Sample records for verdant-roosevelt island tidal

  1. Verdant-Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate HomeVela Jump to:I Wind Farm Jump

  2. Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Bruce Albert [Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association] [Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association was awarded a U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program grant (DE-EE0005624) for the Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (Project). The goal of the Project was to perform a feasibility study to determine if a tidal energy project would be a viable means to generate electricity and heat to meet long-term fossil fuel use reduction goals, specifically to produce at least 30% of the electrical and heating needs of the tribally-owned buildings in False Pass. The Project Team included the Aleut Region organizations comprised of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA), and Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association (APICDA); the University of Alaska Anchorage, ORPC Alaska a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), City of False Pass, Benthic GeoScience, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The following Project objectives were completed: collected existing bathymetric, tidal, and ocean current data to develop a basic model of current circulation at False Pass, measured current velocities at two sites for a full lunar cycle to establish the viability of the current resource, collected data on transmission infrastructure, electrical loads, and electrical generation at False Pass, performed economic analysis based on current costs of energy and amount of energy anticipated from and costs associated with the tidal energy project conceptual design and scoped environmental issues. Utilizing circulation modeling, the Project Team identified two target sites with strong potential for robust tidal energy resources in Isanotski Strait and another nearer the City of False Pass. In addition, the Project Team completed a survey of the electrical infrastructure, which identified likely sites of interconnection and clarified required transmission distances from the tidal energy resources. Based on resource and electrical data, the Project Team developed a conceptual tidal energy project design utilizing ORPC’s TidGen® Power System. While the Project Team has not committed to ORPC technology for future development of a False Pass project, this conceptual design was critical to informing the Project’s economic analysis. The results showed that power from a tidal energy project could be provided to the City of False at a rate at or below the cost of diesel generated electricity and sold to commercial customers at rates competitive with current market rates, providing a stable, flat priced, environmentally sound alternative to the diesel generation currently utilized for energy in the community. The Project Team concluded that with additional grants and private investment a tidal energy project at False Pass is well-positioned to be the first tidal energy project to be developed in Alaska, and the first tidal energy project to be interconnected to an isolated micro grid in the world. A viable project will be a model for similar projects in coastal Alaska.

  3. MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:Energy InformationSEAREV Pays deTreat Island

  4. Changes in Beachface Bed Elevation over a Tidal Cycle on Santa Rosa Island, Florida and Matagorda, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Gemma

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    . Data from one ultrasonic sensor was chosen to compile for the tidal cycle. Sonic 4 was chosen because it was located midway through the swash zone and positioned on station 4 of the 8 transect stations which showed the best data for rising, high tide... CHANGES IN BEACHFACE BED ELEVATION OVER A TIDAL CYCLE ON SANTA ROSA ISLAND, FLORIDA AND MATAGORDA PENINSULA, TEXAS Major: Environmental Geosciences April 2009 Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A...

  5. Groundwater response to dual tidal fluctuations in a peninsula or an elongated island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    1 , Hongbin Zhan2,3, *, and Zhonghua Tang1 1 School of Environmental Studies, China University of the tidal fluctuations. This is called quasi-steady state condition *Correspondence to: Hongbin Zhan

  6. ISLANDER

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003251WKSTN00 Genomic Island Identification Software v 1.0  http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/software 

  7. Marsh, mudflat and tidal creek assessment Cumberland Island National Seashore. Kings Bay Environmental Monitoring Program cumberland island national seashore. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakashima, L.D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was designed to determine whether backbarrier dredging for the Kings Bay Naval Base is affecting marsh habitat sustainability on Cumberland Island. Research was predicated on the hypothesis that if the operation is indeed exerting an influence on Cumberland Island, it will most likely be first perceived in the effect it has on the rates of supply and delivery of sediments to the marshes and mudflats. The authors located three comparable sites, which experience a different level of exposure to the effects of dredging. Second, we initiated a time-series of marsh/mudflat sedimentation measurements, which are expected to be continued in future years. Finally, we compared six different methods for monitoring sedimentation, all of which are currently in practice.

  8. Tidal power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammons, T.J. (Glasgow Univ., Scotland (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the physics of tidal power considering gravitational effects of moon and sun; semidiurnal, diurnal, and mixed tides; and major periodic components that affect the tidal range. Shelving, funneling, reflection, and resonance phenomena that have a significant effect on tidal range are also discussed. The paper then examines tidal energy resource for principal developments estimated from parametric modeling in Europe and worldwide. Basic parameters that govern the design of tidal power schemes in terms of mean tidal range and surface area of the enclosed basin are identified. While energy extracted is proportional to the tidal amplitude squared, requisite sluicing are is proportional to the square root of the tidal amplitude. Sites with large tidal amplitudes are therefore best suited for tidal power developments, whereas sites with low tidal amplitudes have sluicing that may be prohibitive. It is shown that 48% of the European tidal resource is in the United Kingdom, 42% in France and 8% in Ireland, other countries having negligible potential. Worldwide tidal resource is identified. Tidal barrage design and construction using caissons is examined, as are alternative operating modes (single-action generation, outflow generation, flood generation, two-way generation, twin basin generation, pumping, etc), development trends and possibilities, generation cost at the barrage boundary, sensitivity to discount rates, general economics, and markets. Environmental effects, and institutional constraints to the development of tidal barrage schemes are also discussed.

  9. Interactions Between Tidal Flows and Ooid Shoals, Northern Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeder, Stacy Lynn; Rankey, Gene C.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    active sand waves and ripples. Towards the platform margin, tidal currents pass through narrow inlets. The main inlet opening oceanward (NW) of the shoal stretches between two Pleistocene bedrock islands, connected by a bedrock high that extends... include both flood and ebb tidal deltas, with generally lobate forms, convex away from the islands, and with endpoints at the inlets. Although the inner portions of these lobes are mainly seagrass-stabilized muddy peloidal and skeletal sands with local...

  10. Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

  11. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClarenceStraitTidalEnergyProject,TenaxEnergyTropicalTidalTestCentre,&o...

  12. EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. The DOE NEPA process for this project has been canceled.

  13. Temporal Variation in Fish Communities Off Santa Cruz Island, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Ralph

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at sub-tidal reefs and kelp beds at Santa Cruz Island in theand/or by the loss of giant kelp, which occurs during warm-diminishing the extent of giant kelp beds. Student Michelle

  14. Overland Tidal Power Generation Using Modular Tidal Prism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naturally occurring sites with sufficient kinetic energy suitable for tidal power generation with sustained currents > 1 to 2 m/s are relatively rare. Yet sites with greater than 3 to 4 m of tidal range are relatively common around the U.S. coastline. Tidal potential does exist along the shoreline but is mostly distributed, and requires an approach which allows trapping and collection to also be conducted in a distributed manner. In this paper we examine the feasibility of generating sustainable tidal power using multiple nearshore tidal energy collection units and present the Modular Tidal Prism (MTP) basin concept. The proposed approach utilizes available tidal potential by conversion into tidal kinetic energy through cyclic expansion and drainage from shallow modular manufactured overland tidal prisms. A preliminary design and configuration of the modular tidal prism basin including inlet channel configuration and basin dimensions was developed. The unique design was shown to sustain momentum in the penstocks during flooding as well as ebbing tidal cycles. The unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was used to subject the proposed design to a number of sensitivity tests and to optimize the size, shape and configuration of MTP basin for peak power generation capacity. The results show that an artificial modular basin with a reasonable footprint (? 300 acres) has the potential to generate 10 to 20 kw average energy through the operation of a small turbine located near the basin outlet. The potential of generating a total of 500 kw to 1 MW of power through a 20 to 40 MTP basin tidal power farms distributed along the coastline of Puget Sound, Washington, is explored.

  15. Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

  16. Textural criteria for the discrimination of water-laid and wind-laid barrier island sands: a North Padre Island, Texas example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, David

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Laid Barrier Island Sands: A North Padre Island, Texas Example (August 1985) David Cunningham, B. S. ; The University of Texas at Austin Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James M. Mazzullo The grain size and grain shape characteristics of 63, 200 quartz... sand grains were analyzed from 158 samples systematically collected along three transects across North Padre Island. Sampled subenviron- ments included the forebeach, backbeach, foredune ridge, eolian flat, back-island dunes, and wind-tidal flats...

  17. Tidal Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas [Univ of Washington; Aliseda, Alberto [Univ of Washington; Palodichuk, Michael [Univ of Washington; Polagye, Brian [Univ of Washington; Thomson, James [Univ of Washington; Chime, Arshiya [Univ of Washington; Malte, Philip [Univ of washington

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: tidal energy resource assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resource assessment Tidal Energy Resource Assessment in the East River Tidal Strait, New York On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Water...

  19. Variations of net ecosystem CO2 exchange in a tidal inundated wetland: Coupling MODIS and towerbased fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    .e., biomass), nutrient availability and use, and species composition in coastal Chongming Island, Shanghai, but gradual changes of water level can play an important role in deter- mining the net ecosystem CO2 exchange multiple towers to detect the changes along the tidal gradient, but the high cost and maintenance hinder

  20. Tidal inlet processes and deposits along a low energy coastline: easter Barataria Bight, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moslow, T.F.; Levin, D.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical, seismic and vibracore data were used to determine the geologic framework of sand deposits along the predominantly muddy coastline of eastern Barataria Bight, Louisiana. Three inlet types with distinct sand body geometries and morphologies were identified and are found 1) at flanking barrier island systems spread laterally across the front of interdistributary bays; 2) in old distributary channels; 3) at overwash breaches; or 4) combination of these. Barataria Bight, a sheltered barrier island shoreline embayment with limited sand supply, minimal tidal range (36 cm) and low wave energies (30 cm) can be used to show examples of each inlet type. Barataria Pass and Quatre Bayou Pass are inlets located in old distributary channels. However, Barataria Pass has also been affected by construction between barrier islands. Pass Ronquille is located where the coastline has transgressed a low area in the delta plain. This breach is situated in a hydraulically efficient avenue between the Gulf and Bay Long behind it. Pass Abel is a combination of a low-profile barrier breach and the reoccupation of an old distributary channel. Shelf and shoreline sands are reworked from abandoned deltaic distributaries and headlands. Inner shelf sands are concentrated in thick (10 m) shore-normal relict distributary channels with fine grained cross-bedded and ripple laminated sand overlain by burrowed shelf muds. Shoreface sand deposits occur as 2-3 m thick, fine-grained, coarsening upward and burrowed ebb-tidal delta sequences and shore-parallel relict tidal inlet channels filled through lateral accretion.

  1. Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Rosswog; E. Ramirez-Ruiz; W. R. Hix

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than $2\\times 10^5$ M$_\\odot$ swallow a typical 0.6 M$_\\odot$ dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's self-gravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an X-ray flare close to the Eddington limit of $L_{\\rm Edd} \\simeq 10^{41} {\\rm erg/s} M_{\\rm bh}/1000 M$_\\odot$), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: tidal energy converters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team includes a partnership between...

  3. Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyoThornwood,Tianfu PVOverseeingTidal

  4. Tidal Stream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyoThornwood,TianfuTidal Sails AS

  5. Tidal | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower Station Jump to: navigation, searchNewTidal Home

  6. Three-dimensional Modeling of Tidal Hydrodynamics in the San Francisco Estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Edward S.; MacWilliams, Michael L.; Kimmerer, Wim J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1993. Tidal residual intertidal mudflat (TRIM) model and itsthe Tidal Residual Intertidal Mudflat (TRIM) model (Casulli

  7. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tidal Streams in the United States Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States The project documented in this report created a national...

  8. Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor Binnington; Eric Poisson

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neutron star can be measured by Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider a spherical body deformed by an external tidal field, and provide precise and meaningful definitions for electric-type and magnetic-type Love numbers; and these are computed for polytropic equations of state. The theory applies to black holes as well, and we find that the relativistic Love numbers of a nonrotating black hole are all zero.

  9. Tidal Heating of Extra-Solar Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Jackson; Richard Greenberg; Rory Barnes

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Extra-solar planets close to their host stars have likely undergone significant tidal evolution since the time of their formation. Tides probably dominated their orbital evolution once the dust and gas had cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget that governed the planet's physical properties, including its radius, which in many cases may be measured by observing transit events. Typically, tidal heating increases as a planet moves inward toward its star and then decreases as its orbit circularizes. Here we compute the plausible heating histories for several planets with measured radii, using the same tidal parameters for the star and planet that had been shown to reconcile the eccentricity distribution of close-in planets with other extra-solar planets. Several planets are discussed, including for example HD 209458 b, which may have undergone substantial tidal heating during the past billion years, perhaps enough to explain its large measured radius. Our models also show that GJ 876 d may have experienced tremendous heating and is probably not a solid, rocky planet. Theoretical models should include the role of tidal heating, which is large, but time-varying.

  10. Tidal deformations of a spinning compact object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Pani; Leonardo Gualtieri; Andrea Maselli; Valeria Ferrari

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The deformability of a compact object induced by a perturbing tidal field is encoded in the tidal Love numbers, which depend sensibly on the object's internal structure. These numbers are known only for static, spherically-symmetric objects. As a first step to compute the tidal Love numbers of a spinning compact star, here we extend powerful perturbative techniques to compute the exterior geometry of a spinning object distorted by an axisymmetric tidal field to second order in the angular momentum. The spin of the object introduces couplings between electric and magnetic deformations and new classes of induced Love numbers emerge. For example, a spinning object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second order in the spin. The deformations are encoded in a set of inhomogeneous differential equations which, remarkably, can be solved analytically in vacuum. We discuss certain subtleties in defining the multipole moments of the central object, which are due to the difficulty in separating the tidal field from the linear response of the object in the solution. By extending the standard procedure to identify the linear response in the static case, we prove analytically that the Love numbers of a Kerr black hole remain zero to second order in the spin. As a by-product, we provide the explicit form for a slowly-rotating, tidally-deformed Kerr black hole to quadratic order in the spin, and discuss its geodesic and geometrical properties.

  11. Island Energy Snapshots

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These energy snapshots highlight the energy landscape of islands in the Caribbean and the surrounding area.

  12. A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tidal wetland below MHLW Table 4.19. Performance IndicatorsPerformance Indicator All Tidal wetlands Tidal wetlands All

  13. 12th Annual Wave & Tidal 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The UK is currently the undisputed global leader in marine energy, with more wave and tidal stream devices installed than the rest of the world combined. This leading position is built on an...

  14. Viscoelastic Models of Tidally Heated Exomoons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobos, Vera

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal heating of exomoons may play a key role in their habitability, since the elevated temperature can melt the ice on the body even without significant solar radiation. The possibility of life is intensely studied on Solar System moons such as Europa or Enceladus, where the surface ice layer covers tidally heated water ocean. Tidal forces may be even stronger in extrasolar systems, depending on the properties of the moon and its orbit. For studying the tidally heated surface temperature of exomoons, we used a viscoelastic model for the first time. This model is more realistic than the widely used, so-called fixed Q models, because it takes into account the temperature dependency of the tidal heat flux, and the melting of the inner material. With the use of this model we introduced the circumplanetary Tidal Temperate Zone (TTZ), that strongly depends on the orbital period of the moon, and less on its radius. We compared the results with the fixed Q model and investigated the statistical volume of the TTZ usi...

  15. Half Moon Cove Tidal Project. Feasibility report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Half Moon Cove Tidal Power Project would be located in a small cove in the northern part of Cobscook Bay in the vicinity of Eastport, Maine. The project would be the first tidal electric power generating plant in the United States of America. The basin impounded by the barrier when full will approximate 1.2 square miles. The average tidal range at Eastport is 18.2 feet. The maximum spring tidal range will be 26.2 feet and the neap tidal range 12.8 feet. The project will be of the single pool-type single effect in which generation takes place on the ebb tide only. Utilizing an average mean tidal range of 18.2 feet the mode of operation enables generation for approximately ten and one-half (10-1/2) hours per day or slightly in excess of five (5) hours per tide. The installed capacity will be 12 MW utilizing 2 to 6 MW units. An axial flow, or Bulb type of turbine was selected for this study.

  16. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty [Project Director - AK] [Project Director - AK

    2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the FERC pilot project process. The Project compared results obtained from this method to results obtained from other passive hydrophone technologies and to visual observation techniques performed simultaneously. This Final Report makes recommendations on the best practice for future data collection, for ORPC’s work in Cook Inlet specifically, and for tidal power projects in general. This Project developed a marine mammal study design and compared technologies for hydroacoustic and visual data collection with potential for broad application to future tidal and hydrokinetic projects in other geographic areas. The data collected for this Project will support the environmental assessment of future Cook Inlet tidal energy projects, including ORPC’s East Foreland Tidal Energy Project and any tidal energy developments at Fire Island. The Project’s rigorous assessment of technology and methodologies will be invaluable to the hydrokinetic industry for developing projects in an environmentally sound and sustainable way for areas with high marine mammal activity or endangered populations. By combining several different sampling methods this Project will also contribute to the future preparation of a comprehensive biological assessment of ORPC’s projects in Cook Inlet.

  17. Tidal Evolution of Rubble Piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Goldreich; Re'em Sari

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Many small bodies in the solar system are believed to be rubble piles, a collection of smaller elements separated by voids. We propose a model for the structure of a self-gravitating rubble pile. Static friction prevents its elements from sliding relative to each other. Stresses are concentrated around points of contact between individual elements. The effective dimensionless rigidity, $\\tilde\\mu_{rubble}$, is related to that of a monolithic body of similar composition and size, $\\tilde\\mu$ by $\\tilde \\mu_{rubble} \\sim \\tilde \\mu^{1/2} \\epsilon_Y^{-1/2}$, where $\\epsilon_Y \\sim 10^{-2}$ is the yield strain. This represents a reduction in effective rigidity below the maximum radius, $R_{max}\\sim [\\mu\\epsilon_Y/(G\\rho^2)]^{1/2}\\sim 10^3\\km$, at which a rubble pile can exist. Densities derived for binary near-Earth asteroids imply that they are rubble piles. As a consequence, their tidal evolution proceeds $10^3$ to $10^4$ times faster than it would if they were monoliths. This accounts for both the sizes of their semimajor axes and their small orbital eccentricities. We show that our model for the rigidity of rubble piles is compatible with laboratory experiment in sand.

  18. Fitting orbits to tidal streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have seen the discovery of many tidal streams through the Galaxy. Relatively straightforward observations of a stream allow one to deduce three phase-space coordinates of an orbit. An algorithm is presented that reconstructs the missing phase-space coordinates from these data. The reconstruction starts from assumed values of the Galactic potential and a distance to one point on the orbit, but with noise-free data the condition that energy be conserved on the orbit enables one to reject incorrect assumptions. The performance of the algorithm is investigated when errors are added to the input data that are comparable to those in published data for the streams of Pal 5. It is found that the algorithm returns distances and proper motions that are accurate to of order one percent, and enables one to reject quite reasonable but incorrect trial potentials. In practical applications it will be important to minimize errors in the input data, and there is considerable scope for doing this.

  19. The Biogeography of Globally Threatened Seabirds and Island Conservation Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatz, Dena R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phoenix Islands Huksan Do Persian Gulf Persian Gulf MaltaMaltaIslands Malta Islands Malta Islands Malta Islands Malta

  20. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  1. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  2. 2008 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Teel

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008. Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.'

  3. Tiki Island, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyoThornwood,TianfuTidalTiki Island, Texas:

  4. Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Stephen B.; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy; Roland, I.; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

    2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Islands of Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket are separated from the Massachusetts mainland by Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds; water between the two islands flows through Muskeget Channel. The towns of Edgartown (on Martha�¢����s Vineyard) and Nantucket recognize that they are vulnerable to power supply interruptions due to their position at the end of the power grid, and due to sea level rise and other consequences of climate change. The tidal energy flowing through Muskeget Channel has been identified by the Electric Power Research Institute as the strongest tidal resource in Massachusetts waters. The Town of Edgartown proposes to develop an initial 5 MW (nameplate) tidal energy project in Muskeget Channel. The project will consist of 14 tidal turbines with 13 providing electricity to Edgartown and one operated by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth for research and development. Each turbine will be 90 feet long and 50 feet high. The electricity will be brought to shore by a submarine cable buried 8 feet below the seabed surface which will landfall in Edgartown either on Chappaquiddack or at Katama. Muskeget Channel is located between Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket. Its depth ranges between 40 and 160 feet in the deepest portion. It has strong currents where water is transferred between Nantucket Sound and the Atlantic Ocean continental shelf to the south. This makes it a treacherous passage for navigation. Current users of the channel are commercial and recreational fishing, and cruising boats. The US Coast Guard has indicated that the largest vessel passing through the channel is a commercial scallop dragger with a draft of about 10 feet. The tidal resource in the channel has been measured by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and the peak velocity flow is approximately 5 knots. The technology proposed is the helical Gorlov-type turbine positioned with a horizontal axis that is positively buoyant in the water column and held down by anchors. This is the same technology proposed by Ocean Renewable Power Company in the Western Passage and Cobscook Bay near Eastport Maine. The blades rotate in two directions capturing the tides energy both during flood and ebb tides. The turbines will be anchored to the bottom and suspended in the water column. Initial depth of the turbines is expected to be about 25 feet below the surface to avoid impacting navigation while also capturing the strongest currents. The Town of Edgartown was initially granted a Preliminary Permit by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on March 1, 2008, and has recently received a second permit valid through August 2014. The Preliminary Permit gives Edgartown the exclusive right to apply for a power generation license for power generated from the hydrokinetic energy in the water flowing in this area. Edgartown filed a Draft Pilot License Application with FERC on February 1, 2010 and an Expanded Environmental Notification Form with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office at the same time. It expects to file a Final License Application in late 2013. Harris Miller Miller & Hanson (HMMH) of Burlington Massachusetts is acting as the Project Manager for the Town of Edgartown and collaborating with other partners of the project including the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth's Marine Renewable Energy Center and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. HMMH was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's Advanced Water Program to conduct marine science and hydrokinetic site-specific environmental studies for projects actively seeking a FERC License. HMMH, on behalf of the Town, is managing this comprehensive study of the marine environment in Muskeget Channel and potential impacts of the tidal project on indicator species and habitats. The University of Massachusetts School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) conducted oceanographic studies of tidal currents, tide level, benthic habit

  5. Tidally-induced warps in protostellar discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Terquem; J. Papaloizou; R. Nelson

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review results on the dynamics of warped gaseous discs. We consider tidal perturbation of a Keplerian disc by a companion star orbiting in a plane inclined to the disc. The perturbation induces the precession of the disc, and thus of any jet it could drive. In some conditions the precession rate is uniform, and as a result the disc settles into a warp mode. The tidal torque also leads to the truncation of the disc, to the evolution of the inclination angle (not necessarily towards alignment of the disc and orbital planes) and to a transport of angular momentum in the disc. We note that the spectral energy distribution of such a warped disc is different from that of a flat disc. We conclude by listing observational effects of warps in protostellar discs.

  6. Tidal heating in multilayered terrestrial exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry, E-mail: wade.g.henning@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R{sub E} is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  7. Siting of dredged material islands in bays and estuaries along low-energy coastlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathewson, C.C.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bays, estuaries, and lagoons along low-energy coastlines are protected shallow water environments, which make them suitable sites for intracoastal transportation routes. Dredging operations often construct disposal islands, which are cost effective and provide protected sites for shore birds. Channel maintenance is often required because sediments are transported from the island to the channel. Studies of dredge material island changes along the Texas coast have shown that the reworking and transport of island sediments is influenced by a number of geologic, geotechnical, biological, and climatic factors. Significant factors are: wind; waves; tides, both astronomic and wind generated; currents produced by wind, fluvial, and tidal processes; physical characteristics of the dredged material; climate, including both prevailing and storm conditions; basin physiography, island design, shape, height, and location within the basin; biology, both flora and fauna; and the activities of man, ship wake, subsidence, etc. Selection of the most effective island location can be based on a process model that incorporates a recognition of the influence and interaction of the physical factors that erode and transport island sediments and those that stabilize the island. This model can be applied early in the site selection process with corresponding improvements in the design and permitting of the dredging program.

  8. Tidal interactions in multi-planet systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaloizou, J C B

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study systems of close orbiting planets evolving under the influence of tidal circularization. It is supposed that a commensurability forms through the action of disk induced migration and orbital circularization. After the system enters an inner cavity or the disk disperses the evolution continues under the influence of tides due to the central star which induce orbital circularization. We derive approximate analytic models that describe the evolution away from a general first order resonance that results from tidal circularization in a two planet system and which can be shown to be a direct consequence of the conservation of energy and angular momentum. We consider the situation when the system is initially very close to resonance and also when the system is between resonances. We also perform numerical simulations which confirm these models and then apply them to two and four planet systems chosen to have parameters related to the GJ581 and HD10180 systems. We also estimate the tidal dissipation rates t...

  9. Regulation of Tidal and Wave Energy Projects (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State regulation of tidal and wave energy projects is covered under the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act (MWDCA), and complements regulation by the Federal Energy Regulation...

  10. All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ocean Renewable Power Company will unveil its first commercial-scale tidal turbine before it is deployed underwater to generate power. The pilot project -- supported by...

  11. Interconnection Guidelines (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island enacted legislation (HB 6222) in June 2011 to standardize the application process for the interconnection of customer-sited renewable-energy systems to the state’s distribution grid....

  12. Forestry Policies (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island's forests cover over half of the state's land area, and are managed by the Department of Environmental Management, Division of Forest Environment. The State issued its "Forest...

