National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for vertical change bars

  1. Precision Model Independent Determination of vertical bar V{sub ub} vertical bar from B{yields}{pi}l{nu}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnesen, Christian M.; Stewart, Iain W.; Grinstein, Benjamin; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2005-08-12

    A precision method for determining vertical bar V{sub ub} vertical bar using the full range in q{sup 2} of B{yields}{pi}l{nu} data is presented. At large q{sup 2} the form factor is taken from unquenched lattice QCD, at q{sup 2}=0 we impose a model independent constraint obtained from B{yields}{pi}{pi} using the soft-collinear effective theory, and the shape is constrained using QCD dispersion relations. We find vertical bar V{sub ub} vertical bar=(3.54{+-}0.17{+-}0.44)x10{sup -3}. With 5% experimental error and 12% theory error, this is competitive with inclusive methods. Theory error is dominated by the input points, with negligible uncertainty from the dispersion relations.

  2. Probabilities from entanglement, Born's rule p{sub k}= vertical bar {psi}{sub k} vertical bar{sup 2} from envariance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2005-05-15

    I show how probabilities arise in quantum physics by exploring the implications of environment-assisted invariance or envariance, a recently discovered symmetry exhibited by entangled quantum systems. Envariance of perfectly entangled 'Bell-like' states can be used to rigorously justify complete ignorance of the observer about the outcome of any measurement on either of the members of the entangled pair. For more general states, envariance leads to Born's rule p{sub k}{proportional_to} vertical bar {psi}{sub k} vertical bar{sup 2} for the outcomes associated with Schmidt states. The probabilities derived in this manner are an objective reflection of the underlying state of the system--they represent experimentally verifiable symmetries, and not just a subjective 'state of knowledge' of the observer. This envariance-based approach is compared with and found to be superior to prequantum definitions of probability including the standard definition based on the 'principle of indifference' due to Laplace and the relative frequency approach advocated by von Mises. Implications of envariance for the interpretation of quantum theory go beyond the derivation of Born's rule: Envariance is enough to establish the dynamical independence of preferred branches of the evolving state vector of the composite system and, thus, to arrive at the environment-induced superselection (einselection) of pointer states, which was usually derived by an appeal to decoherence. The envariant origin of Born's rule for probabilities sheds light on the relation between ignorance (and, hence, information) and the nature of quantum states.

  3. Fast strain wave induced magnetization changes in long cobalt bars: Domain motion versus coherent rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.; Adenwalla, S.; Borchers, J. A.; Maranville, B. B.

    2015-02-14

    A high frequency (88 MHz) traveling strain wave on a piezoelectric substrate is shown to change the magnetization direction in 40 μm wide Co bars with an aspect ratio of 10{sup 3}. The rapidly alternating strain wave rotates the magnetization away from the long axis into the short axis direction, via magnetoelastic coupling. Strain-induced magnetization changes have previously been demonstrated in ferroelectric/ferromagnetic heterostructures, with excellent fidelity between the ferromagnet and the ferroelectric domains, but these experiments were limited to essentially dc frequencies. Both magneto-optical Kerr effect and polarized neutron reflectivity confirm that the traveling strain wave does rotate the magnetization away from the long axis direction and both yield quantitatively similar values for the rotated magnetization. An investigation of the behavior of short axis magnetization with increasing strain wave amplitude on a series of samples with variable edge roughness suggests that the magnetization reorientation that is seen proceeds solely via coherent rotation. Polarized neutron reflectivity data provide direct experimental evidence for this model. This is consistent with expectations that domain wall motion cannot track the rapidly varying strain.

  4. Vertical responses of Atlantic croaker to gas supersaturation and temperature change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamberlain, G.W.; Neill, W.H.; Romanowsky, P.A.; Strawn, K.

    1980-11-01

    Vertical responses of juvenile Atlantic croakers (Micropogon undulatus) to acute supersaturation of nitrogen and oxygen and to changing temperature were observed in a 2.5-m-tall test cylinder supplied with flowing estuarine water. Supersaturation of nitrogen caused an initial upward movement of fish, although a compensatory downward response seemed to occur after 2 to 4 hours of exposure. Supersaturation of oxygen resulted in an almost immediate downward movement of fish. Abrupt upward displacement of fish followed water-temperature changes, especially increases. Similarities between the behavior of croakers in these experiments and the behavior of other physoclists after swim-bladder volume manipulation suggested that gas supersaturation caused the swim bladders of our fish to inflate, resulting first in upward drift and then in downward swimming to restore neutral buoyancy. A nonlinear response model incorporating this hypothesis accounted for 62% of the variation (over all experiments) in mean vertical displacement of the croakers. Supersaturation-induced inflation of the swim bladder may provide physoclistous fishes a direct mechanism for avoiding gas bubble disease by stimulating the fish to descend to a depth at which no gas has a relative saturation value greater than 100%.

  5. Estimating nocturnal ecosystem respiration from the vertical turbulent flux and change in storage of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Lianhong; Van Gorsel, Eva; Leuning, Ray; Delpierre, Nicolas; Black, Andy; Chen, Baozhang; Munger, J. William; Wofsy, Steve; Aubinet, M.

    2009-11-01

    Micrometeorological measurements of nighttime ecosystem respiration can be systematically biased when stable atmospheric conditions lead to drainage flows associated with decoupling of air flow above and within plant canopies. The associated horizontal and vertical advective fluxes cannot be measured using instrumentation on the single towers typically used at micrometeorological sites. A common approach to minimize bias is to use a threshold in friction velocity, u*, to exclude periods when advection is assumed to be important, but this is problematic in situations when in-canopy flows are decoupled from the flow above. Using data from 25 flux stations in a wide variety of forest ecosystems globally, we examine the generality of a novel approach to estimating nocturnal respiration developed by van Gorsel et al. (van Gorsel, E., Leuning, R., Cleugh, H.A., Keith, H., Suni, T., 2007. Nocturnal carbon efflux: reconciliation of eddy covariance and chamber measurements using an alternative to the u*-threshold filtering technique. Tellus 59B, 397 403, Tellus, 59B, 307-403). The approach is based on the assumption that advection is small relative to the vertical turbulent flux (FC) and change in storage (FS) of CO2 in the few hours after sundown. The sum of FC and FS reach a maximum during this period which is used to derive a temperature response function for ecosystem respiration. Measured hourly soil temperatures are then used with this function to estimate respiration RRmax. The new approach yielded excellent agreement with (1) independent measurements using respiration chambers, (2) with estimates using ecosystem light-response curves of Fc + Fs extrapolated to zero light, RLRC, and (3) with a detailed process-based forest ecosystem model, Rcast. At most sites respiration rates estimated using the u*-filter, Rust, were smaller than RRmax and RLRC. Agreement of our approach with independent measurements indicates that RRmax provides an excellent estimate of nighttime

  6. Search for the Flavor Changing Neutral Current Decay t $\\to Zq$ in $p \\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, : T.

    2008-05-01

    We report a search for the flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) decay of the top quark t {yields} Zq (q = u, c) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector. This decay is strongly suppressed in the standard model (SM) and a signal at the Tevatron would be an indication of physics beyond the SM. Using Z+ {ge} 4 jet final state candidate events, both with and without an identified bottom quark jet, we discriminate signal from background by exploring kinematic constraints present in FCNC events and obtain an upper limit of {Beta}(t {yields} Zq) < 3.7% at 95% C.L.

  7. Flow pattern changes influenced by variation of viscosities of a heterogeneous gas-liquid mixture flow in a vertical channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keska, Jerry K.; Hincapie, Juan; Jones, Richard

    2011-02-15

    In the steady-state flow of a heterogeneous mixture such as an air-liquid mixture, the velocity and void fraction are space- and time-dependent parameters. These parameters are the most fundamental in the analysis and description of a multiphase flow. The determination of flow patterns in an objective way is extremely critical, since this is directly related to sudden changes in spatial and temporal changes of the random like characteristic of concentration. Flow patterns can be described by concentration signals in time, amplitude, and frequency domains. Despite the vital importance and countless attempts to solve or incorporate the flow pattern phenomena into multiphase models, it has still been a very challenging topic in the scientific community since the 1940's and has not yet reached a satisfactory solution. This paper reports the experimental results of the impact of fluid viscosity on flow patterns for two-phase flow. Two-phase flow was created in laboratory equipment using air and liquid as phase medium. The liquid properties were changed by using variable concentrations of glycerol in water mixture which generated a wide-range of dynamic viscosities ranging from 1 to 1060 MPa s. The in situ spatial concentration vs. liquid viscosity and airflow velocity of two-phase flow in a vertical ID=50.8 mm pipe were measured using two concomitant computer-aided measurement systems. After acquiring data, the in situ special concentration signals were analyzed in time (spatial concentration and RMS of spatial concentration vs. time), amplitude (PDF and CPDF), and frequency (PSD and CPSD) domains that documented broad flow pattern changes caused by the fluid viscosity and air velocity changes. (author)

  8. Bar coded retroreflective target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  9. Beam Dynamics Studies of Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, G. Krafft, K. Detrick, S. Silva, J. Delayen, M. Spata ,M. Tiefenback, A. Hofler ,K. Beard

    2011-03-01

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for parallel-bar transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type RF separators: normal- and super-conducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to conventional TM$_{110}$ type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a one- or two-cell superconducting structure are enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the Lambertson magnet. Both the normal and super-conducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

  10. Report (Vertical)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defined Benefit Eligible Survivor Income Program Benefit Program Summary Effective June 1, 2006 (Restated May 1, 2010) This document restates The LANS Survivor Income Program to provide greater clarity regarding this benefit but does not in any way change the benefits originally available through the Program. i LANS Benefits Group May 2010 Table of Contents This Booklet

  11. Report (Vertical)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANS HR-Benefits Group September 1, 2012 918425-3 LANS 401(k) Retirement Plan Summary Plan Description This Summary Plan Description (SPD) is intended to provide a summary of the principal features of the LANS 401(k) Retirement Plan ("Plan") and is not meant to interpret, extend or change the Plan in any way. This SPD will continue to be updated. Please check back on a regular basis for the most recent version and check with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Benefits Office for

  12. Triple bar, high efficiency mechanical sealer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pak, Donald J.; Hawkins, Samantha A.; Young, John E.

    2013-03-19

    A clamp with a bottom clamp bar that has a planar upper surface is provided. The clamp may also include a top clamp bar connected to the bottom clamp bar, and a pressure distribution bar between the top clamp bar and the bottom clamp bar. The pressure distribution bar may have a planar lower surface in facing relation to the upper surface of the bottom clamp bar. An object is capable of being disposed in a clamping region between the upper surface and the lower surface. The width of the planar lower surface may be less than the width of the upper surface within the clamping region. Also, the pressure distribution bar may be capable of being urged away from the top clamp bar and towards the bottom clamp bar.

  13. BAR FORMATION FROM GALAXY FLYBYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, Meagan; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sinha, Manodeep E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2014-08-01

    Recently, both simulations and observations have revealed that flybysfast, one-time interactions between two galaxy halosare surprisingly common, nearing/comparable to galaxy mergers. Since these are rapid, transient events with the closest approach well outside the galaxy disk, it is unclear if flybys can transform the galaxy in a lasting way. We conduct collisionless N-body simulations of three coplanar flyby interactions between pure-disk galaxies to take a first look at the effects flybys have on disk structure, with particular focus on stellar bar formation. We find that some flybys are capable of inciting a bar with bars forming in both galaxies during our 1:1 interaction and in the secondary during our 10:1 interaction. The bars formed have ellipticities ? 0.5, sizes on the order of the host disk's scale length, and persist to the end of our simulations, ?5Gyr after pericenter. The ability of flybys to incite bar formation implies that many processes associated with secular bar evolution may be more closely tied with interactions than previously thought.

  14. Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Robinson Bar Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Robinson Bar...

  15. Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Baker's Bar M Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Baker's Bar M...

  16. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  17. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  18. Vertical Velocity Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically...

  19. Needle bar for warp knitting machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagel, Adolf; Thumling, Manfred

    1979-01-01

    Needle bar for warp knitting machines with a number of needles individually set into slits of the bar and having shafts cranked to such an extent that the head section of each needle is in alignment with the shaft section accommodated by the slit. Slackening of the needles will thus not influence the needle spacing.

  20. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  1. Cam-controlled boring bar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glatthorn, Raymond H.

    1986-01-01

    A cam-controlled boring bar system (100) includes a first housing (152) which is rotatable about its longitudinal axis (154), and a second housing in the form of a cam-controlled slide (158) which is also rotatable about the axis (154) as well as being translatable therealong. A tool-holder (180) is mounted within the slide (158) for holding a single point cutting tool. Slide (158) has a rectangular configuration and is disposed within a rectangularly configured portion of the first housing (152). Arcuate cam slots (192) are defined within a side plate (172) of the housing (152), while cam followers (194) are mounted upon the cam slide (158) for cooperative engagement with the cam slots (192). In this manner, as the housing (152) and slide (158) rotate, and as the slide (158) also translates, a through-bore (14) having an hourglass configuration will be formed within a workpiece (16) which may be, for example, a nuclear reactor steam generator tube support plate.

  2. A newly developed Kolsky tension bar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Korellis, John S.

    2010-03-01

    Investigation of damage and failure of materials under impact loading relies on reliable dynamic tensile experiments. A precise Kolsky tension bar is highly desirable. Based on the template of the Kolsky compression bar that we recently developed and presented at 2009 SEM conference, a new Kolsky tension bar apparatus was completed at Sandia National Laboratories, California. It is secured to the same optical table. Linear bearings with interior Frelon coating were employed to support the whole tension bar system including the bars and gun barrel. The same laser based alignment system was used to efficiently facilitate highly precise alignment of the bar system. However, the gun part was completely re-designed. One end of the gun barrel, as a part of loading device, was directly jointed to the bar system. A solid cylindrical striker is launched inside the gun barrel and then impacts on a flange attached to the other end of the gun barrel to facilitate a sudden tensile loading on the whole system. This design improves the quality of impact to easily produce a perfect stress wave and is convenient to utilize pulse shaping technique. A calibration and dynamic characterization of an aluminum specimen are presented.

  3. Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection ...

  4. POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen ...

  5. DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment ...

  6. American Bar Association Section on Environment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bar Association Section on Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Bar Association Section on Environment Place: Chicago, Illinois Zip: 60610 Product: The Section of...

  7. Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project Alumni Link: ... Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project Researchers ...

  8. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, J.B.

    1982-03-15

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengagable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  9. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, J.B.

    1984-03-13

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out is disclosed. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine. 3 figs.

  10. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, James B.

    1984-01-01

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls (10, 12) are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit (14) and a rigid member (16, 18, 20, 22, 24). One gage ball (10) is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly (34) which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball (12) is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly (38) which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball (12) is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball (10). As the moving ball (12) executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls (10, 12) caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly (50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60) actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit (14). Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball (10) locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  11. ${{\\bar{d}} - {\\bar{u}}}$ Flavor Asymmetry in the Proton in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salamu, Y.; Ji, Cheung-Ryong; Melnitchouk, Wally; Wang, P.

    2015-09-01

    The ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton arising from pion loops is computed using chiral effective field theory. The calculation includes both nucleon and ? intermediate states, and uses both the fully relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. The x dependence of ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ extracted from the Fermilab E866 DrellYan data can be well reproduced in terms of a single transverse momentum cutoff parameter regulating the ultraviolet behavior of the loop integrals. In addition to the distribution at x > 0, corrections to the integrated asymmetry from zero momentum contributions are computed, which arise from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at x = 0. These have not been accounted for in previous analyses, and can make important contributions to the lowest moment of ${\\bar d-\\bar u}$ .

  12. Bar code application to nuclear material accountancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usui, S.; Sano, H. )

    1991-01-01

    For the purpose of efficient implementation of IAEA safeguards inspection, operators ought to prepare the information which is related to the strata for flow verification in a timely manner, such as physical inventory listing and summary of the fuel bundles. Today the use of bar code technique in tracing of products related data or counting number of items has been more and more applied to many facets of industry. From these points of view, the Japan Nuclear Fuel Company (NF) has been developing JNF Total Bar Code System. Now JNF has established an on-line input system of the fuel bundle accountability data by use of the bar code system to quickly prepare the information necessary for the inspection. As the first step, JNF implemented this bar code system at the flow verification to prepare physical inventory summary and location map of the fuel bundles in the storage. This paper reports that as a result of this, NF confirmed that this bar code system made it possible to input easily and quickly nuclear material accountancy information, and therefore this system is utilized as an effective and efficient measure of timely preparation for the inspection.

  13. Evidence for B+ -> K*0bar K*+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and fraction of longitudinal polarization for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K*{sup +} with a sample of 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We obtain the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K*{sup +}) = (1.2 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup ?6} with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. We measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization f{sub L} = 0.75{sub -0.26}{sup +0.16} {+-} 0.03. The first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

  14. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production in $$p \\bar{p}$$ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2016-02-09

    Here, we studymore » $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production asymmetries in $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, and $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^\\pm \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$ events recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV. We find an excess of $$\\Lambda$$'s ($$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$'s) produced in the proton (antiproton) direction. This forward-backward asymmetry is measured as a function of rapidity. We confirm that the $$\\bar{\\Lambda}/\\Lambda$$ production ratio, measured by several experiments with various targets and a wide range of energies, is a universal function of "rapidity loss", i.e., the rapidity difference of the beam proton and the lambda.« less

  15. Star formation properties in barred galaxies. III. Statistical study of bar-driven secular evolution using a sample of nearby barred spirals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Zhi-Min; Wu, Hong; Cao, Chen E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    Stellar bars are important internal drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Using a sample of nearby spiral galaxies with weak and strong bars, we explore the relationships between the star formation feature and stellar bars in galaxies. We find that galaxies with weak bars tend coincide with low concentrical star formation activity, while those with strong bars show a large scatter in the distribution of star formation activity. We find enhanced star formation activity in bulges toward stronger bars, although not predominantly, consistent with previous studies. Our results suggest that different stages of the secular process and many other factors may contribute to the complexity of the secular evolution. In addition, barred galaxies with intense star formation in bars tend to have active star formation in their bulges and disks, and bulges have higher star formation densities than bars and disks, indicating the evolutionary effects of bars. We then derived a possible criterion to quantify the different stages of the bar-driven physical process, while future work is needed because of the uncertainties.

  16. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  17. Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules October 30, 2014 - 4:58pm Addthis As photovoltaics (PV) markets expand across the United States the...

  18. Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best ...

  19. Strength of hydrostation trash rack bars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsvetkov, A.P.

    1985-07-01

    Trash racks are one of the important parts of the mechanical equipment of hydroelectric stations since their breakage causes shutdown of the turbines until they are repaired. Therefore, the provision of trouble-free operation of racks is of importance. The author states that the most vulnerable part of the rack structure is the bars, which can be damaged both from the static load as a result of clogging and from the stresses occurring during vibration of the bars under the effect of the water passing through them. Used for explaining the processes in the case reported here is the Milovich theory, which does not however touch on all the causes and conditions of increase of oscillation amplitude as it is observed in the laboratory.

  20. Hadron Physics in BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafferty, G.D.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-29

    Some recent results in hadron physics from the BaBar experiment are discussed. In particular, the observation of two new charmed states, the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2457), is described, and results are presented on the first measurement of the rare decay mode of the B meson, B{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  1. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  2. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  3. Finite Element Simulations to Explore Assumptions in Kolsky Bar Experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Justin

    2015-08-05

    The chief purpose of this project has been to develop a set of finite element models that attempt to explore some of the assumptions in the experimental set-up and data reduction of the Kolsky bar experiment. In brief, the Kolsky bar, sometimes referred to as the split Hopkinson pressure bar, is an experimental apparatus used to study the mechanical properties of materials at high strain rates. Kolsky bars can be constructed to conduct experiments in tension or compression, both of which are studied in this paper. The basic operation of the tension Kolsky bar is as follows: compressed air is inserted into the barrel that contains the striker; the striker accelerates towards the left and strikes the left end of the barrel producing a tensile stress wave that propogates first through the barrel and then down the incident bar, into the specimen, and finally the transmission bar. In the compression case, the striker instead travels to the right and impacts the incident bar directly. As the stress wave travels through an interface (e.g., the incident bar to specimen connection), a portion of the pulse is transmitted and the rest reflected. The incident pulse, as well as the transmitted and reflected pulses are picked up by two strain gauges installed on the incident and transmitted bars as shown. By interpreting the data acquired by these strain gauges, the stress/strain behavior of the specimen can be determined.

  4. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,123","9,738",99.0,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"1,123","9,738",99.0 "Data for 2010" "PWR = Pressurized Light Water

  5. The effects of interim flow operations from Glen Canyon Dam on Colorado River sand bars in the Grand Canyon, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplinski, M.A.; Hazel, J.E.; Beus, S.S. . Geology Dept.); Stevens, L.E. . NPS Cooperative Parks Studies Unit); Mayes, H.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Discharges from Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) affect the geomorphology and stability of downstream alluvial sediment deposits. To protect downstream resources, the US DOI mandated interim flow criteria (IFC) on 1 August, 1991. The IFC consist of reduced daily fluctuations (226--566 m[sup 3]/s) and reduced ramping rates (42.5--57 m[sup 3]/s/hr), the primary objective of which is to maintain sediment storage in the river system by minimizing sediment transport. This study was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the IFC in achieving this objective. The authors examined whether reduced daily fluctuations lead to subaerial sand bar erosion and increased subaqueous sediment storage. They collected and analyzed topographic and bathymetric survey data from sand bars throughout the Colorado River corridor in Sept/Oct, 1991 and in Oct/Nov, 1992 to compare changes in sand bar morphology. They examined changing topography due to GCD operation in what they termed the hydrologically active zone (HAZ), that portion of the sand bar exposed to daily dam operations (142--900 m[sup 3]/s stage elevations). Volumes within the HAZ and profiles across this zone were generated from these sediment deposits. Their preliminary results show that, in general, erosion of sediment at higher bar elevations was coincident with deposition along lower parts of the bar platform. The observed response to IFC elevation in order to maintain sediment deposits for Colorado River corridor bio-diversity (e.g., fisheries habitats). 88% of sand bars that showed significant volume gain were preceded by significant volume loss, implying that antecedent conditions are an important factor in sand bar response to GCD operations. Sediment transport capacity was reduced as evidenced by increased sediment storage in recirculation zones and sediment infilling of eddy return channels. The authors conclude that IFC are achieving their primary objective of maintaining sediment storage within the river corridor.

  6. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  7. Picture of the Week: Raising the bar on carbon capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of which come from fossil-fuel-based electricity generation. ... and the National Energy Technology Laboratory have ...orange bars represent a mix of electricity and ...

  8. MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bar Field Bend < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zo...

  9. Diamond Bar, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Diamond Bar, California US South Coast Air Quality Management District SCAQMD References US Census Bureau Incorporated place...

  10. Measurement of the B0-bar Lifetime and the B0B0-bar Oscillation Frequency Using Partially Reconstructed B0-bar to D*+ l- nu-bar Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-27

    The authors present a simultaneous measurement of the {bar B}{sup 0} lifetime {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} and B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub d}. We use a sample of about 50,000 partially reconstructed {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays identified with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at SLAC. The flavor of the other B meson in the event is determined from the charge of another high-momentum lepton.

  11. Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists call for antibody 'bar code' system to follow Human Genome Project Researchers ... on the scale of the now-completed Human Genome Project. (Image: Public Domain, ...

  12. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber based Biosensor Platform...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber based Biosensor Platform for Glucose Sensor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber based Biosensor ...

  13. Aerosynthesis: Growths of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aerosynthesis: Growths of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers with Air DC Plasma Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Aerosynthesis: Growths of Vertically Aligned Carbon ...

  14. Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2013-12-03

    A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

  15. Unitarity Triangle Angle Measurements at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latham, Thomas E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-30

    We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory. We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory.

  16. Method and an apparatus to control the lateral motion of a long metal bar being formed by a mechanical process such as rolling or drawing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Tzyy-Shuh; Huang, Hsun-Hau; Lin, Chang-Hung

    2007-10-02

    An adjustable guide, includes two or more mechanisms each having a rotatable retaining element containing a retaining groove with a variable radius in its perimeter surface. The grooves form a guidance path to control the lateral, i.e. non-axial, motion of a long bar moving along a longitudinal axis during a production process.The diameter of the guidance path varies according to the variable radii of the grooves. The guidance path increases in size at a predetermined rate, from a point of origin to an end point on the retaining groove. Rotating the retaining elements causes the diameter of the retaining grooves to change so that the size of the guidance path can be changed to match the diameter of the bar being rolled, size of the guidance path can be changed to fit the diameter of a new bar rolled without having to exchange the guide for a different sized guide, reduce fiction between the bar and the guide, a media, such as compressed air, can be injected between the retaining elements via orifices.Each retaining element is attached to a mounting apparatus. The mounting apparatus can be fixed or flexible. The flexible mounting apparatus includes one or more springs and one or more shock absorbers. A force neutral position of the flexible mounting apparatus is designed to be located on the predetermined ideal bar path line. The flexible mounting apparatus dissipates kinetic energy from the bar thereby reducing the bar's lateral motion relative to the ideal bar path line.The damping ratio of the mounting apparatus can be adjustable to alter the product's vibration mode to enable better control of the bar's lateral motion.

  17. Effective Higgs vertices in the generic MSSM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivellin, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    In this article we consider chirally enhanced corrections to Higgs vertices in the most general MSSM. We include the contributions stemming from bilinear terms, from the trilinear A terms, and from their nonholomorphic analogues, the A{sup '} terms, which couple squarks to the ''wrong'' Higgs field. We perform a consistent renormalization of the Higgs vertices beyond the decoupling limit (M{sub SUSY{yields}{infinity}}), using a purely diagrammatic approach. The cancellation of the different contributions in and beyond the decoupling limit is discussed and the possible size of decoupling effects which occur if the supersymmetry particles are not much heavier than the electroweak scale are examined. In the decoupling limit we recover the results obtained in the effective-field-theory approach. For the nonholomorphic A{sup '} terms we find the well known tan{beta} enhancement in the down sector similar to the one for terms proportional to {mu}. Because of the a priori generic flavor structure of these trilinear terms large flavor-changing neutral Higgs couplings can be induced. We also discover new tan{beta} enhanced contributions involving the usual holomorphic A terms, which were not discussed before in the literature. These corrections occur only if also flavor-diagonal nonholomorphic corrections to the Higgs couplings are present. This reflects the fact that the A terms, and also the chirality-changing self-energies, are physical quantities and cannot be absorbed into renormalization constants.

  18. On the Verge of One Petabyte - the Story Behind the BaBar Database...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Story Behind the BaBar Database System Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On the Verge of One Petabyte - the Story Behind the BaBar Database System The BaBar database ...

  19. Numerical Simulations of the Kolsky Compression Bar Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corona, Edmundo

    2015-10-01

    The Kolsky compression bar, or split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB), is an ex- perimental apparatus used to obtain the stress-strain response of material specimens at strain rates in the order of 10 2 to 10 4 1/s. Its operation and associated data re- duction are based on principles of one-dimensional wave propagation in rods. Second order effects such as indentation of the bars by the specimen and wave dispersion in the bars, however, can significantly affect aspects of the measured material response. Finite element models of the experimental apparatus were used here to demonstrate these two effects. A procedure proposed by Safa and Gary (2010) to account for bar indentation was also evaluated and shown to improve the estimation of the strain in the bars significantly. The use of pulse shapers was also shown to alleviate the effects of wave dispersion. Combining the two can lead to more reliable results in Kolsky compression bar testing.

  20. J Bar L Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name J Bar L Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility J Bar L Guest...

  1. W/Z + jets production at the tevatron {bar p}p collider (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: WZ + jets production at the tevatron bar pp collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: WZ + jets production at the tevatron bar pp collider You are ...

  2. Vertical tube liquid pollutant separators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, W.M.

    1982-06-08

    A plurality of elongated hollow, circular, foraminous substantially vertical tubes contiguously stacked transversely to the direction flowing liquid such as waste water containing foreign matter, I.E., settable solids and free oil, in a coalescer-separator apparatus provide a filter body providing for significant surface area contact by the liquid on both inside and outside surfaces of the tubes to entrap the foreign matter but defining substantially vertical passages permitting the entrapped foreign matter to be gravity separated with the lighter matter coalescing and floating upwardly and the heavier matter settling downwardly so that substantially clarified effluent flows from the apparatus. The stacked tube filter body is contained within an insulated closed container of a sufficient capacity, and the arrays of holes in the tube walls are coordinated with respect to the intended volumetric capacity of the apparatus, so that turbulence in the liquid flowing through the filter body is minimized.

  3. Vertically Integrated Circuits at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    The exploration of the vertically integrated circuits, also commonly known as 3D-IC technology, for applications in radiation detection started at Fermilab in 2006. This paper examines the opportunities that vertical integration offers by looking at various 3D designs that have been completed by Fermilab. The emphasis is on opportunities that are presented by through silicon vias (TSV), wafer and circuit thinning and finally fusion bonding techniques to replace conventional bump bonding. Early work by Fermilab has led to an international consortium for the development of 3D-IC circuits for High Energy Physics. The consortium has submitted over 25 different designs for the Fermilab organized MPW run organized for the first time.

  4. Webinar: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. ...

  5. Quarkonium Spectroscopy and New States from BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, L.; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2007-06-08

    We review results on charmonium and bottomonium spectroscopy by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. More space is reserved to the new results like the observation of hadronic non-B{bar B} {Upsilon}(4S) decays and the investigation on the production and decay properties of the recently discovered charmonium-like states X(3872) and Y (4260). These results are preliminary, unless otherwise specified.

  6. THE MASS PROFILE AND SHAPE OF BARS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): SEARCH FOR AN AGE INDICATOR FOR BARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Sheth, Kartik; Muoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Zaritsky, Dennis; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Holwerda, Benne; Ho, Luis C.; Comern, Sbastien; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Knapen, Johan H.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Hinz, Joannah L.; Buta, Ronald J.; Kim, Minjin; Madore, Barry F.; and others

    2015-01-20

    We have measured the radial light profiles and global shapes of bars using two-dimensional 3.6 ?m image decompositions for 144 face-on barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. The bar surface brightness profile is correlated with the stellar mass and bulge-to-total (B/T) ratio of their host galaxies. Bars in massive and bulge-dominated galaxies (B/T> 0.2) show a flat profile, while bars in less massive, disk-dominated galaxies (B/T? 0) show an exponential, disk-like profile with a wider spread in the radial profile than in the bulge-dominated galaxies. The global two-dimensional shapes of bars, however, are rectangular/boxy, independent of the bulge or disk properties. We speculate that because bars are formed out of disks, bars initially have an exponential (disk-like) profile that evolves over time, trapping more disk stars to boxy bar orbits. This leads bars to become stronger and have flatter profiles. The narrow spread of bar radial profiles in more massive disks suggests that these bars formed earlier (z > 1), while the disk-like profiles and a larger spread in the radial profile in less massive systems imply a later and more gradual evolution, consistent with the cosmological evolution of bars inferred from observational studies. Therefore, we expect that the flatness of the bar profile can be used as a dynamical age indicator of the bar to measure the time elapsed since the bar formation. We argue that cosmic gas accretion is required to explain our results on bar profile and the presence of gas within the bar region.

  7. New experimental techniques with the split Hopkinson pressure bar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, C.E.; Follansbee, P.S.; Wright, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    The split Hopkinson pressure bar or Kolsky bar has provided for many years a technique for performing compression tests at strain rates approaching 10/sup 4/ s/sup -1/. At these strain rates, the small dimensions possible in a compression test specimen give an advantage over a dynamic tensile test by allowing the stress within the specimen to equilibrate within the shortest possible time. The maximum strain rates possible with this technique are limited by stress wave propagation in the elastic pressure bars as well as in the deforming specimen. This subject is reviewed in this paper, and it is emphasized that a slowly rising excitation is preferred to one that rises steeply. Experimental techniques for pulse shaping and a numerical procedure for correcting the raw data for wave dispersion in the pressure bars are presented. For tests at elevated temperature a bar mover apparatus has been developed which effectively brings the cold pressure bars into contact with the specimen, which is heated with a specially designed furnace, shortly before the pressure wave arrives. This procedure has been used successfully in tests at temperatures as high as 1000/sup 0/C.

  8. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  9. Category:Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Flowmeter Test Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Vertical Flowmeter Test page? For detailed information on Vertical Flowmeter Test, click...

  10. Magnetometry of micro-magnets with electrostatically defined Hall bars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lachance-Quirion, Dany; Camirand Lemyre, Julien; Bergeron, Laurent; Sarra-Bournet, Christian; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2015-11-30

    Micro-magnets are key components for quantum information processing with individual spins, enabling arbitrary rotations and addressability. In this work, characterization of sub-micrometer sized CoFe ferromagnets is performed with Hall bars electrostatically defined in a two-dimensional electron gas. Due to the ballistic nature of electron transport in the cross junction of the Hall bar, anomalies such as the quenched Hall effect appear near zero external magnetic field, thus hindering the sensitivity of the magnetometer to small magnetic fields. However, it is shown that the sensitivity of the diffusive limit can be almost completely restored at low temperatures using a large current density in the Hall bar of about 10 A/m. Overcoming the size limitation of conventional etched Hall bars with electrostatic gating enables the measurement of magnetization curves of 440 nm wide micro-magnets with a signal-to-noise ratio above 10{sup 3}. Furthermore, the inhomogeneity of the stray magnetic field created by the micro-magnets is directly measured using the gate-voltage-dependent width of the sensitive area of the Hall bar.

  11. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ production cross section using dilepton events in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-05-01

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector. We consider final states with at least two jets and two leptons (ee, e{mu}, {mu}{mu}), and events with one jet for the the e{mu} final state as well. The measured cross section is {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.36{sub -0.79}{sup +0.90} (stat + syst) pb. This result combined with the cross section measurement in the lepton + jets final state yields {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.56{sub -0.56}{sup +0.63}(stat + syst) pb, which agrees with the standard model expectation. The relative precision of 8% of this measurement is comparable to the latest theoretical calculations.

  12. In situ study of the R{bar 3}c-R{bar 3}m orientational disorder in calcite.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antao, S. M.; Hassan, I.; Mulder, W. H.; Lee, P. L.; Toby, B. H.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of West Indies

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependences of the crystal structure and intensities of the (113) and (211) reflections in calcite, CaCO{sub 3}, were studied using Rietveld structure refinements based on synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data. Calcite transforms from R{bar 3}c to R{bar 3}m at about T{sub c} = 1240 K. A CO{sub 3} group occupies, statistically, two positions with equal frequency in the disordered R{bar 3}m phase, but with unequal frequency in the partially ordered R{bar 3}c phase. One position for the CO{sub 3} group is rotated by 180{sup o} with respect to the other. The unequal occupancy of the two orientations in the partially ordered R{bar 3}c phase is obtained directly from the occupancy factor, x, for the O1 site and gives rise to the order parameter, S = 2x - 1. The a cell parameter shows a negative thermal expansion at low T, followed by a plateau region at higher T, then a steeper contraction towards T{sub c}, where the CO{sub 3} groups disorder in a rapid process. Using a modified Bragg-Williams model, fits were obtained for the order parameter S, and for the intensities of the (113) and (211) reflections.

  13. STAR FORMATION IN NUCLEAR RINGS OF BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear rings in barred galaxies are sites of active star formation. We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the temporal and spatial behavior of star formation occurring in nuclear rings of barred galaxies where radial gas inflows are triggered solely by a bar potential. The star formation recipes include a density threshold, an efficiency, conversion of gas to star particles, and delayed momentum feedback via supernova explosions. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a nuclear ring is roughly equal to the mass inflow rate to the ring, while it has a weak dependence on the total gas mass in the ring. The SFR typically exhibits a strong primary burst followed by weak secondary bursts before declining to very small values. The primary burst is associated with the rapid gas infall to the ring due to the bar growth, while the secondary bursts are caused by re-infall of the ejected gas from the primary burst. While star formation in observed rings persists episodically over a few Gyr, the duration of active star formation in our models lasts for only about half of the bar growth time, suggesting that the bar potential alone is unlikely to be responsible for gas supply to the rings. When the SFR is low, most star formation occurs at the contact points between the ring and the dust lanes, leading to an azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters. When the SFR is large, on the other hand, star formation is randomly distributed over the whole circumference of the ring, resulting in no apparent azimuthal age gradient. Since the ring shrinks in size with time, star clusters also exhibit a radial age gradient, with younger clusters found closer to the ring. The cluster mass function is well described by a power law, with a slope depending on the SFR. Giant gas clouds in the rings have supersonic internal velocity dispersions and are gravitationally bound.

  14. Single Packaged Vertical Units | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Single Packaged Vertical Units Single Packaged Vertical Units The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards. Single Packaged Vertical Units -- v2.0 (103.53 KB) More

  15. Category:Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Vertical Electrical Sounding...

  16. ARM - Evaluation Product - Convective Vertical Velocity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In particular, vertical air motions associated with these processes are inherently linked to the life cycle of these convective systems and are therefore directly tied to their...

  17. Vertical Flowmeter Logging | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Vertical Flowmeter Logging Author U.S. Geological Survey Published USGS Groundwater...

  18. Vertical Flowmeter Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Vertical Flowmeter Test Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration...

  19. Single Packaged Vertical Units | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    standards. File Single Packaged Vertical Units -- v2.0 More Documents & Publications Room Air Conditioners Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment

  20. Vertical Circuits Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and intellectual property for the manufacture of low cost ultra high-speedhigh-density semiconductor components. References: Vertical Circuits, Inc.1 This article is a...

