conventional interferometric techniques. The metrology requirements for these mirrors are extremely challenging. This paper presents a prototype of a Vertical Scanning Long Trace Profiler (VSLTP) which is optimized to measure the surface figure of x-ray telescope mirrors in a vertical orientation. The optical system of the VSLTP is described. Experimental results from measurements on an x-ray telescope mandrel and tests of the accuracy and repeatability of the prototype VSLTP are presented. The prototype instrument has achieved a height measurement accuracy of about 50 nanometers with a repeatability of better than 20 nanometers, and a slope measurement accuracy of about 1 microradian.

Li, Haizhang; Li, Xiaodan; Grindel, M.W.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Industry Approach to Seismic Severe Accident Policy Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides utilities with industry recommended guidelines for cost-effective seismic evaluation of nuclear power plants in response to NRC Generic Letter 88-20. Guidance is provided on application of seismic probabilistic risk assessment and seismic margin methods for full-, focused-, and reduced-scope evaluations. It provides strategies for coordinating these evaluations with similar reviews needed for resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-46.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Seismic interpretation and classification of mud volcanoes of the South Caspian Basin, offshore Azerbaijan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the nature of mud volcanism, mechanisms of formation, types of eruptions and their relationship to the hydrocarbon systems provides important information about subsurface conditions and geological processes within the South Caspian Basin. A 2D seismic grid in southeastern offshore Azerbaijan is used to define the areal distribution of mud volcanoes and to make a classification of the mud volcanoes based on characteristic seismic features. As a result detailed database for each determined mud volcano is constructed. Analysis of different parameters from this database shows that there is a high concentration of mud volcanoes at the southern part of the study area. It is coincides with the distribution of the subsurface structures within the basin. Mud volcanoes with low relief (several tens of meters) are mainly concentrated in the northeast. Conversely, mud volcanoes with large vertical relief (greater than 200 m) are clustered in the southwest part of the basin. Mud volcano development in the South Caspian Basin is generally linked to faults, which in some instances are detached at the basement level. By using interpreted seismic surfaces it is possible to determine relative time of mud flows from the mud volcanoes. Timing of mud flows reveals to the actual activity of the mud volcanoes and it gives valuable information about possible mechanism of mud volcanism within the South Caspian Basin. Previous studies of the onshore mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan and the results from current work conclude that mud volcano formation within the South Caspian Basin is mainly controlled by tectonic forces and overpressured sediments. Mud volcano activity is not always related to the Maykop organic reach shale succession. It can occur at shallow depths by pressure breakthrough from any stratigraphic zone.

Yusifov, Mehdi Zahid

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Piedmont seismic reflection study: A program integrated with tectonics to probe the cause of eastern seismicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new tectonic model of the Appalachian orogen indicates that one, not two or more, terrane boundaries is present in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge of the central and southern Appalachians. This terrane boundary is the Taconic suture, it has been transported in the allochthonous Blue Ridge/Piedmont crystalline thrust nappe, and it is repeated at the surface by faulting and folding associated with later Paleozoic orogenies. The suture passes through the lower crust and lithosphere somewhere east of Richmond. It is spatially associated with seismicity in the central Virginia seismic zone, but is not conformable with earthquake focal planes and appears to have little causal relation to their localization.

Glover, L. III; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.; Bollinger, G.A. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flank Area (Wyss, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

409

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Valeri Korneev at Berkeley National Lab has developed a low cost method for real-time seismic monitoring of underground fluid reservoirs based on tube-wave analysis.

410

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil ...  

Tube-wave Seismic Imaging and Monitoring Method for Oil Reservoirs and Aquifers Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contact LBL About This Technology

411

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration...

412

Development Of Active Seismic Vector-Wavefield Imaging Technology...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This report describes the development and testing of vector-wavefield seismic sources that can generate shear (S) waves that may be valuable in geothermal exploration and...

413

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP)...

414

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MICRO-SEISMICITY, FAULT STRUCTURE AND HYDRAULIC COMPARTMENTALIZATION WITHIN THE COSO GETHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

415

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California...

416

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Seismic Technology Adapted to...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ...

417

Microsoft Word - Calpine EGS_Seismic Eval Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Environmental Impacts of Induced Seismicity at the Calpine Enhanced Geothermal System Project, The Geysers, California prepared for RMT, Inc. 4 West Fourth Avenue,...

418

APPENDIX J: STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE WITH DOE SEISMICITY PROTOCOL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

compliance with the "Protocol for Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems". Calpine Corporation and other Geysers geothermal operators have long been...