  13. THE EFFECT OF MASS LOSS ON THE TIDAL EVOLUTION OF EXTRASOLAR PLANET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Jianheng

    By combining mass loss and tidal evolution of close-in planets, we present a qualitative study on their tidal migrations. We incorporate mass loss in tidal evolution for planets with different masses and find that mass ...

  14. Tidal Energy Resource Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,Department ThirdCosts | Department ofTidal Energy

  15. Tidal Sails AS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyoThornwood,TianfuTidal Sails AS Jump to:

  16. TidalStream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin Hydropower Station Jump to: navigation, searchNewTidal

  17. Enhancing Electrical Supply by Pumped Storage in Tidal Lagoons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    to demand into high­value demand­following power; and second, it can simultaneously serve as a tidal power/3/07 Summary The principle that the net energy delivered by a tidal pool can be increased by pumping extra stop blowing for two days at a time? Chemical or kinetic­energy storage systems are an economical way

  18. Enhancing Electrical Supply by Pumped Storage in Tidal Lagoons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    to demand into high-value demand-following power; and second, it can simultaneously serve as a tidal power/3/07 Summary The principle that the net energy delivered by a tidal pool can be increased by pumping extra stop blowing for two days at a time? Chemical or kinetic-energy storage systems are an economical way

  19. Tidal Conversion at a Submarine Ridge FRANOIS PTRLIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    that control the tidally powered radiation of in- ternal gravity waves (the "tidal conversion") from received 30 July 2003, in final form 20 January 2004) ABSTRACT The radiative flux of internal wave energy tide over submarine topography is a main source of the mechanical energy required to power the internal

  20. Directly Imaging Tidally Powered Migrating Jupiters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Subo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that ongoing direct imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by Gyr-"old" main-sequence stars, they can be as "hot" as young Jupiters at ~100 Myr, the prime targets of direct imaging surveys. These planets, with years-long orbits, are presently migrating to "feed" the "hot Jupiters" in steady state. Their existence is expected from a class of "high-e" migration mechanisms, in which gas giants are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink their semi-major axis by factor of ~ 10-100 due to tidal dissipation at successive close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the planet atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity ~2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of our Jupiter during a typical Gyr migration time scale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make ...

  1. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce A. Wright

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

  2. A new golden era in island biogeography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez-Palacios, Jose Maria; Kueffer, Christoph; Drake, Donald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insular woodiness on the Canary Islands: a remarkable caseevery five days in the Canary Islands (Martín Esquivel et

  3. PSEG Long Island- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although PSEG Long Island’s net metering policy is not governed by the State’s net metering law, the provisions are similar to the State law. Net metering is available for residential, non-reside...

  4. MHK Projects/Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:Energy Information

  5. MHK Projects/Cape Islands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07)AKBrough Head Wave Farm

  6. MHK Projects/Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet < MHKSound, NY Project State/Province

  7. MHK Projects/Long Island Sound Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet < MHKSound,IrontonKrotzLeancon

  8. MHK Projects/Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet.7413°,Scotlandville BendBillia Croo,New

  9. MHK Projects/Ward s Island Tidal Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects Jump to:Vicksburg Bend < MHK ProjectsWECs

  10. Long Island Solar Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, R.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a remarkable success story, whereby very different interest groups found a way to capitalize on unusual circumstances to develop a mutually beneficial source of renewable energy. The uniqueness of the circumstances that were necessary to develop the Long Island Solar Farm make it very difficult to replicate. The project is, however, an unparalleled resource for solar energy research, which will greatly inform large-scale PV solar development in the East. Lastly, the LISF is a superb model for the process by which the project developed and the innovation and leadership shown by the different players.

  11. Quantifying Turbulence for Tidal Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using newly collected data from a tidal power site in Puget Sound, WA, metrics for turbulence quantification are assessed and discussed. The quality of raw ping Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data for turbulence studies is evaluated against Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) data at a point. Removal of Doppler noise from the raw ping data is shown to be a crucial step in turbulence quantification. Excluding periods of slack tide, the turbulent intensity estimates at a height of 4.6 m above the seabed are 8% and 11% from the ADCP and ADV, respectively. Estimates of the turbulent dissipation rate are more variable, from 10e-3 to 10e-1 W/m^3. An example analysis of coherent Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) is presented.

  12. On the circulation and tidal flushing of Mobile Bay, Alabama 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, George Belden

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is not filling with sediment to any apparent degree. The U. S. Corps of Engineers maintains ths Mobile Ship Channel to a depth of thirty-two feet. Dredging operations proceed during most of the year since this depth is some twenty-two f'eet below the mean bay... ~ ~ ~ ~ ix ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ 4 6 9 10 E. Meteorological III. TIDAL FLUSHING THEORY 15 A. Ketchum's Tidal Prism Theory B. Stommel's and Arons' Ydxing Length Theory. of Tidal Flushing IV. THE HYDROGRAPHIC SURVEY 22 27 A. Planning B...

  13. On the circulation and tidal flushing of Mobile Bay, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, George Belden

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For each of the twenty-eight station positions, curves vere then drawn for temperature-depth and salinity&epth for the different ob- served tidal stages. From these curves temperature-depth sections (Figure V) and salinity-depth sections (Figures VI, VII...) vere oon- structed 1' or six cross-sections of Mobile Bay and for the ship channel length, for the different tidal stages. Current velocity vectors were plotted by station for surface and bottom at ebb and flood tidal stages. From these data surface...

  14. NAME: Elkhorn Slough Tidal Marsh Restoration: Building Resilience with the Beneficial Reuse of Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    stormwater runoff. EXPECTED BENEFITS: Habitats, particularly tidal marsh, intertidal mudflat, and soft

  15. GREEN HOMES LONG ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    energy bill, reduce your carbon footprint... at little or no cost to you. #12;A Message From Supervisor energy-efficient and reduce our community's carbon footprint. Why do we call it Long Island Green Homes to yourevery day. By making basic improvements to yourevery day home, you can reduce your carbon footprint

  16. Barrier island depositional systems in Black Warrior basin, lower Pennsylvanian (Pottsville) in northwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, C.A.; Gastaldo, R.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basal Pennsylvanian lower Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama is part of a southwestward-thickening wedge of terrigenous sediments consisting of orthoquartzitic sandstone, siltstone, and shales with discontinuous coals. The present study delineates each lower Pottsville lithofacies, to confirm or refute a barrier-island model. Preliminary interpretation of lithofacies using lithologic criteria, sedimentary structures, and fossil assemblages confirms a barrier deposition system. Exposures along I-65 in southern Cullman County are interpreted to represent lagoonal deposits based on the high percentage of mud-sized material, massive and structureless washover sandstone beds, and highly rippled interbedded sandstones and silty shales that contain microcross-stratification. Exposures in northern Cullman County are interpreted to represent tidal channel-fill deposits, flood tidal sequences, and possible foreshore sandstone deposits. Tidal channel-fill deposits are recognized by coarse sandstone textures with pebble lags, large-scale cross-bedding, and their geometry. Flood tidal sequences are recognized by stacked cross-bedded sets and additional sedimentary structures. Foreshore deposits are interpreted based on the orientation of low-angle planar bedding.

  17. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Tidal Current Energy Extraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaojing

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical and experimental investigations of tidal current energy extraction have been conducted in this study. A laboratory-scale water flume was simulated using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. ...

  18. axis tidal turbines: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Power Limitation Control for a PMSG-Based Marine Current Turbine at High Tidal Speed and Physics Websites Summary: Power Limitation Control for a PMSG-Based Marine Current...

  19. analysing tidally induced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We discuss the results of 3D simulations...

  20. Hydrodynamic analysis of a vertical axis tidal current turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gretton, Gareth I.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal currents can be used as a predictable source of sustainable energy, and have the potential to make a useful contribution to the energy needs of the UK and other countries with such a resource. One of the technologies ...

  1. Geomorphic structure of tidal hydrodynamics in salt marsh creeks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    of the tidal signal within the marsh area. Citation: Fagherazzi, S., M. Hannion, and P. D'Odorico (2008 by elegant hydrological and geomorphological theories [Gupta et al., 1980; Rodriguez-Iturbe and Valdes, 1979

  2. Nonrotating black hole in a post-Newtonian tidal environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephanne Taylor; Eric Poisson

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the motion and tidal dynamics of a nonrotating black hole placed within a post-Newtonian external spacetime. The tidal perturbation created by the external environment is treated as a small perturbation. At a large distance from the black hole, the gravitational field of the external distribution of matter is assumed to be sufficiently weak to be adequately described by the (first) post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity. There, the black hole is treated as a monopole contribution to the total gravitational field. There exists an overlap in the domains of validity of each description, and the black-hole and post-Newtonian metrics are matched in the overlap. The matching procedure produces the equations of motion for the black hole and the gravito-electric and gravito-magnetic tidal fields acting on the black hole. We first calculate the equations of motion and tidal fields by making no assumptions regarding the nature of the post-Newtonian environment; this could contain a continuous distribution of matter or any number of condensed bodies. We next specialize our discussion to a situation in which the black hole is a member of a post-Newtonian two-body system. As an application of our results, we examine the geometry of the deformed event horizon and calculate the tidal heating of the black hole, the rate at which it acquires mass as a result of its tidal interaction with the companion body.

  3. Culturing revolution : the local Communists of China's Hainan Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Jeremy Andrew

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One: Deserted Treasure Island……………………………………………….13 ChapterChapter One Deserted Treasure Island: The Social Ecology andIsolated Island/Treasure Island – Gudao / Baodao Social and

  4. The tidal disruption of protoplanetary accretion discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John D. Larwood

    1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we revisit the problem of the tidal interaction occuring between a protostellar accretion disc and a secondary point mass following a parabolic trajectory. We model the disc response analytically and we compare our results with three-dimensional SPH simulations. Inviscid as well as viscous hydrodynamics is considered. We show that in a viscous system the response derived from inviscid considerations is predominant even for the highest estimates of an anomalous disc shear viscosity. The angular momentum lost from the disc during the encounter is derived from linear theory, for distant fly-bys, as well as the changes to the disc orientation expected in non-coplanar encounters. It is shown that the target discs can become warped and precess by a small amount during non-coplanar encounters. This small precession is shown to give rise to a relative tilt of the disc which is always more important for determining its final orientation than is the change to the orbital inclination. We discuss the implications of our results for protostellar accretion discs and planetary systems.

  5. Rhode Island Stormwater Design and Installation Standards Manual (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rhode Island's stormwater design and installation standards manual has been developed to describe mandatory and suggested stormwater design and performance criteria for applicants to the Department...

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  7. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  12. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Prairie Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Prairie Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  13. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2004 ­ November 30, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution.............

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  16. Using Tidal Tails to Probe Dark Matter Halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Dubinski; J. Christopher Mihos; Lars Hernquist

    1995-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We use simulations of merging galaxies to explore the sensitivity of the morphology of tidal tails to variations of the halo mass distributions in the parent galaxies. Our goal is to constrain the mass of dark halos in well-known merging pairs. We concentrate on prograde encounters between equal mass galaxies which represent the best cases for creating tidal tails, but also look at systems with different relative orientations, orbital energies and mass ratios. As the mass and extent of the dark halo increase in the model galaxies, the resulting tidal tails become shorter and less massive, even under the most favorable conditions for producing these features. Our simulations imply that the observed merging galaxies with long tidal tails ($\\sim 50-100$ kpc) such as NGC 4038/39 (the Antennae) and NGC 7252 probably have halo:disk+bulge mass ratios less than 10:1. These results conflict with the favored values of the dark halo mass of the Milky Way derived from satellite kinematics and the timing argument which give a halo:disk+bulge mass ratio of $\\sim 30:1$. However, the lower bound of the estimated dark halo mass in the Milky Way (mass ratio $\\sim 10:1$) is still consistent with the inferred tidal tail galaxy masses. Our results also conflict with the expectations of $\\Omega=1$ cosmologies such as CDM which predict much more massive and extended dark halos.

  17. Quantifying Vegetation Recovery on Santa Rosa Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rentschlar, Elizabeth

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of recovery on barrier islands after hurricanes is not well understood, because the majority of studies have focused on the geomorphic impact of storms on barrier islands. Dune vegetation recovery is a vital component of barrier island...

  18. Nauru Island Effect Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next8,NatureNauru Island

  19. Small-Scale Solar Grants (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides incentives for renewable-energy projects. Incentive programs are funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) and...

  20. Energy Transition Initiative: Islands Playbook (Book) | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Transition Initiative: Islands Playbook (Book) Re-direct Destination: The Island Energy Playbook (the Playbook) provides an action-oriented guide to successfully initiating,...

  1. The Theory of Island Biogeography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    The Theory of Island Biogeography Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson The young biologists" dominated by the collection of data. In The Theory of Island Biogeography they set out to change that by devel- oping a general mathema- tical theory that would make sense of a key ecological problem

  2. TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A1689 is consistent with a model including a black hole of {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of {approx}0.5 M{sub sun}.

  3. Resonant Oscillations and Tidal Heating in Coalescing Binary Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong Lai

    1994-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal interaction in a coalescing neutron star binary can resonantly excite the g-mode oscillations of the neutron star when the frequency of the tidal driving force equals the intrinsic g-mode frequencies. We study the g-mode oscillations of cold neutron stars using recent microscopic nuclear equations of state, where we determine self-consistently the sound speed and Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequency in the nuclear liquid core. The properties of the g-modes associated with the stable stratification of the core depend sensitively on the pressure-density relation as well as the symmetry energy of the dense nuclear matter. The frequencies of the first ten g-modes lie approximately in the range of $10-100$ Hz. Resonant excitations of these g-modes during the last few minutes of the binary coalescence result in energy transfer and angular momentum transfer from the binary orbit to the neutron star. The angular momentum transfer is possible because a dynamical tidal lag develops even in the absence of fluid viscosity. However, since the coupling between the g-mode and the tidal potential is rather weak, the amount of energy transfer during a resonance and the induced orbital phase error are very small. Resonant excitations of the g-modes play an important role in tidal heating of binary neutron stars. Without the resonances, viscous dissipation is effective only when the stars are close to contact. The resonant oscillations result in dissipation at much larger orbital separation. The actual amount of tidal heating depends on the viscosity of the neutron star. Using the microscopic viscosity, we find that the binary neutron stars are heated to a temperature $\\sim 10^8$ K before they come into contact.

  4. Modeling Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta Under a Broad Suite of Potential Future Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–Sanof pulsing events to sustainability. Estuaries Coasts 18:Evaluating tidal marsh sustainability in the face of sea-

  5. Sustainability of a Tidal Freshwater Marsh Exposed to a Long-term Hydrologic Barrier and Sea Level Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    a tidal fresh- water marsh perpendicular to the Patuxent River (Maryland) channel has created a northern elevation change . Accretion . Tidal freshwater marsh . Seasonal sedimentation . Jug Bay . Patuxent River

  6. A Conceptual Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marsh. UC Berkeley LA 222 Hydrology Term Paper. Orr, M. , S.Restoration Plan and Tidal Hydrology Assessment forthree consists of a tidal hydrology analysis before and

  7. Methylmercury Production in Tidal Salt Marsh Sediments and Potential Control Using Iron Amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich, Patrick D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bay, a freshwater tidal mudflat wetland in the Hudson River.species that utilized tidal mudflat or open bay habitats (in forage fish that utilize mudflat and wetland habitats

  8. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

  9. Relativistic tidal heating of Hamiltonian quasi-local boundary expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Lau Loi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purdue and Favata calculate the tidal heating used certain classical pseudotensors. Booth and Creighton employed the quasi-local mass formalism of Brown and York to demonstrate the same subject. All of them give the result matched with the Newtonian theory. Here we present another Hamiltonian quasi-local boundary expressions and all give the same desired value. This indicates that the tidal heating is unique as Thorne predicted. Moreover, we discovered that the pseudo-tensor method and quasi-local method are fundamentally different.

  10. Relativistic tidal heating of Hamiltonian quasi-local boundary expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau Loi So

    2015-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Purdue and Favata calculate the tidal heating used certain classical pseudotensors. Booth and Creighton employed the quasi-local mass formalism of Brown and York to demonstrate the same subject. All of them give the result matched with the Newtonian theory. Here we present another Hamiltonian quasi-local boundary expressions and all give the same desired value. This indicates that the tidal heating is unique as Thorne predicted. Moreover, we discovered that the pseudo-tensor method and quasi-local method are fundamentally different.

  11. Extreme Value Analysis of Tidal Stream Velocity Perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harding, Samuel; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Bryden, Ian

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a statistical extreme value analysis of maximum velocity perturbations from the mean flow speed in a tidal stream. This study was performed using tidal velocity data measured using both an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) at the same location which allows for direct comparison of predictions. The extreme value analysis implements of a Peak-Over-Threshold method to explore the effect of perturbation length and time scale on the magnitude of a 50-year perturbation.

  12. A numerical model for the coupled long-term evolution of salt marshes and tidal flats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    -shore mudflat model that takes into account tidal effects; Waeles et al. [2004] incor- porated in the same

  13. MSL F693 F01 French Tidal Power CRN # 36273 Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalik, Zygmunt

    MSL F693 F01 French Tidal Power CRN # 36273 Station 3 CREDITS Zygmunt Kowalik A new course on TIDES. Such application has raised many questions about an environmental impact of tidal power development. The course a function of the changes in the sun- earth-moon system, caused by dissipation of the tidal energy

  14. TIDAL HEATING OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS Brian Jackson, Richard Greenberg, and Rory Barnes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Rory

    TIDAL HEATING OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS Brian Jackson, Richard Greenberg, and Rory Barnes Lunar and gas cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget governing

  15. Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline Management Trade Friday, October 13, 2006 of new tools produced by the Center for Coastal Resources Managment (CCRM) and other programs) technology with digital aerial photographs and the power of the Internet. They are accessible from desktop

  16. Tidal Stage Variability of Fecal Coliform and Chlorophyll a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    leachates, leaking sewer mains, wild and do- mestic animal wastes, and runo. However, the inter- action environmental hazards, to enter an estuarine environment characterized by high variability regarding temperature to understanding both the basic ecology of tidal creeks and the applied aspects of sampling protocols and pollutant

  17. First-post-Newtonian quadrupole tidal interactions in binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Vines; Éanna É. Flanagan

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider tidal coupling in a binary stellar system to first-post-Newtonian order. We derive the orbital equations of motion for bodies with spins and mass quadrupole moments and show that they conserve the total linear momentum of the binary. We note that spin-orbit coupling must be included in a 1PN treatment of tidal interactions in order to maintain consistency (except in the special case of adiabatically induced quadrupoles); inclusion of 1PN quadrupolar tidal effects while omitting spin effects would lead to a failure of momentum conservation for generic evolution of the quadrupoles. We use momentum conservation to specialize our analysis to the system's center-of-mass-energy frame; we find the binary's relative equation of motion in this frame and also present a generalized Lagrangian from which it can be derived. We then specialize to the case in which the quadrupole moment is adiabatically induced by the tidal field (in which case it is consistent to ignore spin effects). We show how the adiabatic dynamics for the quadrupole can be incorporated into our action principle and present the simplified orbital equations of motion and conserved energy for the adiabatic case. These results are relevant to gravitational wave signals from inspiralling binary neutron stars.

  18. Large-scale tidal fields on primordial density perturbations ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Gonzalez

    1997-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the strength of the tidal field produced by the large-scale density field acting on primordial density perturbations in power law models. By analysing changes in the orientation of the deformation tensor, resulted from smoothing the density field on different mass scales, we show that the large-scale tidal field can strongly affect the morphology and orientation of density peaks. The measure of the strength of the tidal field is performed as a function of the distance to the peak and of the spectral index. We detected evidence that two populations of perturbations seems to coexist; one, with a misalignment between the main axes of their inertia and deformation tensors. This would lead to the angular momentum acquisition and morphological changes. For the second population, the perturbations are found nearly aligned in the direction of the tidal field, which would imprint them low angular momentum and which would allow an alignment of structures as those reported between clusters of galaxies in filaments, and between galaxies in clusters. Evidence is presented that the correlation between the orientation of perturbations and the large-scale density field could be a common property of Gaussian density fields with spectral indexes $n < 0$. We argue that alignment of structures can be used to probe the flatness of the spectrum on large scales but it cannot determine the exact value of the spectral index.

  19. Pasture and Soil Management Following Tidal Saltwater Intrusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Redmon, Larry; McFarland, Mark L.; Feagley, Sam E.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    When land is flooded by saltwater, as after a hurricane tidal surge, it can long-term effects on soil productivity and fertility. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded pasture land. Having soil tested for salinity is an important step....

  20. Overview of Ocean Wave and Tidal Energy Lingchuan Mei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad

    Overview of Ocean Wave and Tidal Energy Lingchuan Mei Department of Electrical Engineering Columbia with the climate change has led us to the exploration of new renewable energy in the past few decades. Oceans of this paper is to briefly overview the technology development of the ocean energy exploration, focusing on two

  1. Island Political Economy Geoff Bertram & Bernard Poirine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    323 Chapter 10 Island Political Economy Geoff Bertram & Bernard Poirine Introduction In this chapter we build on the observation that island economies, and especially small ones (population below one of development strategies. Common elements of "islandness" may serve to define island economies as a general

  2. Long Island Solar Farm Project Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Long Island Solar Farm #12;Project Overview The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a 32-megawatt. Project Developer/Owner/Operator: Long Island Solar Farm, LLC (BP Solar & MetLife) Purchaser of Power and construct arrays ~ 2 years of output (88,000 MWh equivalent) Long Island Solar Farm #12;Other Pollutants

  3. The State of Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Republic of the Marshall Islands MarshallIslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    The State of Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Republic of the Marshall Islands 387 MarshallIslands The State of Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Republic of the Marshall Islands Maria Beger1 , Dean Jacobson22 (1,940,000 mi2 ), the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) is comprised of 1,225 islands

  4. EIS-0006: Wind Turbine Generator System, Block Island, Rhode Island

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of installing and operating a large experimental wind turbine, designated the MOD-OA, which is proposed to be installed on a knoll in Rhode Island's New Meadow Hill Swamp, integrated with the adjacent Block Island Power Company power plant and operated to supply electricity to the existing utility network.

  5. No Company Is An Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, A.

    No company is an island. Utilities and their industrial customers are discovering that collaboration can breed opportunity while isolation can lead to ruin. Inter company relationships have changed over recent years and HL&P and its customers...

  6. Pacific Islands Region News Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Islands Region News Release Contact: Wende Goo FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 808-721-4098 May 27 of these unique twins by contributing more than 100 hours of work to construct a holding pen for the young seal

  7. Climate Action Plan (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the fall of 2001, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM), the RI State Energy Office (SEO), and the Governor's office convened the Rhode Island Greenhouse Gas Stakeholder Project in...

  8. The Long Island Solar Farm

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In November 2011, a utility-scale solar array became operational in the most unlikely of places: at Brookhaven National Laboratory on densely populated Long Island, New York. Now the largest...

  9. Modeling In-stream Tidal Energy Extraction and Its Potential Environmental Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in harnessing in-stream tidal energy in response to concerns of increasing energy demand and to mitigate climate change impacts. While many studies have been conducted to assess and map tidal energy resources, efforts for quantifying the associated potential environmental impacts have been limited. This paper presents the development of a tidal turbine module within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model and its application for assessing the potential environmental impacts associated with tidal energy extraction. The model is used to investigate in-stream tidal energy extraction and associated impacts on estuarine hydrodynamic and biological processes in a tidally dominant estuary. A series of numerical experiments with varying numbers and configurations of turbines installed in an idealized estuary were carried out to assess the changes in the hydrodynamics and biological processes due to tidal energy extraction. Model results indicated that a large number of turbines are required to extract the maximum tidal energy and cause significant reduction of the volume flux. Preliminary model results also indicate that extraction of tidal energy increases vertical mixing and decreases flushing rate in a stratified estuary. The tidal turbine model was applied to simulate tidal energy extraction in Puget Sound, a large fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast.

  10. Site response at Treasure and Yerba Buena Islands, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baise, L G; Glaser, Steven D; Dreger, D

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    array at the Treasure Island Naval Station. ’’ Loma Prietadamage in Oakland, Treasure Island, and San Francisco. ’’C. H. ?1969?. ‘‘Treasure Island ?ll. ’’ Bay mud developments

  11. Spatial motion of the Magellanic Clouds. Tidal models ruled out?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruzicka, Adam; Palous, Jan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, Kallivayalil et al. derived new values of the proper motion for the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively). The spatial velocities of both Clouds are unexpectedly higher than their previous values resulting from agreement between the available theoretical models of the Magellanic System and the observations of neutral hydrogen (HI) associated with the LMC and the SMC. Such proper motion estimates are likely to be at odds with the scenarios for creation of the large-scale structures in the Magellanic System suggested so far. We investigated this hypothesis for the pure tidal models, as they were the first ones devised to explain the evolution of the Magellanic System, and the tidal stripping is intrinsically involved in every model assuming the gravitational interaction. The parameter space for the Milky Way (MW)-LMC-SMC interaction was analyzed by a robust search algorithm (genetic algorithm) combined with a fast restricted N-body model of the interaction. Our method extended ...