  1. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  2. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  3. Assessing Cloud Spatial and Vertical Distribution with Infrared Cloud Analyzer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Spatial and Vertical Distribution with Infrared Cloud Analyzer I. Genkova and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington T. Besnard ATMOS SARL Le Mans, France D. Gillotay Institute d'Aeronomie Spatiale de Belgique Brussels, Belgium Introduction In the effort to resolve uncertainties about global climate change, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (www.arm.gov) is improving the treatment of cloud radiative forcing and feedbacks in general

  4. Study of the Decays of Charm Mesons With the BaBar Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Study of the Decays of Charm Mesons With the BaBar Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of the Decays of Charm Mesons With the BaBar Experiment You are ...

  5. Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using CORBA Servers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optimizing Parallel Access to the BaBar Database System Using ...

  6. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyklinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Pernen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  7. Flow-Based Detection of Bar Coded Particles (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Flow-Based Detection of Bar Coded Particles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flow-Based Detection of Bar Coded Particles We have developed methods for flow control, ...

  8. Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle You are accessing a document from the ...

  9. Production of BaBar Skimmed Analysis Datasets Using the Grid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Production of BaBar Skimmed Analysis Datasets Using the Grid Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Production of BaBar Skimmed Analysis Datasets Using the Grid You are ...

  10. Searches for Light New Physics at BaBar (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Searches for Light New Physics at BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Searches for Light New Physics at BaBar Authors: ...

  11. Spreader-Bar Radiation Detection System Enhancements: A Modeling and Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, James H.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Baciak, James E.; Hensley, Walter K.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Robinson, Sean M.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Schweppe, John E.

    2012-11-13

    This report provides the modeling and simulation results of the investigation of enhanced spreader bar radiation detection systems.

  12. Calibration of a Hopkinson bar with a transfer standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, V.I.; Leisher, W.B.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1991-01-01

    During the past year, program field test temperatures, that are beyond the test accelerometer operational limits of {minus}30{degrees}F and +150{degrees}F, required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of {minus}50{degrees}F and +160{degrees}F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Since there is no NIST-traceable (National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable) calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000g--15,000g for the temperature extremes of {minus}50{degrees}F and +160{degrees}F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson bar with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The NIST accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is {plus minus}5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified by the Sandia Secondary Standards Division with an uncertainty of 6%. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jostlein, H.

    1997-07-15

    An automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine determines the accuracy of a coordinate measuring machine having at least one servo drive. The apparatus comprises a first and second gauge ball connected by a telescoping rigid member. The rigid member includes a switch such that inward radial movement of the second gauge ball relative to the first gauge ball causes activation of the switch. The first gauge ball is secured in a first magnetic socket assembly in order to maintain the first gauge ball at a fixed location with respect to the coordinate measuring machine. A second magnetic socket assembly secures the second gauge ball to the arm or probe holder of the coordinate measuring machine. The second gauge ball is then directed by the coordinate measuring machine to move radially inward from a point just beyond the length of the ball bar until the switch is activated. Upon switch activation, the position of the coordinate measuring machine is determined and compared to known ball bar length such that the accuracy of the coordinate measuring machine can be determined. 5 figs.

  14. Automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jostlein, Hans

    1997-01-01

    An automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine determines the accuracy of a coordinate measuring machine having at least one servo drive. The apparatus comprises a first and second gauge ball connected by a telescoping rigid member. The rigid member includes a switch such that inward radial movement of the second gauge ball relative to the first gauge ball causes activation of the switch. The first gauge ball is secured in a first magnetic socket assembly in order to maintain the first gauge ball at a fixed location with respect to the coordinate measuring machine. A second magnetic socket assembly secures the second gauge ball to the arm or probe holder of the coordinate measuring machine. The second gauge ball is then directed by the coordinate measuring machine to move radially inward from a point just beyond the length of the ball bar until the switch is activated. Upon switch activation, the position of the coordinate measuring machine is determined and compared to known ball bar length such that the accuracy of the coordinate measuring machine can be determined.

  15. Vertical transport and sources in flux models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Vertical transport in flux models in examined and shown to reproduce expected limits for densities and fluxes. Disparities with catalog distributions are derived and inverted to find the sources required to rectify them.

  16. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  17. Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster), NREL (National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System Two-vessel system for primary and secondary ... moves by gravity from top to bottom of reactor in plug-fl ow fashion * Residence time is ...

  18. Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home ... Google + Vimeo Newsletter Signup SlideShare Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine ...

  19. Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP, 2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At Rye...

  20. Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vertical Seismic Profiling At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Seismic Profiling At...

  1. Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Specialized company that builds vertical drilling equipment for the development of geothermal resources. References: Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH1 This article is a stub....

  2. Stabilization of the Vertical Mode in Tokamaks by Localized Nonaxisymm...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Stabilization of the Vertical Mode in Tokamaks by Localized Nonaxisymmetric Fields Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stabilization of the Vertical Mode in ...

  3. Rare Decays And Exotic States With BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, S.H.; /McGill U.

    2006-08-28

    Results from the BABAR experiment are presented for searches for several rare FCNC B and D meson decays, including the modes B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, B {yields} ({rho},{omega}){gamma} and B{sup +} {yields} (K,{pi}){sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. Limits on lepton flavor violation in neutrino-less {tau} decays are also discussed. Finally, results of BABAR searches for the strange pentaquark states {Theta}{sup +}(1540), {Xi}{sup --}(1860) and {Xi}{sup 0}(1860) are summarized.

  4. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  5. Calibration of a Hopkinson Bar with a Transfer Standard

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bateman, Vesta I.; Leisher, William B.; Brown, Fred A.; Davie, Neil T.

    1993-01-01

    A program requirement for field test temperatures that are beyond the test accelerometer operational limits of −30° F and +150° F required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of −50° F and +160° F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Because there is no National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000–15,000 g for the temperature extremes of −50° F and +160° F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson barmore » with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is ±5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified with an uncertainty of 6%.« less

  6. Cryogenic Pressure Vessels for H2 Vehicles Rapidly Refueled by LH2 pump to 700 bar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vessels for H 2 Vehicles Rapidly Refueled by LH 2 pump to 700 bar Salvador Aceves, Gene Berry, Guillaume Petitpas, Vernon Switzer Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CAMX meeting October 29 th , 2015 LLNL-PRES-678629 * Cryogenic H 2 Onboard Storage * Temperature as a Degree of Freedom in H 2 storage * LLNL Cryocompressed Project History * 350 Bar Test Vehicle Park & Drive Results * Current Project * 700 bar prototype (cryogenic) vessels * Refueling with LH 2 Pump * Test Vessel Cycling

  7. Simulation of Watts Bar Unit 1 Initial Startup Tests with Continuous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Simulation of Watts Bar Unit 1 Initial Startup Tests with Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Methods The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors* is developing ...

  8. DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington, DC - The Office of General Counsel was recently asked whether the Sudan Accountability and Divestment Act of 2007 barred the Department from considering a loan guarantee application...

  9. BaBar Status and Prospects for CP Asymmetry Measurements: Sin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    These results are obtained with approximately 232 million Upsilon(4S) yields Bbar B ... The perspectives of sin(2beta + gamma) measurement with bar Bsup 0 yields Dsup ...

  10. U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker...

  11. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Randy M; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Hill, David E

    2011-11-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor

  12. Chiral coupling constants {ital {bar l}}{sub 1} and {ital {bar l}}{sub 2} from {pi}{pi}phase shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ananthanarayan, B.; Buettiker, P.

    1996-07-01

    A Roy equation analysis of the available {pi}{pi} phase shift data is performed with the {ital I}=0 {ital S}-wave scattering length {ital a}{sup 0}{sub 0} in the range predicted by the one-loop standard chiral perturbation theory. A suitable dispersive framework is developed to extract the chiral coupling constants {bar {ital l}}{sub 1}, {bar {ital l}}{sub 2} and yields {bar {ital l}}{sub 1}={minus}1.70{plus_minus}0.15 and {bar {ital l}}{sub 2}{approx_equal}5.0. We remark on the implications of this determination to (combinations of) threshold parameter predictions of the three lowest partial waves. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  14. Distribution and kinematics of neutral hydrogen gas and the radio continuum emission in barred spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondrechen, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    VLA radio synthesis observations of three barred spiral galaxies, NGC 1097, NGC 1365, and M83 are presented. Neutral hydrogen spectral line observations were made, as well as continuum observations at wavelengths of 6 cm and 20 cm. The continuum observations of the bars of NGC 1097 and M83 reveal that the radio emission is coincident with the linear dust lanes in the bars, that it is non-thermal in origin, and is moderately polarized. These data show that the dust lanes are generated by shocks, confirming a major theoretical prediction of bar structure. Spectral line observations of the neutral hydrogen gas reveal many interesting properties of these galaxies. Direct observation of the gas flow in the bar of NGC 1097 confirmed the presence of noncircular motions, of similar magnitude, to those predicted based on the presence of the bar and its associated shocks. Noncircular motions in the spiral arms of NGC 1097 and NGC 1365 were also found. The distribution of neutral hydrogen gas in the three galaxies has two common properties. In each galaxy, the peak surface densities of hydrogen gas and the optical spiral arms are coincident. Also, there are rings of gas at radii just larger than the bar lengths in each galaxy, with the greatest concentration of gas occurring at the ends of the bars.

  15. Evidence for Spin Correlation in t(t)over-bar Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; la Cruz, I. Heredia-De; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.

    2012-01-19

    We present a measurement of the ratio of events with correlated t and {bar t} spins to the total number of t{bar t} events. This ratio f is evaluated using a matrix-element-based approach in 729 t{bar t} candidate events with a single lepton {ell} (electron or muon) and at least four jets. The analyzed p{bar p} collisions data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Combining this result with a recent measurement of f in dileptonic final states, we find f in agreement with the standard model. In addition, the combination provides evidence for the presence of spin correlation in t{bar t} events with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations.

  16. Bar coded air sample tracking and bar coded loose surface contamination sample tracking: How it can assist in compliance with the DOE`s new 10 CFR 835 and the NRC`s new 10 CFR 20 regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.H.

    1994-12-31

    The paper describes advance sample tracking and processing techniques which utilize bar code technology for field data collection and count room analysis. Techniques described by the paper include bar coded area air sampling, bar coded portable breathing zone air sampling, and bar coded loose surface contamination sampling. Bar coded sample tracking is explored to demonstrate how it can assist in compliance with new DOE 10 CFR 835 and NRC 10 CFR 20 requirements. Operation of portable bar code readers is explored to provide insight to the advantages of bar coded sample tracking and corresponding sample trending analyses. Case studies involving bar coded sample tracking systems which are in use at NRC facilities, DOE sites, and decommission projects are discussed.

  17. ARM - Evaluation Product - Vertical Air Motion during Large-Scale...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsVertical Air Motion during Large-Scale Stratiform Rain ARM Data Discovery Browse ... Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Vertical Air ...

  18. Offshore Ambitions for the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ambitions for the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia ... Offshore Ambitions for the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine HomeEnergy, News, News & Events, ...

  19. ISSUANCE 2015-8-28: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Single Package Vertical Heat Pumps, Final Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Single Package Vertical Heat Pumps, Final Rule

  20. Exclusive Initial-State-Radiation Production of the DDbar,D*Dbar, and D*D*bar Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    We perform a study of the exclusive production of D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* in initial-state-radiation events, from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, to search for charmonium and possible new resonances. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} and was recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II storage rings. The D{bar D}, D*{bar D}, and D*{bar D}* mass spectra show clear evidence of several {psi} resonances. However, there is no evidence for Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D} or Y(4260) {yields} D*{bar D}*.

  1. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Febriyani, Caroline Prijatna, Kosasih Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8 mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5 mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25 mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  2. Experimental comparison of retrofit vertical air collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, A.T.; Stickney, B.L.

    1980-01-01

    Two vertical air collector systems were built and monitored. One of these is a back-pass collector in which a layer of sheet metal serves as the absorber plate. The other is a front pass collector in which the wall surface serves as the absorber plate. The results demonstrate the importance of considering heat moving through walls even when storage of heat in the wall is of limited significance. With poorly insulated walls, heat is better able to move through the wall with a front pass collector, indicating that this type of collector is a more effective heating system.

  3. Long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choquette, Kent D.; Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting near 1300 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave below, at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al.sub.0.94 Ga.sub.0.06 As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the active region, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55.degree. C.

  4. Two-phase flow instabilities in a vertical annular channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babelli, I.; Nair, S.; Ishii, M.

    1995-09-01

    An experimental test facility was built to study two-phase flow instabilities in vertical annular channel with emphasis on downward flow under low pressure and low flow conditions. The specific geometry of the test section is similar to the fuel-target sub-channel of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Mark 22 fuel assembly. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was observed following flow excursion and flow reversal in the test section. Density wave instability was not recorded in this series of experimental runs. The results of this experimental study show that flow excursion is the dominant instability mode under low flow, low pressure, and down flow conditions. The onset of instability data are plotted on the subcooling-Zuber (phase change) numbers stability plane.

  5. Weldability, mechanical and corrosion properties of microalloyed reinforcing bars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, L. |; Hernandez, G.; Carpio, J.J.; Arganis, C.

    1994-12-31

    The first Mexican specification of low alloy reinforcing bars of weldable grade and optimal mechanical response during plastic deformation caused by earthquakes was issued in 1987. The modifications of the Construction Code of Mexico City after the 1985 earthquakes included the recommendation of using low alloy rebars as a first option for the reinforced concrete building main structural components. The low alloy rebars are fabricated employing low carbon steels microalloyed with niobium or vanadium in order to combine the weldability and high ductility of the low carbon steels with the high strength provided by the, microalloying elements. The present paper reports the results of a comparative study of standard (medium carbon) and microalloyed rebars considering features of microstructure, mechanical behavior, weldability and the electrochemical properties of these two materials embedded in plain and chloride contaminated concrete. The main differences were observed in microstructural features, mechanical behavior and weldability. The corrosion rate measurements of standard and microalloyed rebars are similar. The weldability of the rebars is discussed in terms of the better electrical connectivity of the reinforcement and cathodic protection.

  6. Measurements of the CKM Angle Alpha at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-04

    The authors present improved measurements of the branching fractions and CP-asymmetries fin the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0} decays, which impact the determination of {alpha}. The combined branching fractions of B {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and B {yields} K{sub 1}(1400){pi} decays are measured for the first time and allow a novel determination of {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay channel. These measurements are performed using the final dataset collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory. The primary goal of the experiments based at the B factories is to test the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) picture of CP violation in the standard model of electroweak interactions. This can be achieved by measuring the angles and sides of the Unitarity Triangle in a redundant way.

  7. Differential vent and bar actuated circulating valve and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brieger, E. F.

    1985-07-16

    A tool for use downhole in a borehole for carrying out a backsurging method whereby existing open perforations are cleaned. The tool comprises an annular body having spaced cylindrical walls, each of which reciprocatingly receives spaced pistons which move individually relative to one another. A port is formed through each of the walls of each of the cylinders with the first port being normally closed by a first piston and the second port being normally open. The second piston is moved to close the second port. The tool is placed on the end of a tubing string or within a tool string and run downhole into the borehole. A packer device enables the pressure between the lower annulus, the upper annulus, and the tubing to be adjusted relative to one another. A bar is then dropped down the tubing string, contacts the second piston and moves the second piston to cover the second port. The tubing pressure is reduced to provide a pressure differential between the lower annulus and the interior of the tubing. The first valve automatically opens when a predetermined pressure differential is achieved between the tubing and lower annulus, thereby providing a predetermined pressure differential across the old perforations, and cleaning debris therefrom upon the opening of the first port.

  8. Verification of Advective Bar Elements Implemented in the Aria Thermal Response Code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Brantley

    2016-01-01

    A verification effort was undertaken to evaluate the implementation of the new advective bar capability in the Aria thermal response code. Several approaches to the verification process were taken : a mesh refinement study to demonstrate solution convergence in the fluid and the solid, visually examining the mapping of the advective bar element nodes to the surrounding surfaces, and a comparison of solutions produced using the advective bars for simple geometries with solutions from commercial CFD software . The mesh refinement study has shown solution convergence for simple pipe flow in both temperature and velocity . Guidelines were provided to achieve appropriate meshes between the advective bar elements and the surrounding volume. Simulations of pipe flow using advective bars elements in Aria have been compared to simulations using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent (r) and provided comparable solutions in temperature and velocity supporting proper implementation of the new capability. Verification of Advective Bar Elements iv Acknowledgements A special thanks goes to Dean Dobranich for his guidance and expertise through all stages of this effort . His advice and feedback was instrumental to its completion. Thanks also goes to Sam Subia and Tolu Okusanya for helping to plan many of the verification activities performed in this document. Thank you to Sam, Justin Lamb and Victor Brunini for their assistance in resolving issues encountered with running the advective bar element model. Finally, thanks goes to Dean, Sam, and Adam Hetzler for reviewing the document and providing very valuable comments.

  9. Candidate events in a search for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{r_arrow}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}} oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athanassopoulos, C.; Auerbach, L.B.; Bauer, D.A.; Bolton, R.D.; Boyd, B.; Burman, R.L.; Caldwell, D.O.; Cohen, I.; Dieterle, B.D.; Donahue, J.B.; Eisner, A.M.; Fazely, A.; Federspiel, F.J.; Garvey, G.T.; Gray, M.; Gunasingha, R.M.; Highland, V.; Imlay, R.; Johnston, K.; Louis, W.C.; Lu, A.; Margulies, J.; McIlhany, K.; Metcalf, W.; Reeder, R.A.; Sandberg, V.; Schillaci, M.; Smith, D.; Stancu, I.; Strossman, W.; Sullivan, M.K.; VanDalen, G.J.; Vernon, W.; Wang, Y.; White, D.H.; Whitehouse, D.; Works, D.; Xiao, Y.; Yellin, S. |||||||||||

    1995-10-02

    A search for {bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}`s in excess of the number expected from conventional sources has been made using the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector, located 30 m behind the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility beam stop. The {bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}} are detected via {bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}} {ital p}{r_arrow}{ital e}{sup +}{ital n} with {ital e}{sup +} energy between 36 and 60 MeV, followed by a {gamma} ray from {ital np}{r_arrow}{ital d}{gamma} (2.2 MeV). Using strict cuts to identify {gamma} rays correlated with {ital e}{sup +} yields 9 events with only 2.1{plus_minus}0.3 background expected. A likelihood fit to the entire {ital e}{sup +} sample results in a total excess of 16.4{sub {minus}8.9}{sup +9.7}{plus_minus}3.3 events. If attributed to {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{r_arrow}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}} oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability of (0.34{sub {minus}0.18}{sup +0.20}{plus_minus}0.07)%.

  10. The environment of barred galaxies in the low-redshift universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Ye; Sodi, Bernardo Cervantes; Li, Cheng; Wang, Lixin; Wang, Enci E-mail: leech@shao.ac.cn

    2014-12-01

    We present a study of the environment of barred galaxies using a volume-limited sample of over 30,000 galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use four different statistics to quantify the environment: the projected two-point cross-correlation function, the background-subtracted number count of neighbor galaxies, the overdensity of the local environment, and the membership of our galaxies to galaxy groups to segregate central and satellite systems. For barred galaxies as a whole, we find a very weak difference in all the quantities compared to unbarred galaxies of the control sample. When we split our sample into early- and late-type galaxies, we see a weak but significant trend for early-type galaxies with a bar to be more strongly clustered on scales from a few 100 kpc to 1 Mpc when compared to unbarred early-type galaxies. This indicates that the presence of a bar in early-type galaxies depends on the location within their host dark matter halos. This is confirmed by the group catalog in the sense that for early-types, the fraction of central galaxies is smaller if they have a bar. For late-type galaxies, we find fewer neighbors within ∼50 kpc around the barred galaxies when compared to unbarred galaxies from the control sample, suggesting that tidal forces from close companions suppress the formation/growth of bars. Finally, we find no obvious correlation between overdensity and the bars in our sample, showing that galactic bars are not obviously linked to the large-scale structure of the universe.

  11. Control system for a vertical axis windmill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brulle, Robert V.

    1983-10-18

    A vertical axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90.degree. and 270.degree. to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  12. High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lazaratos, Spyridon K.

    1999-12-07

    A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

  13. Search for $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow WZ \\rightarrow l\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pani, Priscilla

    2010-07-01

    The high energy physics has made huge steps forward the comprehension of the inner most nature of our universe and the matter we are composed of. The experimental discoveries, and the theories of the last 50 years that the experimental discoveries had confirmed or inspired, made possible to build a theory of the interactions. Weak interactions have been discovered and unified with the Electromagnetic ones in the Standard Model, which is the most widely experimentally tested and confirmed model of this century. The only prediction which is still unconfirmed is the existence of a particle, the Higgs boson, which provides particles with mass, interacting with them, in a spontaneous symmetry breakdown that doesn't violate the natural gauge symmetry of the Lagrangian of the system. One of the ways in which the Standard Model has been tested during the last 20 years is by accelerating e{sup +}e{sup -} (LEP) or p{bar p} (Tevatron) particles in a circular ring and colliding them inside a detector which is designed to reveal the final reaction products. We now have two operating hadron colliders in the world. The Tevatron at Fermilab laboratory of Chicago, collides protons against anti-protons since 1989 and has reached its maximum energy in the mass center of 1.96 TeV since 2001. It has collected approximately 7 fb{sup -1} of data so far, that allowed important discoveries, as the top quark one, B{sub s} mixing, precision measurements of some of the Standard Model free parameters, e.g. the W mass, and search for New Phenomena. The LHC at CERN in Geneva is a proton proton collider and has started the data acquisition in March 2010, at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, thus beating the world record of the Tevatron. LHC however has not yet either the integrated luminosity nor the detailed understanding of the detectors to start investigating Higgs or di-boson production. The purpose of this work is to analyse the data of the CDF experiment at Tevatron to search for the

  14. Webinar: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Thursday, February 25, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

  15. The use of a beryllium Hopkinson bar to characterize a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1996-03-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. In this paper, the beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration with a laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement is described. The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of dc-50 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 70,000 g as determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar are presented. Preliminary results of characterizations of the accelerometers subjected to cross-axis shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration are presented.

  16. Application of bar codes to the automation of analytical sample data collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurgensen, H A

    1986-01-01

    The Health Protection Department at the Savannah River Plant collects 500 urine samples per day for tritium analyses. Prior to automation, all sample information was compiled manually. Bar code technology was chosen for automating this program because it provides a more accurate, efficient, and inexpensive method for data entry. The system has three major functions: sample labeling is accomplished at remote bar code label stations composed of an Intermec 8220 (Intermec Corp.) interfaced to an IBM-PC, data collection is done on a central VAX 11/730 (Digital Equipment Corp.). Bar code readers are used to log-in samples to be analyzed on liquid scintillation counters. The VAX 11/730 processes the data and generates reports, data storage is on the VAX 11/730 and backed up on the plant's central computer. A brief description of several other bar code applications at the Savannah River Plant is also presented.

  17. Observation in BaBar of a Narrow Resonance in the D{sub s} pi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the Dsub s pisup 0 System at 2317 MeVcsup 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation in BaBar of a Narrow Resonance in the Dsub s pisup 0 System at ...

  18. Chiral Anomaly Effects And the BaBar Measurements of the$\\gamma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...to pi0 Transition Form Factor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chiral Anomaly Effects And the BaBar Measurements of the gammagamma*to pi0 ...

  19. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitates specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.

  20. Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Mesh Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-01-24

    VAWTGen is a mesh generator for creating a finite element beam mesh of arbitrary vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWT). The software accepts input files specifying tower and blade structural and aerodynamic descriptions and constructs a VAWT using a minimal set of inputs. VAWTs with an arbitrary number of blades can be constructed with or without a central tower. Strut connections between the tower and blades can be specified in an arbitrary manner. The software also facilitatesmore » specifying arbitrary joints between structural components and concentrated structural tenns (mass and stiffness). The output files which describe the VAWT configuration are intended to be used with the Offshore Wind ENergy Simulation (OWENS) Toolkit software for structural dynamics analysis of VAWTs. Furthermore, VAWTGen is useful for visualizing output from the OWENS analysis software.« less

  1. EERE Success Story-Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules EERE Success Story-Raising the Bar for Quality PV Modules October 30, 2014 - 4:58pm Addthis As photovoltaics (PV) markets expand across the United States the manufacture of safe, reliable, and high-quality PV modules is critical to achieve cost competitive solar energy. Since the development and codification of testing standards for PV modules requires a lengthy multiyear process, Department of Energy's SunShot Initiative and National Renewable

  2. AmeriFlux US-Bar Bartlett Experimental Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Bar Bartlett Experimental Forest. Site Description - The Bartlett Experimental Forest (448170 N, 71830 W) is located within the White Mountains National Forest in north-central New Hampshire, USA. The 1050 ha forest extends across an elevational range from 200 to 900 m a.s.l. It was established in 1931 and is managed by the USDA Forest Service Northeastern Research Station in Durham, NH. The climate is humid continental with short, cool summers (mean July temperature, 19.8C) and long, cold winters (mean January temperature, 9.8C). Annual precipitation averages 130 cm and is distributed evenly throughout the year. Soils are developed from glacial till and are predominantly shallow, well-drained spodosols. At lowto mid-elevation, vegetation is dominated by northern hardwoods (American beech, Fagus grandifolia; sugar maple, Acer saccharum; yellow birch, Betula alleghaniensis; with some red maple, Acer rubrum and paper birch, Betula papyrifera). Conifers (eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis; eastern white pine, Pinus strobus; red spruce, Picea rubens) are occasionally found intermixed with the more abundant deciduous species but are generally confined to the highest (red spruce) and lowest (hemlock and pine) elevations. In 2003, the site was adopted as a NASA North American Carbon Program (NACP) Tier-2 field research and validation site. A 26.5 m high tower was installed in a low-elevation northern hardwood stand in November, 2003, for the purpose of making eddy covariance measurements of the forest–atmosphere exchange of CO2, H2O and radiant energy. Continuous flux and meteorological measurements began in January, 2004, and are ongoing. Average canopy height in the vicinity of the tower is approximately 20–22 m. In the tower footprint, the forest is predominantly classified into red maple, sugar maple, and American beech forest types. Leaf area index in the vicinity of the tower is 3.6 as measured

  3. Robotic platform for traveling on vertical piping network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A; Vrettos, Nick J; Krementz, Daniel; Marzolf, Athneal D

    2015-02-03

    This invention relates generally to robotic systems and is specifically designed for a robotic system that can navigate vertical pipes within a waste tank or similar environment. The robotic system allows a process for sampling, cleaning, inspecting and removing waste around vertical pipes by supplying a robotic platform that uses the vertical pipes to support and navigate the platform above waste material contained in the tank.

  4. Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Practices in Indian Country | Department of Energy Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country March 1, 2012 Las Vegas, Nevada Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best

  5. Summary of Convective Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Summary of Convective Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma Authors: Giangrande S. E. ; Collis, S. ; Straka, J. ; Protat, A. ; Williams, ...

  6. Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CONVENTIONAL ENERGY (OIL, GAS & COAL) FORUM & ASSOCIATED VERTICAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ... South, Las Vegas, NV 89119 The dynamic world of conventional energy (focusing on oil, gas ...

  7. An ultimate storage ring lattice with vertical emittance generated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: An ultimate storage ring lattice with vertical emittance generated by damping wigglers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An ultimate storage ring lattice...

  8. Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zohdy, Et Al.,...

  9. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics ... Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. ...

  10. Vertical Variability of Aerosols and Water Vapor Over the Southern...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vertical Variability of Aerosols and Water Vapor Over the Southern Great Plains R. A. ... Abstract We use Raman lidar profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, relative humidity, ...

  11. Instrument Development Tethered Balloon Sounding System for Vertical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tethered Balloon Sounding System for Vertical Radiation Profiles C. D. Whiteman J. M. Alzheimer G. A. Anderson M. R. Garnich W. J. Shaw Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, WA...

  12. LONG-TERM DYNAMICS OF RADIONUCLIDE VERTICAL MIGRATION IN SOILS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NUCLEAR POWER PLANT EXCLUSION ZONE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LONG-TERM DYNAMICS OF RADIONUCLIDE VERTICAL MIGRATION IN SOILS OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER ...

  13. Vertical Emmittance Studies at the ATF Damping Ring (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ... A primary purpose of the ATF Damping Ring is to demonstrate the small vertical emittance ...

  14. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  15. Free convective condensation in a vertical enclosure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, R.J.; Peterson, P.F.; Corradini, M.L.; Pernsteiner, A.P.

    1995-09-01

    Free convective condensation in a vertical enclosure was studied numerically and the results were compared with experiments. In both the numerical and experimental investigations, mist formation was observed to occur near the cooling wall, with significant droplet concentrations in the bulk. Large recirculation cells near the end of the condensing section were generated as the heavy noncondensing gas collecting near the cooling wall was accelerated downward. Near the top of the enclosure the recirculation cells became weaker and smaller than those below, ultimately disappearing near the top of the condenser. In the experiment the mist density was seen to be highest near the wall and at the bottom of the condensing section, whereas the numerical model predicted a much more uniform distribution. The model used to describe the formation of mist was based on a Modified Critical Saturation Model (MCSM), which allows mist to be generated once the vapor pressure exceeds a critical value. Equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and MCSM calculations were preformed, showing the experimental results to lie somewhere in between the equilibrium and nonequilibrium predictions of the numerical model. A single adjustable constant (indicating the degree to which equilibrium is achieved) is used in the model in order to match the experimental results.

  16. Vertical barriers with increased sorption capacities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradl, H.B.

    1997-12-31

    Vertical barriers are commonly used for the containment of contaminated areas. Due to the very small permeability of the barrier material which is usually in the order of magnitude of 10-10 m/s or less the advective contaminant transport can be more or less neglected. Nevertheless, there will always be a diffusive contaminant transport through the barrier which is caused by the concentration gradient. Investigations have been made to increase the sorption capacity of the barrier material by adding substances such as organoclays, zeolites, inorganic oxides and fly ashes. The contaminants taken into account where heavy metals (Pb) and for organic contaminants Toluole and Phenantrene. The paper presents results of model calculations and experiments. As a result, barrier materials can be designed {open_quotes}tailor-made{close_quotes} depending on the individual contaminant range of each site (e.g. landfills, gasworks etc.). The parameters relevant for construction such as rheological properties, compressive strength and permeability are not affected by the addition of the sorbents.

  17. Bistable laser device with multiple coupled active vertical-cavity resonators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-08-19

    A new class of bistable coupled-resonator vertical-cavity semiconductor laser devices has been developed. These bistable laser devices can be switched, either electrically or optically, between lasing and non-lasing states. A switching signal with a power of a fraction of a milliwatt can change the laser output of such a device by a factor of a hundred, thereby enabling a range of optical switching and data encoding applications.

  18. Enforcement Process Overview Changes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SAFETY AND SECURITY ENFORCEMENT PROCESS OVERVIEW CHANGES JULY 2016  The excerpts below show the changes made, in redline/strikeout, from the April 2015 version to the July 2016 version of the Enforcement Process Overview.  The page numbers below refer to page numbers of the July 2016 version of the document.  In the July 2016 version of the document on this website, the areas where these changes have been made are marked by a vertical line in the left margin. Page 25 Interview

  19. Measurement of the mass difference between $t$ and $\\bar{t}$ quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We present a direct measurement of the mass difference between t and {bar t} quarks using t{bar t} candidate events in the lepton+jets channel, collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's 1.96 TeV Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. We make an event by event estimate of the mass difference to construct templates for top quark pair signal events and background events. The resulting mass difference distribution of data is compared to templates of signals and background using a maximum likelihood fit. From a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb{sup -1}, we measure a mass difference, {Delta}M{sub top} = M{sub t} - M{sub {bar t}} = -3.3 {+-} 1.4 (stat) {+-} 1.0 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}, approximately two standard deviations away from the CPT hypothesis of zero mass difference. This is the most precise measurement of a mass difference between t and its {bar t} partner to date.

  20. Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

  1. Theoretic base of Edge Local Mode triggering by vertical displacements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z. T.; He, Z. X.; Wang, Z. H.; Wu, N.; Tang, C. J.

    2015-05-15

    Vertical instability is studied with R-dependent displacement. For Solovev's configuration, the stability boundary of the vertical instability is calculated. The pressure gradient is a destabilizing factor which is contrary to Rebhan's result. Equilibrium parallel current density, j{sub //}, at plasma boundary is a drive of the vertical instability similar to Peeling-ballooning modes; however, the vertical instability cannot be stabilized by the magnetic shear which tends towards infinity near the separatrix. The induced current observed in the Edge Local Mode (ELM) triggering experiment by vertical modulation is derived. The theory provides some theoretic explanation for the mitigation of type-I ELMS on ASDEX Upgrade. The principle could be also used for ITER.

  2. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, R. K.; Sivaraman, C.; Shippert, T. R.; Riihimaki, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate height-resolved measurements of higher-order statistical moments of vertical velocity fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  3. Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-06-01

    We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} < x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} < 10{sup -1} and 10{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, respectively. Results are presented for the region of {bar p}-momentum-loss fraction 0.03 < {zeta}{sub {bar p}} < 0.09 and a four-momentum transfer squared t{sub {bar p}} > -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

  4. T-615: IBM Rational System Architect ActiveBar ActiveX Control Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a high risk security vulnerability with the ActiveBar ActiveX controls used by IBM Rational System Architect.

  5. Search for a narrow t(t)over-bar resonance in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-14

    We report a search for a narrow t{bar t} resonance that decays into a lepton+jets final state based on an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set upper limits on the production cross section of such a resonance multiplied by its branching fraction to t{bar t}. We exclude a leptophobic topcolor Z' at the 95% confidence level for masses below 835 GeV (940 GeV) if its width is 1.2% (3%) of its mass. We also exclude color octet vector bosons (colorons) with masses below 775 GeV.

  6. I=1/2 and 3/2 K pi scattering in a qqq-bar q-bar potential model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Isgur; J. Weinstein

    1991-01-01

    We present the results of a study of I=1/2 and 3/2 K pi scattering based on our earlier analysis of the I=0, 1, and 2 pseudoscalar-pseudoscalar systems. While the latter systems formed KK-bar molecules in both I=0 and 1, here, with the same parameters, we find that neither K pi , K eta , nor K eta ' form bound states. Both I=1/2 and 3/2 phase-shift predictions are found to agree with experimental data. A shift in the mass and width of the ''bare'' qq-bar state K*{sub 0}is induced by the coupled-channel interactions, which also provide a physical source for the low-energy ''background'' phase shift normally introduced in analyses of K pi data.

  7. Bar impact tester for dynamic-fracture testing of ceramics and ceramic composites. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deobald, L.R.; Kobayashi, A.S.

    1991-07-01

    A bar impact test was developed to study the dynamic fracture responses of precracked ceramic bars, Al2O3 and 15/29% volume SiCw/Al2O3. Laser interferometric displacement gage data was used together with dynamic finite element analysis to determine the instantaneous crack length and the dynamic stress intensity factor, K sub ID(t), in the fracturing ceramic bars impacted with impactor velocities of 5.8, 8.0, and 10 m/s. The crack velocities increased from 1400 to 2600 m/s with increasing impact velocity. K sub ID(t) initiated at the expected dynamic fracture toughness and increased with time and with increasing impact velocity. The dynamic initiation fracture toughness and an increasing K sub ID(t) with time and increasing impact velocity were obtained.

  8. Measurement of the Electric Charge of the Top Quark in $\\boldsymbol{t\\bar{t}}$ Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2014-09-08

    We present a measurement of the electric charge of top quarks using $t\\bar{t}$ events produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Tevatron. The analysis is based on fully reconstructed $t\\bar{t}$ pairs in lepton+jets final states. Using data corresponding to 5.3 $\\rm fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity, we exclude the hypothesis that the top quark has a charge of $Q=-4/3\\,e$ at a significance greater than 5 standard deviations. We also place an upper limit of 0.46 on the fraction of such quarks that can be present in an admixture with the standard model top quarks ($Q=+2/3\\,e$) at a 95\\% confidence level.

  9. Proton Form Factors And Related Processes in BaBar by ISR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferroli, R.B.; /Enrico Fermi Ctr., Rome /INFN, Rome

    2007-02-12

    BaBar has measured with unprecedented accuracy e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} from the threshold up to Q{sub p{bar p}}{sup 2} {approx} 20 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 4}, finding out an unexpected cross section, with plateaux and drops. In particular it is well established a sharp drop near threshold, where evidence for structures in multihadronic channels has also been found. Other unexpected and spectacular features of the Nucleon form factors are reminded, the behavior of space-like G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} and the neutron time-like form factors.

  10. Search for {ital B}{r_arrow}l{bar {nu}}{sub l}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Stone, S.; Xing, X.; Zhu, G.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Egyed, Z.; Jain, V.; Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O`Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F.; Asner, D.M.; Athanas, M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Witherell, M.S.; Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ehrlich, R.; Elia, R.; Gaidarev, P.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Liu, Y.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Lingel, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; McLean, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Bellerive, A.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Spaan, B.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Momayezi, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Ling, Z.; (CLEO Co..

    1995-07-31

    We search for the decays {ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}l{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub l} in a sample of 2.2{times}10{sup 6} charged {ital B} decays using the CLEO detector. We see no evidence for a signal in any channel and set upper limits on the branching fractions of {ital B}({ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}){lt}2.2{times}10{sup {minus}3}, {ital B}({ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{mu}{sup {minus}}{nu}2;m{sub {mu}}){lt}2.1{times}10{sup {minus}5}, and {ital B}({ital B}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital e}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}){lt}1.5{times}10{sup {minus}5} at the 90% confidence level.