419

Advanced Seismic data Analysis Program (The "Hot Pot Project...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

seismic data to locate deep geothermal structures. Awardees (Company Institution) OSKI Energy, LLC Awardee Website http:www.oskienergy.com Partner 1 Optim, Inc Partner 2...

420

Injection monitoring with seismic arrays and adaptive noise cancellation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although the application of seismic methods, active and passive, to monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes is not new, seismic arrays and array processing technology coupled with a new noise cancellation method has not been attempted. Successful application of seismic arrays to passively monitor in-situ reservoir stimulation processes depends on being able to sufficiently cancel the expected large amplitude background seismic noise typical of an oil or geothermal production environment so that small amplitude seismic signals occurring at depth can be detected and located. This report describes the results of a short field experiment conducted to test both the application of seismic arrays for in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring and the active noise cancellation technique in a real reservoir production environment. Although successful application of these techniques to in-situ reservoir stimulation monitoring would have the greatest payoff in the oil industry, the proof-of-concept field experiment site was chosen to be the Geysers geothermal field in northern California. This site was chosen because of known high seismicity rates, a relatively shallow production depth, cooperation and some cost sharing the UNOCAL Oil Corporation, and the close proximity of the site to LLNL. The body of this report describes the Geysers field experimental configuration and then discusses the results of the seismic array processing and the results of the seismic noise cancellation followed by a brief conclusion. 2 refs., 11 figs.

Harben, P.E.; Harris, D.B.; Jarpe, S.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

422

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blackwell, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

423

Time-dependent seismic tomography and its application to the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

changes in Earth structure are commonly determined using local earthquake tomography computer programs that invert multiple seismic-wave arrival time data sets separately and...

424

Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Seismic Reflection...

425

Next-Generation Performance-Based Seismic Design ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Next-Generation Performance-Based Seismic Design Guidelines Program Plan for New and Existing Buildings FEMA-445 / August 2006 ...

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Seismic Design of Steel Special Concentrically Braced Frame ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NEHRP Seismic Design Technical Brief No. 8 ... Dr. John (Jay) L. Harris, III, managed the project to produce this Technical Brief for EL. ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Project Type ...

428

Using Supercomputers to Improve Seismic Hazard Maps | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of 2% in 50 years. Using Supercomputers to Improve Seismic Hazard Maps PI Name: Thomas Jordan PI Email: tjordan@usc.edu Institution: Southern California Earthquake Center...

429

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

430

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

431

Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

432

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms of plate tectonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global pattern of earthquakes and seismic energy distributions: Insights for the mechanisms October 2011 Keywords: Global seismicity Declustered catalogue Earthquake energy distribution Plate tectonics In this paper, we analyse the distributions of number of events (N) and seismic energy (E

Doglioni, Carlo

433

Control system for a vertical axis windmill  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90.degree. and 270.degree. to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

Brulle, Robert V. (St. Louis County, MO)

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

Effective Higgs vertices in the generic MSSM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we consider chirally enhanced corrections to Higgs vertices in the most general MSSM. We include the contributions stemming from bilinear terms, from the trilinear A terms, and from their nonholomorphic analogues, the A{sup '} terms, which couple squarks to the ''wrong'' Higgs field. We perform a consistent renormalization of the Higgs vertices beyond the decoupling limit (M{sub SUSY{yields}{infinity}}), using a purely diagrammatic approach. The cancellation of the different contributions in and beyond the decoupling limit is discussed and the possible size of decoupling effects which occur if the supersymmetry particles are not much heavier than the electroweak scale are examined. In the decoupling limit we recover the results obtained in the effective-field-theory approach. For the nonholomorphic A{sup '} terms we find the well known tan{beta} enhancement in the down sector similar to the one for terms proportional to {mu}. Because of the a priori generic flavor structure of these trilinear terms large flavor-changing neutral Higgs couplings can be induced. We also discover new tan{beta} enhanced contributions involving the usual holomorphic A terms, which were not discussed before in the literature. These corrections occur only if also flavor-diagonal nonholomorphic corrections to the Higgs couplings are present. This reflects the fact that the A terms, and also the chirality-changing self-energies, are physical quantities and cannot be absorbed into renormalization constants.

