National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ventyx velocity suite

  1. ventyxReprint.indd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    worldPower 2010 1 T he utility world has changed drastically in the last 10 years. New technologies like Smart Meters and fully functional Smart Grid concepts have made large inroads into the utility space and no one should want to be left behind. Utilities also face additional pressures from regulatory bodies who are continuing to encourage carbon reduction and greater customer flexibility. Utilities need to balance these new requirements with the financial obligations of providing reliable

  2. PDock Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-03-01

    The PDock suite is a software package for performing molecular docking simulations. PDock was designed to bea modular and extensible software package that interfaces easily with third party codes to quickly evaluate and test different methods for moleuclar docking simulations. Docking calculations start with three dimensional atomistic models of two molecules (usually a protein and small molecule) and predict how they will bind to each other. This problem can be broken down into 2 mainmoreツツサ steps: 1) predicting various orientation/conformation combinations (called 'poses') of one molecule to "dock" into the other one and 2) scoring each possible pose. The best scoring pose is predicted to be the biological one. PDock has two main algoritms for performing the first step of docking. The first performs a biased search of poses using its own implementation of the published DOCK algorithm. The second is an evolutionary search algorithm. PDock uses a force-field based scoring scheme with an option of perform a more computationally expensive solvation correction. The PDock suite includes the following programs : PDock (main program); PGrid: for pre-processing input files; ProteinPDock (simplified main ()and input file for special case of protein-protein docking); and CombiPDock (simpliefied main() and input file for special case of combinatorial libraries).ツォツless

  3. CNP_TEST_SUITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002854MLTPL00 Automated Nuclear Data Test Suite file:///usr/gapps/CNP_src/us/RR/test_suite_cz/cnp_test_suite

  4. STAYS PNNL SUITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002851IBMPC00 STAYSL PNNL Suite http://radiochemscieng.pnnl.gov/research_areas/research_area_description.asp?id=283

  5. Oracle Management Tool Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-06-01

    The Oracle Management Tool Suite is used to automatically manage Oracle based systems. This includes startup and shutdown of databases and application servers as well as backup, space management, workload management and log file management.

  6. Sierra Mechanics suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mechanics suite - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  7. STAYSL PNNL Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-04-12

    The STAYSL PNNL Suite of software provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of themoreツツサ reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations. The software suite consists of the STAYSL PNNL, SHIELD, BCF, and NJpp Fortran codes and the SigPhi Calculator spreadsheet tool. In addition, the development of this software suite and associated data libraries used the third-party NJOY99 Fortran code (http://t2.lanl.gov/nis/codes/njoy99/). The NJOY99 and NJpp codes are used to assemble cross section and covariance input data libraries (for both SHIELD and STAYSL PNNL) from the International Reactor Dosimetry File of 2002 (IRDF-2002; http://www-nds.iaea.org/irdf2002/) developed by the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (Vienna, Austria). The BCF, SigPhi Calculator, and SHIELD software tools are used to calculate corrected activation rates and neutron self-shielding correction factors, which are inputs to the STAYSL PNNL code.ツォツless

  8. Roof Savings Calculator Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-11-22

    The software options currently supported by the simulation engine can be seen/experienced at www.roofcalc.com. It defaults all values to national averages with options to test a base-case (residential or commercial) building versus a comparison building with inputs for building type, location, building vintage, conditioned area, number of floors, and window-to-wall ratio, cooling system efficiency, type of heating, heating system efficiency, duct location, roof/ceiling insulation level, above-sheathing ventilation, radiant barrier, roof thermal mass, roof solar reflectance,moreツツサ roof thermal emittance, utility costs, roof pitch. The Roof Savings Caculator Suite adds utilities and website/web service and the integration of AtticSim with DOE-2.1E, with the end-result being Roof Savings Calculator.ツォツless

  9. Hybrid Optimization Software Suite (HOSS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hybrid Optimization Software Suite (HOSS) Hybrid Optimization Software Suite (HOSS) LANS is currently seeking an industry partner(s) to assist with the commercial deployment of its Hybrid Optimization Software Suite (HOSS) technology portfolio. Submit your Commercialization Proposal on or before COB Wednesday, March 9, 2016. Submit your Proposal thumbnail of Kathleen McDonald Head of Intellectual Property, Business Development Executive Kathleen McDonald Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation

  10. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  11. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  12. SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science SPOT Suite brings advanced algorithms, high performance computing and data management to the masses August 18, 2014 Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov als.jpg Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Berkeley Lab (Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt) Some mysteries of science can only be explained on a nanometer scale -even smaller than a single strand of human DNA, which is about 2.5 nanometers wide. At this scale, scientists

  13. DC Pro Software Tool Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet describes how DOE's Data Center Energy Profiler (DC Pro) Software Tool Suite and other resources can help U.S. companies identify ways to improve the efficiency of their data centers.