  11. Bringing the SciBar detector to the booster neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Alcaraz, J.; Andringa, S.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Catala, J.; Cervera, A.; Conrad, J.M.; Couce, E.; Dore, U.; Espinal, X.; Finley, D.A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Hayato, Y.; Hiraide, K.; Ishii, T.; Jover, G.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kurimoto, Y.; Kurosawa, Y.; /Columbia U. /Fermilab /KEK, Tsukuba /Barcelona, IFAE /Tokyo U., ICRR /Valencia U., IFIC /Kyoto U. /Los Alamos /Louisiana State U. /Stratton Mountain Sch. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Colorado U.

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the physics case for bringing SciBar, the fully active, finely segmented tracking detector at KEK, to the FNAL Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) line. This unique opportunity arose with the termination of K2K beam operations in 2005. At that time, the SciBar detector became available for use in other neutrino beam lines, including the BNB, which has been providing neutrinos to the MiniBooNE experiment since late 2002. The physics that can be done with SciBar/BNB can be put into three categories, each involving several measurements. First are neutrino cross section measurements which are interesting in their own right, including analyses of multi-particle final states, with unprecedented statistics. Second are measurements of processes that represent the signal and primary background channels for the upcoming T2K experiment. Third are measurements which improve existing or planned MiniBooNE analyses and the understanding of the BNB, both in neutrino and antineutrino mode. For each of these proposed measurements, the SciBar/BNB combination presents a unique opportunity or will significantly improve upon current or near-future experiments for several reasons. First, the fine granularity of SciBar allows detailed reconstruction of final states not possible with the MiniBooNE detector. Additionally, the BNB neutrino energy spectrum is a close match to the expected T2K energy spectrum in a region where cross sections are expected to vary dramatically with energy. As a result, the SciBar/BNB combination will provide cross-section measurements in an energy range complementary to MINERvA and complete the knowledge of neutrino cross sections over the entire energy range of interest to the upcoming off-axis experiments.

  12. Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States) and Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Delayen, Jean Roger [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

  13. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with any transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes

  14. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth; Arkin, Adam P.; et al

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with anymore » transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes. However, the current strategies for TnSeq are

  15. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1990-12-04

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 9 figs.

  16. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.; Battles, James E.; Hull, John R.; Rote, Donald M.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel.

  17. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with vertical alternating magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, R.J.; Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Battles, J.E.; Hull, J.R.; Rote, D.M.

    1988-06-17

    An apparatus for containing molten metal using a magnet producing vertical alternating magnetic field positioned adjacent to the area in which the molten metal is to be confined. This invention can be adapted particularly to the casting of metal between counter-rotating rollers with the vertical alternating magnetic field used to confine the molten metal at the edges of the rollers. Alternately, the vertical alternating magnetic field can be used as a flow regulator in casting molten metal from an opening in a channel. 8 figs.

  18. Study Compares Floating-Platform Options for Offshore Vertical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... deep-water vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs). This analysis uses a 5 MW VAWT topside design envelope created by Sandia to compare floating platform options for each turbine in ...

  19. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    49 Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman TR Shippert LD Riihimaki July 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work...

  20. Conservation assessment for the Siskiyou Mountains salamander and Scott Bar salamander in northern California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinikour, W. S.; LaGory, K. E.; Adduci, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-10-20

    The purpose of this conservation assessment is to summarize existing knowledge regarding the biology and ecology of the Siskiyou Mountains salamander and Scott Bar salamander, identify threats to the two species, and identify conservation considerations to aid federal management for persistence of the species. The conservation assessment will serve as the basis for a conservation strategy for the species.

  1. An overview of bar and seamless tubular microalloyed steels for structural application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aloi, N.E. Jr.; Luksa, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Medium-carbon (0.15 to 0.40 wt.% C) vanadium microalloyed steels produced as large-diameter bar and seamless tubular long products have been successfully applied to structural applications. Microalloyed steels such as WMA-65 and WMA-80 are designed to replace either quenched-and-tempered or hot-rolled carbon steels. Incentives for converting to microalloyed steels include reduced material and processing costs or allowance for smaller, lighter components through increased strength realized through microalloying. Structural steels that require good weldability are restricted to lower carbon and alloy levels and thus are excellent candidates for microalloyed steels. Processing of high-strength vanadium-carbonitride precipitation-strengthened ferrite/pearlite microalloyed steel long products includes controlling bar rolling of sizes from 50 mm (2 in.) to 305 mm (12 in.) OD, or tube piercing of sizes from 38 mm (1.5 in.) to 320 mm (12.5 in.) OD, and air cooling at the steel mill. Bar products may be subsequently forged where controlled processing must also be performed to meet the desired properties. Both bar and tubing products are described. Chemical composition, mechanical properties, and weldability of the processed microalloyed steels are also discussed.

  2. POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar has been postponed until further notice. The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

  3. Webinar February 25: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Thursday, February 25, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST). Strategic Analysis will present results of its cost analysis of onboard compressed hydrogen storage systems.

  4. Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. EST. Strategic Analysis will present results of its cost analysis of onboard compressed hydrogen storage systems.

  5. Study of the Exclusive Initial State RadiationProduction of the D \\bar D System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-07

    A study of exclusive production of the D{bar D} system through initial-state radiation is performed in a search for charmonium states, where D = D{sup 0} or D{sup +}. The D{sup 0} mesons are reconstructed in the D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, and D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay modes. The D{sup +} is reconstructed through the D{sup +} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} decay mode. The analysis makes use of an integrated luminosity of 288.5 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR experiment. The D{bar D} mass spectrum shows a clear {psi}(3770) signal. Further structures appear in the 3.9 and 4.1 GeV/c{sup 2} regions. No evidence is found for Y(4260) decays to D{bar D}, implying an upper limit {Beta}(Y(4260) {yields} D{bar D})/{Beta}(Y(4260) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 7.6 (95% confidence level).

  6. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud

  7. Measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ cross section at the Run II Tevatron using Support Vector Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehouse, Benjamin Eric

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation measures the t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section at the Run II CDF detector using data from early 2001 through March 2007. The Tevatron at Fermilab is a p$\\bar{p}$ collider with center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. This data composes a sample with a time-integrated luminosity measured at 2.2 ± 0.1 fb-1. A system of learning machines is developed to recognize t$\\bar{t}$ events in the 'lepton plus jets' decay channel. Support Vector Machines are described, and their ability to cope with a multi-class discrimination problem is provided. The t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section is then measured in this framework, and found to be σt$\\bar{t}$ = 7.14 ± 0.25 (stat)-0.86+0.61(sys) pb.

  8. From documentation to prediction: Raising the bar for thermokarst research

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rowland, Joel C.; Coon, Ethan T.

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that to date the majority of published research on thermokarst has been directed at documenting its form, occurrence, and rates of occurrence. The fundamental processes driving thermokarst have long been largely understood. However, the detailed physical couplings between, water, air, soil, and the thermal dynamics governing freeze-thaw and soil mechanics is less understood and not captured in models aimed at predicting the response of frozen soils to warming and thaw. As computational resources increase more sophisticated mechanistic models can be applied; these show great promise as predictive tools. These models will be capable of simulating the responsemore » of soil deformation to thawing/freezing cycles and the long-term, non-recoverable response of the land surface to the loss of ice. At the same time, advances in remote sensing of permafrost environments also show promise in providing detailed and spatially extensive estimates in the rates and patterns of subsidence. These datasets provide key constraints to calibrate and evaluate the predictive power of mechanistic models. In conclusion, in the coming decade, these emerging technologies will greatly increase our ability to predict when, where, and how thermokarst will occur in a changing climate.« less

  9. From documentation to prediction: Raising the bar for thermokarst research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowland, Joel C.; Coon, Ethan T.

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that to date the majority of published research on thermokarst has been directed at documenting its form, occurrence, and rates of occurrence. The fundamental processes driving thermokarst have long been largely understood. However, the detailed physical couplings between, water, air, soil, and the thermal dynamics governing freeze-thaw and soil mechanics is less understood and not captured in models aimed at predicting the response of frozen soils to warming and thaw. As computational resources increase more sophisticated mechanistic models can be applied; these show great promise as predictive tools. These models will be capable of simulating the response of soil deformation to thawing/freezing cycles and the long-term, non-recoverable response of the land surface to the loss of ice. At the same time, advances in remote sensing of permafrost environments also show promise in providing detailed and spatially extensive estimates in the rates and patterns of subsidence. These datasets provide key constraints to calibrate and evaluate the predictive power of mechanistic models. In conclusion, in the coming decade, these emerging technologies will greatly increase our ability to predict when, where, and how thermokarst will occur in a changing climate.

  10. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in ZH → μ+μ-b$\\bar{b}$ Production at DØ and Evidence for the H→ b$\\bar{b}$ Decay at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Jiaming

    2014-01-01

    search for ZH → μ+μ-b$\\bar{b}$ is presented, using a Run 2 dataset with an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 collected by the DØ detector. Selected events contain at least two reconstructed jets and a Z candidate reconstructed with two opposite-sign charged muons. Random forests of decision trees are trained to distinguish between signal and background events in two orthogonal b-tag samples. The ZH → μ+μ-b$\\bar{b}$b analysis is then combined with ZH → e+e-b$\\bar{b}$ analysis. For the combined results of ZH → ℓ+ℓ-b$\\bar{b}$b, no Higgs signal is observed, limits are set on the ZH cross-section BR(H→ b$\\bar{b}$) for different Higgs masses, from 90 to 150 GeV. For a Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV, the observed cross-section limit is 7.1 times the SM cross-section with an expected sensitivity of 5.1 times the SM cross section. The result of ZH → ℓ+ℓ-b$\\bar{b}$b channel has been combined with searches in other Higgs decay channels at the Tevatron, which led to the first evidence of H → b$\\bar{b}$.

  11. Weather Research and Forecasting Model with Vertical Nesting Capability

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-08-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with vertical nesting capability is an extension of the WRF model, which is available in the public domain, from www.wrf-model.org. The new code modifies the nesting procedure, which passes lateral boundary conditions between computational domains in the WRF model. Previously, the same vertical grid was required on all domains, while the new code allows different vertical grids to be used on concurrently run domains. This new functionality improvesmore » WRF's ability to produce high-resolution simulations of the atmosphere by allowing a wider range of scales to be efficiently resolved and more accurate lateral boundary conditions to be provided through the nesting procedure.« less

  12. One for the history books: NNSA Fellow sets the bar high and never gives up

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) One for the history books: NNSA Fellow sets the bar high and never gives up Wednesday, September 7, 2016 - 9:30am Dr. April Gillens leans in for a photo with Dr. James P. Clements, president of Clemson University, at commencement festivities. Image credit: Clemson University NNSA Fellow April Gillens has made history as the first African-American to receive a doctorate in Environmental Engineering and Science from Clemson University. This

  13. A Measurement of the Exclusive Branching Fraction for B → π K at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aspinwall, Marie Louise

    2002-02-01

    This thesis presents an exclusive measurement of the branching fraction B for the rare charmless hadronic B decays to πK final states. A sample of 22.57±0.36 million BB pairs was collected with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's PEP-II B Factory, during the Run 1 data taking period (1999-2000).

  14. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  15. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hadley, G. Ronald; Lear, Kevin L.; Awyoung, Adelbert; Choquette, Kent D.

    1999-01-01

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) device comprises one or more VCSELs with each VCSEL having a mode-control region thereabout, with the mode-control region forming an optical cavity with an effective cavity length different from the effective cavity length within each VCSEL. Embodiments of the present invention can be formed as single VCSELs and as one- or two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs, with either an index-guided mode of operation or an index anti-guided mode of operation being defined by a sign of the difference in the two effective cavity lengths.

  16. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shupe, Matthew

    2013-05-22

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  17. Recommendation and implementation of special seasonal flow releases to enhance sauger spawning in Watts Bar tailwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeager, B.; Shiao, Ming.

    1992-05-01

    In recent years sauger populations in Chickamauga Reservoir, as well as several other areas in the Tennessee River Valley, have suffered drastic declines in numbers. Based on field creel evaluations the fisherman harvest of sauger in Chickamauga Reservoir has declined from an estimated high of 66,000 fish caught in 1979 to 0 fish in 1989. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency began an aggressive effort in 1990 and 1991 to recover this population, as well as those of Ft. Loudon and Watts Bar Reservoirs, by stocking large numbers of fingerling sauger. This is however, only a short-term, stopgap measure. The decline in the population of Chickamauga Reservoir appears directly related to dramatically lower discharges from Watts Bar Dam during the recent drought. The primary factor affecting year-class strength (numbers of sauger successfully spawned in a year and reaching catchable size in subsequent years) is the amount of spawning habitat available in the month of April (the spawning season for sauger) at one particular site below Watts Bar Dam. This report documents studies aimed at optimizing sauger spawning in Chickamauga Reservoir.

  18. Optimization of Design and Manufacturing Process of Metal Foam Filled Anti-Intrusion Bars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Andrea; Mussi, Valerio; Strano, Matteo

    2011-05-04

    The role of an anti-intrusion bar for automotive use is to absorb the kinetic energy of the colliding bodies that is partially converted into internal work of the bodies involved in the crash. The aim of this paper is to investigate the performances of a new kind of anti-intrusion bars for automotive use, filled with metallic foams. The reason for using a cellular material as a filler deals with its capacity to absorb energy during plastic deformation, while being lightweight. The study is the evolution of a previous paper presented by the authors at Esaform 2010 and will present new results and findings. It is conducted by evaluating some key technical issues of the manufacturing problem and by conducting experimental and numerical analyses. The evaluation of materials and shapes of the closed sections to be filled is made in the perspective of a car manufacturer (production costs, weight reduction, space availability in a car door, etc.). Experimentally, foams are produced starting from an industrial aluminium precursor with a TiH{sub 2} blowing agent. Bars are tested in three point bending, in order to evaluate their performances in terms of force-displacement response and other specific performance parameters. In order to understand the role of interface between the inner surface of the tube and the external surface of the foam, different kinds of interface are tested.

  19. Effects of spiral arms on star formation in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-09-01

    We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the effect of spiral arms on the star formation rate (SFR) in nuclear rings of barred-spiral galaxies. We find that spiral arms can be an efficient means of gas transport from the outskirts to the central parts, provided that the arms are rotating slower than the bar. While the ring star formation in models with no arms or corotating arms is active only during around the bar growth phase, arm-driven gas accretion both significantly enhances and prolongs the ring star formation in models with slow-rotating arms. The arm-enhanced SFR is larger by a factor of ?3-20 than in the no-arm model, with larger values corresponding to stronger and slower arms. Arm-induced mass inflows also make dust lanes stronger. Nuclear rings in slow-arm models are ?45% larger than in the no-arm counterparts. Star clusters that form in a nuclear ring exhibit an age gradient in the azimuthal direction only when the SFR is small, whereas no notable age gradient is found in the radial direction for models with arm-induced star formation.

  20. U-165: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Spoof Address Bar URLs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two vulnerabilities were reported in Apple iOS. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. A remote user can spoof the address bar URL.

  1. Recent Results on D0 - Anti-D0 Mixing from BaBar and Belle (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Recent Results on D0 - Anti-D0 Mixing from BaBar and Belle Authors: Neri, Nicola ; Pisa U. INFN, Pisa Publication Date: 2013-06-04 OSTI Identifier: 1082815 Report ...

  2. Roles of Wind Shear at Different Vertical Levels, Part I: Cloud System Organization and Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qian; Fan, Jiwen; Hagos, Samson M.; Gustafson, William I.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-07-16

    Understanding of critical processes that contribute to the organization of mesoscale convective systems is important for accurate weather forecast and climate prediction. In this study, we investigate the effects of wind shear at different vertical levels on the organization and properties of cloud systems using the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model with a spectral-bin microphysical scheme. The sensitivity experiments are performed by increasing wind shear at the lower (0-5 km), middle (5-10 km), upper (> 10 km) and the entire troposphere, respectively, based on a control run for a mesoscale convective system (MCS) with weak wind shear. We find that increasing wind shear at the both lower and middle vertical levels reduces the domain-accumulated precipitation and the occurrence of heavy rain, while increasing wind shear at the upper levels changes little on precipitation. Although increasing wind shear at the lower-levels is favorable for a more organized quasi-line system which leads to enlarged updraft core area, and enhanced updraft velocities and vertical mass fluxes, the precipitation is still reduced by 18.6% compared with the control run due to stronger rain evaporation induced by the low-level wind shear. Strong wind shear in the middle levels only produces a strong super-cell over a narrow area, leading to 67.3% reduction of precipitation over the domain. By increasing wind shear at the upper levels only, the organization of the convection is not changed much, but the increased cloudiness at the upper-levels leads to stronger surface cooling and then stabilizes the atmosphere and weakens the convection. When strong wind shear exists over the entire vertical profile, a deep dry layer (2-9 km) is produced and convection is severely suppressed. There are fewer very-high (cloud top height (CTH) > 15 km) and very-deep (cloud thickness > 15 km) clouds, and the precipitation is only about 11.8% of the control run. The changes in cloud microphysical

  3. Search for New Bottomlike Quark Pair Decays Q Q-Bar to (T W- ) (T-Bar W -) in Same-Charge Dilepton Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; /more authors..

    2012-04-02

    We report the most restrictive direct limits on masses of fourth-generation down-type quarks b{prime}, and quark-like composite fermions (B or T{sub 5/3}), decaying promptly to tW{sup {-+}}. We search for a significant excess of events with two same-charge leptons (e, {mu}), several hadronic jets, and missing transverse energy. An analysis of data from p{bar p} collisions with an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the CDF II detector at Fermilab yields no evidence for such a signal, setting mass limits m{sub b{prime}}, m{sub B} > 338 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub T{sub 5/3}} > 365 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level.

  4. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  5. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsenseismic anisotropy parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-06-27

    The Sayers and Kachanov (1991) crack-influence parametersare shown to be directly related to Thomsen (1986) weak-anisotropyseismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crack density issmall enough. These results are then applied to seismic wave propagationin reservoirs having HTI symmetry due to aligned vertical fractures. Theapproach suggests a method of inverting for fracture density from wavespeed data.

  6. Cryogenic vertical test facility for the SRF cavities at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.; Liaw, CJ; Porqueddu, R.; Grau, M.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tallerico, T.; McIntyre, G.; Lederle, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.

    2011-03-28

    A vertical test facility has been constructed to test SRF cavities and can be utilized for other applications. The liquid helium volume for the large vertical dewar is approximate 2.1m tall by 1m diameter with a clearance inner diameter of 0.95m after the inner cold magnetic shield installed. For radiation enclosure, the test dewar is located inside a concrete block structure. The structure is above ground, accessible from the top, and equipped with a retractable concrete roof. A second radiation concrete facility, with ground level access via a labyrinth, is also available for testing smaller cavities in 2 smaller dewars. The cryogenic transfer lines installation between the large vertical test dewar and the cryo plant's sub components is currently near completion. Controls and instrumentations wiring are also nearing completion. The Vertical Test Facility will allow onsite testing of SRF cavities with a maximum overall envelope of 0.9 m diameter and 2.1 m height in the large dewar and smaller SRF cavities and assemblies with a maximum overall envelope of 0.66 m diameter and 1.6 m height.

  7. Novel vertical silicon photodiodes based on salicided polysilicon trenched contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminski, Yelena; Shauly, Eitan; Paz, Yaron

    2015-12-07

    The classical concept of silicon photodiodes comprises of a planar design characterized by heavily doped emitters. Such geometry has low collection efficiency of the photons absorbed close to the surface. An alternative, promising, approach is to use a vertical design. Nevertheless, realization of such design is technologically challenged, hence hardly explored. Herein, a novel type of silicon photodiodes, based on salicided polysilicon trenched contacts, is presented. These contacts can be prepared up to 10 μm in depth, without showing any leakage current associated with the increase in the contact area. Consequently, the trenched photodiodes revealed better performance than no-trench photodiodes. A simple two dimensional model was developed, allowing to estimate the conditions under which a vertical design has the potential to have better performance than that of a planar design. At large, the deeper the trench is, the better is the vertical design relative to the planar (up to 10 μm for silicon). The vertical design is more advantageous for materials characterized by short diffusion lengths of the carriers. Salicided polysilicon trenched contacts open new opportunities for the design of solar cells and image sensors. For example, these contacts may passivate high contact area buried contacts, by virtue of the conformity of polysilicon interlayer, thus lowering the via resistance induced recombination enhancement effect.

  8. A New Stochastic Modeling of 3-D Mud Drapes Inside Point Bar Sands in Meandering River Deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Yanshu

    2013-12-15

    The environment of major sediments of eastern China oilfields is a meandering river where mud drapes inside point bar sand occur and are recognized as important factors for underground fluid flow and distribution of the remaining oil. The present detailed architectural analysis, and the related mud drapes' modeling inside a point bar, is practical work to enhance oil recovery. This paper illustrates a new stochastic modeling of mud drapes inside point bars. The method is a hierarchical strategy and composed of three nested steps. Firstly, the model of meandering channel bodies is established using the Fluvsim method. Each channel centerline obtained from the Fluvsim is preserved for the next simulation. Secondly, the curvature ratios of each meandering river at various positions are calculated to determine the occurrence of each point bar. The abandoned channel is used to characterize the geometry of each defined point bar. Finally, mud drapes inside each point bar are predicted through random sampling of various parameters, such as number, horizontal intervals, dip angle, and extended distance of mud drapes. A dataset, collected from a reservoir in the Shengli oilfield of China, was used to illustrate the mud drapes' building procedure proposed in this paper. The results show that the inner architectural elements of the meandering river are depicted fairly well in the model. More importantly, the high prediction precision from the cross validation of five drilled wells shows the practical value and significance of the proposed method.

  9. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, V.I.; Bell, R.G. III; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125-fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical system. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two part study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. This paper reports the first part of the shock mitigating materials study. A study to compare three thicknesses (0.125, 0.250, and 0.500 in.) of seventeen, unconfined materials for their shock mitigating characteristics has been completed with a split Hopkinson bar configuration. The nominal input as measured by strain gages on the incident Hopkinson bar is 50 fps {at} 100 {micro}s for these tests. It is hypothesized that a shock mitigating material has four purposes: to lengthen the shock pulse, to attenuate the shock pulse, to mitigate high frequency content in the shock pulse, and to absorb energy. Both time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare the materials` achievement of these purposes.

  10. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. VIII. BARRED DISK GALAXIES IN THE CORE OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinova, Irina; Jogee, Shardha; Weinzirl, Tim; Erwin, Peter; Trentham, Neil; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Den Brok, Mark; Peletier, Reynier F.; Kleijn, Gijs V.; Graham, Alister W.; Carter, David; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Balcells, Marc; Guzman, Rafael; Hoyos, Carlos; Mobasher, Bahram; Peng, Eric W. E-mail: sj@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-02-20

    We use high-resolution ({approx}0.''1) F814W Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) images from the Hubble Space Telescope ACS Treasury survey of the Coma cluster at z {approx} 0.02 to study bars in massive disk galaxies (S0s), as well as low-mass dwarf galaxies in the core of the Coma cluster, the densest environment in the nearby universe. Our study helps to constrain the evolution of bars and disks in dense environments and provides a comparison point for studies in lower density environments and at higher redshifts. Our results are: (1) we characterize the fraction and properties of bars in a sample of 32 bright (M{sub V} {approx}< -18, M{sub *} > 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }) S0 galaxies, which dominate the population of massive disk galaxies in the Coma core. We find that the measurement of a bar fraction among S0 galaxies must be handled with special care due to the difficulty in separating unbarred S0s from ellipticals, and the potential dilution of the bar signature by light from a relatively large, bright bulge. The results depend sensitively on the method used: the bar fraction for bright S0s in the Coma core is 50% {+-} 11%, 65% {+-} 11%, and 60% {+-} 11% based on three methods of bar detection, namely, strict ellipse fit criteria, relaxed ellipse fit criteria, and visual classification. (2) We compare the S0 bar fraction across different environments (the Coma core, A901/902, and Virgo) adopting the critical step of using matched samples and matched methods in order to ensure robust comparisons. We find that the bar fraction among bright S0 galaxies does not show a statistically significant variation (within the error bars of {+-}11%) across environments which span two orders of magnitude in galaxy number density (n {approx} 300-10,000 galaxies Mpc{sup -3}) and include rich and poor clusters, such as the core of Coma, the A901/902 cluster, and Virgo. We speculate that the bar fraction among S0s is not significantly enhanced in rich clusters compared to low

  11. Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-30

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  12. Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

  13. Analysis of BaBar data for three meson tau decay modes using the Tauola generator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shekhovtsova, Olga

    2014-11-24

    The hadronic current for the τ⁻ → π⁻π⁺π⁻ντ decay calculated in the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory with an additional modification to include the σ meson is described. In addition, implementation into the Monte Carlo generator Tauola and fitting strategy to get the model parameters using the one-dimensional distributions are discussed. The results of the fit to one-dimensional mass invariant spectrum of the BaBar data are presented.

  14. Analysis of BaBar data for three meson tau decay modes using the Tauola generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shekhovtsova, Olga

    2014-11-24

    The hadronic current for the τ⁻ → π⁻π⁺π⁻ντ decay calculated in the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory with an additional modification to include the σ meson is described. In addition, implementation into the Monte Carlo generator Tauola and fitting strategy to get the model parameters using the one-dimensional distributions are discussed. The results of the fit to one-dimensional mass invariant spectrum of the BaBar data are presented.

  15. Friction of partially embedded vertically aligned carbon nanofibers inside elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aksak, Burak; Sitti, Metin; Cassell, Alan; Li, Jun; Meyyappan, Meyya; Callen, Phillip [NanoRobotics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas 77058 (United States)

    2007-08-06

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers partially embedded inside polyurethane (eVACNFs) are proposed as a robust high friction fibrillar material with a compliant backing. Carbon nanofibers with 50-150 nm in diameter and 20-30 {mu}m in length are vertically grown on silicon and transferred completely inside an elastomer by vacuum molding. By using time controlled and selective oxygen plasma etching, fibers are partially released up to 5 {mu}m length. Macroscale friction experiments show that eVACNFs exhibit reproducible effective friction coefficients up to 1. Besides high friction, the proposed fabrication method improves fiber-substrate bond strength, and enables uniform height nanofibers with a compliant backing.

  16. Vertical stability requirements for ARIES-I reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bathke, C.G.; Jardin, S.C.; Leuer, J.A.; Ward, D.J.; Princeton Univ., NJ . Plasma Physics Lab.; General Atomics, San Diego, CA; Princeton Univ., NJ . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    The vertical stability of the ARIES-I reactor design is analyzed with the NOVA-W, PSTAB, and TSC codes. A growth rate of {approximately}5.7 s{sup -1} is predicted for a vacuum vessel positioned behind the scrapeoff, first wall, and blanket (0.7 in inboard and 0.9 in outboard thickness) and acting as a passive stabilizer. A reactive power of {approximately}2 MV A would be required for active feedback coils located outside of the TF coils {approximately}3 m to correct a 50-mm vertical displacement of the magnetic axis. A multipolar expansion technique used in the TSC analysis is also used to examine options that minimize stored energy. 10 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Aeroelastically coupled blades for vertical axis wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paquette, Joshua; Barone, Matthew F.

    2016-02-23

    Various technologies described herein pertain to a vertical axis wind turbine blade configured to rotate about a rotation axis. The vertical axis wind turbine blade includes at least an attachment segment, a rear swept segment, and optionally, a forward swept segment. The attachment segment is contiguous with the forward swept segment, and the forward swept segment is contiguous with the rear swept segment. The attachment segment includes a first portion of a centroid axis, the forward swept segment includes a second portion of the centroid axis, and the rear swept segment includes a third portion of the centroid axis. The second portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced ahead of the first portion of the centroid axis and the third portion of the centroid axis is angularly displaced behind the first portion of the centroid axis in the direction of rotation about the rotation axis.

  18. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hadley, G.R.; Lear, K.L.; Awyoung, A.; Choquette, K.D.

    1999-05-11

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser device is disclosed. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) device comprises one or more VCSELs with each VCSEL having a mode-control region thereabout, with the mode-control region forming an optical cavity with an effective cavity length different from the effective cavity length within each VCSEL. Embodiments of the present invention can be formed as single VCSELs and as one- or two-dimensional arrays of VCSELs, with either an index-guided mode of operation or an index anti-guided mode of operation being defined by a sign of the difference in the two effective cavity lengths. 10 figs.

  19. Taxel-addressable matrix of vertical nanowire piezotronic transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Wu, Wenzhuo; Wen, Xiaonan

    2015-05-05

    A tactile sensing matrix includes a substrate, a first plurality of elongated electrode structures, a plurality of vertically aligned piezoelectric members, an insulating layer infused into the piezoelectric members and a second plurality of elongated electrode structures. The first plurality of elongated electrode structures is disposed on the substrate along a first orientation. The vertically aligned piezoelectric members is disposed on the first plurality of elongated electrode structures and form a matrix having columns of piezoelectric members disposed along the first orientation and rows of piezoelectric members disposed along a second orientation that is transverse to the first orientation. The second plurality of elongated electrode structures is disposed on the insulating layer along the second orientation. The elongated electrode structures form a Schottky contact with the piezoelectric members. When pressure is applied to the piezoelectric members, current flow therethrough is modulated.

  20. chang(1)-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Vertical Profile of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius from Multiple Spectral Channels F.-L. Chang and Z. Li Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada H. W. Barker Atmospheric Environment Service Dowsview, Ontario, Canada Introduction Cloud optical depth and droplet size are two important parameters required for understanding the radiative effects of clouds and their impact on climate (e.g., Fouquart et al. 1990). Numerous efforts have been made to retrieve the two parameters from

  1. Sandia vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) demonstrate offshore advantages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) demonstrate offshore advantages - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy

  2. Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    albedo and asymmetry parameter at Barrow. Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter at Barrow. Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Aerosols Efforts are currently underway to run and evaluate the Broadband Heating Rate Profile project at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site for the time period

  3. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P.; Lott, J.A.

    1994-09-27

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors. 5 figs.

  4. Electrically injected visible vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Richard P.; Lott, James A.

    1994-01-01

    Visible laser light output from an electrically injected vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VSCEL) diode is enabled by the addition of phase-matching spacer layers on either side of the active region to form the optical cavity. The spacer layers comprise InAlP which act as charge carrier confinement means. Distributed Bragg reflector layers are formed on either side of the optical cavity to act as mirrors.

  5. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  6. Innovative Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Rotors - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management

  7. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Modeling the vertical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    profiles of aerosol characteristics and radiative impacts over the ARM sites Modeling the vertical profiles of aerosol characteristics and radiative impacts over the ARM sites Chuang, Catherine DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chin, Steve DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in mediating the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. A global high-resolution aerosol modeling system developed by the Lawrence Livermore National

  8. Flow augmenters for vertical-axis windmills and turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, F.C.

    1981-03-10

    A windmill is disclosed, the windmill including a vertical shaft mounted for rotation about its longitudinal axis, a number of blades spaced circumferentially around the longitudinal axis, and being disposed generally parallel to the axis of rotation of the vertical shaft, and supporting arms extending radially outwardly from the vertical shaft for supporting the blades. The windmill also includes a first member connected to an upper end of one of the blades and defining a first surface having a leading edge with respect to the direction of movement of the blade and a trailing edge rearward of the leading edge, the leading edge being lower than the trailing edge. The first surface also includes an inside lateral edge and an outer lateral edge spaced radially outwardly from the inside lateral edge, the inside lateral edge being higher than the outer lateral edge. A second member is connected to the lower end of the blade and defines a second surface, the second surface having a leading edge with respect to the direction of movement of the blade and a trailing surface rearward of the second surface leading edge, the second surface leading edge being higher than the trailing edge. The second surface also includes an inside lateral edge and an outer lateral edge spaced radially outwardly from the second surface inside lateral edge, the second surface inside lateral edge being lower than the second surface outside lateral edge.

  9. Electrical generation using a vertical-axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, R.N.

    1982-12-01

    Traditionally, windmills have been of the propeller or multiblade types, both of which have their rotational axis parallel to the flow of the wind. A vertical-axis wind turbine has its rotational axis perpendicular to the flow of wind and requires no orientation to keep the rotor in the windstream. The vertical-axis wind turbine operates on the same principle as an airfoil and produces lift and drag as any airfoil. A newly designed 100-kW vertical-axis wind turbine has been operated for one year at the USDA Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, TX. The turbine has an induction generator and supplies power to a sprinkler irrigation system with excess power being sold to the electric utility. The turbine begins producing power at 5.5 m/s windspeed and reaches its rated output of 100-kW at 15 m/s. The unit has obtained a peak efficiency of 48% at a windspeed of 8 m/s or 81% of theoretical maximum. Using 17 years of windspeed data from the National Weather Service, the annual energy output is estimated at 200,000 kWh. The unit has experienced several operational problems during its initial testing. Guy cables were enlarged to provide greater stiffness to reduce blade stress levels, lightning shorted the main contactor, and the brake system required a complete redesign and modification. The turbine was operational about 60% of the time.

  10. Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    A new and improved stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel including a vertical feed combustion chamber for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack, a major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprising a water jacket for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid and for convection circulation of the fluid for confining the locus of wood fuel combustion to the bottom of the vertical gravity feed combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel extending from the laterally directed draft outlet affords delayed travel time in a high temperature environment to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air as an actively induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion and high temperature zone. Active sources of forced air and induced draft are included, multiple use and circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

  11. A new alternative in vertical barrier wall construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawl, G.F.

    1997-12-31

    A new proprietary vertical barrier wall system has been developed to revolutionize the construction process by eliminating many of the concerns of conventional installation method`s with respect to performance, installation constraints and costs. Vertical barrier walls have been used in the environmental and construction industries for a variety of purposes, usually for cut-off or containment. The typical scenario involves a groundwater contamination problem, in which a vertical barrier wall is utilized to contain or confine the spread of contaminants below the ground surface. Conventional construction techniques have been adequate in many applications, but often fall short of their intended purposes due to physical constraints. In many instances, the economics of these conventional methods have limited the utilization of physical barrier walls. Polywall, the trade name for this new barrier wall technology, was subsequently developed to meet these needs and offer a number of distinct advantages in a variety of scenarios by maximizing confinement and minimizing installation costs. Polywall is constructed from chemically resistant high density polyethylene (HDPE) plastic. It has proven in a half-dozen projects to date to be the most cost-effective and technically sound approach to many containment situations. This paper will cover the development of the technology and will provide a brief synopsis of several installations.

  12. Low profile, high load vertical rolling positioning stage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shu, Deming; Barraza, Juan

    1996-01-01

    A stage or support platform assembly for use in a synchrotron accurately positions equipment to be used in the beam line of the synchrotron. The support platform assembly includes an outer housing in which is disposed a lifting mechanism having a lifting platform or stage at its upper extremity on which the equipment is mounted. A worm gear assembly is located in the housing and is adapted to raise and lower a lifting shaft that is fixed to the lifting platform by an anti-binding connection. The lifting platform is moved vertically as the lifting shaft is moved vertically. The anti-binding connection prevents the shaft from rotating with respect to the platform, but does permit slight canting of the shaft with respect to the lifting platform so as to eliminate binding and wear due to possible tolerance mismatches. In order to ensure that the lifting mechanism does not move in a horizontal direction as it is moved vertically, at least three linear roller bearing assemblies are arranged around the outer-periphery of the lifting mechanism. One of the linear roller bearing assemblies can be adjusted so that the roller bearings apply a loading force against the lifting mechanism. Alternatively, a cam mechanism can be used to provide such a loading force.

  13. CS Chang

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CS Chang CS Chang FES Requirements Worksheet 1.1. Project Information - Center for Plasma Edge Simulation Document Prepared By CS Chang Project Title Center for Plasma Edge...

  14. Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

  15. Copper damage modeling with the tensile hopkinson bar and gas gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonks, D. L.; Thissell, W. R.; Trujillo, C. P.; Schwartz, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile damage nucleation in recovered copper tensile Hopkinson bar specimens has been modeled using the 2D EPIC code. The model has also been successfully applied to spallation gas gun data to greatly expand the pressure range. The split tensile Hopkinson pressure bar permits the creation of damage at fairly high strain rates (10{sup 4}/s) with large plastic strains (100%). Careful momentum trapping allows incipient damage states to be arrested and recovered for metallurgical examination. The use of notched samples allows the pressure - flow stress, or triaxiality, to be varied from 1/3 to about 1.2 to study the interplay of pressure and deviatoric stress. In this paper, we will concentrate on modeling the nucleation of ductile damage in pure copper (Hitachi). With the same material, we also study spallation in a gas gun experiment to obtain the nucleation stress under high pressure and small plastic strain. The goal of the modeling is to obtain a unified nucleation model suitable for both.