Crivellin, Andreas [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

436

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

Christopher Williams; Mike Jensen

437

Seismic Characterization of Coal-Mining Seismicity in Utah for CTBT Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Underground coal mining (down to {approx}0.75 km depth) in the contiguous Wasatch Plateau (WP) and Book Cliffs (BC) mining districts of east-central Utah induces abundant seismicity that is monitored by the University of Utah regional seismic network. This report presents the results of a systematic characterization of mining seismicity (magnitude {le} 4.2) in the WP-BC region from January 1978 to June 2000-together with an evaluation of three seismic events (magnitude {le} 4.3) associated with underground trona mining in southwestern Wyoming during January-August 2000. (Unless specified otherwise, magnitude implies Richter local magnitude, M{sub L}.) The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) undertook this cooperative project to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in research and development relating to monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The project, which formally began February 28, 1998, and ended September 1, 2000, had three basic objectives: (1) Strategically install a three-component broadband digital seismic station in the WP-BC region to ensure the continuous recording of high-quality waveform data to meet the long-term needs of LLNL, UUSS, and other interested parties, including the international CTBT community. (2) Determine source mechanisms--to the extent that available source data and resources allowed--for comparative seismic characterization of stress release in mines versus earthquakes in the WP-BC study region. (3) Gather and report to LLNL local information on mine operations and associated seismicity, including ''ground truth'' for significant events. Following guidance from LLNL's Technical Representative, the focus of Objective 2 was changed slightly to place emphasis on three mining-related events that occurred in and near the study area after the original work plan had been made, thus posing new targets of opportunity. These included: a magnitude 3.8 shock that occurred close to the Willow Creek coal mine in the Book Cliffs area on February 5, 1998 (UTC date), just prior to the start of this project; a magnitude 4.2 shock on March 7,2000 (UTC date), in the same area as the February 5 event; and a magnitude 4.3 shock that occurred on January 30,2000 (UTC and local date), associated with a panel collapse at the Solvay trona mine in southwestern Wyoming. This is the same mine in which an earlier collapse event of magnitude 5.2 occurred in February 1995, attracting considerable attention from the CTBT community.

Arabasz, W J; Pechmann, J C

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses. The original scope of the project was to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). Although Milestone M-48-14 has been met, Revision I is being issued to address external review comments with emphasis on changes in the modeling of anchor bolts connecting the concrete dome and the steel primary tank. The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that a nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis be performed on the DSTs. The analysis is required to include the effects of sliding interfaces and fluid sloshing (fluid-structure interaction). SSI analysis has traditionally been treated by frequency domain computer codes such as SHAKE (Schnabel, et al. 1972) and SASSI (Lysmer et al. 1999a). Such frequency domain programs are limited to the analysis of linear systems. Because of the contact surfaces, the response of the DSTs to a seismic event is inherently nonlinear and consequently outside the range of applicability of the linear frequency domain programs. That is, the nonlinear response of the DSTs to seismic excitation requires the use of a time domain code. The capabilities and limitations of the commercial time domain codes ANSYS{reg_sign} and MSC Dytran{reg_sign} for performing seismic SSI analysis of the DSTs and the methodology required to perform the detailed seismic analysis of the DSTs has been addressed in Rinker et al (2006a). On the basis of the results reported in Rinker et al. (2006a), it is concluded that time-domain SSI analysis using ANSYS{reg_sign} is justified for predicting the global response of the DSTs. The most significant difference between the current revision (Revision 1) of this report and the original issue (Revision 0) is the treatment of the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome.

MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; CARPENTER BG; HENDRIX C; ABATT FG

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Development of a HT seismic downhole tool.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) require the stimulation of the drilled well, likely through hydraulic fracturing. Whether fracturing of the rock occurs by shear destabilization of natural fractures or by extensional failure of weaker zones, control of the fracture process will be required to create the flow paths necessary for effective heat mining. As such, microseismic monitoring provides one method for real-time mapping of the fractures created during the hydraulic fracturing process. This monitoring is necessary to help assess stimulation effectiveness and provide the information necessary to properly create the reservoir. In addition, reservoir monitoring of the microseismic activity can provide information on reservoir performance and evolution over time. To our knowledge, no seismic tool exists that will operate above 125 C for the long monitoring durations that may be necessary. Replacing failed tools is costly and introduces potential errors such as depth variance, etc. Sandia has designed a high temperature seismic tool for long-term deployment in geothermal applications. It is capable of detecting microseismic events and operating continuously at temperatures up to 240 C. This project includes the design and fabrication of two High Temperature (HT) seismic tools that will have the capability to operate in both temporary and long-term monitoring modes. To ensure the developed tool meets industry requirements for high sampling rates (>2ksps) and high resolution (24-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter) two electronic designs will be implemented. One electronic design will utilize newly developed 200 C electronic components. The other design will use qualified Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) devices and will have a continuous operating temperature of 240 C.