  14. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizationsmoreツツサ and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.ツォツless

  15. Real-Time Benchmark Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-01-17

    This software provides a portable benchmark suite for real time kernels. It tests the performance of many of the system calls, as well as the interrupt response time and task response time to interrupts. These numbers provide a baseline for comparing various real-time kernels and hardware platforms.

  16. Data-Intensive Benchmarking Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-11-26

    The Data-Intensive Benchmark Suite is a set of programs written for the study of data-or storage-intensive science and engineering problems, The benchmark sets cover: general graph searching (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce breadth-first search), genome sequence searching, HTTP request classification (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce), low-level data communication, and storage device micro-beachmarking

  17. Hybrid Optimization Software Suite (HOSS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hybrid Optimization Software Suite (HOSS) January 21, 2016 Request for Proposal Los Alamos National Security, LLC ("LANS") is the manager and operator of the Los Alamos National Laboratory ("LANL") for the U.S. Department of Energy's ("DOE's") National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LANS is a mission-centric Federally Funded Research and Development Center focused on solving the most critical national security challenges through

  18. Mojo Application Monitoring Tool Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-12-11

    Mojo is a software tool suite that can be used to monitor the progress of compute jobs on Linux Clusters and other high-performance computing platforms.Mojo is designed to allow system administrators to monitor the health and progress of computing jobs, and to allow users to view the progress and status of their own jobs. The facilities provided include the ability to notify users of job テδεつεδづつ「テδεつづδづつテδεつづδづつ徂angsテδεつεδづつ「テδεつづδづつテδεつづδづつ, and to take an automated action (e.g killing themoreツツサ job) when something goes wrong. These operations can lead to a more efficient use of scarce resources.ツォツless

  19. Contract carriage battles fought in antitrust suits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hume, M.

    1984-11-12

    Antitrust may be the approach natural gas end users need to gain access to gas transmission when pipelines or utilities allegedly resist carriage. Two pending suits could help ease the way for those who have trouble negotiating contract carriage of their self-help gas, and could help set precedents in similar antitrust suits. The cases involve a Colorade brick company's suit against Colorado Interstate Gas Co. and the State of Illinois' suit against Panhandle Eaton Pipeline Co. The issue is whether pipeline companies violate antitrust laws by refusing to carry fuel in competition with their own sales.

  20. Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System - 2013 BTO Peer Review Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU...

  1. Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Suite of Projects RTU Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring ... of 46% * The retrofitable smart monitoring and diagnostic system (SMDS) should ...

  2. Notices Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    913 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 240 / Friday, December 13, 2013 / Notices Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite 10800, Arlington, Virginia 22202-4149. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barry S. Lineback, Telephone: (703) 603-7740, Fax: (703) 603-0655, or email CMTEFedReg@AbilityOne.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Addition On 6/28/2013 (78 FR 38952-38953), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled published notice of proposed addition to the Procurement List.

  3. The LLNL MPI_Tool Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-10-25

    MPI_T is an interface for tools introduced in the 3.0 version of MPI. The interface provides mechanisms for tools to access and set performance and control variables that are exposed by an MPI implementation. We have developed an MPI_T tool suite to provide a first set of tools exploiting the new interface and to get tool writers started on the path to more sophisticated support.

  4. Notices Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    13 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 240 / Friday, December 13, 2013 / Notices Disabled, 1401 S. Clark Street, Suite 10800, Arlington, Virginia 22202-4149. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barry S. Lineback, Telephone: (703) 603-7740, Fax: (703) 603-0655, or email CMTEFedReg@AbilityOne.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Addition On 6/28/2013 (78 FR 38952-38953), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled published notice of proposed addition to the Procurement List.