  16. Report on FY15 Two-Bar Thermal Ratcheting Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yanli; Jetter, Robert I; Baird, Seth T; Pu, Chao; Sham, Sam

    2015-06-22

    Alloy 617 is a reference structural material for very high temperature components of advanced-gas cooled reactors with outlet temperatures in the range of . In order for designers to be able to use Alloy 617 for these high temperature components, Alloy 617 has to be approved for use in Section III (the nuclear section) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A plan has been developed to submit a draft code for Alloy 617 to ASME Section III by 2015. However, the current rules in Subsection NH* for the evaluation of strain limits and creep-fatigue damage using simplified methods based on elastic analysis have been deemed inappropriate for Alloy 617 at temperatures above . The rationale for this exclusion is that at higher temperatures it is not feasible to decouple plasticity and creep deformation, which is the basis for the current simplified rules. This temperature, , is well below the temperature range of interest for this material in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) applications. The only current alternative is, thus, a full inelastic analysis which requires sophisticated material models which have been formulated but not yet verified. To address this issue, proposed code rules have been developed which are based on the use of elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) analysis methods and which are expected to be applicable to very high temperatures. These newly proposed rules also address a long-term objective to provide an option for more simple, comprehensive and easily applied rules than the current so called simplified rules These two-bar tests discussed herein are part of an ongoing series of tests with cyclic loading at high temperatures using specimens representing key features of potential component designs. The initial focus of the two-bar ratcheting test program, to verify the procedure for evaluation of strain limits for Alloy 617 at very high temperatures, has been expanded to respond to guidance from

  17. Sandia Vertical-Axis Wind-Turbine Research Presented at Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vertical-Axis Wind-Turbine Research Presented at Science of Making Torque from Wind ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Sandia Vertical-Axis Wind-Turbine Research ...

  18. Sandia and Partners Complete Phase I of a Vertical-Axis Deep...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I of a Vertical-Axis Deep-Water Offshore Turbine Study - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon ... Sandia and Partners Complete Phase I of a Vertical-Axis Deep-Water Offshore Turbine Study ...

  19. Hanford Disposal Facility Expands Vertically to Make Room for More Waste |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Disposal Facility Expands Vertically to Make Room for More Waste Hanford Disposal Facility Expands Vertically to Make Room for More Waste February 11, 2016 - 12:25pm Addthis This photo illustration of the conceptual view shows the vertical expansion of the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The large area on the right includes the uppermost surface of the vertical expansion, which will be shaped to form a crown and will be covered with a 2 percent grade and

  20. Vertical-axis wind turbines -- The current status of an old technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Vertical-axis wind turbine technology is not well understood, even though the earliest wind machines rotated about a vertical axis. The operating environment of a vertical-axis wind turbine is quite complex, but detailed analysis capabilities have been developed and verified over the last 30 years. Although vertical-axis technology has not been widely commercialized, it exhibits both advantages and disadvantages compared to horizontal-axis technology, and in some applications, it appears to offer significant advantages.

  1. Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arizona, Site | Department of Energy Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site Vertical Distribution of Contamination in Ground Water at the Tuba City, Arizona, Site (7.2 MB) More Documents & Publications Diffusion Multilayer Sampling of Ground Water in Five Wells at the

  2. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kalesse, Heike

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  3. Injector Cavities Fabrication, Vertical Test Performance and Primary Cryomodule Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Haipeng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Clemens, William; Davis, G; Henry, James; Macha, Kurt; Overton, Roland

    2015-09-01

    After the electromagnetic design * and the mechanical design ** of a β=0.6, 2-cell elliptical SRF cavity, the cavity has been fabricated. Then both 2-cell and 7-cell cavities have been bench tuned to the target values of frequency, coupling external Q and field flatness. After buffer chemistry polishing (BCP) and high pressure rinses (HPR), Vertical 2K cavity test results have been satisfied the specifications and ready for the string assembly. We will report the cavity performance including Lorenz Force Detuning (LFD) and Higher Order Modes (HOM) damping data. Its integration with cavity tuners to the cryomodule design will be reported.

  4. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  5. VERTICAL RELAXATION OF A MOONLET PROPELLER IN SATURN'S A RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, H.; Seiss, M.; Spahn, F. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Golm (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    Two images, taken by the Cassini spacecraft near Saturn's equinox in 2009 August, show the Earhart propeller casting a 350 km long shadow, offering the opportunity to watch how the ring height, excited by the propeller moonlet, relaxes to an equilibrium state. From the shape of the shadow cast and a model of the azimuthal propeller height relaxation, we determine the exponential cooling constant of this process to be {lambda} = 0.07 {+-} 0.02 km{sup -1}, and thereby determine the collision frequency of the ring particles in the vertically excited region of the propeller to be {omega}{sub c}/{Omega} = 0.9 {+-} 0.2.

  6. Torque ripple in a Darrieus, vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, R.C. Jr.

    1980-09-01

    Interaction between a steady wind and a rotating, Darrieus, vertical axis wind turbine produces time periodic aerodynamic loads which cause time dependent torque variations, referred to as torque ripple, to occur in the mechanical link between the turbine and the electrical generator. There is concern for the effect of torque ripple upon fatigue life of drive train components and upon power quality. An analytical solution characterizing the phenomenon of torque ripple has been obtained which is based upon a Fourier expansion of the time dependent features of the problem. Numerical results for torque ripple, some experimental data, determination of acceptable levels and methods of controlling it, are presented and discussed.

  7. Economic analysis of vertical wells for coalbed methane recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Previous economic studies of the recovery and utilization of methane from coalbeds using vertical wells were based on drainage in advance of mining where a single seam is drained with well spacing designed for rapid predrainage. This study extends the earlier work and shows that methane recovery costs can be reduced significantly by increasing well spacing and draining multiple coalbeds. A favorable return on investment can be realized in many geologic settings using this method. Sensitivity of recovery economics to certain development costs and parametric variations are also examined as are the economics of three methane utilization options.

  8. Numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tachimori, M.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical simulation model for vertical flow in geothermal wells is presented. The model consists of equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, for thermodynamic state of water, for friction losses, for slip velocity relations, and of the criteria for various flow regimes. A new set of correlations and criteria is presented for two-phase flow to improve the accuracy of predictions; bubbly flow - Griffith and Wallis correlation, slug flow - Nicklin et al. one, annular-mist flow - Inoue and Aoki and modified by the author. The simulation method was verified by data from actual wells.

  9. DOE Physical-Based Hydrogen Storage Workshop: Identifying Potential Pathways for Lower Cost 700 bar Storage Vessels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office hosted the workshop "Identifying Potential Pathways for Lower Cost 700 bar Storage Vessels" in Southfield, Michigan, on August 24, 2016, at the United States Council for Automotive Research. The objective of the workshop was to identify and prioritize specific and tangible research and development strategies that have high potential to lower the costs of composite overwrapped pressure vessels for 700 bar hydrogen storage to enable wide-spread commercialization of fuel cell electric vehicles.

  10. Threshold Switching Characteristics of Nb/NbO2/TiN Vertical Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuhan; Comes, Ryan B.; Wolf, Stuart A.; Lu, Jiwei

    2015-11-25

    Nb/NbO2/TiN vertical structures were synthesized in-situ and patterned to devices with different contact areas. The devices exhibited threshold resistive switching with minimal hysteresis and a small EThreshold (60~90 kV/cm). The switching behavior was unipolar, and demonstrated good repeatability. A less sharp but still sizable change in the device resistance was observed up to 150 °C. It was found that the resistive switching without Nb capping layer exhibited the hysteretic behavior and much larger EThreshold (~250 kV/cm) likely due to a 2-3 nm surface Nb2O5 layer. The stable threshold switching behavior well above room temperature shows the potential applications of this device as an electronic switch.

  11. Measurement of monoenergetic neutrons from the {bar p}d reaction at rest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwahori, J.; Kawaguti, M.; Yoshida, H.; Koike, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Kurokawa, S.; Takasaki, M.; Takeutchi, F.; Inoue, K.; Doi, K.; Fujitani, T.; Kozuki, T.; Kusumoto, H.; Nagano, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Omori, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Tsuchiya, M.; Ueda, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Chiba, M.

    1997-01-01

    To search for baryonium states, a highly sensitive experiment with good statistics has been carried out at KEK by using an antiproton beam, deuterium target, and time-of-flight counter together with a modularized NaI(Tl) detector. At the 4{sigma} level, no narrow peaks due to the production of baryonia in the {bar p}d{r_arrow}Bn reaction have been observed in the neutron spectra. At lower significance levels, however, we have observed four narrow peaks with 3.7{sigma}{minus}3.5{sigma}, and two at an even lower significance level, in different charge-multiplicity final states. The recoil momentum distribution of the neutrons has been extracted for the channel with zero charge prongs. The energy spectra for {gamma} rays in coincidence with the neutron have been also obtained. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Profiling of selenium removal in hydrogen ambient zone-refined tellurium bar using RF-GDOES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anil, G. . E-mail: anilpillai_99@yahoo.com; Reddy, M.R.P.; Prasad, D.S.; Ali, S.T.; Munirathnam, N.R.; Prakash, T.L.

    2007-01-15

    Ultrapure tellurium (Te) metal has become an important metal in the strategic sector for fabricating high performance infrared devices for thermal imaging and night vision cameras. Zone refining (ZR) is a proven technique for purification of Te. Selenium (Se), present as an impurity in Te, is not easily removed by ZR under normal conditions as the segregation coefficient (K) is around 0.44-0.50. Hence, ZR was performed in a hydrogen atmosphere, during which Se gets converted to hydrogen selenide at the molten moving zones and carried away into the sodium hydroxide scrubbers. In this study a radio-frequency glow discharge optical emission spectrometer (RF-GDOES) was used for determining the concentration of Se along the 56 cm Te zone-refined bar. It was observed that the initial concentration of 1100 ppb Se was decreased to 30 ppb after 2 cycles.

  13. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkins bar configuration. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1997-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil and rock penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reached the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. Here, a study to compare two thickness values, 0.125 and 0.250 in. of five materials, GE RTV 630, HS II Silicone, Polysulfide Rubber, Sylgard 184, and Teflon for their shock mitigating characteristics with a split Hopkinson bar configuration has been completed. The five materials have been tested in both unconfined and confined conditions at ambient temperature and with two applied loads of 750 {mu}{epsilon} peak (25 fps peak) with a 100 {micro}s duration, measured at 10% amplitude, and 1500 {mu}{epsilon} peak (50 fps peak) with a 100 {micro}s duration, measured at 10% amplitude. The five materials have been tested at ambient, cold ({minus}65 F), and hot (+165 F) for the unconfined condition with the 750 {mu}{epsilon} peak (25 fps peak) applied load. Time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare how these materials lengthen the shock pulse

  14. Investigation of novel decay B _____ ____(2S)____K at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schalch, Jacob; /Oberlin Coll. /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    We investigate the undocumented B meson decay, B{sup +} {yields} {Psi}(2S){omega}K{sup +}. The data were collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collier operating at the {gamma}(4S) resonance, a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV/c{sup 2}. The {gamma}(4S) resonance primarily decays to pairs of B-mesons. The BaBar collaboration at the PEP-II ring was located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and was designed to study the collisions of positrons and electrons. The e{sup -}e{sup +} pairs collide at asymmetric energies, resulting in a center of mass which is traveling at relativistic speeds. The resulting time dilation allows the decaying particles to travel large distances through the detector before undergoing their rapid decays, a process that occurs in the in the center of mass frame over extremely small distances. As they travel through silicon vertex trackers, a drift chamber, a Cerenkov radiation detector and finally an electromagnetic calorimeter, we measure the charge, energy, momentum, and particle identification in order to reconstruct the decays that have occurred. While all well understood mesons currently fall into the qq model, the quark model has no a priori exclusion of higher configuration states such as qqqq which has led experimentalists and theorists alike to seek evidence supporting the existence of such states. Currently, there are hundreds of known decay modes of the B mesons cataloged by the Particle Data Group, but collectively they only account for approximately 60% of the B branching fraction and it is possible that many more exist.

  15. Electromagnetic confinement for vertical casting or containing molten metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method adapted to confine a molten metal to a region by means of an alternating electromagnetic field. As adapted for use in the present invention, the alternating electromagnetic field given by B.sub.y =(2.mu..sub.o .rho.gy).sup.1/2 (where B.sub.y is the vertical component of the magnetic field generated by the magnet at the boundary of the region; y is the distance measured downward form the top of the region, .rho. is the metal density, g is the acceleration of gravity and .mu..sub.o is the permeability of free space) induces eddy currents in the molten metal which interact with the magnetic field to retain the molten metal with a vertical boudnary. As applied to an apparatus for the continuous casting of metal sheets or rods, metal in liquid form can be continuously introduced into the region defined by the magnetic field, solidified and conveyed away from the magnetic field in solid form in a continuous process.

  16. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; Novak, Jeff M.; Halvorson, Ardell D.; Arriaga, Francisco; Lightle, David T.; Hoover, Amber; Emerson, Rachel; Barbour, Nancy W.

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg⁻¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ⁻¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha⁻¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha⁻¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  17. FFTF vertical sodium storage tank preliminary thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, J.J.

    1995-02-21

    In the FFTF Shutdown Program, sodium from the primary and secondary heat transport loops, Interim Decay Storage (IDS), and Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) will be transferred to four large storage tanks for temporary storage. Three of the storage tanks will be cylindrical vertical tanks having a diameter of 28 feet, height of 22 feet and fabricated from carbon steel. The fourth tank is a horizontal cylindrical tank but is not the subject of this report. The storage tanks will be located near the FFTF in the 400 Area and rest on a steel-lined concrete slab in an enclosed building. The purpose of this work is to document the thermal analyses that were performed to ensure that the vertical FFTF sodium storage tank design is feasible from a thermal standpoint. The key criterion for this analysis is the time to heat up the storage tank containing frozen sodium at ambient temperature to 400 F. Normal operating conditions include an ambient temperature range of 32 F to 120 F. A key parameter in the evaluation of the sodium storage tank is the type of insulation. The baseline case assumed six inches of calcium silicate insulation. An alternate case assumed refractory fiber (Cerablanket) insulation also with a thickness of six inches. Both cases assumed a total electrical trace heat load of 60 kW, with 24 kW evenly distributed on the bottom head and 36 kW evenly distributed on the tank side wall.

  18. Vertical dispersion of inertial waves in the upper ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenstein, D.M.

    1983-05-20

    A linear model of the vertical dispersion of near-inertial waves is developed. A porosity distribution near the bottom of the computational domain minimizes bottom reflections and simulates an ocean of the infinite depth. The model is used to show that the vertical dispersion of near-inertial waves in the upper ocean may, under certain conditions, contribute significanlty to the observed rapid decay of inertial oscillations in the surface layer. The kinetic energy of inertial oscillations at mid-latitudes decays with an e folding time scale of 10 days or less, when the parameter lambda(km)/N(cph)d(m) is less than or of the order of unity, where lambda is the wavelength of the wind-generated near-inertial waves, N is the Vaeisaelae frequency in the upper pycnocline, and d is the surface layer thickness. At the top of the pycnocline the model predicts a velocity maximum, which develops as energy propagates downward, out of the surface layer. However, when the upper pycnocline is sufficiently peaked, a resonant frequency interference effect is predicted. This effect modulates the dissipation of surface layer inertial oscillations, and their magnitude after a storm need not decay monotonically. We also make qualitative comparisons with deep-ocean current meter observations taken during the Mixed Layer Experiment (MILE) and with shallow water (105 m) observations taken in the Baltic Sea.

  19. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; et al

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the earmore » averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg⁻¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ⁻¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha⁻¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha⁻¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.« less

  20. Control system for a vertical-axis windmill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brulle, R.V.

    1981-09-03

    A vertical-axis windmill having a rotating structure is provided with a series of articulated vertical blades whose positions are controlled to maintain a constant RPM for the rotating structure, when wind speed is sufficient. A microprocessor controller is used to process information on wind speed, wind direction and RPM of the rotating structure to develop an electrical signal for establishing blade position. The preferred embodiment of the invention, when connected to a utility grid, is designed to generate 40 kilowatts of power when exposed to a 20 mile per hour wind. The control system for the windmill includes electrical blade actuators that modulate the blades of the rotating structure. Blade modulation controls the blade angle of attack, which in turn controls the RPM of the rotor. In the preferred embodiment, the microprocessor controller provides the operation logic and control functions. A wind speed sensor provides inputs to start or stop the windmill, and a wind direction sensor is used to keep the blade flip region at 90 and 270/sup 0/ to the wind. The control system is designed to maintain constant rotor RPM when wind speed is between 10 and 40 miles per hour.

  1. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane M. F. Johnson; Douglas L. Karlen; Garold L. Gresham; Keri B. Cantrell; David W. Archer; Brian J. Wienhold; Gary E. Varvel; David A. Laird; John Baker; Tyson E. Ochsner; Jeff M. Novak; Ardell D. Halvorson; Francisco Arriaga; David T. Lightle; Amber Hoover; Rachel Emerson; Nancy W. Barbour

    2014-11-01

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 0.40 MJ kg?, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?, but it would be only 1000 L ha? if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  2. Thrust stand for vertically oriented electric propulsion performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-11-15

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A noncontact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy-current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN level thrusts, while those tests conducted on a 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  3. Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hill, Richard C.

    1982-01-01

    A stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel includes a vertical feed combustion chamber (15) for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack. A major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprises a water jacket (14) for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid for convection circulation of the fluid. The locus (31) of wood fuel combustion is thereby confined to the refractory base of the combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel (34) extending laterally from the base of the chamber affords delayed travel time in a high temperature refractory environment sufficient to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air prior to extraction of heat in heat exchanger (16). Induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion chamber and refractory high temperature zone to the heat exchanger and flue. Also included are active sources of forced air and induced draft, multiple circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

  4. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plateau 376-7435 Class of Change I - Signatories X II - Executive Manager III - Project Manager Change Title Modify Tri-Party Agreement Milestone Series M-015 in...

  5. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plateau 376-7435 Class of Change X I - Signatories II - Executive Manager III - Project Manager Change Title Modify Tri-Party Agreement Milestone Series M-020 in...

  6. Application of the Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Seismic Property Characterization of Hydrate-bearing Sand Undergoing Water Saturation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2011-05-03

    Conventional resonant bar tests allow the measurement of seismic properties of rocks and sediments at low frequencies (several kilohertz). However, the tests require a long, slender sample which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface and weak and fractured formations. We present an alternative low-frequency measurement technique to the conventional resonant bar tests. This technique involves a jacketed core sample placed between a pair of long, metal extension rods with attached seismic source and receiver—the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the added length and mass to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The proposed “Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB)” test is applied in two steps. In the first step, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the system are measured. Then, numerical inversions for the compressional and shear wave velocities and attenuation are performed. We initially applied the SHRB test to synthetic materials (plastics) for testing its accuracy, then used it for measuring the seismic velocities and attenuation of a rock core containing supercritical CO{sub 2}, and a sediment core while methane hydrate formed in the pore space.

  7. Failure of zinc-plated self-tapping screws and Belleville washers used to install spoiler bars in cast iron dryers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruscato, R.M.; Herro, H.M.

    1999-07-01

    During a routine internal inspection of 39 dryers containing spoiler bars, hundreds of broken self-tapping screws used to install those bars were found. Many other screws, as well as many Belleville washers, which spring load the bar assembly against the shell, were found to be severely cracked. The spoiler bar system had been in service for 27 months. Fortunately, none of the bars had broken loose inside the dryers. Failures were the result of hydrogen embrittlement which produced the cracking. Hydrogen was produced by a galvanic corrosion cell established between the zinc plating and the hardened washers and hardened self-tapping screws. Minor chemical/pH upset conditions typical in paper mill steam systems may have accelerated the activity of the galvanic cell. This, in turn, enhanced the evolution of hydrogen. Once the zinc was consumed, hydrogen evolution ceased, and the driving force for cracking was eliminated.

  8. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  9. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber Based Biosensor Platform for Glucose Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamun, Khandaker Abdullah Al; Tulip, Fahmida S; Macarthur, Kimberly C; McFarlane, Nicole M; Islam, Syed K

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) have recently become an important tool for biosensor design. Carbon nanofibers (CNF) have excellent conductive and structural properties with many irregularities and defect sites in addition to exposed carboxyl groups throughout their surfaces. These properties allow a better immobilization matrix compared to carbon nanotubes and offer better resolution when compared with the FET-based biosensors. VACNFs can be deterministically grown on silicon substrates allowing optimization of the structures for various biosensor applications. Two VACNF electrode architectures have been employed in this study and a comparison of their performances has been made in terms of sensitivity, sensing limitations, dynamic range, and response time. The usage of VACNF platform as a glucose sensor has been verified in this study by selecting an optimum architecture based on the VACNF forest density. Read More: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0129156414500062

  10. 3-D laser patterning process utilizing horizontal and vertical patterning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malba, Vincent; Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    A process which vastly improves the 3-D patterning capability of laser pantography (computer controlled laser direct-write patterning). The process uses commercially available electrodeposited photoresist (EDPR) to pattern 3-D surfaces. The EDPR covers the surface of a metal layer conformally, coating the vertical as well as horizontal surfaces. A laser pantograph then patterns the EDPR, which is subsequently developed in a standard, commercially available developer, leaving patterned trench areas in the EDPR. The metal layer thereunder is now exposed in the trench areas and masked in others, and thereafter can be etched to form the desired pattern (subtractive process), or can be plated with metal (additive process), followed by a resist stripping, and removal of the remaining field metal (additive process). This improved laser pantograph process is simpler, faster, move manufacturable, and requires no micro-machining.

  11. Test reports for K Basins vertical fuel handling tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meling, T.A.

    1995-02-01

    The vertical fuel handling tools, for moving N Reactor fuel elements, were tested in the 305 Building Cold Test Facility (CTF) in the 300 Area. After fabrication was complete, the tools were functionally tested in the CTF using simulated N Reactor fuel rods (inner and outer elements). The tools were successful in picking up the simulated N Reactor fuel rods. These tools were also load tested using a 62 pound dummy to test the structural integrity of each assembly. The tools passed each of these tests, based on the performance objectives. Finally, the tools were subjected to an operations acceptance test where K Basins Operations personnel operated the tool to determine its durability and usefulness. Operations personnel were satisfied with the tools. Identified open items included the absence of a float during testing, and documentation required prior to actual use of the tools in the 100 K fuel storage basin.

  12. Turbulent natural and mixed convection along a vertical plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Mulaweh, H.I.; Armaly, B.F.; Chen, T.S.; Zhao, J.Z.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of turbulent boundary-layer air flow in natural and mixed convection adjacent to an isothermal vertical flat plate are reported. Laser-Doppler velocimeter and cold wire anemometer were used, respectively, to measure simultaneously the mean turbulent velocity and temperature distributions were measured for a temperature difference, {Delta}T, of 30 C between the heated wall and the free stream air at a fixed location x = 3 m (with a corresponding Grashof number Gr{sub x} = 8.55 x 10{sup 10}), and for a range of free stream velocities 0 m/s {le} U{sub {infinity} } {le} 0.41 m/s. The effect of small free stream velocity on the turbulent natural convection is examined. These results reveal that the introduction of small free stream velocity on turbulent natural convection flow suppresses turbulence and decreases the heat transfer rate from the heated wall.

  13. Assessment of CCFL model of RELAP5/MOD3 against simple vertical tubes and rod bundle tests. International Agreement Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, S.; Arne, N.; Chung, B.D.; Kim, H.J.

    1993-06-01

    The CCFL model used in RELAP5/MOD3 version 5m5 has been assessed against simple vertical tubes and bundle tests performed at a facility of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The effect of changes in tube diameter and nodalization of tube section were investigated. The roles of interfacial drags on the flooding characteristics are discussed. Differences between the calculation and the experiment are also discussed. A comparison between model assessment results and the test data showed that the calculated value lay well on the experimental flooding curve specified by user, but the pressure jump before onset of flooding was not calculated.

  14. Energy harvesting from coherent resonance of horizontal vibration of beam excited by vertical base motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, C. B.; Qin, W. Y.

    2014-09-15

    This letter investigates the energy harvesting from the horizontal coherent resonance of a vertical cantilever beam subjected to the vertical base excitation. The potential energy of the system has two symmetric potential wells. So, under vertical excitation, the system can jump between two potential wells, which will lead to the large vibration in horizontal direction. Two piezoelectric patches are pasted to harvest the energy. From experiment, it is found that the vertical excitation can make the beam turn to be bistable. The system can transform vertical vibration into horizontal vibration of low frequency when excited by harmonic motion. The horizontal coherence resonance can be observed when excited by a vertical white noise. The corresponding output voltages of piezoelectric films reach high values.

  15. Vertical air motions over the Tropical Western Pacific for validating cloud resolving and regional models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Christopher R.

    2015-03-16

    The objective of this project was to estimate the vertical air motion using Doppler velocity spectra from two side-by-side vertically pointing radars. The retrieval technique was applied to two different sets of radars. This first set was 50- and 920-MHz vertically pointing radars near Darwin, Australia. The second set was 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz vertically pointing radars deployed at SGP for MC3E. The retrieval technique uses the longer wavelength radar (50 or 449 MHz) to observe both the vertical air motion and precipitation motion while the shorter wavelength radar (920 MHz or 2.8 GHz) observes just the precipitation motion. By analyzing their Doppler velocity spectra, the precipitation signal in the 920 MHz or 2.8 GHz radar is used to mask-out the precipitation signal in the 50 or 449 MHz radar spectra, leaving just the vertical air motion signal.

  16. Integration of photoactive and electroactive components with vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, Robert P.; Esherick, Peter; Jewell, Jack L.; Lear, Kevin L.; Olbright, Gregory R.

    1997-01-01

    A monolithically integrated optoelectronic device is provided which integrates a vertical cavity surface emitting laser and either a photosensitive or an electrosensitive device either as input or output to the vertical cavity surface emitting laser either in parallel or series connection. Both vertical and side-by-side arrangements are disclosed, and optical and electronic feedback means are provided. Arrays of these devices can be configured to enable optical computing and neural network applications.

  17. Integration of photoactive and electroactive components with vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Esherick, P.; Jewell, J.L.; Lear, K.L.; Olbright, G.R.

    1997-04-29

    A monolithically integrated optoelectronic device is provided which integrates a vertical cavity surface emitting laser and either a photosensitive or an electrosensitive device either as input or output to the vertical cavity surface emitting laser either in parallel or series connection. Both vertical and side-by-side arrangements are disclosed, and optical and electronic feedback means are provided. Arrays of these devices can be configured to enable optical computing and neural network applications. 9 figs.

  18. Measurement of the branching ratio of B¯→D(*)τ−ν¯τ relative to (B)over bar to B¯→D(*)ℓ−ν¯ℓ decays with hadronic tagging at Belle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huschle, Matthias J.; Kuhr, Thomas; Heck, M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, Kirill; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, Alexey; Gillard, R.; Glattaur, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Grygier, J.; Hamer, P.; Hara, K.; Hara, Takanori; Hasenbusch, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Heider, M.; Heller, A.; Horiguchi, T.; Hou, W. S.; Hsu, C. L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Keck, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Nakako; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, Hideki; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, Subhashree; Moll, A.; Moon, H K.; Mussa, R.; Nakamura, KR; Nakano, E.; Nakao, Mikihiko; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, Shohei; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Oswald, Christian; Pakhlova, Galina; Pal, Bilas K.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, Alan J.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, Martin E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Simon, F.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sokolov, A.; Solovyeva, Elena; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Steder, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, Eun Il; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, Jared AK; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yook, Youngmin; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-10-26

    Belle II paper 450 We report a measurement of the branching fraction ratios R(D)(()*)) of (B) over bar

  19. Annual radiological environmental monitoring report: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, 1992. Operations Services/Technical Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report describes the preoperational environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN) in 1992. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas that will not be influenced by plant operations. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. During plant operations, results from stations near the plant will be compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts to the public. Exposures calculated from environmental samples were contributed by naturally occurring radioactive materials, from materials commonly found in the environment as a result of atmospheric fallout, or from the operation of other nuclear facilities in the area. Since WBN has not operated, there has been no contribution of radioactivity from the plant to the environment.

  20. Watts Bar Unit 1 Cycle Zero Power Physics Tests Analysis with VERA-CS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehin, Jess C; Godfrey, Andrew T; Evans, Thomas M; Hamilton, Steven P; Francheschini, F.

    2014-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is developing a collection of methods and software products known as VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, including a core simulation capability called VERA-CS. A key milestone for this endeavor is to validate VERA against measurements from operating nuclear power reactors. The first step in validation against plant data is to determine the ability of VERA to accurately simulate the initial startup physics tests for Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 (WBN1) cycle 1. VERA-CS calculations were performed with the Insilico code developed at ORNL using cross section processing from the SCALE system and the transport capabilities within the Denovo transport code using the SPN method. The calculations were performed with ENDF/B-VII.0 cross sections in 252 groups (collapsed to 23 groups for the 3D transport solution). The key results of the comparison of calculations with measurements include initial criticality, control rod worth critical configurations, control rod worth, differential boron worth, and isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient (ITC). The VERA results for these parameters show good agreement with measurements, with the exception of the ITC, which requires additional investigation. Results are also compared to those obtained with Monte Carlo methods and a current industry core simulator.

  1. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6-02-01 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form Do not use blue ink. Type or print using black ink. Date 2/11/2002 Originator Phone P. M. Knollmeyer, Assistant Manager Central Plateau 376-7435 Class of Change [X] I - Signatories [ ] II - Executive Manager [ ] III - Project Manager Change Title Modification of the M-016 Series Milestones Description/Justification of Change The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) contains commitments for the U.S.

  2. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13-02-01 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form Do not use blue ink. Type or print using black ink. Date 2/11/2002 Originator Phone P. M. Knollmeyer, Assistant Manager Central Plateau 376-7435 Class of Change [X] I - Signatories [ ] II - Executive Manager [ ] III - Project Manager Change Title Modification of the Central Plateau 200 Area Non-Tank Farm Remedial Action Work Plans (M-013 Series Milestones) Description/Justification of Change The Hanford Federal Facility

  3. CS Chang

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CS Chang CS Chang FES Requirements Worksheet 1.1. Project Information - Center for Plasma Edge Simulation Document Prepared By CS Chang Project Title Center for Plasma Edge Simulation Principal Investigator CS Chang Participating Organizations New York University, ORNL, PPPL, LBNL, MIT, Columbia U., Rutgers U. Lehigh U., Georgia Tech, Auburn U., U. Colorado, U. California at Irvine, Caltech, Hinton Associates Funding Agencies DOE SC DOE NSA NSF NOAA NIH Other: 2. Project Summary & Scientific

  4. A measurement of the ratio of inclusive cross sections $\\sigma(p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z+b{\\rm\\, jet})/ \\sigma(p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z+{\\rm jet})$ at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    The ratio of the cross section for p{bar p} interactions producing a Z boson and at least one b quark jet to the inclusive Z+jet cross section is measured using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The Z {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} candidate events with at least one b jet are discriminated from Z+ charm and light jet(s) events by a novel technique that exploits the properties of the tracks associated to the jet. The measured ratio is 0.0193 {+-} 0.0027 for events having a jet with transverse momentum p{sub T} > 20 GeV and pseudorapidity |{eta}| {le} 2.5, which is the most precise to date and is consistent with theoretical predictions.

  5. ARM - PI Product - Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rate Retrievals ProductsCloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files

  6. The impact of vertical shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The impact of vertical shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenesis to environmental rotation and thermodynamic state: TROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS AND SHEAR Citation Details ...

  7. The Road to the Higgs in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Facini, Gabriel

    2011-04-01

    Presented is a series of analyses which are central to the search for a low-mass Higgs boson. A search for ZZ production in the ZZ → ℓ-+v$\\bar{v}$ channel is introduced then the successful combination of this analysis with with the ZZ → ℓ+-ℓ'+ℓ'- search to produce the first observation of the ZZ process at a hadron collider is then detailed. The final analysis presented is the search for the Higgs in the ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ channel and the interpretation as a ZZ → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ search in order to validate the techniques. Common themes are discussed, such as multivariate techniques and instrumental backgrounds from energy measurement fluctuations and the tools used to combat them. The formalism of the statistical analysis of the final selected sample is introduced generally and demonstrated in the context of the above mentioned searches. The optimization of the selection through the identification of poorly reconstructed leptons is included as well as the utilization of b-quark identifying tools. Some space is given to jet reconstruction/identification and the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger. The efficient identification and calibration of jets is central to many physics analysis especially in the low mass higgs search. Another key component of the ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ search is the proficient identification of jets and an imbalance of transverse energy in the first level of the triggering system. Therefore, the Level 1 Calorimeter Trigger, designed to achieve this, is a necessary component for a sensitive ZH → v$\\bar{v}$b$\\bar{b}$ search.

  8. $W$ boson polarization measurement in the $t\\bar{t}$ dilepton channel using the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-05-01

    We present a measurement of W boson polarization in top-quark decays in t{bar t} events with decays to dilepton final states using 5.1 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity in p{bar p} collisions collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. A simultaneous measurement of the fractions of longitudinal (f{sub 0}) and right-handed (f{sub +}) W bosons yields the results f{sub 0} = 0.71{sub -0.17}{sup +0.18}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.07 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst). Combining this measurement with our previous result based on single lepton final states, we obtain f{sub 0} = 0.84 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.16 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst). The results are consistent with standard model expectation.

  9. Vertical zone melt growth of GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, R.L.; Nordquist, P.E.R.; Gorman, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    A Vertical Zone Melt (VZM) technique has been applied to the single crystal growth of GaAs. A pyrolytic boron nitride crucible and a (100) oriented seed were used along with liquid encapsulation by boric oxide. In the case of GaAs, the ampoule was pressurized with either argon or argensic vapor from elemental arsenic at pressures ranging from 1 to 2 atmospheres. A molten zone length of 22 mm gave a growth interface which is nearly flat and resulted in routine single crystal growth. Temperature gradients of 4{degrees}C/cm. and 9{degrees}C/cm. have produced dislocation densities of <1000/cm{sup 2} and 2000-5000/cm{sup 2} respectively for 34 mm diameter crystals of GaAs. Post growth cooling rates for GaAs have been 35, 160 and 500{degrees}C/hr. The cooling rate has been found to affect the number and size of arsenic precipitates and the EL2 concentration in the GaAs crystal. The effects of these and other growth parameters on the crystalline perfection and electrical properties of the crystals will be discussed.

  10. Rivulet Flow In Vertical Parallel-Wall Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. Mc Creery; P. Meakin

    2006-04-01

    In comparison with studies of rivulet flow over external surfaces, rivulet flow confined by two surfaces has received almost no attention. Fully-developed rivulet flow in vertical parallel-wall channels was characterized, both experimentally and analytically for flows intermediate between a lower flow limit of drop flow and an upper limit where the rivulets meander. Although this regime is the most simple rivulet flow regime, it does not appear to have been previously investigated in detail. Experiments were performed that measured rivulet widths for aperture spacing ranging from 0.152 mm to 0.914 mm. The results were compared with a simple steadystate analytical model for laminar flow. The model divides the rivulet cross-section into an inner region, which is dominated by viscous and gravitational forces and where essentially all flow is assumed to occur, and an outer region, dominated by capillary forces, where the geometry is determined by the contact angle between the fluid and the wall. Calculations using the model provided excellent agreement with data for inner rivulet widths and good agreement with measurements of outer rivulet widths.

  11. Kink modes and surface currents associated with vertical displacement events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manickam, Janardhan; Boozer, Allen; Gerhardt, Stefan

    2012-08-15

    The fast termination phase of a vertical displacement event (VDE) in a tokamak is modeled as a sequence of shrinking equilibria, where the core current profile remains constant so that the safety-factor at the axis, q{sub axis}, remains fixed and the q{sub edge} systematically decreases. At some point, the n = 1 kink mode is destabilized. Kink modes distort the magnetic field lines outside the plasma, and surface currents are required to nullify the normal component of the B-field at the plasma boundary and maintain equilibrium at finite pressure. If the plasma touches a conductor, the current can be transferred to the conductor, and may be measurable by the halo current monitors. This report describes a practical method to model the plasma as it evolves during a VDE, and determine the surface currents, needed to maintain equilibrium. The main results are that the onset conditions for the disruption are that the growth-rate of the n = 1 kink exceeds half the Alfven time and the associated surface current needed to maintain equilibrium exceeds one half of the core plasma current. This occurs when q{sub edge} drops below a low integer, usually 2. Application to NSTX provides favorable comparison with non-axisymmetric halo-current measurements. The model is also applied to ITER and shows that the 2/1 mode is projected to be the most likely cause of the final disruption.

  12. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, Robert P. (Boulder, CO); Olbright, Gregory R. (Boulder, CO); Lott, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of .lambda./2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In.sub.z (Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y).sub.1-z P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of .lambda./n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum.

  13. Methods and apparatus for vertical coupling from dielectric waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaacobi, Ami; Cordova, Brad Gilbert

    2014-06-17

    A frequency-chirped nano-antenna provides efficient sub-wavelength vertical emission from a dielectric waveguide. In one example, this nano-antenna includes a set of plasmonic dipoles on the opposite side of a SiYV.sub.4 waveguide from a ground plane. The resulting structure, which is less than half a wavelength long, emits a broadband beam (e.g., >300 nm) that can be coupled into an optical fiber. In some embodiments, a diffractive optical element with unevenly shaped regions of high- and low-index dielectric material collimates the broadband beam for higher coupling efficiency. In some cases, a negative lens element between the nano-antenna and the diffractive optical element accelerates the emitted beam's divergence (and improves coupling efficiency), allowing for more compact packaging. Like the diffractive optical element, the negative lens element includes unevenly shaped regions of high- and low-index dielectric material that can be designed to compensate for aberrations in the beam emitted by the nano-antenna.

  14. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  15. Visible light emitting vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Lott, J.A.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1995-06-27

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser that emits visible radiation is built upon a substrate, then having mirrors, the first mirror on top of the substrate; both sets of mirrors being a distributed Bragg reflector of either dielectrics or other materials which affect the resistivity or of semiconductors, such that the structure within the mirror comprises a plurality of sets, each having a thickness of {lambda}/2n where n is the index of refraction of each of the sets; each of the mirrors adjacent to spacers which are on either side of an optically active bulk or quantum well layer; and the spacers and the optically active layer are from one of the following material systems: In{sub z}(Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1{minus}y}){sub 1{minus}z}P, InAlGaAs, AlGaAs, InGaAs, or AlGaP/GaP, wherein the optically active region having a length equal to m {lambda}/2n{sub eff} where m is an integer and n{sub eff} is the effective index of refraction of the laser cavity, and the spacer layer and one of the mirrors being transmissive to radiation having a wavelength of {lambda}/n, typically within the green to red portion of the visible spectrum. 10 figs.