Maldonado, Frank P.; Greving, Jeffrey J.; Henfling, Joseph Anthony; Chavira, David J.; Uhl, James Eugene; Polsky, Yarom

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Surface Forcing of the Infrared Cooling Profile over the Tibetan Plateau. Part I: Influence of Relative Longwave Radiative Heating at High Altitude  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the Tibetan Plateau on the behavior of the surface longwave radiation budget is examined, and the behavior of the vertical profile of longwave cooling over the plateau, including its diurnal variation, is quantified. The investigation ...

Eric A. Smith; Lei Shi

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

An Analysis of Errors in Drop Size Distribution Retrievals and Rain Bulk Parameters with a UHF Wind Profiling Radar and a Two-Dimensional Video Disdrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointed wind profiling radars can be used to obtain measurements of the underlying drop size distribution (DSD) for a rain event by means of the Doppler velocity spectrum. Precipitation parameters such as rainfall rate, radar ...

Laura Kanofsky; Phillip Chilson

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

A Study of a Retrieval Method for Temperature and Humidity Profiles from Microwave Radiometer Observations Based on Principal Component Analysis and Stepwise Regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the application of principal component analysis and stepwise regression in the retrieval of vertical profiles of temperature and humidity based on the measurements of a 35-channel microwave radiometer. It uses the radiosonde ...

Haobo Tan; Jietai Mao; Huanhuan Chen; P. W. Chan; Dui Wu; Fei Li; Tao Deng

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Comparisons of Raman Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Water Vapor Profiles with Radiosondes, Hygrometers on the Meteorological Observation Tower, and GPS at Tsukuba, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical distribution profiles of the water vapor mixing ratio (w) were measured by Raman lidar at the Meteorological Research Institute, Japan, during the period from 2000 to 2004. The measured values were compared with those obtained with ...

Tetsu Sakai; Tomohiro Nagai; Masahisa Nakazato; Takatsugu Matsumura; Narihiro Orikasa; Yoshinori Shoji

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Geophysics II. Tools for seismic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on tools for seismic data interpretation. Each of the 25 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Geophysics III. Geologic interpretation of seismic data  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on geologic interpretation of seismic data interpretation. Each of the 21 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Quantifying one and two dimensional lateral heterogeneities in fluvio-deltaic reservoirs using 3-D seismic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We document scale-invariant statistics and strong anisotropy in rock properties from well log and 3-D seismic data in fluvial/deltaic reservoirs in the El 330 Field, Gulf of Mexico. The scarcity of well log data in the lateral direction necessitates the use of lower resolution seismic data to quantify lateral heterogeneity. Spectral analysis of two dimensional seismic horizon slices and one dimensional traces extracted form the 3-D data cube reveal scale invariant behavior with a characteristic correlation parameter ([beta]) in both dimensions. This parameter captures the degree of correlation in profiles or surfaces ([beta]=0) for white noise. Two dimensional analysis of the horizon slice indicates a ([beta]) value of approximately 2.0 while analysis of one dimensional profiles from the same slice reveal an anisotropy along depositional strike and dip with ([beta]) values of 1.6 and 2.1, respectively. The higher correlation observed in the direction of stratigraphic dip may reflect the stratigraphic fabric associated with channel systems. This one dimensional lateral variability in seismic data also matches the variability in higher resolution horizontal well log data suggesting a scale invariant behavior over approximately 3 orders of magnitude (1-1000 feet). Different depositional environments within specific systems tracts may have characteristic correlation parameters that provide insight into one and two dimensional lateral variations of reservoir heterogeneity. Correlation parameters obtained in these environments may then be used to quantify rock fabric and provide constraints in the simulation of rock property fields in the inter-well region.

Deutsch, H.A.; Douglass, R. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Hamilton, D.E. (Subsurface Computer Modeling, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Characterization of fracture reservoirs using static and dynamic data: From sonic and 3D seismic to permeability distribution. Annual report, March 1, 1996--February 28, 1997  

SciTech Connect

In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. They also may connect the borehole to remote zones of better reservoir characteristics. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based on the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. The project is a study directed toward the evaluation of acoustic logging and 3D-seismic measurement techniques as well as fluid flow and transport methods for mapping permeability anisotropy and other petrophysical parameters for the understanding of the reservoir fracture systems and associated fluid dynamics. The principal application of these measurement techniques and methods is to identify and investigate the propagation characteristics of acoustic and seismic waves in the Twin Creek hydrocarbon reservoir owned by Union Pacific Resources (UPR) and to characterize the fracture permeability distribution using production data. This site is located in the overthrust area of Utah and Wyoming. UPR drilled six horizontal wells, and presently UPR has two rigs running with many established drill hole locations. In addition, there are numerous vertical wells that exist in the area as well as 3D seismic surveys. Each horizontal well contains full FMS logs and MWD logs, gamma logs, etc.