  5. ARM - Measurement - Vertical velocity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsVertical velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Vertical velocity The component of the velocity vector, along the local vertical. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements,

  6. Suite of Photo-electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic ... Suite of Photo-electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production National Renewable Energy Laboratory ...

  7. Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency Increases Accountabi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Increases Accountability and Staff Engagement Throughout the Organization Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency Increases Accountability and Staff Engagement ...

  8. Suite of Cellulase Enzyme Technologies for Biomass Conversion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Suite of Cellulase Enzyme Technologies for Biomass Conversion National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  9. Perspectives on Deposition Velocity

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Deposition Velocity ... Going down the rabbit hole to explain that sinking feeling Brian DiNunno, Ph.D. Project Enhancement Corporation June 6 th , 2012 Discussion Framework w Development of the HSS Deposition Velocity Safety Bulletin w Broader discussion of appropriate conservatism within dispersion modeling and DOE-STD-3009 DOE-STD-3009 Dose Comparison "General discussion is provided for source term calculation and dose estimation, as well as prescriptive guidance for the latter. The

  10. ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor fall velocity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    velocity Fall velocity of hydrometeors (e.g. rain, snow, graupel, hail). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  11. A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Suite of Engineered GFP Molecules for Oligomeric Scaffolding Authors: Leibly, David J. ; Arbing, Mark A. ; Pashkov, Inna ; DeVore, Natasha ; Waldo, Geoffrey S. ; Terwilliger, Thomas C. ; Yeates, Todd O. [1] ; LANL) [2] + Show Author Affiliations UCLA ( Publication Date: 2015-11-30 OSTI Identifier: 1227481 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation:

  12. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  13. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  14. DYNA3D/ParaDyn Regression Test Suite Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J I

    2011-01-25

    The following table constitutes an initial assessment of feature coverage across the regression test suite used for DYNA3D and ParaDyn. It documents the regression test suite at the time of production release 10.1 in September 2010. The columns of the table represent groupings of functionalities, e.g., material models. Each problem in the test suite is represented by a row in the table. All features exercised by the problem are denoted by a check mark in the corresponding column. The definition of ''feature'' has not been subdivided to its smallest unit of user input, e.g., algorithmic parameters specific to a particular type of contact surface. This represents a judgment to provide code developers and users a reasonable impression of feature coverage without expanding the width of the table by several multiples. All regression testing is run in parallel, typically with eight processors. Many are strictly regression tests acting as a check that the codes continue to produce adequately repeatable results as development unfolds, compilers change and platforms are replaced. A subset of the tests represents true verification problems that have been checked against analytical or other benchmark solutions. Users are welcomed to submit documented problems for inclusion in the test suite, especially if they are heavily exercising, and dependent upon, features that are currently underrepresented.

  15. NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    costs? Thanks Submitted by Vbugnion on 27 February, 2013 - 16:25 1 answer Points: 1 Hi Vbugnion, Just to clarify, you're not asking about the OpenEI utility rates, but rather...

  16. Crowne Plaza Suites MSP Airport - Mall of America

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Annual Meeting of the National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Crowne Plaza Suites MSP Airport - Mall of America Bloomington, Minnesota * May 13-15, 2014 Revised Agenda Monday, May 12 4 - 5 pm NTSF Planning Committee Meeting Executive Conference For members only 5 - 6 pm Registration Ballroom Foyer Tuesday, May 13 7:30 am - 5 pm Registration and Exhibit Setup Ballroom Foyer 2014 Annual Meeting of the National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Revised Agenda Page 2 Updated April 29, 2014 8 -

  17. Crowne Plaza Suites MSP Airport - Mall of America

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Crowne Plaza Suites MSP Airport - Mall of America Bloomington, Minnesota | May 13-15, 2014 2014 Annual Meeting of the National Transportation Stakeholders Forum 2 WELCOME It is our pleasure to welcome you to the 2014 Annual Meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF). We represent the NTSF Tribal Caucus and the Council of State Governments' Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee, who are co-hosting this year's meeting. The

  18. pcircle - A Suite of Scalable Parallel File System Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-10-01