  16. Prefabricated vertical drains flow resistance under vacuum conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaranta, J.D.; Gabr, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The results of experimental research are presented and discussed with focus on the internal well resistance of prefabricated vertical drains (PVD) under vacuum-induced water flow. Measured results included fluid flow rates for two different cross-sectional hydraulic profiles (Types 1 and 2 PVDs). Experimental results indicated linear relationship, independent of the PVD widths, between extracted fluid velocity and the applied hydraulic gradient. Data showed a laminar flow regime to predominate for test velocities corresponding to hydraulic gradients {lt}0.5. The larger nominal hydraulic radius of the Type 2 PVD is credited with providing a flow rate equal to approximately 3.2 times that of the Type 1 PVD at approximately the same operating total head. There was no apparent dependency of the transmissivity {theta} on the width or lengths (3, 4, and 5 m) of the PVDs tested. In the case of the 100-mm-wide Type 1 PVD, {theta} = 618 mm{sup 2}/s was estimated from the measured data versus {theta} = 1,996 mm{sup 2}/s for Type 2 PVD with the same dimensions.

  17. Axisymmetric Simulations of the ITER Vertical Stability Coil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titus, Peter H.

    2013-07-09

    The ITER in-vessel coil system includes Vertical Stability (VS) coils and Edge Localized Mode (ELM) coils. There are two large VS ring coils, one upper and one lower. Each has four turns which are independently connected. The VS coils are needed for successful operation of ITER for most all of its operating modes. The VS coils must be highly reliable and fault tolerant. The operating environment includes normal and disruption Lorentz forces. To parametrically address all these design conditions in a tractable analysis requires a simplified model. The VS coils are predominately axisymmetric, and this suggests that an axisymmetric model can be meaningfully used to address the variations in mechanical design, loading, material properties, and time dependency. The axisymmetric finite element analysis described in this paper includes simulations of the bolted frictional connections used for the mounting details. Radiation and elastic-plastic response are modeled particularly for the extreme faulted conditions. Thermal connectivity is varied to study the effects of partial thermal connection of the actively cooled conductor to the remaining structure.

  18. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erik C. Westman

    2003-10-24

    Improved ground-imaging capabilities have enormous potential to increase energy, environmental, and economic benefits by improving exploration accuracy and reducing energy consumption during the mining cycle. Seismic tomography has been used successfully to monitor and evaluate geologic conditions ahead of a mining face. A primary limitation to existing seismic tomography, however, is the placement of sensors. The goal of this project is to develop an array of 24 seismic sensors capable of being mounted in either a vertical or horizontal borehole. Development of this technology reduces energy usage in excavation, transportation, ventilation, and processing phases of the mining operation because less waste is mined and the mining cycle suffers fewer interruptions. This new technology benefits all types of mines, including metal/nonmetal, coal, and quarrying. The primary research tasks focused on sensor placement method, sensor housing and clamping design, and cabling and connector selection. An initial design is described in the report. Following assembly, a prototype was tested in the laboratory as well as at a surface stone quarry. Data analysis and tool performance were used for subsequent design modifications. A final design is described, of which several components are available for patent application. Industry partners have shown clear support for this research and demonstrated an interest in commercialization following project completion.

  19. Characterization of secondary phases in modified vertical bridgman growth czt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, Martine

    2009-07-10

    CdZnTe or 'CZT' crystals are highly suitable for use as a room temperature based spectrometer for the detection and characterization of gamma radiation. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. For example, various structural heterogeneities within the CZT crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SP) can have a negative impact on the detector performance. In this study, a CZT material was grown by the modified vertical Bridgman growth (MVB) method with zone leveled growth without excess Te in the melt. Visual observations of material from the growth of this material revealed significant voids and SP. Three samples from this material was analyzed using various analytical techniques to evaluate its electrical properties, purity and detector performance as radiation spectrometers and to determine the morphology, dimension and elemental/structural composition of one of the SP in this material. This material was found to have a high resistivity but poor radiation spectrometer performance. It had SP that were rich in polycrystalline aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), metallic Te and polycrystalline CdZnTe and 15 to 50 {micro}m in diameter. Bulk elemental analyses of sister material from elsewhere in the boule did not contain high levels of Al so there is considerable elemental impurity heterogeneity within the boule from this growth.

  20. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $$t\\bar{t}$$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1more » pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.« less

  1. Recommendation and implementation of special seasonal flow releases to enhance sauger spawning in Watts Bar tailwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeager, B.; Shiao, Ming

    1992-05-01

    In recent years sauger populations in Chickamauga Reservoir, as well as several other areas in the Tennessee River Valley, have suffered drastic declines in numbers. Based on field creel evaluations the fisherman harvest of sauger in Chickamauga Reservoir has declined from an estimated high of 66,000 fish caught in 1979 to 0 fish in 1989. The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency began an aggressive effort in 1990 and 1991 to recover this population, as well as those of Ft. Loudon and Watts Bar Reservoirs, by stocking large numbers of fingerling sauger. This is however, only a short-term, stopgap measure. The decline in the population of Chickamauga Reservoir appears directly related to dramatically lower discharges from Watts Bar Dam during the recent drought. The primary factor affecting year-class strength (numbers of sauger successfully spawned in a year and reaching catchable size in subsequent years) is the amount of spawning habitat available in the month of April (the spawning season for sauger) at one particular site below Watts Bar Dam. This report documents studies aimed at optimizing sauger spawning in Chickamauga Reservoir.

  2. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $t\\bar{t}$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1 pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.

  3. Algorithms Performance Investigation of a Generalized Spreader-Bar Detection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Sean M.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Hensley, Walter K.; Schweppe, John E.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Erikson, Luke E.; Ely, James H.

    2010-10-01

    A “generic” gantry-crane-mounted spreader bar detector has been simulated in the Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNP [1]. This model is intended to represent the largest realistically feasible number of detector crystals in a single gantry-crane model intended to sit atop an InterModal Cargo Container (IMCC). Detectors were chosen from among large commonly-available sodium iodide (NaI) crystal scintillators and spaced as evenly as is thought possible with a detector apparatus attached to a gantry crane. Several scenarios were simulated with this model, based on a single IMCC being moved between a ship’s deck or cargo hold and the dock. During measurement, the gantry crane will carry that IMCC through the air and lower it onto a receiving vehicle (e.g. a chassis or a bomb cart). The case of an IMCC being moved through the air from an unknown radiological environment to the ground is somewhat complex; for this initial study a single location was picked at which to simulate background. An HEU source based on earlier validated models was used, and placed at varying depths in a wood cargo. Many statistical realizations of these scenarios are constructed from simulations of the component spectra, simulated to have high statistics. The resultant data are analyzed with several different algorithms. The simulated data were evaluated by each algorithm, with a threshold set to a statistical-only false alarm probability of 0.001 and the resultant Minimum Detectable Amounts were generated for each Cargo depth possible within the IMCC. Using GADRAS as an anomaly detector provided the greatest detection sensitivity, and it is expected that an algorithm similar to this will be of great use to the detection of highly shielded sources.

  4. Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is fighting climate change with research, clean fossil energy technology, domestic renewable energy development and more energy efficient appliances, homes, businesses and vehicles.

  5. Change Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change Log Change Log NERSC-8 / Trinity Benchmarks Change Log 09/03/2013 Correction applied to MiniDFT web-page (to remove inconsistency with MiniDFT README). Capability Improvement measurements do not require 10,000 MPI ranks per k-point. 08/06/2013 Various pages have changed to remove "draft" status 08/02/2013 Correction added to FLOP Counts for "Small" Single-Node Miniapplication Tests page 07/12/2013 README files updated for IOR benchmark to correct an error in wording

  6. Change Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC-8 Trinity Benchmarks Change Log 09032013 Correction applied to MiniDFT web-page ... results spreadsheet (linked on SSP web page); clarification to benchmark run rules ...

  7. Integration of a waveguide self-electrooptic effect device and a vertically coupled interconnect waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2008-02-26

    A self-electrooptic effect device ("SEED") is integrated with waveguide interconnects through the use of vertical directional couplers. Light initially propagating in the interconnect waveguide is vertically coupled to the active waveguide layer of the SEED and, if the SEED is in the transparent state, the light is coupled back to the interconnect waveguide.

  8. Addendum for the Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, NevadaTest Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2007-05-01

    This document, which makes changes to Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--074, Revision 0 (May 2006) was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated June 20, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: Section 6.0 Conceptual Model Uncertainty Analyses. Please note that in this section figures showing the observed versus simulated well head (Figures 6-1, 6-5, 6-7, 6-16, 6-28, 6-30, 6-32, 6-34, 6-37, 6-42, 6-47, 6-52, 6-57, 6-62, 6-71, and 6-86) have a vertical break in scale on the y axis. Section 7.0 Parameter Sensitivity Analysis. In Section 7.2, the parameter perturbation analysis defines two components of the objective function PHI. These two components include the WELL component that represents the head portion of the objective function as measured in wells and the FLUX component that represents the lateral boundary flux portion of the objective function. In the text and figures in Section 7.2, the phrases well portion of the objective function and head portion of the objective function are used interchangeably in discussions of the WELL component of the objective function.

  9. The use of a beryllium Hopkinson bar to characterize in-axis and cross-axis accelerometer response in shock environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1997-05-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A beryllium Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend the understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations and with and without mechanical isolation, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. In this paper, recent measurements with beryllium single and split-Hopkinson bar configurations are described. The in axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer in mechanical isolation for frequencies of dc-30 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 6,000 g as determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar with a certified laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement are presented. Results of characterizations of the accelerometers subjected to cross axis shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration are also presented.

  10. Inclusive and differential measurements of the t t-bar charge asymmetry in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-10-01

    The t t-bar charge asymmetry is measured in events containing a charged lepton (electron or muon) and at least four jets, one of which is identified as originating from b-quark hadronization. The analyzed dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. An inclusive and three differential measurements of the t t-bar charge asymmetry as a function of rapidity, transverse momentum, and invariant mass of the t t-bar system are presented. The measured inclusive t t-bar charge asymmetry is A(C) = 0.004 +/- 0.010 (stat.) +/- 0.011 (syst.). This result and the three differential measurements are consistent with zero asymmetry as well as with the predictions of the standard model.

  11. Search for a heavy particle decaying to a top quark and a light quark in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-03-01

    We present a search for a new heavy particle M produced in association with a top quark, p{bar p} {yields} t(M {yields} {bar t}q) or p{bar p} {yields} {bar t}({bar M} {yields} t{bar q}), where q stands for up quarks and down quarks. Such a particle may explain the recent anomalous measurements of top-quark forward-backward asymmetry. If the light-flavor quark (q) is reconstructed as a jet (j), this gives a {bar t}+j or t+j resonance in t{bar t}+jet events, a previously unexplored experimental signature. In a sample of events with exactly one lepton, missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set cross-section upper limits on the production (p{bar p} {yields} Mt or {bar M} {bar t}) at 95% confidence level from 0.61 pb to 0.02 pb for M masses ranging from 200 GeV/c{sup 2} to 800 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

  12. Combination of searches for anomalous top quark couplings with 5.4 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J. A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffe, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-07-09

    We present measurements of the tWb coupling form factors using information from electroweak single top quark production and from the helicity of W bosons from top quark decays in t{bar t} events. We set upper limits on anomalous tWb coupling form factors using data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

  13. Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ecause it takes time to establish institutional change, federal agencies need multiyear plans that continuously work to achieve, reinforce, and improve significant and persistent sustainability goals.

  14. Vertically aligned crystalline silicon nanowires with controlled diameters for energy conversion applications: Experimental and theoretical insights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razek, Sara Abdel; Swillam, Mohamed A.; Allam, Nageh K.

    2014-05-21

    Vertically orientated single crystalline silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with controlled diameters are fabricated via a metal-assisted chemical etching method. The diameter of the fabricated nanowires is controlled by simply varying the etching time in HF/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} electrolytes. The fabricated SiNWs have diameters ranging from 117 to 650?nm and lengths from 8 to 18??m. The optical measurements showed a significant difference in the reflectance/absorption of the SiNWs with different diameters, where the reflectance increases with increasing the diameter of the SiNWs. The SiNWs showed significant photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra with peaks lying between 380 and 670?nm. The PL intensity increases as the diameter increases and shows red shift for peaks at ?670?nm. The increase or decrease of reflectivity is coincident with PL intensity at wavelength ?660?nm. The x-ray diffraction patterns confirm the high crystallinity of the fabricated SiNWs. In addition, the Raman spectra showed a shift in the first order transverse band toward lower frequencies compared to that usually seen for c-Si. Finite difference time domain simulations have been performed to confirm the effect of change of diameter on the optical properties of the nanowires. The simulation results showed good agreement with the experimental results for the SiNWs of different diameters.

  15. Change Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change Log Change Log Crossroads/NERSC-9 Benchmarks Change Log 05/25/2016 Updated to latest version 3.0 release of the HPCG distribution. For the APEX benchmark, the -DHPCG_CONTIGUOUS_ARRAYS flag is now used which improves the baseline performance on Edison significantly. Please refer to the updated SSI spreadsheet for the new baseline value. 05/17/2016 Updated source distribution. README.APEX now states to use "Grind Time" as the figure of merit. Failed to do this on the 5/10/2016

  16. Design and Analysis of the ITER Vertical Stability Coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter H. Titus, et. al.

    2012-09-06

    The ITER vertical stability (VS) coils have been developed through the preliminary design phase by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Final design, prototyping and construction will be carried out by the Chinese Participant Team contributing lab, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP). The VS coils are a part of the in-vessel coil systems which include edge localized mode (ELM) coils as well as the VS coils. An overview of the ELM coils is provided in another paper at this conference. 15 The VS design employs four turns of stainless steel jacketed mineral insulated copper (SSMIC) conductors The mineral insulation is Magnesium Oxide (MgO). Joule and nuclear heat is removed by water flowing at 3 m/s through the hollow copper conductor. A key element in the design is that slightly elevated temperatures in the conductor and its support spine during operation impose compressive stresses that mitigate fatigue damage. Away from joints, and break-outs, conductor thermal stresses are low because of the axisymmetry of the winding (there are no corner bends as in the ELM coils).The 120 degree segment joint, and break-out or terminal regions are designed with similar but imperfect constraint compared with the ring coil portion of the VS. The support for the break-out region is made from a high strength copper alloy, CuCrZr. This is needed to conduct nuclear heat to the actively cooled conductor and to the vessel wall. The support "spine" for the ring coil portion of the VS is 316 stainless steel, held to the vessel with preloaded 718 bolts. Lorentz loads resulting from normal operating loads, disruption loads and loads from disruption currents in the support spine shared with vessel, are applied to the VS coil. The transmission of the Lorentz and thermal expansion loads from the "spine" to the vessel rails is via friction augmented with a restraining "lip" to ensure the coil frictional slip is minimal and acceptable. Stresses in the coil

  17. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR STARBURST RING IN THE BARRED GALAXY NGC 1097

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Matsushita, Satoki; Ho, Paul T. P.; Wu, Ya-Lin; Liu, Guilin; Oi, Nagisa

    2011-08-01

    We report high-resolution {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1), {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1), and {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) imaging of the Seyfert 1/starburst ring galaxy NGC 1097 with the Submillimeter Array for the purpose of studying the physical and kinematic properties of the 1 kpc circumnuclear starburst ring. Individual star clusters as detected in the Hubble Space Telescope map of Pa{alpha} line emission have been used to determine the star formation rate (SFR), and are compared with the properties of the molecular gas. The molecular ring has been resolved into individual clumps at the giant molecular cloud association (GMA) scale of 200-300 pc in all three CO lines. The intersection between the dust lanes and the starburst ring, which is associated with the orbit-crowding region, is resolved into two physically/kinematically distinct features in the 1.''5 x 1.''0 (105 x 70 pc) {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1) map. The clumps associated with the dust lanes have broader line widths, higher surface gas densities, and lower SFRs, while the narrow line clumps associated with the starburst ring have opposite characteristics. A Toomre-Q value lower than unity at the radius of the ring suggests that the molecular ring is gravitationally unstable to fragmentation at GMA scale. The line widths and surface density of the gas mass of the clumps show an azimuthal variation related to the large-scale dynamics. The SFR, on the other hand, is not significantly affected by the dynamics, but has a correlation with the intensity ratio of {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2) and {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1), which traces the denser gas associated with star formation. Our resolved CO map, especially in the orbit-crowding region, observationally demonstrates for the first time that the physical/kinematic properties of GMAs are affected by the large-scale bar-potential dynamics in NGC 1097.

  18. Study of Rare B Meson Decays Related to the CKM Angle Beta at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmer, Keith; /Amherst Coll.

    2007-06-06

    This study reports measurements of the branching fractions of B meson decays to {eta}{prime}K{sup +}, {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, {omega}{pi}{sup +}, {omega}K{sup +}, and {omega}K{sup 0}. Charge asymmetries are measured for the charged modes and the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S and C are measured for the neutral modes. The results are based on a data sample of 347 fb{sup -1} containing 383 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- storage ring located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Statistically significant signals are observed for all channels with the following results: B(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup +}) = (70.0{+-}1.5{+-}2.8)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}) = (66.6{+-}2.6{+-}2.8)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup +}) = (6.7{+-}0.5{+-}0.4)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}K{sup +}) = (6.3{+-}0.5{+-}0.3)x10-6, and B(B{sup 0} {yields} ?K0) = (5.6{+-}0.8{+-}0.3)x10-6, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We measure A{sub ch}({eta}{prime}K{sup +}) = +0.010{+-}0.022{+-}0.006, A{sub ch}({omega}{pi}{sup +}) = -0.02{+-}0.08{+-}0.01, A{sub ch}({omega}K{sup +}) = -0.01{+-}0.07{+-}0.01, S{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = 0.56{+-}0.12{+-}0.02, C{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = -0.24 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.03, S{sub {omega}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = 0.62+0.25 -0.29 {+-} 0.02, and C{sub {omega}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = -0.39+0.25 -0.24 {+-} 0.03. The result in S{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} contributes to the published measurement from BABAR, which differs from zero by 5.5 standard deviations and is the first observation of mixing-induced CP-violation in a charmless B decay.

  19. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Date: M-16-04-04 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form Do not use blue ink. Type or print using black ink. May 27, 2004 Originator: K. A. Klein Phone:...

  20. Measurement of D0 lifetime with the BaBar detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simi, Gabriele; /Pisa U. /SLAC

    2009-12-17

    This work is the result of the researchers carried out during a three years Ph.D. period in the BABAR experiment. The first chapter consists in an introduction to the theoretical aspects of the D{sup 0} meson lifetime determination and CP violation parameters, as well as an overview of the CP violation in the B sector, which is the main topic of the experiment. The description of the experimental apparatus follows with particular attention to the Silicon Vertex Tracker detector, the most critical detector for the determination of decay vertices and thus of lifetimes and time dependent CP violation asymmetries. In the fourth chapter the operation and running of the vertex detector is described, as a result from the experience as Operation Manager of the SVT, with particular attention to the safety of the device and the data quality assurance. The last chapter is dedicated to the determination of the D{sup 0} meson lifetime with the BABAR detector, which is the main data analysis carried out by the candidate. The analysis is characterized by the selection of an extremely pure sample of D{sup 0} mesons for which the decay flight length and proper time is reconstructed. The description of the unbinned maximum likelihood fit follows, as well as the discussion of the possible sources of systematic uncertainties. In the appendix is also presented a preliminary study of a possible development regarding the determination of mixing and CP violation parameters for the D{sup 0} meson.

  1. Assessing ecological risks to the fish community from residual coal fly ash in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rigg, David K.; Wacksman, Mitch N.; Iannuzzi, Jacqueline; Baker, Tyler F.; Adams, Marshall; Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen

    2014-12-18

    For this research, extensive site-specific biological and environmental data were collected to support an evaluation of risks to the fish community in Watts Bar Reservoir from residual ash from the December 2008 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston ash release. This paper describes the approach used and results of the risk assessment for the fish community, which consists of multiple measurement endpoints (measures of exposure and effects) for fish. The lines of evidence included 1) comparing postspill annual fish community assessments with nearby prespill data and data from other TVA reservoirs, 2) evaluating possible effects of exposures of fish eggs andmore » larval fish to ash in controlled laboratory toxicity tests, 3) evaluating reproductive competence of field-exposed fish, 4) assessing individual fish health through physical examination, histopathology, and blood chemistry, 5) comparing fish tissue concentrations with literature-based critical body residues, and 6) comparing concentrations of ash-related contaminants in surface waters with US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Ambient Water Quality Standards for Fish and Aquatic Life. These measurement endpoints were treated as independent lines of evidence that were integrated into an overall weight-of-evidence estimate of risk to the fish community. Collectively, the data and analysis presented here indicate that ash and ash-related constituents pose negligible risks to the fish communities in Watts Bar Reservoir. This conclusion contradicts the predictions by some researchers immediately following the ash release of devastating effects on the aquatic ecology of Watts Bar Reservoir. The information presented in this article reaffirms the wisdom of carefully evaluating the evidence before predicting probable ecological effects of a major event such as the TVA Kingston ash release. Lastly, this study demonstrates that a thorough and detailed investigation using multiple measurement endpoints

  2. Assessing ecological risks to the fish community from residual coal fly ash in Watts Bar Reservoir, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigg, David K.; Wacksman, Mitch N.; Iannuzzi, Jacqueline; Baker, Tyler F.; Adams, Marshall; Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen

    2014-12-18

    For this research, extensive site-specific biological and environmental data were collected to support an evaluation of risks to the fish community in Watts Bar Reservoir from residual ash from the December 2008 Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston ash release. This paper describes the approach used and results of the risk assessment for the fish community, which consists of multiple measurement endpoints (measures of exposure and effects) for fish. The lines of evidence included 1) comparing postspill annual fish community assessments with nearby prespill data and data from other TVA reservoirs, 2) evaluating possible effects of exposures of fish eggs and larval fish to ash in controlled laboratory toxicity tests, 3) evaluating reproductive competence of field-exposed fish, 4) assessing individual fish health through physical examination, histopathology, and blood chemistry, 5) comparing fish tissue concentrations with literature-based critical body residues, and 6) comparing concentrations of ash-related contaminants in surface waters with US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Ambient Water Quality Standards for Fish and Aquatic Life. These measurement endpoints were treated as independent lines of evidence that were integrated into an overall weight-of-evidence estimate of risk to the fish community. Collectively, the data and analysis presented here indicate that ash and ash-related constituents pose negligible risks to the fish communities in Watts Bar Reservoir. This conclusion contradicts the predictions by some researchers immediately following the ash release of devastating effects on the aquatic ecology of Watts Bar Reservoir. The information presented in this article reaffirms the wisdom of carefully evaluating the evidence before predicting probable ecological effects of a major event such as the TVA Kingston ash release. Lastly, this study demonstrates that a thorough and detailed investigation using multiple measurement endpoints is needed

  3. Search for bottom squarks in p[bar p] collisions at [radical] (s) =1. 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R. ); Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; da Motta, H.; Santoro, A. ); Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V. ); Mao, H.S. ); Gomez, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P. ); Hoeneisen, B. ); Parua, N. ); Ducros, Y. ); Beri, S.B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kohli, J.M.; Singh, J.B. ); Shivpuri, R.K. ); Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Shankar, H

    1999-08-01

    We report on a search for bottom squarks ([tilde b]) produced in p[bar p] collisions at [radical] (s) =1.8 TeV using the DO/ detector at Fermilab. Bottom squarks are assumed to be produced in pairs and to decay to the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) and a [ital b] quark with a branching fraction of 100[percent]. The LSP is assumed to be the lightest neutralino and stable. We set limits on the production cross section as a function of [tilde b] mass and LSP mass. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  4. Search for bottom squarks in p{bar p} collisions at {radical} (s) =1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R.; Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; da Motta, H.; Santoro, A.; Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V.; Mao, H.S.; Gomez, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P.; Hoeneisen, B.; Parua, N.; Ducros, Y.; Shivpuri, R.K.; Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Shankar, H.C.; Park, Y.M.; Choi, S.; Kim, S.K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Gonzalez Solis, J.L.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Magana-Mendoza, L.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Pawlik, B.; Akimov, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Kuleshov, S.; Belyaev, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Ermolov, P.; Karmanov, D.; Leflat, A.; Manankov, V.; Merkin, M.; Shabalina, E.; Abramov, V.; Babintsev, V.V.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bojko, N.I.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Denisov, S.P.; Dyshkant, A.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Galyaev, A.N.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Kostritskiy, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kozlovsky, E.A.; Mayorov, A.A.; Babukhadia, L.; Davis, K.; Fein, D.; and others

    1999-08-01

    We report on a search for bottom squarks ({tilde b}) produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical} (s) =1.8 TeV using the DO/ detector at Fermilab. Bottom squarks are assumed to be produced in pairs and to decay to the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) and a {ital b} quark with a branching fraction of 100{percent}. The LSP is assumed to be the lightest neutralino and stable. We set limits on the production cross section as a function of {tilde b} mass and LSP mass. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

    2006-04-26

    The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

  6. Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 2, Quality assurance/quality control summary report for arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.A.; Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.

    1995-04-01

    Arsenic contamination was studied in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because (1) it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal, (2) it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. The present study dffers from previous reports on arsenic concentrations in the CR/WBR system in the use of much more sensitive and precise processing and analytical techniques to measure arsenic species (arsenate, arsenite, and organic arsenic) at levels well below the ecological and human health risk screening criteria. The absolute detection limits using these techniques are approximately 20 to 40 pmol/L or 0.0015 to 0.003 {mu}g/L.

  7. Long-term impacts of aerosols on the vertical development of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Long-term impacts of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and precipitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Long-term impacts of aerosols on ...

  8. Aeroelastic Modeling of Large Off-shore Vertical-axis Wind Turbines...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... K. Dixon, C. Ferreira, C. Hofemann, G. van Bussel, and G. van Kuik, "A 3D unsteady panel method for vertical axis wind turbines," Proceedings of the European Wind Energy ...

  9. Vertically-tapered optical waveguide and optical spot transformer formed therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bakke, Thor; Sullivan, Charles T.

    2004-07-27

    An optical waveguide is disclosed in which a section of the waveguide core is vertically tapered during formation by spin coating by controlling the width of an underlying mesa structure. The optical waveguide can be formed from spin-coatable materials such as polymers, sol-gels and spin-on glasses. The vertically-tapered waveguide section can be used to provide a vertical expansion of an optical mode of light within the optical waveguide. A laterally-tapered section can be added adjacent to the vertically-tapered section to provide for a lateral expansion of the optical mode, thereby forming an optical spot-size transformer for efficient coupling of light between the optical waveguide and a single-mode optical fiber. Such a spot-size transformer can also be added to a III-V semiconductor device by post processing.

  10. Development of bottom-emitting 1300 nm vertical-cavity surface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Development of bottom-emitting 1300 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. No abstract prepared. Authors: Fish, M. A. 1 ; Serkland, Darwin Keith ; Guilfoyle, Peter S. ...

  11. Highly aligned vertical GaN nanowires using submonolayer metal catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Creighton, J. Randall

    2010-06-29

    A method for forming vertically oriented, crystallographically aligned nanowires (nanocolumns) using monolayer or submonolayer quantities of metal atoms to form uniformly sized metal islands that serve as catalysts for MOCVD growth of Group III nitride nanowires.

  12. Adaptive Detached Eddy Simulation of a Vertical Tail with Active Flow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Adaptive Detached Eddy Simulation of a Vertical Tail with Active Flow Control Adaptive Detached Eddy Simulation of a Vertical Tail with Active Flow Control PI Name: Kenneth Jansen PI Email: jansenke@colorado.edu Institution: University of Colorado Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 40 Million Year: 2012 Research Domain: Engineering The use of fuel-and its accompanying costs-has become an increasing concern in many industries.

  13. Design and analysis of a vertical axis ocean current power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard, C.C.; Hartzog, J.R.; Sorge, R.V.; Quigley, J.V.; Adams, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a calculation of the power generated by a vertical axis ocean current power plant. An analytical model is presented and a computer solution described. Results of the calculation show the optimum angles of the blades about the vertical axis to maximize power output, as well as the total extractable power of the plant for various ocean current velocities. Tow tank tests are described for a scale model of the plant.

  14. Electric characteristics of germanium Vertical Multijunction (VMJ) photovoltaic cells under high intensity illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unishkov, V.A.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the performance evaluation of Vertical Multijunction (VMJ) germanium (Ge) photovoltaic (PV) cells. Vertical Multijunction Germanium Photovoltaic cells offer several advantages for Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications such as high intensity light conversion, low series resistance, more efficient coupling to lower temperature sources, high output voltage, simplified heat rejection system as well as potentially simple fabrication technology and low cost photovoltaic converter device. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Numerical simulations of a vertical tail of a commercial aircraft with

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    active flow control | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility simulations of a vertical tail of a commercial aircraft with active flow control Authors: Rasquin, M., Martin, J., Jansen, K. A series of numerical simulations of a realistic vertical tail of a commercial aircraft, with a tapered swept stabilizer and a rudder, is considered in this work with application of flow control. Flow control is known to have the capacity to augment the streamwise momentum near the rudder suction peak where

  16. Moisture absorption results for vertical calciner plutonium dioxide product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, J.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-03

    A sample of calcined plutonium dioxide was exposed to room air for one week. The sample was weighed daily to determine if the material absorbed moisture from the room air. A random variation of weight was observed after the first day; however, the sample returned to its original weight at the end of the week. The loss on ignition for the material increased from 0.439 to 0.544 weight percent during this time. This change is considered inconsequential as the material will normally be packaged for storage within hours of its production.

  17. Pore-fluid effects on seismic waves in vertically fractured earth with orthotropic symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2010-05-15

    For elastically noninteracting vertical-fracture sets at arbitrary orientation angles to each other, a detailed model is presented in which the resulting anisotropic fractured medium generally has orthorhombic symmetry overall. Some of the analysis methods and ideas of Schoenberg are emphasized, together with their connections to other similarly motivated and conceptually related methods by Sayers and Kachanov, among others. Examples show how parallel vertical-fracture sets having HTI (horizontal transversely isotropic) symmetry transform into orthotropic fractured media if some subsets of the vertical fractures are misaligned with the others, and then the fractured system can have VTI (vertical transversely isotropic) symmetry if all of the fractures are aligned randomly or half parallel and half perpendicular to a given vertical plane. An orthotropic example having vertical fractures in an otherwise VTI earth system (studied previously by Schoenberg and Helbig) is compared with the other examples treated and it is finally shown how fluids in the fractures affect the orthotropic poroelastic system response to seismic waves. The key result is that fracture-influence parameters are multiplied by a factor of (1-B), where 0 {le} B < 1 is Skempton's second coefficient for poroelastic media. Skempton's B coefficient is itself a measurable characteristic of fluid-saturated porous rocks, depending on porosity, solid moduli, and the pore-fluid bulk modulus. For heterogeneous porous media, connections between the present work and earlier related results of Brown and Korringa are also established.

  18. Method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of geothermal field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poppendiek, Heinz F.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining vertical heat flux of a geothermal field, and mapping the entire field, is based upon an elongated heat-flux transducer (10) comprised of a length of tubing (12) of relatively low thermal conductivity with a thermopile (20) inside for measuring the thermal gradient between the ends of the transducer after it has been positioned in a borehole for a period sufficient for the tube to reach thermal equilibrium. The transducer is thermally coupled to the surrounding earth by a fluid annulus, preferably water or mud. A second transducer comprised of a length of tubing of relatively high thermal conductivity is used for a second thermal gradient measurement. The ratio of the first measurement to the second is then used to determine the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., from a precalculated graph, and using the value of thermal conductivity thus determined, then determining the vertical earth temperature gradient, b, from predetermined steady state heat balance equations which relate the undisturbed vertical earth temperature distributions at some distance from the borehole and earth thermal conductivity to the temperature gradients in the transducers and their thermal conductivity. The product of the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and the earth's undisturbed vertical temperature gradient, b, then determines the earth's vertical heat flux. The process can be repeated many times for boreholes of a geothermal field to map vertical heat flux.

  19. A search for $ZH\\rightarrow \\mu\\mu b \\bar{b}$ production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ancu, Lucian-Stefan; /Nijmegen U.

    2010-04-01

    The Standard Model describes with a very good accuracy all interactions of the, so far, known elementary particles. However the Higgs mechanism, which gives rise to the observed mass of these particles, has not yet been confirmed. The Higgs particle has not yet been observed, and the observation or exclusion is an important test of the Standard Model. The Standard Model does not predict the mass of the Higgs particle, however it does impose some limits on the range in which this mass can lie. In direct searches a Higgs with a mass smaller than 114.4 GeV and within 162 GeV and 166 GeV has been excluded at 95% CL at the LEP and the Tevatron colliders. The analysis presented in this thesis is aimed to search for the ZH {yields} {mu}{mu}b{bar b} events in 3.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV.

  20. A Block-Structured KIVA Program for Engines with Vertical or Canted Valves

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-08-23

    KIVA3VRELEASE2 is a computer program for the numerical calculation of transient, two and three-dimensional, chemically reactive flows with sprays. It is a newer version of the earlier KIVA3 (1993) that has now been extended to model vertical of canted valves in the cylinder head of a gasoline or diesel engine. KIVA3, in turn, was based on the earlier KIVA2 (1989) and uses the same numerical solution procedure and solves the same sort of equations. KIVA3VRELEASE2more » uses a block-structured mesh with connectivity defined through indirect addressing. The departure from a single rectangular structure in logical space allows complex geometries to be modeled with significantly greater efficiency because large regions of deactivated cells are no longer necessary. Cell-face boundary conditions permit greater flexibility and simplification in the application of boundary conditions. KIVA3VRELEASE2 contains a number of significant changes. New features enhance the robustness, efficiency, and usefullness of the overall program for engine modeling. Automatic restart of the cycle with a reduced timestep in case of iteration limit or temperature overflow will reduce code crashes. A new option provides automatic deactivation of a port region when it is closed from the cylinder and reactivation when it communicates with the cylinder. Corrections in the code improve accuracy; extensions to the particle-based liquid wall film model makes the model more complete and a spli injection option has been added. A new subroutine monitors the liquid and gaseous fuel phases and energy balance data and emissions are monitored and printed. New features have been added to the grid generator K3PREP and the graphics post processor, K3POST.« less

  1. Method and apparatus to control the lateral motion of a long metal bar being formed by a mechanical process such as rolling or drawing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Tzyy-Shuh; Huang, Hsun-Hau; Lin, Chang-Hung

    2011-01-04

    An apparatus to control lateral motion of a bar moving along a guidance path includes a pair of rotatable hubs each having at least first and second rollers at locations around the perimeter of the hub. The first roller has a first retaining groove of a first radius and the second roller has a second groove of a second radius smaller than the first radius. Each hub further includes at least one guiding element located between the rollers with a guide channel extending in the outer surface. A mounting system allows the hubs to be rotated between first and second positions. In the first position the first rollers oppose each other forming a guideway having a first, enlarged diameter for capturing a free end of an approaching bar. In the second position the second rollers form a second, smaller diameter to match the actual size of the bar.

  2. Search for $ZH \\rightarrow \\ell^+\\ell^-b\\bar{b}$ production in $4.2$~fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96~\\TeV$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-08-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 4.2 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Selected events contain one reconstructed Z {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} candidate and at least two jets, including at least one b-tagged jet. In the absence of an excess over the background expected from other standard model processes, limits on the ZH cross section multiplied by the branching ratios are set. The limit at M{sub H} = 115 GeV is a factor of 5.9 larger than the standard model prediction.

  3. Final Project Report on Arsenic Biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir, Volume 2: Quality Assurance/Quality Control Summary Report for Arsenic Biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    Arsenic contamination was studied in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system downstream from the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because (1) it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal, (2) it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. The present study differs from previous reports on arsenic concentrations in the CR/WBR system in the use of much more sensitive and precise processing and analytical techniques to measure arsenic species (arsenate, arsenite, and organic arsenic) at levels well below the ecological and human health risk screening criteria. The absolute detection limits using these techniques are approximately 20 to 40 pmol/L, or 0.0015 to 0.003 {micro}g/L. Four main sites were sampled quarterly over a 3-year period (1990 through 1992). Sites investigated included Lower Watts Bar Reservoir near the Watts Bar Dam (Tennessee River kilometer 849.6), the Kingston area (Clinch River kilometer 1.6), Poplar Creek (Poplar Creek kilometer 1.6), and the McCoy Branch Embayment (McCoy Branch kilometer 0.3). Additional sites were investigated in the vicinity of these main stations to determine the distribution of contamination and to identify possible alternative or additional sources of arsenic. Detection limits that were a factor of 20 below the minimum risk screening criteria were achieved for 100% of arsenic speciation data. However, 118 samples for inductively coupled plasma metals analysis were not preserved to analytical specifications, and the analytical holding times for 180 ion chromatography samples were not met. More rigorous preservative testing protocols and more tightly defined analytical statements of work will

  4. Constraints on models for the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity in $$\\boldsymbol{VH\\rightarrow Vb\\bar{b}}$$ final states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2014-10-16

    In this study, we present constraints on models containing non-standard model values for the spinmore » $J$ and parity $P$ of the Higgs boson, $H$, in up to 9.7~fb$$^{-1}$$ of $$p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = $$ 1.96~TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These are the first studies of Higgs boson $$J^{P}$$ with fermions in the final state. In the $$ZH\\rightarrow \\ell\\ell b\\bar{b}$$, $$WH\\rightarrow \\ell\

  5. CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sehwook; /Iowa State U.

    2011-04-01

    We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p{bar p} collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t{bar t} events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from {pi}{sup 0} decay are discussed in this thesis.

  6. Resolution-dependent behavior of subgrid-scale vertical transport in the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Heng; Gustafson, William I.; Hagos, Samson M.; Wu, Chien-Ming; Wan, Hui

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the behavior of quasi-equilibrium based convective parameterizations at higher resolution, we use a diagnostic frame- work to examine the resolution-dependence of sub grid-scale vertical trans-port of moist static energy as parameterized by the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization (ZM). Grid-scale input to ZM is supplied by coarsening output from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations onto sub-domains ranging in size from 8 _ 8 to 256 _ 256 km2. Then the ZM based parameterization of vertical transport of moist static energy for scales smaller than the sub-domain size (w0h0 ZM) are compared to those directly calculated from the CRM simulations (w0h0CRM) for different sub-domain sizes. The overall strength of w0h0CRM decreases by more than half as the sub-domain size decreases from 128 to 8 km across while w0h0 ZM decreases with sub-domain size only for strong convection cases and increases for weaker cases. The resolution dependence of w0h0 ZM is determined by the positive-denite change rate of grid-scale convective available potential energy (CAPE) in the convective quasi-equilibrium (QE) closure. Further analysis shows the change rate of actual grid-scale CAPE (before taking the positive definite value) and w0h0CRM behave very similarly as the sub-domain size changes because they are both tied to grid-scale advective tendencies. We can improve the resolution dependence of w0h0ZM significantly by averaging the grid-scale change rate of CAPE over an appropriately large area surrounding each sub-domain before taking its positive definite value. Even though the overall strength of w0h0CRM decreases with increasing resolution, its variability increases dramatically. w0h0ZM can capture neither the magnitude nor the pattern of this variability at relatively high resolutions (8 or 16 km grid spacing), suggesting the need for stochastic treatment of convection at these scales.

  7. Vertical group III-V nanowires on si, heterostructures, flexible arrays and fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli; Soci, Cesare; Bao, Xinyu; Wei, Wei; Jing, Yi; Sun, Ke

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the invention provide a method for direct heteroepitaxial growth of vertical III-V semiconductor nanowires on a silicon substrate. The silicon substrate is etched to substantially completely remove native oxide. It is promptly placed in a reaction chamber. The substrate is heated and maintained at a growth temperature. Group III-V precursors are flowed for a growth time. Preferred embodiment vertical Group III-V nanowires on silicon have a core-shell structure, which provides a radial homojunction or heterojunction. A doped nanowire core is surrounded by a shell with complementary doping. Such can provide high optical absorption due to the long optical path in the axial direction of the vertical nanowires, while reducing considerably the distance over which carriers must diffuse before being collected in the radial direction. Alloy composition can also be varied. Radial and axial homojunctions and heterojunctions can be realized. Embodiments provide for flexible Group III-V nanowire structures. An array of Group III-V nanowire structures is embedded in polymer. A fabrication method forms the vertical nanowires on a substrate, e.g., a silicon substrate. Preferably, the nanowires are formed by the preferred methods for fabrication of Group III-V nanowires on silicon. Devices can be formed with core/shell and core/multi-shell nanowires and the devices are released from the substrate upon which the nanowires were formed to create a flexible structure that includes an array of vertical nanowires embedded in polymer.

  8. Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; ,

    2012-02-14

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

  9. Phase change material storage heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goswami, D. Yogi; Hsieh, Chung K.; Jotshi, Chand K.; Klausner, James F.

    1997-01-01

    A storage heater for storing heat and for heating a fluid, such as water, has an enclosure defining a chamber therein. The chamber has a lower portion and an upper portion with a heating element being disposed within the enclosure. A tube through which the fluid flows has an inlet and an outlet, both being disposed outside of the enclosure, and has a portion interconnecting the inlet and the outlet that passes through the enclosure. A densely packed bed of phase change material pellets is disposed within the enclosure and is surrounded by a viscous liquid, such as propylene glycol. The viscous liquid is in thermal communication with the heating element, the phase change material pellets, and the tube and transfers heat from the heating element to the pellets and from the pellets to the tube. The viscous fluid has a viscosity so that the frictional pressure drop of the fluid in contact with the phase change material pellets substantially reduces vertical thermal convection in the fluid. As the fluid flows through the tube heat is transferred from the viscous liquid to the fluid flowing through the tube, thereby heating the fluid.

  10. Electron-electron interaction, weak localization and spin valve effect in vertical-transport graphene devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Mingsheng; Gong, Youpin; Wei, Xiangfei; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Jianbao; Liu, Ping; Guo, Yufen; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Guangtong

    2014-04-14

    We fabricated a vertical structure device, in which graphene is sandwiched between two asymmetric ferromagnetic electrodes. The measurements of electron and spin transport were performed across the combined channels containing the vertical and horizontal components. The presence of electron-electron interaction (EEI) was found not only at low temperatures but also at moderate temperatures up to ∼120 K, and EEI dominates over weak localization (WL) with and without applying magnetic fields perpendicular to the sample plane. Moreover, spin valve effect was observed when magnetic filed is swept at the direction parallel to the sample surface. We attribute the EEI and WL surviving at a relatively high temperature to the effective suppress of phonon scattering in the vertical device structure. The findings open a way for studying quantum correlation at relatively high temperature.

  11. Large-scale fabrication of vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Hu, Youfan; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Chen; Zhu, Guang

    2014-09-09

    A generator includes a substrate, a first electrode layer, a dense plurality of vertically-aligned piezoelectric elongated nanostructures, an insulating layer and a second electrode layer. The substrate has a top surface and the first electrode layer is disposed on the top surface of the substrate. The dense plurality of vertically-aligned piezoelectric elongated nanostructures extends from the first electrode layer. Each of the nanostructures has a top end. The insulating layer is disposed on the top ends of the nanostructures. The second electrode layer is disposed on the non-conductive layer and is spaced apart from the nanostructures.

  12. Vertical dispersion methods in x-ray spectroscopy of high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renner, O.; Missalla, T.; Foerster, E.

    1995-12-31

    General formulae for the applying the vertical dispersion principle in x-ray spectroscopy of multiple charged ions are summarized, the characteristics of the experimental schemes based on flat and bent crystals are discussed. The unique properties of the novel spectroscopic methods, i.e., their extremely high dispersion, high spectral and 1-D spatial resolution and good collection efficiency, make them very attractive for ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. The examples of successful use of the vertical dispersion modifications of the double-crystal and the Johann spectrometer in diagnostics of several types of laser-generated plasma are presented.

  13. Vertical poloidal asymmetries of low-Z element radiation in the PDX tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brau, K.; Suckewer, S.; Wong, S.K.

    1983-06-01

    Vertical poloidal asymmetries of hydrogen isotopes and low-Z impurity radiation in the PDX tokamak may be caused by poloidally asymmetric sources of these elements at gas inlet valves, limiters or vacuum vessel walls, asymmetric magnetic field geometry in the region beyond the plasma boundary, or by ion curvature drifts. Low ionization states of carbon (C II- C IV) are more easily influenced by edge conditions than is CV. Vertical poloidal asymmetries of CV are correlated with the direction of the toroidal field. The magnitude of the asymmetry agrees with the predictions of a quasifluid neoclassical model. Experimental data and numerical simulations are presented to investigate different models of impurity poloidal asymmetries.

  14. Forecast Change

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Forecast Change 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 from 2015 United States Usage (kWh) 3,444 3,354 3,129 3,037 3,151 3,302 4.8% Price (cents/kWh) 12.06 12.09 12.58 13.04 12.95 12.84 -0.9% Expenditures $415 $405 $393 $396 $408 $424 3.9% New England Usage (kWh) 2,122 2,188 2,173 1,930 1,992 2,082 4.5% Price (cents/kWh) 15.85 15.50 16.04 17.63 18.64 18.37 -1.5% Expenditures $336 $339 $348 $340 $371 $382 3.0% Mid-Atlantic Usage (kWh) 2,531 2,548 2,447 2,234 2,371 2,497 5.3% Price (cents/kWh) 16.39 15.63

  15. Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 1, Main text. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.; Grebmeier, J.M.; Harris, R.A.; Moore, R.C.; Madix, S.E.; Newman, K.A.; Rash, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    This document reports on the study of arsenic contamination in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system, downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products, such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal; it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the Environmental Protection Agency; and disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Four main sites were sampled quarterly over a 3-year period. Sites investigated included lower Watts Bar Reservoir near Watts Bar Dam [Tennessee River kilometer (TRK) 849.6], the Kingston area [Clinch River kilometer (CRK) 1.6], Poplar Creek, and the McCoy Branch Embayment. Additional sites were investigated in the vicinity of these main stations to determine the distribution of contamination and to identify possible alternative or additional sources of arsenic.

  16. Observation of Exclusive Gamma Gamma Production in $p \\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-12-01

    We have observed exclusive {gamma} production in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using data from 1.11 {+-} 0.07 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab. We selected events with two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy E{sub T} > 2.5 GeV and pseudorapidity |{eta}| < 1.0, with no other particles detected in -7.4 < {eta} < +7.4. The two showers have similar E{sub T} and azimuthal angle separation {Delta}{phi} {approx} {pi}; 34 events have two charged particle tracks, consistent with the QED process p{bar p} {yields} p + e{sup +}e{sup -} + {bar p} by two-photon exchange, while 43 events have no charged tracks. The number of these events that are exclusive {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is consistent with zero and is < 15 at 95% C.L. The cross section for p{bar p} {yields} p + {gamma}{gamma} + {bar p} with |{eta}({gamma})| < 1.0 and E{sub T} ({gamma}) > 2.5 GeV is 2.48{sub -0.35}{sup +0.40}(stat){sub -0.51}{sup +0.40}(syst)pb.

  17. APPLICATION OF STIR BAR SORPTIVE EXTRACTION TO ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE AND SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN IN SOLIDS AND AQUEOUS SAMPLES FROM THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FRYE JM; KUNKEL JM

    2009-03-05

    Stir bar sorptive extraction was applied to aqueous and solid samples for the extraction and analysis of organic compounds from the Hanford chemicals of potential concern list, as identified in the vapor data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory analyzed these compounds from vapor samples on thermal desorption tubes as part of the Hanford Site industrial hygiene vapor sampling effort.

  18. Measurement of $\\boldsymbol{\\ttb}$ production in the tau + jets channel using $\\boldsymbol{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\boldsymbol{\\sqrt{s} = 1.96}$~TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section multiplied by the branching ratio to tau lepton decaying semi-hadronically ({tau}{sub h}) plus jets, {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + X) {center_dot} BR(t{bar t} {yields} {tau}{sub h} + jets), at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector. Assuming a top quark mass of 170 GeV, we measure {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} {center_dot} BR{sub {tau}{sub h}+j} = 0.60{sub -0.22}{sup +0.23}(stat){sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}(syst){+-}0.04 (lumi) pb. In addition, we extract the t{bar t} production cross section using the t{bar t} {yields} {tau}{sub h} + jets topology, with the result {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 6.9{sub -1.2}{sup +1.2}(stat){sub -0.7}{sup +0.8}(syst) {+-} 0.4 (lumi) pb. These findings are in good agreement with standard model predictions and measurements performed using other top quark decay channels.

  19. Method to estimate the vertical dispersion parameter in a 10 Km range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoen, L.; Xinyuan, J.; Jinte, Y.

    1983-12-01

    Based on the Monin-Batchelor Similarity Theory and the concept of effective roughness length, this paper presented an empirical vertical dispersion model in a 10 kilometer range. It could be used under a flat and homogeneous, as well as complex, topographical condition.

  20. Coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers with two active gain regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-05-20

    A new class of coupled-resonator vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers has been developed. These lasers have multiple resonant cavities containing regions of active laser media, resulting in a multi-terminal laser component with a wide range of novel properties.

  1. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy alsomore » eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.« less

  2. Controlling the vertical mode coupling instability with feedback in the ALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrd, J.; Barry, W.

    1997-01-01

    The authors present the results of experiments to control the mode coupling instability in the vertical direction using a feedback system. Presently, they can raise the instability threshold from {approximately} 20 mA to 35 mA. The maximum current threshold is reached when the feedback is operated in a resistive mode.

  3. Production of vertical arrays of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2013-08-13

    A hot filament chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to grow at least one vertical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In general, various embodiments of the present invention disclose novel processes for growing and/or producing enhanced nanotube carpets with decreased diameters as compared to the prior art.

  4. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A novel design for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment.

  5. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.

    1998-02-10

    A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

  6. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy alsomore » eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Lastly, our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.« less

  7. CVD growth of graphene under exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride for vertical hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Min; Jang, Sung Kyu; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO2, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems. - Abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO{sub 2}, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems.

  8. Identification and control of plasma vertical position using neural network in Damavand tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasouli, H.; Rasouli, C.; Koohi, A.

    2013-02-15

    In this work, a nonlinear model is introduced to determine the vertical position of the plasma column in Damavand tokamak. Using this model as a simulator, a nonlinear neural network controller has been designed. In the first stage, the electronic drive and sensory circuits of Damavand tokamak are modified. These circuits can control the vertical position of the plasma column inside the vacuum vessel. Since the vertical position of plasma is an unstable parameter, a direct closed loop system identification algorithm is performed. In the second stage, a nonlinear model is identified for plasma vertical position, based on the multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network (NN) structure. Estimation of simulator parameters has been performed by back-propagation error algorithm using Levenberg-Marquardt gradient descent optimization technique. The model is verified through simulation of the whole closed loop system using both simulator and actual plant in similar conditions. As the final stage, a MLP neural network controller is designed for simulator model. In the last step, online training is performed to tune the controller parameters. Simulation results justify using of the NN controller for the actual plant.

  9. Cryogenic system for the Energy Recovery Linac and vertical test facility at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.; Soria, V.; Lederle, D.; Orfin, P.; Porqueddu, R.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.; Tallerico, T.; Masi, L.

    2011-03-28

    A small cryogenic system and warm helium vacuum pumping system provides cooling to either the Energy Recovery Linac's (ERL) cryomodules that consist of a 5-cell cavity and an SRF gun or a large Vertical Test Dewar (VTD) at any given time. The cryogenic system consists of a model 1660S PSI piston plant, a 3800 liter storage dewar, subcooler, a wet expander, a 50 g/s main helium compressor, and a 170 m{sup 3} storage tank. A system description and operating plan of the cryogenic plant and cryomodules is given. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar has a plant that can produce the equivalent of 300W at 4.5K with the addition of a wet expander 350 W at 4.5K. Along with this system, a sub-atmospheric, warm compression system provides pumping to produce 2K at the ERL cryomodules or the Vertical Test Dewar. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar makes use of existing equipment for putting a system together. It can supply either the ERL side or the Vertical Test Dewar side, but not both at the same time. Double valve isolation on the liquid helium supply line allows one side to be warmed to room temperature and worked on while the other side is being held at operating temperature. The cryogenic system maintain the end loads from 4.4K to 2K or colder depending on capacity. Liquid helium storage dewar capacity allows ERL or the VTD to operate above the plant's capacity when required and ERL cryomodules ballast reservoirs and VTD reservoir allows the end loads to operate on full vacuum pump capacity when required.

  10. Report (Vertical)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M236, M333, M473, M0512, M0538, M0541, M552

    M473, M0512, M0538, M0541

    Naval Nuclear Laboratory - Knolls Site/Kesselring Site Naval Nuclear Laboratory - Bettis Site Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Nevada National Security Site Naval Nuclear Laboratory - Naval Reactors Facility Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Savannah River Site (SRS) DOE/NNSA Headquarters Pantex Plant (PX) Albuquerque Complex Headquarters National Security

  11. Characterization and modeling of mechanical behavior of single crystal titanium deformed by split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morrow, B. M.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; Martinez, D. T.; Addessio, F. L.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Lookman, T.; Cerreta, E. K.

    2016-03-28

    Single crystal titanium samples were dynamically loaded using split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) and the resulting microstructures were examined. Characterization of the twins and dislocations present in the microstructure was conducted to understand the pathway for observed mechanical behavior. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to measure textures and quantify twinning. Microstructures were profusely twinned after loading, and twin variants and corresponding textures were different as a function of initial orientation. Focused ion beam (FIB) foils were created to analyze dislocation content using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Large amounts of dislocations were present, indicating that plasticity was achieved through slip andmore » twinning together. Viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) modeling was used to confirm the complex order of operations during deformation. The activation of different mechanisms was highly dependent upon crystal orientation. For [0001] and View the MathML source[101¯1]-oriented crystals, compressive twinning was observed, followed by secondary tensile twinning. Furthermore, dislocations though prevalent in the microstructure, contributed to final texture far less than twinning.« less

  12. Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W plus jets Final States in p(p)over-bar Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De la Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin et al.

    2012-05-02

    We study WW and WZ production with {ell}{nu}qq ({ell} = e,{mu}) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections {sigma}(WW) and {sigma}(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V = W,Z) cross section to be {sigma}(WV) = 19.6{sub -3.0}{sup +3.2} pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measure {sigma}(WW) = 15.9{sub -3.2}{sup +3.7} pb and {sigma}(WZ) = 3.3{sub -3.3}{sup +4.1} pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  13. First Search for Multijet Resonances in $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV $ p\\bar{p}$ Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-07-22

    We present the first model independent search for three-jet hadronic resonances within multijet events in $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV $ p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Pair production of supersymmetric gluinos and squarks with hadronic R-parity violating decays is employed as an example of a new physics benchmark for this signature. Selection criteria based on the kinetmatic properties of an ensemble of jet combinations within each event help to extract signal from copious QCD background. Our background estimates include all-hadronic t{anti t} decays that have a signature similar to the signal. No significant excess outside the top quark mass window is observed in data with an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1}. We place 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section {sigma}(p{anti p} {yields} X X') x BR ((tilde gg) {yields} 3 jet + 3 jet) where X, X' = {tilde g}, {tilde q}, or {tilde {anti q}}, with {tilde q}, {tilde {anti q}} {yields} {tilde g} + jet, as a function of gluino mass, in the range of 77 GeV/c{sup 2} to 240 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  14. Transport and accumulation of cesium-137 and mercury in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir system. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Lowry, P.D.; Moriones, C.R.; Ford, C.J.; Dearstone, K.C.; Turner, R.R.; Kimmel, B.L.; Brandt, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Operations and waste disposal activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) have introduced a variety of airborne, liquid, and solid wastes into the surrounding environment. Some of these wastes may affect off-site areas by entering local streams, which ultimately drain into the Clinch and Tennessee river system. Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides, metals and organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir suggest the presence of a variety of contaminants of possible concern to the protection of human health and the environment. The work reported here represents part of the initial scoping phase for the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. In this work, the distribution of {sup 137}Cs is used to identify contaminant accumulation patterns and potential problem, or ``hot-spot,`` areas with regard to environmental hazard or human health. Radiocesium was chosen for this scoping effort because (1) its history of release into the Clinch River is reasonably well documented, (2) it is easy and inexpensive to measure by gamma spectrometry, and (3) it is rapidly sorbed to particulate matter and thus serves as a cost-effective tracer for identifying the transport and accumulation patterns of many other particle-reactive contaminants, such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and plutonium (Pu), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

  15. Transport and accumulation of cesium-137 and mercury in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Lowry, P.D.; Moriones, C.R.; Ford, C.J.; Dearstone, K.C.; Turner, R.R.; Kimmel, B.L.; Brandt, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Operations and waste disposal activities at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) have introduced a variety of airborne, liquid, and solid wastes into the surrounding environment. Some of these wastes may affect off-site areas by entering local streams, which ultimately drain into the Clinch and Tennessee river system. Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides, metals and organic compounds in water, sediment, and biota of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir suggest the presence of a variety of contaminants of possible concern to the protection of human health and the environment. The work reported here represents part of the initial scoping phase for the Clinch River RCRA Facility Investigation. In this work, the distribution of {sup 137}Cs is used to identify contaminant accumulation patterns and potential problem, or hot-spot,'' areas with regard to environmental hazard or human health. Radiocesium was chosen for this scoping effort because (1) its history of release into the Clinch River is reasonably well documented, (2) it is easy and inexpensive to measure by gamma spectrometry, and (3) it is rapidly sorbed to particulate matter and thus serves as a cost-effective tracer for identifying the transport and accumulation patterns of many other particle-reactive contaminants, such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and plutonium (Pu), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

  16. First Search for Multijet Resonances in $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV $$ p\\bar{p}$$ Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-07-22

    We present the first model independent search for three-jet hadronic resonances within multijet events inmore » $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV $$ p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Pair production of supersymmetric gluinos and squarks with hadronic R-parity violating decays is employed as an example of a new physics benchmark for this signature. Selection criteria based on the kinetmatic properties of an ensemble of jet combinations within each event help to extract signal from copious QCD background. Our background estimates include all-hadronic t{anti t} decays that have a signature similar to the signal. No significant excess outside the top quark mass window is observed in data with an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1}. We place 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section {sigma}(p{anti p} {yields} X X') x BR ((tilde gg) {yields} 3 jet + 3 jet) where X, X' = {tilde g}, {tilde q}, or {tilde {anti q}}, with {tilde q}, {tilde {anti q}} {yields} {tilde g} + jet, as a function of gluino mass, in the range of 77 GeV/c{sup 2} to 240 GeV/c{sup 2}.« less

  17. MEASURED SPACE CONDITIONING PERFORMANCE OFA VERTICAL-BORE GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP (GSHP) OVER TWELVE MONTHS UNDER SIMULATED OCCUPANCY LOADS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D; Baxter, Van D; Gehl, Anthony C

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents monthly performance metrics of a 7.56 kW (2.16 ton) GSHP serving the space conditioning loads of a 251m2 (2700ft2) residential home with a phase change material in its envelope, and a single vertical-bore 94.5m (310 ft) ground loop. The same ground loop also serviced a ground source heat pump water heater. Envelope characteristics are discussed briefly in the context of reducing thermal losses. Data on entering water temperatures, energy extracted from the ground, energy delivered/removed, compressor electricity use, COP, GSHP run times (low and high compressor stages), and the impact of fan and pump energy consumption on efficiency are presented for each month. Both practical as well as research and development issues are discussed. The findings suggest that GSHPs represent a practical technology option to reduce source energy reduction and greenhouse emissions under the IECC 2012 Standard, as well as the European Union (EU) 2020 target of generating over 25% of heat consumed in the EU from renewable energy.

  18. First measurements of Hiro currents in vertical displacement event in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Hao; Xu, Guosheng; Wang, Huiqian; Zakharov, Leonid E.; Li, Xujing

    2015-06-15

    Specially designed tiles were setup in the 2012 campaign of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), to directly measure the toroidal surface currents during the disruptions. Hiro currents with direction opposite to the plasma currents have been observed, confirming the sign prediction by the Wall Touching Vertical Mode (WTVM) theory and numerical simulations. During the initial phase of the disruption, when the plasma begins to touch the wall, the surface currents can be excited by WTVM along the plasma facing tile surface, varying with the mode magnitude. The currents are not observed in the cases when the plasma moves away from the tile surface. This discovery addresses the importance of the plasma motion into the wall in vertical disruptions. WTVM, acting as a current generator, forces the Hiro currents to flow through the gaps between tiles. This effect, being overlooked so far in disruption analysis, may damage the edges of the tiles and is important for the ITER device.

  19. In situ oil shale retort with a generally T-shaped vertical cross section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1981-01-01

    An in situ oil shale retort is formed in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The retort contains a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale and has a production level drift in communication with a lower portion of the fragmented mass for withdrawing liquid and gaseous products of retorting during retorting of oil shale in the fragmented mass. The principal portion of the fragmented mass is spaced vertically above a lower production level portion having a generally T-shaped vertical cross section. The lower portion of the fragmented mass has a horizontal cross sectional area smaller than the horizontal cross sectional area of the upper principal portion of the fragmented mass above the production level.

  20. Performance and breakdown characteristics of irradiated vertical power GaN P-i-N diodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    King, M. P.; Armstrong, A. M.; Dickerson, J. R.; Vizkelethy, G.; Fleming, R. M.; Campbell, J.; Wampler, W. R.; Kizilyalli, I. C.; Bour, D. P.; Aktas, O.; et al

    2015-10-29

    Electrical performance and defect characterization of vertical GaN P-i-N diodes before and after irradiation with 2.5 MeV protons and neutrons is investigated. Devices exhibit increase in specific on-resistance following irradiation with protons and neutrons, indicating displacement damage introduces defects into the p-GaN and n- drift regions of the device that impact on-state device performance. The breakdown voltage of these devices, initially above 1700 V, is observed to decrease only slightly for particle fluence <; 1013 cm-2. Furthermore, the unipolar figure of merit for power devices indicates that while the on-resistance and breakdown voltage degrade with irradiation, vertical GaN P-i-Ns remainmore » superior to the performance of the best available, unirradiated silicon devices and on-par with unirradiated modern SiC-based power devices.« less

  1. THE VERTICAL COMPOSITION OF NEUTRINO-DOMINATED ACCRETION DISKS IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tong; Xue, Li; Gu, Wei-Min; Lu, Ju-Fu, E-mail: tongliu@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)] [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-01-10

    We investigate the vertical structure and element distribution of neutrino-dominated accretion flows around black holes in spherical coordinates using the reasonable nuclear statistical equilibrium. According to our calculations, heavy nuclei tend to be produced in a thin region near the disk surface, whose mass fractions are primarily determined by the accretion rate and vertical distribution of temperature and density. In this thin region, we find that {sup 56}Ni is dominant for the flow with a low accretion rate (e.g., 0.05 M {sub Sun} s{sup -1}), but {sup 56}Fe is dominant for the flow with a high accretion rate (e.g., 1 M {sub Sun} s{sup -1}). The dominant {sup 56}Ni in the aforementioned region may provide a clue to understanding the bumps in the optical light curve of core-collapse supernovae.

  2. Metrology for x-ray telescope mirrors in a vertical configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Haizhang; Li, Xiaodan; Grindel, M.W.

    1995-09-01

    Mirrors used in x-ray telescope systems for observations outside of the earth`s atmosphere are usually made of several thin nested shells, each formed by a pair of paraboloidal and hyperboloidal surfaces. The thin shells are very susceptible to self-weight deflection caused by gravity and are nearly impossible to test by conventional interferometric techniques. The metrology requirements for these mirrors are extremely challenging. This paper presents a prototype of a Vertical Scanning Long Trace Profiler (VSLTP) which is optimized to measure the surface figure of x-ray telescope mirrors in a vertical orientation. The optical system of the VSLTP is described. Experimental results from measurements on an x-ray telescope mandrel and tests of the accuracy and repeatability of the prototype VSLTP are presented. The prototype instrument has achieved a height measurement accuracy of about 50 nanometers with a repeatability of better than 20 nanometers, and a slope measurement accuracy of about 1 microradian.

  3. Characterization of vertical strain silicon MOSFET incorporating dielectric pocket (SDP-VMOSFET)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napiah, Z. A. F. M. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Makhtar, N. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Othman, M. A. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Idris, M. I. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Arith, F. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Yasin, N. Y. M. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com Taib, S. N. E-mail: nazirah6969@gmail.com E-mail: idzdihar@utem.edu.my E-mail: yashidar@yahoo.com

    2014-02-24

    The vertical Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET) leads to a double channel width that can increase the packaging density. The strained silicon MOSFET was introduced to modify the carrier transport properties of silicon in order to enhance transport of both electrons and holes within strained layer. Dielectric pocket was act to control encroachment of the drain doping into the channel and reduce short channel effects (SCE). SDP-VMOSFET which was a combination of those advantages was proposed to overcome the SCE in term of leakage current, threshold voltage roll-off also Drain Induce Barrier Lowering (DIBL). As a result, SDP-VMOSFET produces a better threshold voltage and DIBL compared to related structures. Meanwhile, it gives slightly increased for leakage current compared to Vertical MOSFET Incorporating Dielectric Pocket. The characteristics of the SDP-VMOSFET are analyzed in order to optimize the performance of the device and leading to the next generation of IC technology.

  4. Measurement of the top-quark mass in all-jets $$t\\bar{t}$$ events in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-07-17

    The mass of the top quark is measured using a sample ofmore » $$t\\bar{t}$$ candidate events with at least six jets in the final state. The sample is selected from data collected with the CMS detector in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV in 2011 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.54 inverse femtobarns. The mass is reconstructed for each event employing a kinematic fit of the jets to a $$t\\bar{t}$$ hypothesis. The top-quark mass is measured to be 173.49 $$\\pm$$ 0.69 (stat.) $$\\pm$$ 1.21 (syst.) GeV. A combination with previously published measurements in other decay modes by CMS yields a mass of 173.54 $$\\pm$$ 0.33 (stat.) $$\\pm$$ 0.96 (syst.) GeV.« less

  5. Search for $WH$ associated production in 5.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    We present a search for associated production of Higgs and W bosons in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in 5.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by the D0 experiment. Multivariate analysis techniques are applied to events containing one lepton, an imbalance in transverse energy, and one or two b-tagged jets to discriminate a potential WH signal from standard model backgrounds. We observe good agreement between data and background, and set an upper limit of 4.5 (at 95% confidence level and for m{sub H} = 115 GeV) on the ratio of the WH cross section multiplied by the branching fraction of H {yields} b{bar b} to its standard model prediction. A limit of 4.8 is expected from simulation.

  6. Measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays using 5.4 fb$^{\\boldsymbol{-1}}$ of $\\boldsymbol{p\\bar{p}}$ collision data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    We present a measurement of the helicity of the W boson produced in top quark decays using t{bar t} decays in the {ell}+jets and dilepton final states selected from a sample of 5.4 fb{sup -1} of collisions recorded using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. We measure the fractions of longitudinal and right-handed W bosons to be f{sub 0} = 0.669 {+-} 0.102 [{+-}0.078 (stat.) {+-} 0.065 (syst.)] and f{sub +} = 0.023 {+-} 0.053 [{+-}0.041 (stat.){+-}0.034 (syst.)], respectively. This result is consistent at the 98% level with the standard model. A measurement with f{sub 0} fixed to the value from the standard model yields f{sub +} = 0.010 {+-} 0.037 [{+-}0.022 (stat.) {+-} 0.030 (syst.)].

  7. Development and Demonstration of a High Efficiency, Rapid Heating, Low NOx Alternative to Conventional Heating of Round Steel Shapes, Steel Substrate (Strip) and Coil Box Transfer Bars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurek, Harry; Wagner, John

    2010-01-25

    Direct Flame Impingement involves the use of an array of very high-velocity flame jets impinging on a work piece to rapidly heat the work piece. The predominant mode of heat transfer is convection. Because of the locally high rate of heat transfer at the surface of the work piece, the refractory walls and exhaust gases of a DFI furnace are significantly cooler than in conventional radiant heating furnaces, resulting in high thermal efficiency and low NOx emissions. A DFI furnace is composed of a successive arrangement of heating modules through or by which the work piece is conveyed, and can be configured for square, round, flat, and curved metal shapes (e.g., billets, tubes, flat bars, and coiled bars) in single- or multi-stranded applications.

  8. Search for Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric standard model in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jaminn D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; Lopes de Sa R.; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-04-20

    We report results from searches for neutral Higgs bosons produced in p{bar p} collisions recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We study the production of inclusive neutral Higgs boson in the {tau}{tau} final state and in association with a b quark in the b{tau}{tau} and bbb final states. These results are combined to improve the sensitivity to the production of neutral Higgs bosons in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). The data are found to be consistent with expectation from background processes. Upper limits on MSSM Higgs boson production are set for Higgs boson masses ranging from 90 to 300 GeV. We exclude tan {beta} > 20-30 for Higgs boson masses below 180 GeV. These are the most stringent constraints on MSSM Higgs boson production in p{bar p} collisions.

  9. Longitudinal Spin Transfer to Lambda and Lambda bar Hyperons in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    The longitudinal spin transfer, D{sub LL}, from high energy polarized protons to {Lambda} and {bar {Lambda}} hypersons has been measured for the first time in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. The measurements cover pseudorapidity, {eta}, in the range |{eta}| < 1.2 and transverse momenta, p{sub T}, up to 4 GeV/c. The longitudinal spin transfer is found to be D{sub LL} = -0.03{+-}0.13(stat){+-}0.04(syst) for inclusive {Lambda} and D{sub LL} = -0.12{+-}0.08(stat){+-}0.03(syst) for inclusive {bar {Lambda}} hyperons with <{eta}> = 0.5 and = 3.7 GeV/c. The dependence on {eta} and p{sub T} is presented.

  10. Measurement of the top-quark mass in all-jets $t\\bar{t}$ events in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-07-17

    The mass of the top quark is measured using a sample of $t\\bar{t}$ candidate events with at least six jets in the final state. The sample is selected from data collected with the CMS detector in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV in 2011 and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.54 inverse femtobarns. The mass is reconstructed for each event employing a kinematic fit of the jets to a $t\\bar{t}$ hypothesis. The top-quark mass is measured to be 173.49 $\\pm$ 0.69 (stat.) $\\pm$ 1.21 (syst.) GeV. A combination with previously published measurements in other decay modes by CMS yields a mass of 173.54 $\\pm$ 0.33 (stat.) $\\pm$ 0.96 (syst.) GeV.

  11. Chromomagnetic dipole-operator corrections in {bar B}{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} at O({beta}{sub 0}{alpha}{sub s}{sup 2})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferroglia, Andrea; Haisch, Ulrich

    2010-11-01

    We calculate the fermionic corrections to the photon-energy spectrum of {bar B}{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} which arise from the self-interference of the chromomagnetic dipole operator Q{sub 8} at next-to-next-to-leading order by applying naive non-Abelianization. The resulting O({beta}{sub 0}{alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) correction to the {bar B}{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} branching ratio amounts to a relative shift of +0.12% (+0.27%) for a photon-energy cut of 1.6 GeV (1.0 GeV). We also comment on the potential size of resummation and nonperturbative effects related to Q{sub 8}.

  12. Ultra-high Charge Carrier Mobility in an Organic Semiconductor by Vertical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chain Alignment | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Ultra-high Charge Carrier Mobility in an Organic Semiconductor by Vertical Chain Alignment Thursday, March 31, 2016 The control of the electronic and optical properties of conjugated polymer thin films is of great interest for building more efficient solution processed organic electronic devices, e.g. photovoltaic (OPV) and light emitting (OLED) devices. The crystallinity and the chain orientation in the polymer film has been shown

  13. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Márquez, Francisco; López, Vicente; Morant, Carmen; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Domingo, Concepción; Elizalde, Eduardo; Zamora, Félix

    2010-01-01

    Arrmore » ays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800°C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.« less

  14. Installing a HDPE vertical containment and collection system in one pass utilizing a deep trencher

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocchino, W.M.; Burson, B.

    1997-12-31

    A unique method has been developed to install high density polyethylene (HDPE) vertical containment panels and a horizontal collection system for the containment and collection of contaminated groundwater. Unlike other means of creating this type of system, this barrier wall and collection system is installed in one step and in one narrow trench, utilizing a one-pass deep trencher. Originally HDPE vertical barriers were installed using conventional slurry trenching techniques. Use of this method raised questions of trench stability and disposal costs for the trench spoils. In addition, if a collection system was desired, a separate trench or vertical wells were required. In response to these concerns, a trenchless vibratory installation method was developed. Although this method addressed the concerns of trench stability and disposal costs, it raised a whole new set of concerns dealing with drivable soil conditions, buried debris and obstructions. Again, if a collection system was desired, a separate trench or vertical wells had to be installed. The latest development, the one-pass, deep trencher, has eliminated or significantly reduced the previously discussed construction concerns. The trencher methods reduce the amount of spoils generated because a trench width of 61 cm (24 inches) is constantly maintained by the machine. Additionally, soil classification and density are not as critical as with a vibratory installation. This is due to the trencher`s ability to trench in all but the hardest of materials (blow counts exceeding 35 blows/ft). Finally, the cost to add a collection system adjacent to the cutoff wall is substantially reduced and is limited only to the cost of the additional hydraulic fill and 4 inches HDPE collection piping. The trench itself is already constructed with the installation of the wall.

  15. An after-market, five-port vertical beam line extension for the PETtrace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnhart, T. E.; Engle, J. W.; Severin, G. W.; Valdovinos, H. F.; Gagnon, K.; Nickles, R. J.

    2012-12-19

    Most commercial cyclotrons intended for medical isotope production provide a limited number of beam ports crowded into a minimal vault space. Taking advantage of our new lab construction, we planned and installed a beam-line on port Music-Sharp-Sign 2 of our GEMS PETtrace to bring beam to an additional 5 target positions. These are oriented in the vertical plane, with the downward directed beam well suited for molten target substrates.

  16. Growth and characterization of 4-chloro-3-nitrobenzophenone single crystals using vertical Bridgman technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aravinth, K. Babu, G. Anandha Ramasamy, P.

    2014-04-24

    4-chloro-3-nitrobenzophenone (4C3N) has been grown by using vertical Bridgman technique. The grown crystal was confirmed by Powder X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystalline perfection of the grown crystal was examined by high-resolution X-ray diffraction study. The fluorescence spectra of grown 4C3N single crystals exhibit emission peak at 575 nm. The micro hardness measurements were used to analyze the mechanical property of the grown crystal.

  17. Proposal for the development of 3D Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (VIPRAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deptuch, Gregory; Hoff, Jim; Kwan, Simon; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Ted; Ramberg, Erik; Todri, Aida; Yarema, Ray; Demarteua, Marcel,; Drake, Gary; Weerts, Harry; /Argonne /Chicago U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2010-10-01

    Future particle physics experiments looking for rare processes will have no choice but to address the demanding challenges of fast pattern recognition in triggering as detector hit density becomes significantly higher due to the high luminosity required to produce the rare process. The authors propose to develop a 3D Vertically Integrated Pattern Recognition Associative Memory (VIPRAM) chip for HEP applications, to advance the state-of-the-art for pattern recognition and track reconstruction for fast triggering.

  18. Current Drive for Plasma Via Vertically-Structured Permanent Magnet System.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Current Drive for Plasma Via Vertically-Structured Permanent Magnet System. This invention uses the rotatoin of permanent magnets to generate a plasma current with toroidal fusion confinement devices. This particular device strategically places two rings of magnets above and below the ferromagnetic core in order to maximize both the efficiency and plasma current. No.: M-872 Inventor(s): Ali Zolfaghari

  19. Characterization of Vertical Velocity and Drop Size Distribution Parameters in Widespread Precipitation at ARM Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giangrande S. E.; Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

    2012-02-01

    Extended, high-resolution measurements of vertical air motion and median volume drop diameter D0 in widespread precipitation from three diverse Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) locations [Lamont, Oklahoma, Southern Great Plains site (SGP); Niamey, Niger; and Black Forest, Germany] are presented. The analysis indicates a weak (0-10 cm{sup -1}) downward air motion beneath the melting layer for all three regions, a magnitude that is to within the typical uncertainty of the retrieval methods. On average, the hourly estimated standard deviation of the vertical air motion is 0.25 m s{sup -1} with no pronounced vertical structure. Profiles of D0 vary according to region and rainfall rate. The standard deviation of 1-min-averaged D0 profiles for isolated rainfall rate intervals is 0.3-0.4 mm. Additional insights into the form of the raindrop size distribution are provided using available dual-frequency Doppler velocity observations at SGP. The analysis suggests that gamma functions better explain paired velocity observations and radar retrievals for the Oklahoma dataset. This study will be useful in assessing uncertainties introduced in the measurement of precipitation parameters from ground-based and spaceborne remote sensors that are due to small-scale variability.

  20. VERTICAL STRUCTURE AND CORONAL POWER OF ACCRETION DISKS POWERED BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL-INSTABILITY TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we consider two outstanding intertwined problems in modern high-energy astrophysics: (1) the vertical-thermal structure of an optically thick accretion disk heated by the dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and (2) determining the fraction of the accretion power released in the corona above the disk. For simplicity, we consider a gas-pressure-dominated disk and assume a constant opacity. We argue that the local turbulent dissipation rate due to the disruption of the MRI channel flows by secondary parasitic instabilities should be uniform across most of the disk, almost up to the disk photosphere. We then obtain a self-consistent analytical solution for the vertical thermal structure of the disk, governed by the balance between the heating by MRI turbulence and the cooling by radiative diffusion. Next, we argue that the coronal power fraction is determined by the competition between the Parker instability, viewed as a parasitic instability feeding off of MRI channel flows, and other parasitic instabilities. We show that the Parker instability inevitably becomes important near the disk surface, leading to a certain lower limit on the coronal power. While most of the analysis in this paper focuses on the case of a disk threaded by an externally imposed vertical magnetic field, we also discuss the zero net flux case, in which the magnetic field is produced by the MRI dynamo itself, and show that most of our arguments and conclusions should be valid in this case as well.

  1. Vertical wave packets observed in a crystallized hexagonal monolayer complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samsonov, D.; Zhdanov, S.; Morfill, G.

    2005-02-01

    Propagation of vertical wave packets was observed experimentally in a crystallized hexagonal monolayer complex plasma. It was found that the phase velocity exceeded the group velocity by a factor 65 and was directed into the opposite direction as expected for an inverse optical-like dispersion relation. The wave packets propagated keeping their width constant. The explanation of this behavior is based on three-dimensional equations of motion and uses a long-wavelength weak dispersion weak inhomogeneity approximation. While the wave dispersion causes the wave packet to spread, lattice inhomogeneity and neutral gas drag counteract spreading. A plasma diagnostic method was developed that is based on the ratio between vertical and dust-lattice wave speeds. This ratio is very sensitive to the lattice parameter {kappa} (ratio of the particle separation to the screening length) in a very useful range of {kappa} < or approx. 2. It was found that only a two-dimensional lattice model can provide a quantitative description of the vertical waves, while a linear chain model gives only a qualitative agreement.

  2. GaAs buffer layer technique for vertical nanowire growth on Si substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaoqing Parizi, Kokab B.; Huo, Yijie; Kang, Yangsen; Philip Wong, H.-S.; Li, Yang

    2014-02-24

    Gold catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid method is widely applied to IIIV nanowire (NW) growth on Si substrate. However, the easy oxidation of Si, possible Si contamination in the NWs, high defect density in the NWs, and high sensitivity of the NW morphology to growth conditions largely limit its controllability. In this work, we developed a buffer layer technique by introducing a GaAs thin film with predefined polarity as a template. It is found that samples grown on these buffer layers all have high vertical NW yields in general, due to the single-orientation of the buffer layers. Low temperature buffer with smoother surface leads to highest yield of vertical NWs, while high temperature (HT) buffer with better crystallinity results in perfect NW quality. The defect-free property we observed here is very promising for optoelectronic device applications based on GaAs NW. Moreover, the buffer layers can eliminate Si contamination by preventing Si-Au alloy formation and by increasing the thickness of the Si diffusion barrier, thus providing more flexibility to vertical NW growth. The buffer layer technique we demonstrated here could be easily extended to other III-V on Si system for electronic and photonic applications.

  3. Extracting the three- and four-graviton vertices from binary pulsars and coalescing binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannella, Umberto; Foffa, Stefano; Maggiore, Michele; Sanctuary, Hillary; Sturani, Riccardo

    2009-12-15

    Using a formulation of the post-Newtonian expansion in terms of Feynman graphs, we discuss how various tests of general relativity (GR) can be translated into measurement of the three- and four-graviton vertices. In problems involving only the conservative dynamics of a system, a deviation of the three-graviton vertex from the GR prediction is equivalent, to lowest order, to the introduction of the parameter {beta}{sub PPN} in the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism, and its strongest bound comes from lunar laser ranging, which measures it at the 0.02% level. Deviation of the three-graviton vertex from the GR prediction, however, also affects the radiative sector of the theory. We show that the timing of the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar provides a bound on the deviation of the three-graviton vertex from the GR prediction at the 0.1% level. For coalescing binaries at interferometers we find that, because of degeneracies with other parameters in the template such as mass and spin, the effects of modified three- and four-graviton vertices is just to induce an error in the determination of these parameters and, at least in the restricted PN approximation, it is not possible to use coalescing binaries for constraining deviations of the vertices from the GR prediction.

  4. The Use of a Beryllium Hopkinson Bar to Characterize In-Axis and Cross-Axis Accelerometer Response in Shock Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1999-01-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments have been studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Laboratory. A beryllium Hopkinson bar capability with diameters of 0.75 in. and 2.0 in has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar and a certified laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement is presented. The cross-axis performance of the accelerometer subjected to static compression on a beryllium cylinder, static strain on a steel beam, dynamic strain on a steel beam (ISA-RP 37.2, Paragraph 6.6), and compressive shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration is also presented. The performance of the accelerometer in a combined in-axis and cross-axis shock environment is shown for one configuration. Finally, a failure analysis conducted in cooperation with ENDEVCO gives a cause for the occasional unexplained failures that have occurred in some applications.

  5. Search for High-Mass \\boldmath$e^+e^-$ Resonances in \\boldmath$p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at \\boldmath$\\sqrt{s}=$1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-10-01

    A search for high-mass resonances in the e{sup +}e{sup -} final state is presented based on {radical}s =1.96 TeV p{bar p} collision data from the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron from an integrated luminosity of 2.5 fb{sup -1}. The largest excess over the standard model prediction is at an e{sup +}e{sup -} invariant mass of 240 GeV/c{sup 2}. The probability of observing such an excess arising from fluctuations in the standard model anywhere in the mass range of 150-1,000 GeV/c{sup 2} is 0.6% (equivalent to 2.5 {sigma}). We set Bayesian upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} X) {center_dot} {Beta}(X {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) at the 95% credibility level, where X is a spin 1 or spin 2 particle, and we exclude the standard model coupling Z{prime} and the Randall-Sundrum graviton for {kappa}/{bar M}{sub Pl} = 0.1 with masses below 963 and 848 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively.

  6. Results of sediment and water sampling for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes -- Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes. Data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-10-01

    Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.

  7. A simultaneous measurement of the $b$-tagging efficiency scale factor and the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, Nazim; /McGill U.

    2011-07-01

    The ability to compare results between Monte Carlo and data is imperative in modern experimental high-energy physics analyses. The b-tagging efficiency Scale Factor (SF) allows for an accurate comparison of b quark identification in data samples and Monte Carlo. This thesis presents a simultaneous measurement of the SF for the SecVtx algorithm and the t{bar t} production cross section using 5.6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t{bar t} cross section was measured to be 7.26 {+-} 0.47 pb, consistent with prior CDF analyses. The tight SF value was measured to be 0.925 {+-} 0.032 and the loose SF value was measured at 0.967 {+-} 0.033. These are the most precise SF SecVtx measurements to be performed at CDF to date.

  8. Measurements of the $$t\\bar{t}$$ charge asymmetry using the dilepton decay channel in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-30

    The t t-bar charge asymmetry in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 7 TeV is measured using the dilepton decay channel (ee, e mu, or mu mu). The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The t t-bar and lepton charge asymmetries, defined as the differences in absolute values of the rapidities between the reconstructed top quarks and antiquarks and of the pseudorapidities between the positive and negative leptons, respectively, are measured to be Ac = -0.010 +/- 0.017 (stat.) +/- 0.008 (syst.) and Aclep = 0.009 +/- 0.010 (stat.) +/- 0.006 (syst). The lepton charge asymmetry is also measured as a function of the invariant mass, rapidity, and transverse momentum of the t t-bar system. All measurements are consistent with the expectations of the standard model.« less

  9. Vertical distribution of juvenile chum salmon, Oncorhynchus keta, in relation to a thermal discharge into Port Moody Arm, Burrard Inlet, British Columbia. Canadian technical report of fisheries and aquatic sciences Number 2235

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birtwell, I.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is one of a series of reports that describe results of field and laboratory studies on the effect of heated sea water on juvenile chum salmon. The studies were initiated in response to potential increases in the thermal discharge from BC Hydro`s Burrard Generating Station into the marine waters of Port Moody Arm, Burrard Inlet. The report presents results of the second of two 1997 studies, in which preference/avoidance cages in Port Moody Arm were used to examine the vertical distribution of chum salmon at a reference location and at sites 70, 250, and 1,200 metres from the heated cooling water discharge. The results were related to the ambient aquatic conditions to reveal differences or similarities in the vertical distribution of salmon with proximity to discharge location, and to identify variables that accounted for these changes.

  10. change_address_111609

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHANGE OF ADDRESS and EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION TO: HUMAN RESOURCES DATE: Z# Social Security # Print First Name Print Middle Name or Initial Print Last Name (Currently in Payroll System) Complete appropriate changes: NAME CHANGE: Print Name Change to ADDRESS CHANGE: Mailing Address City State Zip TELEPHONE NUMBER CHANGE: FROM Area Code and # TO Area Code and # Cell Area Code and # Home phone Message phone EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION CHANGE: Name Relationship Day Phone Evening Phone Address City State

  11. Process for mounting a protection diode on a vertical multijunction photovoltaic cell structure and photovoltaic cells obtained

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnould, J.

    1982-09-07

    In a stack of diodes forming a vertical multijunction photovoltaic cell, an inversely connected diode is firmly secured to this stack with possible insertion of a intermediate wafer made from a conducting material.

  12. Potential vertical movement of large heat-generating waste packages in salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Daniel James; Martinez, Mario J.; Hardin, Ernest L.

    2013-05-01

    With renewed interest in disposal of heat-generating waste in bedded or domal salt formations, scoping analyses were conducted to estimate rates of waste package vertical movement. Vertical movement is found to result from thermal expansion, from upward creep or heave of the near-field salt, and from downward buoyant forces on the waste package. A two-pronged analysis approach was used, with thermal-mechanical creep modeling, and coupled thermal-viscous flow modeling. The thermal-mechanical approach used well-studied salt constitutive models, while the thermal-viscous approach represented the salt as a highly viscous fluid. The Sierra suite of coupled simulation codes was used for both approaches. The waste package in all simulations was a right-circular cylinder with the density of steel, in horizontal orientation. A time-decaying heat generation function was used to represent commercial spent fuel with typical burnup and 50-year age. Results from the thermal-mechanical base case showed approximately 27 cm initial uplift of the package, followed by gradual relaxation closely following the calculated temperature history. A similar displacement history was obtained with the package density set equal to that of salt. The slight difference in these runs is attributable to buoyant displacement (sinking) and is on the order of 1 mm in 2,000 years. Without heat generation the displacement stabilizes at a fraction of millimeter after a few hundred years. Results from thermal-viscous model were similar, except that the rate of sinking was constant after cooldown, at approximately 0.15 mm per 1,000 yr. In summary, all calculations showed vertical movement on the order of 1 mm or less in 2,000 yr, including calculations using well-established constitutive models for temperature-dependent salt deformation. Based on this finding, displacement of waste packages in a salt repository is not a significant repository performance issue.

  13. Experimental natural convection on vertical surfaces for building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fossa, M.; Menezo, C.; Leonardi, E.

    2008-02-15

    An experimental study on natural convection in an open channel is carried out in order to investigate the effect of the geometrical configuration of heat sources on the heat transfer behaviour. To this aim, a series of vertical heaters are cooled by natural convection of air flowing between two parallel walls. The objective of the work is to investigate the physical mechanisms which influence the thermal behaviour of a double-skin photovoltaic (PV) facade. This results in a better understanding of the related phenomena and infers useful engineering information for controlling the energy transfers from the environment to the PV surfaces and from the PV surfaces to the building. Furthermore increasing the heat transfer rate from the PV surfaces increases the conversion efficiency of the PV modules since they operate better as their temperature is lower. The test section consists in a double vertical wall, 2 m high, and each wall is constituted by 10 different heating modules 0.2 m high. The heater arrangement simulates, at a reduced scale, the presence of a series of vertical PV modules. The heat flux at the wall ranges from 75 to 200 W/m{sup 2}. In this study, the heated section is 1.6 m in height, preceded by an adiabatic of 0.4 m in height. Different heating configurations are analyzed, including the uniform heating mode and two different configurations of non uniform, alternate heating. The experimental procedure allows the wall surface temperature, local heat transfer coefficient and local and average Nusselt numbers to be inferred. The experimental evidences show that the proper selection of the separating distance and heating configuration can noticeably decrease the surface temperatures and hence enhance the conversion efficiency of PV modules. (author)

  14. GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF ROTATING, PRESSURE-CONFINED, POLYTROPIC GAS DISKS WITH VERTICAL STRATIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae; Seo, Young Min; Hong, Seung Soo E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: sshong@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2012-12-20

    We investigate the gravitational instability (GI) of rotating, vertically stratified, pressure-confined, polytropic gas disks using a linear stability analysis as well as analytic approximations. The disks are initially in vertical hydrostatic equilibrium and bounded by a constant external pressure. We find that the GI of a pressure-confined disk is in general a mixed mode of the conventional Jeans and distortional instabilities, and is thus an unstable version of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. The Jeans mode dominates in weakly confined disks or disks with rigid boundaries. On the other hand, when the disk has free boundaries and is strongly pressure confined, the mixed GI is dominated by the distortional mode that is surface-gravity waves driven unstable under their own gravity and thus incompressible. We demonstrate that the Jeans mode is gravity-modified acoustic waves rather than inertial waves and that inertial waves are almost unaffected by self-gravity. We derive an analytic expression for the effective sound speed c{sub eff} of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. We also find expressions for the gravity reduction factors relative to a razor-thin counterpart that are appropriate for the Jeans and distortional modes. The usual razor-thin dispersion relation, after correcting for c{sub eff} and the reduction factors, closely matches the numerical results obtained by solving a full set of linearized equations. The effective sound speed generalizes the Toomre stability parameter of the Jeans mode to allow for the mixed GI of vertically stratified, pressure-confined disks.

  15. Grouting for vertical geothermal heat pump systems: Engineering design and field procedures manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    Grouting of the vertical ground heat exchanger is important for environmental and heat transfer reasons, and is generally accomplished by the placement of a low permeability material into the annular space between the borehole wall and the pipes suspended in the borehole. Backfilling is the practice of placing drill cuttings or other materials into the annular volume, with no specific effort directed toward creating a hydraulic seal. State and local regulations dictate the need for grouting versus backfilling. This manual concentrates on the technical aspects of grouting, including the environmental issues related to grouting, the thermal characteristics of different grouting materials and how the design must account for those, and the practical aspects of grouting for the field technician. Formation conditions are presented where grouting is necessary to assure the quality of the potable water source, while other conditions are cited where only portions of the borehole need to be grouted. Thermal properties of several grouting materials, both bentonite-based and cement-based, are provided as input data to the calculation of borehole thermal resistance. A procedure is provided for the designer of a vertical ground heat exchanger to calculate borehole thermal resistance, and techniques are described to utilize those values in commonly used commercial design software packages. Several sets of field verification data are presented which indicate that the borehole thermal resistance design data are relevant and important in the performance of the vertical u-bend heat exchanger. Finally, procedures are described for the field technician for mixing equipment, pump, and tremie pipe selection. Methods to estimate the volume of grout required for a job are provided. Recommended field procedures for tremie installation and the grouting process are also provided.

  16. Characterization of dynamic change of Fan-delta reservoir properties in water-drive development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Shenghe; Xiong Qihua; Liu Yuhong

    1997-08-01

    Fan-delta reservoir in Huzhuangji oil field of east China, is a typical highly heterogeneous reservoir. The oil field has been developed by water-drive for 10 years, but the oil recovery is less than 12%, and water cut is over 90%, resulting from high heterogeneity and serious dynamic change of reservoir properties. This paper aims at the study of dynamic change of reservoir properties in water-drive development. Through quantitative imaging analysis and mercury injection analysis of cores from inspection wells, the dynamic change of reservoir pore structure in water-drive development was studied. The results show that the {open_quotes}large pore channels{close_quotes} develop in distributary channel sandstone and become larger in water-drive development, resulting in more serious pore heterogeneity. Through reservoir sensitivity experiments, the rock-fluid reaction in water-drive development is studied. The results show the permeability of some distal bar sandstone and deserted channel sandstone becomes lower due to swelling of I/S clay minerals in pore throats. OD the other hand, the permeability of distributary channel and mouth bar sandstone become larger because the authigenic Koalinites in pore throats are flushed away with the increase of flow rate of injection water. Well-logging analysis of flooded reservoirs are used to study the dynamic change of reservoir properties in various flow units. The distribution of remaining oil is closely related to the types and distribution of flow units.

  17. Testing appropriateness of small scale vertical axis windmills. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dengler, T.

    1984-04-26

    A comparative evaluation was performed on three vertical axis windmills; Darrieus, rotating bucket and flexible, to determine which of the three was the most practical for the homeowner to construct and use to supplement electric consumption. The design and construction of the windmills are summarized. Visual observations were made on the behavior of the windmills and an anemometer was installed for the purpose of collecting data on windmill performance in different wind velocities. Results showed that the Darrieus windmill performed best, followed closely by the flexible vane. The rotating bucket was found to be a poor performer.

  18. Thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays: Growth conditions and tube inhomogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Pham, Quang N.; Saltonstall, Christopher B.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2014-10-13

    The thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VACNTAs) grown on silicon dioxide substrates via chemical vapor deposition is measured using a 3ω technique. For each sample, the VACNTA layer and substrate are pressed to a heating line at varying pressures to extract the sample's thermophysical properties. The nanotubes' structure is observed via transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The presence of hydrogen and water vapor in the fabrication process is tuned to observe the effect on measured thermal properties. The presence of iron catalyst particles within the individual nanotubes prevents the array from achieving the overall thermal conductivity anticipated based on reported measurements of individual nanotubes and the packing density.

  19. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  20. The Theory of the Kink Mode during the Vertical Disruption Events in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonid E. Zakharov

    2008-01-14

    This paper explains the locked m/n = 1/1 kink mode during the vertical disruption event when the plasma has an electrical contact with the plasma facing conducting surfaces. It is shown that the kink perturbation can be in equilibrium state even with a stable safety factor q > 1, if the halo currents, excited by the kink mode, can flow through the conducting structure. This suggests a new explanation of the so-called sideway forces on the tokamak in-vessel components during the disruption event. __________________________________________________

  1. Result of MHI 2-Cell Seamless Dumb-Bell Cavity Vertical Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okihira, K.; Hara, H.; Ikeda, N.; Inoue, F.; Sennyu, K.; Geng, Rongli; Rimmer, Robert A.; Kako, E.

    2014-12-01

    MHI have supplied several 9-cell cavities for STF (R&D of ILC project at KEK) and have been considering production method for stable quality and cost reduction, seamless dumb-bell cavity was one of them. We had fabricated a 2 cell seamless dumb-bell cavity for cost reduction and measured RF performance in collaboration with JLab, KEK and MHI. Surface treatment recipe for ILC was applied for MHI 2-cell cavity and vertical test was performed at JLab. The cavity reached Eacc=32.4MV/m after BCP and EP. Details of the result are reported.

  2. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

    1995-03-14

    The authors report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, they can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%. 4 figs.

  3. Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chalmers, Scott A.; Killeen, Kevin P.; Lear, Kevin L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, we can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%.

  4. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  5. Control of light polarization using optically spin-injected vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frougier, J. Jaffrs, H.; Deranlot, C.; George, J.-M.; Baili, G.; Dolfi, D.; Alouini, M.; Sagnes, I.; Garnache, A.

    2013-12-16

    We fabricated and characterized an optically pumped (100)-oriented InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum well Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VECSEL). The structure is designed to allow the integration of a Metal-Tunnel-Junction ferromagnetic spin-injector for future electrical injection. We report here the control at room temperature of the electromagnetic field polarization using optical spin injection in the active medium of the VECSEL. The switching between two highly circular polarization states had been demonstrated using an M-shaped extended cavity in multi-modes lasing. This result witnesses an efficient spin-injection in the active medium of the LASER.

  6. Controllable spiking patterns in long-wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for neuromorphic photonics systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtado, Antonio; Javaloyes, Julien

    2015-12-14

    Multiple controllable spiking patterns are achieved in a 1310 nm Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) in response to induced perturbations and for two different cases of polarized optical injection, namely, parallel and orthogonal. Furthermore, reproducible spiking responses are demonstrated experimentally at sub-nanosecond speed resolution and with a controlled number of spikes fired. This work opens therefore exciting research avenues for the use of VCSELs in ultrafast neuromorphic photonic systems for non-traditional computing applications, such as all-optical binary-to-spiking format conversion and spiking information encoding.

  7. Vertical borehole design and completion practices used to remove methane gas from mineable coalbeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, S.W.; Trevits, M.A.; Steidl, P.F.

    1980-08-01

    Coalbed gas drainage from the surface in advance of mining has long been the goal of researchers in mine safety. Bureau of Mines efforts to achieve this goal started about 1965 with the initiation of an applied research program designed to test drilling, completion, and production techniques for vertical boreholes. Under this program, over 100 boreholes were completed in 16 different coalbeds. The field methods derived from these tests, together with a basic understanding of the coalbed reservoir, represent an available technology applicable to any gas drainage program whether designed primarily for mine safety or for gas recovery, or both.

  8. Remote Sensing of Cirrus Particle Size Vertical Profile Using 1.38 μm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectrum and MODIS/ARM Data Remote Sensing of Cirrus Particle Size Vertical Profile Using 1.38 μm Spectrum and MODIS/ARM Data Wang, Xingjuan UCLA Department of Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences Liou, Kuo-Nan UCLA Ou, Szu-cheng University of California, Los Angeles Takano, Yoshihede UCLA Department of Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences Chen, Yong UCLA Category: Cloud Properties The time series of backscattering coefficients derived from lidar and Doppler millimeter-wave radar returns, as

  9. Method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological structures from a vertical bore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, David A.; Barker, Clark R.; Keith, H. Dean

    1982-01-01

    This invention is directed to a method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological strata from a vertical position. The geological structures intended to be penetrated in this fashion are coal seams, as for in situ gasification or methane drainage, or in oil-bearing strata for increasing the flow rate from a pre-existing well. Other possible uses for this device might be for use in the leaching of uranium ore from underground deposits or for introducing horizontal channels for water and steam injections.

  10. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M.

    2007-12-11

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  11. Lateral and Vertical Transistors Using the AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, S; Mishra, UK

    2013-10-01

    Power conversion losses are endemic in all areas of electricity consumption, including motion control, lighting, air conditioning, and information technology. Si, the workhorse of the industry, has reached its material limits. Increasingly, the lateral AlGaN/GaN HEMT based on gallium nitride (GaN-on-Si) is becoming the device of choice for medium power electronics as it enables high-power conversion efficiency and reduced form factor at attractive pricing for wide market penetration. The reduced form factor enabled by high-efficiency operation at high frequency further enables significant system price reduction because of savings in bulky extensive passive elements and heat sink costs. The high-power market, however, still remains unaddressed by lateral GaN devices. The current and voltage demand for high power conversion application makes the chip area in a lateral topology so large that it becomes more difficult to manufacture. Vertical GaN devices would play a big role alongside of silicon carbide (SiC) to address the high power conversion needs. In this paper, the development, performance, and status of lateral and vertical GaN devices are discussed.

  12. Simulation of winds as seen by a rotating vertical axis wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, R.L.

    1984-02-01

    The objective of this report is to provide turbulent wind analyses relevant to the design and testing of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). A technique was developed for utilizing high-speed turbulence wind data from a line of seven anemometers at a single level to simulate the wind seen by a rotating VAWT blade. Twelve data cases, representing a range of wind speeds and stability classes, were selected from the large volume of data available from the Clayton, New Mexico, Vertical Plane Array (VPA) project. Simulations were run of the rotationally sampled wind speed relative to the earth, as well as the tangential and radial wind speeds, which are relative to the rotating wind turbine blade. Spectral analysis is used to compare and assess wind simulations from the different wind regimes, as well as from alternate wind measurement techniques. The variance in the wind speed at frequencies at or above the blade rotation rate is computed for all cases, and is used to quantitatively compare the VAWT simulations with Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) simulations. Qualitative comparisons are also made with direct wind measurements from a VAWT blade.

  13. Verification of theoretically computed spectra for a point rotating in a vertical plane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, D.C.; Connell, J.R.; George, R.L.

    1985-03-01

    A theoretical model is modified and tested that produces the power spectrum of the alongwind component of turbulence as experienced by a point rotating in a vertical plane perpendicular to the mean wind direction. The ability to generate such a power spectrum, independent of measurement, is important in wind turbine design and testing. The radius of the circle of rotation, its height above the ground, and the rate of rotation are typical for those for a MOD-OA wind turbine. Verification of this model is attempted by comparing two sets of variances that correspond to individual harmonic bands of spectra of turbulence in the rotational frame. One set of variances is calculated by integrating the theoretically generated rotational spectra; the other is calculated by integrating rotational spectra from real data analysis. The theoretical spectrum is generated by Fourier transformation of an autocorrelation function taken from von Karman and modified for the rotational frame. The autocorrelation is based on dimensionless parameters, each of which incorporates both atmospheric and wind turbine parameters. The real data time series are formed by sampling around the circle of anemometers of the Vertical Plane Array at the former MOD-OA site at Clayton, New Mexico.

  14. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Boris B.; Sverdlik, Leonid G.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; Solomon, Paul A.; Lantz, Jeffrey; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Artamonova, Maria S.; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2013-01-01

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM 2.5 and PM 10 mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regionalmore » sources are characterized by pollution transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51) and the fine particle mass fraction (64%). Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.« less

  15. A systematic approach to vertically excited states of ethylene using configuration interaction and coupled cluster techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feller, David, E-mail: dfeller@owt.com; Peterson, Kirk A. [Department of Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-4630 (United States); Davidson, Ernest R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 (United States)

    2014-09-14

    A systematic sequence of configuration interaction and coupled cluster calculations were used to describe selected low-lying singlet and triplet vertically excited states of ethylene with the goal of approaching the all electron, full configuration interaction/complete basis set limit. Included among these is the notoriously difficult, mixed valence/Rydberg {sup 1}B{sub 1u} V state. Techniques included complete active space and iterative natural orbital configuration interaction with large reference spaces which led to variational spaces of 1.8 10{sup 9} parameters. Care was taken to avoid unintentionally biasing the results due to the widely recognized sensitivity of the V state to the details of the calculation. The lowest vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials to the {sup 2}B{sub 3u} and {sup 2}B{sub 3} states were also determined. In addition, the heat of formation of twisted ethylene {sup 3}A{sub 1} was obtained from large basis set coupled cluster theory calculations including corrections for core/valence, scalar relativistic and higher order correlation recovery.

  16. The Brinkman model for thermosolutal convection in a vertical annular porous layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennacer, R.; Beji, H.; Duval, R.; Vasseur, P.

    2000-01-01

    Double-diffusive natural convection in porous media, i.e. flows generated by buoyancy due to simultaneous temperature and concentration gradients, has received considerable attention in recent years. Interest in this phenomenon has been motivated by such diverse engineering problems as the migration of moisture contained in fibrous insulation, grain storage, the contaminated transport in saturated soil, the underground disposal of nuclear wastes, drying processes, etc. Here, numerical study is carried out on double-diffusive natural convection within a vertical circular porous annulus. Motions are driven by the externally applied constant temperature and concentration differences imposed across the vertical walls of the enclosure. In the formulation of the problem, use is made of the Brinkman extended Darcy model which allows the no-slip boundary condition on a solid wall, to be satisfied. The flow is assumed to be laminar and two dimensional. The density variation is taken into account by the Boussinesq approximation. The control-volume approach is used for solving the governing equations. Solutions for the flow fields, temperature and concentration distributions and Nusselt, {ovr Nu}{sub i} and Sherwood, {ovr Sh}{sub i} numbers are obtained in terms of the governing parameters of the problem. The effect of both the Darcy number, Da, and the radius ratio, {kappa}, or {ovr Nu}{sub i} and {ovr Sh}{sub i} is found to be significant. Results for a pure viscous fluid and a Carcy (densely packed) porous medium emerge from the present model is limiting cases.

  17. Base line for determining local, small-scale vertical movements in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trahan, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    Subsidence in Louisiana is a result of many factors ranging from local, man-induced to regional, large-scale processes. The measurement of local, man-induced subsidence is especially critical in areas with high rates of land loss. In order to measure local vertical movement, absolute historical geodetic movements have been estimated by adjusting all movements along the first-order vertical control network from northeast to southwest Louisiana as related to the Monroe Uplift. The adjustment will serve as a base line by which local subsidence or uplift can be measured. A generalized trend of increasing subsidence to the south in Louisiana is probably a reflection of increasing sediment thickness and weight toward the AXIS of the Gulf Coast Basin. Anomalous values as low as -17.6 mm/y occur superjacent to the position of Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial elements. Positive movement, up to +4.1 mm/y, has been found associated with the Iberian structural axis in south-central Louisiana. Land subsidence due to natural causes may far outweigh subsidence resulting from fluid withdrawal or depressurization of geopressured aquifers. The effects of regional and local natural processes should not be underestimated in any systematic approach to measuring subsidence. 13 references, 7 figures.

  18. Experimental research on heat transfer of natural convection in vertical rectangular channels with large aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Qing; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Tian, Wenxi; Ye, Zhonghao

    2010-01-15

    This work presents the experimental research on the steady laminar natural convection heat transfer of air in three vertical thin rectangular channels with different gap clearance. The much higher ratio of width to gap clearance (60-24) and the ratio of length to gap clearance (800-320) make the rectangular channels similar with the coolant flow passage in plate type fuel reactors. The vertical rectangular channels were composed of two stainless steal plates and were heated by electrical heating rods. The wall temperatures were detected with the K-type thermocouples which were inserted into the blind holes drilled in the steal plates. Also the air temperatures at the inlet and outlet of the channel were detected. The wall heat fluxes added to the air flow were calculated by the Fourier heat conduction law. The heat transfer characteristics were analyzed, and the average Nusselt numbers in all the three channels could be well correlated with the Rayleigh number or the modified Rayleigh number in a uniform correlation. Furthermore, the maximum wall temperatures were investigated, which is a key parameter for the fuel's integrity during some accidents. It was found that even the wall heat flux was up to 1500 W/m{sup 2}, the maximum wall temperature was lower than 350 C. All this work is valuable for the plate type reactor's design and safety analysis. (author)

  19. VERTICAL KINK OSCILLATION OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE STRUCTURE IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.; Cho, K.-S.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2014-12-20

    Vertical transverse oscillations of a coronal magnetic rope, observed simultaneously in the 171 Å and 304 Å bandpasses of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), are detected. The oscillation period is about 700 s and the displacement amplitude is about 1 Mm. The oscillation amplitude remains constant during the observation. Simultaneous observation of the rope in the bandpasses corresponding to the coronal and chromospheric temperatures suggests that it has a multi-thermal structure. Oscillatory patterns in 171 Å and 304 Å are coherent, which indicates that the observed kink oscillation is collective, in which the rope moves as a single entity. We interpret the oscillation as a fundamental standing vertically polarized kink mode of the rope, while the interpretation in terms of a perpendicular fast wave could not be entirely ruled out. In addition, the arcade situated above the rope and seen in the 171 Å bandpass shows an oscillatory motion with the period of about 1000 s.

  20. CONFIGURATION CHANGE PROPOSAL (CCP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Change Request | Domain Name Server (DNS) Change | | This change request form is to share information on domain name server changes, new requirements, modifications, or enhancements within the DOE Headquarters programmatic and office management areas. This change request should be forwarded to the Domain Management Team (DL-Domain.Management@hq.doe.gov) for validation, review and discussion. Detailed instructions are available at https://powerpedia.energy.gov/wiki/Domain_change_process. |

  1. Climatic change due to solar irradiance changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Raper, S.C.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Solar irradiance reconstructions back to 1874 are used to estimate the effect of the Sun on global-mean temperature. The importance of the history effect of the Sun on global-mean temperature. The importance of the history effect, whereby recent temperature changes may be influenced significantly by past forcing changes, is evaluated. Modelled temperature changes are shown to be relatively insensitive to model uncertainties. The overall range of modelled temperature variations is extremely small, 0.05C.

  2. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy $pp$ and $$p\\bar p$$ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-01-01

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energymore » $pp$ and $$p\\bar p $$ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $1/p_T^n$ at high $p_T$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $p_T$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $p_T$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $p_T$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $$p \\bar p$$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $$p\\bar p$$ collisions.« less

  3. From QCD-based hard-scattering to nonextensive statistical mechanical descriptions of transverse momentum spectra in high-energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p$ collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Wilk, Grzegorz; Cirto, Leonardo J. L.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2015-01-01

    Transverse spectra of both jets and hadrons obtained in high-energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p $ collisions at central rapidity exhibit power-law behavior of $1/p_T^n$ at high $p_T$. The power index $n$ is 4-5 for jet production and is slightly greater for hadron production. Furthermore, the hadron spectra spanning over 14 orders of magnitude down to the lowest $p_T$ region in $pp$ collisions at LHC can be adequately described by a single nonextensive statistical mechanical distribution that is widely used in other branches of science. This suggests indirectly the dominance of the hard-scattering process over essentially the whole $p_T$ region at central rapidity in $pp$ collisions at LHC. We show here direct evidences of such a dominance of the hard-scattering process by investigating the power index of UA1 jet spectra over an extended $p_T$ region and the two-particle correlation data of the STAR and PHENIX Collaborations in high-energy $pp$ and $p \\bar p$ collisions at central rapidity. We then study how the showering of the hard-scattering product partons alters the power index of the hadron spectra and leads to a hadron distribution that can be cast into a single-particle non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution. Because of such a connection, the non-extensive statistical mechanical distribution can be considered as a lowest-order approximation of the hard-scattering of partons followed by the subsequent process of parton showering that turns the jets into hadrons, in high energy $pp$ and $p\\bar p$ collisions.

  4. Climate Change Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing the Impact of Climate Change on America's Water, Land, and Other Natural and Cultural Resources Energy and Climate Change Council DOI Climate Science Centers ...

  5. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality ...

  6. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  7. Search for events with leptonic jets and missing transverse energy in $\\mathbf{p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s}=1.96}$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-08-01

    We present the first search for pair production of isolated jets of charged leptons in association with a large imbalance in transverse energy in p{bar p} collisions using 5.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No excess is observed above Standard Model background, and the result is used to set upper limits on the production cross section of pairs of supersymmetric chargino and neutralino particles as a function of 'dark-photon' mass, where the dark photon is produced in the decay of the lightest supersymmetric particle.

  8. Precise study of the $Z/\\gamma^*$ boson transverse momentum distribution in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions using a novel technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-10-01

    Using 7.3 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, we measure the distribution of the variable {phi}*{sub {eta}}, which probes the same physical effects as the Z/{gamma}* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. A QCD prediction is found to describe the general features of the {phi}*{sub {eta}} distribution, but is unable to describe its detailed shape or dependence on boson rapidity. A prediction that includes a broadening of transverse momentum for small values of the parton momentum fraction is strongly disfavored.