Parra, J.O.; Collier, H.A.; Owen, T.E. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as minor with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

3D porosity prediction from seismic inversion and neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we address the problem of transforming seismic reflection data into an intrinsic rock property model. Specifically, we present an application of a methodology that allows interpreters to obtain effective porosity 3D maps from post-stack ... Keywords: Feed-forward neural network, Matlab, Reservoir characterization, Seismic inversion

Emilson Pereira Leite; Alexandre Campane Vidal

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Knowledge Assisted Visualization: Knowledge-assisted visualization of seismic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present novel techniques for knowledge-assisted annotation and computer-assisted interpretation of seismic data for oil and gas exploration. We describe the existing procedure for oil and gas search which consists of manually extracting information ... Keywords: 2D textures, 3D textures, Illustrative visualization, Knowledge-assisted visualization, Rapid interpretation, Seismic interpretation

Daniel Patel; yvind Sture; Helwig Hauser; Christopher Giertsen; M. Eduard Grller

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 16 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2011. Six earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), seven earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, thirteen earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and three earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (1.8 Mc) was recorded on October 19, 2010 at depth 17.5 km with epicenter located near the Yakima River between the Rattlesnake Mountain and Horse Heaven Hills swarm areas.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Engineering Seismic Base Layer for Defining Design Earthquake Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineer's common sense that incident wave is common in a widespread area at the engineering seismic base layer is shown not to be correct. An exhibiting example is first shown, which indicates that earthquake motion at the ground surface evaluated by the analysis considering the ground from a seismic bedrock to a ground surface simultaneously (continuous analysis) is different from the one by the analysis in which the ground is separated at the engineering seismic base layer and analyzed separately (separate analysis). The reason is investigated by several approaches. Investigation based on eigen value problem indicates that the first predominant period in the continuous analysis cannot be found in the separate analysis, and predominant period at higher order does not match in the upper and lower ground in the separate analysis. The earthquake response analysis indicates that reflected wave at the engineering seismic base layer is not zero, which indicates that conventional engineering seismic base layer does not work as expected by the term 'base'. All these results indicate that wave that goes down to the deep depths after reflecting in the surface layer and again reflects at the seismic bedrock cannot be neglected in evaluating the response at the ground surface. In other words, interaction between the surface layer and/or layers between seismic bedrock and engineering seismic base layer cannot be neglected in evaluating the earthquake motion at the ground surface.

Yoshida, Nozomu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, Tagajo 1-13-1, Miyagi (Japan)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

453

Vertical axis wind turbine control strategy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early expensive in automatic operation of the Sandia 17-m vertical axis research wind turbine (VAWT) has demonstrated the need for a systematic study of control algorithms. To this end, a computer model has been developed that uses actual wind time series and turbine performance data to calculate the power produced by the Sandia 17-m VAWT operating in automatic control. The model has been used to investigate the influence of starting algorithms on annual energy production. The results indicate that, depending on turbine and local wind characteristics, a bad choice of a control algorithm can significantly reduce overall energy production. The model can be used to select control algorithms and threshold parameters that maximize long-term energy production. An attempt has been made to generalize these results from local site and turbine characteristics to obtain general guidelines for control algorithm design.

McNerney, G.M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Active and passive seismic imaging of a hydraulic fracture in diatomite  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a comprehensive set of experiments including remote- and treatment-well microseismic monitoring, interwell shear-wave shadowing, and surface tiltmeter arrays, that was used to monitor the growth of a hydraulic fracture in the Belridge diatomite. To obtain accurate measurements, and extensive subsurface network of geophones was cemented spanning the diatomite formation in three closely spaced observation wells around the well to be fracture treated. Data analysis indicates that the minifracture and main hydraulic fracture stimulations resulted in a nearly vertical fracture zone (striking N26{degrees}E) vertically segregated into two separate elements, the uppermost of which grew 60 ft above the perforated interval. The interwell seismic effects are consistent with a side process zone of reduced shear velocity, which remote-well microseismic data independently suggest may be as wide as 40 ft. The experiments indicate complicated processes occurring during hydraulic fracturing that have significant implications for stimulation, waterflooding, in fill drilling, and EOR. These processes are neither well understood nor included in current hydraulic fracture models.

Vinegar, H.J.; Wills, P.B.; De Martini, D.C. (Shell Development Co. (US))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

456

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

457

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

458

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

459

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

460

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vertical seismic profile" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

462

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

463

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

464

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

465

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

466

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

467

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

468

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

469

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

470

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

471

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

472

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

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EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

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EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

475

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

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EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfu