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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Palo Verde  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Palo Verde" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

2

Search for Neutrino Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the initial results from a measurement of the anti-neutrino flux and spectrum at a distance of about 800 m from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented gadolinium-loaded scintillation detector. We find that the anti-neutrino flux agrees with that predicted in the absence of oscillations to better than 5%, excluding at 90% CL $\\rm\\bar\

F. Boehm; J. Busenitz; B. Cook; G. Gratta; H. Henrikson; J. Kornis; D. Lawrence; K. B. Lee; K. McKinny; L. Miller; V. Novikov; A. Piepke; B. Ritchie; D. Tracy; P. Vogel; Y-F. Wang; J. Wolf

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

3

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

Pázsit, Imre

4

Pollen and plant macrofossil vegetation record recovered from Hinds Cave, Val Verde County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Advisory Committee & Dr. Vsughn N. Bryant, , Tr. Pollen anc plant macrof'ossil samples were collected from Hinds Cave, an arc?eolog'ca& "ite in Val Verde County, Texas, Plant macrofossils were identified and quantified, and relative pollen frequencies... ttle over the la""t 9, 000-10, 000 years, ACKNOWLED GEANT S Dr, Vaughn N. Bryant of the Biology Department, Texas AAM University, deserves my deepest gratitude because he is the reascn I entered the field of palynology. r. Bryant also patiently...

Dering, James Philip

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal for the digital protection systems of a nuclear power plant. When spec- ifying requirements for software and CRSA processes are described using shutdown system 2 of the Wolsong nuclear power plants as the digital

6

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazière

Demazière, Christophe

7

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

Pázsit, Imre

8

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

9

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

10

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

11

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

12

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

13

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

14

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

15

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

16

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

17

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

18

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

19

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

20

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

22

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

23

VOLUME 84, NUMBER 17 P HY S I CA L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 APRIL 2000 Search for Neutrino Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors F. Boehm, 3 J. Busenitz, 1 B. Cook, 3 G. Gratta, 4 H. Henrikson at a distance of about 800 m from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using.15.+g, 14.60.Lm, 25.30.Pt Nuclear reactors have been used as intense sources of â?¢ n e in experiments

Gratta, Giorgio

24

VOLUME 84, NUMBER 17 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 APRIL 2000 Search for Neutrino Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oscillations at the Palo Verde Nuclear Reactors F. Boehm,3 J. Busenitz,1 B. Cook,3 G. Gratta,4 H. Henrikson,3 J the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented gadolinium.30.Pt Nuclear reactors have been used as intense sources of ¯ne in experiments searching for neutrino

Gratta, Giorgio

25

CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing WAS DEEPLY INVOLVED IN ALMOST EVERY ASPECT OF BUILDING THE PLANTS THROUGH · Quality Assurance · Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

26

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

27

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

28

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

29

Nuclear Power Plant Design Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Power Plant Design Project A Response to the Environmental and Economic Challenge Of Global.............................................................................................................. 4 3. Assessment of the Issues and Needs for a New Plant

30

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

31

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

32

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

33

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,160","9,556",100.0,"Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,160","9,556",100.0...

34

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0...

35

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(percent)","Owner" "Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Unit 1",685,"5,918",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Generation Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",685,"5,918",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal...

36

Issues for New Nuclear Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Explore * Idaho's energy picture * Nuclear power in the U.S. * Potential for a nuclear power plant in Idaho 0 5 10 15 20 25 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Million Megawatt-Hours Total...

37

Issues for New Nuclear Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to produce heavy components and nuclear-grade equipment - Transportation of heavy components - Constructionoperation workforce - Cost of new plants Cooling Technology...

38

Owners of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

40

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

42

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop jointly a licensing strategy for the Next Generation Nuclear plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) for...

43

Final results from the Palo Verde neutrino oscillation experiment J. Busenitz,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water reactors with a total thermal power of 11.63 GW. The detector was located at a shallow underground. Improvements have been made on recon- struction and simulation, reducing the systematic error by one at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station in Arizona. The plant consists of three identical pressurized

Piepke, Andreas G.

44

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

45

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear- based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950°C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications (see Figure 1). The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to other nuclear technologies.

Dr. David A. Petti

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Plant nuclear bodies Peter J Shaw1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant nuclear bodies Peter J Shaw1 and John WS Brown2 Knowledge of the organization bodies have been examined in plants, and recently, various other sub-nuclear domains that are involved. Until recently, the only plant nuclear bodies to be in any way characterized were the nucleolus [11

Shaw, Peter

49

Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

Purvis, James W.

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant Andrew C. Kadak Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Small is Beautiful · Nuclear Energy - But Getting Better #12;Politically Correct ! · Natural Safety is a bad idea. · There is no new nuclear energy plant that is competitive at this time. · De-regulation did

51

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

53

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

54

Future AI and Robotics Technology for Nuclear Plants Decommissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future AI and Robotics Technology for Nuclear Plants Decommissioning Huosheng Hu and Liam Cragg to aid in decommissioning nuclear plants that have been used to process or store nuclear materials. Scope potential applications to nuclear plant decommissioning, namely Nanotechnology, Telepresence

Hu, Huosheng

55

Organizational learning at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Nuclear Power Plant Advisory Panel on Organizational Learning provides channels of communications between the management and organization research projects of the MIT International Program for Enhanced Nuclear Power ...

Carroll, John S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Components," Journal of Nuclear Materials, 212-215, 1223 (1994). 13. Arnold, L, Windscale 1957, Anatomy of a Nuclear Accident, St Martin Press, London, 1992. 14....

57

Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF)] [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

aguirre nuclear plant: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Denmark December 1991 12;Abstract. A computer model of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant a compute simulation of a simplified pressurized nuclear power plant model...

59

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis...

60

RESEARCH PAPER Composition of the plant nuclear envelope: theme and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PAPER Composition of the plant nuclear envelope: theme and variations Iris Meier* Plant plants is only just beginning, fundamental differences from the animal nuclear envelope have already been to known plant regulatory pathways. Plant nuclear envelope composition The inner nuclear envelope A number

Meier, Iris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Presented by NGNP Industry Alliance November 30, 2009 I In nd du us st tr ry y A Al ll li ia an nc ce e Clean,...

62

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Columbia Generating Station Unit...

63

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Duane Arnold Energy Center Unit...

64

Dose reduction at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The collective dose equivalent at nuclear power plants increased from 1250 rem in 1969 to nearly 54,000 rem in 1980. This rise is attributable primarily to an increase in nuclear generated power from 1289 MW-y to 29,155 MW-y; and secondly, to increased average plant age. However, considerable variation in exposure occurs from plant to plant depending on plant type, refueling, maintenance, etc. In order to understand the factors influencing these differences, an investigation was initiated to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at light water plants. Objectives are to: identify high-dose maintenance tasks and related dose-reduction techniques; investigate utilization of high-reliability, low-maintenance equipment; recommend improved radioactive waste handling equipment and procedures; examine incentives for dose reduction; and compile an ALARA handbook.

Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Sun-Sentinel How Florida's nuclear plants compare to Japan's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sun-Sentinel How Florida's nuclear plants compare to Japan's By Julie Patel March 17, 2011 01:35 PM What went wrong at the Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan and how are Florida's nuclear plants prepared to deal with similar problems? Nuclear operators in Florida say the biggest risk their plants face is from

Belogay, Eugene A.

66

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Callaway Unit 1","1,190","8,996",100.0,"Union...

67

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Grand Gulf Unit 1","1,251","9,643",100.0,"Syste...

68

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Should that prove to be impractical (e.g. due to excessive heat loss in the intermediate heat transfer loop), an earthen berm separating the two plants may be a suitable...

69

Nuclear plant cancellations: causes, costs, and consequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was commissioned in order to help quantify the effects of nuclear plant cancellations on the Nation's electricity prices. This report presents a historical overview of nuclear plant cancellations through 1982, the costs associated with those cancellations, and the reasons that the projects were terminated. A survey is presented of the precedents for regulatory treatment of the costs, the specific methods of cost recovery that were adopted, and the impacts of these decisions upon ratepayers, utility stockholders, and taxpayers. Finally, the report identifies a series of other nuclear plants that remain at risk of canellation in the future, principally as a result of similar demand, finance, or regulatory problems cited as causes of cancellation in the past. The costs associated with these potential cancellations are estimated, along with their regional distributions, and likely methods of cost recovery are suggested.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP).

Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Floating nuclear power plant safety assurance principles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the north regions of the Russian federation and low density population areas, there is a real necessity for ecological clean energy small power sources. For this purpose, floating nuclear power plants, designed on the basis of atomic ship building engineering, are being conceptualized. It is possible to use the ship building plants for the reactor purposes. Issues such as radioactive waste management are described.

Zvonarev, B.M.; Kuchin, N.L.; Sergeev, I.V.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

SELFMONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF­MONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION) Aldo and identification are extremely important activities for the safety of a nuclear power plant. In particular inside huge and complex production plants. 1 INTRODUCTION Safety in nuclear power plants requires

73

Nuclear plant irradiated steel handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This reference handbook presents selected information extracted from the EPRI reactor surveillance program database, which contains the results from surveillance program reports on 57 plants and 116 capsules. Tabulated data includes radiation induced temperature shifts, capsule irradiation conditions and statistical features of the Charpy V-notch curves. General information on the surveillance materials is provided and the Charpy V-notch energy results are presented graphically.

Oldfield, W.; Oldfield, F.M.; Lombrozo, P.M.; McConnell, P.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Date Set for Closure of Russian Nuclear Weapons Plant - NNSA...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Date Set for Closure of Russian Nuclear Weapons Plant - NNSA Is Helping Make It Happen | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission...

75

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi Chevalier EDF R&D ­ Simulation and information Technologies for Power generation system Department 6, Quai Monitoring, Empirical Modeling, Power Plants, Safety Critical Nuclear Instrumentation, Autoassociative models

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

76

Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any petition for approval of construction of a nuclear energy generating plant within the state, or any petition for approval of the operation of a nuclear energy generating plant beyond the date...

77

Advanced nuclear plant control room complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Balance of Plant Requirements for a Nuclear Hydrogen Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the requirements for the components and systems that support the hydrogen production portion of a 600 megawatt thermal (MWt) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These systems, defined as the "balance-of-plant" (BOP), are essential to operate an effective hydrogen production plant. Examples of BOP items are: heat recovery and heat rejection equipment, process material transport systems (pumps, valves, piping, etc.), control systems, safety systems, waste collection and disposal systems, maintenance and repair equipment, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical supply and distribution, and others. The requirements in this document are applicable to the two hydrogen production processes currently under consideration in the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. These processes are the sulfur iodide (S-I) process and the high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process. At present, the other two hydrogen production process - the hybrid sulfur-iodide electrolytic process (SE) and the calcium-bromide process (Ca-Br) -are under flow sheet development and not included in this report. While some features of the balance-of-plant requirements are common to all hydrogen production processes, some details will apply only to the specific needs of individual processes.

Bradley Ward

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Improved Economics of Nuclear Plant Life Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adoption of new on-line monitoring, diagnostic and eventually prognostics technologies has the potential to impact the economics of the existing nuclear power plant fleet, new plants and future advanced designs. To move from periodic inspection to on-line monitoring for condition based maintenance and eventually prognostics will require advances in sensors, better understanding of what and how to measure within the plant; enhanced data interrogation, communication and integration; new predictive models for damage/aging evolution; system integration for real world deployments; quantification of uncertainties in what are inherently ill-posed problems and integration of enhanced condition based maintenance/prognostics philosophies into new plant designs, operation and O&M approaches. The move to digital systems in petrochemical, process and fossil fuel power plants is enabling major advances to occur in the instrumentation, controls and monitoring systems and approaches employed. The adoption within the nuclear power community of advanced on-line monitoring and advanced diagnostics has the potential for the reduction in costly periodic surveillance that requires plant shut-down , more accurate cost-benefit analysis, “just-in-time” maintenance, pre-staging of maintenance tasks, move towards true “operation without failures” and a jump start on advanced technologies for new plant concepts, such as those under the International Gen IV Program. There are significant opportunities to adopt condition-based maintenance when upgrades are implemented at existing facilities. The economic benefit from a predictive maintenance program based upon advanced on-line monitoring and advanced diagnostics can be demonstrated from a cost/benefit analysis. An analysis of the 104 US legacy systems has indicated potential savings at over $1B per year when applied to all key equipment; a summary of the supporting analysis is provided in this paper.

Bond, Leonard J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Jarrell, Donald B.; Bond, Joseph W D.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Seismic requirements for design of nuclear power plants and nuclear test facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This standard establishes engineering requirements for the design of nuclear power plants and nuclear test facilities to accommodate vibratory effects of earthquakes.

Not Available

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nuclear power plant performance assessment pertaining to plant aging in France and the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of aging on nuclear power plant performance has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The approaches used to make an assessment of this effect strongly influence the economics of nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Cesium Removal at Fukushima Nuclear Plant - 13215  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Great East Japan Earthquake that took place on March 11, 2011 created a number of technical challenges at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant. One of the primary challenges involved the treatment of highly contaminated radioactive wastewater. Avantech Inc. developed a unique patent pending treatment system that addressed the numerous technical issues in an efficient and safe manner. Our paper will address the development of the process from concept through detailed design, identify the lessons learned, and provide the updated results of the project. Specific design and operational parameters/benefits discussed in the paper include: - Selection of equipment to address radionuclide issues; - Unique method of solving the additional technical issues associated with Hydrogen Generation and Residual Heat; - Operational results, including chemistry, offsite discharges and waste generation. Results show that the customized process has enabled the utility to recycle the wastewater for cooling and reuse. This technology had a direct benefit to nuclear facilities worldwide. (authors)

Braun, James L.; Barker, Tracy A. [Avantech Incorporated, 95A Sunbelt Blvd Columbia, SC 29203 (United States)] [Avantech Incorporated, 95A Sunbelt Blvd Columbia, SC 29203 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006Photovoltaic TheoryPlant 242-Z Americium Recovery Facility

84

Mesa Verde's New Museum Showcases Sustainable Building Technologies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Mesa Verde's New Museum Showcases Sustainable Building Technologies Mesa Verde's New Museum Showcases Sustainable Building Technologies April 18, 2013 - 11:42am Addthis Mesa Verde...

85

News Release Closure of Russian Nuclear Plant.PDF  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

RELEASE Jonathan Kiell, 202586-7371 September 27, 2001 Date Set for Closure of Russian Nuclear Weapons Plant U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration Is Helping Make It...

86

Electromagnetic Compatibility in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) has long been a key element of qualification for mission critical instrumentation and control (I&C) systems used by the U.S. military. The potential for disruption of safety-related I&C systems by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), or power surges is also an issue of concern for the nuclear industry. Experimental investigations of the potential vulnerability of advanced safety systems to EMI/RFI, coupled with studies of reported events at nuclear power plants (NPPs) that are attributed to EMI/RFI, confirm the safety significance of EMC for both analog and digital technology. As a result, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in the development of the technical basis for guidance that addresses EMC for safety-related I&C systems in NPPs. This research has involved the identification of engineering practices to minimize the potential impact of EMI/RFI and power surges and an evaluation of the ambient electromagnetic environment at NPPs to tailor those practices for use by the nuclear industry. Recommendations for EMC guidance have been derived from these research findings and are summarized in this paper.

Ewing, P.D.; Kercel, S.W.; Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

87

Risk-informed incident management for nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decision making as a part of nuclear power plant operations is a critical, but common, task. Plant management is forced to make decisions that may have safety and economic consequences. Formal decision theory offers the ...

Smith, Curtis Lee, 1966-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 17, 2012 ... Abstract: Nuclear power plants must be regularly shut down in order to perform refueling and maintenance operations. The scheduling of the ...

Kengy Barty

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

89

Optimization Online - Nuclear norm minimization for the planted ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 21, 2009 ... Nuclear norm minimization for the planted clique and biclique problems. Brendan Ames(bpames ***at*** math.uwaterloo.ca) Stephen ...

Brendan Ames

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

90

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

average value for nuclear plants) aFinal Envir. Statement (Statement, Koshkonong Nuclear Plant, August 1976. U. S.rem; operation of the nuclear plants themselves only *Other

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety-related nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are designed to withstand loadings from a number of low-probability external and interval events, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and loss-of-coolant accidents. Loadings incurred during normal plant operation therefore generally are not significant enough to cause appreciable degradation. However, these structures are susceptible to aging by various processes depending on the operating environment and service conditions. The effects of these processes may accumulate within these structures over time to cause failure under design conditions, or lead to costly repair. In the late 1980s and early 1990s several occurrences of degradation of NPP structures were discovered at various facilities (e.g., corrosion of pressure boundary components, freeze- thaw damage of concrete, and larger than anticipated loss of prestressing force). Despite these degradation occurrences and a trend for an increasing rate of occurrence, in-service inspection of the safety-related structures continued to be performed in a somewhat cursory manner. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the first of several new requirements to help ensure that adequate in-service inspection of these structures is performed. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience presented. Nondestructive examination techniques commonly used to inspect the NPP steel and concrete structures to identify and quantify the amount of damage present are reviewed. Finally, areas where nondestructive evaluation techniques require development (i.e., inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary, and thick heavily reinforced concrete sections are discussed.

Graves, H.L.; Naus, D.J.; Norris, W.E.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMERGENCY PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSINGEmergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination ofproposed nuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . • . . . .

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Daya Bay Nuclear Plant Project in the Light of International Environmental Law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result from locating a nuclear plant so close to the Hongat 1292 (1975). THE DA YA BAY NUCLEAR PLANT PROJECT national1986) (H.K. ). THE DA YA BAY NUCLEAR PLANT PROJECT IV. THE "

Mushkat, Roda

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

98

Mapping complexity sources in nuclear power plant domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the sources of complexity in advanced Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their effects on human reliability is critical for ensuring safe performance of both operators and the entire system. New ...

Sasangohar, Farzan

99

Can New Nuclear Power Plants be Project Financed?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper considers the prospects for financing a wave of new nuclear power plants (NPP) using project financing, which is used widely in large capital intensive infrastructure investments, including the power and gas sectors, but has...

Taylor, Simon

100

The Daya Bay Nuclear Plant Project in the Light of International Environmental Law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ministry of Nuclear Industry; PACIFIC BASIN LAW JOURNAL [international law prohibits a state from building a nuclearNUCLEAR PLANT PROJECT IN THE LIGHT OF INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

Mushkat, Roda

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Development of decontamination techniques for decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NUPEC has been developing various techniques to safely and efficiently decommission large commercial nuclear power plants. The development work, referred to as the verification tests, has been performed since 1982. The verification tests on decontamination techniques have focused on the reduction of both occupational radiation exposure and radioactive waste volume. Experiments on various decontamination methods have been carried out. Prospects of applying efficient decontamination techniques to commercial nuclear power plant decommissioning are bright due to the experimental results.

Ishikura, T.; Miwa, T.; Onozawa, T.; Ohtsuka, H. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Plant and Components Dept.; Ishigure, K. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Engineering and System Science

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 UNSUPERVISED CLUSTERING FOR FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi1 of prototypical behaviors. Its performance is tested with respect to an artificial case study and then applied on transients originated by different faults in the pressurizer of a nuclear power reactor. Key Words: Fault

Boyer, Edmond

103

Boron control system for a nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchangers which reversibly store borate ions in a temperature dependent process are combined with evaporative boric acid recovery apparatus to provide a boron control system for controlling the reactivity of nuclear power plants. A plurality of ion exchangers are operated sequentially to provide varying amounts of boric acid to a nuclear reactor for load follow operations. Evaporative boric acid recovery apparatus is utilized for major changes in the boron concentration within the nuclear reactor.

Brown, W.W.; Van der Schoot, M.R.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Licensing Strategy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reactor that is based on research and development (R&D) activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative and shall be used to generate electricity,...

105

ISOLATION OF NUCLEAR DNA FROM PLANTS Based on Peterson et al. (1997), Plant Mol. Biol. Reptr. 15: 148-153.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISOLATION OF NUCLEAR DNA FROM PLANTS Based on Peterson et al. (1997), Plant Mol. Biol. Reptr. 15 quantities of nuclear DNA from a wide variety of plants including pine, tomato, juniper, cypress, sorghum for plants in which polyphenols are a problem, although it has provided good results for every plant species

Ray, David

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Aging of concrete structures in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Structural Aging (SAG) Program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), had the overall objective of providing the USNRC with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plant structures for continued service. The program consists of three technical tasks: materials property data base, structural component assessment/repair technology, and quantitative methodology for continued service determinations. Major accomplishments under the SAG Program during the first two years of its planned five-year duration have included: development of a Structural Materials Information Center and formulation of a Structural Aging Assessment Methodology for Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants. 9 refs.

Naus, D.J.; Pland, C.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Arndt, E.G. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Aging management of containment structures in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted by ORNL under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of nuclear power plant containment and other safety-related structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Accomplishments include development of a Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, evaluation of models for potential concrete containment degradation factors, development of a procedure to identify critical structures and degradation factors important to aging management, evaluations of nondestructive evaluation techniques. assessments of European and North American repair practices for concrete, review of parameters affecting corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and development of methodologies for making current condition assessments and service life predictions of new or existing reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants.

Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Graves, H.L. III; Norris, W.E. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Tour of Entergy's Nuclear Power Plant in River Bend Owner: Entergy Gulf States Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tour of Entergy's Nuclear Power Plant in River Bend Owner: Entergy Gulf States Inc. Reactor Type a nuclear power plant. Plant was Entergy, a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) type. Built in the 80's, it has of the veteran plant workers. The presentation gave the nuclear plant engineering basics and built

Ervin, Elizabeth K.

109

Regulatory guidance for lightning protection in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects. (authors)

Kisner, R. A.; Wilgen, J. B.; Ewing, P. D.; Korsah, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6007 (United States); Antonescu, C. E. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Regulatory Guidance for Lightning Protection in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects.

Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Ewing, Paul D [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Antonescu, Christina E [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

total reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Seabrook Unit 1","1,247","10,910",100.0,"NextEr...

112

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOE’s project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Nuclear Power Plant NDE Challenges - Past, Present, and Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operating fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants was built to fossil plant standards (of workmanship, not fitness for service) and with good engineering judgment. Fortuitously, those nuclear power plants were designed using defense-in-depth concepts, with nondestructive examination (NDE) an important layer, so they can tolerate almost any component failure and still continue to operate safely. In the 30+ years of reactor operation, many material failures have occurred. Unfortunately, NDE has not provided the reliability to detect degradation prior to initial failure (breaching the pressure boundary). However, NDE programs have been improved by moving from prescriptive procedures to performance demonstrations that quantify inspection effectiveness for flaw detection probability and sizing accuracy. Other improvements include the use of risk-informed strategies to ensure that reactor components contributing the most risk receive the best and most frequent inspections. Another challenge is the recent surge of interest in building new nuclear power plants in the United States to meet increasing domestic energy demand. New construction will increase the demand for NDE but also offers the opportunity for more proactive inspections. This paper reviews the inception and evolution of NDE for nuclear power plants over the past 40 years, recounts lessons learned, and describes the needs remaining as existing plants continue operation and new construction is contemplated.

Doctor, S. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 58, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2011 277 Anomaly Detection in Nuclear Power Plants via  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Nuclear Power Plants via Symbolic Dynamic Filtering Xin Jin, Student Member, IEEE, Yin Guo, Soumik Sarkar detection algorithm for condition monitoring of nuclear power plants, where symbolic feature extraction Innova- tive & Secure (IRIS) simulator of nuclear power plants, and its per- formance is evaluated

Ray, Asok

116

Nuclear Power Plant Containment Pressure Boundary Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants is summarized. This research is aimed at understanding the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containment and liners of concrete containment. This understanding will lead to improvements in risk-informed regulatory decision making. Containment pressure boundary components are described and potential aging factors identified. Quantitative tools for condition assessments of aging structures to maintain an acceptable level of reliability over the service life of the plant are discussed. Finally, the impact of aging (i.e., loss of shell thickness due to corrosion) on steel containment fragility for a pressurized water reactor ice-condenser plant is presented.

Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.C.; Costello, J.F.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Service experience and reliability improvement: Nuclear, fossil, and petrochemical plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication contains papers presented at the following four symposia conducted at the 1994 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota, June 19--23: Service Experience in Nuclear Plants; Risk-Based Inspection and Evaluation; Service Experience in Operating Fossil Power Plants; and Service Experience in Petrochemical Plants. These symposia were sponsored by the Materials and Fabrication and the Design and Analysis Committees of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division. The objective of these symposia was to disseminate information on issues and degradation that have resulted from the operation of nuclear, fossil, and petrochemical power plants, as well as related reliability issues. Thirty-nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Bamford, W.H.; Cipolla, R.C.; Warke, W.R.; Onyewuenyi, O.A.; Bagnoli, D.; Phillips, J.H.; Prager, M.; Becht, C. IV (eds.)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Service experience and life management: Nuclear, fossil, and petrochemical plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication contains papers presented at four symposia conducted at the 1993 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference in Denver, Colorado, July 25--29. The symposia titles are listed below: Service Experience and Reliability Improvement in Nuclear Plants; Service Experience in Operating Fossil Power Plants; Service Experience in Petrochemical Plants; Aging Management, Condition Monitoring and Diagnostics. These symposia were sponsored by the Materials and Fabrication and the Design and Analysis Committees of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division. The objective of these sessions was to disseminate information on issues and degradation which have resulted from the operation of nuclear, fossil, and petrochemical power plants, as well as related monitoring and diagnostic techniques. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Bamford, W.H. (ed.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Nuclear power plant fire protection: philosophy and analysis. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report combines a fire severity analysis technique with a fault tree methodology for assessing the importance to nuclear power plant safety of certain combinations of components and systems. Characteristics unique to fire, such as propagation induced by the failure of barriers, have been incorporated into the methodology. By applying the resulting fire analysis technique to actual conditions found in a representative nuclear power plant, it is found that some safety and nonsafety areas are both highly vulnerable to fire spread and impotant to overall safety, while other areas prove to be of marginal importance. Suggestions are made for further experimental and analytical work to supplement the fire analysis method.

Berry, D. L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A methodology for evaluating ``new`` technologies in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As obsolescence and spare parts issues drive nuclear power plants to upgrade with new technology (such as optical fiber communication systems), the ability of the new technology to withstand stressors present where it is installed needs to be determined. In particular, new standards may be required to address qualification criteria and their application to the nuclear power plants of tomorrow. This paper discusses the failure modes and age-related degradation mechanisms of fiber optic communication systems, and suggests a methodology for identifying when accelerated aging should be performed during qualification testing.

Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Holcomb, D.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Reproductive Life Events in the Population Living in the Vicinity of a Nuclear Waste Reprocessing Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: There is concern about the health of populations living close to nuclear waste reprocessing plants. We conducted the health of the population living in the vicinity of nuclear waste reprocessing plants was raised the Dounreay nuclear waste reprocessing plant (United Kingdom).[1] Similar studies around the French nuclear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

124

Yeast-Plant Coupled Vector System for Identification of Nuclear Proteins1[OA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yeast-Plant Coupled Vector System for Identification of Nuclear Proteins1[OA] Adi Zaltsman, Bu.G.) Nuclear proteins are involved in many critical biological processes within plant cells and, therefore nuclear localization. Thus, studies of plant nuclear proteins would be facilitated by a convenient

Citovsky, Vitaly

125

Ground-based testing of space nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small nuclear power plants for space applications are evaluated according to their testability in this two part report. The first part introduces the issues involved in testing these power plants. Some of the concerns include oxygen embrittlement of critical components, the test environment, the effects of a vacuum environment on materials, the practically of racing an activated test chamber, and possible testing alternative the SEHPTR, king develop at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

McDonald, T.G.

1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

ASSESSING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT SAFETY AND RECOVERY FROM EARTHQUAKES USING A SYSTEM-OF-SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Monte Carlo simulation the probability that the nuclear power plant enters in an unsafe stateASSESSING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT SAFETY AND RECOVERY FROM EARTHQUAKES USING A SYSTEM in which the plant is embedded. As a test system, we consider the impacts produced on a nuclear power plant

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

127

A formal software requirements specification method for digital nuclear plant protection systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A formal software requirements specification method for digital nuclear plant protection systems plant protection system in nuclear power plants. NuSCR improves the readability and specifiability those in aerospace, satellite and nuclear power plants, whose failure could result in danger to human

128

Aging assessment of large electric motors in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large electric motors serve as the prime movers to drive high capacity pumps, fans, compressors, and generators in a variety of nuclear plant systems. This study examined the stressors that cause degradation and aging in large electric motors operating in various plant locations and environments. The operating history of these machines in nuclear plant service was studied by review and analysis of failure reports in the NPRDS and LER databases. This was supplemented by a review of motor designs, and their nuclear and balance of plant applications, in order to characterize the failure mechanisms that cause degradation, aging, and failure in large electric motors. A generic failure modes and effects analysis for large squirrel cage induction motors was performed to identify the degradation and aging mechanisms affecting various components of these large motors, the failure modes that result, and their effects upon the function of the motor. The effects of large motor failures upon the systems in which they are operating, and on the plant as a whole, were analyzed from failure reports in the databases. The effectiveness of the industry`s large motor maintenance programs was assessed based upon the failure reports in the databases and reviews of plant maintenance procedures and programs.

Villaran, M.; Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. NeroResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn Cyber Security NuclearNewNatural

132

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn Cyber Security NuclearNewNaturalOur Mission /

133

Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Kansas City Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational Nuclear SecurityNationalApply for Our Jobs /Operations / Acquisition and

135

New Generation Nuclear Plant -- High Level Functions and Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This functions and requirements (F&R) document was prepared for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The highest-level functions and requirements for the NGNP preconceptual design are identified in this document, which establishes performance definitions for what the NGNP will achieve. NGNP designs will be developed based on these requirements by commercial vendor(s).

J. M. Ryskamp; E. J. Gorski; E. A. Harvego; S. T. Khericha; G. A. Beitel

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

137

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants. WASH-1400. October 1975.Content of for Nuclear Power Plants. Regulatory Guide 1.101.PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSING PROCESS

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Rancho Seco nuclear plant was simulated, A total ofdistributions around the nuclear plant sites based on thegrowth surrounding nuclear plants after the issuance of the

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surrounding a nuclear plant, and they are stronglylocation for a nuclear plant, but it is the measures thatand consequences of nuclear plant accidents and would match

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Enhancement of NRC station blackout requirements for nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction to conduct a systematic and methodical review of NRC processes and regulations to determine whether the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system and to make recommendations to the Commission for its policy direction, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The NTTF's review resulted in a set of recommendations that took a balanced approach to defense-in-depth as applied to low-likelihood, high-consequence events such as prolonged station blackout (SBO) resulting from severe natural phenomena. Part 50, Section 63, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 'Loss of All Alternating Current Power,' currently requires that each nuclear power plant must be able to cool the reactor core and maintain containment integrity for a specified duration of an SBO. The SBO duration and mitigation strategy for each nuclear power plant is site specific and is based on the robustness of the local transmission system and the transmission system operator's capability to restore offsite power to the nuclear power plant. With regard to SBO, the NTTF recommended that the NRC strengthen SBO mitigation capability at all operating and new reactors for design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NTTF also recommended strengthening emergency preparedness for prolonged SBO and multi-unit events. These recommendations, taken together, are intended to clarify and strengthen US nuclear reactor safety regarding protection against and mitigation of the consequences of natural disasters and emergency preparedness during SBO. The focus of this paper is on the existing SBO requirements and NRC initiatives to strengthen SBO capability at all operating and new reactors to address prolonged SBO stemming from design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NRC initiatives are intended to enhance core and spent fuel pool cooling, reactor coolant system integrity, and containment integrity. (authors)

McConnell, M. W. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop: 012-H2, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Online Monitoring of Plant Assets in the Nuclear Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today’s online monitoring technologies provide opportunities to perform predictive and proactive health management of assets within many different industries, in particular the defense and aerospace industries. The nuclear industry can leverage these technologies to enhance safety, productivity, and reliability of the aging fleet of existing nuclear power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is collaborating with the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Long-Term Operations program to implement online monitoring in existing nuclear power plants. Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using EPRI’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software, a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures used to assess the health status of generator step-up transformers and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. Fault signatures are developed based on the results of detailed technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The Diagnostic Advisor of the FW-PHM Suite software matches developed fault signatures with operational data to provide early identification of critical faults and troubleshooting advice that could be used to distinguish between faults with similar symptoms. This research is important as it will support the automation of predictive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

Nancy Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal; Binh Pham; Richard Rusaw; Randy Bickford

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Reprocessing of nuclear fuels at the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than 30 years, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) has been a major supplier of nuclear materials such as plutonium-239 and tritium-3 for nuclear and thermonuclear weapons, plutonium-238 for space exploration, and isotopes of americium, curium, and californium for use in the nuclear research community. SRP is a complete nuclear park, providing most of the processes in the nuclear fuel cycle. Key processes involve fabrication and cladding of the nuclear fuel, target, and control assemblies; rework of heavy water for use as reactor moderator; reactor loading, operation, and unloading; chemical recovery of the reactor transmutation products and spent fuels; and management of the gaseous, liquid, and solid nuclear and chemical wastes; plus a host of support operations. The site's history and the key processes from fabrication of reactor fuels and targets to finishing of virgin plutonium for use in the nuclear weapons complex are reviewed. Emphasis has been given to the chemistry of the recovery and purification of weapons grade plutonium from irradiated reactor targets.

Gray, L.W.

1986-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

144

Operating nuclear plant feedback to ASME and French codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The French have an advantage in nuclear plant operating experience feedback due to the highly centralized nature of their nuclear industry. There is only one utility in charge of design as well as operations (EDF) and only one reactor vendor (Framatome). The ASME Code has played a key role in resolving technical issues in the design and operation of nuclear plants since the inception of nuclear power. The committee structure of the Code brings an ideal combination of senior technical people with both broad and specialized experience to bear on complex how safe is safe enough technical issues. The authors now see an even greater role for the ASME Code in a proposed new regulatory era for the US nuclear industry. The current legalistic confrontational regulatory era has been quite destructive. There now appears to be a real opportunity to begin a new era of technical consensus as the primary means for resolving safety issues. This change can quickly be brought about by having the industry take operating plant problems and regulatory technical issues directly to the ASME Code for timely resolution. Surprisingly, there is no institution in the US nuclear industry with such a mandate. In fact, the industry is organized to feedback through the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issues which could be far better resolved through the ASME Code. Major regulatory benefits can be achieved by closing this loop and providing systematic interaction with the ASME Code. The essential elements of a new regulatory era and ideas for organizing US institutional industry responsibilities, taken from the French experience, are described in this paper.

Journet, J. [Electricite de France, Clamart (France); O`Donnell, W.J. [O`Donnell Consulting Engineers, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Mapping Complexity Sources in Nuclear Power Plant Domains Understanding the sources of complexity in advanced Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping Complexity Sources in Nuclear Power Plant Domains Understanding the sources of complexity in advanced Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their effects on human reliability is critical of complexity leveraging network theory. INTRODUCTION The nuclear power industry in United States has declined

Cummings, Mary "Missy"

146

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume...

147

Innovative applications of technology for nuclear power plant productivity improvements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry in several countries is concerned about the ability to maintain high plant performance levels due to aging and obsolescence, knowledge drain, fewer plant staff, and new requirements and commitments. Current plant operations are labor-intensive due to the vast number of operational and support activities required by commonly used technology in most plants. These concerns increase as plants extend their operating life. In addition, there is the goal to further improve performance while reducing human errors and increasingly focus on reducing operations and maintenance costs. New plants are expected to perform more productively than current plants. In order to achieve and increase high productivity, it is necessary to look at innovative applications of modern technologies and new concepts of operation. The Electric Power Research Inst. is exploring and demonstrating modern technologies that enable cost-effectively maintaining current performance levels and shifts to even higher performance levels, as well as provide tools for high performance in new plants. Several modern technologies being explored can provide multiple benefits for a wide range of applications. Examples of these technologies include simulation, visualization, automation, human cognitive engineering, and information and communications technologies. Some applications using modern technologies are described. (authors)

Naser, J. A. [Electric Power Research Inst., 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94303 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

149

Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Targeting of PlantTargeting of Plant RanGAPRanGAP to the Nuclear Envelopeto the Nuclear Envelope Annkatrin Rose,Annkatrin Rose, ShalakaShalaka S. Patel, Iris MeierS. Patel, Iris Meier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Targeting of PlantTargeting of Plant RanGAPRanGAP to the Nuclear Envelopeto the Nuclear Envelope RanGAP1 and tomato MAF1. Plant RanGAP and MAF1 are targeted to the nuclear envelope in plant cells to be cytoplasmic. Plant RanGAP contains a N- terminal domain shared with the nuclear envelope protein MAF1 (cyan

Meier, Iris

151

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 by G. Palmiotti, J. Cahalan, P. Pfeiffer, T;2 ANL-AFCI-168 Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants G

Anitescu, Mihai

152

A Domain-Specific Safety Analysis for Digital Nuclear Plant Protection Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Domain-Specific Safety Analysis for Digital Nuclear Plant Protection Systems Sanghyun Yoon through safety analy- sis is strongly mandated for safety-critical systems. Nuclear plant protection, NuFTA, for nuclear plant protection systems. NuFTA mechanically constructs a software fault tree

153

A Verification Framework for FBD based Software in Nuclear Power Plants Junbeom Yoo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Verification Framework for FBD based Software in Nuclear Power Plants Junbeom Yoo Div, conducted using a nuclear power plant shutdown system being developed in Korea, demonstrated in nuclear power plant's reactor protection systems. The software verification framework uses two different

154

Formal Verification of Safety I&C System Designs: Two Nuclear Power Plant Related Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C4.2 Formal Verification of Safety I&C System Designs: Two Nuclear Power Plant Related Applications and control (I&C) systems play a crucial role in the operation of nuclear power plants (NPP) and other safety is available. The use of model checking to verify two nuclear power plant related systems is described: an arc

Heljanko, Keijo

155

Nuclear Power Plant Components Condition Monitoring by Probabilistic Support Vector , Redouane Seraouib  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Power Plant Components Condition Monitoring by Probabilistic Support Vector Machine Jie.zio@ecp.fr Abstract In this paper, an approach for the prediction of the condition of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP monitoring, Nuclear power plant, Point prediction hal-00790421,version1-12Jun2013 Author manuscript

Boyer, Edmond

156

ATP-dependent regulation of nuclear Ca2 levels in plant cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATP-dependent regulation of nuclear Ca2 levels in plant cells Tom D. Bunney, Peter J. Shaw, Peter A in [Ca2+ ] occurs in the nuclear periphery. The occurrence of ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake in plant nuclei rights reserved. Key words: Nucleus; Plant; Ca2 uptake; Signal transduction; Imaging; Nuclear pore

Shaw, Peter

157

Evolution of a Visual Impact Model to Evaluate Nuclear Plant Siting and Design Option1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolution of a Visual Impact Model to Evaluate Nuclear Plant Siting and Design Option1 2/ Brian A and economic options for the analysis of nuclear plant siting possibilities (Burnham 1974; Jones, April 1975 of nuclear plant siting options for the AEC. BNWL's multi-disciplinary impact evaluation pro- cedure required

Standiford, Richard B.

158

PLC-Based Safety Critical Software Development for Nuclear Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLC-Based Safety Critical Software Development for Nuclear Power Plants Junbeom Yoo1 , Sungdeok Cha development technique for nuclear power plants'I&C soft- ware controllers. To improve software safety, we in developing safety-critical control software for a Korean nuclear power plant, and experience to date has been

159

Condition monitoring of motor-operated valves in nuclear power plants Pierre Granjon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Condition monitoring of motor-operated valves in nuclear power plants Pierre Granjon Gipsa of nuclear power plants. Unfortunately, today's policies present a major drawback. Indeed, these monitoring safety constraints: nuclear power plants. Key components of such systems are motor-operated valves (MOVs

Boyer, Edmond

160

Vulnerability Analysis of a Nuclear Power Plant Considering Detonations of Explosive Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vulnerability Analysis of a Nuclear Power Plant Considering Detonations of Explosive Devices Marko threats to a nuclear power plant in the year 1991 and after the 9/11 events in 2001. The methodology which strength and injuries of human beings with nuclear power plant models used in probabilistic safety

Cizelj, Leon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants D Laurier 1 living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Germany. We present herein results about the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in France for the same age range. These results

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

162

U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Continued Life or Replacement After 60? (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20% of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of greenhouse gas regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Review of maintenance personnel practices at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored Maintenance Qualifications and Staffing Project, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted a preliminary assessment of nuclear power plant (NPP) maintenance practices. As requested by the NRC, the following areas within the maintenance function were examined: personnel qualifications, maintenance training, overtime, shiftwork and staffing levels. The purpose of the assessment was to identify the primary safety-related problems that required further analysis before specific recommendations can be made on the regulations affecting NPP maintenance operations.

Chockie, A.D.; Badalamente, R.V.; Hostick, C.J.; Vickroy, S.C.; Bryant, J.L.; Imhoff, C.H.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Infrastructure development assistance modeling for nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model, a general frame to be utilized in assisting newcomer countries to start a nuclear power program. A nuclear power plant project involves technical complexity and high level of investment with long duration. Considering newcomers are mostly developing countries that lack the national infrastructure, key infrastructure issues may constitute the principal constraints to the development of a nuclear power program. In this regard, it is important to provide guidance and support to set up an appropriate infrastructure when we help them with the first launch of nuclear power plant project. To date, as a sole nuclear power generation company, KHNP has been invited many times to mentor or assist newcomer countries for their successful start of a nuclear power program since Republic of Korea is an exemplary case of a developing country which began nuclear power program from scratch and became a major world nuclear energy country in a short period of time. Through hosting events organized to aid newcomer countries' initiation of nuclear power projects, difficulties have been recognized. Each event had different contents according to circumstances because they were held as an unstructured and one-off thing. By developing a general model, we can give more adequate and effective aid in an efficient way. In this paper, we created a model to identify necessary infrastructures at the right stage, which was mainly based on a case of Korea. Taking into account the assistance we received from foreign companies and our own efforts for technological self-reliance, we have developed a general time table and specified activities required to do at each stage. From a donor's perspective, we explored various ways to help nuclear infrastructure development including technical support programs, training courses, and participating in IAEA technical cooperation programs on a regular basis. If we further develop the model, the next task would be to make the model more sophisticated as a 'semi-tailored model' so that it can be applied to a certain country reflecting its unique conditions. In accordance with its degree of established infrastructure, we can adjust or modify the model. Despite lots of benefits of using this model, there remain limitations such as time and budget constraints. These problems, however, can be addressed by cooperating with international organization such as the IAEA and other companies that share the same goal of helping newcomer countries introduce nuclear power. (authors)

Park, J. H.; Hwang, K.; Park, K. M.; Kim, S. W.; Lee, S. M. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD, 23, 106 gil, Yeongdong-daero, Gangnam-gu, 153-791 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Decommissioning nuclear power plants - the wave of the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper discusses the project controls developed in the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. Considerations are given to the contaminated piping and equipment that have to be removed and the spent and used fuel that has to be disposed of. The storage issue is of primary concern here. The cost control aspects and the dynamics of decommissioning are discussed. The effects of decommissioning laws on the construction and engineering firms are mentioned. 5 refs.

Griggs, F.S. Jr. [Raytheon Engineers and Contractors, Cumberland City, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

168

Understanding the nature of nuclear power plant risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of understanding of severe accident consequences from the non-mechanistic assumptions of WASH-740 to WASH-1400, NUREG-1150, SOARCA and today in the interpretation of the consequences of the accident at Fukushima. As opposed to the general perception, the radiological human health consequences to members of the Japanese public from the Fukushima accident will be small despite meltdowns at three reactors and loss of containment integrity. In contrast, the radiation-related societal impacts present a substantial additional economic burden on top of the monumental task of economic recovery from the nonnuclear aspects of the earthquake and tsunami damage. The Fukushima accident provides additional evidence that we have mis-characterized the risk of nuclear power plant accidents to ourselves and to the public. The human health risks are extremely small even to people living next door to a nuclear power plant. The principal risk associated with a nuclear power plant accident involves societal impacts: relocation of people, loss of land use, loss of contaminated products, decontamination costs and the need for replacement power. Although two of the three probabilistic safety goals of the NRC address societal risk, the associated quantitative health objectives in reality only address individual human health risk. This paper describes the types of analysis that would address compliance with the societal goals. (authors)

Denning, R. S. [Ohio State Univ., 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1142 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Conceivable new recycling of nuclear waste by nuclear power companies in their plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We outline the basic principles and the needed experiments for a conceivable new recycling of nuclear waste by the power plants themselves to avoid its transportation and storage to a (yet unknown) dumping area. Details are provided in an adjoining paper and in patents pending.

Ruggero Maria Santilli

1997-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Meteorological Monitoring program at a former nuclear weapons plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Meteorological Monitoring program at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is to provide meteorological information for use in assessing the transport, and diffusion, and deposition of effluent actually or potentially released into the atmosphere by plant operations. Achievement of this objective aids in protecting health and safety of the public, employees, and environment, and directly supports Emergency Response programs at RFP. Meteorological information supports the design of environmental monitoring networks for impact assessments, environmental surveillance activities, remediation activities, and emergency responses. As the mission of the plant changes from production of nuclear weapons parts to environmental cleanup and economic development, smaller releases resulting from remediation activities become more likely. These possible releases could result from airborne fugitive dust, evaporation from collection ponds, or grass fires.

Maxwell, D.R.; Bowen, B.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant pumps important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

Booker, S.; Katz, D.; Daavettila, N.; Lehnert, D. [MDC-Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Southfield, MI (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Plant Cell, Vol. 10, 16371647, October 1998, www.plantcell.org 1998 American Society of Plant Physiologists The Plant U1 Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Particle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Plant Physiologists The Plant U1 Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Particle 70K Protein Interacts with TwoThe Plant Cell, Vol. 10, 1637­1647, October 1998, www.plantcell.org © 1998 American Society small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U1 snRNP) 70K protein (U1-70K), one of the three U1 sn

Reddy, A.S.N

174

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report LBL-5287. "Power Plant Reliability-Availability andConunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Compiling Utility Requirements For New Nuclear Power Plant Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) submitted in November 2000 to the Finnish Government an application for a Decision-in-Principle concerning the construction of a new nuclear power plant in Finland. The actual investment decision can be made first after a positive decision has been made by the Government and the Parliament. Parallel to the licensing process, technical preparedness has been upheld so that the procurement process can be commenced without delay, when needed. This includes the definition of requirements for the plant and preliminary preparation of bid inquiry specifications. The core of the technical requirements corresponds to the specifications presented in the European Utility Requirement (EUR) document, compiled by major European electricity producers. Quite naturally, an amount of modifications to the EUR document are needed that take into account the country- and site-specific conditions as well as the experiences gained in the operation of the existing NPP units. Along with the EUR-related requirements concerning the nuclear island and power generation plant, requirements are specified for scope of supply as well as for a variety of issues related to project implementation. (author)

Patrakka, Eero [Teollisuuden Voima Oy, 27160 Olkiluoto (Finland)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Plant Cell, Vol. 11, 14451456, August 1999, www.plantcell.org 1999 American Society of Plant Physiologists Light QualityDependent Nuclear Import of the Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physiologists Light Quality­Dependent Nuclear Import of the Plant Photoreceptors Phytochrome A and B StefanThe Plant Cell, Vol. 11, 1445­1456, August 1999, www.plantcell.org © 1999 American Society of Plant Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Center, P.O. Box 521, H-6701 Szeged, Hungary The phytochrome

Schäfer, Eberhard

177

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fiber optic sensors for nuclear power plant applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies have been carried out for application of Raman Distributed Temperature Sensor (RDTS) in Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). The high temperature monitoring in sodium circuits of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) is important. It is demonstrated that RDTS can be usefully employed in monitoring sodium circuits and in tracking the percolating sodium in the surrounding insulation in case of any leak. Aluminum Conductor Steel Reinforced (ACSR) cable is commonly used as overhead power transmission cable in power grid. The suitability of RDTS for detecting defects in ACSR overhead power cable, is also demonstrated.

Kasinathan, Murugesan; Sosamma, Samuel; BabuRao, Chelamchala; Murali, Nagarajan; Jayakumar, Tammana [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu-603102 (India)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

Powell, James G. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

Powell, J.G.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparison of Options for a Pilot Plant Fusion Nuclear Mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The pilot plant mission encompassed component test and fusion nuclear science missions plus the requirement to produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. Three magnetic configuration options were developed around this mission: the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS). With the completion of the study and separate documentation of each design option a question can now be posed; how do the different designs compare with each other as candidates for meeting the pilot plant mission? In a pro/con format this paper will examine the key arguments for and against the AT, ST and CS magnetic configurations. Key topics addressed include: plasma parameters, device configurations, size and weight comparisons, diagnostic issues, maintenance schemes, availability influences and possible test cell arrangement schemes.

Brown, T; Goldston, R J; El-Guebaly, L; Kessel, C; Neilson, G H; Malang, S; Menard, J E; Prager, S; Waganer, L; Titus, P

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

Nuclear power plant simulation facility evaluation methodology: handbook. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is Volume 1 of a two-part document which describes a project conducted to develop a methodology to evaluate the acceptability of nuclear power plant (NPP) simulation facilities for use in the simulator-based portion of NRC's operator licensing examination. The proposed methodology is to be utilized during two phases of the simulation facility life-cycle, initial simulator acceptance and recurrent analysis. The first phase is aimed at ensuring that the simulator provides an accurate representation of the reference NPP. There are two components of initial simulator evaluation: fidelity assessment and a direct determination of the simulation facility's adequacy for operator testing. The second phase is aimed at ensuring that the simulation facility continues to accurately represent the reference plant throughout the life of the simulator. Recurrent evaluation is comprised of three components: monitoring reference plant changes, monitoring the simulator's hardware, and examining the data from actual plant transients as they occur. Volume 1 is a set of guidelines which details the steps involved in the two life-cycle phases, presents an overview of the methodology and data collection requirements, and addresses the formation of the evaluation team and the preparation of the evaluation plan. 29 figs.

Laughery, K.R. Jr.; Carter, R.J.; Haas, P.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Identification of good practices in the operation of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work developed an approach to diagnose problems and identify good practices in the operation of nuclear power plants using the system dynamics technique. The research began with construction of the ORSIM (Nuclear Power ...

Chen, Haibo, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Incremental costs and optimization of in-core fuel management of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with development of methods for optimizing the energy production and refuelling decision for nuclear power plants in an electric utility system containing both nuclear and fossil-fuelled stations. ...

Watt, Hing Yan

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

An examination of the pursuit of nuclear power plant construction projects in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent serious reconsideration of nuclear power as a means for U.S. electric utilities to increase their generation capacity provokes many questions regarding the achievable success of future nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Study of seismic design bases and site conditions for nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an investigation of four topics pertinent to the seismic design of nuclear power plants: Design accelerations by regions of the continental United States; review and compilation of design-basis seismic levels and soil conditions for existing nuclear power plants; regional distribution of shear wave velocity of foundation materials at nuclear power plant sites; and technical review of surface-founded seismic analysis versus embedded approaches.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

EIS-0225: Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the potential environemental impact of a proposal to continue operation of the Pantex Plant and associated storage of nuclear weapon components. Alternatives considered include: ...

188

Aging of safety class 1E transformers in safety systems of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses aging effects on safety-related power transformers in nuclear power plants. It also evaluates maintenance, testing, and monitoring practices with respect to their effectiveness in detecting and mitigating the effects of aging. The study follows the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Nuclear Plant-Aging Research approach. It investigates the materials used in transformer construction, identifies stressors and aging mechanisms, presents operating and testing experience with aging effects, analyzes transformer failure events reported in various databases, and evaluates maintenance practices. Databases maintained by the nuclear industry were analyzed to evaluate the effects of aging on the operation of nuclear power plants.

Roberts, E.W.; Edson, J.L.; Udy, A.C. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Automatic Plant Watering System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Automatic Plant Watering System Overview The goal of this project was to design an automatic plant watering system for commercial in the soil of household plants and delivery water to those plants on a need-only basis. The overall design

Demirel, Melik C.

190

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for managing the R&D program elements; (2) Developing a specific work package for the R&D activities to be performed during each government fiscal year; (3) Reporting the status and progress of the work based on committed deliverables and milestones; (4) Developing collaboration in areas of materials R&D of benefit to the NGNP with countries that are a part of the Generation IV International Forum; and (5) Ensuring that the R&D work performed in support of the materials program is in conformance with established Quality Assurance and procurement requirements. The objective of the NGNP Materials R&D Program is to provide the essential materials R&D needed to support the design and licensing of the reactor and balance of plant, excluding the hydrogen plant. The materials R&D program is being initiated prior to the design effort to ensure that materials R&D activities are initiated early enough to support the design process and support the Project Integrator. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge; thus, new materials and approaches may be required.

G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

None

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Feature Extraction for Data-Driven Fault Detection in Nuclear Power Plants Xin Jin, Robert M. Edwards and Asok Ray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feature Extraction for Data-Driven Fault Detection in Nuclear Power Plants Xin Jin, Robert M monitoring of nuclear power plants (NPP) is one of the key issues addressed in nuclear energy safety research is performed during each nuclear power plant refueling outage, which may not be cost effective [1

Ray, Asok

193

Aging of Class 1E batteries in safety systems of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of aging effects on safety-related batteries in nuclear power plants. The purpose is to evaluate the aging effects caused by operation within a nuclear facility and to evaluate maintenance, testing, and monitoring practices with respect to their effectiveness in detecting and mitigating the effects of aging. The study follows the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Nuclear Plant-Aging Research approach and investigates the materials used in battery construction, identifies stressors and aging mechanisms, presents operating and testing experience with aging effects, analyzes battery-failure events reported in various data bases, and evaluates recommended maintenance practices. Data bases that were analyzed included the NRC's Licensee Event Report system, the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations' Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's In-Plant Reliability Data System, and The S.M. Stoller Corporation's Nuclear Power Experience data base.

Edson, J.L.; Hardin, J.E.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hctor L. Palacios Verdes Caracas, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Héctor L. Palacios Verdes Caracas, Venezuela Phone: ask Email: hectorpal@gmail.com Web page: http://www.ldc.usb.ve/~hlp Citizen: Venezuela Residence: Venezuela Education Ph. D. Informatics and Digital Communication December. Caracas, Venezuela. Thesis: Planning as Branch and Bound: a Constraint Programming implementation. Advisor

Palacios, Héctor

195

Management of aging of nuclear power plant containment structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research addressing aging management of nuclear power plant concrete and steel containment structures is summarized. Accomplishments related to concrete containment structures include formation of a materials` property database; an aging assessment methodology to identify critical structures and degradation factors; guidelines and evaluation criteria for use in condition assessments; and a time-dependent reliability-based methodology for condition assessments and estimations of future performance. Under the steel containments and liners activity, a degradation assessment methodology has been developed, mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in the containment due to aggressive environmental factors have been identified, and statistical data supporting the use of these models in time-dependent reliability analysis have been summarized.

Naus, D.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Engineering Technology Div.; Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Norris, W.E.; Graves, H.L. III [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Prognostics and Life Beyond 60 for Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safe, secure, reliable and sustainable energy supply is vital for advanced and industrialized life styles. To meet growing energy demand there is interest in longer term operation (LTO) for the existing nuclear power plant fleet and enhancing capabilities in new build. There is increasing use of condition based maintenance (CBM) for active components and periodic in service inspection (ISI) for passive systems: there is growing interest in deploying on-line monitoring. Opportunities exist to move beyond monitoring and diagnosis based on pattern recognition and anomaly detection to and prognostics with the ability to provide an estimate of remaining useful life (RUL). The adoption of digital I&C systems provides a framework within which added functionality including on-line monitoring can be deployed, and used to maintain and even potentially enhance safety, while at the same time improving planning and reducing both operations and maintenance costs.

Leonard J. Bond; Pradeep Ramuhalli; Magdy S. Tawfik; Nancy J. Lybeck

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to be constructed near Idaho Falls, Idaho The NGNP is intrinsically safer than current reactors and is planned for startup ca. 2021 Safety is more prominent in the minds of the Public and Governing Officials following the nuclear reactor meltdown accidents in Fukushima, Japan The authors propose that the NGNP should be designed with International (IAEA) Safeguards in mind to support export to Non-Nuclear-Weapons States There are two variants of the NGNP design; one using integral Prismatic-shaped fuel assemblies in a fixed core; and one using recirculating fuel balls (or Pebbles) The following presents the infrastructure required to safeguard the NGNP This infrastructure is required to safeguard the Prismatic and Pebble-fueled NGNP (and other HTGR/VHTR) The infrastructure is based on current Safeguards Requirements and Practices implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for similar reactors The authors of this presentation have worked for decades in the area of International Nuclear Safeguards and are recognized experts in this field Presentation for INMM conference in July 2012.

Dr. Mark Schanfein; Philip Casey Durst

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Underwater nuclear power plants: improved safety, environmental compatibility and efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The further development of nuclear power engineering depends on the creation of a new generation of nuclear power plant (NPP) projects that have a high degree of safety. Decisions ensuring secure NPP exploitation must be based on the possibility of eliminating or localizing accidents. Using environmental properties to achieve secure NPP exploitation and accident elimination leads to suggest the construction of NPPs in water. An efficient way to provide energy to remote coastal areas is through use of floatable construction of prefabricated units. Floatable construction raises the quality of works, reduces expenditures on industrial facilities, and facilities building conditions in districts with extreme climatic conditions. A type of NPP that is situated on a shelf with the reactor compartment placed at the sea bottom is proposed. The underwater location of the reactor compartment on the fixed depth allows the natural water environment conditions of natural hydrostatic pressure, heat transfer and circulation to provide NPP safety. An example of new concept for power units with under-water localization of the reactor compartment is provided by the double-block NPP in a VVER reactor.

Galustov, K.Z.; Abadjyan, K.A.; Pavlov, A.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

License Stewardship Approach to Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper explores both the conceptual approach to decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities using a license stewardship approach as well as the first commercial application of this approach. The license stewardship approach involves a decommissioning company taking control of a site and the 10 CFR 50 License in order to complete the work utilizing the established trust fund. In conclusion: The license stewardship approach is a novel way to approach the decommissioning of a retired nuclear power plant that offers several key advantages to all parties. For the owner and regulators, it provides assurance that the station will be decommissioned in a safe, timely manner. Ratepayers are assured that the work will be completed for the price they already have paid, with the decommissioning contractor assuming the financial risk of decommissioning. The contractor gains control of the assets and liabilities, the license, and the decommissioning fund. This enables the decommissioning contractor to control their work and eliminates redundant layers of management, while bringing more focus on achieving the desired end state - a restored site. (authors)

Daly, P.T.; Hlopak, W.J. [Commercial Services Group, EnergySolutions 1009 Commerce Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Nuclear Safety Risk Management in Refueling Outage of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NPP is used to planning maintenance, in-service inspection, surveillance test, fuel handling and design modification in the refueling outage; the operator response capability will be reduced plus some of the plant systems out of service or loss of power at this time. Based on 8 times refueling outage experiences of the Qinshan NPP, this article provide some good practice and lesson learned for the nuclear safety risk management focus at four safety function areas of Residual Heat Removal Capability, Inventory Control, Power availability and Reactivity control. (authors)

Meijing Wu; Guozhang Shen [Qinshan Nuclear power company (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference (PBNC 2012), BEXCO, Busan, Korea, March 18 ~ 23, 2012 CHALLENGES OF CYBER SECURITY FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PBNC 2012 CHALLENGES OF CYBER SECURITY FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS Kwangjo Kim KAIST, Daejeon, Korea.kim@kustar.ac.ae Abstract Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) become one of the most important infrastructures in providing improvement. 1. Introduction Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) become one of the most important infrastructures

Kim, Kwangjo

202

Contract Specifications For Olkiluoto 3 Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Finnish Parliament ratified in May 2002 the application for a Decision-in- Principle (DIP) that was submitted by Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) in November 2000 concerning the construction of a new nuclear power plant in Finland (FIN5). The bid inquiries for FIN5 were sent out by TVO in September 2002, requesting the bids by the end of March 2003. A contract with the plant supplier was signed in December 2003, implying the construction of a PWR of type EPR (European Pressurised Water Reactor) in Olkiluoto, called Olkiluoto 3 NPP. The preparation of Bid Inquiry Specifications (BIS) was initiated simultaneously with the filing of the application for DIP. The compilation of BIS was an evolutionary process, starting with the collection of relevant reference material, proceeding through the development of technical, administrative and commercial requirements, and ending with the consolidation of all documentation to a package containing the complete BIS. An intensive bid evaluation process started immediately after receiving the bids, accompanied by negotiations with the supplier candidates. The final Contract Specifications (CS) were constituted on the basis of the BIS supplemented with information contained in the bid and the outcome of the contract negotiations. (author)

Patrakka, Eero [Teollisuuden Voima Oy, 27160 Olkiluoto (Finland)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Literature Review on Ruthenium Behaviour in Nuclear Power Plant Severe Accidents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Literature Review on Ruthenium Behaviour in Nuclear Power Plant Severe Accidents C. MUN , L Literature Review on Ruthenium Behaviour in Nuclear Power Plant Severe Accidents C. MUN a , L. CANTREL a , C Accidents Majeurs (DPAM), CEN Cadarache - France 1 b Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Direction de l'Energie

Boyer, Edmond

204

The Decommissioning of the Trino Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following a referendum in Italy in 1987, the four Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) owned and operated by the state utility ENEL were closed. After closing the NPPs, ENEL selected a ''safestore'' decommissioning strategy; anticipating a safestore period of some 40-50 years. This approach was consistent with the funds collected during plant operation, and was reinforced by the lack of both a waste repository and a set of national free release limits for contaminated materials in Italy. During 1999, twin decisions were made to privatize ENEL and to transform the nuclear division into a separate subsidiary of the ENEL group. This group was renamed Sogin and during the following year, ownership of the company was transferred to the Italian Treasury. On formation, Sogin was asked by the Italian government to review the national decommissioning strategy. The objective of the review was to move from a safestore strategy to a prompt decommissioning strategy, with the target of releasing all of the nuclear sites by 2020. It was recognized that this target was conditional upon the availability of a national LLW repository together with interim stores for both spent fuel and HLW by 2009. The government also agreed that additional costs caused by the acceleration of the decommissioning program would be considered as stranded costs. These costs will be recovered by a levy on the kWh price of electricity, a process established and controlled by the Regulator of the Italian energy sector. Building on the successful collaboration to develop a prompt decommissioning strategy for the Latina Magnox reactor (1), BNFL and Sogin agreed to collaborate on an in depth study for the prompt decommissioning of the Sogin PWR at Trino. BNFL is currently decommissioning six NPPs and is at an advanced stage of planning for two further units, having completed a full and rigorous exercise to develop Baseline Decommissioning Plans (BDP's) for these stations. The BDP exercise utilizes the full range of BNFL decommissioning experience and knowledge to develop a strategy, methodology and cost for the decommissioning of NPPs. Over the past year, a prompt decommissioning strategy for Trino has been developed. The strategy has been based on the principles of minimizing waste products that require long term storage, maximizing 'free release' materials and utilizing existing and regulatory approved technologies.

Brusa, L.; DeSantis, R.; Nurden, P. L.; Walkden, P.; Watson, B.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

205

Leasing of Nuclear Power Plants With Using Floating Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposal to organize and realize the international program on leasing of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor compartments is brought to the notice of potential partners. The proposal is oriented to the construction of new NPPs or to replacement of worked-out reactor units of the NPPs in operation on the sites situated near water area and to the use of afloat technologies for construction, mounting and transportation of reactor units as a Reactor Compartment Block Module (RCBM). According to the offered project the RCBM is fabricated in factory conditions at the largest Russian defense shipbuilding plant - State Unitary Enterprise 'Industrial Association SEVMASHPREDPRIYATIE' (SEVMASH) in the city of Severodvinsk of the Arkhangelsk region. After completion of assembling, testing and preliminary licensing the RCBM is given buoyancy by means of hermetic sealing and using pontoons and barges. The RCBM delivery to the NPP site situated near water area is performed by sea route. The RCBM is brought to the place of its installation with the use of appropriate hydraulic structures (canals, shipping locks), then is lowered on the basement constructed beforehand and incorporated into NPP scheme, of which the components are installed in advance. Floating means can be detached from the RCBM and used repeatedly for other RCBMs. Further procedure of NPP commissioning and its operation is carried out according to traditional method by power company in the framework of RCBM leasing with enlisting the services of firm-manufacturer's specialists either to provide reactor plant operation and concomitant processes or to perform author's supervision of operation. After completion of lifetime and reactor unloading the RCBM is dismantled with using the same afloat technology and taken away from NPP site to sea area entirely, together with its structures (reactor vessel, heat exchangers, pumps, pipelines and other equipment). Then RCBM is transported by shipping route to a firm-manufacturer, for subsequent reprocessing, utilization and storage. Nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes are removed from NPP site also. Use of leasing method removes legal problems connected with the transportation of radioactive materials through state borders as the RCBM remains a property of the state-producer at all stages of its life cycle. (authors)

Kuznetsov, Yu.N.; Gabaraev, B.A.; Reshetov, V.A.; Moskin, V.A. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise, N.A. Dollezhal' Scientific-Research and Design Institute of Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 – Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 – Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 – Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 – Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study include a process model and a N2H2 economic assessment model (both developed by the Idaho National Laboratory). Both models are described in this report. The N2H2 model closely tracked and provided similar results as the H2A model and was instrumental in assessing the effects of plant availability on price when operated in the shoulder mode for electrical pricing. Differences between the H2A and N2H2 model are included in this report.

Stephen Schey

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

P. E. MacDonald

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Thirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago Representatives of more than 30 countries signed a deal on Tuesday to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor nuclear reactors, but critics argue it could be at least 50 years before a commercially viable reactor

209

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal Equipment (nuclear plant) Turbine Building ClosedCooling Water System (nuclear plant) SteamReheater (nuclear plant) Inspection Water Induction

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The impact of offsite factors on the safety performance of small nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of an analysis of the influence of offsite factors on small nuclear power-plant (SNPP) safety performance during postulated severe accidents are presented. Given the plant locations in the immediate vicinity of residential areas and the impossibility of accomplishing the expeditious evacuation of the public, the risk caused by an SNPP severe accident may be considerably less than that for such an event in a large nuclear power plant. 3 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Baranaev, Yu.D.; Viktorov, A.N. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. NeroResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data Table G.1 gives reactor (LWR) power plants constructed in USA. It is required to predict the capital cost involved in the construction of further LWR power plants. The notation used in Table G.1 is explained in Table G.2. The final 6

Reid, Nancy

214

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Example G Cost of construction of nuclear power plants Description of data Table G.1 gives data) power plants constructed in USA. It is required to predict the capital cost involved in the construction of further LWR power plants. The notation used in Table G.1 is explained in Table G.2. The final 6 lines

Reid, Nancy

215

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 East Campus Power Plant Deaerator Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 East Campus Power Plant Deaerator Optimization Overview In the East Campus Power plant a new Deaerator system has been installed which Deaerator is the most efficient and then make a recommendation to the plant of which one should

Demirel, Melik C.

216

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Waste Minimization Policy at the Romanian Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioactive waste management system at Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Romania was designed to maintain acceptable levels of safety for workers and to protect human health and the environment from exposure to unacceptable levels of radiation. In accordance with terminology of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), this system consists of the ''pretreatment'' of solid and organic liquid radioactive waste, which may include part or all of the following activities: collection, handling, volume reduction (by an in-drum compactor, if appropriate), and storage. Gaseous and aqueous liquid wastes are managed according to the ''dilute and discharge'' strategy. Taking into account the fact that treatment/conditioning and disposal technologies are still not established, waste minimization at the source is a priority environmental management objective, while waste minimization at the disposal stage is presently just a theoretical requirement for future adopted technologies . The necessary operational and maintenance procedures are in place at Cernavoda to minimize the production and contamination of waste. Administrative and technical measures are established to minimize waste volumes. Thus, an annual environmental target of a maximum 30 m3 of radioactive waste volume arising from operation and maintenance has been established. Within the first five years of operations at Cernavoda NPP, this target has been met. The successful implementation of the waste minimization policy has been accompanied by a cost reduction while the occupational doses for plant workers have been maintained at as low as reasonably practicable levels. This paper will describe key features of the waste management system along with the actual experience that has been realized with respect to minimizing the waste volumes at the Cernavoda NPP.

Andrei, V.; Daian, I.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants.

Ritterbusch, S.E.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Palo Verde College | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County,PPPSolar Jump to: navigation, search Name:Palo Verde

222

Safeguards Issues at Nuclear Reactors and Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Agency's safeguards technical objective is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection.

Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Two novel procedures for aggregating randomized model ensemble outcomes for robust signal reconstruction in nuclear power plants monitoring systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reconstruction in nuclear power plants monitoring systems P. Baraldi1 , E. Zio1,* , G. Gola2 , D. Roverso2 , M importance for the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. Auto-associative regression models of nuclear power plants for it allows the timely detection of malfunctions and anomalies during operation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

224

Abstract--Resins are used in nuclear power plants for water ultrapurification. Two approaches are considered in this work  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Resins are used in nuclear power plants for water ultrapurification. Two approaches in manufacturing ultrapure water for nuclear power plants. Resins allow the removal of ionic impurities to subparts-per-million. Thereby in nuclear power plants, resins contribute to guarantee personnel safety, to control feed system

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

225

DATA-DRIVEN ON-LINE PREDICTION OF THE AVAILABLE RECOVERY TIME IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FAILURE SCENARIOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DATA-DRIVEN ON-LINE PREDICTION OF THE AVAILABLE RECOVERY TIME IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FAILURE-XADS). Key Words: Recovery Time, Emergency Accident Management, Nuclear Power Plant, Lead- Bismuth Eutectic e [Øwre, 2001]. Yet, the problem of what kind of decision support to provide to nuclear power plant

Boyer, Edmond

226

Conference committees Chairman of the conference "New Nuclear Power Plants in the Netherlands", June 21-22, 2011,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conference committees Chairman of the conference "New Nuclear Power Plants in the Netherlands Nuclear Power Plants, September 15-19, 2003, Kyoto, Japan. Session chairman GENES4/ANP2003 ,,International Conference on Global Environment and Advanced Nuclear Power Plants, September 15-19, 2003, Kyoto

227

Status of radioiodine control for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status of radioiodine control in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant with respect to capture, fixation, and disposal. Where possible, we refer the reader to a number of survey documents which have been published in the last four years. We provide updates where necessary. Also discussed are factors which must be considered in developing criteria for iodine control. For capture from gas streams, silver mordenite and a silver nitrate impregnated silica (AC-6120) are considered state-of-the-art and are recommended. Three aqueous scrubbing processes have been demonstrated: Caustic scrubbing is simple but probably will not give an adequate iodine retention by itself. Mercurex (mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrubbing) has a number of disadvantages including the use of toxic mercury. Iodox (hyperazeotropic nitric acid scrubbing) is effective but employs a very corrosive and hazardous material. Other technologies have been tested but require extensive development. The waste forms recommended for long-term storage or disposal are silver iodide, the iodates of barium, strontium, or calcium, and silver loaded sorbents, all fixed in cement. Copper iodide in bitumen (asphalt) is a possibility but requires testing. The selection of a specific form will be influenced by the capture process used.

Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Reassessment of selected factors affecting siting of Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory has performed a series of probabilistic consequence assessment calculations for nuclear reactor siting. This study takes into account recent insights into severe accident source terms and examines consequences in a risk based format consistent with the quantitative health objectives (QHOs) of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy. Simplified severe accident source terms developed in this study are based on the risk insights of NUREG-1150. The results of the study indicate that both the quantity of radioactivity released in a severe accident as well as the likelihood of a release are lower than those predicted in earlier studies. The accident risks using the simplified source terms are examined at a series of generic plant sites, that vary in population distribution, meteorological conditions, and exclusion area boundary distances. Sensitivity calculations are performed to evaluate the effects of emergency protective action assumptions on the risk of prompt fatality and latent cancers fatality, and population relocation. The study finds that based on the new source terms the prompt and latent fatality risks at all generic sites meet the QHOs of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy by margins ranging from one to more than three orders of magnitude. 4 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs.

Davis, R.E.; Hanson, A.L.; Mubayi, V.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Aging assessment of surge protective devices in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment was performed to determine the effects of aging on the performance and availability of surge protective devices (SPDs), used in electrical power and control systems in nuclear power plants. Although SPDs have not been classified as safety-related, they are risk-important because they can minimize the initiating event frequencies associated with loss of offsite power and reactor trips. Conversely, their failure due to age might cause some of those initiating events, e.g., through short circuit failure modes, or by allowing deterioration of the safety-related component(s) they are protecting from overvoltages, perhaps preventing a reactor trip, from an open circuit failure mode. From the data evaluated during 1980--1994, it was found that failures of surge arresters and suppressers by short circuits were neither a significant risk nor safety concern, and there were no failures of surge suppressers preventing a reactor trip. Simulations, using the ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) were performed to determine the adequacy of high voltage surge arresters.

Davis, J.F.; Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Carroll, D.P. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)] [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Quiz # 7, STAT 383, Prof. Suman Sanyal, April 8, 2009 (Q2, Page 354) To decide whether the pipe welds in a nuclear power plant meet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

welds in a nuclear power plant meet specifications, a random sample of welds is to be selected : µ nuclear power plants is to determine if welds

Sanyal, Suman

231

abono verde canavalia: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Job Access, ElderlyDisabled Rural Transit District Val Verde County Kerrville Bus Company Intercity Bus Services... Community Council of Southwest Texas, Inc. 2006-12-01...

232

Confirmation of the seismic resistance of nuclear power plant equipment after assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that the natural frequencies and damping decrements of nuclear power plant equipment can only be determined experimentally and directly at the power generation units (reactors) of nuclear power plants under real disassembly conditions for the equipment, piping network, thermal insulation, etc. A computational experimental method is described in which the natural frequencies and damping decrements are determined in the field and the seismic resistance is reevaluated using these values. This method is the basis of the standards document 'Methods for confirming the dynamic characteristics of systems and components of the generating units of nuclear power plants which are important for safety' prepared and introduced in 2012.

Kaznovsky, P. S.; Kaznovsky, A. P.; Saakov, E. S.; Ryasnyj, S. I. [JSC 'Atomtehenergo' (Russian Federation)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Atmospheric dispersion and the radiological consequences of normal airborne effluents from a nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between the consequences of the normal exhaust of radioactive materials in air from nuclear power plants and atmospheric dispersion is studied. Because the source terms of the exhaust from a nuclear power plant are relatively low and their radiological consequences are far less than the corresponding authoritative limits, the atmospheric dispersion models, their various modifications, and selections of relevant parameters have few effects on those consequences. In the environmental assessment and siting, the emphasis should not be placed on the consequence evaluation of routine exhaust of nuclear power plants, and the calculation of consequences of the exhaust and atmospheric field measurements should be appropriately, simplified. 12 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

Fang, D.; Yang, L. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Sun, C.Z. [Suhou Nuclear Research Inst., Suzhou (China)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Probabilistic methods in seismic risk assessment for nuclear power plants: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art in seismic risk analysis applied to the design and siting of nuclear power plants was addressed in this meeting. Presentations were entered individually into the date base. (ACR)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Maximizing nuclear power plant performance via mega-uprates and subsequent license renewal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this thesis is to develop a methodology to evaluate the engineering and economic implications of maximizing performance of the United States' commercial fleet of nuclear power plants. This methodology addresses ...

DeWitte, Jacob D. (Jacob Dominic)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Dynamic reliability using entry-time approach for maintenance of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-time processes have the potential to provide a significantly greater range of applicability and flexibility than traditional reliability tools for case studies related to equipment and components in nuclear power plants. In this dissertation, the finite...

Wang, Shuwen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

A holistic investigation of complexity sources in nuclear power plant control rooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear power community in the United States is moving to modernize aging power plant control rooms as well as develop control rooms for new reactors. New generation control rooms, along with modernized control rooms, ...

Sasangohar, Farzan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

John Collins

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nuclear Plant Feedwater Heater Handbook. Volume 3. Operation and maintenance guidelines. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the third part of a three-volume handbook covering closed feedwater heaters for nuclear electric power generating plants. This third volume covers the operation and maintenance of closed feedwater heaters. 11 refs., 23 figs., 5 tabs.

Bell, R.J.; Hardy, C.D. Jr.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Nuclear Plant Feedwater Heater Handbook. Volume 1. Primer. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first part of a three volume handbook covering closed feedwater heaters for electric power generating plants. This volume is a primer to the subject of feedwater heaters and their integration into the plant. 24 refs.

Bell, R.J.; Wells, T.G. Jr.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

NONE

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents.

Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

VerdeLogix | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UCOpen EnergyVelankani Group Jump to:VentiFountainVerdeLogix

245

A Domain-Specific Safety Analysis for Digital Nuclear Plant Protection Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Domain-Specific Safety Analysis for Digital Nuclear Plant Protection Systems Sanghyun Yoon tries to assure the systems' safety through performing various safety analysis techniques ­ FTA (Fault was KNICS(Korea Nuclear Instrumentation and Control System) RPS(Reactor Protection System). · Prototype

246

Design Features and Technology Uncertainties for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the conclusions, observations, and recommendations of the Independent Technology Review Group (ITRG) regarding design features and important technology uncertainties associated with very-high-temperature nuclear system concepts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The ITRG performed its reviews during the period November 2003 through April 2004.

John M. Ryskamp; Phil Hildebrandt; Osamu Baba; Ron Ballinger; Robert Brodsky; Hans-Wolfgang Chi; Dennis Crutchfield; Herb Estrada; Jeane-Claude Garnier; Gerald Gordon; Richard Hobbins; Dan Keuter; Marilyn Kray; Philippe Martin; Steve Melancon; Christian Simon; Henry Stone; Robert Varrin; Werner von Lensa

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK B188 Summary of methods proposed for risk informing the design and regulation of future nuclear power plants. All elements of the historical design and regulation process are preserved, but the methods proposed for new plants use probabilistic risk assessment methods as the primary decision making tool.

Ritterbusch, Stanley; Golay, Michael; Duran, Felicia; Galyean, William; Gupta, Abhinav; Dimitrijevic, Vesna; Malsch, Marty

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

248

Assessement of Codes and Standards Applicable to a Hydrogen Production Plant Coupled to a Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an assessment of codes and standards applicable to a hydrogen production plant to be coupled to a nuclear reactor. The result of the assessment is a list of codes and standards that are expected to be applicable to the plant during its design and construction.

M. J. Russell

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Nuclear material safeguards for enrichments plants: Part 4, Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant: Diversion scenarios and IAEA safeguards activities: Safeguards training course  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication is Part 4 of a safeguards training course in Nuclear Material Safeguards for enrichment plants. This part of the course deals with diversion scenarios and safeguards activities at gas centrifuge enrichment plants.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

In-Plant Reliability Data base for nuclear plant components. Interim report: diesel generators, batteries, chargers and inverters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the In-Plant Reliability Data (IPRD) program is to develop a comprehensive, component-specific reliability data base for probabilistic risk assessment and for other statistical analyses relevant to component reliability evaluations. This document is the product of a pilot study that was undertaken to demonstrate the methodology and feasibility of applying IPRDS techniques to develop and analyze the reliability characteristics of key electrical components in five nuclear power plants. These electrical components include diesel generators, batteries, battery chargers and inverters. The sources used to develop the data base and produce the component failure rates and mean repair times were the plant equipment lists, plant drawings, maintenance work requests, Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARs), and interviews with plant personnel. The data spanned approximately 33 reactor-years of commercial operation.

Kahl, W.K.; Borkowski, R.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Prognostics Health Management and Life Beyond 60 for Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is growing interest in longer-term operation of the current US nuclear power plant fleet. This paper will present an overview of prognostic health management (PHM) technologies that could play a role in the safe and effective operation of nuclear power plants during extended life. A case study in prognostics for materials degradation assessment, using laboratory-scale measurements, is briefly discussed, and technical gaps that need to be addressed prior to PHM system deployment for nuclear power life extension are presented.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Bond, Leonard J.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

advanced nuclear plant: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

253

advanced nuclear plants: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. . . . 18 3.4.1 Heat Exchanger - Code description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3.4.2 Simulation ResultsADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING...

254

Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 17, 2012 ... Energy generation in France is a competitive market, whereas ... from wind farms, solar energy or run of river plant without pondage.

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

255

Dynamic alarm presentation in a nuclear plant control room  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The alarm activation set point and priority for a given, spatially fixed alarm tile can vary depending in part on the mode of plant operation.

Kenneth, Scarola (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5975, Incentive Regulation of Investor-Owned Nuclear Power Plants by Public Utility Regulators, published in January 1993. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

McKinney, M.D.; Seely, H.E.; Merritt, C.R.; Baker, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT NGNP Technology Development Roadmapping  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ISR Inner Side Reflector Kc Fracture Toughness kg Kilogram K-T Kepner-Tregoe KTA German nuclear technical committee kW Kilowatt LANL Los Alamos National Laboratory LBE Licensing...

258

Nuclear norm minimization for the planted clique and biclique ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 21, 2009 ... This problem was shown to be. NP-hard by Peeters [16]. In Sections 3 and 4, we relax these problems to convex optimization using the nuclear.

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nuclear Power Plant NDE Challenges - Past, Present, and Future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a paper that covers the major thrust of NDE work that PNNL has conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission from 1977 to the present.

Doctor, Steven R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Identification of performance indicators for nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance indicators have been assuming an increasingly important role in the nuclear industry. An integrated methodology is proposed in this research for the identification and validation of performance indicators for ...

Sui, Yu, 1973-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Source book for planning nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode.

Reed, S.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Use of neural networks in the operation of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of neural networks to the operation of nuclear power plants is being investigated under a US Department of Energy sponsored program at the University of Tennessee. Projects include the feasibility of using neural networks for the following tasks: (a) diagnosing specific abnormal conditions, (b) detection of the change of mode of operation, (c) signal validation, (d) monitoring of check valves, (e) modeling of the plant thermodynamics, (f) emulation of core reload calculations, (g) analysis of temporal sequences in NRC's licensee event report,'' (h) monitoring of plant parameters, and (i) analysis of plant vibrations. Each of these projects and its status are described briefly in this article. the objective of each of these projects is to enhance the safety and performance of nuclear plants through the use of neural networks. 6 refs.

Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA) Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Structures - Overview of Methods and Related Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this limited study were to provide an overview of the methods that are available for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete and metallic structures, and to provide an assessment of the status of methods that address inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. In meeting these objectives a general description of nuclear power plant safety-related structures was provided as well as identification of potential degradation factors, testing and inspection requirements, and operating experience; methods for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures and containment metallic pressure boundaries were identified and described; and applications of nondestructive evaluation methods specifically related to inspection of thick-section reinforced concrete structures and inaccessible portions of containment metallic pressure boundaries were summarized. Recommendations are provided on utilization of test article(s) to further advance nondestructive evaluation methods related to thick-section, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary representative of nuclear power plant containments. Conduct of a workshop to provide an update on applications and needed developments for nondestructive evaluation of nuclear power plant structures would also be of benefit.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Digital Full-Scope Simulation of a Conventional Nuclear Power Plant Control Room, Phase 2: Installation of a Reconfigurable Simulator to Support Nuclear Plant Sustainability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program has developed a control room simulator in support of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. This report highlights the recent completion of this reconfigurable, full-scale, full-scope control room simulator buildout at the Idaho National Laboratory. The simulator is fully reconfigurable, meaning it supports multiple plant models developed by different simulator vendors. The simulator is full-scale, using glasstop virtual panels to display the analog control boards found at current plants. The present installation features 15 glasstop panels, uniquely achieving a complete control room representation. The simulator is also full-scope, meaning it uses the same plant models used for training simulators at actual plants. Unlike in the plant training simulators, the deployment on glasstop panels allows a high degree of customization of the panels, allowing the simulator to be used for research on the design of new digital control systems for control room modernization. This report includes separate sections discussing the glasstop panels, their layout to mimic control rooms at actual plants, technical details on creating a multi-plant and multi-vendor reconfigurable simulator, and current efforts to support control room modernization at U.S. utilities. The glasstop simulator provides an ideal testbed for prototyping and validating new control room concepts. Equally importantly, it is helping create a standardized and vetted human factors engineering process that can be used across the nuclear industry to ensure control room upgrades maintain and even improve current reliability and safety.

Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Kirk Fitzgerald; Jacques Hugo; Bruce Hallbert

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Online Condition Monitoring to Enable Extended Operation of Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safe, secure, and economic operation of nuclear power plants will remain of strategic significance. New and improved monitoring will likely have increased significance in the post-Fukushima world. Prior to Fukushima, many activities were already underway globally to facilitate operation of nuclear power plants beyond their initial licensing periods. Decisions to shut down a nuclear power plant are mostly driven by economic considerations. Online condition monitoring is a means to improve both the safety and economics of extending the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants, enabling adoption of proactive aging management. With regard to active components (e.g., pumps, valves, motors, etc.), significant experience in other industries has been leveraged to build the science base to support adoption for online condition-based maintenance and proactive aging management in the nuclear industry. Many of the research needs are associated with enabling proactive management of aging in passive components (e.g., pipes, vessels, cables, containment structures, etc.). This paper provides an overview of online condition monitoring for the nuclear power industry with an emphasis on passive components. Following the overview, several technology/knowledge gaps are identified, which require addressing to facilitate widespread online condition monitoring of passive components.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Bond, Leonard J.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Regulatory Challenges of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants in Korea - 13101  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As of 2012, 23 units of nuclear power plants are in operation, but there is no experience of permanent shutdown and decommissioning of nuclear power plant in Korea. It is realized that, since late 1990's, improvement of the regulatory framework for decommissioning has been emphasized constantly from the point of view of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s safety standards. And it is known that now IAEA prepare the safety requirement on decommissioning of facilities, its title is the Safe Decommissioning of Facilities, General Safety Requirement Part 6. According to the result of IAEA's Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission to Korea in 2011, it was recommended that the regulatory framework for decommissioning should require decommissioning plans for nuclear installations to be constructed and operated and these plans should be updated periodically. In addition, after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan in March of 2011, preparedness for early decommissioning caused by an unexpected severe accident became also important issues and concerns. In this respect, it is acknowledged that the regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Korea need to be improved. First of all, we identify the current status and relevant issues of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear power plants compared to the IAEA's safety standards in order to achieve our goal. And then the plan is to be established for improvement of regulatory framework for decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea. After dealing with it, it is expected that the revised regulatory framework for decommissioning could enhance the safety regime on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants in Korea in light of international standards. (authors)

Lee, Jungjoon; Ahn, Sangmyeon; Choi, Kyungwoo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Juyoul; Kim, Juyub [FNC Technology, 46 Tabsil-ro, Giheung-gu, Yongin 446-902 (Korea, Republic of)] [FNC Technology, 46 Tabsil-ro, Giheung-gu, Yongin 446-902 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Initiating Event Rates at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants 1988–2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyzing initiating event rates is important because it indicates performance among plants and also provides inputs to several U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) risk-informed regulatory activities. This report presents an analysis of initiating event frequencies at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants since each plant’s low-power license date. The evaluation is based on the operating experience from fiscal year 1988 through 2013 as reported in licensee event reports. Engineers with nuclear power plant experience staff reviewed each event report since the last update to this report for the presence of valid scrams or reactor trips at power. To be included in the study, an event had to meet all of the following criteria: includes an unplanned reactor trip (not a scheduled reactor trip on the daily operations schedule), sequence of events starts when reactor is critical and at or above the point of adding heat, occurs at a U.S. commercial nuclear power plant (excluding Fort St. Vrain and LaCrosse), and is reported by a licensee event report. This report displays occurrence rates (baseline frequencies) for the categories of initiating events that contribute to the NRC’s Industry Trends Program. Sixteen initiating event groupings are trended and displayed. Initiators are plotted separately for initiating events with different occurrence rates for boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. p-values are given for the possible presence of a trend over the most recent 10 years.

John A. Schroeder; Gordon R. Bower

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Use of fuel cells for improving on-site emergency power availability and reliability ad nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To assure safe shutdown of a nuclear power plant, there must always be reliable means of decay heat removal provided, in last resort, by an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS). Currently the majority of nuclear power ...

Akkaynak, Derya

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation’s electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit...

270

Potential application of neural networks to the operation of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of neural networks, a rapidly evolving technology used extensively in defense applications, to some of the problems of operating nuclear power plants is a logical complement to the expert systems currently being introduced in some of those plants. The potential applications of neural networks include, but are not limited to: (1) Diagnosing specific abnormal conditions. (2) Identifying nonlinear dynamics and transients. (3) Detecting the change of mode of operation. (4) Controlling temperature and pressure during start-up. (5) validating signals. (6) Plant-wide monitoring using autoassociative neural networks. (7) Monitoring of check valves. (8) Modeling the plant thermodynamics to increase efficiency. (9) Emulating core reload calculations. (10) Analyzing temporal sequences in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensee Event Reports. (11) Monitoring plant parameters. (12) Analyzing vibrations in plants and rotating machinery. The work on such applications indicates that neural networks alone, or in conjunction with other advanced technologies, have the potential to enhance the safety, reliability, and operability of nuclear power plants. 36 refs.

Uhrig, R.E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

OVERVIEW OF A RECONFIGURABLE SIMULATOR FOR MAIN CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plant modernization in the U.S. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

Ronald L. Boring

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Safeguards Guidance Document for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities: International Nuclear Safeguards Requirements and Practices For Uranium Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second in a series of guidelines on international safeguards requirements and practices, prepared expressly for the designers of nuclear facilities. The first document in this series is the description of generic international nuclear safeguards requirements pertaining to all types of facilities. These requirements should be understood and considered at the earliest stages of facility design as part of a new process called “Safeguards-by-Design.” This will help eliminate the costly retrofit of facilities that has occurred in the past to accommodate nuclear safeguards verification activities. The following summarizes the requirements for international nuclear safeguards implementation at enrichment plants, prepared under the Safeguards by Design project, and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of NA-243. The purpose of this is to provide designers of nuclear facilities around the world with a simplified set of design requirements and the most common practices for meeting them. The foundation for these requirements is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Relevant safeguards requirements are also cited from the Safeguards Criteria for inspecting enrichment plants, found in the IAEA Safeguards Manual, Part SMC-8. IAEA definitions and terms are based on the IAEA Safeguards Glossary, published in 2002. The most current specification for safeguards measurement accuracy is found in the IAEA document STR-327, “International Target Values 2000 for Measurement Uncertainties in Safeguarding Nuclear Materials,” published in 2001. For this guide to be easier for the designer to use, the requirements have been restated in plainer language per expert interpretation using the source documents noted. The safeguards agreement is fundamentally a legal document. As such, it is written in a legalese that is understood by specialists in international law and treaties, but not by most outside of this field, including designers of nuclear facilities. For this reason, many of the requirements have been simplified and restated. However, in all cases, the relevant source document and passage is noted so that readers may trace the requirement to the source. This is a helpful living guide, since some of these requirements are subject to revision over time. More importantly, the practices by which the requirements are met are continuously modernized by the IAEA and nuclear facility operators to improve not only the effectiveness of international nuclear safeguards, but also the efficiency. As these improvements are made, the following guidelines should be updated and revised accordingly.

Robert Bean; Casey Durst

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The status of nuclear power plants in the People's Republic of China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China's main energy source is coal, but transportation and environmental problems make that fuel less than desirable. Therefore, the Chinese, as part of an effort toward alternative energy sources, are developing nuclear power plants. In addition to providing a cleaner power source, development of nuclear energy would improve the Chinese economic condition and give the nation greater world status. China's first plants, at Qinshan and Daya Bay, are still incomplete. However, China is working toward completion of those reactors and planning the training and operating procedures needed to operate them. At the same time, it is improving its nuclear fuel exports. As they develop the capability for generating nuclear power, the Chinese seem to be aware of the accompanying quality and safety considerations, which they have declared to be first priorities. 50 refs., 7 figs.

Puckett, J.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Nuclear safety procedure upgrade project at USEC/MMUS gaseous diffusion plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Martin Marietta Utility Services has embarked on a program to upgrade procedures at both of its Gaseous Diffusion Plant sites. The transition from a U.S. Department of Energy government-operated facility to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulated has necessitated a complete upgrade of plant operating procedures and practices incorporating human factors as well as a philosophy change in their use. This program is designed to meet the requirements of the newly written 10CFR76, {open_quotes}The Certification of Gaseous Diffusion Plants,{close_quotes} and aid in progression toward NRC certification. A procedures upgrade will help ensure increased nuclear safety, enhance plant operation, and eliminate personnel procedure errors/occurrences.

Kocsis, F.J. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - tanks and pools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continued operation of nuclear power plants for periods that extend beyond their original 40-year license period is a desirable option for many U.S. utilities. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of operating license renewals is necessary before continued operation becomes a reality. Effective aging management for plant components is important to reliability and safety, regardless of current plant age or extended life expectations. However, the NRC requires that aging evaluations be performed and the effectiveness of aging management programs be demonstrated for components considered within the scope of license renewal before granting approval for operation beyond 40 years. Both the NRC and the utility want assurance that plant components will be highly reliable during both the current license term and throughout the extended operating period. In addition, effective aging management must be demonstrated to support Maintenance Rule (10 CFR 50.65) activities.

Blocker, E.; Smith, S.; Philpot, L.; Conley, J.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Improved assessment of population doses and risk factors for a nuclear power plant under accident conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to assess the doses received by the members of the public due to an accident at a nuclear power plant, a number of physical processes must be modeled. These processes include the release of radioactive materials, the atmospheric dispersion... representative of the industry. Generic reactor sites must be conceptualized in order to obtain meteorologic data which is representative of the areas within the United States in which nuclear power facilities have been sited, Information such as population...

Meyer, Christopher Martin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of Spray Booth Operations in X-705, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for Spray Booth Operations in the Decontamination and Recovery Facility, X-705, at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A general description of current procedures and related hardware/equipment is presented. Control parameters relevant to nuclear criticality safety are explained, and a consolidated listing of administrative controls and safety systems is developed. Based on compliance with DOE Orders and MMES practices, the overall operation is evaluated, and recommendations for enhanced safety are suggested.

Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

NONE

1995-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

Community emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents: A selected and partially annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of responding to emergencies at nuclear power plants is often considered the responsibility of the personnel onsite. This is true for most, if not all, of the incidents that may happen during the course of the plant`s operating lifetime. There is however, the possibility of a major accident occurring at anytime. Major nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island have taught their respective countries and communities a significant lesson in local emergency preparedness and response. Through these accidents, the rest of the world can also learn a great deal about planning, preparing and responding to the emergencies unique to nuclear power. This bibliography contains books, journal articles, conference papers and government reports on emergency response to nuclear power plant accidents. It does not contain citations for ``onsite`` response or planning, nor does it cover the areas of radiation releases from transportation accidents. The compiler has attempted to bring together a sampling of the world`s collective written experience on dealing with nuclear reactor accidents on the sate, local and community levels. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, that written experience has grown enormously.

Youngen, G.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Natural Circulation in Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants Phenomena, models, and methodology for system reliability assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years it has been recognized that the application of passive safety systems (i.e., those whose operation takes advantage of natural forces such as convection and gravity), can contribute to simplification and potentially to improved economics of new nuclear power plant designs. In 1991 the IAEA Conference on ''The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future'' noted that for new plants the use of passive safety features is a desirable method of achieving simplification and increasing the reliability of the performance of essential safety functions, and should be used wherever appropriate''.

Jose Reyes

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants’ (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for field workers in an NPP setting. This document especially is directed at NPP business managers, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and other non-Information Technology personnel. This information is not intended to replace basic project management practices or reiterate these processes, but is to support decision-making, planning, and preparation of a business case.

Heather D. Medema; Ronald K. Farris

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Transgenic plants are sensitive bioindicators of nuclear pollution caused by the Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the genetic consequences of radioactive contamination originating from the Nuclear reactor accident of Chernobyl on indigenous populations of plants and animals, it is essential to determine the rates of accumulating genetic changes in chronically irradiated populations. An increase in germline mutation rates in humans living close to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site, and a two- to tenfold increase in germline mutations in barn swallows breeding in Chernobyl have been reported. Little is known, however, about the effects of chronic irradiation on plant genomes. Ionizing radiation causes double-strand breaks in DNA, which are repaired via illegitimate or homologous recombination. The authors make use of Arabidopsis thaliana plants carrying a {beta}-glucuronidase marker gene as a recombination substrate to monitor genetic alterations in plant populations, which are caused by nuclear pollution of the environment around Chernobyl. A significant increase in somatic intrachromosomal recombination frequencies was observed at nuclear pollution levels from 0.1--900 Ci/km{sup 2}, consistent with an increase in chromosomal aberrations. This bioindicator may serve as a convenient and ethically acceptable alternative to animal systems.

Kovalchuk, I.; Kovalchuk, O. [Ivano-Frankivsk State Medical Academy (Ukraine)]|[Friedrich Miescher Inst., Basel (Switzerland); Arkhipov, A. [Chernobyl Scientific and Technical Center of International Research (Ukraine); Hohn, B. [Friedrich Miescher Inst., Basel (Switzerland)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Managing aging in nuclear power plants: Insights from NRC maintenance team inspection reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plant`s maintenance program is the principal vehicle through which age-related degradation is managed. From 1988 to 1991, the NRC evaluated the maintenance program of every nuclear power plant in the United States. Forty-four out of a total of 67 of the reports issued on these in-depth team inspections were reviewed for insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the programs as related to the need to understand and manage the effects of aging on nuclear plant systems, structures, and components. Relevant information was extracted from these inspection reports and sorted into several categories, including Specific Aging Insights, Preventive Maintenance, Predictive Maintenance and Condition Monitoring, Post Maintenance Testing, Failure Trending, Root Cause Analysis and Usage of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in the Maintenance Process. Specific examples of inspection and monitoring techniques successfully used by utilities to detect degradation due to aging have been identified. The information also was sorted according to systems and components, including: Auxiliary Feedwater, Main Feedwater, High Pressure Injection for both BWRs and PWRs, Service Water, Instrument Air, and Emergency Diesel Generator Air Start Systems, and Emergency Diesel Generators Air Start Systems, emergency diesel generators, electrical components such as switchgear, breakers, relays, and motor control centers, motor operated valves and check valves. This information was compared to insights gained from the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Attributes of plant maintenance programs where the NRC inspectors felt that improvement was needed to properly address the aging issue also are discussed.

Fresco, A.; Subudhi, M.; Gunther, W.; Grove, E.; Taylor, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project 2009 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the NGNP Project is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy technology to the United States and other economies by demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not served by light water reactors (LWRs). Those markets typically use fossil fuels to fulfill their energy needs, and high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) like the NGNP can reduce this dependence and the resulting carbon footprint.

Larry Demick; Jim Kinsey; Keith Perry; Dave Petti

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes “Best Technology Available” for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plant’s steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R&D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

Gary Vine

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

EDF Nuclear Power Plants Operating Experience with MOX fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EDF started Plutonium recycling in PWR in 1987 and progressively all the 20 reactors, licensed in using MOX fuel, have been loaded with MOX assemblies. At the origin of MOX introduction, these plants operated at full power in base load and the core management limited the irradiation time of MOX fuel assemblies to 3 annual cycles. Since 1995 all these reactors can operate in load follow mode. Since that time, a large amount of experience has been accumulated. This experience is very positive considering: - Receipt, handling, in core behaviour, pool storage and shipment of MOX fuel; - Operation of the various systems of the plant; - Environment impact; - Radioprotection; - Safety file requirements; - Availability for the grid. In order to reduce the fuel cost and to reach a better adequacy between UO{sub 2} fuel reprocessing flow and plutonium consumption, EDF had decided to improve the core management of MOX plants. This new core management call 'MOX Parity' achieves parity for MOX and UO{sub 2} assemblies in term of discharge burn-up. Compared to the current MOX assembly the Plutonium content is increased from 7,08% to 8,65% (equivalent to natural uranium enriched to respectively 3,25% and 3,7%) and the maximum MOX assembly burn-up moves from 42 to 52 GWd/t. This amount of burn-up is obtained from loading MOX assemblies for one additional annual cycle. Some, but limited, adaptations of the plant are necessary. In addition a new MOX fuel assembly has been designed to comply with the safety criteria taking into account the core management performances. These design improvements are based on the results of an important R and D program including numerous experimental tests and post-irradiated fuel examinations. In particular, envelope conditions compared to MOX Parity neutronic solicitations has been extensively investigated in order to get a full knowledge of the in reactor fuel behavior. Moreover, the operating conditions of the plant have been evaluated in many details and finally no important impact is anticipated. The industrial maturity of plutonium recycling activities is fully demonstrated and a new progress can be done with a complete confidence. The licensing process of 'MOX Parity' core management is in progress and its implementation on the 20 PWR is now expected at mid 2007. (author)

Thibault, Xavier [EDF Generation, Tour EDF Part Dieu - 9 rue des Cuirassiers B.P.3181 - 69402 Lyon Cedex 03 (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Physical protection solutions for security problems at nuclear power plants. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Department of Energy sponsorship, Sandia National Laboratories has developed a broad technological base of components and integrated systems to address security concerns at facilities of importance, including nuclear reactors. The primary security concern at a light water reactor is radiological sabotage, a deliberate set of actions at a plant which could expose the public to a significant amount of radiation (on the order of 10 CFR 100 limits). (Also of importance to plant operators are acts of industrial sabotage that could prevent a plant from producing electrical power).

Darby, J.L.; Jacobs, J.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The integrated workstation: A common, consistent link between nuclear plant personnel and plant information and computerized resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing use of computer technology in the US nuclear power industry has greatly expanded the capability to obtain, analyze, and present data about the plant to station personnel. Data concerning a power plant`s design, configuration, operational and maintenance histories, and current status, and the information that can be derived from them, provide the link between the plant and plant staff. It is through this information bridge that operations, maintenance and engineering personnel understand and manage plant performance. However, it is necessary to transform the vast quantity of data available from various computer systems and across communications networks into clear, concise, and coherent information. In addition, it is important to organize this information into a consolidated, structured form within an integrated environment so that various users throughout the plant have ready access at their local station to knowledge necessary for their tasks. Thus, integrated workstations are needed to provide the inquired information and proper software tools, in a manner that can be easily understood and used, to the proper users throughout the plant. An effort is underway at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address this need by developing Integrated Workstation functional requirements and implementing a limited-scale prototype demonstration. The integrated Workstation requirements will define a flexible, expandable computer environment that permits a tailored implementation of workstation capabilities and facilitates future upgrades to add enhanced applications. The functionality to be supported by the integrated workstation and inherent capabilities to be provided by the workstation environment win be described. In addition, general technology areas which are to be addressed in the Integrated Workstation functional requirements will be discussed.

Wood, R.T.; Knee, H.E.; Mullens, J.A.; Munro, J.K. Jr.; Swail, B.K.; Tapp, P.A.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

EU could go it alone on nuclear fusion plant 29.11.2004 -10:02 CET | By Richard Carter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EU could go it alone on nuclear fusion plant 29.11.2004 - 10:02 CET | By Richard Carter The EU if no agreement can be reached with Japan by the end of the year over where to build the plant, according to EU research ministers. Talks over the world's first nuclear fusion reactor have stalled because Japan

290

Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

Reid, RL

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

Aerial Radiation Measurements from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a slide show type presentation concerning DOE and Aerial Measuring System (AMS) activities and results with respect to assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. These include ground monitoring and aerial monitoring.

Guss, P. P.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

293

Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

Camillo A. DiNunzio Framatome ANP DE& S; Dr. Abhinav Gupta Assistant Professor NCSU; Dr. Michael Golay Professor MIT Dr. Vincent Luk Sandia National Laboratories; Rich Turk Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems; Charles Morrow, Sandia National Laboratories; Geum-Taek Jin, Korea Power Engineering Company Inc.

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC's current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC`s current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described.

Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Nuclear Plant Feedwater Heater Handbook. Volume 2. Design and procurement guidelines. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the second part of a three volume handbook covering closed feedwater heaters for nuclear electric power generating plants. This second volume covers the engineering, design, specification, bid, procurement, fabrication, installation and commissioning of the heater. 22 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

Bell, R.J.; Wells, T.G. Jr.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Ranking of four potential nuclear power plant sites in Iraq according to the collective dose criterion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The collective dose criterion was used to rank four potential nuclear power-plant sites. Baiji, Al-Mahzam, Al-Abbasia, and Abu-Dalaf. Atmospheric as well as aquatic releases of radionuclides into the environment from the VVER 440 nuclear power plant during normal operation were used to estimate the collective dose equivalents. The results indicated that the collective doses at Baiji, Al-Mahzam, Al-Abbasia, and Abu-Dalaf were 3.6 x 10{sup -2}, 4.7 x 10{sup -2}, 1.1 x 10{sup -1}, and 1.2 x 10{sup -1} man-Sv, respectively. Thus the order of preference is Baiji, Al-Mahzam, Al-Abbasia, and Abu-Dalaf. The effective dose equivalents to the highest exposed individual resulting from atmospheric as well as aquatic releases of radionuclides from the reactor at any one of the four potential nuclear power-plant sites would not exceed 2 x 10{sup -5} Sv/yr. Thus any one of the four sites is suitable for the operation of the 440 nuclear power plants. 27 refs., 1 tab.

Marouf, B.A.; Al-Kateeb, G.H.; Al-Ani, D.S. [and others

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Aging management of nuclear power plant containments for license renewal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1990, the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), now the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), submitted for NRC review, the industry reports (IRs), NUMARC Report 90-01 and NUMARC Report 90-10, addressing aging management issues associated with PWR containments and BWR containments for license renewal, respectively. In 1996, the Commission amended 10 CFR 50.55a to promulgate requirements for inservice inspection of containment structures. This rule amendment incorporates by reference the 1992 Edition with the 1992 Addenda of Subsections IWE and IWL of the ASME Code addressing the inservice inspection of metal containments/liners and concrete containments, respectively. The purpose of this report is to reconcile the technical information and agreements resulting from the NUMARC IR reviews which are generally described in NUREG-1557 and the inservice inspection requirements of subsections IWE and IWL as promulgated in {section}50.55a for license renewal consideration. This report concludes that Subsections IWE and IWL as endorsed in {section}50.55a are generally consistent with the technical agreements reached during the IR reviews. Specific exceptions are identified and additional evaluations and augmented inspections for renewal are recommended.

Liu, W.C.; Kuo, P.T.; Lee, S.S.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Prognostics and Health Management in Nuclear Power Plants: A Review of Technologies and Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the current state of the art of prognostics and health management (PHM) for nuclear power systems and related technology currently applied in field or under development in other technological application areas, as well as key research needs and technical gaps for increased use of PHM in nuclear power systems. The historical approach to monitoring and maintenance in nuclear power plants (NPPs), including the Maintenance Rule for active components and Aging Management Plans for passive components, are reviewed. An outline is given for the technical and economic challenges that make PHM attractive for both legacy plants through Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) and new plant designs. There is a general introduction to PHM systems for monitoring, fault detection and diagnostics, and prognostics in other, non-nuclear fields. The state of the art for health monitoring in nuclear power systems is reviewed. A discussion of related technologies that support the application of PHM systems in NPPs, including digital instrumentation and control systems, wired and wireless sensor technology, and PHM software architectures is provided. Appropriate codes and standards for PHM are discussed, along with a description of the ongoing work in developing additional necessary standards. Finally, an outline of key research needs and opportunities that must be addressed in order to support the application of PHM in legacy and new NPPs is presented.

Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hines, Wes; Upadhyaya, Belle

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: boiling water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWR) (NUREG-1123) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog and Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations (NUREG-1121) will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55. The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at boiling water reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring personnel and public health and safety. The BWR K/A Catalog is organized into five major sections: Plant-wide Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. The BWR Catalog represents a modification of the form and content of the K/A Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Pressurized Water Reactors (NUREG-1122). First, categories of knowledge and ability statements have been redefined. Second, the scope of the definition of emergency and abnormal plant evolutions has been revised in line with a symptom-based approach. Third, K/As related to the operational applications of theory have been incorporated into the delineations for both plant systems and emergency and abnormal plant evolutions, while K/As pertaining to theory fundamental to plant operation have been delineated in a separate theory section. Finally, the components section has been revised.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Assessment of inservice conditions of safety-related nuclear plant structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is a compilation from a number of sources of information related to the condition Of structures and civil engineering features at operating nuclear power plants in the United States. The most significant information came from the hands-on inspection of the six old plants (licensed prior to 1977) performed by the staff of the Civil Engineering and Geosciences Branch (ECGB) in the Division of Engineering of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. For the containment structures, most of the information related to the degraded conditions came from the licensees as part of the Licensing Event Report System (10 CFR 50.73), or as part of the requirement under limiting condition of operation of the plant-specific Technical Specifications. Most of the information related to the degradation of other Structures and civil engineering features was extracted from the industry survey, the reported incidents, and the plant visits. The report discusses the condition of the structures and civil engineering features at operating nuclear power plants and provides information that would help detect, alleviate, and correct the degraded conditions of the structures and civil engineering features.

Ashar, H.; Bagchi, G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Application of NUREG/CR-5999 interim fatigue curves to selected nuclear power plant components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent test data indicate that the effects of the light water reactor (LWR) environment could significantly reduce the fatigue resistance of materials used in the reactor coolant pressure boundary components of operating nuclear power plants. Argonne National Laboratory has developed interim fatigue curves based on test data simulating LWR conditions, and published them in NUREG/CR-5999. In order to assess the significance of these interim fatigue curves, fatigue evaluations of a sample of the components in the reactor coolant pressure boundary of LWRs were performed. The sample consists of components from facilities designed by each of the four U.S. nuclear steam supply system vendors. For each facility, six locations were studied, including two locations on the reactor pressure vessel. In addition, there are older vintage plants where components of the reactor coolant pressure boundary were designed to codes that did not require an explicit fatigue analysis of the components. In order to assess the fatigue resistance of the older vintage plants, an evaluation was also conducted on selected components of three of these plants. This report discusses the insights gained from the application of the interim fatigue curves to components of seven operating nuclear power plants.

Ware, A.G.; Morton, D.K.; Nitzel, M.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Design issues concerning Iran`s Bushehr nuclear power plant VVER-1000 conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On January 8, 1995, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) signed a contract for $800 million with the Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (Minatom) to complete Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP) unit 1. The agreement called for a Russian VVER-1000/320 pressurized water reactor (PWR) to be successfully installed into the existing German-built BNPP facilities in 5 yr. System design differences, bomb damage, and environmental exposure are key issues with which Minatom must contend in order to fulfill the contract. The AEOI under the Shah of Iran envisioned Bushehr as the first of many nuclear power plants, with Iran achieving 24 GW(electric) by 1993 and 34 GW(electric) by 2000. Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) began construction of the two-unit plant near the Persian Gulf town of Halileh in 1975. Unit 1 was {approx}80% complete and unit 2 was {approx}50% complete when construction was interrupted by the 1979 Iranian Islamic revolution. Despite repeated AEOI attempts to lure KWU and other companies back to Iran to complete the plant, Western concerns about nuclear proliferation in Iran and repeated bombings of the plant during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war dissuaded Germany from resuming construction.

Carson, C.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Extending Sensor Calibration Intervals in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently in the USA, sensor recalibration is required at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in UK, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors which require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors which need it. The US NRC accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This project addresses key issues in advanced recalibration methodologies and provides the science base to enable adoption of best practices for applying online monitoring, resulting in a public domain standardized methodology for sensor calibration interval extension. Research to develop this methodology will focus on three key areas: (1) quantification of uncertainty in modeling techniques used for calibration monitoring, with a particular focus on non-redundant sensor models; (2) accurate determination of acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and (3) the use of virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity.

Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Guideline for the seismic technical evaluation of replacement items for nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seismic qualification for equipment originally installed in nuclear power plants was typically performed by the original equipment suppliers or manufactures (OES/OEM). Many of the OES/OEM no longer maintain quality assurance programs with adequate controls for supplying nuclear equipment. Utilities themselves must provide reasonable assurance in the continued seismic adequacy of such replacement items. This guideline provides practical, cost-effective techniques which can be used to provide reasonable assurance that replacement items will meet seismic performance requirements necessary to maintain the seismic design basis of commercial nuclear power plants. It also provides a method for determining when a seismic technical evaluation of replacement items (STERI) is required as part of the procurement process for spare and replacement items. Guidance on supplier program requirements necessary to maintain continued seismic adequacy and on documentation of maintaining required seismic adequacy is also included.

Harris, S.P.; Cushing, R.W. (EQE International, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Johnson, H.W. (Programmatic Solutions, Smithtown, NY (United States)); Abeles, J.M. (System 1, Inc., Potomac, MD (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The integrated workstation: A common, consistent link between nuclear plant personnel and plant information and computerized resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing use of computer technology in the US nuclear power industry has greatly expanded the capability to obtain, analyze, and present data about the plant to station personnel. Data concerning a power plant's design, configuration, operational and maintenance histories, and current status, and the information that can be derived from them, provide the link between the plant and plant staff. It is through this information bridge that operations, maintenance and engineering personnel understand and manage plant performance. However, it is necessary to transform the vast quantity of data available from various computer systems and across communications networks into clear, concise, and coherent information. In addition, it is important to organize this information into a consolidated, structured form within an integrated environment so that various users throughout the plant have ready access at their local station to knowledge necessary for their tasks. Thus, integrated workstations are needed to provide the inquired information and proper software tools, in a manner that can be easily understood and used, to the proper users throughout the plant. An effort is underway at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address this need by developing Integrated Workstation functional requirements and implementing a limited-scale prototype demonstration. The integrated Workstation requirements will define a flexible, expandable computer environment that permits a tailored implementation of workstation capabilities and facilitates future upgrades to add enhanced applications. The functionality to be supported by the integrated workstation and inherent capabilities to be provided by the workstation environment win be described. In addition, general technology areas which are to be addressed in the Integrated Workstation functional requirements will be discussed.

Wood, R.T.; Knee, H.E.; Mullens, J.A.; Munro, J.K. Jr.; Swail, B.K.; Tapp, P.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND-NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HYDROGEN ENERGY Accepted June 2008 1 HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND-NUCLEAR evaluation of hydrogen production and storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant considering some new of a combined nuclear-wind-hydrogen system is discussed first, where the selling and buying of electricity

Cañizares, Claudio A.

309

Decision to reorganise or reorganising decisions? A First-Hand Account of the Decommissioning of the Phnix Nuclear Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Decommissioning of the Phénix Nuclear Power Plant Melchior Pelleterat de Borde, MINES ParisTech, Christophe Martin prepared for decommissioning. This study, conducted between 2010 and 2012, is focused on the Phénix nuclear in the context of nuclear decommissioning. This article does not aim to present the results of the study, i

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

310

Aging of steel containments and liners in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aging of the containment pressure boundary in light water reactor plants is being addressed to understand the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion efficacy of inspection and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of concrete containments. and to make recommendations on use of risk models in regulatory decisions. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of containment related degradation experience is presented. Current and emerging nondestructive examination techniques and a degradation assessment methodology for characterizing and quantifying the amount of damage present are described. Quantitative tools for condition assessment of aging structures using time dependent structural reliability analysis methods are summarized. Such methods provide a framework for addressing the uncertainties attendant to aging in the decision process. Results of this research provide a means for establishing current and estimating future structural capacity margins of containments, and to address the significance of incidences of reported containment degradation.

Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Engineering Technology Div.; Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Norris, W.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Diversity Strategies for Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation and Control Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the technical basis for establishing acceptable mitigating strategies that resolve diversity and defense-in-depth (D3) assessment findings and conform to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. The research approach employed to establish appropriate diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on D3 methods and experience from nuclear power and nonnuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of best practices, and assessment of the nature of common-cause failures (CCFs) and compensating diversity attributes. The research described in this report does not provide guidance on how to determine the need for diversity in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs. Rather, the scope of this report provides guidance to the staff and nuclear industry after a licensee or applicant has performed a D3 assessment per NUREG/CR-6303 and determined that diversity in a safety system is needed for mitigating the consequences of potential CCFs identified in the evaluation of the safety system design features. Succinctly, the purpose of the research described in this report was to answer the question, 'If diversity is required in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs, how much diversity is enough?' The principal results of this research effort have identified and developed diversity strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria. Technology, which corresponds to design diversity, is chosen as the principal system characteristic by which diversity criteria are grouped to form strategies. The rationale for this classification framework involves consideration of the profound impact that technology-focused design diversity provides. Consequently, the diversity usage classification scheme involves three families of strategies: (1) different technologies, (2) different approaches within the same technology, and (3) different architectures within the same technology. Using this convention, the first diversity usage family, designated Strategy A, is characterized by fundamentally diverse technologies. Strategy A at the system or platform level is illustrated by the example of analog and digital implementations. The second diversity usage family, designated Strategy B, is achieved through the use of distinctly different technologies. Strategy B can be described in terms of different digital technologies, such as the distinct approaches represented by general-purpose microprocessors and field-programmable gate arrays. The third diversity usage family, designated Strategy C, involves the use of variations within a technology. An example of Strategy C involves different digital architectures within the same technology, such as that provided by different microprocessors (e.g., Pentium and Power PC). The grouping of diversity criteria combinations according to Strategies A, B, and C establishes baseline diversity usage and facilitates a systematic organization of strategic approaches for coping with CCF vulnerabilities. Effectively, these baseline sets of diversity criteria constitute appropriate CCF mitigating strategies for digital safety systems. The strategies represent guidance on acceptable diversity usage and can be applied directly to ensure that CCF vulnerabilities identified through a D3 assessment have been adequately resolved. Additionally, a framework has been generated for capturing practices regarding diversity usage and a tool has been developed for the systematic assessment of the comparative effect of proposed diversity strategies (see Appendix A).

Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL; Waterman, Michael E. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the H. B. Robinson nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. H. B. Robinson was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the H. B. Robinson plant.

Moffitt, N.E.; Lloyd, R.C.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Garner, L.W. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the McGuire nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. McGuire was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the McGuire plant.

Bumgardner, J.D.; Lloyd, R.C.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the J. M. Farley Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment(PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. J. M. Farley was selected as the second plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important at the J. M. Farley plant. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Vo, T.V.; Pugh, R.; Gore, B.F.; Harrison, D.G. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Ginna was selected as the eighth plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Ginna plant. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Pugh, R.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Moffitt, N.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the South Texas Project nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. South Texas Project was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the South Texas Project plant.

Bumgardner, J.D.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Integrated head package cable carrier for a nuclear power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cabling arrangement is provided for a nuclear reactor located within a containment. Structure inside the containment is characterized by a wall having a near side surrounding the reactor vessel defining a cavity, an operating deck outside the cavity, a sub-space below the deck and on a far side of the wall spaced from the near side, and an operating area above the deck. The arrangement includes a movable frame supporting a plurality of cables extending through the frame, each connectable at a first end to a head package on the reactor vessel and each having a second end located in the sub-space. The frame is movable, with the cables, between a first position during normal operation of the reactor when the cables are connected to the head package, located outside the sub-space proximate the head package, and a second position during refueling when the cables are disconnected from the head package, located in the sub-space. In a preferred embodiment, the frame straddles the top of the wall in a substantially horizontal orientation in the first position, pivots about an end distal from the head package to a substantially vertically oriented intermediate position, and is guided, while remaining about vertically oriented, along a track in the sub-space to the second position.

Meuschke, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); Trombola, Daniel M. (Murrysville, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development of a checklist for evaluating emergency procedures used in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the process for developing a checklist to be used by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Inspection and Enforcement (I and E) inspectors during their evaluation of emergency procedures used in nuclear power plants. The objective of the checklist is to aid inspectors in identifying procedural characteristics that can lead to reactor operator performance deviations. Four nuclear power plants were surveyed to obtain a sample of procedures and related information for human factors evaluation. In addition, a human factors analysis of 890 LERs submitted during the period 1975 through 1978 was performed to identify the major categories of performance deviations associated with reactor operator activities. Checklist items aimed at preventing these performance deviations or facilitating their early detection were developed. The study findings supporting the procedures evaluation criteria comprising the checklist items are described in this report. A companion document, Checklist for Evaluating Emergency Procedures Used in Nuclear Power Plants, NUREG/CR-2005, SAND81-7074, has been prepared as a handbook for inspectors. It describes the checklist and provides instructions for its use. 24 figs.

Brune, R.L.; Weinstein, M.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Method of installing a control room console in a nuclear power plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Development, Application, and Implementation of RAMCAP to Characterize Nuclear Power Plant Risk From Terrorism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to increased interest in risk-informed decision making regarding terrorism, EPRI and ERIN Engineering were selected by U.S. DHS and ASME to develop and demonstrate the RAMCAP method for nuclear power plant (NPP) risk assessment. The objective is to characterize plant-specific NPP risk for risk management opportunities and to provide consistent information for DHS decision making. This paper is an update of this project presented at the American Nuclear Society (ANS) International Topical Meeting on Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA05) in September, 2005. The method uses a characterization of risk as a function of Consequence, Vulnerability, and Threat. For each site, worst case scenarios are developed for each of sixteen benchmark threats. Nuclear RAMCAP hypothesizes that the intent of the perpetrator is to cause offsite radiological consequences. Specific targets are the reactor core, the spent fuel pool, and nuclear spent fuel in a dry storage facility (ISFSI). Results for each scenario are presented as conditional risk for financial loss, early fatalities and early injuries. Expected consequences for each scenario are quantified, while vulnerability is estimated on a relative likelihood scale. Insights for other societal risks are provided. Although threat frequencies are not provided, target attractiveness and threat deterrence are estimated. To assure efficiency, completeness, and consistency; results are documented using standard RAMCAP Evaluator software. Trial applications were successfully performed at four plant sites. Implementation at all other U.S. commercial sites is underway, supported by the Nuclear Sector Coordinating Council (NSCC). Insights from RAMCAP results at 23 U.S. plants completed to date have been compiled and presented to the NSCC. Results are site-specific. Physical security barriers, an armed security force, preparedness for design-basis threats, rugged design against natural hazards, multiple barriers between fuel and environment, accident mitigation capability, severe accident management procedures, and offsite emergency plans are risk-beneficial against all threat types. (authors)

Gaertner, John P. [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 Harris Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Teagarden, Grant A. [ERIN Engineering and Research (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

U.S. Seafood Safe and Unaffected by Radiation Contamination from Japanese Nuclear Power Plant Incident; U.S. Monitoring Control Strategy Explained  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Seafood Safe and Unaffected by Radiation Contamination from Japanese Nuclear Power Plant about radiation contamination from the Japanese nuclear power plant incident and on the control potential routes by which seafood contaminated with radionuclides from the Japanese nuclear power plant

323

Redundant Sensor Calibration and Estimation for Monitoring and Control of Nuclear Power Plants Xin Jin, Asok Ray and Robert M. Edwards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Redundant Sensor Calibration and Estimation for Monitoring and Control of Nuclear Power Plants Xin@engr.psu.edu INTRODUCTION Performance, reliability and safety of nuclear power plants depend upon validity and accuracy are installed with redundancy in nuclear power plants. Redundancy can be classified into two groups: direct

Ray, Asok

324

Power to the People or Regulatory Ratcheting? Explaining the Success (or Failure) of Attempts to Site Commercial U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: 1954 -19961  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Site Commercial U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: 1954 - 19961 7 April 2014 Eric Berndt2 and Daniel P. Aldrich to attempt siting nuclear power plant facilities in large numbers in the 1960s. By the late 1990s, more than 1984). In the case of the Shoreham Nuclear Generating Station in Long Island, the plant was completed

325

The Handbook of Applied Bayesian Analysis, Eds: Tony O'Hagan & Mike West, Oxford University Bayesian analysis and decisions in nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian analysis and decisions in nuclear power plant maintenance Elmira Popova, David Morton, Paul Damien are then applied to solving an important problem in a nuclear power plant system at the South Texas Project (STP) Electric Generation Station. STP is one of the newest and largest nuclear power plants in the US

Morton, David

326

Applicability of Operational Research Techniques in CANDU Nuclear Plant Maintenance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As previously reported at ICONE 6 in New Orleans, 1996, and ICONE 9 in Niece, 2001, the use of various maintenance optimization techniques at Bruce has lead to cost effective preventive maintenance applications for complex systems. Innovative practices included greatly reducing Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) costs while maintaining the accuracy of the analysis. The optimization strategy has undergone further evolution and at the present an Integrated Maintenance Program (IMP) is being put in place. Further cost refinement of the station preventive maintenance strategy whereby decisions are based on statistical analysis of historical failure data is being evaluated. A wide range of Operational Research (OR) literature was reviewed for implementation issues and several encouraging areas were found that will assist in the current effort of evaluating maintenance optimization techniques for nuclear power production. The road ahead is expected to consist first of resolving 25 years of data issues and preserving the data via appropriate knowledge system techniques while post war demographics permit experts to input into the system. Subsequent analytical techniques will emphasize total simplicity to obtain the requisite buy in from Corporate Executives who possibly are not trained in Operational Research. Case studies of containment airlock seal failures are used to illustrate the direct applicability of stochastic processes. Airlocks and transfer chambers were chosen as they have long been known as high maintenance items. Also, the very significant financial consequences of this type of failure will help to focus the attention of Senior Management on the effort. Despite substantial investment in research, improvement in the design of the seal material or configuration has not been achieved beyond the designs completed in the 1980's. Overall, the study showed excellent agreement of the relatively quick stochastic methods with the maintenance programs produced at great cost over years of trial and error. The pivotal role of expert opinion via experienced users/problem owners/maintenance engineers in all phases of the method and its application was noted and will be explored in subsequent efforts. The results are displayed via economic alternatives to more easily attract the attention of Maintenance Managers. Graphical overviews of the data demonstrated that substantial insight can be gained by simply organizing the data into statistically meaningful arrays such as histograms. The conclusions highlight several very positive avenues to evaluate at this particular juncture in time. (author)

Doyle, E. Kevin [Bruce Power LP, Box 4000B12, Tiverton, Ont., N0G2T0 (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Space Nuclear Power Plant Pre-Conceptual Design Report, For Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This letter transmits, for information, the Project Prometheus Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) Pre-Conceptual Design Report completed by the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT). This report documents the work pertaining to the Reactor Module, which includes integration of the space nuclear reactor with the reactor radiation shield, energy conversion, and instrumentation and control segments. This document also describes integration of the Reactor Module with the Heat Rejection segment, the Power Conditioning and Distribution subsystem (which comprise the SNPP), and the remainder of the Prometheus spaceship.

B. Levine

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

328

Considerations in the evaluation of concrete structures for continued service in aged Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, there are /approximately/119 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the US either under construction, operating at low-to-full power, or awaiting an operating license. Together, these units have a net generating capacity of /approximately/110 GW(e). Assuming no life extension of present facilities, the operating licenses for these plants will start to expire in the middle of the next decade with Yankee Rowe being the first plant to attain this status. Where it is noted that with no life extension of facilities, a potential loss of electrical generating capacity in excess of 75 GW(e) could occur during the time period 2006 to 2020 when the operating licenses of 80 to 90 NPPs are scheduled to expire. A potential timely and cost-effective solution to meeting future electricity demand, which has worked well for non-nuclear generating plants, is to extend the service life (operating licenses) of existing NPPs. Since the concrete components in these plants provide a vital safety function, any continued service considerations must include an in-depth assessment of the safety-related concrete structures. 7 refs.

Naus, D.; Marchbanks, M.; Oland, B.; Arndt, G.; Brown, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Impact of structural aging on seismic risk assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Structural Aging Program is addressing the potential for degradation of concrete structural components and systems in nuclear power plants over time due to aging and aggressive environmental stressors. Structures are passive under normal operating conditions but play a key role in mitigating design-basis events, particularly those arising from external challenges such as earthquakes, extreme winds, fires and floods. Structures are plant-specific and unique, often are difficult to inspect, and are virtually impossible to replace. The importance of structural failures in accident mitigation is amplified because such failures may lead to common-cause failures of other components. Structural condition assessment and service life prediction must focus on a few critical components and systems within the plant. Components and systems that are dominant contributors to risk and that require particular attention can be identified through the mathematical formalism of a probabilistic risk assessment, or PRA. To illustrate, the role of structural degradation due to aging on plant risk is examined through the framework of a Level 1 seismic PRA of a nuclear power plant. Plausible mechanisms of structural degradation are found to increase the core damage probability by approximately a factor of two.

Ellingwood, B.; Song, J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

France gets nuclear fusion plant France will get to host the project to build a 10bn-euro (6.6bn) nuclear fusion reactor, in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) nuclear fusion reactor, in the face of strong competition from Japan. The International Thermonuclear division, which is responsible for the UK's thermonuclear fusion programme, said the decisionFrance gets nuclear fusion plant France will get to host the project to build a 10bn-euro (£6.6bn

331

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safety Technology Group is developing methodology that can be used to assess the risk of operating a plant to reprocess spent nuclear fuel. As an early step in the methodology, a preliminary hazards analysis identifies safety-related incidents. In the absence of appropriate safety features, these incidents could lead to significant consequences and risk to onsite personnel or to the public. This report is a compilation of potential safety-related incidents that have been identified in studies at SRL and in safety analyses of various commercially designed reprocessing plants. It is an expanded revision of the version originally published as DP-1558, Published December 1980.

Durant, W.S.; Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Stoddard, D.H.

1982-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Byron and Braidwood nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Byron and Braidwood were selected for the fourth study in this program. The produce of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plants and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Byron/Braidwood plants. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.: Vo, T.V. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research towards the development of advanced algorithms for online calibration monitoring. The objective of this research is to develop the next generation of online monitoring technologies for sensor calibration interval extension and signal validation in operating and new reactors. These advances are expected to improve the safety and reliability of current and planned nuclear power systems as a result of higher accuracies and increased reliability of sensors used to monitor key parameters. The focus of this report is on documenting the outcomes of the first phase of R&D under this project, which addressed approaches to uncertainty quantification (UQ) in online monitoring that are data-driven, and can therefore adjust estimates of uncertainty as measurement conditions change. Such data-driven approaches to UQ are necessary to address changing plant conditions, for example, as nuclear power plants experience transients, or as next-generation small modular reactors (SMR) operate in load-following conditions.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Lin, Guang; Crawford, Susan L.; Konomi, Bledar A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Shumaker, Brent; Hashemian, Hash

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status of ongoing research towards the development of advanced algorithms for online calibration monitoring. The objective of this research is to develop the next generation of online monitoring technologies for sensor calibration interval extension and signal validation in operating and new reactors. These advances are expected to improve the safety and reliability of current and planned nuclear power systems as a result of higher accuracies and increased reliability of sensors used to monitor key parameters. The focus of this report is on documenting the outcomes of the first phase of R&D under this project, which addressed approaches to uncertainty quantification (UQ) in online monitoring that are data-driven, and can therefore adjust estimates of uncertainty as measurement conditions change. Such data-driven approaches to UQ are necessary to address changing plant conditions, for example, as nuclear power plants experience transients, or as next-generation small modular reactors (SMR) operate in load-following conditions.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lin, Guang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crawford, Susan L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Konomi, Bledar A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Braatz, Brett G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Coble, Jamie B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shumaker, Brent [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States); Hashemian, Hash [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Devices and methods for managing noncombustible gasses in nuclear power plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems passively eliminate noncondensable gasses from facilities susceptible to damage from combustion of built-up noncondensable gasses, such as H2 and O2 in nuclear power plants, without the need for external power and/or moving parts. Systems include catalyst plates installed in a lower header of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) condenser, a catalyst packing member, and/or a catalyst coating on an interior surface of a condensation tube of the PCCS condenser or an annular outlet of the PCCS condenser. Structures may have surfaces or hydrophobic elements that inhibit water formation and promote contact with the noncondensable gas. Noncondensable gasses in a nuclear power plant are eliminated by installing and using the systems individually or in combination. An operating pressure of the PCCS condenser may be increased to facilitate recombination of noncondensable gasses therein.

Marquino, Wayne; Moen, Stephan C; Wachowiak, Richard M; Gels, John L; Diaz-Quiroz, Jesus; Burns, Jr., John C

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

A survey of repair practices for nuclear power plant containment metallic pressure boundaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and leaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containments in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify repair practices for restoring metallic containment pressure boundary components that have been damaged or degraded in service. This report presents issues associated with inservice condition assessments and continued service evaluations and identifies the rules and requirements for the repair and replacement of nonconforming containment pressure boundary components by welding or metal removal. Discussion topics include base and welding materials, welding procedure and performance qualifications, inspection techniques, testing methods, acceptance criteria, and documentation requirements necessary for making acceptable repairs and replacements so that the plant can be returned to a safe operating condition.

Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Handbook of nuclear power plant seismic fragilities, Seismic Safety Margins Research Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has a gola to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. As part of this program, calculations of the seismic risk from a typical commercial nuclear reactor were made. These calculations required a knowledge of the probability of failure (fragility) of safety-related components in the reactor system which actively participate in the hypothesized accident scenarios. This report describes the development of the required fragility relations and the data sources and data reduction techniques upon which they are based. Both building and component fragilities are covered. The building fragilities are for the Zion Unit 1 reactor which was the specific plant used for development of methodology in the program. Some of the component fragilities are site-specific also, but most would be usable for other sites as well.

Cover, L.E.; Bohn, M.P.; Campbell, R.D.; Wesley, D.A.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Summary and analysis of public comments on NUREG-1317: Regulatory options for nuclear plant license renewal: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On August 29, 1988, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on nuclear plant license renewal and solicited public comments on NUREG-1317, ''Regulatory Options for Nuclear Plant License Renewal.'' NUREG-1317 presents a discussion of fifteen topics involving technical, environmental, and procedural issues and poses a set of related questions. As part of its ongoing task for the NRC, The MITRE Corporation has summarized and analyzed the public comments received. Fifty-three written comments were received. Of these, 83 percent were from nuclear industry representatives; the remaining comments represented federal and state agencies, public interest groups, and a private citizen.

Ligon, D.M.; Seth, S.S.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

The History and Future of NDE in the Management of Nuclear Power Plant Materials Degradation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author has spent more than 25 years conducting engineering and research studies to quantify the performance of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) in nuclear power plant (NPP) applications and identifying improvements to codes and standards for NDE to manage materials degradation. This paper will review this fundamental NDE engineering/research work and then look to the future on how NDE can be optimized for proactively managing materials degradation in NPP components.

Doctor, Steven R.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Dose-projection considerations for emergency conditions at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to review the problems and issues associated with making environmental radiation-dose projections during emergencies at nuclear power plants. The review is divided into three areas: source-term development, characterization of atmospheric dispersion and selection of appropriate dispersion models, and development of dosimetry calculations for determining thyroid dose and whole-body dose for ground-level and elevated releases. A discussion of uncertainties associated with these areas is also provided.

Stoetzel, G.A.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Poeton, R.W.; Powell, D.C.; Desrosiers, A.E.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Separation Requirements for a Hydrogen Production Plant and High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the methods, models, and results of an evaluation for locating a hydrogen production facility near a nuclear power plant. In order to answer the risk-related questions for this combined nuclear and chemical facility, we utilized standard probabilistic safety assessment methodologies to answer three questions: what can happen, how likely is it, and what are the consequences? As part of answering these questions, we developed a model suitable to determine separation distances for hydrogen process structures and the nuclear plant structures. Our objective of the model-development and analysis is to answer key safety questions related to the placement of one or more hydrogen production plants in the vicinity of a high-temperature nuclear reactor. From a thermal-hydraulic standpoint we would like the two facilities to be quite close. However, safety and regulatory implications force the separation distance to be increased, perhaps substantially. Without answering these safety questions, the likelihood for obtaining a permit to construct and build such as facility in the U.S. would be questionable. The quantitative analysis performed for this report provides us with a scoping mechanism to determine key parameters related to the development of a nuclear-based hydrogen production facility. From our calculations, we estimate that when the separation distance is less than 100m, the core damage frequency is large enough (greater than 1E-6/yr) to become problematic in a risk-informed environment. However, a variety of design modifications, for example blast-deflection barriers, were explored to determine the impact of potential mitigating strategies. We found that these mitigating cases may significantly reduce risk and should be explored as the design for the hydrogen production facility evolves.

Curtis Smith; Scott Beck; Bill Galyean

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Reviewing PSA-based analyses to modify technical specifications at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes to Technical Specifications (TSs) at nuclear power plants (NPPs) require review and approval by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Currently, many requests for changes to TSs use analyses that are based on a plant`s probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). This report presents an approach to reviewing such PSA-based submittals for changes to TSs. We discuss the basic objectives of reviewing a PSA-based submittal to modify NPP TSs; the methodology of reviewing a TS submittal, and the differing roles of a PSA review, a PSA Computer Code review, and a review of a TS submittal. To illustrate this approach, we discuss our review of changes to allowed outage time (AOT) and surveillance test interval (STI) in the TS for the South Texas Project Nuclear Generating Station. Based on this experience gained, a check-list of items is given for future reviewers; it can be used to verify that the submittal contains sufficient information, and also that the review has addressed the relevant issues. Finally, recommended steps in the review process and the expected findings of each step are discussed.

Samanta, P.K.; Martinez-Guridi, G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International Corporation, Dublin, OH (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner`s Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

AGE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT STRUCTURES AND COMPONENTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes and highlights the results of the initial phase of a research project on the assessment of aged and degraded structures and components important to the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). A review of age-related degradation of structures and passive components at NPPs was performed. Instances of age-related degradation have been collected and reviewed. Data were collected from plant generated documents such as Licensing Event Reports, NRC generic communications, NUREGs and industry reports. Applicable cases of degradation occurrences were reviewed and then entered into a computerized database. The results obtained from the review of degradation occurrences are summarized and discussed. Various trending analyses were performed to identify which structures and components are most affected, whether degradation occurrences are worsening, and what are the most common aging mechanisms. The paper also discusses potential aging issues and degradation-susceptible structures and passive components which would have the greatest impact on plant risk.

BRAVERMAN,J.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

346

Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-stationary batteries. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant stationary batteries important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

Berg, R.; Shao, J.; Krencicki, G.; Giachetti, R. [Multiple Dynamics Corp., Southfield, MI (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Age-Related Degradation of Nuclear Power Plant Structures and Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes and highlights the results of the initial phase of a research project on the assessment of aged and degraded structures and components important to the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). A review of age-related degradation of structures and passive components at NPPs was performed. Instances of age-related degradation have been collected and reviewed. Data were collected from plant generated documents such as Licensing Event Reports, NRC generic communications, NUREGs and industry reports. Applicable cases of degradation occurrences were reviewed and then entered into a computerized database. The results obtained from the review of degradation occurrences are summarized and discussed. Various trending analyses were performed to identify which structures and components are most affected, whether degradation occurrences are worsening, and what was the most common aging mechanisms. The paper also discusses potential aging issues and degradation-susceptible structures and passive components which would have the greatest impact on plant risk.

Braverman, J.; Chang, T.-Y.; Chokshi, N.; Hofmayer, C.; Morante, R.; Shteyngart, S.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Electrical switchgear. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant electrical switchgear important to license renewal. The latent of this AMG to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner which allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance, to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.; Schuler, K. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services Co., Inc., Blue Bell, PA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

A. Petraglia; C. Sabbarese; M. De Cesare; N. De Cesare; F. Quinto; F. Terrasi; A. D'Onofrio; P. Steier; L. K. Fifield; A. M. Esposito

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

Petraglia, A; De Cesare, M; De Cesare, N; Quinto, F; Terrasi, F; D'Onofrio, A; Steier, P; Fifield, L K; Esposito, A M; 10.1051/radiopro/2012010

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Numerical simulation of the thermal conditions in a sea bay water area used for water supply to nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consideration is given to the numerical simulation of the thermal conditions in sea water areas used for both water supply to and dissipation of low-grade heat from a nuclear power plant on the shore of a sea bay.

Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'B. E. Vedeneev All-Russia Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG)' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'B. E. Vedeneev All-Russia Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering (VNIIG)' (Russian Federation)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Risk-informed public safety policy for seismic events in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) are potentially vulnerable to accidents, which can either be internally or externally initiated. External events include natural events like tornadoes, hurricanes, and earthquakes. The purpose ...

Afolayan Jejeloye, Olubukola

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Comparative analysis of United States and French nuclear power plant siting and construction regulatory policies and their economic consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite the substantial commitments of time and money which are devoted to the nuclear power plant siting process, the effectiveness of the system in providing a balanced evaluation of the technical, environmental and ...

Golay, Michael Warren.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The potential role of new technology for enhanced safety and performance of nuclear power plants through improved service maintenance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refinements in the safety and performance of nuclear power plants must be made to maintain public confidence and ensure competitiveness with other power sources. The aircraft industry, US Navy, and other programs have ...

Achorn, Ted Glen

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Development of a hybrid intelligent system for on-line real-time monitoring of nuclear power plant operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nuclear power plant (NPP) has an intricate operational domain involving systems, structures and components (SSCs) that vary in scale and complexity. Many of the large scale SSCs contribute to the lost availability in the ...

Yildiz, Bilge, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Economic Analysis of a Nuclear Reactor Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production was developed to provide a basis for comparing the HTE concept with other hydrogen production concepts. The reference plant design is driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The reference design reactor power is 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 540°C and 900°C, respectively. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 4,009,177 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The optimized design for the reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes an air-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The inlet air for the air-sweep system is compressed to the system operating pressure of 5.0 MPa in a four-stage compressor with intercooling. The alternating-current, AC, to direct-current, DC, conversion efficiency is 96%. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the lower heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.12% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.356 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10%.

E. A. Harvego; M. G. McKellar; M. S. Sohal; J. E. O'Brien; J. S. Herring

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

"COMPLEJIDAD DE LA NANOCIENCIA VERDE: RECURSOS NATURALES, PROCESOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

explotación de los recursos renovables y no renovables, la generación de nuevos productos, así como de los"COMPLEJIDAD DE LA NANOCIENCIA VERDE: RECURSOS NATURALES, PROCESOS PRODUCTIVOS, NANOPRODUCTOS Y sistema para la síntesis #12;Sistema de síntesis construido Consumo de recursos naturales #12;Pasos

Mejía-Monasterio, Carlos

358

Evaluation criteria and procedure for nuclear power plant temporary loads/temporary conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operating nuclear power plants frequently encounter temporary loads/temporary conditions in plant normal operation and maintenance (O and M). The most obvious examples are installation of temporary shielding and scaffolding, or removal of certain supports, to facilitate plant refueling and maintenance outage activities. Short-term operability calls such as those due to snubber failures or unanticipated transients also create temporary loads/temporary conditions. These temporary situations often generate loads that are outside the original plant design basis. Consequently, separate evaluations are needed to ensure that plant structures, systems and components (SSCs) maintain their integrity and functionality while these temporary loads are active. Also, the temporary structures and components need to be evaluated to ensure their integrity during the temporary duration of use. Three types of approaches are normally adopted either individually or in combination to perform needed evaluations: relax the design allowables, use a more refined analysis model but retain the design basis acceptance criteria, or offset temporary loads by eliminating or reducing part of the design basis loads based on short duration considerations. This paper reviews temporary loading/temporary condition issues and the current industry criteria and procedures proposed in dealing with these issues. Where appropriate, regulatory positions on temporary loads/temporary conditions are discussed.

Tang, H.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Minichiello, J.C. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States); Olson, D.E. [Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Site Selection & Characterization Status Report for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the near future, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will need to make important decisions regarding design and construction of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). One part of making these decisions is considering the potential environmental impacts that this facility may have, if constructed here at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides DOE decision makers with a process to systematically consider potential environmental consequences of agency decisions. In addition, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Title VI, Subtitel C, Section 644) states that the 'Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) shall have licensing and regulatory authority for any reactor authorized under this subtitle.' This stipulates that the NRC will license the NGNP for operation. The NRC NEPA Regulations (10 CFR Part 51) require tha thte NRC prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a permit to construct a nuclear power plant. The applicant is required to submit an Environmental report (ER) to aid the NRC in complying with NEPA.

Mark Holbrook

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Safety and Nonsafety Communications and Interactions in International Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current industry and NRC guidance documents such as IEEE 7-4.3.2, Reg. Guide 1.152, and IEEE 603 do not sufficiently define a level of detail for evaluating interdivisional communications independence. The NRC seeks to establish criteria for safety systems communications that can be uniformly applied in evaluation of a variety of safety system designs. This report focuses strictly on communication issues related to data sent between safety systems and between safety and nonsafety systems. Further, the report does not provide design guidance for communication systems nor present detailed failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) results for existing designs. This letter report describes communications between safety and nonsafety systems in nuclear power plants outside the United States. A limited study of international nuclear power plants was conducted to ascertain important communication implementations that might have bearing on systems proposed for licensing in the United States. This report provides that following information: 1.communications types and structures used in a representative set of international nuclear power reactors, and 2.communications issues derived from standards and other source documents relevant to safety and nonsafety communications. Topics that are discussed include the following: communication among redundant safety divisions, communications between safety divisions and nonsafety systems, control of safety equipment from a nonsafety workstation, and connection of nonsafety programming, maintenance, and test equipment to redundant safety divisions during operation. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

Farfan, E. B.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.; Oskolkov, B. Ya.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gaschak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

Challenges in Determining the Isotopic Mixture for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the United States response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant emergency, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Consequence Management (CM) Teams were activated with elements deploying to Japan. The NNSA CM teams faced the urgent need for information regarding the potential radiological doses that citizens of might experience. This paper discusses the challenges and lessons learned associated with the analysis of field collected samples and gamma spectra in an attempt to determine the isotopic mixture present on the ground around the Plant. There were several interesting and surprising lessons to be learned from the sample analysis portion of the response. The paper discusses several elements of the response that were unique to the event occurring in Japan, as well as several elements that would have occurred in a U.S. nuclear reactor event. Sections of this paper address details of the specific analytical challenges faced during the efforts to analyze samples and try to understand the overall release source term.

Shanks, Arthur [Sandia National Laboratories; Fournier, Sean [Sandia National Laboratories; Shanks, Sonoya [Sandia National Laboratories

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

A practical approach to risk-based inservice inspection in U.S. nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To provide guidelines for practical implementation of risk-based ISI, EPRI sponsored work to develop evaluation procedures and criteria for defining risk-based inservice inspection programs for nuclear power plant piping. These procedures and criteria include efficient means to identify risk significant piping segments, inspection locations, and available inspection techniques. These procedures were applied in a pilot study to assess the feasibility of successfully implementing risk-based inservice inspection programs at nuclear plants. The results from the pilot study indicate that implementation of risk-based inservice inspection programs can reduce the cost and radiation exposure associated with inservice inspection, while maintaining a high level of safety. The list of references provides additional details of these procedures and plant-specific applications. Also, an EPRI technical report has been published to document these procedures. Software has been developed to support and fully document this procedure. Additional development is adding an expert system to the present data base system. The approach compares well to approaches used (or being considered) in other industries and can easily be adapted to these other industries and to address economic and personnel safety in addition to public safety measures.

Gosselin, S.R. [Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States); Gamble, R. [Sartrex Corp., Rockville, MD (United States); Dimitrijevic, V.B.; O`Regan, P.J.; Chapman, J.R. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MS (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Recommendations for NRC policy on shift scheduling and overtime at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL's) recommendations to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for an NRC policy on shift scheduling and hours of work (including overtime) for control room operators and other safety-related personnel in nuclear power plants. First, it is recommended that NRC make three additions to its present policy on overtime: (1) limit personnel to 112 hours of work in a 14-day period, 192 hours in 28 days, and 2260 hours in one year; exceeding these limits would require plant manager approval; (2) add a requirement that licensees obtain approval from NRC if plant personnel are expected to exceed 72 hours of work in a 7-day period, 132 hours in 14 days, 228 hours in 28 days, and 2300 hours in one year; and (3) make the policy a requirement, rather than a nonbinding recommendation. Second, it is recommended that licensees be required to obtain NRC approval to adopt a routine 12-hour/day shift schedule. Third, it is recommended that NRC add several nonbinding recommendations concerning routine 8-hour/day schedules. Finally, because additional data can strengthen the basis for future NRC policy on overtime, five methods are suggested for collecting data on overtime and its effects. 44 refs., 10 tabs.

Lewis, P.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Protection of Nuclear Plants Against Vehicular Bombs Via Full Spectrum Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A more urgent need now exists since 9/11 to protect vital assets at nuclear plants from physical security threats. Any approach to successful defense must result in the best possible risk profile , while also performing this defense against credible threats within the context of limited personnel and materiel resources. Engineered solutions need to be well thought out, and take advantage of each plant's available organic strengths and opportunities. A robust, well trained/equipped highly motivated protective force will help reduce concerns where there are weaknesses making the plant vulnerable to threats. A thorough risk assessment takes into account the proper combination of both deterministic and probabilistic application of resources as a most advantageous approach; this is postulated to be development of integrated protection methods and plans, which blend solid engineering design with the highest caliber of protection forces. By setting a clear and ambitious objective to shield the nuclear assets with this type of dynamic full spectrum defense in depth, the risk of harm-breach or likelihood of any opponent's threat being realized should be reduced to the lowest practicable levels.

Campagna, M. S.; Sawruk, W.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

An Integrated Scheme for Anomaly Identification and Automatic Control of Nuclear Power Plants Xin Jin, Robert M. Edwards and Asok Ray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Integrated Scheme for Anomaly Identification and Automatic Control of Nuclear Power Plants Xin.edu INTRODUCTION Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) are complex systems with many variables that require adjustment Jin, Robert M. Edwards and Asok Ray Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania

Ray, Asok

368

Knowledges and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: pressurized water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document catalogs roughly 5300 knowledges and abilities of reactor operators and senior reactor operators. It results from a reanalysis of much larger job-task analysis data base compiled by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Knowledges and abilities are cataloged for 45 major power plant systems and 38 emergency evolutions, grouped according to 11 fundamental safety functions (e.g., reactivity control and reactor coolant system inventory control). With appropriate sampling from this catalog, operator licensing examinations having content validity can be developed. A structured sampling procedure for this catalog is under development by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and will be published as a companion document, ''Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations'' (NUREG-1121). The examinations developed by using the catalog and handbook will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55.

Not Available

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A Review of Sensor Calibration Monitoring for Calibration Interval Extension in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently in the United States, periodic sensor recalibration is required for all safety-related sensors, typically occurring at every refueling outage, and it has emerged as a critical path item for shortening outage duration in some plants. Online monitoring can be employed to identify those sensors that require calibration, allowing for calibration of only those sensors that need it. International application of calibration monitoring, such as at the Sizewell B plant in United Kingdom, has shown that sensors may operate for eight years, or longer, within calibration tolerances. This issue is expected to also be important as the United States looks to the next generation of reactor designs (such as small modular reactors and advanced concepts), given the anticipated longer refueling cycles, proposed advanced sensors, and digital instrumentation and control systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the general concept of online monitoring for sensor calibration monitoring in 2000, but no U.S. plants have been granted the necessary license amendment to apply it. This report presents a state-of-the-art assessment of online calibration monitoring in the nuclear power industry, including sensors, calibration practice, and online monitoring algorithms. This assessment identifies key research needs and gaps that prohibit integration of the NRC-approved online calibration monitoring system in the U.S. nuclear industry. Several needs are identified, including the quantification of uncertainty in online calibration assessment; accurate determination of calibration acceptance criteria and quantification of the effect of acceptance criteria variability on system performance; and assessment of the feasibility of using virtual sensor estimates to replace identified faulty sensors in order to extend operation to the next convenient maintenance opportunity. Understanding the degradation of sensors and the impact of this degradation on signals is key to developing technical basis to support acceptance criteria and set point decisions, particularly for advanced sensors which do not yet have a cumulative history of operating performance.

Coble, Jamie B.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Bond, Leonard J.; Hashemian, Hash; Shumaker, Brent; Cummins, Dara

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Formation of hot particles during the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of irradiated Chernobyl nuclear fuel at 670 to 1,170 K for 3 to 21 h resulted in its destruction into fine particles, the dispersal composition of which is well described by lognormal distribution regularity. The median radius of the formed particles does not depend on the annealing temperature and decreases with the increase of the annealing period from 10 to 3 {micro}m. Proceeding from the dispersal composition and matrix composition of the Chernobyl hot fuel particles, it can be concluded that the oxidation of nuclear fuel was one of the basic mechanisms of hot fuel particle formation during the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. With oxidation in air and the dispersal of irradiated oxide nuclear fuel at as low as 670 K, ruthenium, located on the granular borders, is released. Ruthenium is oxidized to volatile RuO{sub 4}, sublimated, and condensed on materials of iron. Nickel and stainless steel can be efficiently used at high temperatures (tested to 1,200 K) for radioruthenium adsorption in accidents and for some technological operations. As the temperature of hot fuel particles annealed in inert media increases from 1,270 to 2,270 K, the relative release of radionuclides increases in the following sequence: cesium isotopes; europium isotopes; cerium isotopes; americium isotopes; and ruthenium, plutonium, and curium isotopes.

Kashparov, V.A.; Ivanov, Y.A.; Zvarisch, S.I.; Protsak, V.P.; Khomutinin, Y.V.; Kurepin, A.D.; Pazukhin, E.M. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology, Chabany (Ukraine)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Estimation of the caesium-137 source term from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant using a consistent joint assimilation of air concentration and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants in Japan. Diesel backup power sys- tems should have sustained the reactors cooling processEstimation of the caesium-137 source term from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant using during the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011. In Winiarek et al. (2012b

Boyer, Edmond

373

Radioactive Releases Impact from Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant, Bulgaria into the Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to present a general overview of the radioactive releases impact generated by Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP), Bulgaria to the environment and public. The liquid releases presented are known as the so called controlled water discharges, that are generated after reprocessing of the inevitable accumulated liquid radioactive waste in the plant operation process. The radionuclides containing in the liquid releases are given in the paper as a result of systematic measuring. Database for radiation doses evaluation on the public around Kozloduy NPP site is developed using IAEA LADTAP computerized program. The computer code LADTAP represents realization of a model that evaluates the public dose as a result of NPP releases under normal operation conditions. The results of this evaluation were the basic licensing document for a new liquid release limit.

Genchev, G. T.; Kuleff, I.; Tanev, N. T.; Delistoyanova, E. S.; Guentchev, T.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Digital control systems in nuclear power plants: Failure information, modeling concepts, and applications. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly describes some current applications of advanced computerized digital display and control systems at US commercial nuclear power plants and presents the results of a literature search that was made to gather information on the reliability of these systems. Both hardware and software reliability were addressed in this review. Only limited failure rate information was found, with the chemical process industry being the primary source of information on hardware failure rates and expert opinion the primary source for software failure rates. Safety-grade digital control systems are typically installed on a functional like-for-like basis, replacing older analog systems without substantially changing interactions with other plant systems. Future work includes performing a limited probabilistic risk assessment of a representative DCS to assess its risk significance.

Galyean, W.J.

1993-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

375

Digital control systems in nuclear power plants: Failure information, modeling concepts, and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly describes some current applications of advanced computerized digital display and control systems at US commercial nuclear power plants and presents the results of a literature search that was made to gather information on the reliability of these systems. Both hardware and software reliability were addressed in this review. Only limited failure rate information was found, with the chemical process industry being the primary source of information on hardware failure rates and expert opinion the primary source for software failure rates. Safety-grade digital control systems are typically installed on a functional like-for-like basis, replacing older analog systems without substantially changing interactions with other plant systems. Future work includes performing a limited probabilistic risk assessment of a representative DCS to assess its risk significance.

Galyean, W.J.

1993-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

Saurwein, John

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Project plan remove special nuclear material from PFP project plutonium finishing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Remove Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Materials. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for PFP Remove SNM Materials project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Remove SNM Materials project. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

BARTLETT, W.D.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

378

Handbook of human-reliability analysis with emphasis on nuclear power plant applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of the Handbook is to present methods, models, and estimated human error probabilities (HEPs) to enable qualified analysts to make quantitative or qualitative assessments of occurrences of human errors in nuclear power plants (NPPs) that affect the availability or operational reliability of engineered safety features and components. The Handbook is intended to provide much of the modeling and information necessary for the performance of human reliability analysis (HRA) as a part of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of NPPs. Although not a design guide, a second purpose of the Handbook is to enable the user to recognize error-likely equipment design, plant policies and practices, written procedures, and other human factors problems so that improvements can be considered. The Handbook provides the methodology to identify and quantify the potential for human error in NPP tasks.

Swain, A D; Guttmann, H E

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Evaluation of aged concrete structures for continued service in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are summarized of a study on concrete component aging and its significance relative to continued service of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond the initial period for which they were granted operating licenses. Progress is presented of a second study being conducted to identify and provide acceptance criteria for structural safety issues which the USNRC staff will need to address when applications are submitted for continued service of NPPs. Major activities under this program include: development of a materials property data base, establishment of structural component assessment and repair procedures, and development of a methodology for determination of structural reliability. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Naus, D.J.; Marchbanks, M.F.; Arndt, E.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Evaluation of aged concrete structures for continued service in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are summarized of a study on concrete component aging and its significance relative to continued service of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond the initial period for which they were granted operating licenses. Progress is presented of a second study being conducted to identify and provide acceptance criteria for structural safety issues which the USNRC staff will need to address when applications are submitted for continued service of NPPs. Major activities under this program include: development of a materials property data base, establishment of structural component assessment and repair procedures, and development of a methodology for determination of structural reliability.

Naus, D.J.; Marchbanks, M.F.; Arndt, E.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION FOR MODELING CONTROL ROOM CREW PERFORMANCE AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an emerging project regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for visualizing and modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (i) the estimation of human error associated with advanced control room equipment and configurations, (ii) the investigative determination of contributory cognitive factors for risk significant scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (iii) the certification of reduced staffing levels in advanced control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of cognition, elements of situation awareness, and risk associated with human performance in next generation control rooms.

Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman; Tuan Q Tran; Brian F Gore

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Preparation of SARs for nonreactor nuclear facilities at the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety Analysis Reports for designated nonreactor nuclear facilities at the Savannah River Plant are prepared in accordance with the DOE Savannah River Manual Chapter 52X1. The accident analysis section is based on the Integrated Risk Assessment Plan, a methodology developed by the Savannah River Laboratory for reprocessing facilities. In general, designated facilities contain radioactive, chemical, or other materials to the extent that a credible accident could have a significant detrimental effect on health and safety. The responsibility for specifying which facilities are designated rests with the manager, Savannah River Operations Office.

Durant, W.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on the implementation of ALARA at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the papers presented and the discussions that took place at the Third International Workshop on ALARA Implementation at Nuclear Power Plants, held in Hauppauge, Long Island, New York from May 8--11, 1994. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together scientists, engineers, health physicists, regulators, managers and other persons who are involved with occupational dose control and ALARA issues. The countries represented were: Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. The workshop was organized into twelve sessions and three panel discussions. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Khan, T.A. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Roecklein, A.K. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Procedure for conducting a human-reliability analysis for nuclear power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes in detail a procedure to be followed in conducting a human reliability analysis as part of a probabilistic risk assessment when such an analysis is performed according to the methods described in NUREG/CR-1278, Handbook for Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications. An overview of the procedure describing the major elements of a human reliability analysis is presented along with a detailed description of each element and an example of an actual analysis. An appendix consists of some sample human reliability analysis problems for further study.

Bell, B.J.; Swain, A.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The hunt for theta13 at the Daya Bay nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment is located at the Daya Bay nuclear power plant in Shenzhen, China. The experiment deploys eight "identical" antineutrino detectors to measure antineutrino fluxes from six 2.9 GW_{th} reactor cores in three underground experimental halls at different distances. The target zone of the Daya Bay detector is filled with 20 t 0.1% Gd doped LAB liquid scintillator. The baseline uncorrelated detector uncertainty is ~0.38% using current experimental techniques. Daya Bay can reach a sensitivity of <0.01 to $sin^2 2theta_{13}$ with baseline uncertainties after 3 years of data taking.

Wei Wang; for the Daya Bay collaboration

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

A safety and regulatory assessment of generic BWR and PWR permanently shutdown nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term availability of less expensive power and the increasing plant modification and maintenance costs have caused some utilities to re-examine the economics of nuclear power. As a result, several utilities have opted to permanently shutdown their plants. Each licensee of these permanently shutdown (PSD) plants has submitted plant-specific exemption requests for those regulations that they believe are no longer applicable to their facility. This report presents a regulatory assessment for generic BWR and PWR plants that have permanently ceased operation in support of NRC rulemaking activities in this area. After the reactor vessel is defueled, the traditional accident sequences that dominate the operating plant risk are no longer applicable. The remaining source of public risk is associated with the accidents that involve the spent fuel. Previous studies have indicated that complete spent fuel pool drainage is an accident of potential concern. Certain combinations of spent fuel storage configurations and decay times, could cause freshly discharged fuel assemblies to self heat to a temperature where the self sustained oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding may cause cladding failure. This study has defined four spent fuel configurations which encompass all of the anticipated spent fuel characteristics and storage modes following permanent shutdown. A representative accident sequence was chosen for each configuration. Consequence analyses were performed using these sequences to estimate onsite and boundary doses, population doses and economic costs. A list of candidate regulations was identified from a screening of 10 CFR Parts 0 to 199. The continued applicability of each regulation was assessed within the context of each spent fuel storage configuration and the results of the consequence analyses.

Travis, R.J.; Davis, R.E.; Grove, E.J.; Azarm, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Aging assessment of essential HVAC chillers used in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a comprehensive aging assessment of chillers used in the essential safety air-conditioning systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The chillers used, and air-conditioning systems served, vary in design from plant to plant. The review of operating experience indicated that chillers experience aging degradation and failures. The primary aging factors of concern for chillers include vibration, excessive temperatures and pressures, thermal cycling, chemical attack, and poor quality cooling water. The evaluation of Licensee Event Reports (LERs) indicated that about 38% of the failures were primarily related to aging, 55% were partially aging related, and 7% of the failures were unassignable. About 25% of the failures were primarily caused by human, design, procedure, and other errors. The large number of errors is probably directly related to the complexity of chillers and their interfacing systems. Nearly all of the LERs were the result of entering plant Technical Specification Limiting Condition for Operation (LCO) that initiated remedial actions like plant shutdown procedures. The trend for chiller-related LERs has stabilized at about 0.13 LERs per plant year since 1988. Carefully following the vendor procedures and monitoring the equipment can help to minimize and/or eliminate most of the premature failures. Recording equipment performance can be useful for trending analysis. Periodic operation for a few hours on a weekly or monthly basis is useful to remove moisture and non-condensable gases that gradually build up inside the chiller. Chiller pressurization kits are available that will help minimize the amount of moisture and air ingress to low-pressure chillers during standby periods. The assessment of service life condition monitoring of chillers indicated there are many simple to sophisticated methods available that can help in chiller surveillance and monitoring.

Blahnik, D.E.; Camp, T.W.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Analysis of a Main Steam Line Break in Asco Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive analysis of a double-ended main steam line break (MSLB) accident assumed to occur in the Asco nuclear power plant was carried out using the RELAP/PARCS coupled code. The general results of the benchmark provide a certain qualification of tools and methodologies used. Applying such methodologies to other plant models can be useful to extend conclusions and to identify areas where further analysis is needed. The calculations showed the capability of the control rod to recover the accident. However, one stuck control rod caused some recriticality or return to power (RTP), whose magnitude is heavily affected by the initial and boundary conditions. This paper identifies similarities and discrepancies between the benchmark calculation on the TMI-1 model and the Westinghouse three-loop calculation on the Asco model. The use of an integral plant model was helpful in showing the importance on the RTP of different plant systems that are modeled in detail. The high-pressure injection system and feedwater lines as well as the broken steam line model are the most significant.

Cuadra, Arantxa; Gago, Jose Luis; Reventos, Francesc

2001-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

Aging of turbine drives for safety-related pumps in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was performed to examine the relationship between time-dependent degradation and current industry practices in the areas of maintenance, surveillance, and operation of steam turbine drives for safety-related pumps. These pumps are located in the Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) system for pressurized-water reactor plants and in the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling and High-Pressure Coolant Injection systems for boiling-water reactor plants. This research has been conducted by examination of failure data in the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, review of Licensee Event Reports, discussion of problems with operating plant personnel, and personal observation. The reported failure data were reviewed to determine the cause of the event and the method of discovery. Based on the research results, attempts have been made to determine the predictability of failures and possible preventive measures that may be implemented. Findings in a recent study of AFW systems indicate that the turbine drive is the single largest contributor to AFW system degradation. However, examination of the data shows that the turbine itself is a reliable piece of equipment with a good service record. Most of the problems documented are the result of problems with the turbine controls and the mechanical overspeed trip mechanism; these apparently stem from three major causes which are discussed in the text. Recent improvements in maintenance practices and procedures, combined with a stabilization of the design, have led to improved performance resulting in a reliable safety-related component. However, these improvements have not been universally implemented.

Cox, D.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Advanced Outage and Control Center: Strategies for Nuclear Plant Outage Work Status Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research effort is a part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, performed in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The Outage Control Center (OCC) Pilot Project was directed at carrying out the applied research for development and pilot of technology designed to enhance safe outage and maintenance operations, improve human performance and reliability, increase overall operational efficiency, and improve plant status control. Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Unfortunately, many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. They depend heavily upon large teams of staff, multiple work and coordination locations, and manual administrative actions that require large amounts of paper. Previous work in human reliability analysis suggests that many repetitive tasks, including paper work tasks, may have a failure rate of 1.0E-3 or higher (Gertman, 1996). With between 10,000 and 45,000 subtasks being performed during an outage (Gomes, 1996), the opportunity for human error of some consequence is a realistic concern. Although a number of factors exist that can make these errors recoverable, reducing and effectively coordinating the sheer number of tasks to be performed, particularly those that are error prone, has the potential to enhance outage efficiency and safety. Additionally, outage management requires precise coordination of work groups that do not always share similar objectives. Outage managers are concerned with schedule and cost, union workers are concerned with performing work that is commensurate with their trade, and support functions (safety, quality assurance, and radiological controls, etc.) are concerned with performing the work within the plants controls and procedures. Approaches to outage management should be designed to increase the active participation of work groups and managers in making decisions that closed the gap between competing objectives and the potential for error and process inefficiency.

Gregory Weatherby

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Primer on Durability of Nuclear Power Plant Reinforced Concrete Structures - A Review of Pertinent Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide a primer on the environmental effects that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant concrete structures. As concrete ages, changes in its properties will occur as a result of continuing microstructural changes (i.e., slow hydration, crystallization of amorphous constituents, and reactions between cement paste and aggregates), as well as environmental influences. These changes do not have to be detrimental to the point that concrete will not be able to meet its performance requirements. Concrete, however, can suffer undesirable changes with time because of improper specifications, a violation of specifications, or adverse performance of its cement paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either physical or chemical attack. Contained in this report is a discussion on concrete durability and the relationship between durability and performance, a review of the historical perspective related to concrete and longevity, a description of the basic materials that comprise reinforced concrete, and information on the environmental factors that can affect the performance of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Commentary is provided on the importance of an aging management program.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Updating Human Factors Engineering Guidelines for Conducting Safety Reviews of Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. This paper describes the role of HFE guidelines in the safety review process and the content of the key HFE guidelines used. Then we will present the methodology used to develop HFE guidance and update these documents, and describe the current status of the update program.

O, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger - NRC

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

Behavior-based rules for fitness-for-duty assessment of nuclear power plant personnel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants requires that plant personnel not be under the influence of any substance, legal or illegal, or mentally or physically impaired from any cause that in any way adversely affects their ability to safely and competently perform their duties. This goal has been formalized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in their proposed rule for a fitness-for-duty program. The purpose of this paper is to describe a performance-based tool based on surrogate tests and dose equivalency methodologies that is a viable candidate for fitness-for-duty assessment. The automated performance test system (APTS) is a microcomputer-based human performance test battery that has been developed over a decade of research supported variously by the National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, US Department of Energy, and the US Navy and Army. Representing the most psychometrically sound test from evaluations of over 150 well-known tests of basic psychomotor and cognitive skills, the battery provides direct prediction of a worker's fitness for duty. Twenty-four tests are suitable for use, and a dozen have thus far been shown to be sensitive to the effects of legal and illegal drugs, alcohol, fatigue, stress, and other causes of impairment.

Kennedy, R.S.; Turnage, J.J.; Price, H.E.; Lane, N.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Monitoring Thermal Fatigue Damage In Nuclear Power Plant Materials Using Acoustic Emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proactive aging management of nuclear power plant passive components requires technologies to enable monitoring and accurate quantification of material condition at early stages of degradation (i.e., pre-macrocrack). Acoustic emission (AE) is well-suited to continuous monitoring of component degradation and is proposed as a method to monitor degradation during accelerated thermal fatigue tests. A key consideration is the ability to separate degradation responses from external sources such as water spray induced during thermal fatigue testing. Water spray provides a significant background of acoustic signals, which can overwhelm AE signals caused by degradation. Analysis of AE signal frequency and energy is proposed in this work as a means for separating degradation signals from background sources. Encouraging results were obtained by applying both frequency and energy filters to preliminary data. The analysis of signals filtered using frequency and energy provides signatures exhibiting several characteristics that are consistent with degradation accumulation in materials. Future work is planned to enable verification of the efficacy of AE for thermal fatigue crack initiation detection. While the emphasis has been placed on the use of AE for crack initiation detection during accelerated aging tests, this work also has implications with respect to the use of AE as a primary tool for early degradation monitoring in nuclear power plant materials. The development of NDE tools for characterization of aging in materials can also benefit from the use of a technology such as AE which can continuously monitor and detect crack initiation during accelerated aging tests.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Pitman, Stan G.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Bond, Leonard J.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

396

REVIEW Of COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURE GUIDELINES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computerized procedures (CPs) are recognized as an emerging alternative to paper-based procedures for supporting control room operators in nuclear power plants undergoing life extension and in the concept of operations for advanced reactor designs. CPs potentially reduce operator workload, yield increases in efficiency, and provide for greater resilience. Yet, CPs may also adversely impact human and plant performance if not designed and implemented properly. Therefore, it is important to ensure that existing guidance is sufficient to provide for proper implementation and monitoring of CPs. In this paper, human performance issues were identified based on a review of the behavioral science literature, research on computerized procedures in nuclear and other industries, and a review of industry experience with CPs. The review of human performance issues led to the identification of a number of technical gaps in available guidance sources. To address some of the gaps, we developed 13 supplemental guidelines to support design and safety. This paper presents these guidelines and the case for further research.

David I Gertman; Katya Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The evolution of the break preclusion concept for nuclear power plants in Germany  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the updating of the Guidelines for PWR`s of the {open_quotes}Reaktor-Sicherheitskommission{close_quotes} (RSK) in 1981 the requirements on the design have been changed with respect to the postulated leaks and breaks in the primary pressure boundary. The major change was a revision in the requirements for pipe whip protection. As a logical consequence of the {open_quotes}concept of basic safety{close_quotes} a guillotine type break or any other break type resulting in a large opening is not postulated any longer for the calculation of reaction and jet forces. As an upper limit for a leak an area of 0, 1 A (A = open cross section of the pipe) is postulated. This decision was based on a general assessment of the present PWR system design in Germany. Since then a number of piping systems have been requalified in the older nuclear power plants to comply with the break preclusion concept. Also a number of extensions of the concept have been developed to cover also leak-assumptions for branch pipes. Furthermore due considerations have been given to other aspects which could contribute to a leak development in the primary circuit, like vessel penetrations, manhole covers, flanges, etc. Now the break preclusion concept originally applied to the main piping has been developed into an integrated concept for the whole pressure boundary within the containment and will be applied also in the periodic safety review of present nuclear power plants.

Schulz, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Koeln (Germany)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

Ian McKirdy

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Main report and appendix A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This document is Volume 1, consisting of the executive summary, summary and observations, and an appendix listing the GALL literature review tables.

Kaza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Application of EPRI risk-based inservice inspection procedure to combustion engineering design of nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPRI developed risk-based inservice inspection procedure is used to select the elements for inservice inspection on a section of the high pressure safety injection system of the Entergy Operations ANO2 nuclear plant. This plant is the pilot plant in a six utility-eleven plant EPRI tailored collaboration program to apply the general EPRI procedures to Combustion Engineering NSSS designs. The procedure results in a reduction of candidate inspection locations from 14, based on current ASME Section XI rules for B-J welds to 3, based on the risk-based selection criteria.

Lubin, B.T. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (United States). Nuclear Operations; Fourgerousse, R. [Entergy Operations-ANO2, Russellville, AR (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Applying Human Factors Evaluation and Design Guidance to a Nuclear Power Plant Digital Control System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) nuclear industry, like similar process control industries, has moved toward upgrading its control rooms. The upgraded control rooms typically feature digital control system (DCS) displays embedded in the panels. These displays gather information from the system and represent that information on a single display surface. In this manner, the DCS combines many previously separate analog indicators and controls into a single digital display, whereby the operators can toggle between multiple windows to monitor and control different aspects of the plant. The design of the DCS depends on the function of the system it monitors, but revolves around presenting the information most germane to an operator at any point in time. DCSs require a carefully designed human system interface. This report centers on redesigning existing DCS displays for an example chemical volume control system (CVCS) at a U.S. nuclear power plant. The crucial nature of the CVCS, which controls coolant levels and boration in the primary system, requires a thorough human factors evaluation of its supporting DCS. The initial digital controls being developed for the DCSs tend to directly mimic the former analog controls. There are, however, unique operator interactions with a digital vs. analog interface, and the differences have not always been carefully factored in the translation of an analog interface to a replacement DCS. To ensure safety, efficiency, and usability of the emerging DCSs, a human factors usability evaluation was conducted on a CVCS DCS currently being used and refined at an existing U.S. nuclear power plant. Subject matter experts from process control engineering, software development, and human factors evaluated the DCS displays to document potential usability issues and propose design recommendations. The evaluation yielded 167 potential usability issues with the DCS. These issues should not be considered operator performance problems but rather opportunities identified by experts to improve upon the design of the DCS. A set of nine design recommendations was developed to address these potential issues. The design principles addressed the following areas: (1) color, (2) pop-up window structure, (3) navigation, (4) alarms, (5) process control diagram, (6) gestalt grouping, (7) typography, (8) terminology, and (9) data entry. Visuals illustrating the improved DCS displays accompany the design recommendations. These nine design principles serve as the starting point to a planned general DCS style guide that can be used across the U.S. nuclear industry to aid in the future design of effective DCS interfaces.

Thomas Ulrich; Ronald Boring; William Phoenix; Emily Dehority; Tim Whiting; Jonathan Morrell; Rhett Backstrom

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Analysis of Improved Reference Design for a Nuclear-Driven High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) for the efficient production of hydrogen without the greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil-fuel hydrogen production techniques has been under investigation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) for the last several years. The activities at the INL have included the development, testing and analysis of large numbers of solid oxide electrolysis cells, and the analyses of potential plant designs for large scale production of hydrogen using an advanced Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to provide the process heat and electricity to drive the electrolysis process. The results of these system analyses, using the UniSim process analysis software, have shown that the HTE process, when coupled to a VHTR capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs with hydrogen production efficiencies in excess of 50%. In addition, economic analyses performed on the INL reference plant design, optimized to maximize the hydrogen production rate for a 600 MWt VHTR, have shown that a large nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant can to be economically competitive with conventional hydrogen production processes, particularly when the penalties associated with greenhouse gas emissions are considered. The results of this research led to the selection in 2009 of HTE as the preferred concept in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen technology down-selection process. However, the down-selection process, along with continued technical assessments at the INL, has resulted in a number of proposed modifications and refinements to improve the original INL reference HTE design. These modifications include changes in plant configuration, operating conditions and individual component designs. This paper describes the resulting new INL reference design and presents results of system analyses performed to optimize the design and to determine required plant performance and operating conditions.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Consideration of nuclear criticality when disposing of transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on general arguments presented in this report, nuclear criticality was eliminated from performance assessment calculations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a repository for waste contaminated with transuranic (TRU) radioisotopes, located in southeastern New Mexico. At the WIPP, the probability of criticality within the repository is low because mechanisms to concentrate the fissile radioisotopes dispersed throughout the waste are absent. In addition, following an inadvertent human intrusion into the repository (an event that must be considered because of safety regulations), the probability of nuclear criticality away from the repository is low because (1) the amount of fissile mass transported over 10,000 yr is predicted to be small, (2) often there are insufficient spaces in the advective pore space (e.g., macroscopic fractures) to provide sufficient thickness for precipitation of fissile material, and (3) there is no credible mechanism to counteract the natural tendency of the material to disperse during transport and instead concentrate fissile material in a small enough volume for it to form a critical concentration. Furthermore, before a criticality would have the potential to affect human health after closure of the repository--assuming that a criticality could occur--it would have to either (1) degrade the ability of the disposal system to contain nuclear waste or (2) produce significantly more radioisotopes than originally present. Neither of these situations can occur at the WIPP; thus, the consequences of a criticality are also low.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.; SANCHEZ,LAWRENCE C.; STOCKMAN,CHRISTINE T.; TRELLUE,HOLLY R.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The risks involved in the routine release of /sup 85/Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of /sup 85/Kr. Instead of releasing the /sup 85/Kr to the environment when fuel is reprocessed, it can be captured, immobilized and stored. Two alternative methods of capturing /sup 85/Kr (cryogenic distillation and fluorocarbon absorption) and one method of immobilizing the captured gas (ion implantation/sputtering) were theoretically incorporated into a representative fuel reprocessing plant, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, even though there are no known plans to start up this facility. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02 to 0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks for the three situations, (i.e., no-capture and two-capture alternatives) cannot be considered meaningful. It is possible that no risks would occur from any of the three situations. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from /sup 85/Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from the other two situations considered. Present regulations mandate recovery and disposal of /sup 85/Kr from the off gases of a facility reprocessing spent fuel from commercial sources. Because of the lack of a clear-cut indication that recovery woud be beneficial, it does not seem prudent to burden the facilities with a requirement for /sup 85/Kr recovery, at least until operating experience demonstrates the incentive. The probable high aging of the early fuel to be processed and the higher dose resulting from the release of the unregulated /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C also encourage delaying implementation of the /sup 85/Kr recovery in the early plants.

Mellinger, P.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.S.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Monitoring equipment environment during nuclear plant operation at Salem and Hope Creek generating stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring of environmental parameters has become a significant issue for operating nuclear power plants. While the long-term benefits of plant life extension programs are being pursued with comprehensive environmental monitoring programs, the potential effect of local hot spots at various plant locations needs to be evaluated for its effect on equipment degradation and shortening of equipment qualified life. A significant benefit can be experienced from temperature monitoring when a margin exists between the design versus actual operating temperature. This margin can be translated into longer equipment qualified life and significant reduction in maintenance activities. At PSE and G, the immediate need for monitoring environmental parameters is being accomplished via the use of a Logic Beach Bitlogger. The Bitlogger is a portable data loggings system consisting of a system base, input modules and a communication software package. Thermocouples are installed on selected electrical equipment and cables are run from the thermocouples to the input module of the Bitlogger. Temperature readings are taken at selected intervals, stored in memory, and downloaded periodically to a PC software program, i.e., Lotus. The data is formatted into tabular or graphical documents. Because of their versatility, Bitloggers are being used differently at the authors Nuclear facility. At the Salem Station (2 Units-4 loop Westinghouse PWR), a battery powered, fully portable, calibrated Bitlogger is located in an accessible area inside Containment where it monitors the temperature of various electrical equipment within the Pressurizer Enclosure. It is planned that close monitoring of the local hot spot temperatures in this area will allow them to adjust and reconcile the environmental qualification of the equipment.

Blum, A.; Smith, R.J. [Public Service Electric and Gas Co., Hancocks Bridge, NJ (United States)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Sixth American Nuclear Society International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface Technologies NPIC&HMIT 2009, Knoxville, Tennessee, April 5-9, 2009, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth American Nuclear Society International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, automation 1 INTRODUCTION In nuclear power plants (NPPs), novel digitalized I&C systems enable complicated, on CD-ROM, American Nuclear Society, LaGrange Park, IL (2009) VERIFICATION OF SAFETY LOGIC DESIGNS

Heljanko, Keijo

408

Aging assessment of essential HVAC chillers used in nuclear power plants. Phase 1, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a Phase I aging assessment of chillers used in the essential safety air-conditioning systems of nuclear power plants. Centrifugal chillers in the 75- to 750-ton refrigeration capacity range are the predominant type used. The chillers used, and air-conditioning systems served, vary in design from plant-to-plant. It is crucial to keep chiller internals very clean and to prevent the leakage of water, air, and other contaminants into the refrigerant containment system. Periodic operation on a weekly or monthly basis is necessary to remove moisture and noncondensable gases that gradually build up inside the chiller. This is especially desirable if a chiller is required to operate only as an emergency standby unit. The primary stressors and aging mechanisms that affect chillers include vibration, excessive temperatures and pressures, thermal cycling, chemical attack, and poor quality cooling water. Aging is accelerated by moisture, non-condensable gases (e.g., air), dirt, and other contamination within the refrigerant containment system, excessive start/stop cycling, and operating below the rated capacity. Aging is also accelerated by corrosion and fouling of the condenser and evaporator tubes. The principal cause of chiller failures is lack of adequate monitoring. Lack of performing scheduled maintenance and human errors also contribute to failures.

Blahnik, D.E.; Klein, R.F. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI): On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring for Next Generation Nuclear Plants - Phase I Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This OSTI ID belongs to an IWO and is being released out of the system. The Program Manager Rebecca Richardson has confirmed that all reports have been received. The objective of this project is to design and demonstrate the operation of the real-time intelligent self-diagnostic and prognostic system for next generation nuclear power plant systems. This new self-diagnostic technology is titled, ''On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System'' (SDMS). This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS on a pilot plant scale service water system, where a distributed array of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures typical of next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. This project employs state-of-the-art sensors, instrumentation, and computer processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and to provide diagnostic and automated prognostics capabilities.

L. J. Bond; S. R. Doctor; R. W. Gilbert; D. B. Jarrell; F. L. Greitzer; R. J. Meador

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: perspectives for organizational assessment. Volume 2. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. Volume 1 of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety. The six chapters of this volume discuss the major elements in our general approach to safety in the nuclear industry. The chapters include information on organizational design and safety; organizational governance; utility environment and safety related outcomes; assessments by selected federal agencies; review of data sources in the nuclear power industry; and existing safety indicators.

Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Nadel, M.V.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.; Kerwin, N.; Kennedy, J.K. Jr.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

OECD/NEA study on the economics of the long-term operation of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) established the Ad hoc expert group on the Economics of Long-term Operation (LTO) of Nuclear Power Plants. The primary aim of this group is to collect and analyse technical and economic data on the upgrade and lifetime extension experience in OECD countries, and to assess the likely applications for future extensions. This paper describes the key elements of the methodology of economic assessment of LTO and initial findings for selected NEA member countries. (authors)

Lokhov, A.; Cameron, R. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, 12, boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant innovative features for extended station blackout mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Station Blackout (SBO) is defined as 'a condition wherein a nuclear power plant sustains a loss of all offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of all onsite emergency alternating current (AC) power system. Station blackout does not include the loss of available AC power to buses fed by station batteries through inverters or by alternate AC sources as defined in this section, nor does it assume a concurrent single failure or design basis accident...' in accordance with Reference 1. In this paper, the innovative features of the AP1000 plant design are described with their operation in the scenario of an extended station blackout event. General operation of the passive safety systems are described as well as the unique features which allow the AP1000 plant to cope for at least 7 days during station blackout. Points of emphasis will include: - Passive safety system operation during SBO - 'Fail-safe' nature of key passive safety system valves; automatically places the valve in a conservatively safe alignment even in case of multiple failures in all power supply systems, including normal AC and battery backup - Passive Spent Fuel Pool cooling and makeup water supply during SBO - Robustness of AP1000 plant due to the location of key systems, structures and components required for Safe Shutdown - Diverse means of supplying makeup water to the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCS) and the Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) through use of an engineered, safety-related piping interface and portable equipment, as well as with permanently installed onsite ancillary equipment. (authors)

Vereb, F.; Winters, J.; Schulz, T.; Cummins, E.; Oriani, L. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

System Simulation of Nuclear Power Plant by Coupling RELAP5 and Matlab/Simulink  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since RELAP5 code has general and advanced features in thermal-hydraulic computation, it has been widely used in transient and accident safety analysis, experiment planning analysis, and system simulation, etc. So we wish to design, analyze, verify a new Instrumentation And Control (I and C) system of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) based on the best-estimated code, and even develop our engineering simulator. But because of limited function of simulating control and protection system in RELAP5, it is necessary to expand the function for high efficient, accurate, flexible design and simulation of I and C system. Matlab/Simulink, a scientific computation software, just can compensate the limitation, which is a powerful tool in research and simulation of plant process control. The software is selected as I and C part to be coupled with RELAP5 code to realize system simulation of NPPs. There are two key techniques to be solved. One is the dynamic data exchange, by which Matlab/Simulink receives plant parameters and returns control results. Database is used to communicate the two codes. Accordingly, Dynamic Link Library (DLL) is applied to link database in RELAP5, while DLL and S-Function is applied in Matlab/Simulink. The other problem is synchronization between the two codes for ensuring consistency in global simulation time. Because Matlab/Simulink always computes faster than RELAP5, the simulation time is sent by RELAP5 and received by Matlab/Simulink. A time control subroutine is added into the simulation procedure of Matlab/Simulink to control its simulation advancement. Through these ways, Matlab/Simulink is dynamically coupled with RELAP5. Thus, in Matlab/Simulink, we can freely design control and protection logic of NPPs and test it with best-estimated plant model feedback. A test will be shown to illuminate that results of coupling calculation are nearly the same with one of single RELAP5 with control logic. In practice, a real Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is modeled by RELAP5 code, and its main control and protection system is duplicated by Matlab/Simulink. Some steady states and transients are calculated under control of these I and C systems, and the results are compared with the plant test curves. The application showed that it can do exact system simulation of NPPs by coupling RELAP5 and Matlab/Simulink. This paper will mainly focus on the coupling method, plant thermal-hydraulic model, main control logics, test and application results. (authors)

Meng Lin; Dong Hou; Zhihong Xu; Yanhua Yang; Ronghua Zhang [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200030 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Emptying of the Storage for Solid Radioactive Waste in the Greifswald Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the Greifswald site, 8 WWER 440 reactor units are located and also several facilities to handle fuel and radwaste. After the reunification of Germany, the final decision was taken to decommission all these Russian designed reactors. Thus, EWN is faced with a major decommissioning project in the field of nuclear power stations. One of the major tasks before the dismantling of the plant is the complete disposal of the operational waste. Among other facilities, a store for solid radioactive waste is located on the site, which has been filled over 17 years of operation of units 1 to 4. The paper presents the disposal technology development and results achieved. This activity is the first project in the operational history of the Russian type serial reactor line WWER-440.

Hartmann, B.; Fischer, J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

415

Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management at Chernobyle Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the framework of the preparation for the decommissioning of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) an Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management (ICSRM) will be built under the EC TACIS Program in the vicinity of ChNPP. The paper will present the proposed concepts and their integration into existing buildings and installations. Further, the paper will consider the safety cases, as well as the integration of Western and Ukrainian Organizations into a cohesive project team and the requirement to guarantee the fulfillment of both Western standards and Ukrainian regulations and licensing requirements. The paper will provide information on the status of the interim design and the effects of value engineering on the output of basic design phase. The paper therefor summarizes the design results of the involved design engineers of the Design and Process Providers BNFL (LOT 1), RWE NUKEM GmbH (LOT 2 and General) and INITEC (LOT 3).

Ahner, S.; Fomin, V. V.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

Review of Methods Related to Assessing Human Performance in Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the increased use of digital systems in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms comes a need to thoroughly understand the human performance issues associated with digital systems. A common way to evaluate human performance is to test operators and crews in NPP control room simulators. However, it is often challenging to characterize human performance in meaningful ways when measuring performance in NPP control room simulations. A review of the literature in NPP simulator studies reveals a variety of ways to measure human performance in NPP control room simulations including direct observation, automated computer logging, recordings from physiological equipment, self-report techniques, protocol analysis and structured debriefs, and application of model-based evaluation. These methods and the particular measures used are summarized and evaluated.

Katya L Le Blanc; Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Integrated Diagnostic and Prognostic Tools for Residual Life Estimation in Aging Nuclear Power Plant Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent events in Japan have focused renewed attention on the safe operation of light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants (NPPs). A central issue in safe, long-term operations of existing and planned NPPs is the early detection and monitoring of significant materials degradation. Materials aging and degradation in passive components is expected to be the key factor in determining the operational life of an NPP and may limit long-term operations in the current LWR fleet. Methods for detecting and assessing the degradation state in NPP structural materials, followed by approaches to estimate the remaining useful life (RUL) of the component, are therefore necessary for safe, long-term operations. This paper explores advanced diagnostic and prognostic approaches to detecting material degradation, and then determining RUL given the current material state.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Henager, Charles H.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Human-centered HMI design to support cognitive process of operators in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, an operation advisory system to aid cognitive process of operators is proposed for advanced main control rooms (MCRs) in future nuclear power plants (NPPs). As MCRs are fully digitalized and designed based on computer technologies, MCRs have much evolved by improving human-machine interface (HMI) design and by adapting automation or support systems for helping operator's convenient operation and maintenance. Various kinds of support systems for operators are developed or developing for advanced MCRs. The proposed system is suggesting a design basis about 'What kinds of support systems are most efficient and necessary for MCR operators ' and 'how to use them together.' In this paper, the operator's operation processes are analyzed based on a human cognitive process model and appropriate support systems that support each activity of the human cognitive process are suggested. Also, the proposed support system is evaluated using Bayesian belief network model and human error probabilities in order to estimate its effect. (authors)

Lee, S. J.; Seong, P. H. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Institutional implications of establishing safety goals for nuclear power plants. [PWR; BWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to anticipate and address institutional problems that may arise from the adoption of NRC's proposed Policy Statement on Safety Goals for Nuclear Power Plants. The report emphasizes one particular category of institutional problems: the possible use of safety goals as a basis for legal challenges to NRC actions, and the resolution of such challenges by the courts. Three types of legal issues are identified and analyzed. These are, first, general legal issues such as access to the legal system, burden of proof, and standard of proof. Second is the particular formulation of goals. Involved here are such questions as sustainable rationale, definitions, avoided issues, vagueness of time and space details, and degree of conservatism. Implementation brings up the third set of issues which include interpretation and application, linkage to probabilistic risk assessment, consequences as compared to events, and the use of results.

Morris, F.A.; Hooper, R.L.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2804)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for application in heat exchangers and core internals for the NGNP. The primary candidates are Inconel 617, Haynes 230, Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR. Based on the technical maturity, availability in required product forms, experience base, and high temperature mechanical properties all of the vendor pre-conceptual design studies have specified Alloy 617 as the material of choice for heat exchangers. Also a draft code case for Alloy 617 was developed previously. Although action was suspended before the code case was accepted by ASME, this draft code case provides a significant head start for achieving codification of the material. Similarly, Alloy 800H is the material of choice for control rod sleeves. In addition to the above listed considerations, Alloy 800H is already listed in the nuclear section of the ASME Code; although the maximum use temperature and time need to be increased.

J. K. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in ...

Simgen, Hardy; Aufmhoff, Heinfried; Baumann, Robert; Kaether, Florian; Lindemann, Sebastian; Rauch, Ludwig; Schlager, Hans; Schlosser, Clemens; Schumann, Ulrich

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

Janeen Denise Robertson

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 6: Process Heat and Hydrogen Co-Generation PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise was conducted to identify potential safety-0-related physical phenomena for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) when coupled to a hydrogen production or similar chemical plant. The NGNP is a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) with the design goal to produce high-temperature heat and electricity for nearby chemical plants. Because high-temperature heat can only be transported limited distances, the two plants will be close to each other. One of the primary applications for the VHTR would be to supply heat and electricity for the production of hydrogen. There was no assessment of chemical plant safety challenges. The primary application of this PIRT is to support the safety analysis of the NGNP coupled one or more small hydrogen production pilot plants. However, the chemical plant processes to be coupled to the NGNP have not yet been chosen; thus, a broad PIRT assessment was conducted to scope alternative potential applications and test facilities associated with the NGNP. The hazards associated with various chemicals and methods to minimize risks from those hazards are well understood within the chemical industry. Much but not all of the information required to assure safe conditions (separation distance, relative elevation, berms) is known for a reactor coupled to a chemical plant. There is also some experience with nuclear plants in several countries that have produced steam for industrial applications. The specific characteristics of the chemical plant, site layout, and the maximum stored inventories of chemicals can provide the starting point for the safety assessments. While the panel identified events and phenomena of safety significance, there is one added caveat. Multiple high-temperature reactors provide safety-related experience and understanding of reactor safety. In contrast, there have been only limited safety studies of coupled chemical and nuclear plants. The work herein provides a starting point for those studies; but, the general level of understanding of safety in coupling nuclear and chemical plants is less than in other areas of high-temperature reactor safety.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Gorensek, M. B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Herring, S. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Pickard, P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Demonstrating Structural Adequacy of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures for Beyond Design-Basis Pressure Loadings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Demonstrating the structural integrity of U.S. nuclear power plant (NPP) containment structures, for beyond design-basis internal pressure loadings, is necessary to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements and performance goals. This paper discusses methods for demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment for beyond design-basis pressure loadings. Three distinct evaluations are addressed: (1) estimating the ultimate pressure capacity of the containment structure (10 CFR 50 and US NRC Standard Review Plan, Section 3.8) ; (2) demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment subjected to pressure loadings associated with combustible gas generation (10 CFR 52 and 10 CFR 50); and (3) demonstrating the containment structural integrity for severe accidents (10 CFR 52 as well as SECY 90-016, SECY 93-087, and related NRC staff requirements memoranda (SRMs)). The paper describes the technical basis for specific aspects of the methods presented. It also presents examples of past issues identified in licensing activities related to these evaluations.

Braverman, J.I.; Morante, R.

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

426

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Testing of a naturally aged nuclear power plant inverter and battery charger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A naturally aged inverter and battery charger were obtained from the Shippingport facility. This equipment was manufactured in 1974, and was installed at Shippingport in 1975 as part of a major plant modification. Testing was performed on this equipment under the auspices of the NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program to evaluate the type and extent of degradation due to aging, and to determine the effectiveness of condition monitoring techniques which could be used to detect aging effects. Steady state testing was conducted over the equipment's entire operating range. Step load changes were also initiated in order to monitor the electrical response. During this testing, component temperatures were monitored and circuit waveforms analyzed. Results indicated that aging had not substantially affected equipment operation. On the other hand, when compared with original acceptance test data, the monitoring techniques employed were sensitive to changes in measurable component and equipment parameters indicating the viability of detecting degradation prior to catastrophic failure. 7 refs., 34 figs., 12 tabs.

Gunther, W.E.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Identification and Evaluation of Human Factors Issues Associated with Emerging Nuclear Plant Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study has identified human performance research issues associated with the implementation of new technology in nuclear power plants (NPPs). To identify the research issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were prioritized into four categories based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts representing vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. The study also identifies the priority of each issue and the rationale for those in the top priority category. The top priority issues were then organized into research program areas of: New Concepts of Operation using Multi-agent Teams, Human-system Interface Design, Complexity Issues in Advanced Systems, Operating Experience of New and Modernized Plants, and HFE Methods and Tools. The results can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas to support the safe operation of new NPPs.

O'Hara,J.M.; Higgins,J.; Brown, William S.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The effect of Sequoyah Nuclear Plant on dissolved oxygen in Chickamauga Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summer of 1985, the Tennessee Division of Water Pollution Control and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency measured dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations downstream from the Sequoyah Nuclear Plant (SQN) discharge mixing zone that were below the state criterion for DO. The Tennessee General Water Quality Criteria'' specifies that DO should be a minimum of 5.0 mg/l measured at a depth of 5 feet for the protection of fish and aquatic life. The Tennessee Valley Authority developed the present study to answer general concerns about reservoir conditions and potential for adverse effects on aquatic biota. Four objectives were defined for this study: (1) to better define the extent and duration of the redistribution of DO in the reservoir, (2) to better understand DO dynamics within the mixing zone, (3) to determine whether DO is being lost (or added) as the condenser cooling water passes through the plant, and (4) to evaluate the potential for impact on aquatic life in the reservoir.

Butkus, S.R.; Shiao, M.C.; Yeager, B.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Comparative Evaluation of Cutting Methods of Activated Concrete from Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning - 13548  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of radioactive wastes from decommissioning of a nuclear power plant varies greatly depending on factors such as type and size of the plant, operation history, decommissioning options, and waste treatment and volume reduction methods. There are many methods to decrease the amount of decommissioning radioactive wastes including minimization of waste generation, waste reclassification through decontamination and cutting methods to remove the contaminated areas. According to OECD/NEA, it is known that the radioactive waste treatment and disposal cost accounts for about 40 percentage of the total decommissioning cost. In Korea, it is needed to reduce amount of decommissioning radioactive waste due to high disposal cost, about $7,000 (as of 2010) per a 200 liter drum for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). In this paper, cutting methods to minimize the radioactive waste of activated concrete were investigated and associated decommissioning cost impact was assessed. The cutting methods considered are cylindrical and volume reductive cuttings. The study showed that the volume reductive cutting is more cost-effective than the cylindrical cutting. Therefore, the volume reductive cutting method can be effectively applied to the activated bio-shield concrete. (authors)

Kim, HakSoo; Chung, SungHwan; Maeng, SungJun [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)] [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Agricultural approaches of remediation in the outside of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines agricultural approaches of remediation activity done in contaminated areas around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. About the decontamination examination of contaminated areas, we have tried the land scale test of a rice field before and after planting by the use of currently recommended methods. Since farmers would carry out the land preparation by themselves, generation of secondary radioactive waste should be as low as possible through the decontamination works. For the radioactive nuclide migration control of rice by wet rice production, several types of decontamination methods such as zeolite addition and potassium fertilization in the soil have been examined. The results are summarized in the 4 following points. 1) Plowing and water discharge are effective for removing radioactive cesium from rice field. 2) Additional potassium fertilization is effective for reducing cesium radioactivity in the product. 3) No significant difference is observed with or without the zeolite addition. 4) Very low transfer factor of cesium from soil to brown rice has been obtained compared with literature values.

Sato, Nobuaki [Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Saso, Michitaka [Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company: 2-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 210-0862 (Japan); Umeda, Miki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-29 Muramatsu, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan); Fujii, Yasuhiko [Tokyo Institute of Technology:2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Amemiya, Kiyoshi [Hazama Corporation: 2-2-5 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8479 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The trend of digital control system design for nuclear power plants in Korea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently there are 20 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation, and 6 more units are under construction in Korea. The control systems of those NPPs have also been developed together with the technology advancement. Control systems started with On-Off control using the relay logic, had been evolved into Solid-State logic using TTL ICs, and applied with the micro-processors since the Yonggwang NPP Units 3 and 4 which started its construction in 1989. Multiplexers are also installed at the local plant areas to collect field input and to send output signals while communicating with the controllers located in the system cabinets near the main control room in order to reduce the field wiring cables. The design of the digital control system technology for the NPPs in Korea has been optimized to maximize the operability as well as the safety through the design, construction, start-up and operation experiences. Both Shin-Kori Units 1 and 2 and Shin-Wolsong Units 1 and 2 NPP projects under construction are being progressed at the same time. Digital Plant Control Systems of these projects have adopted multi-loop controllers, redundant loop configuration, and soft control system for the radwaste system. Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) and Distributed Control System (DCS) are applied with soft control system in Shin-Kori Units 3 and 4. This paper describes the evolvement of control system at the NPPs in Korea and the experience and design improvement through the observation of the latest failure of the digital control system. In addition, design concept and its trend of the digital control system being applied to the NPP in Korea are introduced. (authors)

Park, S. H.; Jung, H. Y.; Yang, C. Y.; Choe, I. N. [Korea Power Engineering Company, 360-9 Mabuk-Dong, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do, 446-713 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Val Verde County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401UpsonUtah StateLoadingGrantEnergyVRBVal Verde County,

434

Val Verde, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401UpsonUtah StateLoadingGrantEnergyVRBVal Verde

435

Cape Verde Archipelago Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahan DivideCannon (Various) JumpVerde Archipelago

436

Rio Verde, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm Jump to:SectorRim RockLinda,Verde,

437

PowerVerde Inc formerly Vyrex Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:Job CorpPowerVerde Inc formerly Vyrex Corporation

438

Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for both the PBMR and prismatic design. The main focus of this report is the RPV for both design concepts with emphasis on material selection.

Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

439

Technical basis for environmental qualification of microprocessor-based safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of studies sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide the technical basis for environmental qualification of computer-based safety equipment in nuclear power plants. The studies were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The studies address the following: (1) adequacy of the present test methods for qualification of digital I and C systems; (2) preferred (i.e., Regulatory Guide-endorsed) standards; (3) recommended stressors to be included in the qualification process during type testing; (4) resolution of need for accelerated aging for equipment to be located in a benign environment; and (5) determination of an appropriate approach for addressing the impact of smoke in digital equipment qualification programs. Significant findings from the studies form the technical basis for a recommended approach to the environmental qualification of microprocessor-based safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants.

Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hassan, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Tanaka, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "verde nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

As officials in Japan deal with the accumulation of radioactive seawater near the devastated Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in the wake of last month's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in the wake of last month's earthquake and tsunami, the U.S. Department of Energy is investing in fundamental research it hopes can be used to build safer nuclear reactors and avoid reactor emergencies. The department's Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP

Danon, Yaron

442

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity and operating efficiency of nuclear plants [31,operating efficiency of nuclear plants in the past decades.cost of the fuel Nuclear Plant Capacity Factor Nuclear

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel power plants. However,power plants, which are reviewed and licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and relatively few areas of geothermal and

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

Sackschewsky, M.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE`s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE`s Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute`s Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454{degrees}C [850`F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about {plus_minus}5% (23.6{degrees}C [42.5{degrees}F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes.

Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

An Empirical Study on Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for inspecting nuclear power plant (NPP) components. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate UT techniques to assess their ability to detect, locate, size, and characterize fabrication flaws in typical NPP weldments. This particular study focused on the evaluation of four carbon steel pipe-to-pipe welds on specimens that ranged in thicknesses from 19.05 mm (0.75 in.) to 27.8 mm (1.094 in.) and were 355.6 mm (14.0 in.) or 406.4 mm (16.0 in.) in diameter. The pipe welds contained both implanted (intentional) fabrication flaws as well as bonus (unintentional) flaws throughout the entire thickness of the weld and the adjacent base material. The fabrication flaws were a combination of planar and volumetric flaw types, including incomplete fusion, incomplete penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array UT (PA UT) techniques applied primarily for detection and length sizing of the flaws. Radiographic examinations were also conducted on the specimens with RT detection and length sizing results being used to establish true state. This paper will discuss the comparison of UT and RT (true state) detection results conducted to date along with a discussion on the technical gaps that need to be addressed before these methods can be used interchangeably for repair and replacement activities for NPP components.

Moran, Traci L.; Pardini, Allan F.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Prowant, Matthew S.; Mathews, Royce

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY FOR THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT COMPLEX, HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maintaining compliance with environmental regulatory requirements is a significant priority in successful completion of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Nuclear Material Stabilization (NMS) Project. To ensure regulatory compliance throughout the deactivation and decommissioning of the PFP complex, an environmental regulatory strategy was developed. The overall goal of this strategy is to comply with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and/or compliance agreements during PFP stabilization, deactivation, and eventual dismantlement. Significant environmental drivers for the PFP Nuclear Material Stabilization Project include the Tri-Party Agreement; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA); the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA); the Clean Air Act (CAA), and the Clean Water Act (CWA). Recent TPA negotiation s with Ecology and EPA have resulted in milestones that support the use of CERCLA as the primary statutory framework for decommissioning PFP. Milestones have been negotiated to support the preparation of Engineering Evaluations/Cost Analyses for decommissioning major PFP buildings. Specifically, CERCLA EE/CA(s) are anticipated for the following scopes of work: Settling Tank 241-Z-361, the 232-Z Incinerator, , the process facilities (eg, 234-5Z, 242, 236) and the process facility support buildings. These CERCLA EE/CA(s) are for the purpose of analyzing the appropriateness of the slab-on-grade endpoint Additionally, agreement was reached on performing an evaluation of actions necessary to address below-grade structures or other structures remaining after completion of the decommissioning of PFP. Remaining CERCLA actions will be integrated with other Central Plateau activities at the Hanford site.

Hopkins, A.M.; Heineman, R.; Norton, S.; Miller, M.; Oates, L.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

448

COMPUTER-BASED PROCEDURE FOR FIELD ACTIVITIES: RESULTS FROM THREE EVALUATIONS AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) along with partners from the nuclear industry have been investigating the design requirements for computer-based work instructions (including operations procedures, work orders, maintenance procedures, etc.) to increase efficiency, safety, and cost competitiveness of existing light water reactors.

Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Laboratory; Bly, Aaron [Idaho National Laboratory; LeBlanc, Katya [Idaho National Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Regulatory analysis for amendments to regulations for the environmental review for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for a proposed rule that will amend the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s environmental review requirements for applications for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. The objective of the proposed rulemaking is to improve regulatory efficiency by providing for the generic evaluation of certain environmental impacts associated with nuclear plant license renewal. After considering various options, the staff identified and analyzed two major alternatives. With Alternative A, the existing regulations would not be amended. This option requires that environmental reviews be performed under the existing regulations. Alternative B is to assess, on a generic basis, the environmental impacts of renewing the operating license of individual nuclear power plants, and define the issues that will need to be further analyzed on a case-by-case basis. In addition, Alternative B removes from NRC`s review certain economics-related issues. The findings of this assessment are to be codified in 10 CFR 51. The staff has selected Alternative B as the preferred alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Research and Development Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the “highly ranked” phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Review of nuclear power plant safety cable aging studies with recommendations for improved approaches and for future work.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many U. S. nuclear power plants are approaching 40 years of age and there is a desire to extend their life for up to 100 total years. Safety-related cables were originally qualified for nuclear power plant applications based on IEEE Standards that were published in 1974. The qualifications involved procedures to simulate 40 years of life under ambient power plant aging conditions followed by simulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Over the past 35 years or so, substantial efforts were devoted to determining whether the aging assumptions allowed by the original IEEE Standards could be improved upon. These studies led to better accelerated aging methods so that more confident 40-year lifetime predictions became available. Since there is now a desire to potentially extend the life of nuclear power plants way beyond the original 40 year life, there is an interest in reviewing and critiquing the current state-of-the-art in simulating cable aging. These are two of the goals of this report where the discussion is concentrated on the progress made over the past 15 years or so and highlights the most thorough and careful published studies. An additional goal of the report is to suggest work that might prove helpful in answering some of the questions and dealing with some of the issues that still remain with respect to simulating the aging and predicting the lifetimes of safety-related cable materials.

Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Bernstein, Robert

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Design-Basis Flood Estimation for Site Characterization at Nuclear Power Plants in the United States of America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe approaches and methods for estimation of the design-basis flood at nuclear power plant sites. Chapter 1 defines the design-basis flood and lists the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations that require estimation of the design-basis flood. For comparison, the design-basis flood estimation methods used by other Federal agencies are also described. A brief discussion of the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency for estimation of the design-basis floods in its member States is also included.

Prasad, Rajiv; Hibler, Lyle F.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Surry Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Containment Technology Test Facility (CTTF) and the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories are used to perform scaled experiments that simulate High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) phenomena on the containment load. High-temperature, chemically reactive melt (thermite) is ejected by high-pressure steam into a scale model of a reactor cavity. Debris is entrained by the steam blowdown into a containment model where specific phenomena, such as the effect of subcompartment structures, prototypic air/steam/hydrogen atmospheres, and hydrogen generation and combustion, can be studied. Four Integral Effects Tests (IETs) have been performed with scale models of the Surry NPP to investigate DCH phenomena. The 1/61{sup th} scale Integral Effects Tests (IET-9, IET-10, and IET-11) were conducted in CTRF, which is a 1/6{sup th} scale model of the Surry reactor containment building (RCB). The 1/10{sup th} scale IET test (IET-12) was performed in the Surtsey vessel, which had been configured as a 1/10{sup th} scale Surry RCB. Scale models were constructed in each of the facilities of the Surry structures, including the reactor pressure vessel, reactor support skirt, control rod drive missile shield, biological shield wall, cavity, instrument tunnel, residual heat removal platform and heat exchangers, seal table room and seal table, operating deck, and crane wall. This report describes these experiments and gives the results.

Blanchat, T.K.; Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Progress and Status of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant's New Solid Waste Management and Storage Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A considerable amount of dry radioactive waste from former NPP operation has accumulated up to date and is presently stored at the Ignalina NPP site, Lithuania. Current storage capacities are nearly exhausted and more waste is to come from future decommissioning of the two RMBKtype reactors. Additionally, the existing storage facilities does not comply to the state-of-the-art technology for handling and storage of radioactive waste. In 2005, INPP faced this situation of a need for waste processing and subsequent interim storage of these wastes by contracting NUKEM with the design, construction, installation and commissioning of new waste management and storage facilities. The subject of this paper is to describe the scope and the status of the new solid waste management and storage facilities at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. In summary: The turnkey contract for the design, supply and commission of the SWMSF was awarded in December 2005. The realisation of the project was initially planned within 48 month. The basic design was finished in August 2007 and the Technical Design Documentation and Preliminary Safety Analyses Report was provided to Authorities in October 2007. The construction license is expected in July 2008. The procurement phase was started in August 2007, start of onsite activities is expected in November 2007. The start of operation of the SWMSF is scheduled for end of 2009. (authors)

Rausch, J.; Henderson, R.W. [NUKEM Technologies GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Penkov, V. [State Enterprise Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant, Visaginas (Lithuania)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z