  12. Atmospheric heat redistribution and collapse on tidally locked rocky planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wordsworth, Robin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric collapse is likely to be of fundamental importance to tidally locked rocky exoplanets but remains understudied. Here, general results on the heat transport and stability of tidally locked terrestrial-type atmospheres are reported. First, the problem is modeled with an idealized 3D general circulation model (GCM) with gray gas radiative transfer. It is shown that over a wide range of parameters the atmospheric boundary layer, rather than the large-scale circulation, is the key to understanding the planetary energy balance. Through a scaling analysis of the interhemispheric energy transfer, theoretical expressions for the day-night temperature difference and surface wind speed are created that reproduce the GCM results without tuning. Next, the GCM is used with correlated-k radiative transfer to study heat transport for two real gases (CO2 and CO). For CO2, empirical formulae for the collapse pressure as a function of planetary mass and stellar flux are produced, and critical pressures for atmospher...

  13. Orbital motions as gradiometers for post-Newtonian tidal effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct long-term changes occurring in the orbital dynamics of a local gravitationally bound binary system $S$ due to the post-Newtonian tidal acceleration caused by an external massive source are investigated. A class of systems made of a test particle $m$ rapidly orbiting with orbital frequency $n_{\\rm b}$ an astronomical body of mass $M$ which, in turn, slowly revolves around a distant object of mass $M^{'}$ with orbital frequency $n_{\\rm b}^{'}\\ll n_{\\rm b}$ is considered. The characteristic frequencies of the non-Keplerian orbital variations of $m$ and of $M$ itself are assumed to be negligible with respect to both $n_{\\rm b}$ and $n_{\\rm b}^{'}$. General expressions for the resulting Newtonian and post-Newtonian tidal orbital shifts of $m$ are obtained. The future missions BepiColombo and JUICE to Mercury and Ganymede, respectively, are considered in view of a possible detection. The largest effects, of the order of $\\approx 0.1-0.5$ milliarcseconds per year (mas yr$^{-1}$), occur for the Ganymede orbiter of the JUICE mission. Although future improvements in spacecraft tracking and orbit determination might, perhaps, reach the required sensitivity, the systematic bias represented by the other known orbital perturbations of both Newtonian and post-Newtonian origin would be overwhelming. The realization of a dedicated artificial mini-planetary system to be carried onboard and Earth-orbiting spacecraft is considered as well. Post-Newtonian tidal precessions as large as $\\approx 1-10^2$ mas yr$^{-1}$ could be obtained, but the quite larger Newtonian tidal effects would be a major source of systematic bias because of the present-day percent uncertainty in the product of the Earth's mass times the Newtonian gravitational parameter.

  14. Investigation of tidal power, Cobscook Bay, Maine. Environmental Appendix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information regarding existing terrestrial and marine resources and water quality conditions in the Cobscook Bay area. A preliminary assessment of impacts from a tidal power project is also presented and data gaps are identified. Reports contained in the appendix were prepared by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Marine Fisheries Service, the University of Maine at Orino, School of Forestry Resources and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

  15. Modeling Tidal Streams in evolving dark matter halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Penarrubia; Andrew J. Benson; David Martinez-Delgado; Hans-Walter Rix

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore whether stellar tidal streams can provide information on the secular, cosmological evolution of the Milky Way's gravitational potential and on the presence of subhalos. We carry out long-term (~t_hubble) N-body simulations of disrupting satellite galaxies in a semi-analytic Galaxy potential where the dark matter halo and the subhalos evolve according to a LCDM cosmogony. All simulations are constrained to end up with the same position and velocity at present. Our simulations account for: (i) the secular evolution of the host halo's mass, size and shape, (ii) the presence of subhalos and (iii) dynamical friction. We find that tidal stream particles respond adiabatically to the Galaxy growth so that, at present, the energy and angular momentum distribution is exclusively determined by the present Galaxy potential. In other words, all present-day observables can only constrain the present mass distribution of the Galaxy independent of its past evolution. We also show that, if the full phase-space distribution of a tidal stream is available, we can accurately determine (i) the present Galaxy's shape and (ii) the amount of mass loss from the stream's progenitor, even if this evolution spanned a cosmologically significant epoch.

  16. Resonant oscillations and tidal heating in coalescing binary neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, D

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal interaction in a coalescing neutron star binary can resonantly excite the g-mode oscillations of the neutron star when the frequency of the tidal driving force equals the intrinsic g-mode frequencies. We study the g-mode oscillations of cold neutron stars using recent microscopic nuclear equations of state, where we determine self-consistently the sound speed and Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequency in the nuclear liquid core. The properties of the g-modes associated with the stable stratification of the core depend sensitively on the pressure-density relation as well as the symmetry energy of the dense nuclear matter. The frequencies of the first ten g-modes lie approximately in the range of 10-100 Hz. Resonant excitations of these g-modes during the last few minutes of the binary coalescence result in energy transfer and angular momentum transfer from the binary orbit to the neutron star. The angular momentum transfer is possible because a dynamical tidal lag develops even in the absence of fluid viscosity. ...

  17. The mass-metallicity relation of tidal dwarf galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recchi, S; Ploeckinger, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dwarf galaxies generally follow a mass-metallicity (MZ) relation, where more massive objects retain a larger fraction of heavy elements. Young tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs), born in the tidal tails produced by interacting gas-rich galaxies, have been thought to not follow the MZ relation, because they inherit the metallicity of the more massive parent galaxies. We present chemical evolution models to investigate if TDGs that formed at very high redshifts, where the metallicity of their parent galaxy was very low, can produce the observed MZ relation. Assuming that galaxy interactions were more frequent in the denser high-redshift universe, TDGs could constitute an important contribution to the dwarf galaxy population. The survey of chemical evolution models of TDGs presented here captures for the first time an initial mass function (IMF) of stars that is dependent on both the star formation rate and the gas metallicity via the integrated galactic IMF (IGIMF) theory. As TDGs form in the tidal debris of interacti...

  18. Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

  19. Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office ........................................................................... 11 Options for liquid biofuel feedstock transport ............................................................................. agency thereof. #12;A Comparison of Hawaii's Inter-Island Maritime Transportation of Solid Versus Liquid

  20. REAP Islanded Grid Wind Power Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by Renewable Energy Alaska Project, this three-day conference will show attendees how to learn, network, and share information on wind systems in island and islanded grid environments through expert panel discussions, stakeholder dialogue, and training.

  1. Islands and Our Renewable Energy Future (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Gevorgian, V.; Kelley, K.; Conrad, M.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Only US Laboratory Dedicated Solely to Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. High Contribution Renewables in Islanded Power Systems.

  2. A comparison of measured and modeled tidal currents in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Michael S

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Advisory Committee; Dr. David A. Brooks A modified version of the National Ocean Survey harmonic analysis computer program was used to extract the tidal signal from current meter records at five mooring stations (present stations) collected during four... summer periods in the Gulf of Maine. The results showed that the dominant tidal current constituent at all stations was the M2 constituent. The M2 tidal currents at each present station were vertically-averaged using a depth-weighting scheme...

  3. The Unusual Tidal Dwarf Candidate in the Merger System NGC 3227/6: Star Formation in a Tidal Shock?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carole G. Mundell; Phil A. James; Nora Loiseau; Eva Schinnerer; Duncan A. Forbes; ;

    2004-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of active star formation in the HI cloud associated with the interacting Seyfert system NGC 3227/NGC 3226 that was originally identified as a candidate tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) by Mundell et al. and that we name J1023+1952. We present the results of broad-band BRIJHK and ultraviolet imaging that show the HI cloud is associated with massive on-going star formation seen as a cluster of blue knots (M_B < -15.5 mag) surrounded by a diffuse ultraviolet halo and co-spatial with a ridge of high column density neutral hydrogen its southern half. We also detect Ha emission from the knots with a flux density corresponding to a star-formation rate of SFR~0.011 Msun per yr. Although J1023+1952 spatially overlaps the edge of the disk of NGC 3227, it has a mean HI velocity 150 km/s higher than that of NGC 3227 so is kinematically distinct; comparison of ionized and neutral gas kinematics in the star-forming region show closely matched velocities, providing strong evidence that the knots are embedded in J1023+1952 and do not merely lie behind in the disk of NGC 3227, thus confirming J1023+1952 as a gas-rich dwarf galaxy. We discuss two scenarios for the origin of J1023+1952; as a third, pre-existing dwarf galaxy involved in the interaction with NGC 3227 and NGC 3226, or a newly-forming dwarf galaxy condensing out of the tidal debris removed from the gaseous disk of NGC 3227. Given the lack of a detectable old stellar population, a tidal origin is more likely. If J1023+1952 is a bound object forming from returning gaseous tidal tail material, we infer a dynamically young age similar to its star-formation age, and suggests it is in the earliest stages of TDG evolution. Whatever the origin of J1023+1952 we suggest that its star formation is shock-triggered by collapsing tidal debris. (Abridged)

  4. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  5. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  6. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  7. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  8. Close Encounters Treasure Island: Sequencing Moorea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    Close Encounters Also... Treasure Island: Sequencing Moorea Devon Zagory on Food Safety College Features 12 CLOSE ENCOUNTERS by Claire Cain Miller Passing earth science to the next generation 20 TREASURE ISLAND by Erika Check Barcoding CNR's island research station Departments 2 L

  9. Modeling the Effects of Tidal Energy Extraction on Estuarine Hydrodynamics in a Stratified Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional coastal ocean model with a tidal turbine module was used in this paper to study the effects of tidal energy extraction on temperature and salinity stratification and density driven two-layer estuarine circulation. Numerical experiments with various turbine array configurations were carried out to investigate the changes in tidally mean temperature, salinity and velocity profiles in an idealized stratified estuary that connects to coastal water through a narrow tidal channel. The model was driven by tides, river inflow and sea surface heat flux. To represent the realistic size of commercial tidal farms, model simulations were conducted based on a small percentage of the total number of turbines that would generate the maximum extractable energy in the system. Model results indicated that extraction of tidal energy will increase the vertical mixing and decrease the stratification in the estuary. Extraction of tidal energy has stronger impact on the tidally-averaged salinity, temperature and velocity in the surface layer than the bottom. Energy extraction also weakens the two-layer estuarine circulation, especially during neap tides when tidal mixing the weakest and energy extraction is the smallest. Model results also show that energy generation can be much more efficient with higher hub height with relatively small changes in stratification and two-layer estuarine circulation.

  10. Ocean Tidal Dissipation and its Role in Solar System Satellite Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Erinna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dominant contributor to the ocean energy dissipation (see §dominant contributor to the ocean energy dissipation (see §of interest, e.g. the ocean kinetic energy and tidal

  11. Assessment of Strike of Adult Killer Whales by an OpenHydro Tidal Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Copping, Andrea E.; Watkins, Michael L.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report to DOE on an analysis to determine the effects of a potential impact to an endangered whale from tidal turbines proposed for deployment in Puget Sound.

  12. MECHANISMS GENERATING MODIFICATION OF BENTHOS FOLLOWING TIDAL FLAT INVASION BY A SPARTINA HYBRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neira, Carlos; Grosholz, Edwin D; Levin, Lisa A; Blake, Rachael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1997. Kinetics of tidal resuspension of microbiota: testingare susceptible to resuspension following bio- turbation (in barnacle recruitment and resuspension of adult benthic

  13. Mechanisms generating modification of benthos following tidal flat invasion by a Spartina hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neira, C; Grosholz, E D; Levin, L A; Blake, R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1997. Kinetics of tidal resuspension of microbiota: testingare susceptible to resuspension following bio- turbation (in barnacle recruitment and resuspension of adult benthic

  14. Simple method for calculating island widths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, J.R. (Department of Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0391 (USA)); Hanson, J.D. (Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (USA))

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for calculating magnetic island widths has been developed. This method uses only that information obtained from integrating along the closed field line at the island center. Thus, this method is computationally less intensive than the usual method of producing surfaces of section of sufficient detail to locate and resolve the island separatrix. This method has been implemented numerically and used to analyze the buss work islands of ATF (Fusion Technol. {bold 10}, 179 (1986)). In this case the method proves to be accurate to at least within 20% even though the islands are within a factor of 2 of overlapping.

  15. Tilted accretion discs in cataclysmic variables: tidal instabilities and superhumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Murray; P. J. Armitage

    1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the growth of tidal instabilities in accretion discs in a binary star potential, using three dimensional numerical simulations. As expected from analytic work, the disc is prone to an eccentric instability provided that it is large enough to extend to the 3:1 resonance. The eccentric disc leads to positive superhumps in the light curve. It has been proposed that negative superhumps might arise from a tilted disc, but we find no evidence that the companion gravitational tilt instability can grow fast enough in a fluid disc to create a measurable inclination. The origin of negative superhumps in the light curves of cataclysmic variables remains a puzzle.

  16. Pulse Tidal formerly Pulse Generation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook icon TwitterZip JumpProwindPuda Coal IncPulse Tidal

  17. MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07)AK ProjectMS ProjectJerseyBW2 Tidal

  18. MHK Projects/Orient Point Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet <|Galway Bay IE <Orcadian WaveTidal

  19. MHK Technologies/KESC Tidal Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK ProjectsFlagship <HelixKESC Tidal Generator <

  20. MHK Technologies/TidalStar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHKDUCK <TidalStar < MHK

  1. Tidal Stream Power Web GIS Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyoThornwood,TianfuTidal Sails AS Jump

  2. Magnetic island evolution in hot ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Waelbroeck, F. L.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Horton, W. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of finite ion temperature on magnetic island evolution are studied by means of numerical simulations of a reduced set of two-fluid equations which include ion as well as electron diamagnetism in slab geometry. The polarization current is found to be almost an order of magnitude larger in hot than in cold ion plasmas, due to the strong shear of ion velocity around the separatrix of the magnetic islands. As a function of the island width, the propagation speed decreases from the electron drift velocity (for islands thinner than the Larmor radius) to values close to the guiding-center velocity (for islands of order 10 times the Larmor radius). In the latter regime, the polarization current is destabilizing (i.e., it drives magnetic island growth). This is in contrast to cold ion plasmas, where the polarization current is generally found to have a healing effect on freely propagating magnetic island.

  3. Changes in Beachface Bed Elevation over a Tidal Cycle on Santa Rosa Island, Florida and Matagorda, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Gemma

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave-scale changes in beach elevation were measured using a cross-shore array of ultrasonic distance sensors on a dissipative beach at Matagorda Peninsula, Texas, in December 2008. The data collected in this study are compared to data collected in a...

  4. A Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branch Creek to Suisun Marsh, Solano County CA: Predicting the Impact to the Federally Listed Plant Soft Bird's Beak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Jessica J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this study. Changes in hydrology are not the only potentialA Tidal Hydrology Assessment for Reconnecting Spring Branchmay change the tidal hydrology and impact the area occupied

  5. HAWAIIAN OCEAN MIXING EXPERIMENT (HOME): FARFIELD PROGRAM HAWAIIAN TIDAL ENERGY BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dushaw, Brian

    precision to quantify the tidal power dissipated in the nearfield of the Ridge. The data are vitalHAWAIIAN OCEAN MIXING EXPERIMENT (HOME): FARFIELD PROGRAM HAWAIIAN TIDAL ENERGY BUDGET Principal and ocean acoustic tomography have brought a new dimension to the subject. We propose to measure the energy

  6. Intracranial Pressure Variation Associated with Changes in End-Tidal CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intracranial Pressure Variation Associated with Changes in End-Tidal CO2 Sunghan Kim, James Mc that the partial pressure of arterial CO2 (PaCO2) can affect cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and therefore ICP. The end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2) is usually monitored by clinicians as a proxy for PaCO2. We show

  7. Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 13601374 Characterizing chaotic dispersion in a coastal tidal model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCasce, Joseph H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lyapunov exponents; Norwegian coast; Tidal currents 1. Introduction The coastal shelf is an important of Mathematics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1053, 0316 Blindern, Norway c Norwegian Meteorological Institute, P to study dispersion and mixing in a model in the Norwegian Trondheim fjord. We focus on the tidally driven

  8. NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-122 Tidal Datum Distributions in Puget Sound,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum OAR PMEL-122 Tidal Datum Distributions in Puget Sound, Washington, Based . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3. Puget Sound Channel Tide Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.1 Description of the channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 9. Appendix: Tidal harmonic constants in Puget Sound . . . 30 10. References

  9. Impact of sheep grazing on juvenile sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax L., in tidal salt marshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Impact of sheep grazing on juvenile sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax L., in tidal salt marshes P L., from sheep grazed and ungrazed tidal salt marshes were com- pared qualitatively. Juvenile sea bass colonise the salt marsh at ¯ood during 43% of the spring tides which inundate the salt

  10. Cross-shore suspended sediment transport under tidal currents Andrew J. Hogg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -mail: david@bpi.cam.ac.uk Abstract The transport of sediment over an intertidal mudflat by a cross-shore tidal lag and indicates that the cross-shore flows tend to accrete sediment on the intertidal mudflats and the amplitude of the tidal current. 1. Introduction Intertidal mudflats are extensive coastal regions

  11. On the dynamics and morphology of extensive tidal mudflats: Integrating remote sensing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    On the dynamics and morphology of extensive tidal mudflats: Integrating remote sensing data sensing data and inundation models allows the mapping of extensive tidal mudflats in a sub-Arctic estuary changes in mudflats morphology, and 3. mapping previously unobserved mud- flat topographies in order

  12. Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogg, Andrew

    Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents D of suspended sediment transport under cross-shore tidal currents on an intertidal mudflat. We employ; 4558 Oceanography: Physical: Sediment transport; KEYWORDS: estuaries, intertidal mudflats, intertidal

  13. Dynamical resonance locking in tidally interacting binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua Burkart; Eliot Quataert; Phil Arras

    2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the dynamics of resonance locking in detached, tidally interacting binary systems. In a resonance lock, a given stellar or planetary mode is trapped in a highly resonant state for an extended period of time, during which the spin and orbital frequencies vary in concert to maintain the resonance. This phenomenon is qualitatively similar to resonance capture in planetary dynamics. We show that resonance locks can accelerate the course of tidal evolution in eccentric systems and also efficiently couple spin and orbital evolution in circular binaries. Previous analyses of resonance locking have not treated the mode amplitude as a fully dynamical variable, but rather assumed the adiabatic (i.e. Lorentzian) approximation valid only in the limit of relatively strong mode damping. We relax this approximation, analytically derive conditions under which the fixed point associated with resonance locking is stable, and further check these analytic results using numerical integrations of the coupled mode, spin, and orbital evolution equations. These show that resonance locking can sometimes take the form of complex limit cycles or even chaotic trajectories. We provide simple analytic formulae that define the binary and mode parameter regimes in which resonance locks of some kind occur (stable, limit cycle, or chaotic). We briefly discuss the astrophysical implications of our results for white dwarf and neutron star binaries as well as eccentric stellar binaries.

  14. Tidal deformation of a slowly rotating material body. I. External metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landry, Philippe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the external metric of a slowly rotating, tidally deformed material body in general relativity. The tidal forces acting on the body are assumed to be weak and to vary slowly with time, and the metric is obtained as a perturbation of a background metric that describes the external geometry of an isolated, slowly rotating body. The tidal environment is generic and characterized by two symmetric-tracefree tidal moments E_{ab} and B_{ab}, and the body is characterized by its mass M, its radius R, and a dimensionless angular-momentum vector \\chi^a environment requires the introduction of four new quantities, which we designate as rotational-tidal Love numbers. All these Love numbers are gauge ...

  15. Pathogenicity island mobility and gene content.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kelly Porter

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Key goals towards national biosecurity include methods for analyzing pathogens, predicting their emergence, and developing countermeasures. These goals are served by studying bacterial genes that promote pathogenicity and the pathogenicity islands that mobilize them. Cyberinfrastructure promoting an island database advances this field and enables deeper bioinformatic analysis that may identify novel pathogenicity genes. New automated methods and rich visualizations were developed for identifying pathogenicity islands, based on the principle that islands occur sporadically among closely related strains. The chromosomally-ordered pan-genome organizes all genes from a clade of strains; gaps in this visualization indicate islands, and decorations of the gene matrix facilitate exploration of island gene functions. A %E2%80%9Clearned phyloblocks%E2%80%9D method was developed for automated island identification, that trains on the phylogenetic patterns of islands identified by other methods. Learned phyloblocks better defined termini of previously identified islands in multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC BAA-2146, and found its only antibiotic resistance island.

  16. Modeling Tidal Stream Energy Extraction and its Effects on Transport Processes in a Tidal Channel and Bay System Using a Three-dimensional Coastal Ocean Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a numerical modeling study for simulating in-stream tidal energy extraction and assessing its effects on the hydrodynamics and transport processes in a tidal channel and bay system connecting to coastal ocean. A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) module was implemented in a three-dimensional (3-D) coastal ocean model using the momentum sink approach. The MHK model was validated with the analytical solutions for tidal channels under one-dimensional (1-D) conditions. Model simulations were further carried out to compare the momentum sink approach with the quadratic bottom friction approach. The effects of 3-D simulations on the vertical velocity profile, maximum extractable energy, and volume flux reduction across the channel were investigated through a series of numerical experiments. 3-D model results indicate that the volume flux reduction at the maximum extractable power predicted by the 1-D analytical model or two-dimensional (2-D) depth-averaged numerical model may be overestimated. Maximum extractable energy strongly depends on the turbine hub height in the water column, and which reaches a maximum when turbine hub height is located at mid-water depth. Far-field effects of tidal turbines on the flushing time of the tidal bay were also investigated. Model results demonstrate that tidal energy extraction has a greater effect on the flushing time than volume flux reduction, which could negatively affect the biogeochemical processes in estuarine and coastal waters that support primary productivity and higher forms of marine life.

  17. Floating Cities, Islands and States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many small countries are in need of additional territory. They build landfills and expensive artificial islands. The ocean covers 71 per cent of the Earth surface. Those countries (or persons of wealth) starting the early colonization of the ocean may obtain advantages through additional territory or creating their own independent state. An old idea is building a big ship. The best solution to this problem, however, is the provision of floating cities, islands, and states. The author idea is to use for floating cities, islands, and states a cheap floating platform created from a natural ice field taken from the Arctic or Antarctic oceans. These cheap platforms protected by air-film (bottom and sides) and a conventional insulating cover (top) and having a cooling system can exist for an unlimited time. They can be increased in number or size at any time, float in warm oceans, travel to different continents and countries, serve as artificial airports, harbors and other marine improvements, as well as floating c...

  18. A signature for turbulence driven magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345 Marseille (France); France-Japan Magnetic Fusion Laboratory, LIA 336 CNRS, Marseille (France); Poyé, A. [Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Yagi, M. [Plasma Theory and Simulation Gr., JAEA, Rokkasho (Japan); Garbet, X. [IRFM, CEA, St-Paul-Lez-Durance 13108 (France); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the properties of magnetic islands arising from tearing instabilities that are driven by an interchange turbulence. We find that such islands possess a specific signature that permits an identification of their origin. We demonstrate that the persistence of a small scale turbulence maintains a mean pressure profile, whose characteristics makes it possible to discriminate between turbulence driven islands from those arising due to an unfavourable plasma current density gradient. We also find that the island poloidal turnover time, in the steady state, is independent of the levels of the interchange and tearing energy sources. Finally, we show that a mixing length approach is adequate to make theoretical predictions concerning island flattening in the island rotation frame.

  19. ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    ANNUAL WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2002 ­ February 28, 2003 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Outfall August 18, 2003 ­ December 4, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Deer Island Parking Lot May 1, 2003 ­ July 15, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 7 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 7 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. Nauru Island Effect Detection Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck

    During Nauru99 it was noted that the island was producing small clouds that advected over the ARM site. The Nauru Island Effect Study was run for 1.5 years and the methodology developed to detect the occurrence. Nauru ACRF downwelling SW, wind direction, and air temperature data are used, along with downwelling SW data from Licor radiometers located on the southern end of the island near the airport landing strip. A statistical analysis and comparison of data from the two locations is used to detect the likely occurrence of an island influence on the Nauru ACRF site data

  3. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Three Mile Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Three Mile Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  4. Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Generations of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) have helped make America what it is today. Their histories recall bitter hardships and proud accomplishments -- from the laborers who...

  5. Dendrochronology of Strain-Relaxed Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merdzhanova, T.; Kiravittaya, S.; Rastelli, A.; Stoffel, M.; Denker, U.; Schmidt, O.G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the observation and study of tree-ring structures below dislocated SiGe islands (superdomes) grown on Si(001) substrates. Analogous to the study of tree rings (dendrochronology), these footprints enable us to gain unambiguous information on the growth and evolution of superdomes and their neighboring islands. The temperature dependence of the critical volume for dislocation introduction is measured and related to the composition of the islands. We show clearly that island coalescence is the dominant pathway towards dislocation nucleation at low temperatures, while at higher temperatures anomalous coarsening is effective and leads to the formation of a depletion region around superdomes.

  6. Simple method for calculating island widths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cary, J.R.; Hanson, J.D.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple method for calculating magnetic island widths has been developed. This method uses only information obtained from integrating along the closed field line at the island center. Thus, this method is computationally less intensive than the usual method of producing surfaces of section of sufficient detail to locate and resolve the island separatrix. This method has been implemented numerically and used to analyze the buss work islands of ATF. In this case the method proves to be accurate to at least within 30%. 7 refs.

  7. Northern Mariana Islands - Territory Energy Profile Overview...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    islands of Pagan and Saipan - unique in Micronesia in having abundant geothermal energy potential, and CNMI has excellent resources for both wind and solar power. CNMI enacted a...

  8. Aeromagnetic Survey And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interpretation, Ascention Island, South Atlantic Ocean Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Aeromagnetic Survey And Interpretation,...

  9. Morphological barrier island changes and recovery of dunes after Hurricane Dennis, St. George Island, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    of the barrier island are analyzed, along with the short-term post-storm recovery of secondary dunes. ResultsMorphological barrier island changes and recovery of dunes after Hurricane Dennis, St. George September 2009 Keywords: Dune recovery LiDAR Overwash Hurricane Dennis Barrier island During the summer

  10. Tidal Downsizing model. II. Planet-metallicity correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core Accretion (CA), the de-facto accepted theory of planet formation, requires formation of massive solid cores as a prerequisite for assembly of gas giant planets. The observed metallicity correlations of exoplanets are puzzling in the context of CA. While gas giant planets are found preferentially around metal-rich host stars, planets smaller than Neptune orbit hosts with a wide range of metallicities. We propose an alternative interpretation of these observations in the framework of a recently developed planet formation hypothesis called Tidal Downsizing (TD). We perform population synthesis calculations based on TD, and find that the connection between the populations of the gas giant and the smaller solid-core dominated planets is non linear and not even monotonic. While gas giant planets formed in the simulations in the inner few AU region follow a strong positive correlation with the host star metallicity, the smaller planets do not. The simulated population of these smaller planets shows a shallow pe...

  11. Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal MHK Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiu, Henry [Research Engineer; van Dam, Cornelis P. [Professor

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) tidal turbine extracts energy from tidal currents, providing clean, sustainable electricity generation. In general, all MHK conversion technologies are confronted with significant operational hurdles, resulting in both increased capital and operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. To counter these high costs while maintaining reliability, MHK turbine designs can be simplified. Prior study found that a tidal turbine could be cost-effectively simplified by removing blade pitch and rotor/nacelle yaw. Its rotor would run in one direction during ebb and then reverse direction when the current switched to flood. We dubbed such a turbine a bidirectional rotor tidal turbine (BRTT). The bidirectional hydrofoils of a BRTT are less efficient than conventional hydrofoils and capture less energy, but the elimination of the pitch and yaw systems were estimated to reduce levelized cost of energy by 7.8%-9.6%. In this study, we investigated two mechanisms for recapturing some of the performance shortfall of the BRTT. First, we developed a novel set of hydrofoils, designated the yy series, for BRTT application. Second, we investigated the use of active flow control via microtabs. Microtabs are small deployable/retractable tabs, typically located near the leading or trailing edge of an air/hydrofoil with height on the order of the boundary layer thickness (1% - 2% of chord). They deploy approximately perpendicularly to the foil surface and, like gurney flaps and plain flaps, globally affect the aerodynamics of the airfoil. By strategically placing microtabs and selectively deploying them based on the direction of the inflow, performance of a BRTT rotor can be improved while retaining bidirectional operation. The yy foils were computationally designed and analyzed. They exhibited better performance than the baseline bidirectional foil, the ellipse. For example, the yyb07cn-180 had 14.7% higher (l/d)max than an ellipse of equal thickness. The yyb07cn family also had higher c{sub p,min} than equivalently thick ellipses, indicating less susceptibility to cavitation. Microtabs applied on yy foils demonstrated improved energy capture. A series of variable speed and constant speed rotors were developed with the yyb07cn family of hydrofoils. The constant speed yyb07cn rotor (yy-B02-Rcs,opt) captured 0.45% more energy than the equivalent rotor with ellipses (e-B02-Rcs,opt). With microtabs deployed (yy?t-B02-Rcs,opt), the energy capture increase over the rotor with ellipses was 1.05%. Note, however, that microtabs must be applied judiciously to bidirectional foils. On the 18% thick ellipse, performance decreased with the addition of microtabs. Details of hydrofoil performance, microtab sizing and positioning, rotor configurations, and revenue impacts are presented herein.

  12. SPH simulations of tidally unstable accretion disks in cataclysmic variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Murray

    1995-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically study the precessing disk model for superhump in the SU~UMa subclass of cataclysmic variables, using a two dimensional SPH code specifically designed for thin disk problems. Two disk simulations for a binary with mass ratio $q=\\frac{3}{17}$ (similar to OY~Car) are performed, in order to investigate the Lubow (1991 a,b) tidal resonance instability mechanism. In the first calculation, a disk evolves under steady mass transfer from $L_1$. In the second simulation, mass is added in Keplerian orbit to the inner disk. The two disks follow similar evolutionary paths. However the $L_1$ stream-disk interaction is found to slow the disk's radial expansion and to circularise gas orbits. The initial eccentricity growth in our simulations is exponential at a rate slightly less than predicted by Lubow (1991a). We do not observe a clearing of material from the resonance region via the disk's tidal response to the $m=2$ component of the binary potential as was described in Lubow (1992). Instead the $m=2$ response weakens as the disk eccentricty increases. Both disks reach an eccentric equilibrium state, in which they undergo prograde precession. The rate of viscous energy dissipation in the disks has a periodic excess with a period matching the disk's rotation. The source is identified as a large region in the outer disk, and the mechanism by which it is produced is identified. The time taken for the periodic excess to develop is consistent with the first appearance of superhumps in a superoutburst.

  13. Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, Allan J

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Addressing the urgent need to develop LCOE competitive renewable energy solutions for US energy security and to replace fossil-fuel generation with the associated benefits to environment impacts including a reduction in CO2 emissions, this Project focused on the advantages of using hydraulic energy transfer (HET) in large-scale Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) systems for harvesting off-shore tidal energy in US waters. A recent DOE resource assessment, identifies water power resources have a potential to meet 15% of the US electric supply by 2030, with MHK technologies being a major component. The work covered a TRL-4 laboratory proof-in-concept demonstration plus modeling of a 15MW full scale system based on an approach patented by NASA-JPL, in which submerged high-ratio gearboxes and electrical generators in conventional MHK turbine systems are replaced by a submerged hydraulic radial pump coupled to on-shore hydraulic motors driving a generator. The advantages are; first, the mean-time-between-failure (MTBF), or maintenance, can be extended from approximately 1 to 5 years and second, the range of tidal flow speeds which can be efficiently harvested can be extended beyond that of a conventional submerged generator. The approach uses scalable, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components, facilitating scale-up and commercialization. All the objectives of the Project have been successfully met (1) A TRL4 system was designed, constructed and tested. It simulates a tidal energy turbine, with a 2-m diameter blade in up to a 2.9 m/sec flow. The system consists of a drive motor assembly providing appropriate torque and RPM, attached to a radial piston pump. The pump circulates pressurized, environmentally-friendly, HEES hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to an axial piston motor which drives an electrical generator, with a resistive load. The performance of the components, subsystems and system were evaluated during simulated tidal cycles. The pump is contained in a tank for immersion testing. The COTS pump and motor were selected to scale to MW size and were oversized for the TRL-4 demonstration, operating at only 1-6% of rated values. Nevertheless, in for 2-18 kW drive power, in agreement with manufacturer performance data, we measured efficiencies of 85-90% and 75-80% for the pump and motor, respectively. These efficiencies being 95-96% at higher operating powers. (2) Two follow-on paths were identified. In both cases conventional turbine systems can be modified, replacing existing gear box and generator with a hydraulic pump and on-shore components. On a conventional path, a TRL5/6 15kW turbine system can be engineered and tested on a barge at an existing site in Maine. Alternatively, on an accelerated path, a TRL-8 100kW system can be engineered and tested by modifying a team member's existing MHK turbines, with barge and grid-connected test sites in-place. On both paths the work can be expedited and cost effective by reusing TRL-4 components, modifying existing turbines and using established test sites. (3) Sizing, performance modeling and costing of a scaled 15MW system, suitable for operation in Maine's Western Passage, was performed. COTS components are identified and the performance projections are favorable. The estimated LCOE is comparable to wind generation with peak production at high demand times. (4) We determined that a similar HET approach can be extended to on-shore and off-shore wind turbine systems. These are very large energy resources which can be addressed in parallel for even great National benefit. (5) Preliminary results on this project were presented at two International Conferences on renewable energy in 2012, providing a timely dissemination of information. We have thus demonstrated a proof-in-concept of a novel, tidal HET system that eliminates all submerged gears and electronics to improve reliability. Hydraulic pump efficiencies of 90% have been confirmed in simulated tidal flows between 1 and 3 m/s, and at only 1-6% of rated power. Total system efficiencies have also been modeled, up to MW-scale, for ti

  14. Origin of Tidal Dissipation in Jupiter: II. the Value of Q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanqin Wu

    2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of tidal dissipation inside Jupiter is not yet understood. Its tidal quality factor ($Q$) is inferred to lie between $10^5$ and $10^6$. We examine effects of inertial-modes on tidal dissipation in a neutrally bouyant, core-less, uniformly rotating planet. The rate of dissipation caused by resonantly excited inertial-modes depends on the following three parameters: how well they are coupled to the tidal potential, how strongly they are dissipated (by the turbulent viscosity), and how densely distributed they are in frequency. We find that as a function of tidal frequency, the $Q$ value exhibits large fluctuations, with its maximum value set by the group of inertial-modes that have a typical offset from an exact resonance of order their turbulent damping rates. In our model, inertial-modes shed their tidally acquired energy very close to the surface within a narrow latitudinal zone (the 'singularity belt'), and the tidal luminosity escapes freely out of the planet. Strength of coupling between the tidal potential and inertial-modes is sensitive to the presence of density discontinuities inside Jupiter. In the case of a discreet density jump (as may be caused by the transition between metallic and molecular hydrogen), we find a time-averaged $Q \\sim 10^7$. Even though it remains unclear whether tidal dissipation due to resonant inertial-modes is the correct answer to the problem, it is impressive that our simple treatment here already leads to three to five orders of magnitude stronger damping than that from the equilibrium tide. Moreover, our conclusions are not affected by the presence of a small solid core, a different prescription for the turbulent viscosity, or nonlinear mode coupling, but they depend critically on the static stability in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter.

  15. Tidal channel deposits in Upper Cretaceous of northern Kaiparowits Plateau, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, J.D.; McCabe, P.J.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven coarsening-upward sequences have been recognized in the 300 to 400-m thick John Henry Member of the Straight Cliffs Formation. These sequences have abundant hummocky cross-stratification and are interpreted as having formed by the progradation of wave-dominated shorelines. A detailed study of these sequences showed that in many cases channel deposits are incised into upper shoreface deposits. These channels are up t 15 m deep. Mudclasts, Ostrea and Inoceramus fragments, and pebbles are present at the base of many channels. Some channel lag deposits also contain logs with Teredolites borings. Thin units of flaser, wavy and lenticular bedding may be present at any position within the channel deposits but are most common higher in the sequences. The channels are, however, infilled predominantly with trough cross-bedded, fine to medium-grained sandstones. Some cross-beds show multiple reactivation surfaces and the bimodal nature of the paleocurrents suggests that the cross-beds were deposited by tidal currents. The presence of tidal bundles with double mud drapes in a few cross-beds confirms the interpretation of the sandstones as tidal channel deposits. At least 22 tidal bundles are present in one tidal bundle sequence, suggesting a semi-diurnal tidal cycle. Although, there is convincing evidence of tides within the channel deposits, the shoreface deposits show little evidence of reworking by tidal currents. Possible beach or intertidal mudflat deposits have a maximum thickness of 1.5 m. The Kaiparowits region during the Upper Cretaceous probably experienced, therefore, a microtidal regime with significant tidal currents being restricted to tidal inlets or estuaries.

  16. Tidal channel deposits in Upper Cretaceous of northern Kaiparowits Plateau, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, J.D.; McCabe, P.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seven coarsening-upward sequences have been recognized in the 300 to 400-m thick John Henry Member of the Straight Cliffs Formation. These sequences have abundant hummocky cross-stratification and are interpreted as having formed by the progradation of wave-dominated shorelines. A detailed study of these sequences showed that in many cases channel deposits are incised into upper shoreface deposits. These channels are up to 15 m deep. Mudclasts, Ostrea and Inoceramus fragments, and pebbles are present at the base of many channels. Some channel lag deposits also contain logs with Teredolites borings. Thin units of flaser, wavy and lenticular bedding may be present at any position within the channel deposits but are most common higher in the sequences. The channels are, however, infilled predominantly with trough cross-bedded, fine to medium-grained sandstones. Some crossbeds show multiple reactivation surfaces and the bimodal nature of the paleocurrents suggests that the cross-beds were deposited by tidal currents. The presence of tidal bundles with double mud drapes in a few cross-beds confirms the interpretation of the sandstones as tidal channel deposits. At least 22 tidal bundles are present in one tidal bundle sequence, suggesting a semi-diurnal tidal cycle. Although there is convincing evidence of tides within the channel deposits, the shoreface deposits show little evidence of reworking by tidal currents. Possible beach or intertidal mudflat deposits have a maximum thickness of 1.5 m. The Kaiparowits region during the Upper Cretaceous probably experience, therefore, a microtidal regime with significant tidal currents being restricted to tidal inlets or estuaries.

  17. Modeling the Energy Output from an In-Stream Tidal Turbine Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye Li; Barbara J. Lence; Sander M. Calisal

    Abstract—This paper is based on a recent paper presented in the 2007 IEEE SMC conference by the same authors [1], discussing an approach to predicting energy output from an instream tidal turbine farm. An in-stream tidal turbine is a device for harnessing energy from tidal currents in channels, and functions in a manner similar to a wind turbine. A group of such turbines distributed in a site is called an in-stream tidal turbine farm which is similar to a wind farm. Approaches to estimating energy output from wind farms cannot be fully transferred to study tidal farms, however, because of the complexities involved in modeling turbines underwater. In this paper, we intend to develop an approach for predicting energy output of an in-stream tidal turbine farm. The mathematical formulation and basic procedure for predicting power output of a stand-alone turbine 1 is presented, which includes several highly nonlinear terms. In order to facilitate the computation and utilize the formulation for predicting power output from a turbine farm, a simplified relationship between turbine distribution and turbine farm energy output is derived. A case study is then conducted by applying the numerical procedure to predict the energy output of the farms. Various scenarios are implemented according to the environmental conditions in Seymour Narrows, British Columbia, Canada. Additionally, energy cost results are presented as an extension. Index Terms—renewable energy, in-stream turbine, tidal current, tidal power, vertical axis turbine, farm system modeling, in-stream tidal turbine farm 1 A stand-alone turbine refers to a turbine around which there is no other turbine that might potentially affect the performance of this turbine.

  18. TIDAL DISSIPATION COMPARED TO SEISMIC DISSIPATION: IN SMALL BODIES, EARTHS, AND SUPER-EARTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroimsky, Michael, E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil [U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    While the seismic quality factor and phase lag are defined solely by the bulk properties of the mantle, their tidal counterparts are determined by both the bulk properties and the size effect (self-gravitation of a body as a whole). For a qualitative estimate, we model the body with a homogeneous sphere, and express the tidal phase lag through the lag in a sample of material. Although simplistic, our model is sufficient to understand that the lags are not identical. The difference emerges because self-gravitation pulls the tidal bulge down. At low frequencies, this reduces strain and the damping rate, making tidal damping less efficient in larger objects. At higher frequencies, competition between self-gravitation and rheology becomes more complex, though for sufficiently large super-Earths the same rule applies: the larger the planet, the weaker the tidal dissipation in it. Being negligible for small terrestrial planets and moons, the difference between the seismic and tidal lagging (and likewise between the seismic and tidal damping) becomes very considerable for large exoplanets (super-Earths). In those, it is much lower than what one might expect from using a seismic quality factor. The tidal damping rate deviates from the seismic damping rate, especially in the zero-frequency limit, and this difference takes place for bodies of any size. So the equal in magnitude but opposite in sign tidal torques, exerted on one another by the primary and the secondary, have their orbital averages going smoothly through zero as the secondary crosses the synchronous orbit. We describe the mantle rheology with the Andrade model, allowing it to lean toward the Maxwell model at the lowest frequencies. To implement this additional flexibility, we reformulate the Andrade model by endowing it with a free parameter {zeta} which is the ratio of the anelastic timescale to the viscoelastic Maxwell time of the mantle. Some uncertainty in this parameter's frequency dependence does not influence our principal conclusions.

  19. HEALTH EFFECTS OF THE NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AT THREE MILE ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (Fabrikant,Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. (Fahrikant,Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island. (Fabrikant,

  20. The dynamics of genetic and morphological variation on volcanic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Roger Stephen

    : volcanism; phylogeography; geographical variation; natural selection; Canary islands; Tarentola 1 and Canary islands). It has been argued that population extinctions, recolonizations and associ- ated a role in shaping geographical variation. The islands of the Canary Archipelago provide an excellent

  1. Rhode Island to Build First Offshore Wind Farm

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Block Island, a small town with only 1,000 full-time, residents, is the site for a big project, when it will become home to Rhode Island’s first offshore wind farm.

  2. Monhegan Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinuteman WindMoana(Tempel,MoeMonhegan Island Jump

  3. Island Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunanInformation sourceInvensysIsland Gas Jump to: navigation,

  4. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  5. news: Bern Convention group of experts on European island biological diversity: an international network to preserve island biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borges, Paulo A. V.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the Government of Canary Islands at Tenerife (1-3 Octoberthe Gov- ernments of Canary Islands, Azores and Madeira inAzores, Madeira and Canary Islands (Macaronesia), Balearic

  6. The Long Island Solar Farm | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy The Long Island Solar Farm More Documents & Publications The Long Island Solar Farm EA-1663: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1928: Final Environmental Assessment...

  7. The Long Island Solar Farm | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the East. The Long Island Solar Farm More Documents & Publications The Long Island Solar Farm EA-1663: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1928: Final Environmental Assessment...

  8. asian pacific islanders: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Mangroves of the Pacific Islands:Agriculture Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: . The perception of mangroves by people in the Pacific islands...

  9. Commercial-Scale Renewable-Energy Grants (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation (RIEDC) provides incentives for renewable-energy projects. Incentive programs are funded by the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund (RIREF) and...

  10. Energy Transformation in the U.S. Virgin Islands | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Us Initiatives & Projects Energy Transition Initiative Energy Transformation in the U.S. Virgin Islands Energy Transformation in the U.S. Virgin Islands Click on the...

  11. amchitka island alaska: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MA August 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for August 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site Island for the month of August...

  12. adak island alaska: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MA August 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for August 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site Island for the month of August...

  13. akutan island alaska: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MA August 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for August 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site Island for the month of August...

  14. The Biogeography of Globally Threatened Seabirds and Island Conservation Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatz, Dena R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and North Islands, Hispaniola, etc. ). The conservation ofand North Islands, Hispaniola, etc. ). The conservation ofGreater Antilles (Hispaniola) Lesser Antilles Galapagos

  15. Observation of energetic electrons within magnetic islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    that energetic electron fluxes peak at sites of compressed density within islands, which imposes a new constraintLETTERS Observation of energetic electrons within magnetic islands L.-J. CHEN1 *, A. BHATTACHARJEE1, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA 2 National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2

  16. Division of Water, Parts 660-661: Tidal Wetlands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations require permits for any activity which directly or indirectly may have a significant adverse effect on the existing condition of any tidal wetland, including but not limited to...

  17. Tidal and Wind Mixing versus Thermal Stratification in the South Atlantic Bight.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    overcome the tendency for tidal power to produce a well-mixed system". Additionally, they expressed some are explored using a potential energy formulation for the South Atlantic Bight (SAB). The efficiency of wind

  18. Analytical Model of Tidal Distortion and Dissipation for a Giant Planet with a Viscoelastic Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storch, Natalia I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present analytical expressions for the tidal Love numbers of a giant planet with a solid core and a fluid envelope. We model the core as a uniform, incompressible, elastic solid, and the envelope as a non-viscous fluid satisfying the $n=1$ polytropic equation of state. We discuss how the Love numbers depend on the size, density, and shear modulus of the core. We then model the core as a viscoelastic Maxwell solid and compute the tidal dissipation rate in the planet as characterized by the imaginary part of the Love number $k_2$. Our results improve upon existing calculations based on planetary models with a solid core and a uniform ($n=0$) envelope. Our analytical expressions for the Love numbers can be applied to study tidal distortion and viscoelastic dissipation of giant planets with solid cores of various rheological properties, and our general method can be extended to study tidal distortion/dissipation of super-earths.

  19. The Distribution of Submersed Aquatic Vegetation in the Fresh and Oligohaline Tidal Potomac River, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington, DC to Broad Creek, MD, 2004...............................................................................6 2. Percent cover of hydrilla in SAV beds located in the tidal Potomac River from Broad Creek, MD to Chicamuxen Creek, MD, 2004.......................................................................7 3. Percent

  20. Sudden increase in tidal response linked to calving and acceleration at a large Greenland outlet glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Juan, J.; Elosegui, P.; Nettles, M.; Larsen, T.B.; Davis, J.L.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; Stearns, Leigh; Anderson, M.L.; Ekstrom, G.; Ahlstrom, A.P.; Stenseng, L.; Khan, S.A.; Forsberg, R.

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    [1] Large calving events at Greenland's largest outlet glaciers are associated with glacial earthquakes and near-instantaneous increases in glacier flow speed. At some glaciers and ice streams, flow is also modulated in a regular way by ocean tidal...

  1. A numerical study of horizontal dispersion in a macro tidal basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maine, University of

    boundary layer near the tidal mixing front on Georges Bank (Houghton and Ho 2001) and in Hudson River that significant horizon- tal dispersion and mixing can be induced in oscillatory flows (Aref 1984; Ottino 1989

  2. Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    contracts will be in place for 20 years -- making them the first long-term tidal energy power purchase agreements in the United States. The implications of these agreements are...

  3. Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    , Canada that relies heavily on diesel fuel for energy generation. An investigation is done into the potential for electricity generation using both tidal stream and wave energy in Haida Gwaii. A mixed integer

  4. MHK Projects/Penobscot Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet <|Galway Bay IEVerona Island, ME Project

  5. Underestimation of the UK Tidal David J.C. MacKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    there and would deliver up to 40 GW (peak). In this note, I present back­of­envelope models of tidal power physical model of the flow of energy in a tidal wave. In a shallow­water­wave model of tide, the true flow­page comment on the DTI Energy Review, Salter [2005] suggests that this standard figure may well be an under

  6. Under-estimation of the UK Tidal David J.C. MacKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    there and would deliver up to 40 GW (peak). In this note, I present back-of-envelope models of tidal power of the flow of energy in a tidal wave. In a shallow-water-wave model of tide, the true flow of en- ergy on the DTI Energy Review, Salter [2005] suggests that this standard figure may well be an under-estimate (see

  7. Hydraulic properties of an artificial tidal inlet through a Texas barrier beach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Stanley Harold

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF AN ARTIFICIAL TIDAL INLET THROUGH A TEXAS BARRIER BEACH A Thesis by STANLEY HAROLD PRATHER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1972 Major Sub]ect: Civil Engineering HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF AN ARTIFICIAL TIDAL INLET THROUGH A TEXAS BARRIER BEACH A Thesis by STANLEY HAROLD PRATHER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (( (Head...

  8. Gravitational self-force corrections to two-body tidal interactions and the effective one-body formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Thibault Damour

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal interactions have a significant influence on the late dynamics of compact binary systems, which constitute the prime targets of the upcoming network of gravitational-wave detectors. We refine the theoretical description of tidal interactions (hitherto known only to the second post-Newtonian level) by extending our recently developed analytic self-force formalism, for extreme mass-ratio binary systems, to the computation of several tidal invariants. Specifically, we compute, to linear order in the mass ratio and to the 7.5$^{\\rm th}$ post-Newtonian order, the following tidal invariants: the square and the cube of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal tensor, the square of the gravitomagnetic quadrupolar tidal tensor, and the square of the gravitoelectric octupolar tidal tensor. Our high-accuracy analytic results are compared to recent numerical self-force tidal data by Dolan et al. \\cite{Dolan:2014pja}, and, notably, provide an analytic understanding of the light ring asymptotic behavior found by them. We transcribe our kinematical tidal-invariant results in the more dynamically significant effective one-body description of the tidal interaction energy. By combining, in a synergetic manner, analytical and numerical results, we provide simple, accurate analytic representations of the global, strong-field behavior of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal factor. A striking finding is that the linear-in-mass-ratio piece in the latter tidal factor changes sign in the strong-field domain, to become negative (while its previously known second post-Newtonian approximant was always positive). We, however, argue that this will be more than compensated by a probable fast growth, in the strong-field domain, of the nonlinear-in-mass-ratio contributions in the tidal factor.

  9. A Modeling Study of the Potential Water Quality Impacts from In-Stream Tidal Energy Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system. Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. However, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.

  10. "Circularization" vs. Accretion -- What Powers Tidal Disruption Events?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piran, Tsvi; Krolik, Julian; Cheng, Roseanne M; Shiokawa, Hotaka

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tidal disruption event (TDE) takes place when a star passes near enough to a massive black hole to be disrupted. About half the star's matter is given elliptical trajectories with large apocenter distances, the other half is unbound. To "circularize", i.e., to form an accretion flow, the bound matter must lose a significant amount of energy, with the actual amount depending on the characteristic scale of the flow measured in units of the black hole's gravitational radius (~ 10^{51} (R/1000R_g)^{-1} erg). Recent numerical simulations (Shiokawa et al., 2015) have revealed that the circularization scale is close to the scale of the most-bound initial orbits, ~ 10^3 M_{BH,6.5}^{-2/3} R_g ~ 10^{15} M_{BH,6.5}^{1/3} cm from the black hole, and the corresponding circularization energy dissipation rate is $\\sim 10^{44} M_{BH,6.5}^{-1/6}$~erg/s. We suggest that the energy liberated during circularization, rather then energy liberated by accretion onto the black hole, powers the observed optical TDE candidates (e.g.A...