    Most of the software related to file system are written for conventional local file system, they are serialized and can't take advantage of the benefit of a large scale parallel file system. "pcircle" software builds on top of ubiquitous MPI in cluster computing environment and "work-stealing" pattern to provide a scalable, high-performance suite of file system tools. In particular - it implemented parallel data copy and parallel data checksumming, with advanced features such as asyncmoreツツサ progress report, checkpoint and restart, as well as integrity checking.ツォツless

  19. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  20. Enhanced Verification Test Suite for Physics Simulation Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamm, J R; Brock, J S; Brandon, S T; Cotrell, D L; Johnson, B; Knupp, P; Rider, W; Trucano, T; Weirs, V G

    2008-10-10

    This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations. The key points of this document are: (1) Verification deals with mathematical correctness of the numerical algorithms in a code, while validation deals with physical correctness of a simulation in a regime of interest. This document is about verification. (2) The current seven-problem Tri-Laboratory Verification Test Suite, which has been used for approximately five years at the DOE WP laboratories, is limited. (3) Both the methodology for and technology used in verification analysis have evolved and been improved since the original test suite was proposed. (4) The proposed test problems are in three basic areas: (a) Hydrodynamics; (b) Transport processes; and (c) Dynamic strength-of-materials. (5) For several of the proposed problems we provide a 'strong sense verification benchmark', consisting of (i) a clear mathematical statement of the problem with sufficient information to run a computer simulation, (ii) an explanation of how the code result and benchmark solution are to be evaluated, and (iii) a description of the acceptance criterion for simulation code results. (6) It is proposed that the set of verification test problems with which any particular code be evaluated include some of the problems described in this document. Analysis of the proposed verification test problems constitutes part of a necessary--but not sufficient--step that builds confidence in physics and engineering simulation codes. More complicated test cases, including physics models of greater sophistication or other physics regimes (e.g., energetic material response, magneto-hydrodynamics), would represent a scientifically desirable complement to the fundamental test cases discussed in this report. The authors believe that this document can be used to enhance the verification analyses undertaken at the DOE WP Laboratories and, thus, to improve the quality, credibility, and usefulness of the simulation codes that are analyzed with these problems.

  1. User antitrust suit alleges utility cabal limits buy-back

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efron, S.

    1984-10-15

    An antitrust suit against 90 Georgia electric utilities, charging that their monopoly of retail electricity sales should not preclude cogenerators and small power producers from selling surplus power to utilities elsewhere on the network, could set a national precedent allowing cogenerators to shop around for the best buy-back rate. Greensboro Lumber Co. charges that the utilities' refusal to wheel cogenerated power to potential purchasers represents a restraint of trade. The lumber company contends that cogenerators should sell to the wholesale market, where utilities have no state-granted monopoly. Attorneys for the two sides are unsure of the immediate outcome, but predict that antitrust action or threatened action could give cogenerators unfair leverage.

  2. User Guide for the STAYSL PNNL Suite of Software Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2013-02-27

    The STAYSL PNNL software suite provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of the reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations.

  3. CoMD Implementation Suite in Emerging Programming Models

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-09-23

    CoMD-Em is a software implementation suite of the CoMD [4] proxy app using different emerging programming models. It is intended to analyze the features and capabilities of novel programming models that could help ensure code and performance portability and scalability across heterogeneous platforms while improving programmer productivity. Another goal is to provide the authors and venders with some meaningful feedback regarding the capabilities and limitations of their models. The actual application is a classical molecularmoreツツサ dynamics (MD) simulation using either the Lennard-Jones method (LJ) or the embedded atom method (EAM) for primary particle interaction. The code can be extended to support alternate interaction models. The code is expected ro run on a wide class of heterogeneous hardware configurations like shard/distributed/hybrid memory, GPU's and any other platform supported by the underlying programming model.ツォツless

  4. eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PDF icon eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory More Documents & Publications Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - WEB iPASS System DOE PIA Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

  5. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L.; Marlin, David H.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  6. DOE Workshop - Deposition Velocity Status

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safely Delivering DOE's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission Safely Delivering the Department of Energy's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission DOE Workshop Deposition Velocity Status Mike Hitchler, Manager Nuclear Facility Safety June 5, 2012 Safely Delivering DOE's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission Existing UCOR Analyses * UCOR facilities at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) use various plume