  9. Study of double parton interactions in diphoton + dijet events in $$p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2016-03-01

    We use a sample of diphoton+dijet events to measure the effective cross section of double parton interactions, which characterizes the area containing the interacting partons in proton-antiproton collisions, and find it to be σeff=19.3±1.4(stat)±7.8(syst) mb. The sample was collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider inmore » $$p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb-1.« less

  10. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391): Supplement No. 19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    Supplement No. 19 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation with (1) additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 18 was issued, and (2) matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 18 was issued.

  11. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings in single top quark production in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beni S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-02-14

    We present new direct constraints on a general Wtb interaction using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model provides a purely left-handed vector coupling at the Wtb vertex, while the most general, lowest dimension Lagrangian allows right-handed vector and left- or right-handed tensor couplings as well. We obtain precise limits on these anomalous couplings by comparing the data to the expectations from different assumptions on the Wtb coupling.

  12. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391). Supplement No. 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tam, P.S.

    1993-10-01

    Supplement No. 12 to the Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for license to operate Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-390 and 50-391, located in Rhea County, Tennessee, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this supplement is to update the Safety Evaluation of (1) additional information submitted by the applicant since Supplement No. 11 was issued, and (2) matters that the staff had under review when Supplement No. 11 was issued.

  13. Factors affecting the failure of copper connectors brazed to copper bus bar segments on a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator at Grand Coulee Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atteridge, D.G.; Klein, R.F.; Layne, R.; Anderson, W.E.; Correy, T.B.

    1988-01-01

    On March 21, 1986, the United States Bureau of Reclamation experienced a ground fault in the main parallel ring assembly of Unit G19 - a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator - at Grand Coulee Dam, Washington. Inspection of the unit revealed that the ground fault had been induced by fracture of one or more of the copper connectors used to join adjacent segments of one of the bus bars in the north half of the assembly. Various experimental techniques were used to detect and determine the presence of cracks, crack morphology, corrosion products, and material microstructure and/or embrittlement. The results of these inspections and recommendations are given. 7 refs., 27 figs.

  14. The impact of vertical shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenesis to environmental rotation and thermodynamic state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Wenyu

    2015-11-19

    Here, the impact of vertical wind shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenesis to environmental rotation and thermodynamic state is investigated through idealized cloud-resolving simulations of the intensification of an incipient vortex. With vertical shear, tropical cyclones intensify faster with a higher Coriolis parameter, f, irrespective of the environmental thermodynamic state. The vertical shear develops a vertically tilted vortex, which undergoes a precession process with the midlevel vortices rotating cyclonically around the surface center. With a higher f, the midlevel vortices are able to rotate continuously against the vertical shear, leading to the realignment of the tilted vortex and rapidmore » intensification. With a lower f, the rotation is too slow such that the midlevel vortices are advected away from the surface center and the intensification is suppressed. The parameter, Χb, measuring the effect from the low-entropy downdraft air on the boundary layer entropy, is found to be a good indicator of the environmental thermodynamic favorability for tropical cyclogenesis in vertical shear. Without vertical shear, tropical cyclones are found to intensify faster with a lower f by previous studies. We show this dependency on f is sensitive to the environmental thermodynamic state. The thermodynamical favorability for convection can be measured by Χm, which estimates the time it takes for surface fluxes to moisten the midtroposphere. A smaller Χm not only leads to a faster intensification due to a shorter period for moist preconditioning of the inner region but also neutralizes the faster intensification with a lower f due to enhanced peripheral convection.« less

  15. The impact of vertical shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenesis to environmental rotation and thermodynamic state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wenyu

    2015-11-19

    Here, the impact of vertical wind shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenesis to environmental rotation and thermodynamic state is investigated through idealized cloud-resolving simulations of the intensification of an incipient vortex. With vertical shear, tropical cyclones intensify faster with a higher Coriolis parameter, f, irrespective of the environmental thermodynamic state. The vertical shear develops a vertically tilted vortex, which undergoes a precession process with the midlevel vortices rotating cyclonically around the surface center. With a higher f, the midlevel vortices are able to rotate continuously against the vertical shear, leading to the realignment of the tilted vortex and rapid intensification. With a lower f, the rotation is too slow such that the midlevel vortices are advected away from the surface center and the intensification is suppressed. The parameter, Χb, measuring the effect from the low-entropy downdraft air on the boundary layer entropy, is found to be a good indicator of the environmental thermodynamic favorability for tropical cyclogenesis in vertical shear. Without vertical shear, tropical cyclones are found to intensify faster with a lower f by previous studies. We show this dependency on f is sensitive to the environmental thermodynamic state. The thermodynamical favorability for convection can be measured by Χm, which estimates the time it takes for surface fluxes to moisten the midtroposphere. A smaller Χm not only leads to a faster intensification due to a shorter period for moist preconditioning of the inner region but also neutralizes the faster intensification with a lower f due to enhanced peripheral convection.

  16. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsenseismic anisotropy parameters for polar media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-12

    Sayers and Kachanov (1991) defined crack-influence parameters that are shown to be directly related to Thomsen (1986) weak-anisotropy seismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crack/fracture density is small enough. These results are then applied to the problem of seismic wave propagation in polar (i.e., non-isotropic) reservoirs having HTI seismic wave symmetry due to the presence of aligned vertical fractures and resulting in azimuthal seismic wave symmetry at the earth's surface. The approach presented suggests one method of inverting for fracture density from wave-speed data. It is also observed that the angular location {theta}{sub ex} of the extreme value (peak or trough) of the quasi-SV-wave speed for VTI occurs at an angle determined approximately by the formula tan{sup 2} {theta}{sub ex} {approx_equal} tan {theta}{sub m} = [(c{sub 33} - c{sub 44})/(c{sub 11}-c{sub 44})]{sup 1/2}, where {theta}{sub m} is an angle determined directly (as shown) from the c{sub ij} elastic stiffnesses, whenever these are known from either quasi-static or seismic wave measurements. Alternatively, {theta}{sub ex} is given in terms of the Thomsen seismic anisotropy parameters by tan {theta}{sub ex} {approx_equal} ([v{sub p}{sup 2}(0)-v{sub s}{sup 2}(0)]/[(1 + 2{epsilon})v{sub p}{sup 2}(0)-v{sub s}{sup 2}(0)]){sup 1/4}, where {epsilon} = (c{sub 11}-c{sub 33})/2c{sub 33}, v{sub p}{sup 2}(0) = c{sub 33}/{rho}, and v{sub s}{sup 2}(0) = c{sub 44}/{rho}, with {rho} being the background inertial mass density. The axis of symmetry is always treated here as the x{sub 3}-axis for either VTI symmetry (due, for example, to horizontal cracks), or HTI symmetry (due to aligned vertical cracks). Then the meaning of the stiffnesses is derived from the fracture analysis in the same way for VTI and HTI media, but for HTI the wave speeds relative to the earth's surface are shifted by 90{sup o} in the plane perpendicular to the aligned vertical fractures. Skempton's (1954) coefficient is

  17. Search for Production of Heavy Particles Decaying to Top Quarks and Invisible Particles in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We present a search for a new particle T{prime} decaying to a top-quark via T{prime} {yields} t + X, where X is an invisible particle. In a data sample with 4.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab in p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, we search for pair production of T0 in the lepton+jets channel, p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + XX {yields} {ell}{nu}bqq{prime}b + XX. We interpret our results primarily in terms of a model where T{prime} are exotic fourth generation quarks and X are dark matter particles. The data are consistent with standard model expectations, and we set 95% confidence level limits on the generic production of T{prime}{bar T}{prime} {yields} t{bar t} + XX. We apply these limits to the dark matter model and exclude the fourth generation exotic quarks T{prime} at 95% confidence level up to m{sub T{prime}} = 360 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub x} {<=} 100 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. Method of design for vertical oil shale retorting vessels and retorting therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reeves, Adam A.

    1978-01-03

    A method of designing the gas flow parameters of a vertical shaft oil shale retorting vessel involves determining the proportion of gas introduced in the bottom of the vessel and into intermediate levels in the vessel to provide for lateral distribution of gas across the vessel cross section, providing mixing with the uprising gas, and determining the limiting velocity of the gas through each nozzle. The total quantity of gas necessary for oil shale treatment in the vessel may be determined and the proportion to be injected into each level is then determined based on the velocity relation of the orifice velocity and its feeder manifold gas velocity. A limitation is placed on the velocity of gas issuing from an orifice by the nature of the solid being treated, usually physical tests of gas velocity impinging the solid.

  19. Vertically aligned gas-insulated transmission line having particle traps at the inner conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, Steinar J.

    1984-01-01

    Gas insulated electrical apparatus having first and second conductors separated by an insulating support within an insulating gas environment, and particle traps disposed along the surface of the high potential conductor for trapping and inactivating foreign particles which may be present within the insulating gas medium. Several embodiments of the invention were developed which are particularly suited for vertically aligned gas insulated transmission lines. The particle traps are grooves or cavities formed into the walls of the tubular inner conductor, without extending into the hollow portion of the conductor. In other embodiments, the traps are appendages or insert flanges extending from the inner conductor, with the insulator supports contacting the appendages instead of the inner conductor.

  20. Frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Thomas D.; Alford, William J.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2002-01-01

    A frequency-doubled semiconductor vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) is disclosed for generating light at a wavelength in the range of 300-550 nanometers. The VECSEL includes a semiconductor multi-quantum-well active region that is electrically or optically pumped to generate lasing at a fundamental wavelength in the range of 600-1100 nanometers. An intracavity nonlinear frequency-doubling crystal then converts the fundamental lasing into a second-harmonic output beam. With optical pumping with 330 milliWatts from a semiconductor diode pump laser, about 5 milliWatts or more of blue light can be generated at 490 nm. The device has applications for high-density optical data storage and retrieval, laser printing, optical image projection, chemical-sensing, materials processing and optical metrology.

  1. Numerical Investigation of Vertical Plunging Jet Using a Hybrid Multifluid–VOF Multiphase CFD Solver

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shonibare, Olabanji Y.; Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid multiphase flow solver has been used to conduct simulations of a vertical plunging liquid jet. This solver combines a multifluid methodology with selective interface sharpening to enable simulation of both the initial jet impingement and the long-time entrained bubble plume phenomena. Models are implemented for variable bubble size capturing and dynamic switching of interface sharpened regions to capture transitions between the initially fully segregated flow types into the dispersed bubbly flow regime. It was found that the solver was able to capture the salient features of the flow phenomena under study and areas for quantitative improvement havemore » been explored and identified. In particular, a population balance approach is employed and detailed calibration of the underlying models with experimental data is required to enable quantitative prediction of bubble size and distribution to capture the transition between segregated and dispersed flow types with greater fidelity.« less

  2. On the role of disorder on graphene and graphene nanoribbon-based vertical tunneling transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Nayereh; Pourfath, Mahdi E-mail: pourfath@iue.tuwien.ac.at

    2014-11-14

    In this work, the characteristics of vertical tunneling field-effect transistors based on graphene (VTGFET) and graphene nanoribbon heterostructure (VTGNRFET) in the presence of disorder are theoretically investigated. An statistical analysis based on an atomistic tight-binding model for the electronic bandstructure along with the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism are employed. We study the dependence of the averaged density of states, transmission probability, on- and off-state conductances, on/off conductance ratio, and transfer characteristics on the substrate induced potential fluctuations and vacancies. In addition, the variabilities of the device characteristics due to the presence of disorder are evaluated. It can be inferred from the results that while introducing vacancies cause a relatively modest suppression of the transmission probability, potential fluctuations lead to the significant increase of transmission probability and conductance of the device. Moreover, the results show that the transport properties of VTGFET are more robust against disorder compared to VTGNRFET.

  3. Evaluation of models for estimating solar irradiation on vertical surfaces at Valencia, Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Utrillas, M.P.; Martinez-Lozano, J.A.; Casanovas, A.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Hourly irradiation data recorded on vertical surfaces at north, east, south, and west orientations during the winter period going from December 1989 to March 1990 in Valencia, Spain, have been compared with estimated solar irradiation from several tilted-surface models. The isotropic-, Temps' and Coulson's-, Klucher's-, Hay's-, Shartveit's and Olseth's, Gueymard's-, and Perez' (simplified) models have been considered for this comparison. Root-mean-square-difference (RMSD), mean-bias-difference (MBD) and mean-absolute-difference (MAD) estimators have been used to measure the departure of models from experimental data. Modeled values are evaluated with the original coefficients proposed by the authors. Results of comparison show that the south orientation is less prone to modeling errors. Perez' 25{degree} circumsolar simplified model being the less affected by errors in north, eat and south orientations; for west orientation Klucher's model gives a lesser error. These results are consistent with those reported in previous studies.

  4. Radiation resistance of GaAs-GaAlAs vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabbour, J.; Zazoui, M.; Sun, G.C.; Bourgoin, J.C.; Gilard, O.

    2005-02-15

    The variations of the optical and electrical characteristics of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser based on GaAs quantum wells have been monitored versus irradiation with 1 MeV electrons. The results are understood by the introduction of nonradiative recombination centers in the wells whose characteristics, capture cross section for minority carriers times their introduction rate, can be determined. A similar study performed for proton irradiation shows that the results can be explained in the same way when the introduction rate of the defects is replaced by the proton energy loss into atomic collisions. These results allow us to deduce the equivalence between electron and proton irradiations: A flux of 1 proton cm{sup -2} which loses an energy E{sub nl} (eV) into atomic collisions is equivalent to a fluence of about 9x10{sup -2} E{sub nl} cm{sup -2}, 1 MeV electrons.

  5. Investigation of the GaN-on-GaAs interface for vertical power device applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mreke, Janina Uren, Michael J.; Kuball, Martin; Novikov, Sergei V.; Foxon, C. Thomas; Hosseini Vajargah, Shahrzad; Wallis, David J.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Haigh, Sarah J.; Al-Khalidi, Abdullah; Wasige, Edward; Thayne, Iain

    2014-07-07

    GaN layers were grown onto (111) GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Minimal band offset between the conduction bands for GaN and GaAs materials has been suggested in the literature raising the possibility of using GaN-on-GaAs for vertical power device applications. I-V and C-V measurements of the GaN/GaAs heterostructures however yielded a rectifying junction, even when both sides of the junction were heavily doped with an n-type dopant. Transmission electron microscopy analysis further confirmed the challenge in creating a GaN/GaAs Ohmic interface by showing a large density of dislocations in the GaN layer and suggesting roughening of the GaN/GaAs interface due to etching of the GaAs by the nitrogen plasma, diffusion of nitrogen or melting of Ga into the GaAs substrate.

  6. Growth of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E.; Crawford, M.H.; Lear, K.L.; Choquette, K.D.

    1996-10-01

    We present growth and characterization of visible and near-infrared vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Discussions on the growth issue of VCSEL materials include growth rate and composition control using an {ital in}{ital situ} normal-incidence reflectometer, comprehensive p- and n-type doping study in AlGaAs by CCl{sub 4} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} over the entire composition range, and optimization of ultra-high material uniformity. We also demonstrate our recent achievements of all-AlGaAs VCSELs which include the first room-temperature continuous- wave demonstration of 700-nm red VCSELs and high-efficiency and low- threshold voltage 850-nm VCSELs.

  7. Modeling and measurement of the motion of the DIII-D vacuum vessel during vertical instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reis, E.; Blevins, R.D.; Jensen, T.H.; Luxon, J.L.; Petersen, P.I.; Strait, E.J.

    1991-11-01

    The motions of the D3-D vacuum vessel during vertical instabilities of elongated plasmas have been measured and studied over the past five years. The currents flowing in the vessel wall and the plasma scrapeoff layer were also measured and correlated to a physics model. These results provide a time history load distribution on the vessel which were input to a dynamic analysis for correlation to the measured motions. The structural model of the vessel using the loads developed from the measured vessel currents showed that the calculated displacement history correlated well with the measured values. The dynamic analysis provides a good estimate of the stresses and the maximum allowable deflection of the vessel. In addition, the vessel motions produce acoustic emissions at 21 Hertz that are sufficiently loud to be felt as well as heard by the D3-D operators. Time history measurements of the sounds were correlated to the vessel displacements. An analytical model of an oscillating sphere provided a reasonable correlation to the amplitude of the measured sounds. The correlation of the theoretical and measured vessel currents, the dynamic measurements and analysis, and the acoustic measurements and analysis show that: (1) The physics model can predict vessel forces for selected values of plasma resistivity. The model also predicts poloidal and toroidal wall currents which agree with measured values; (2) The force-time history from the above model, used in conjunction with an axisymmetric structural model of the vessel, predicts vessel motions which agree well with measured values; (3) The above results, input to a simple acoustic model predicts the magnitude of sounds emitted from the vessel during disruptions which agree with acoustic measurements; (4) Correlation of measured vessel motions with structural analysis shows that a maximum vertical motion of the vessel up to 0.24 in will not overstress the vessel or its supports. 11 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Impact of photonic crystals on LED light extraction efficiency: approaches and limits to vertical structure designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matioli, Elison; Weisbuch, Claude

    2010-08-19

    The enhancement of the extraction efficiency in light emitting diodes (LEDs) through the use of photonic crystals (PhCs) requires a structure design that optimizes the interaction of the guided modes with the PhCs. The main optimization parameters are related to the vertical structure of the LED, such as the thickness of layers, depth of the PhCs, position of the quantum wells as well as the PhC period and fill factor. We review the impact of the vertical design of different approaches of PhC LEDs through a theoretical and experimental standpoint, assessing quantitatively the competing mechanisms that act over each guided mode. Three approaches are described to overcome the main limitation of LEDs with surface PhCs, i.e. the insufficient interaction of low order guided modes with the PhCs. The introduction of an AlGaN confining layer in such structure is shown to be effective in extracting a fraction of the optical energy of low order modes; however, this approach is limited by the growth of the lattice mismatched AlGaN layer on GaN. The second approach, based on thin-film LEDs with PhCs, is limited by the presence of an absorbing reflective metal layer close to the guided modes that plays a major role in the competition between PhC extraction and metal dissipation. Finally, we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically the superior extraction of the guided light in embedded PhC LEDs due to the higher interaction between all optical modes and the PhCs, which resulted in a close to unity extraction efficiency for this device. The use of high-resolution angle-resolved measurements to experimentally determine the PhC extraction parameters was an essential tool for corroborating the theoretical models and quantifying the competing absorption and extraction mechanisms in LEDs.

  9. Supercritical binary geothermal cycle experiments with mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids and a vertical, in-tube, counterflow condenser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demuth, O.J.; Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.; Swank, W.D.

    1985-12-01

    The objective is improved utilization of moderate temperature geothermal resources. Current testing involves supercritical vaporization and counterflow in-tube condensing in an organic Rankine cycle. This report presents a description of the test facility and results from a part of the program in which the condenser was oriented in a vertical attitude. Results of the experiments for the supercritical heaters and the countercurrent, vertical, in-tube condenser are given for both pure and mixed-hydrocarbon working fluids. The heater and condenser behavior predicted by the Heat Transfer Research, Inc. computer codes used for correlation of the data was in excellent agreement with experimental results. A special series of tests, conducted with propane and up to approximately 40% isopentane concentration, indicated that a close approach to ''integral'' condensation was occurring in the vertically-oriented condenser.

  10. Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

    2014-04-30

    Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

  11. Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive Award Process Overview Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive Award Process Overview...

  12. Using computerized tomography to determine ionospheric structures. Part 2, A method using curved paths to increase vertical resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1993-08-01

    A method is presented to unfold the two-dimensional vertical structure in electron density by using data on the total electron content for a series of paths through the ionosphere. The method uses a set of orthonormal basis functions to represent the vertical structure and takes advantage of curved paths and the eikonical equation to reduce the number of iterations required for a solution. Curved paths allow a more thorough probing of the ionosphere with a given set of transmitter and receiver positions. The approach can be directly extended to more complex geometries.

  13. Reservoir performance of a gravity-stable, vertical CO[sub 2] miscible flood: Wolfcamp reef reservoir, Wellman Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bangia, V.K.; Yau, F.F.; Hendricks, G.R. )

    1993-11-01

    A gravity-stable, vertical CO[sub 2] miscible flood was implemented in the Wellman Unit Wolfcamp reef reservoir in 1983. CO[sub 2] was injected into the crest of the reservoir to displace the oil vertically downward, and water was injected into the lower water-swept region of the reservoir to maintain reservoir pressure at slightly above the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP). Excellent production response to increased CO[sub 2] injection was observed. The reservoir performance was encouraging and indicated excellent volumetric conformance and ultimate recovery. This paper reviews the operating strategy and project performance from inception through mid-1991.

  14. Monolithically integrated self-rolled-up microtube-based vertical coupler for three-dimensional photonic integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xin; Arbabi, Ehsan; Goddard, Lynford L.; Li, Xiuling; Chen, Xiaogang

    2015-07-20

    We demonstrate a self-rolled-up microtube-based vertical photonic coupler monolithically integrated on top of a ridge waveguide to achieve three-dimensional (3D) photonic integration. The fabrication process is fully compatible with standard planar silicon processing technology. Strong light coupling between the vertical coupler and the ridge waveguide was observed experimentally, which may provide an alternative route for 3D heterogeneous photonic integration. The highest extinction ratio observed in the transmission spectrum passing through the ridge waveguide was 23 dB.

  15. Top physics: measurement of the tt-bar production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev using lepton + jets events with secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-07

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using events with one charged lepton and jets from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96TeV. In these events, heavy flavor quarks from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, a total of 48 candidate events are selected, where 13.5 {+-} 1.8 events are expected from background contributions. We measure a t{bar t} production cross section of 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup _1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb.

  16. ARM - Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Climate Change A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change ...

  17. Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Research shows that changes in infrastructure prompt changes in behavior (for better or worse). Federal agencies can modify their infrastructure to promote sustainability-oriented behavior change, ideally in ways that make new behaviors easier and more desirable to follow than existing patterns of behavior.

  18. Search for Randall-Sundrum gravitons in the dielectron and diphoton final states with 5.4fb$^{-1}$ of data from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.

    2010-04-01

    Using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we search for decays of the lightest Kaluza-Klein mode of the graviton in the Randall-Sundrum model to ee and {gamma}{gamma}. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of the lightest graviton between 560 GeV and 1050 GeV for values of the coupling k/{bar M}{sub Pl} between 0.01 and 0.1.

  19. Recent DOE Directives Changes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 1, 2009, the Department of Energy (DOE) manuals were revised and issued to correspond with the following recent Contractor Requirements Documents (CRDs) changes to the following Directives: DOE M 205.1-8 Administrative Change 1—Cyber Security Incident Management Manual; DOE M 205.1-7 Administrative Change 1—Security Controls for Unclassified Information Systems Manual; DOE M 205.1-6 Administrative Change 1—Media Sanitization Manual; DOE M 205.1-5 Administrative Change 1—Cyber Security Process Requirements Manual

  20. Vertical ground heat exchanger borehole grouting: Field application studies and in-situ thermal performance testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.

    1998-05-01

    This report summarizes one of a series of EPRI- and National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA)-sponsored research efforts on vertical ground heat exchanger grout and grouting techniques as applied to geothermal heat pumps. In particular, this effort studied actual in-field installation issues for various grout mixtures and types of grouting equipment in different parts of the country.

  1. Measurement of the $t \\bar{t}$ production cross section in the dilepton channel in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-12-29

    The top-antitop quark (t t-bar) production cross section is measured in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 inverse femtobarns. The measurement is performed by analysing events with a pair of electrons or muons, or one electron and one muon, and at least two jets, one of which is identified as originating from hadronisation of a bottom quark. The measured cross section is 239 +/- 2 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) +/- 6 (lum.) pb, for an assumed top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV,morein agreement with the prediction of the standard model.less

  2. Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in t t-bar production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2014-08-01

    The normalised differential top quark-antiquark production cross section is measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the LHC with the CMS detector. The measurement is performed in both the dilepton and lepton + jets decay channels using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns. Using a procedure to associate jets to decay products of the top quarks, the differential cross section of the t t-bar production is determined as a function of the additional jet multiplicity in the lepton + jets channel. Furthermore, the fraction of events with no additional jets is measured in the dilepton channel, as a function of the threshold on the jet transverse momentum. The measurements are compared with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics and no significant deviations are observed.

  3. Search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau(+)tau(-) pairs in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Achary, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjea, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopia, S.; Haley, J.; Hang, L.; Harder, K.; Harein, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoangau, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I. I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-02-01

    We present a search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons decaying into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, were collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set upper limits at the 95% C.L. on the product of production cross section and branching ratio for a scalar resonance decaying into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs, and we interpret these limits as limits on the production of Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and as constraints in the MSSM parameter space.

  4. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Gillberg D.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J-F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Hegeman J. G.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Makovec N.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-20

    We present a measurement of the inclusive jet cross section using the Run II cone algorithm and data collected by the D0 experiment in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.70 fb{sup -1}. The jet energy calibration and the method used to extract the inclusive jet cross section are described. We discuss the main uncertainties, which are dominated by the jet energy scale uncertainty. The results cover jet transverse momenta from 50 GeV to 600 GeV with jet rapidities in the range -2.4 to 2.4 and are compared to predictions using recent proton parton distribution functions. Studies of correlations between systematic uncertainties in transverse momentum and rapidity are presented.

  5. Search for Scalar Top Quark Production in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-03-01

    We report on a search for the supersymmetric partner of the top quark (scalar top) decaying into a charm quark and a neutralino in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample, collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.6 fb{sup -1}. Candidate events are selected by requiring two or more jets and a large imbalance in the transverse momentum. To enhance the analysis sensitivity, at least one of the jets is required to be identified as originating from a charm quark using an algorithm specifically designed for this analysis. The selected events are in good agreement with standard model predictions. In the case of large mass splitting between the scalar top quark and the neutralino we exclude a scalar top quark mass below 180 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level.

  6. Search for High Mass Resonances Decaying to Muon Pairs in $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-01-01

    We present a search for a new narrow, spin-1, high mass resonance decaying to {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} + X, using a matrix element based likelihood and a simultaneous measurement of the resonance mass and production rate. In data with 4.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV, the most likely signal cross section is consistent with zero at 16% confidence level. We therefore do not observe evidence for a high mass resonance, and place limits on models predicting spin-1 resonances, including M > 1071 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level for a Z{prime} boson with the same couplings to fermions as the Z boson.

  7. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section with an in situ Calibration of $b$-jet Identification Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-07-01

    A measurement of the top-quark pair-production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.12 fb{sup -1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab is presented. Decays of top-quark pairs into the final states e{nu} + jets and {mu}{nu} + jets are selected, and the cross section and the b-jet identification efficiency are determined using a new measurement technique which requires that the measured cross sections with exactly one and multiple identified b-quarks from the top-quark decays agree. Assuming a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, a cross section of 8.5 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst.) pb is measured.

  8. Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in t t-bar production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2014-08-20

    The normalised differential top quark-antiquark production cross section is measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the LHC with the CMS detector. The measurement is performed in both the dilepton and lepton + jets decay channels using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 inverse femtobarns. Using a procedure to associate jets to decay products of the top quarks, the differential cross section of the t t-bar production is determined as a function of the additional jet multiplicity in the lepton + jets channel. Furthermore, the fractionmore » of events with no additional jets is measured in the dilepton channel, as a function of the threshold on the jet transverse momentum. The measurements are compared with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics and no significant deviations are observed.« less

  9. Measurement of the $WZ$ Cross Section and Triple Gauge Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-02-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the WZ production cross section as well as limits on anomalous WWZ couplings at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions. The WZ candidates are reconstructed from decays containing three charged leptons and missing energy from a neutrino, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector (7.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity), 64 candidate events are observed with the expected background contributing 8 {+-} 1 events. The measured total cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WZ) = 3.93{sub -0.53}{sup +0.60}(stat){sub -0.46}{sup +0.59}(syst) pb is in good agreement with the standard model prediction of 3.50 {+-} 0.21. The same sample is used to set limits on anomalous WWZ couplings.

  10. Search for Doubly Charged Higgs Boson Pair Production in p(p)over-bar Collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orbaker, D.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; et. al.

    2012-01-10

    We present a search for pair production of doubly-charged Higgs bosons in the processes q{bar q} {yields} H{sup 2+}H{sup 2-} decaying through H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}, {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}, {mu}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}. The search is performed in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of up to 7.0 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The results are used to set 95% C.L. limits on the pair production cross section of doubly-charged Higgs bosons and on their mass for different H{sup {+-}{+-}} branching fractions. Models predicting different H{sup {+-}{+-}} decays are investigated. Assuming B(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = 1 yields an observed (expected) lower limit on the mass of a left-handed H{sub L}{sup {+-}{+-}} boson of 128 (116) GeV and assuming {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = 1 the corresponding limits are 144 (149) GeV. In a model with {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {+-}}) = {Beta}(H{sup {+-}{+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}) = 1/3, we obtain M(H{sub L}{sup {+-}{+-}}) > 130 (138) GeV.

  11. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-06-04

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures are widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use ofmore » the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures.« less

  12. Numerical simulation of supercritical heat transfer under severe axial density gradient in a narrow vertical tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bae, Y. Y.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, Y. W.

    2012-07-01

    A number of computational works have been performed so far for the simulation of heat transfer in a supercritical fluid. The simulations, however, faced a lot of difficulties when heat transfer deteriorates due either to buoyancy or by acceleration. When the bulk temperature approaches the pseudo-critical temperature the fluid experiences a severe axial density gradient on top of a severe radial one. Earlier numerical calculations showed, without exception, unrealistic over-predictions, as soon as the bulk temperature exceeded the pseudo-critical temperature. The over-predictions might have been resulted from an inapplicability of widely-used turbulence models. One of the major causes for the difficulties may probably be an assumption of a constant turbulent Prandtl number. Recent research, both numerical and experimental, indicates that the turbulent Prandtl number is never a constant when the gradient of physical properties is significant. This paper describes the applicability of a variable turbulent Prandtl number to the numerical simulation of heat transfer in supercritical fluids flowing in narrow vertical tubes. (authors)

  13. Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

    2011-11-22

    Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

  14. Characterization of heat loads from mitigated and unmitigated vertical displacement events in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. J.; Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; Strait, E. J.; Wesley, J. C.; Lasnier, C. J.; Pitts, R. A.; Sugihara, M.; Watkins, J.

    2013-06-15

    Experiments have been conducted on the DIII-D tokamak to study the distribution and repeatability of heat loads and vessel currents resulting from vertical displacement events (VDEs). For unmitigated VDEs, the radiated power fraction appears to be of order 50%, with the remaining power dominantly conducted to the vessel walls. Shot-to-shot scatter in heat loads measured at one toroidal location is not large (<50%), suggesting that toroidal asymmetries in conducted heat loads are not large. Conducted heat loads are clearly observed during the current quench (CQ) of both mitigated and unmitigated disruptions. Significant poloidal asymmetries in heat loads and radiated power are often observed in the experiments but are not yet understood. Energy dissipated resistively in the conducting walls during the CQ appears to be small (<5%). The mitigating effect of neon massive gas injection (MGI) as a function of MGI trigger delay has also been studied. Improved mitigation is observed as the MGI trigger delay is decreased. For sufficiently early MGI mitigation, close to 100% radiated energy and a reduction of roughly a factor 2 in vessel forces is achieved.

  15. Reduced graphene oxide and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes superhydrophilic films for supercapacitors devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanin, H.; Saito, E.; Ceragioli, H.J.; Baranauskas, V.; Corat, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Graphene nanosheets were produced onto wire rods. RGO and VACNT-O were evaluated and compared as supercapacitor electrode. RGO and VACNT-O have structural and electrochemical properties quite similars. The materials present good specific capacitance, energy storage and power delivery. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT) superhydrophilic films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition techniques for electrical energy storage investigations. These electrodes were characterized in terms of their material and electrochemical properties by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface wettability, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive and Raman spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic chargedischarge. We observed several physical structural and electrochemical similarities between these carbon-based materials with particular attention to very good specific capacitance, ultra-high energy storage and fast power delivery. Our results showed that the main difference between specific capacitance values is attributed to pseudocapacitive contribution and high density of multiwall nanotubes tips. In this work we have tested a supercapacitor device using the VACNT electrodes.

  16. Buoyant instabilities in downward flow in a symmetrically heated vertical channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, G.; Greif, R.

    1996-07-01

    This study of the downward flow of nitrogen in a tall, partially heated vertical channel (upstream isothermal at T{sub in}*, heated region isothermal at T{sub s}* downstream adiabatic) shows the strong effects of buoyancy even for small temperature differences. Time-dependent oscillations including periodic flow reversals occur along the channel walls. Although the flow and heat transfer are asymmetric, the temperature and axial component of velocity show symmetric reflections at two times that are half a period apart and the lateral component of velocity shows antisymmetric reflections at the two times. There is strong interaction between the downward flow in the central region of the channel and the upward flow along the heated channel walls. At the top of the heated region, the upward buoyant flow turns toward the center of the channel and is incorporated into the downward flow. Along the channel centerline there are nonmonotonic variations of the axial component of velocity and temperature and a large lateral component of velocity that reverses direction periodically. Results are presented for Re = 219.7 and Gr/Re{sup 2} = 1.83, 8.0, and 13.7. The heat transfer and the frequency of the oscillations increases and the flow and temperature fields become more complex as Gr/Re{sup 2} increases. The results have applications to fiber drying, food processing, crystal growth, solar energy collection, cooling of electronic circuits, ventilation, etc.

  17. Development of substrate-removal-free vertical ultraviolet light-emitting diode (RefV-LED)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurose, N. Aoyagi, Y.; Shibano, K.; Araki, T.

    2014-02-15

    A vertical ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diode (LED) that does not require substrate removal is developed. Spontaneous via holes are formed in n-AlN layer epitaxially grown on a high conductive n+Si substrate and the injected current flows directly from the p-electrode to high doped n{sup +} Si substrate through p-AlGaN, multi-quantum wells, n-AlGaN and spontaneous via holes in n-AlN. The spontaneous via holes were formed by controlling feeding-sequence of metal-organic gas sources and NH{sub 3} and growth temperature in MOCVD. The via holes make insulating n-AlN to be conductive. We measured the current-voltage, current-light intensity and emission characteristics of this device. It exhibited a built-in voltage of 3.8 V and emission was stated at 350 nm from quantum wells with successive emission centered at 400 nm. This UV LED can be produced, including formation of n and p electrodes, without any resist process.

  18. Vertical GaN power diodes with a bilayer edge termination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, Jeramy R.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Fischer, Arthur J.; King, Michael P.; Moseley, Michael W.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Kaplar, Robert J.; Kizilyalli, Isik C.; Aktas, Ozgur; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.

    2015-12-07

    Vertical GaN power diodes with a bilayer edge termination (ET) are demonstrated. The GaN p-n junction is formed on a low threading dislocation defect density (104 - 105 cm-2) GaN substrate, and has a 15-μm-thick n-type drift layer with a free carrier concentration of 5 × 1015 cm-3. The ET structure is formed by N implantation into the p+-GaN epilayer just outside the p-type contact to create compensating defects. The implant defect profile may be approximated by a bilayer structure consisting of a fully compensated layer near the surface, followed by a 90% compensated (p) layer near the n-type drift region. These devices exhibit avalanche breakdown as high as 2.6 kV at room temperature. In addition simulations show that the ET created by implantation is an effective way to laterally distribute the electric field over a large area. This increases the voltage at which impact ionization occurs and leads to the observed higher breakdown voltages.

  19. Vertical GaN power diodes with a bilayer edge termination

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dickerson, Jeramy R.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Bryant, Benjamin N.; Fischer, Arthur J.; King, Michael P.; Moseley, Michael W.; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Kaplar, Robert J.; Kizilyalli, Isik C.; Aktas, Ozgur; et al

    2015-12-07

    Vertical GaN power diodes with a bilayer edge termination (ET) are demonstrated. The GaN p-n junction is formed on a low threading dislocation defect density (104 - 105 cm-2) GaN substrate, and has a 15-μm-thick n-type drift layer with a free carrier concentration of 5 × 1015 cm-3. The ET structure is formed by N implantation into the p+-GaN epilayer just outside the p-type contact to create compensating defects. The implant defect profile may be approximated by a bilayer structure consisting of a fully compensated layer near the surface, followed by a 90% compensated (p) layer near the n-type driftmore » region. These devices exhibit avalanche breakdown as high as 2.6 kV at room temperature. In addition simulations show that the ET created by implantation is an effective way to laterally distribute the electric field over a large area. This increases the voltage at which impact ionization occurs and leads to the observed higher breakdown voltages.« less

  20. Heat exchanger sizing for vertical closed-loop ground-source heat pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cane, R.L.D.; Clemes, S.B.; Morrison, A.; Hughes, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    A building energy simulation program has been used in conjunction with a ground heat exchanger sizing algorithm to develop general guidelines on how to size vertical ground heat exchangers for closed-loop ground-source heat pump systems in large buildings. The analysis considered three commercial building types of varying size with different internal loads and heat pump efficiencies. Each building variation was simulated in seven cities, three in the US and four in Canada. The ground heat exchanger sizing algorithm has been previously validated against actual system data. The analysis results showed a strong correlation between heat exchanger length required and annual energy rejected to the ground, if the building was cooling-dominated, or annual energy extracted from the ground, if the building was heating-dominated. The resulting sizing guidelines recommend hour-by-hour energy analysis to determine the energy extracted from and rejected to the building water loop. Using this information the designer will have available easy-to-use, accurate sizing guidelines that should result in more economical installations than those based on previous ``rule of thumb`` guidelines.