  11. On tidal capture of primordial black holes by neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Defillon; Etienne Granet; Petr Tinyakov; Michel H. G. Tytgat

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fraction of primordial black holes (PBHs) of masses $10^{17} - 10^{26}$ g in the total amount of dark matter may be constrained by considering their capture by neutron stars (NSs), which leads to the rapid destruction of the latter. The constraints depend crucially on the capture rate which, in turn, is determined by the energy loss by a PBH passing through a NS. Two alternative approaches to estimate the energy loss have been used in the literature: the one based on the dynamical friction mechanism, and another on tidal deformations of the NS by the PBH. The second mechanism was claimed to be more efficient by several orders of magnitude due to the excitation of particular oscillation modes reminiscent of the surface waves. We address this disagreement by considering a simple analytically solvable model that consists of a flat incompressible fluid in an external gravitational field. In this model, we calculate the energy loss by a PBH traversing the fluid surface. We find that the excitation of modes with the propagation velocity smaller than that of PBH is suppressed, which implies that in a realistic situation of a supersonic PBH the large contributions from the surface waves are absent and the above two approaches lead to consistent expressions for the energy loss.

  12. Tidal Streams and Low Mass Companions of M31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Braun; David Thilker

    2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have imaged the extended HI environment of M31 with an unprecedented combination of high resolution and sensitivity. We detect a number of distinct High Velocity Cloud components associated with M31. A sub-set of the features within 30 kpc appear to be tidal in origin. A filamentary ``halo'' component is concentrated at the M31 systemic velocity and appears to extend into a ``bridge'' connecting M31 and M33. This may represent condensation in coronal gas. A population of discrete clouds is detected out to radii of about 150 kpc. Discrete cloud line-widths are correlated with HI mass and are consistent with a 100:1 ratio of dark to HI mass. These may be the gaseous counterparts of low-mass dark-matter satellites. The combined distribution of M31's HVC components can be characterized by a spatial Gaussian of 55 kpc dispersion and yields an N_HI distribution function which agrees well with that of low red-shift QSOs.

  13. Tidal Accelerometry: Exploring the Cosmos Via Gravitational Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Timir; Wescott, Mike; Jeong, Yeuncheol; Morawiec, Pawel; Gambrell, James; Overcash, Dan; Zhang, Huaizhou; Voulgaris, George

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Newtonian gravitation is non-radiative but is extremely pervasive and penetrates equally into every media because it cannot be shielded. The extra terrestrial fgravity is responsible for earth's trajectory. However its correlation or geodesic deviation is manifested as semi-diurnal and diurnal tides. Tidal signals, A(t) are temporal modulations in the field differential which can be observed in a wide variety of natural and laboratory situations. A(t) is a quasi-static, low frequency signal which arises from the relative changes in positions of the detector and source and is not part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Isaac Newton was the first to recognize the importance of tides in astrometry and attempetd to estimate lunar mass from ocean tides. By a case study we show, how the systematics of the gravitational correlation can be used for calibration and de-trending which can significantly increase the confidence level of high precision experiments. A(t) can also be used to determine the distribution of celes...

  14. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA June 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA at Thompson Island for the month of June 2005, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. Thompson Island Wind

  15. Modeling of In-stream Tidal Energy Development and its Potential Effects in Tacoma Narrows, Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding and providing proactive information on the potential for tidal energy projects to cause changes to the physical system and to key water quality constituents in tidal waters is a necessary and cost-effective means to avoid costly regulatory involvement and late stage surprises in the permitting process. This paper presents a modeling study for evaluating the tidal energy extraction and its potential impacts on the marine environment in a real world site - Tacoma Narrows of Puget Sound, Washington State, USA. An unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, fitted with a module that simulates tidal energy devices, was applied to simulate the tidal energy extracted by different turbine array configurations and the potential effects of the extraction at local and system-wide scales in Tacoma Narrows and South Puget Sound. Model results demonstrated the advantage of an unstructured-grid model for simulating the far-field effects of tidal energy extraction in a large model domain, as well as assessing the near-field effect using a fine grid resolution near the tidal turbines. The outcome shows that a realistic near-term deployment scenario extracts a very small fraction of the total tidal energy in the system and that system wide environmental effects are not likely; however, near-field effects on the flow field and bed shear stress in the area of tidal turbine farm are more likely. Model results also indicate that from a practical standpoint, hydrodynamic or water quality effects are not likely to be the limiting factor for development of large commercial-scale tidal farms. Results indicate that very high numbers of turbines are required to significantly alter the tidal system; limitations on marine space or other environmental concerns are likely to be reached before reaching these deployment levels. These findings show that important information obtained from numerical modeling can be used to inform regulatory and policy processes for tidal energy development.

  16. Tidally averaged circulation in Puget Sound sub-basins: Comparison of historical data, analytical model, and numerical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Kim, Tae Yun; Roberts, Mindy

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Through extensive field data collection and analysis efforts conducted since the 1950s, researchers have established an understanding of the characteristic features of circulation in Puget Sound. The pattern ranges from the classic fjordal behavior in some basins, with shallow brackish outflow and compensating inflow immediately below, to the typical two-layer flow observed in many partially mixed estuaries with saline inflow at depth. An attempt at reproducing this behavior by fitting an analytical formulation to past data is presented, followed by the application of a three-dimensional circulation and transport numerical model. The analytical treatment helped identify key physical processes and parameters, but quickly reconfirmed that response is complex and would require site-specific parameterization to include effects of sills and interconnected basins. The numerical model of Puget Sound, developed using unstructured-grid finite volume method, allowed resolution of the sub-basin geometric features, including presence of major islands, and site-specific strong advective vertical mixing created by bathymetry and multiple sills. The model was calibrated using available recent short-term oceanographic time series data sets from different parts of the Puget Sound basin. The results are compared against (1) recent velocity and salinity data collected in Puget Sound from 2006 and (2) a composite data set from previously analyzed historical records, mostly from the 1970s. The results highlight the ability of the model to reproduce velocity and salinity profile characteristics, their variations among Puget Sound subbasins, and tidally averaged circulation. Sensitivity of residual circulation to variations in freshwater inflow and resulting salinity gradient in fjordal sub-basins of Puget Sound is examined.

  17. U.S. Virgin Islands- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2007, the U.S. Virgin Islands Public Services Commission approved a limited net-metering program for residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV), wind-energy or other renewable energ...

  18. Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Rhode Island as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

  19. 11 Life on Herbert Island (part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 11 Length of track 45 minutes Title of track Life on Herbert Island (part 2) Translation...

  20. 13 Life on Herbert Island (part 3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 13 Length of track 30 minutes Title of track Life on Herbert Island (part 3) Translation...

  1. 12 Life on Herbert Island (part 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 12 Length of track 1 hour 35 minutes Title of track Life on Herbert Island (part 1...

  2. Community Redevelopment Case Study: Jekyll Island

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—features photos from a case study about Jekyll Island's community redevelopment project in Georgia.

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    facilities in Rhode Island, use the TransAtlas interactive mapping tool or use BioFuels Atlas to show the use and potential production of biofuels throughout the U.S. and...

  4. Solar School Program in Reunion Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, M.; Adelard, L.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system efficiency. In Réunion Island, the industrial engineering laboratory is involved in the regional solar school program. Its aim is to gather some local construction actors (city technical offices, architects, civil engineers, specialized university...

  5. The Jobs Development Act (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Jobs Development Act provides an incremental reduction in the corporate income tax rate (9%) to companies creating jobs in Rhode Island. For every ten new jobs created for companies with fewer...

  6. Job Creation Guaranty Program (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RIEDC’s Job Creation Guaranty Program provides businesses looking to expand or relocate in Rhode Island with access to capital and credit. RIEDC guarantees loans by private lenders or guarantees...

  7. CAYMAN ISLANDS National Biodiversity Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    down to us by those who went before, the natural wealth and beauty which is ours. John F. Kennedy environment for the Cayman Islands. CH2M Hill "Study on the Provision of Construction Aggregate and Fill

  8. Bainbridge Island Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The data dashboard for Bainbridge Island, a partner in the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. bban0003805pmcdashboardy13-q3.xls More Documents...

  9. Macroalgal distribution at Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jill Christie

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the reef community, macroalgae have been increasing in abundance on the reefs surrounding Lee Stocking Island (LSI), Bahamas. Macroalgal patches prevent coral recruitment and growth, thereby restructuring the reef. In such cases, coral and algal...

  10. DYER ISLAND CONSERVATION TRUST LETTER OF CONCERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    ..........................................................................................................................8 4 GENERAL POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF THE NPS ON THE MARINE ENVIRONMENTDYER ISLAND CONSERVATION TRUST LETTER OF CONCERN ASSOCIATED WITH THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A NUCLEAR....................................................................................................................................6 3 THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT SURROUNDING BANTAMSKLIP

  11. US Virgin Islands renewable energy future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldfield, Brian (Brian K.)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Virgin Islands must face drastic changes to its electrical system. There are two problems with electricity production in the USVI-it's dirty and it's expensive. Nearly one hundred percent of the electricity in these ...

  12. Solar School Program in Reunion Island 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, M.; Adelard, L.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of its particular geographic situation and relatively high altitude (3069 meters), Reunion Island is composed of a very large amount of micro-climates which have a direct impact on buildings' comfort, energy consumptions and renewable energy...

  13. N. Mariana Islands- Renewables Portfolio Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands enacted its Renewables Portfolio Standard in September 2007, in which a certain percentage of its net electricity sales must come from renewable e...

  14. Long Island Power Authority- Renewable Electricity Goal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As a municipal utility, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) is not obligated to comply with the [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=N... New York Renewable...

  15. Metromorphosis : evolution on the urban island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vezina, Kenrick (Kenrick Freitas)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cities are very much alive. Like islands, they provide a natural testing ground for evolution. With more than half of the world's population living in urban areas now, the influence cities have on the planet's life is ...

  16. PSEG Long Island- Renewable Electricity Goal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As a municipal utility, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) is not obligated to comply with the New York Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). The LIPA Board of Trustees has nevertheless decided...

  17. Controls of Magnetic Islands by Pellet Injection in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaing, K. C. [University of Wisconsin; Houlberg, Wayne A [ORNL; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The appearance of magnetic islands in tokamaks degrades plasma confinement. It is therefore important to control or eliminate the growth of the islands to improve the performance of a tokamak. A theory is developed to control magnetic islands using the localized pressure gradient driven bootstrap current by injecting pellets at the O-point of the island to create a peaked plasma pressure profile inside the island. This localized bootstrap current replenishes the missing equilibrium bootstrap current density that causes the island to grow in the first place. It is shown that the effect of the localized bootstrap current tends to reduce or eliminate the original drive for the growth of the island in the island evolution equation. The theory is also valid for the localized bootstrap current created by localized heating, but with much less effectiveness. A possibility of eliminating the island by controlling the equilibrium profiles is also discussed.

  18. Control of magnetic islands by pellet injection in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaing, K. C. [University of Wisconsin; Rome, James A [ORNL; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The appearance of magnetic islands in tokamaks degrades plasma confinement. It is therefore important to control or eliminate the growth of the islands to improve the performance of a tokamak. A theory is developed to control magnetic islands using the localized pressure gradient driven bootstrap current by injecting pellets at the O-point of the island to create a peaked plasma pressure profile inside the island. This localized bootstrap current replenishes the missing equilibrium bootstrap current density that causes the island to grow in the first place. It is shown that the effect of the localized bootstrap current tends to reduce or eliminate the original drive for the growth of the island in the island evolution equation. The theory is also valid for the localized bootstrap current created by localized heating, but with much less effectiveness. A possibility of eliminating the island by controlling the equilibrium profiles is also discussed. (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Control of magnetic islands by pellet injection in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaing, K. C.; Houlberg, W. A.; Peng, M. [Engineering Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The appearance of magnetic islands in tokamaks degrades plasma confinement. It is therefore important to control or eliminate the growth of the islands to improve the performance of a tokamak. A theory is developed to control magnetic islands using the localized pressure gradient driven bootstrap current by injecting pellets at the O-point of the island to create a peaked plasma pressure profile inside the island. This localized bootstrap current replenishes the missing equilibrium bootstrap current density that causes the island to grow in the first place. It is shown that the effect of the localized bootstrap current tends to reduce or eliminate the original drive for the growth of the island in the island evolution equation. The theory is also valid for the localized bootstrap current created by localized heating, but with much less effectiveness. A possibility of eliminating the island by controlling the equilibrium profiles is also discussed.

  20. Laboratory studies of eddy structures and exchange processes through tidal inlets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolau del Roure, Francisco

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    of the inlet. b) Longitudinal position of the center of the main vortex starting from the edge of the barrier island. c) Lateral position of the center of the main vortex starting from the edge of the barrier island. d) Circulation around the main vortex... island. d) Circulation around the main vortex. e) Maximum vorticity in the main vortex. f) Equivalent diameter of the main vortex. g) Upwelling flowing from the main vortex. ...........................................34 Figure 11 Life-history Type I...

  1. Modeling Tidal Marsh Distribution with Sea-Level Rise: Evaluating the Role of Vegetation, Sediment, and Upland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    and lowest sediment concentrations, the island marshes became dominated by mudflat elevations. Under the same

  2. Measurements of Turbulence at Two Tidal Energy Sites in Puget Sound, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Field measurements of turbulence are pre- sented from two sites in Puget Sound, WA (USA) that are proposed for electrical power generation using tidal current turbines. Rapidly sampled data from multiple acoustic Doppler instruments are analyzed to obtain statistical mea- sures of fluctuations in both the magnitude and direction of the tidal currents. The resulting turbulence intensities (i.e., the turbulent velocity fluctuations normalized by the harmonic tidal currents) are typically 10% at the hub- heights (i.e., the relevant depth bin) of the proposed turbines. Length and time scales of the turbulence are also analyzed. Large-scale, anisotropic eddies dominate the energy spectra, which may be the result of proximity to headlands at each site. At small scales, an isotropic turbulent cascade is observed and used to estimate the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. Data quality and sampling parameters are discussed, with an emphasis on the removal of Doppler noise from turbulence statistics.

  3. Tidal hydraulics of San Luis Pass, Texas: a field and numerical investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, Scott Jerome

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TIDAL HYDPAULICS OF SAN LUIS PASS, TEXAS: A FIELD AND VBKRICAL INSTIGATION A Thesis by SCOTT JEROME MORTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(II University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 i&Iajor Subject: Ocean Engineering TIDAL HyDRAULICS OF SAN LUIS PASS, TEXAS: A FIELD AND M&IERICAL INVESTIGATION A Thesis by SCOTI' JEROIIE MORTON Approved as to style and content by: (C?airman of Committee) (Member) /member...

  4. Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig W. Collar

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy�s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program�s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

  5. Macroscopic traversable wormholes with zero tidal forces inspired by noncommutative geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter K. F. Kuhfittig

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the following issues: (1) the possible existence of macroscopic traversable wormholes, given a noncommutative-geometry background, and (2) the possibility of allowing zero tidal forces, given a known density. It is shown that whenever the energy density describes a classical wormhole, the resulting solution is incompatible with quantum field theory. If the energy density originates from noncommutative geometry, then zero tidal forces are allowed. Also attributable to the noncommutative geometry is the violation of the null energy condition. The wormhole geometry satisfies the usual requirements, including asymptotic flatness.

  6. China Camp's race against the tides: Predicting tidal marsh survival through comparison of project sea level rise elevations and sediment accretion rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannah, Whitney; Kuhn, Marlene

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2). The lowest zone, the mudflat, is primarily unvegetatedre-suspension of existing tidal mudflat sediment (Williams

  7. U.S. Navy - San Clemente Island, California | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    San Clemente Island, California U.S. Navy - San Clemente Island, California Photo of Wind Turbine on San Clemente Island, California San Clemente Island is one of the Channel...

  8. Geographic and Temporal Variability of Middle Holocene Red Abalone Middens on San Miguel Island, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braje, Todd J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    survey of the south coast of San Miguel Island as part of Chaimel Islands National Park's cultural resource management plan (

  9. A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez-Garcia, Alejandro

    1 A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids Stanton T. Cady, Student architecture for generation control in islanded microgrids, and illustrate the performance Member, IEEE Abstract In this paper, we propose a distributed architecture for generation control

  10. The UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE The Canary Islands Health Care Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    The UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE and the Present The Canary Islands Health Care Systems 3 week internship to the local community in the Canary Islands by teaching English to the local residents or volunteering

  11. Global isotopic signatures of oceanic island basalts / by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oschmann, Lynn A

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic analyses of 477 samples representing 30 islands or island groups, 3 seamounts or seamount chains, 2 oceanic ridges and 1 oceanic plateau [for a total of 36 geographic features] are compiled to form ...

  12. andres island school: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Solar School Program in Reunion Island Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: system efficiency. In Runion Island, the industrial engineering laboratory is involved in the...

  13. Community Economic Development Business Program (Prince Edward Island, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Community Economic Development Business (CEDB) program has been created as part of the Prince Edward Island Rural Action Plan to support local investment in innovative Prince Edward Island...

  14. Perceptions of nature in the Caribbean island of Dominica 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarde, Therese Natalie

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commonwealth of Dominica has acquired a reputation as the nature island of the Caribbean. This thesis sets out to explore how Dominicans perceive and relate to nature in their nature island. It considers these perceptions ...

  15. Genomic islands predict functional adaptation in marine actinobacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penn, Kevin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological adaptations among bacterial populations have been linked to genomic islands, strain-specific regions of DNA that house

  16. United States Virgin Islands: St. Thomas (Bovoni) & St. Croix (Longford)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Roberts, O.; Andreas, A.

    Two measurement stations to collect wind data to support future wind power generation in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  17. A CLASS OF ECCENTRIC BINARIES WITH DYNAMIC TIDAL DISTORTIONS DISCOVERED WITH KEPLER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Susan E.; Barclay, Thomas; Howell, Steve B.; Still, Martin; Ibrahim, Khadeejah A. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Everett, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Mullally, Fergal; Rowe, Jason; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D. [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Kurtz, Donald W.; Hambleton, Kelly, E-mail: susan.e.thompson@nasa.gov [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have discovered a class of eccentric binary systems within the Kepler data archive that have dynamic tidal distortions and tidally induced pulsations. Each has a uniquely shaped light curve that is characterized by periodic brightening or variability at timescales of 4-20 days, frequently accompanied by shorter period oscillations. We can explain the dominant features of the entire class with orbitally varying tidal forces that occur in close, eccentric binary systems. The large variety of light curve shapes arises from viewing systems at different angles. This hypothesis is supported by spectroscopic radial velocity measurements for five systems, each showing evidence of being in an eccentric binary system. Prior to the discovery of these 17 new systems, only four stars, where KOI-54 is the best example, were known to have evidence of these dynamic tides and tidally induced oscillations. We perform preliminary fits to the light curves and radial velocity data, present the overall properties of this class, and discuss the work required to accurately model these systems.

  18. Modeling the dynamics of tidally-interacting binary neutron stars up to merger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastiano Bernuzzi; Alessandro Nagar; Tim Dietrich; Thibault Damour

    2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The data analysis of the gravitational wave signals emitted by coalescing neutron star binaries requires the availability of an accurate analytical representation of the dynamics and waveforms of these systems. We propose an effective-one-body (EOB) model that describes the general relativistic dynamics of neutron star binaries from the early inspiral up to merger. Our EOB model incorporates an enhanced attractive tidal potential motivated by recent analytical advances in the post-Newtonian and gravitational self-force description of relativistic tidal interactions. No fitting parameters are introduced for the description of tidal interaction in the late, strong-field dynamics. We compare the model energetics and the gravitational wave phasing with new high-resolution multi-orbit numerical relativity simulations of equal-mass configurations with different equations of state. We find agreement within the uncertainty of the numerical data for all configurations. Our model is the first semi-analytical model which captures the tidal amplification effects close to merger. It thereby provides the most accurate analytical representation of binary neutron star dynamics and waveforms currently available.

  19. innovati nNREL Uses Computing Power to Investigate Tidal Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    innovati nNREL Uses Computing Power to Investigate Tidal Power Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have applied their knowledge of wind flow and turbulence to simulations water currents that carry a significant amount of kinetic energy. To capture this energy, several

  20. Power Limitation Control for a PMSG-Based Marine Current Turbine at High Tidal Speed and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Power Limitation Control for a PMSG-Based Marine Current Turbine at High Tidal Speed and Strong Sea the generator power at rated value. In this paper, two power limitation strategies with flux-weakening control by the power limitation and the rotor speed; this method enables to control the generator power at the limited

  1. Tidal Interactions and Disruptions of Giant Planets on Highly Eccentric Orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua A. Faber; Frederic A. Rasio; Bart Willems

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the evolution of planets undergoing a strong tidal encounter using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), for a range of periastron separations. We find that outside the Roche limit, the evolution of the planet is well-described by the standard model of linear, non-radial, adiabatic oscillations. If the planet passes within the Roche limit at periastron, however, mass can be stripped from it, but in no case do we find enough energy transferred to the planet to lead to complete disruption. In light of the three new extrasolar planets discovered with periods shorter than two days, we argue that the shortest-period cases observed in the period-mass relation may be explained by a model whereby planets undergo strong tidal encounters with stars, after either being scattered by dynamical interactions into highly eccentric orbits, or tidally captured from nearly parabolic orbits. Although this scenario does provide a natural explanation for the edge found for planets at twice the Roche limit, it does not explain how such planets will survive the inevitable expansion that results from energy injection during tidal circularization.

  2. The Distribution of Submersed Aquatic Vegetation in the Fresh and Oligohaline Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Cover: Summer 2005 aerial photo of Dogue Creek and the Potomac River showing extensive dark areas to Dogue Creek, VA, 2005 ....................................................... 9 3. Percent cover of hydrilla in SAV beds located in the tidal Potomac River from Dogue Creek, VA to Quantico Creek, VA, 2005

  3. Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual to tidal periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, Clinton D.

    Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual to tidal periods, California, USA Daniel B. Lluch-Cota Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas del Noroeste, La Paz, Mexico-period cooling are coincident with elevated levels of microbial pollution in the surf zone. This relationship can

  4. Multi-point tidal prediction using artificial neural network with tide-generating forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-point tidal prediction using artificial neural network with tide-generating forces Hsien Available online 23 June 2006 Abstract This paper presents a neural network model of simulating tides Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Neural networks; Tides; Tide-generating forces; Harmonic

  5. PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1 Rebecca J, Lobban and Harrison 1997, Helmuth and Hofmann 2001). During high tide, intertidal algae are underwater algae may be emerged and exposed to increased light stress, elevated air tem- peratures, and increased

  6. Numerical study of the diapycnal flow through a tidal front with passive tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Changming "Charles"

    . This qualitatively agrees with a recent field experiment using a dye tracer on Georges Bank. Additional experiments are performed to investigate the sensitivity of the tracer dispersion to the tidal phase and the location, the previous studies indicated Eulerian cross-front mean circu- lation maybe is in a multiple-cell structure

  7. Dissolved oxygen stratification in two micro-tidal partially-mixed estuaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Dissolved oxygen stratification in two micro-tidal partially-mixed estuaries Jing Lin a,*, Lian Xie online 21 August 2006 Abstract The controlling physical factors for vertical oxygen stratification that vertical stratification of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration can be explained by the extended Hansen

  8. Asymmetric mixing transport: a horizontal transport mechanism for sinking plankton and sediment in tidal flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    on the flood tide creates enhanced vertical mixing, and resuspension of sinking particles higher into the water retards the tidal flow near the bottom, this leads to a net horizontal transport toward the less]. To a large extent these larvae are at the mercy of the prevailing currents, often leading to a strong

  9. Nitrogen Cycling and Ecosystem Exchanges in a Virginia Tidal Freshwater Marsh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neubauer, Scott C.

    loading due to watershed development and urbanization. We present a process-based mass balance model of N habitats for juvenile fishes, and buffering storm and flood waters (Odum et al. 1984; Mitsch and Gosselink dominated tidal freshwater marsh in the York River estuary, Virginia. The model, which was based

  10. Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response Modeling for San Francisco Bay Estuary Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    i Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response Modeling for San Francisco Bay Estuary Tidal Marshes Refuge in northern San Francisco Bay, California. #12;iii Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response)................................................................... 7 Sea-level rise scenario model inputs

  11. An analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation in a leaky confined aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    of China. 1. Introduction In most coastal areas, groundwater and seawater are in con- stant communicationAn analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal fluctuation in a leaky confined aquifer Jiu of the solution presented in this paper. This solution is based on a conceptual model under the assumption

  12. Tidal mixing around the Maritime continent: implications for1 paleoclimate simulations2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of mechanical energy for the ocean circulation and as such is 6 being incorporated changes in the ocean thermal structure, including 12 a ~1o C warming into state-of-the-art climate models. Calculation of the tidal energy flux depends on 7

  13. Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Turbines by Michael Robert Shives B.Eng., Carleton University, 2008 A Dissertation Submitted in Partial Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines) #12;iii ABSTRACT This thesis examines methods for designing and analyzing kinetic turbines based

  14. Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Turbines by Michael Robert Shives B.Eng., Carleton University, 2008 A Thesis Submitted in Partial Hydrodynamic Modeling, Optimization and Performance Assessment for Ducted and Non-ducted Tidal Turbines examines methods for designing and analyzing kinetic turbines based on blade element momentum (BEM) theory

  15. Marine Tidal Current Electric Power Generation Technology: State of the Art and Current Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    resurgence in development of renewable ocean energy technology. Therefore, several demonstration projects appreciated as a vast renewable energy source. The energy is stored in oceans partly as thermal energy, partly categories: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy, energy from salinity

  16. New constraints on the Slate Islands impact structure, Ontario, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrick, Robert R.

    New constraints on the Slate Islands impact structure, Ontario, Canada Virgil L. Sharpton Lunar, Canada John Scott ABSTRACT The Slate Islands in northern Lake Superior represent the eroded remains constrained. INTRODUCTION The Slate Islands are an 7-km-wide archipelago located in northern Lake Superior 10

  17. Stomach contents of cetaceans stranded in the Canary Islands 19962006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Graham

    Stomach contents of cetaceans stranded in the Canary Islands 1996­2006 r. fernandez1 , m.b. santos2, Kogiidae and Ziphiidae, stranded between 1996 and 2006 in the Canary Islands. Cephalopod mandibles (beaks teuthophagous whales. Keywords: feeding, Canary Islands, cetaceans, cephalopods, plastic Submitted 5 August 2008

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northampton, University of

    ORIGINAL PAPER Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants Jeff Ollerton & Louise Cranmer /Accepted: 29 September 2008 # Springer-Verlag 2008 Abstract The Canary Islands are home to a guild Bird vision . Canary Islands . Mutualism . Pollinator. Tenerife Introduction The endemic flora

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    ORIGINAL PAPER Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants Jeff Ollerton & Louise Cranmer) was an effective pollinator of these species. Keywords Bird vision . Canary Islands . Mutualism . Pollinator. Tenerife Introduction The endemic flora of the Canary Islands, situated off the west coast of North Africa

  20. SysBioMed Canary Islands Cancer Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timmer, Jens

    SysBioMed Canary Islands Cancer Research Institute Winter School on Systems Biology for Medical Applications 27th February ­ 2nd March 2007 Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife (Canary Islands) Supported by the European Commission (FP6 projects COSBICS and SysBioMed) and the Canary Islands Institute for Cancer

  1. The Urban Heat Island: Linking Science, Society, and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    The Urban Heat Island: Linking Science, Society, and Technology Living in the desert has always much heat. As Phoenix has grown, the natural environment has been transformed from native desert: · Investigate the Urban Heat Island phenomenon · Explore the impact of the Urban Heat Island on people and other

  2. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston this maintenance. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month

  3. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for January 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of January 2008, at the highest anemometer height

  4. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for February 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of February 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  5. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for October 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of October 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  6. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA July 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA the next service visit. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  7. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for November 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of November 2008, at the highest anemometer height

  8. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for November 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of November 2006, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m

  9. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA March 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA speed at Thompson Island for the month of March 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  10. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA May 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA, at 42° 18 below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of May 2008, at the highest anemometer

  11. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for November 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of November 2007

  12. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA May 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA the next site visit. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  13. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA March 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA the spring of 2006. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  14. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for December 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of December

  15. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for January 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of January 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  16. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for December 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of December 2008, at the highest anemometer height

  17. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA July 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA speed at Thompson Island for the month of July 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  18. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA June 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA to the sensor cables. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  19. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA April 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA speed at Thompson Island for the month of April 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  20. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for October 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of October 2006, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m

  1. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for September 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of September 2006, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m

  2. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for August 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of August 2006, at the highest

  3. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts for September 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of September 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  4. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA June 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA the next service visit. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  5. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for February 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site of 2006. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month

  6. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for October 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site issues arose this month. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  7. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA April 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA the next service visit. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  8. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA June 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA speed at Thompson Island for the month of June 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  9. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts 2007 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of August 2007

  10. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for September 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site issues arose this month. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  11. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA March 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of March 2008, at the highest anemometer height

  12. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for December 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site speed at Thompson Island for the month of December 2006, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m

  13. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA January 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts for January 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site. · Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of January

  14. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA July 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA to the sensor cables. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island

  15. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA, at 42° 18 speed at Thompson Island for the month of May 2007, at the highest anemometer height of 40 m. #12;

  16. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA February 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts for February 2008 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of February 2008, at the highest anemometer height

  17. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA July 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA Series #12;Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson Island for the month of July 2005

  18. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the islands' geology. Rain water harvesting is required by law and serves as the principal water sourceVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2009 1 #12;Introduction The U. S. Virgin

  19. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    always been a major concern in these small volcanic islands where rain water harvesting, ground waterVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2007 1 #12;Introduction The United States

  20. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    areas. In the U. S. Virgin Islands rain water harvesting and seawater desalination are the principalVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2005 Introduction The Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute (VI-WRRI) is located at the University of the Virgin

  1. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water harvesting are the principal sources of fresh water. Ground water supplies are very limited. WaterVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2008 1 #12;Introduction The Virgin Islands

  2. Marine Iguanas Older Than Their Islands Jeff Mitton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitton, Jeffry B.

    Marine Iguanas Older Than Their Islands Jeff Mitton Natural Selections (Appeared in the Boulder Camera, December 11, 2009) The Galapagos Islands ride on the Nazca plate, a tectonic plate drifting toward Ecuador at the rate of one and a half inches per year. But the Galapagos Islands will never reach

  3. Energy Transition Initiative: Islands Playbook (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Island Energy Playbook (the Playbook) provides an action-oriented guide to successfully initiating, planning, and completing a transition to an energy system that primarily relies on local resources to eliminate a dependence on one or two imported fuels. It is intended to serve as a readily available framework that any community can adapt to organize its own energy transition effort.

  4. Storage conditions and eruptive dynamics of central versus flank eruptions in volcanic islands: the case of Tenerife (Canary Islands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : the case of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) Joan Andújara,* , Fidel Costab , Bruno Scailleta a. Université1 Storage conditions and eruptive dynamics of central versus flank eruptions in volcanic islands eruptions (ca. 1 km3 ) of the Teide-Pico Viejo complex (Tenerife Island). Combined with previous

  5. Within-island differentiation and between-island homogeneity: non-equilibrium population structure in the seaweed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the seaweed Cladophoropsis membranacea (Chlorophyta) in the Canary Islands HAN J. VAN DER STRATE1, 2 , LOUIS stone model at larger spatial scales. In the present survey, 23 sites were sampled in the Canary Islands among the Canary Islands regardless of how geographic distances were computed. Only when the Canary

  6. US Army Corps of Engineers Caribbean Islands Region Version 2.0 WETLAND DETERMINATION DATA FORM Caribbean Islands Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    US Army Corps of Engineers Caribbean Islands Region ­ Version 2.0 WETLAND DETERMINATION DATA FORM ­ Caribbean Islands Region Project/Site: Municipality/Town: Sampling Date: Applicant/Owner: PR or USVI or problematic. Hydrophytic Vegetation Present? Yes No Remarks: #12;US Army Corps of Engineers Caribbean Islands

  7. Pool spacing, channel morphology, and the restoration of tidal forested wetlands of the Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Montgomery, David R.

    2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal forested wetlands have sustained substantial areal losses, and restoration practitioners lack a description of many ecosystem structures associated with these late-successional systems in which surface water is a significant controlling factor on the flora and fauna. The roles of large woody debris in terrestrial and riverine ecosystems have been well described compared to functions in tidal areas. This study documents the role of large wood in forcing channel morphology in Picea-sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated freshwater tidal wetlands in the floodplain of the Columbia River, U.S.A. near the Pacific coast. The average pool spacing documented in channel surveys of three freshwater tidal forested wetlands near Grays Bay were 2.2 ± 1.3, 2.3 ± 1.2, and 2.5 ± 1.5. There were significantly greater numbers of pools on tidal forested wetland channels than on a nearby restoration site. On the basis of pool spacing and the observed sequences of log jams and pools, the tidal forested wetland channels were classified consistent with a forced step-pool class. Tidal systems, with bidirectional flow, have not previously been classified in this way. The classification provides a useful basis for restoration project design and planning in historically forested tidal freshwater areas, particularly in regard to the use of large wood in restoration actions and the development of pool habitats for aquatic species. Significant modifications by beaver on these sites warrant further investigation to explore the interactions between these animals and restoration actions affecting hydraulics and channel structure in tidal areas.

  8. Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

  9. Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

  10. Non-linear evolution of the angular momentum of protostructures from tidal torques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Catelan; Tom Theuns

    1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the non-linear evolution of the angular momentum L acquired by protostructures, like protogalaxies and protoclusters, due to tidal interactions with the surrounding matter inhomogeneities. The primordial density distribution is assumed to be Gaussian and the non-linear dynamics of the collisionless mass fluid is followed using Lagrangian perturbation theory. For a Cold Dark Matter spectrum, the inclusion of the leading-order Lagrangian correction terms results in a value of the rms ensemble average ^{1/2} which is only a factor of 1.3 higher than the corresponding linear estimate, irrespective of the scale. Consequently, the predictions of linear theory are rather accurate in quantifying the evolution of the angular momentum of protostructures before collapse sets in. In the Einstein-de Sitter universe, the initial torque is a good estimate for the tidal torque over the whole period during which the object is spun up.

  11. Spin alignments within the cosmic web: a theory of constrained tidal torques near filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codis, Sandrine; Pogosyan, Dmitry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geometry of the cosmic web drives in part the spin acquisition of galaxies. This can be explained in a Lagrangian framework, by identifying the specific long-wavelength correlations within the primordial Gaussian random field which are relevant to spin acquisition. Tidal Torque Theory is revisited in the context of such anisotropic environments, biased by the presence of a filament within a wall. The point process of filament-type saddles represents it most efficiently. The constrained misalignment between the tidal and the inertia tensors in the vicinity of filament-type saddles simply explains the distribution of spin directions. This misalignment implies in particular an azimuthal orientation for the spins of more massive galaxies and a spin alignment with the filament for less massive galaxies. This prediction is found to be in qualitative agreement with measurements in Gaussian random fields and N-body simulations. It relates the transition mass to the geometry of the saddle, and accordingly predicts...

  12. Suggested guidelines for anti-islanding screening.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Abraham; Ropp, Michael

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As increasing numbers of photovoltaic (PV) systems are connected to utility systems, distribution engineers are becoming increasingly concerned about the risk of formation of unintentional islands. Utilities desire to keep their systems secure, while not imposing unreasonable burdens on users wishing to connect PV. However, utility experience with these systems is still relatively sparse, so distribution engineers often are uncertain as to when additional protective measures, such as direct transfer trip, are needed to avoid unintentional island formation. In the absence of such certainty, utilities must err on the side of caution, which in some cases may lead to the unnecessary requirement of additional protection. The purpose of this document is to provide distribution engineers and decision makers with guidance on when additional measures or additional study may be prudent, and also on certain cases in which utilities may allow PV installations to proceed without additional study because the risk of an unintentional island is extremely low. The goal is to reduce the number of cases of unnecessary application of additional protection, while giving utilities a basis on which to request additional study in cases where it is warranted.

  13. Resuspension studies in the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.; Robison, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of inhalation exposure to the total dose for residents of the Marshall Islands was monitored at occasions of opportunity on several islands in the Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. To determine the long-term potential for inhalation exposure, and to understand the mechanisms of redistribution and personal exposure, additional investigations were undertaken on Bikini Island under modified and controlled conditions. Experiments were conducted to provide key parameters for the assessment of inhalation exposure from plutonium-contaminated dust aerosols: characterization of the contribution of plutonium in soil-borne aerosols as compared to sea spray and organic aerosols, determination of plutonium resuspension rates as measured by the meteorological flux-gradient method during extreme conditions of a bare-soil vs. a stabilized surface, determination of the approximate individual exposures to resuspended plutonium by traffic, and studies of exposures to individuals in different occupational environments simulated by personal air sampling of workers assigned to a variety of tasks. Enhancement factors (defined as ratios of the plutonium-activity), of suspended aerosols relative to the plutonium-activity of the soil were determined to be less than 1 (typically 0.4 to 0.7) in the undisturbed, vegetated areas, but greater than 1 (as high as 3) for the case studies of disturbed bare soil, roadside travel, and for occupational duties in fields and in and around houses. 12 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Structural Design of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine Composite Blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bir, G. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the structural design of a tidal composite blade. The structural design is preceded by two steps: hydrodynamic design and determination of extreme loads. The hydrodynamic design provides the chord and twist distributions along the blade length that result in optimal performance of the tidal turbine over its lifetime. The extreme loads, i.e. the extreme flap and edgewise loads that the blade would likely encounter over its lifetime, are associated with extreme tidal flow conditions and are obtained using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Given the blade external shape and the extreme loads, we use a laminate-theory-based structural design to determine the optimal layout of composite laminas such that the ultimate-strength and buckling-resistance criteria are satisfied at all points in the blade. The structural design approach allows for arbitrary specification of the chord, twist, and airfoil geometry along the blade and an arbitrary number of shear webs. In addition, certain fabrication criteria are imposed, for example, each composite laminate must be an integral multiple of its constituent ply thickness. In the present effort, the structural design uses only static extreme loads; dynamic-loads-based fatigue design will be addressed in the future. Following the blade design, we compute the distributed structural properties, i.e. flap stiffness, edgewise stiffness, torsion stiffness, mass, moments of inertia, elastic-axis offset, and center-of-mass offset along the blade. Such properties are required by hydro-elastic codes to model the tidal current turbine and to perform modal, stability, loads, and response analyses.

  15. Broadband Acoustic Environment at a Tidal Energy Site in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines. Several monitoring technologies are being considered to determine the presence of SRKW near the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for determining design and operational specifications of these technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array from three different cruises during high tidal period in February, May, and June 2011. The ambient noise level decreases approximately 25 dB re 1 ?Pa per octave from frequency ranges of 1 kHz to 70 kHz, and increases approximately 20 dB re 1 ?Pa per octave for the frequency from 70 kHz to 200 kHz. The difference of noise pressure levels in different months varies from 10 to 30 dB re 1 ?Pa for the frequency range below 70 kHz. Commercial shipping and ferry vessel traffic were found to be the most significant contributors to sound pressure levels for the frequency range from 100 Hz to 70 kHz, and the variation could be as high as 30 dB re 1 ?Pa. These noise level measurements provide the basic information for designing and evaluating both active and passive monitoring systems proposed for deploying and operating for tidal power generation alert system.

  16. EVOLUTION OF PLANETARY ORBITS WITH STELLAR MASS LOSS AND TIDAL DISSIPATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Fred C. [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bloch, Anthony M. [Math Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Math Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermediate mass stars and stellar remnants often host planets, and these dynamical systems evolve because of mass loss and tides. This paper considers the combined action of stellar mass loss and tidal dissipation on planetary orbits in order to determine the conditions required for planetary survival. Stellar mass loss is included using a so-called Jeans model, described by a dimensionless mass loss rate ? and an index ?. We use an analogous prescription to model tidal effects, described here by a dimensionless dissipation rate ? and two indices (q, p). The initial conditions are determined by the starting value of angular momentum parameter ?{sub 0} (equivalently, the initial eccentricity) and the phase ? of the orbit. Within the context of this model, we derive an analytic formula for the critical dissipation rate ?, which marks the boundary between orbits that spiral outward due to stellar mass loss and those that spiral inward due to tidal dissipation. This analytic result ? = ?(?, ?, q, p, ?{sub 0}, ?) is essentially exact for initially circular orbits and holds to within an accuracy of ?50% over the entire multi-dimensional parameter space, where the individual parameters vary by several orders of magnitude. For stars that experience mass loss, the stellar radius often displays quasi-periodic variations, which produce corresponding variations in tidal forcing; we generalize the calculation to include such pulsations using a semi-analytic treatment that holds to the same accuracy as the non-pulsating case. These results can be used in many applications, e.g., to predict/constrain properties of planetary systems orbiting white dwarfs.

  17. Formation of Hot Planets by a combination of planet scattering, tidal circularization, and Kozai mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Nagasawa; S. Ida; T. Bessho

    2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the formation of close-in extrasolar giant planets through a coupling effect of mutual scattering, Kozai mechanism, and tidal circularization, by orbital integrations. We have carried out orbital integrations of three planets with Jupiter-mass, directly including the effect of tidal circularization. We have found that in about 30% runs close-in planets are formed, which is much higher than suggested by previous studies. We have found that Kozai mechanism by outer planets is responsible for the formation of close-in planets. During the three-planet orbital crossing, the Kozai excitation is repeated and the eccentricity is often increased secularly to values close enough to unity for tidal circularization to transform the inner planet to a close-in planet. Since a moderate eccentricity can remain for the close-in planet, this mechanism may account for the observed close-in planets with moderate eccentricities and without nearby secondary planets. Since these planets also remain a broad range of orbital inclinations (even retrograde ones), the contribution of this process would be clarified by more observations of Rossiter-McLaughlin effects for transiting planets.

  18. Lagoon and tidal flat sedimentation of the Upper Devonian Nisku Formation in southern Alberta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slingsby, A. (Norcen Energy Resources Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Kissling, D.L. (Jackalope Geological Ltd., Lafayette, CO (United States))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1985, 26 oil pools containing 64 million bbl of oil in place have been discovered in the Nisku Formation in southern Alberta. The thoroughly dolomitized Nisku Formation varies from 20 to 30 m thick in southern Alberta and northern Montana. It overlies anhydrites and shaly carbonates of the Southesk or Duperow formations and underlies anhydrites of the Stettler or Potlatch formation. Burrowed, nodular-bedded skeletal wackestone, deposited over a shallow marine shelf, forms the basal Nisku Formation. These strata are succedded diachronously and unconformably by several tidal-flat and lagoon facies that include (1) southeast-thinning washover fans of cross-bedded peloidal grainstone; (2) laminated mudstone to current-bedded peloidal and intraclastic grainstone sourced within the lagoon; (3) stromatolitic mudstones; (4) laminated anhydrite beds precipitated during salina episodes; (5) Amphipora and brachiopod wackestones and thrombolites containing Renalcis, serpulids, and ostracoes, marking a brief marine invasion; and (6) brackish or freshwater shale and mudstone containing fragmented lycopod leaves and antiarch fish remains. These sediments are overlain by cross-bedded, peloidal, and calcisiltite grainstone and stromatolitic mudstone deposited in tidal channels and over shoals. All facies have been subjected to periodic subareal exposure which has produced leaching, solution collapse brecciation, teepee structures, and nodular-mosaic and void-filling anhydrite. Permeable reservoirs exist where leached, dolomitized tidal flat and lagoon sediments contain intercrystalline and pelmoldic porosity and little anhydrite cement.

  19. Origin of Tidal Dissipation in Jupiter: I. Properties of Inertial-Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanqin Wu

    2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study global inertial-modes with the purpose of unraveling the role they play in the tidal dissipation process of Jupiter. For spheres of uniformly rotating, neutrally buoyant fluid, we show that the partial differential equation governing inertial-modes can be separated into two ordinary differential equations when the density is constant, or when the density has a power-law dependence on radius. For more general density dependencies, we show that one can obtain an approximate solution to the inertial-modes that is accurate to the second order in wave-vector. Frequencies of inertial-modes are limited to $\\omega < 2 \\Omega$ ($\\Omega$ is the rotation rate), with modes propagating closer to the rotation axis having higher frequencies. An inertial-mode propagates throughout much of the sphere with a relatively constant wavelength, and a wave amplitude that scales with density as $1/\\sqrt{\\rho}$. It is reflected near the surface at a depth that depends on latitude, with the depth being much shallower near the special latitudes $\\theta = \\cos^{-1} \\pm \\omega/2\\Omega$. Around this region, this mode has the highest wave amplitude as well as the sharpest spatial gradient (the ``singularity belt''), thereby incurring the strongest turbulent dissipation. Inertial-modes naturally cause small Eulerian density perturbations, so they are only weakly coupled to the tidal potential. In a companion paper, we attempt to apply these results to the problem of tidal dissipation in Jupiter.

  20. Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Tidally dominated depositional environment for the Mt. Simon Sandstone in central Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargent, M.L.; Lasemi, Z. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several hundred feet of core from the upper part of the Mt. Simon in central Illinois have been examined macroscopically. Grain sizes and their systematics, bedding characteristics, sedimentary structures, and relationships among beds show that the upper Mt. Simon Sandstone is composed of a series of fining-upward cycles up to 10 m (30 feet) thick. A typical cycle consists, in ascending order, of a sandy subtidal facies, a mixed sand and mud intertidal-flat facies, and a muddy upper tidal-flat facies upward through the succession, the maximum and average grain size becomes progressively finer and the cycles thinner. The lower sandstone of each cycle contains beds that are massive to cross bedded and cross laminated; some beds show scoured reactivation surfaces. A few cycles contain a middle unit characterized by flaser and lenticular bedding and abundant mudcracks. Mudcracks also are common in the shale beds at the top of each cycle. Sedimentary structures such as reactivation surfaces, flaser and lenticular bedding, and mudcracks suggest that these cycles were deposited in peritidal environments. The presence of Skolithos in some cycles suggests very shallow marine conditions. The within-cycle upward fining is caused by regression or progradation that reflects a progressive decrease in current velocity from subtidal to intertidal parts of the tidal flat. Frequent flooding of the tidal flat resulted in repeated fining-upward cycles within the upper part of the Mt. Simon Sandstone.

  2. Ages of Star Clusters in the Tidal Tails of Merging Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulia, A J; Whitmore, B C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the stellar content in the tidal tails of three nearby merging galaxies, NGC 520, NGC 2623, and NGC 3256, using BVI imaging taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The tidal tails in all three systems contain compact and fairly massive young star clusters, embedded in a sea of diffuse, unresolved stellar light. We compare the measured colors and luminosities with predictions from population synthesis models to estimate cluster ages and find that clusters began forming in tidal tails during or shortly after the formation of the tails themselves. We find a lack of very young clusters ($\\le 10$ Myr old), implying that eventually star formation shuts off in the tails as the gas is used up or dispersed. There are a few clusters in each tail with estimated ages that are older than the modeled tails themselves, suggesting that these may have been stripped out from the original galaxy disks. The luminosity function of the tail clusters can be described by a single powe...

  3. A Statistical Model of Magnetic Islands in a Large Current Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermo, R L; Swisdak, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a statistical model describing the dynamics of magnetic islands in very large current layers that develop in space plasma. Two parameters characterize the island distribution: the flux contained in the island and the area it encloses. We derive an integro-differential evolution equation for this distribution function, based on rules that govern the small-scale generation of secondary islands, the rates of island growth, and island merging. Our numerical solutions of this equation produce island distributions relevant to the magnetosphere and corona. We also derive and analytically solve a differential equation for large islands that explicitly shows the role merging plays in island growth.

  4. SURFACE REMEDIATION IN THE ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A CASE STUDY OF AMCHITKA ISLAND, ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giblin, M. O.; Stahl, D. C.; Bechtel, J. A.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Amchitka Island, Alaska, was at one time an integral player in the nation's defense program. Located in the North Pacific Ocean in the Aleutian Island archipelago, the island was intermittently inhabited by several key government agencies, including the U.S. Army, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor agency to the U.S. Department of Energy), and the U.S. Navy. Since 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted extensive investigations on Amchitka to determine the nature and extent of contamination resulting from historic nuclear testing. The uninhabited island was the site of three high-yield nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. These test locations are now part of the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's Environmental Management Program. In the summer of 2001, the DOE launched a large-scale remediation effort on Amchitka to perform agreed-upon corrective actions to the surface of the island. Due to the lack of resources available on Amchitka and logistical difficulties with conducting work at such a remote location, the DOE partnered with the Navy and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to share certain specified costs and resources. Attempting to negotiate the partnerships while organizing and implementing the surface remediation on Amchitka proved to be a challenging endeavor. The DOE was faced with unexpected changes in Navy and USACE scope of work, accelerations in schedules, and risks associated with construction costs at such a remote location. Unfavorable weather conditions also proved to be a constant factor, often slowing the progress of work. The Amchitka Island remediation project experience has allowed the DOE to gain valuable insights into how to anticipate and mitigate potential problems associated with future remediation projects. These lessons learned will help the DOE in conducting future work more efficiently, and can also serve as a guide for other agencies performing similar work.

  5. Harbour Island: The Comparative Archaeology of a Maritime Community 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatch, Heather E

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marie Neilly and the Westley Methodist Church of Harbour Island, Pat Barry, Jeremy Clark, and Wade Higgs and Brenda Clark Higgs. Many others in the community also provided support and encouragement, and I am deeply grateful to them as well. v I... Street Higgs House (DHH)???????????????????... 154 Maritime Cultural Landscape of Harbour Island?????????????... 157 Summary????????????????????????????? 162 CHAPTER VI PATTERNS OF CULTURE AT HARBOUR ISLAND ...................... 163 Kitchen Group...

  6. antilles island arc: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The morphology of the underthrust oceanic crust controls the mag matic activity of the island arc, and particularly the development, in space and time, of "arc compartments." Denis...

  7. Comparison of Secondary Islands in Collisional Reconnection to Hall Reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepherd, L. S.; Cassak, P. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, 26506 (United States)

    2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale resistive Hall-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the transition from Sweet-Parker (collisional) to Hall (collisionless) magnetic reconnection are presented; the first to separate secondary islands from collisionless effects. Three main results are described. There exists a regime with secondary islands but without collisionless effects, and the reconnection rate is faster than Sweet-Parker, but significantly slower than Hall reconnection. This implies that secondary islands do not cause the fastest reconnection rates. The onset of Hall reconnection ejects secondary islands from the vicinity of the X line, implying that energy is released more rapidly during Hall reconnection. Coronal applications are discussed.

  8. Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands Initial Technical Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Hunsberger, R.; Visser, C.; Voss, P.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an initial energy assessment for the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), the first of many steps in developing a comprehensive energy strategy.

  9. Energy Office Grant Helps the Virgin Islands Environmental Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office Grant Helps the Virgin Islands Environmental Resource Station Install Solar Panels, Improve Efficiency, and Cut Monthly Energy Use Nearly 30% Energy Office Grant Helps the...

  10. National Park Service - San Miguel Island, California | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Islands National Park by conserving, recycling, using alternative fuel vehicles, applying renewable energy, and using resources wisely. It also seeks to replace conventional fuels...

  11. U.S. Virgin Islands Leadership Embraces Inclusiveness to Ensure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leadership Embraces Inclusiveness to Ensure Community Ownership of Clean Energy Vision U.S. Virgin Islands Leadership Embraces Inclusiveness to Ensure Community Ownership of Clean...

  12. Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylation Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Mark R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis. In: Functional Genomics: Methods and Protocols, M.Segal: Validation in Genomics: CpG Island Methylationpackage and applications to genomics. Bioinformatics and

  13. ,"Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Imports From Canada (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Grand Island,...

  14. Long Island Power Authority- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Long Island Power Authority offers a variety of incentives for its non-residential customers to increase the energy efficiency of facilities through the Commercial Efficiency Program. Major...

  15. History on Mona Island: Long-term human and landscape dynamics of an 'uninhabited' island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samson, Alice V. M.; Cooper, Jago

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    largely concerned with Mona’s oscillating position with respect to either one of its larger island neighbors, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic/Republic of Haiti. Its archaeology has been used as a barometer to test the weather of the cultural...

  16. Evaluating Tidal Marsh Sustainability in the Face of Sea-Level Rise: A Hybrid Modeling Approach Applied to San Francisco Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on sedimentation and intertidal mudflat change in San Pablowill transition to a mudflat [9,31]. When topographicallybetween tidal marsh and mudflat habitats according to the

  17. opinion: Political erosion dismantles the conservation network existing in the Canary Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández?Palacios, José María; de Nascimento, Lea

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seagrass meadows in the Canary Islands: a mul? tiscaled genetic diversity in the  Canary  Islands:  A  conservation synthesis for the Canary Islands.   Trends in Ecology and 

  18. U.S. Virgin Islands- Renewable Energy Feed-in-Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is a 10 MW limit for aggregate production via feed-in-tariff contracts on the islands of St. Thomas, St. John, Water Island, and other offshore keys and islands and a similar 5 MW limit for...

  19. Pacific Island Energy Snapshots | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM5 Accretion-of-DutiesPROPERTY3-0127 - In thePacific Island

  20. Fox Islands Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information HydroFontana,datasetWind Farm JumpPhaseIslands

  1. Interconnecting gold islands with DNA origami

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | National Nuclear SecurityIntellectualInterconnecting gold islands

  2. MWRA Deer Island Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAG BuoyYOG <MP2MWRA Deer Island Wind

  3. Grey Island Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrderNebraska: EnergyStrategy | OpenGreshamGrey Island

  4. Block Island Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyonsBirchBlock Island Power Co Jump to:

  5. Block Island Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyonsBirchBlock Island Power Co Jump

  6. Kauai Island Utility Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New Energy CoKERAFOLKarlsruheKauai Island Utility

  7. Long Island Power Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin ZhongdiantouLichuan CityLiqcrytechLong Island Power Authority

  8. Falkland Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BV Jump to:FASFMI-HDFRED TypeFairlawn,Falkland Islands:

  9. anti-islanding method based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Hybrid Anti-Islanding Algorithm for Utility Interconnection of Distributed Generation CiteSeer Summary: Abstract- In this paper hybrid anti-islanding...

  10. Proceedings of the Sixth California Islands Symposium, Ventura, California, December 1 3, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Proceedings of the Sixth California Islands Symposium, Ventura, California, December 1 ­ 3, 2003 of the Sixth California Islands Symposium, Ventura, California, December 1 ­ 3, 2003. National Park Service

  11. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA September 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for September 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site no maintenance issues to report. Monthly Data Time Series #12;Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  12. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA April 2008 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site in Boston Harbor, MA to this report if and when this happens. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  13. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA November 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for November 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site during the spring of 2006. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  14. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA August 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for August 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site no maintenance issues to report. Monthly Data Time Series #12;Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  15. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA December 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for December 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site during the spring of 2006. Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  16. Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Thompson Island, Boston Harbor, MA October 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts for October 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Thompson Island monitoring site no maintenance issues to report. #12;Monthly Data Time Series Seen below is a graph of wind speed at Thompson

  17. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the few places in the world where rain water harvesting is required by law. Buildings are constructed and quality issues of water harvesting, development of alternative on-site sewage disposal systems and nonVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Virgin Islands

  18. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , rain water harvesting has been a principal source of potable water for the residents of the USVI such as rain water harvesting, alternative on-site sewage disposal systems and investigation of applicableVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2010 Virgin Islands

  19. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Historically, rain water harvesting has been a principal source of potable water for the residents of the USVI such as rain water harvesting, alternative on-site sewage disposal systems and investigation of applicableVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Virgin Islands

  20. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    harvesting had been a principal source of potable water for the residents of the USVI with some reliance such as rain water harvesting, development of alternative on-site sewage disposal systems and investigationVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2012 Virgin Islands

  1. Hierarchical Control Scheme for Voltage Unbalance Compensation in Islanded Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    Hierarchical Control Scheme for Voltage Unbalance Compensation in Islanded Microgrids Mehdi@et.aau.dk Abstract-- The concept of microgrid hierarchical control is presented, recently. In this paper, a hierarchical scheme which includes primary and secondary control levels is proposed for islanded microgrids

  2. Introduction The island of Hispaniola has reduced its malaria burden,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Ophir

    Introduction The island of Hispaniola has reduced its malaria burden, with parasite prevalence feasible. The risk of imported malaria cases to the island of Hispaniola appears extremely low, e.g., fewer than 10 infections were imported from outside Hispaniola to the Dominican Republic in 2012. Based

  3. Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the biological contamination of waters that have been used for the last 100 years have been shown to lack certainVirgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction The Virgin Islands Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) is a unit of the University of the Virgin

  4. Wind resource assessment: San Nicolas Island, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenna, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Olsen, T.L. [Timothy L. Olsen Consulting, (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    San Nicolas Island (SNI) is the site of the Navy Range Instrumentation Test Site which relies on an isolated diesel-powered grid for its energy needs. The island is located in the Pacific Ocean 85 miles southwest of Los Angeles, California and 65 miles south of the Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS), Point Mugu, California. SNI is situated on the continental shelf at latitude N33{degree}14` and longitude W119{degree}27`. It is approximately 9 miles long and 3.6 miles wide and encompasses an area of 13,370 acres of land owned by the Navy in fee title. Winds on San Nicolas are prevailingly northwest and are strong most of the year. The average wind speed is 7.2 m/s (14 knots) and seasonal variation is small. The windiest months, March through July, have wind speeds averaging 8.2 m/s (16 knots). The least windy months, August through February, have wind speeds averaging 6.2 m/s (12 knots).

  5. TIDAL TAIL EJECTION AS A SIGNATURE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM WHITE DWARF MERGERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raskin, Cody; Kasen, Daniel [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The merger of two white dwarfs may be preceded by the ejection of some mass in ''tidal tails,'' creating a circumstellar medium around the system. We consider the variety of observational signatures from this material, which depend on the lag time between the start of the merger and the ultimate explosion (assuming one occurs) of the system in a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). If the time lag is fairly short, then the interaction of the supernova ejecta with the tails could lead to detectable shock emission at radio, optical, and/or X-ray wavelengths. At somewhat later times, the tails produce relatively broad NaID absorption lines with velocity widths of the order of the white dwarf escape speed ({approx}1000 km s{sup -1}). That none of these signatures have been detected in normal SNe Ia constrains the lag time to be either very short ({approx}< 100 s) or fairly long ({approx}> 100 yr). If the tails have expanded and cooled over timescales {approx}10{sup 4} yr, then they could be observable through narrow NaID and Ca II H and K absorption lines in the spectra, which are seen in some fraction of SNe Ia. Using a combination of three-dimensional and one-dimensional hydrodynamical codes, we model the mass loss from tidal interactions in binary systems, and the subsequent interactions with the interstellar medium, which produce a slow-moving, dense shell of gas. We synthesize NaID line profiles by ray casting through this shell, and show that in some circumstances tidal tails could be responsible for narrow absorptions similar to those observed.

  6. THE TIDAL ORIGIN OF THE MAGELLANIC STREAM AND THE POSSIBILITY OF A STELLAR COUNTERPART

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, Jonathan D.; Bekki, Kenji, E-mail: jdiaz@ast.cam.ac.uk [ICRAR, M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an N-body model that reproduces the morphology and kinematics of the Magellanic Stream (MS), a vast neutral hydrogen (H I) structure that trails behind the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively) in their orbit about the Milky Way (MW). After investigating 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} possible orbits consistent with the latest proper motions, we adopt an orbital history in which the LMC and SMC have only recently become a strongly interacting binary pair. We find that their first close encounter {approx}2 Gyr ago provides the necessary tidal forces to disrupt the disk of the SMC and thereby create the MS. The model also reproduces the on-sky bifurcation of the two filaments of the MS, and we suggest that a bound association with the MW is required to reproduce the bifurcation. Additional H I structures are created during the tidal evolution of the SMC disk, including the Magellanic Bridge, the 'Counter-Bridge', and two branches of leading material. Insights into the chemical evolution of the LMC are also provided, as a substantial fraction of the material stripped away from the SMC is engulfed by the LMC. Lastly, we compare three different N-body realizations of the stellar component of the SMC, which we model as a pressure-supported spheroid motivated by recent kinematical observations. We find that an extended spheroid is better able to explain the stellar periphery of the SMC, and the tidal evolution of the spheroid may imply the existence of a stellar stream akin to the gaseous MS.

  7. MHK Projects/Willapa Bay Tidal Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects Jump to:Vicksburg BendWillapa Bay Tidal Power

  8. MHK Technologies/Sihwa tidal barrage power plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHK Technologies Jump to:Sihwa tidal

  9. TIDAL ENERGY SITE RESOURCE ASSESSMENT: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS, BEST PRACTICES AND CASE STUDIES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D Alloys & Heterostructures |TIDAL ENERGY

  10. The plant geography of dredged-material islands along the Texas coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irish, Gary Joe

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and substrate are the important envi- ronmental factors influencing species distributions. Climatic factors restrict several species to either the northern or southern parts of the Texas Coast, while bay water salinity restricts many of the tidal species... can be accounted for by the env1ronmental factors. Another factor, insular area, was also found to be of importance because it is an estimate of the proportion of tidal to supra-tidal habitat. The vegetation patterning of five representative...

  11. Cultural contributions to the island of St. John, United States Virgin Islands: underwater historical archaeology at Cruz Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marquez, Carmen M

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Virgin Islands, St. Thomas, St. Croix and St. John, in the Lesser Antilles, were discovered by Christopher Columbus in November, 1493, on his second voyage. The islands were not revisited by the Spanish for over 57 years. During...

  12. Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Power Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Wave Resources for Representative Sites Around the Hawaiian Islands Table of Contents Summary p2 Background: Wave Power Conversion p3 Licensing and Permitting p3 Challenges and Barriers p4 Wave Power Resources: Previous Work p5 Wave

  13. Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN), Partnering to Increase Island Energy Security Around the World (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the international partnership for Energy Development in Island nations, including mission, goals, and organization. It also includes background on EDIN's three pilot projects: U.S. Virgin Islands, Iceland-Dominica Collaboration, and New Zealand-Geothermal Potential in the Pacific.

  14. A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

  15. Critical bifurcation of shallow microtidal landforms in tidal flats and salt marshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    of elevations stems from the characteristics of wave-induced sediment resuspension and, in particular, from islands (1, 8). Alternatively, in areas with consistent sediment resuspension caused by a combination by erosion, and the bottom elevation is constantly maintained below MSL (9). Sediment resuspension by wind

  16. Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

  17. GRB060218 AS A TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A WHITE DWARF BY AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Reynolds, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Pe'er, Asaf [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Haas, Roland [Theoretical AstroPhysics Including Relativity, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly unusual pair of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB060218 and an associated supernova, SN2006aj, has puzzled theorists for years. A supernova shock breakout and a jet from a newborn stellar mass compact object have been proposed to explain this pair's multiwavelength signature. Alternatively, we propose that the source is naturally explained by another channel: the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). This tidal disruption is accompanied by a tidal pinching, which leads to the ignition of a WD and a supernova. Some debris falls back onto the IMBH, forms a disk, which quickly amplifies the magnetic field, and launches a jet. We successfully fit soft X-ray spectra with the Comptonized blackbody emission from a jet photosphere. The optical/UV emission is consistent with self-absorbed synchrotron emission from the expanding jet front. The temporal dependence of the accretion rate M-dot (t) in a tidal disruption provides a good fit to the soft X-ray light curve. The IMBH mass is found to be about 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} in three independent estimates: (1) fitting the tidal disruption M-dot (t) to the soft X-ray light curve, (2) computing the jet base radius in a jet photospheric emission model, and (3) inferring the mass of the central black hole based on the host dwarf galaxy's stellar mass. The position of the supernova is consistent with the center of the host galaxy, while the low supernova ejecta mass is consistent with that of a WD. The high expected rate of tidal disruptions in dwarf galaxies is consistent with one source observed by the Swift satellite over several years at a distance of 150 Mpc measured for GRB060218. Encounters with WDs provide much fuel for the growth of IMBHs.

  18. Kinematic studies of transport across an island wake, with application to the Canary islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathias Sandulescu; Emilio Hernandez-Garcia; Cristobal Lopez; Ulrike Feudel

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport from nutrient-rich coastal upwellings is a key factor influencing biological activity in surrounding waters and even in the open ocean. The rich upwelling in the North-Western African coast is known to interact strongly with the wake of the Canary islands, giving rise to filaments and other mesoscale structures of increased productivity. Motivated by this scenario, we introduce a simplified two-dimensional kinematic flow describing the wake of an island in a stream, and study the conditions under which there is a net transport of substances across the wake. For small vorticity values in the wake, it acts as a barrier, but there is a transition when increasing vorticity so that for values appropriate to the Canary area, it entrains fluid and enhances cross-wake transport.

  19. Distributed Wind Case Study: Cross Island Farms, Wellesley Island, New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Installing a small wind turbine can sometimes be difficult due to economics, zoning issues, public perception, and other barriers. Persistence and innovation, however, can result in a successful installation. Dani Baker and David Belding own Cross Island Farms, a 102-acre certified organic farm on Wellesley Island in northern New York. In 2009, they took their interest in renewable energy to the next level by researching the logistics of a small wind installation on their land to make their farm even more sustainable. Their renewable energy system consists of one 10-kilowatt Bergey Excel wind turbine, a solar array, and a propane-powered generator. This case study describes funding for the project and the installation process.

  20. Combining remote sensing data and an inundation model to map tidal mudflat regions and improve flood predictions: A proof of concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    Combining remote sensing data and an inundation model to map tidal mudflat regions and improve mudflats. The remote sensing-based analysis provides for the first time a way to evaluate the flood., and H. Liu (2009), Combining remote sensing data and an inundation model to map tidal mudflat regions

  1. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

  2. Conformally curved binary black hole initial data including tidal deformations and outgoing radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan K. Johnson-McDaniel; Nicolas Yunes; Wolfgang Tichy; Benjamin J. Owen

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) By asymptotically matching a post-Newtonian (PN) metric to two tidally perturbed Schwarzschild metrics, we generate approximate initial data (in the form of a 4-metric) for a nonspinning black hole binary in a circular orbit. We carry out this matching through O(v^4) in the binary's orbital velocity v, so the resulting data are conformally curved. Far from the holes, we use the appropriate PN metric that accounts for retardation, which we construct using the highest-order PN expressions available to compute the binary's past history. The data set's uncontrolled remainders are thus O(v^5) throughout the timeslice; we also generate an extension to the data set that has uncontrolled remainders of O(v^6) in the purely PN portion of the timeslice (i.e., not too close to the holes). The resulting data are smooth, since we join all the metrics together by smoothly interpolating between them. We perform this interpolation using transition functions constructed to avoid introducing excessive additional constraint violations. Due to their inclusion of tidal deformations and outgoing radiation, these data should substantially reduce the initial spurious ("junk") radiation observed in current simulations that use conformally flat initial data. Such reductions in the nonphysical components of the initial data will be necessary for simulations to achieve the accuracy required to supply Advanced LIGO and LISA with the templates necessary for parameter estimation.

  3. The flattenings of the layers of rotating planets and satellites deformed by a tidal potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folonier, Hugo; Kholshevnikov, Konstantin V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the Clairaut theory of the equilibrium ellipsoidal figures for differentiated non-homogeneous bodies in non-synchronous rotation adding to it a tidal deformation due to the presence of an external gravitational force. We assume that the body is a fluid formed by $n$ homogeneous layers of ellipsoidal shape and we calculate the external polar flattenings and the mean radius of each layer, or, equivalently, their semiaxes. To first order in the flattenings, the general solution can be written as $\\epsilon_k={\\cal H}_k*\\epsilon_h$ and $\\mu_k={\\cal H}_k*\\mu_h$, where $\\cal{H}_k$ is a characteristic coefficient for each layer which only depends on the internal structure of the body and $\\epsilon_h, \\mu_h$ are the flattenings of the equivalent homogeneous problem. For the continuous case, we study the Clairaut differential equation for the flattening profile, using the Radau transformation to find the boundary conditions when the tidal potential is added. Finally, the theory is applied to several example...

  4. Using Neutron Star Observations to Determine Crust Thicknesses, Moments of Inertia, and Tidal Deformabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew W. Steiner; Stefano Gandolfi; Farrukh J. Fattoyev; William G. Newton

    2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a systematic assessment of models for the equation of state (EOS) of dense matter in the context of recent neutron star mass and radius measurements to obtain a broad picture of the structure of neutron stars. We demonstrate that currently available neutron star mass and radius measurements provide strong constraints on moments of inertia, tidal deformabilities, and crust thicknesses. A measurement of the moment of inertia of PSR J0737-3039A with 10% error, without any other information from observations, will constrain the EOS over a range of densities to within 50%$-$60%. We find tidal deformabilities between 0.6 and $6\\times 10^{36}$ g cm$^{2}$ s$^{2}$ (to 95% confidence) for $M=1.4~\\mathrm{M}_{\\odot}$, and any measurement which constrains this range will provide an important constraint on dense matter. The crustal fraction of the moment of inertia can be as large as 10% for $M=1.4~\\mathrm{M}_{\\odot}$ permitting crusts to have a large enough moment of inertia reservoir to explain glitches in the Vela pulsar even with a large amount of superfluid entrainment. Finally, due to the uncertainty in the equation of state, there is at least a 40% variation in the thickness of the crust for a fixed mass and radius, which implies that future simulations of the cooling of a neutron star crust which has been heated by accretion will need to take this variation into account.

  5. Revealing the escape mechanism of three-dimensional orbits in a tidally limited star cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Euaggelos E. Zotos

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work is to explore the escape process of three-dimensional orbits in a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. The gravitational field of the cluster is represented by a smooth, spherically symmetric Plummer potential, while the tidal approximation was used to model the steady tidal field of the galaxy. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins towards the two exit channels and relate them with the corresponding escape times of the orbits. For this purpose, we split our investigation into three cases depending on the initial value of the $z$ coordinate which was used for launching the stars. The most noticeable finding is that the majority of stars initiated very close to the primary $(x,y)$ plane move in chaotic orbits and they remain trapped for vast time intervals, while orbits with relatively high values of $z_0$ on the other hand, form well-defined basins of escape. It was also observed, that for energy levels close to the critical escape energy the escape rates of orbits are large, while for much higher values of energy most of the orbits have low escape periods or they escape immediately to infinity. We hope our outcomes to be useful for a further understanding of the dissolution process and the escape mechanism in open star clusters.

  6. Subsidence at the Weeks Island SPR Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, S.J.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The elevation change data measured at the Weeks Island SPR site over the last 16+ years has been studied and analyzed. The subsidence rate is not constant with time and while the subsidence rate may have increased slightly during the past several years, recently the rate has increased more dramatically. The most recent increase comes at a time when the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage mine had been emptied of oil and was in the process of being refilled with brine. Damage to surface structures that has been observed during the past 12-18 months is attributed to the continued subsidence and dtierential subsidence across structures. The recent greater subsidence rates were unanticipated according to analysis results and will be used to aid further subsidence model development.

  7. A SURVEY OF CIGUATERA AT ENEWETAK AND BIKINI, MARSHALL ISLANDS, WITH NOTES ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SURVEY OF CIGUATERA AT ENEWETAK AND BIKINI, MARSHALL ISLANDS, WITH NOTES ON THE SYSTEMATICS ofpotentially ciguatoxicfishes from Enewetak and 256 specimens of 23 species from Bikini, Marshall Islands, were names was necessary for a few ofthe fishes. The Marshall Islands are the easternmost islands

  8. Can Microsatellites Be Used to Infer Phylogenies? Evidence from Population Affinities of the Western Canary Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danchin, Etienne

    of the Western Canary Island Lizard (Gallotia galloti) Murielle Richard1 and Roger S. Thorpe2 School of the West- ern Canary Island lacertid (Gallotia galloti) as a model. The geological times of island in 12 populations from four islands (representing five haplotype lineages) was investigated in five

  9. Inferring dispersal: a Bayesian approach to phylogeny-based island biogeography,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Barros, Enrique

    , with special reference to the Canary Islands Isabel Sanmarti´n1 *, Paul van der Mark2 and Fredrik Ronquist2,3 1 set of published phylogenies of Canary Island organisms to examine overall dispersal rates archipelagos with special reference to the Atlantic Canary Islands. Methods The Canary Islands were divided

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER The diet of feral cats on islands: a review and a call for more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    Santa Cruz de La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain M. Nogales Island Ecology and Evolution Research Group (IPNA-CSIC), Astrofi´sico Francisco Sa´nchez 3, 38206 La Laguna Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain BORIGINAL PAPER The diet of feral cats on islands: a review and a call for more studies E. Bonnaud

  11. Are ightless Galapaganus weevils older than the Galapagos Islands they inhabit?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Brian D.

    are the Canary Islands (Thorpe et al., 1994; Juan et al., 1995, 1996) the Gala pagos Islands (Darwin, 1859Are ¯ightless Galapaganus weevils older than the GalaÂpagos Islands they inhabit? ANDREA S and include 10 ¯ightless species endemic to the Gala pagos islands. These beetles thus provide a promising

  12. Island biogeography Much of our current understanding of how many species occupy a community comes from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    a balance between ongoing immigration of new species to the island and continuous extinction of species') and E is the maximum rate of extinction (the rate of extinction when the number of species on the island there are no species on the island (logically). But extinction rate increases with increasing species on the island

  13. Comparison of SF6 and Fluorescein as Tracers for Measuring Transport Processes in a Large Tidal River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    Comparison of SF6 and Fluorescein as Tracers for Measuring Transport Processes in a Large Tidal SF6 as tracers of advection and longitudinal dispersion from a dual tracer release experiment of SF6 were injected into the Hudson River at an averaged depth of 9.5 m, 1 m above the bottom, near

  14. 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Tidal dissipation in the early Eocene and implications for ocean mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    © 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Tidal dissipation in the early Eocene this article as doi: 10.1002/grl.50510 AcceptedArticle #12;© 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Passage and Tasman Gateways AcceptedArticle #12;© 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved

  15. Tidal effects on net ecosystem exchange of carbon in an estuarine wetland Haiqiang Guo a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noormets, Asko

    Tidal effects on net ecosystem exchange of carbon in an estuarine wetland Haiqiang Guo a,c , Asko, Shanghai, China b Southern Global Change Program, USDA Forest Service, Raleigh, NC, USA c Department concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) have stimulated great interest in studying the carbon

  16. Internal wave and boundary current generation by tidal flow over topography Amadeus Dettner, Harry L. Swinney, and M. S. Paoletti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    ( , shape)/SIW, where Ptide is the effective tidal power that interacts with the topography, and /8 of a uniformly stratified fluid. The radiated power PIW and kinetic energy density of the boundary currents characterized by large kinetic energy densities form over critical topography ( = 1). However, we find

  17. Internal wave and boundary current generation by tidal flow over topography Amadeus Dettner, Harry L. Swinney, and M. S. Paoletti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    ( , shape)/SIW, where Ptide is the effective tidal power that interacts with the topography, and /8 fluid. The radiated power PIW and kinetic energy density of the boundary currents are computed characterized by large kinetic energy densities form over critical topography ( = 1). However, we find

  18. Environmental links to interannual variability in shellfish toxicity in Cobscook Bay and eastern Maine, a strongly tidally mixed coastal region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    Environmental links to interannual variability in shellfish toxicity in Cobscook Bay and eastern e i n f o Keywords: Harmful algal blooms Gulf of Maine Cobscook Bay Shellfish toxicity a b s t r a c of Cobscook Bay, where strong tidal mixing tends to reduce seasonal variability in oceanographic properties

  19. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 5, PAGES 811-814, MARCH 1, 2001 Parameterizing Tidal Dissipation over Rough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Steven

    of barotropic tidal energy. The first line of evidence comes from observations of mix- ing in the abyssal Brazil ocean, the energy flux carried by internal waves generated over rough topog- raphy dominates the energy issues. The first is whether including a parameterization for internal wave energy-flux in a model

  20. Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae Stephan Rosswog1, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz2, W. Raphael Hix3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosswog, Stephan

    Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae Stephan Rosswog1, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz2, W. Raphael Hix3 1 in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate

  1. EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Draft Environmental AssessmentThis EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a project that would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture energy from the flow in both ebb and flood directions.

  2. assateague island national: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL surveys of the Marshall and Marianas Islands by L. P. Schultz and colleagues. Vic went on to exceed all...

  3. aeolian islands italy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de 14 Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Tsunami generation in Stromboli island and impact on the CiteSeer Summary: Abstract. Stromboli is one of the most active...

  4. Power Plant Options Report for Thompson Island prepared by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Power Plant Options Report for Thompson Island A report prepared by the Renewable Energy Research....................................................................... 7 3. Grid-connected and Autonomous Renewable Power Systems ................................ 9 3.1. Renewable Power Sources .............................................................................. 9 3

  5. 46 Various stories from life on Hebert Island (part 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 46 Length of track 1 hour 53 minutes Title of track Various stories from life on Hebert Island...

  6. 47 Various stories from life on Hebert Island (part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 48 Length of track 2 hour 2 minutes Title of track Various stories from life on Hebert Island...

  7. First Regional Super ESPC a Success on Kodiak Island, Alaska...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    at Kodiak Island helped pave the way for additional Super ESPC projects at other agencies. "For these projects to be successful, the agency needs to be committed at the site...

  8. Qualifying RPS Market States (Prince Edward Island, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This entry lists the states with RPS policies that accept generation located in Prince Edward Island, Canada as eligible sources towards their Renewable Portfolio Standard targets or goals. For...

  9. Visual Modeling for Aqua Ventus I off Monhegan Island, ME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, Luke A.; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To assist the University of Maine in demonstrating a clear pathway to project completion, PNNL has developed visualization models of the Aqua Ventus I project that accurately depict the Aqua Ventus I turbines from various points on Monhegain Island, ME and the surrounding area. With a hub height of 100 meters, the Aqua Ventus I turbines are large and may be seen from many areas on Monhegan Island, potentially disrupting important viewsheds. By developing these visualization models, which consist of actual photographs taken from Monhegan Island and the surrounding area with the Aqua Ventus I turbines superimposed within each photograph, PNNL intends to support the project’s siting and permitting process by providing the Monhegan Island community and various other stakeholders with a probable glimpse of how the Aqua Ventus I project will appear.

  10. Rules and Regulations for Groundwater Quality (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations provide standards for groundwater quality in the state of Rhode Island. The rules are intended to protect and restore the quality of the state's groundwater resources for use as...

  11. Quantitative analysis of forest island pattern in selected Ohio landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, G.W.; Burgess, R.L.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively describe the various aspects of regional distribution patterns of forest islands and relate those patterns to other landscape features. Several maps showing the forest cover of various counties in Ohio were selected as representative examples of forest patterns to be quantified. Ten thousand hectare study areas (landscapes) were delineated on each map. A total of 15 landscapes representing a wide variety of forest island patterns was chosen. Data were converted into a series of continuous variables which contained information pertinent to the sizes, shape, numbers, and spacing of woodlots within a landscape. The continuous variables were used in a factor analysis to describe the variation among landscapes in terms of forest island pattern. The results showed that forest island patterns are related to topography and other environmental features correlated with topography.

  12. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Hawaii & Pacific Islands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on Hawaii and Pacific Islands impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring...

  13. Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in...

  14. THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND FRINGE BENEFIT AVERAGE RATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND FRINGE BENEFIT AVERAGE RATE FY 2015 Allocation Cost or Classified.2% URI Budget & Financial Planning Office 9.17.14 Office:fringebenefits:office of sponsored projects: FY2015 Allocation #12;

  15. PSEG Long Island- Solar Initiative Feed-in Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The PSEG Long Island Feed-in Tariff II (FIT II) program provides fixed payments for electricity produced by approved photovoltaic systems over a fixed period of time. The program operates under a...

  16. Midwest Quantitative Biology Conference Mission Point Resort, Mackinac Island, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midwest Quantitative Biology Conference Mission Point Resort, Mackinac Island, Michigan September Exchange Method for the Free Energy of Conformational Fluctuations Michigan State University 3:05-3:30 Role

  17. A Simple Technique for Islanding Detection with Negligible Nondetection Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirtley Jr, James L.

    Although active islanding detection techniques have smaller nondetection zones than passive techniques, active methods could degrade the system power quality and are not as simple and easy to implement as passive methods. ...

  18. aegean island arc: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proposed that the maximum observed thickness Cai, Long 10 Geological Setting, Mineral Resources and ancient works of Samos and adjacent islands of the Aegean Sea, 26-30 August...

  19. ambrym island vanuatu: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subpicosecond carrier dynamics C. Kadowa) Materials; accepted for publication 5 October 1999 We report the growth of self-assembled ErAs islands embedded in GaAs by molecular beam...

  20. anticosti island laurentia: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subpicosecond carrier dynamics C. Kadowa) Materials; accepted for publication 5 October 1999 We report the growth of self-assembled ErAs islands embedded in GaAs by molecular beam...

  1. aegna island tallinn: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subpicosecond carrier dynamics C. Kadowa) Materials; accepted for publication 5 October 1999 We report the growth of self-assembled ErAs islands embedded in GaAs by molecular beam...

  2. Closing Event- Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Invited speakers from Congress, the federal government, and DOE will speak about Asian American and Pacific Islander programs and policy at the Department, and their contributions to the DOE...

  3. Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Asian Pacific American Heritage Month is a celebration of the culture, traditions, and history of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States. Join the Energy Department for the...

  4. Town of Babylon- Long Island Green Homes Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Long Island Green Homes Program is a self-financing residential retrofit program designed to support a goal of upgrading the energy efficiency of existing homes in the Town of Babylon. The...

  5. Long Island Power Authority- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Long Island Power Authority offers a variety of incentive programs which help residential customers upgrade to more energy efficient equipment and appliances in their homes. The Cool Homes Program...

  6. Demonstration of Black Liquor Gasification at Big Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert DeCarrera

    2007-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Technical Report provides an account of the project for the demonstration of Black Liquor Gasification at Georgia-Pacific LLC's Big Island, VA facility. This report covers the period from May 5, 2000 through November 30, 2006.

  7. A seaside resort in an island of the Aegean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriezis, Constantine Anthony

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the thesis is the design of a seaside resort in the island of Andros in Greece. A year-round focus of attraction amidst the Aegean Sea the resort would center around sea related activities. The experience ...

  8. Quaternary morphology and paleoenvironmental records of carbonate islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toomey, Michael (Michael Ryan)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here I use a simple numerical model of reef profile evolution to show that the present-day morphology of carbonate islands has developed largely in response to late Pleistocene sea level oscillations in addition to variable ...

  9. Renewable Energy and Inter-Island Power Transmission (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes recent findings pertaining to inter-island connection of renewable and other energy sources, in particular, as these findings relate cable options, routing, specifications, and pros and cons.

  10. Distribution, Growth, and Disturbance of Catalina Island Rhodoliths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tompkins, Paul Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seasonality. Sedimentology 41: 963-984 Friewald A (1998)Godinez-Orta L (2006) Sedimentology and acoustic mapping ofIsland, New Zealand. Sedimentology 55: 249-274 Orth RJ (

  11. Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (U.S. Virgin Islands)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virgin Islands Energy Office currently offers rebates to residents for purchasing solar water heaters from local vendors. The program will cover residential, solar water heaters of 120 gallons...

  12. Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTS&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Amchitka Island sites describes how LM plans to conduct its mission to protect human health and the environment at the three nuclear test sites located on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Amchitka Island, near the western end of the Aleutian Islands, is approximately 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Amchitka is part of the Aleutian Island Unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Since World War II, Amchitka has been used by multiple U.S. government agencies for various military and research activities. From 1943 to 1950, it was used as a forward air base for the U.S. Armed Forces. During the middle 1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) used a portion of the island as a site for underground nuclear tests. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the U.S. Navy constructed and operated a radar station on the island. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. DOD, in conjunction with AEC, conducted the first nuclear test (named Long Shot) in 1965 to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC in 1969 as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. Cannikin, the third nuclear test on Amchitka, was a weapons-related test detonated on November 6, 1971. With the exception of small concentrations of tritium detected in surface water shortly after the Long Shot test, radioactive fission products from the tests remain in the subsurface at each test location As a continuation of the environmental monitoring that has taken place on Amchitka Island since before 1965, LM in the summer of 2011 collected biological and seawater samples from the marine and terrestrial environment of Amchitka Island adjacent to the three detonation sites and at a background or reference site, Adak Island, 180 miles to the east. Consistent with the goals of the Amchitka LTS&M Plan, four data quality objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 2011 sampling event.

  13. A wave refraction analysis for an axially symmetrical island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forst, Ronald John

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A WAVE REFRACTION ANALYSIS FOR AN AXIALLY SYMMETRICAL ISLAND A Thesis By LIEUTENANT RONALD J FORST UNITED STATES NAVY Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE l966 Major Subject Oceanography A WAVE REFRACTION ANALYSIS FOR AN AXIALLY SYMMETRICAL ISLAND A Thesis By LIEUTENANT RONALD J FORST UNITED STATES NAVY Approved as to style and content by; ( airma Committee) Head of Dep rtme t...

  14. Fish assemblages on coral reefs in Guanaja, Bay Islands, Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahendran, Christopher Kandiah

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FISH ASSEMBLAGES ON CORAL REEFS IN GUANAJA, BAY ISLANDS, HONDURAS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER KANDIAH MAHENDRAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1999 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences FISH ASSEMBLAGES ON CORAL REEFS IN GUANAJA, BAY ISLANDS, HONDURAS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER KANDIAH MAHENDRAN Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  15. Amphibians and Reptiles, Luzon Island, Aurora Province and Aurora Memorial National Park, Northern Philippines: New island distribution records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Rafe M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report 35 new amphibian and reptile distribution records for two regions within the southern Sierra Madre Mountain Range, Aurora Province, central Luzon Island, Philippines. Together with results of our previous survey work in Aurora, our new...

  16. Non-dissipative tidal synchronization in accreting binary white dwarf systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etienne Racine; E. Sterl Phinney; Phil Arras

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a non-dissipative hydrodynamical mechanism that can stabilize the spin of the accretor in an ultra-compact double white dwarf binary. This novel synchronization mechanism relies on a nonlinear wave interaction spinning down the background star. The essential physics of the synchronization mechanism is summarized as follows. As the compact binary coalesces due to gravitational wave emission, the largest star eventually fills its Roche lobe and accretion starts. The accretor then spins up due to infalling material and eventually reaches a spin frequency where a normal mode of the star is resonantly driven by the gravitational tidal field of the companion. If the resonating mode satisfies a set of specific criteria, which we elucidate in this paper, it exchanges angular momentum with the background star at a rate such that the spin of the accretor locks at this resonant frequency, even though accretion is ongoing. Some of the accreted angular momentum that would otherwise spin up the accretor is fed back into the orbit through this resonant tidal interaction. Two modes capable of stabilizing the accretor's spin are the l=4,m=2 and l=5,m=3 CFS unstable hybrid r-modes, which stabilize the spin of the accretor at frequency 2.6 and 1.5 times the binary's orbital frequency respectively. Since the stabilization mechanism relies on continuously driving a mode at resonance, its lifetime is limited since eventually the mode amplitude saturates due to non-linear mode-mode coupling. Rough estimates of the lifetime of the effect lie from a few orbits to millions of years.

  17. On the tidal interaction of massive extra-solar planets on highly eccentric orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Ivanov; J. C. B. Papaloizou

    2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we develop a theory of disturbances induced by the stellar tidal field in a fully convective slowly rotating planet orbiting on a highly eccentric orbit around a central star. We show that there are two contributions to the mode energy and angular momentum gain due to impulsive tidal interaction: a) 'the quasi-static' contribution which requires dissipative processes operating in the planet; b) the dynamical contribution associated with excitation of modes of oscillation. These contributions are obtained self-consistently from a single set of the governing equations. We calculate a critical 'equilibrium' value of angular velocity of the planet \\Omega_{crit} determined by the condition that action of the dynamical tides does not alter the angular velocity at that rotation rate. We show that this can be much larger than the corresponding rate associated with quasi-static tides and that at this angular velocity, the rate of energy exchange is minimised. We also investigate the conditions for the stochastic increase in oscillation energy that may occur if many periastron passages are considered. We make some simple estimates of time scale of circularization of initially eccentric orbit due to tides, using a realistic model of the planet, for orbits withperiods after circularization typical of those observed for extra-solar planets P_{obs} > 3days. We find that dynamic tides could have produced a very large decrease of the semi-major axis of a planet with mass of the order of the Jupiter mass M_{J} and final periods P_{obs} < 4.5days on a time-scale < a few Gyrs. We also discuss several unresolved issues in the context of the scenario of the orbit circularization due to dynamic tides.

  18. An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

  19. Strain-mediated lateral SiGe island motion in single and stacked layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, M.; Rastelli, A.; Kiravittaya, S.; Schmidt, O.G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the lateral motion of SiGe islands on Si(001) substrates in single and twofold stacked layers by using a combination of wet chemical etching and atomic force microscopy. A careful analysis of the footprints left over by the etched islands reveals that islands tend to repel each other, providing evidence that the lateral motion is triggered by the elastic strain repulsion between neighboring islands. This interpretation is further supported by finite element calculations. In closely stacked layers, the lateral island motion can be reduced and even suppressed. The SiGe islands in the upper layer are found to be Si richer compared with the islands in the first layer. Nevertheless, our results strongly suggest that the elastic interaction between vertically aligned islands is mainly responsible for the reduced island motion in the upper layer.

  20. Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

  1. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  2. Countermeasures to Urban Heat Islands: A Global View

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Alan

    2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An important milestone was passed this year when the fraction of the world's population living in cities exceeded 50%. This shift from the countryside to urban areas is certain to continue and, for many, the destination will be large cities. Already there are over 400 cities with populations greater than one million inhabitants and twenty cities with populations greater than ten million inhabitants. With a growing fraction of the population living in an urban environment, the unique aspects of an urban climate also rise in importance. These include features like air pollution and increased humidity. Another unique feature of the urban climate is the phenomenon of the urban heat island. The urban heat island phenomenon was first observed over one hundred years ago in northern latitude cities, where the city centers were slightly warmer than the suburbs. (Instantaneous communications probably played a role in its identification, much as it did for other weather-related events.) For these cities, a heat island was generally a positive effect because it resulted in reduced heating requirements during the winters. It was only in the 1960s, as air conditioning and heavy reliance on automobiles grew, that the negative impacts of heat islands became apparent. The heat islands made summer conditions much less comfortable and increased air conditioning energy use. Since then the summer heat island has become the dominant environmental concern. Measurements in thousands of sites, plus the development of sophisticated dynamic simulations of urban air basins, has enabled us to better understand the relationships between urban temperatures, sunlight, and rates of formation of air pollutants. These models have also given us insights into the roles of vegetation and other characteristics of the land surface. More recently-roughly the last fifteen years-it has become possible to quantify the roles of the major features influencing the formation and persistence of urban heat islands. These developments also allowed us to answer 'what if' questions, such as, 'what if surfaces were changed to be covered with more vegetation or if the albedo of the streets or the roofs was increased'? These simulations, plus measurements of the impact of actual changes, made it possible to imagine that countermeasures to urban heat islands would result in a cooler city requiring less air conditioning and other benefits. In the past five years we have seen the first generation of countermeasures to urban heat islands appear. 'Cool' roofing materials, are now available and, in California, help comply with energy efficiency requirements for buildings. In Japan, cities are giving special incentives to buildings that provide vegetation on their roofs.

  3. An unstructured C-grid based method for 3-D global ocean dynamics: Free-surface formulations and tidal test cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    and tidal test cases G.R. Stuhne *, W.R. Peltier Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George rights reserved. 1. Introduction In a previous paper (Stuhne and Peltier, 2006, hereafter SP), we

  4. Area Solar energy production BACKGROUND -All renewable energies, except for geothermal and tidal, derive their energy from the sun. By harnessing the power of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Area Solar energy production ­ BACKGROUND - All renewable energies installations. Advantages: · A renewable form of energy - "Locks up" carbon, except for geothermal and tidal, derive their energy from the sun

  5. Evolution in the Canary Islands. I. Phylogenetic Relations in the Genus Echium (Boraginaceae) as Shown by Trichome Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Evolution in the Canary Islands. I. Phylogenetic Relations in the Genus Echium (Boraginaceae-threespeciesofEchiumfromthe Canary Islands and Madeira werestudiedin orderto relate growthformtoevolutionarystatusand ecology hypothesisoftheevolutionofannualplants,and ofitsopposite,thetheoryofinsularwoodiness. Introduction The Canary Islands have long been

  6. An early Miocene age for a high-temperature event in gneisses from Zabargad Island (Red Sea, Egypt): mantle diapirism?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    An early Miocene age for a high-temperature event in gneisses from Zabargad Island (Red Sea, Egypt outcropping on Zabargad Island (Red Sea, Egypt). This island, though of limited size (& 4 km2 ), has an almost

  7. Statistics of the Island-Around-Island Hierarchy in Hamiltonian Phase Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Or Alus; Shmuel Fishman; James D. Meiss

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase space of a typical Hamiltonian system contains both chaotic and regular orbits, mixed in a complex, fractal pattern. One oft-studied phenomenon is the algebraic decay of correlations and recurrence time distributions. For area-preserving maps, this has been attributed to the stickiness of boundary circles, which separate chaotic and regular components. Though such dynamics has been extensively studied, a full understanding depends on many fine details that typically are beyond experimental and numerical resolution. This calls for a statistical approach, the subject of the present work. We calculate the statistics of the boundary circle winding numbers, contrasting the distribution of the elements of their continued fractions to that for uniformly selected irrationals. Since phase space transport is of great interest for dynamics, we compute the distributions of fluxes through island chains. Analytical fits show that the "level" and "class" distributions are distinct, and evidence for their universality is given.

  8. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  9. Tides and Tidal Capture in post-Main Sequence Binaries: A Period Gap for Planets Around White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordhaus, J; Ibgui, L; Goodman, J; Burrows, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of a close, low-mass companion is thought to play a substantial and perhaps necessary role in shaping post-Asymptotic Giant Branch and Planetary Nebula outflows. During post-main-sequence evolution, radial expansion of the primary star, accompanied by intense winds, can significantly alter the binary orbit via tidal dissipation and mass loss. To investigate this, we couple stellar evolution models (from the zero-age main-sequence through the end of the post-main sequence) to a tidal evolution code. The binary's fate is determined by the initial masses of the primary and the companion, the initial orbit (taken to be circular), and the Reimer's mass-loss parameter. For a range of these parameters, we determine whether the orbit expands due to mass loss or decays due to tidal torques. Where a common envelope phase (CEP) ensues, we estimate the final orbital separation based on the energy required to unbind the envelope. These calculations predict a period gap for planetary companions to white dwarfs...

  10. Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Mammalian and Vegetative Communities of the Barrier Islands of Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoggin, Annaliese K.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The barrier islands of the gulf coast of the U.S. have been shaped and changed by hurricanes for centuries. These storms can alter the vegetation of the barrier islands by redistributing sediments, scouring off vegetation, physical damage...

  11. Modeling Microgrid Islanding Problems as DCOPs Saurabh Gupta, William Yeoh, Enrico Pontelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeoh, William

    , we formulate the microgrid islanding problem as distributed constraint optimization problem (DCOP. Index Terms--Microgrid, Islanding, Distributed Constraint Optimization. I. INTRODUCTION Every year residential and commercial facilities with controllable loads and distributed generation sources; loads

  12. The Rhode Island state house--the competition (1890-1892)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Hilary A. (Hilary Ann)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of the design competition for the new State House in Providence, Rhode Island, which began in 1890 and ended in 1892. The competition was supervised by the Rhode Island State House Commission, a body formed ...

  13. Working Groups Collaborate on U.S. Virgin Islands Clean Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Groups Collaborate on U.S. Virgin Islands Clean Energy Vision and Road Map Working Groups Collaborate on U.S. Virgin Islands Clean Energy Vision and Road Map A diverse set...

  14. Titanium Silicide Islands on Atomically Clean Si(100): Identifying Single Electron Tunneling Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph L. Tedesco; J. E. Rowe; Robert J. Nemanich

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium silicide islands have been formed by the ultrahigh vacuum deposition of thin films of titanium (electron tunneling (SET) according to the orthodox model of SET. Some of the islands formed are small enough (diameter reliability of future devices.

  15. Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs Small Changes Help Long Island Homeowner Save Big on Energy Costs April 16, 2013 - 12:20pm Addthis Located near...

  16. Gilbert M. Smith, master boatbuilder of Long Island, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merwin, Daria Elizabeth

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extent of the ice sheet, attained some 18, 000 years ago, left a spine-like ridge through the center of the island called the Ronkonkoma terminal moraine. The eastern terminus of the Ronkonkoma moraine is the South Fork of Long Island. The north shore... opportunities for her husband in Patchogue (Hix 1986). At the titne, Patchogue was a thriving port village, adjacent to the dense oyster beds of the Great South Bay and a fledgling center of yachting. By the late 19" century, Patchogue was the largest trading...

  17. Energy Department Helps Advance Island Clean Energy Goals (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) fact sheet highlights a June 2012 solar power purchase agreement between the Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority and three corporations. The fact sheet describes how financial support from DOE and technical assistance from DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory enabled the U.S. Virgin Islands to realistically assess its clean energy resources and identify the most viable and cost-effective solutions to its energy challenges--resulting in a $65 million investment in solar energy in the territory.

  18. Spitzer View of Massive Star Formation in the Tidally Stripped Magellanic Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C -H Rosie; Muller, Erik; Kawamura, Akiko; Gordon, Karl D; Sewi?o, Marta; Whitney, Barbara A; Fukui, Yasuo; Madden, Suzanne C; Meade, Marilyn R; Meixner, Margaret; Oliveira, Joana M; Robitaille, Thomas P; Seale, Jonathan P; Shiao, Bernie; van Loon, Jacco Th

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Magellanic Bridge is the nearest low-metallicity, tidally stripped environment, offering a unique high-resolution view of physical conditions in merging and forming galaxies. In this paper we present analysis of candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs), i.e., {\\it in situ, current} massive star formation (MSF) in the Bridge using {\\it Spitzer} mid-IR and complementary optical and near-IR photometry. While we definitely find YSOs in the Bridge, the most massive are $\\sim10 M_\\odot$, $\\ll45 M_\\odot$ found in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The intensity of MSF in the Bridge also appears decreasing, as the most massive YSOs are less massive than those formed in the past. To investigate environmental effects on MSF, we have compared properties of massive YSOs in the Bridge to those in the LMC. First, YSOs in the Bridge are apparently less embedded than in the LMC: 81% of Bridge YSOs show optical counterparts, compared to only 56% of LMC sources with the same range of mass, circumstellar dust mass, and...

  19. Design of a sediment quality assessment for the tidal Christina River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, K.; Allen, R.; Williams, S. [Delaware State Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, Dover, DE (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed baseline sediment study was designed and conducted within the tidal portion of the Christina River Basin, Delaware. A complementary battery of field-screening and laboratory analyses was established in order to obtain substantial coverage of the basin at reasonable cost. The approach provided for 180 sediment sample locations from a 15 mile stretch of the Christina River, the proximal reaches of its tributaries, and associated wetlands. Analytical parameters consisted of physiochemical measurements (TOC, grain size distribution, and redox potential), total metals, major anions, carcinogenic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pH, and metals partitioning analysis. Toxicity indicators included in the study were: SEM/AVS analysis, IQ{reg_sign} toxicity tests, Microtox{reg_sign}, and Hyalella azteca 10-day acute toxicity tests. This basin-wide approach successfully established a database of sediment information that allowed for the determination of: contaminants of concern; contaminant spatial distribution; potential ecological impacts; contaminant/indicator relationships; and potential upland contaminant source areas. The incorporation of low cost field and analytical methods permitted the use of short-spaced systematic sampling thus eliminating stratified random sampling methods and the need to focus on localized reaches. The database was sufficiently large to allow for statistically valid analyses of the results. Additionally, it will aid in the delineation of relevant strata for subsequent monitoring, provide a comparative baseline for future investigations, and guide state decision-making.

  20. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.