  7. Three axis velocity probe system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Smith, Jr., Nelson S. (Morgantown, WV); Utt, Carroll E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01

    A three-axis velocity probe system for determining three-axis positional velocities of small particles in fluidized bed systems and similar applications. This system has a sensor head containing four closely-spaced sensing electrodes of small wires that have flat ends to establish a two axis plane, e.g. a X-Y plane. Two of the sensing electrodes are positioned along one of the axes and the other two are along the second axis. These four sensing electrodes are surrounded by a guard electrode, and the outer surface is a ground electrode and support member for the sensing head. The electrodes are excited by, for example, sinusoidal voltage having a peak-to-peak voltage of up to 500 volts at a frequency of 2 MHz. Capacitive currents flowing between the four sensing electrodes and the ground electrode are influenced by the presence and position of a particle passing the sensing head. Any changes in these currents due to the particle are amplified and synchronously detected to produce positional signal values that are converted to digital form. Using these digital forms and two values of time permit generation of values of the three components of the particle vector and thus the total velocity vector.

  8. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  9. Pyrotechnic deflagration velocity and permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begeal, D R; Stanton, P L

    1982-01-01

    Particle size, porosity, and permeability of the reactive material have long been considered to be important factors in propellant burning rates and the deflagration-to-detonation transition in explosives. It is reasonable to assume that these same parameters will also affect the deflagration velocity of pyrotechnics. This report describes an experimental program that addresses the permeability of porous solids (particulate beds), in terms of particle size and porosity, and the relationship between permeability and the behavior of pyrotechnics and explosives. The experimental techniques used to acquire permeability data and to characterize the pyrotechnic burning are discussed. Preliminary data have been obtained on the burning characteristics of titanium hydride/potassium perchlorate (THKP) and boron/calcium chromate (BCCR). With THKP, the velocity of a pressure wave (from hot product gases) in the unburned region shows unsteady behavior which is related to the initial porosity or permeability. Simultaneous measurements with pressure gauges and ion gauges reveal that the pressure wave precedes the burn front. Steady burning of BCCR was observed with pressure gauge diagnostics and with a microwave interferometry technique.

  10. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemoreツツサ the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.ツォツless

  11. Tangential velocity measurement using interferometric MTI radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W.; Mileshosky, Brian P.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2006-01-03

    Radar systems use time delay measurements between a transmitted signal and its echo to calculate range to a target. Ranges that change with time cause a Doppler offset in phase and frequency of the echo. Consequently, the closing velocity between target and radar can be measured by measuring the Doppler offset of the echo. The closing velocity is also known as radial velocity, or line-of-sight velocity. Doppler frequency is measured in a pulse-Doppler radar as a linear phase shift over a set of radar pulses during some Coherent Processing Interval (CPI). An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity of a target.

  12. DC Pro Software Tool Suite, Data Center Fact Sheet, Industrial Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet describes how DOE's Data Center Energy Profiler (DC Pro) Software Tool Suite and other resources can help U.S. companies identify ways to improve the efficiency of their data centers.

  13. Can an Iron Man Suit Be Made?: Science Behind Superheroes | GE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Can an Iron Man Suit Be Made?: Science Behind Superheroes Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new...

  14. Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monitoring and Diagnostic System - 2013 BTO Peer Review | Department of Energy Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System - 2013 BTO Peer Review Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System - 2013 BTO Peer Review Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon commlbldgs16_brambley_040413.pdf More Documents &

  15. The Department of Energy Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-02-04

    The supplied-air suits that protect DOE contractor and federal employees from exposure to harmful atmospheres and radioactive contaminants are not included in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification process for respiratory protective devices. Therefore, with the awareness and acknowledgement of NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Department established a system for acceptance testing of supplied-air suits.

  16. NREL: State and Local Governments - The Effect of State Policy Suites on

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Development of Solar Markets The Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar Markets In the report The Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar Markets NREL analysts use statistical analysis and detailed case studies to describe why solar market policies are more successful in some states than others. Their findings indicate that while no standard formula for solar implementation exists, the combination of foundational policies and localized strategies can

  17. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator for the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nonlinear matter power spectrum (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator for the nonlinear matter power spectrum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator for the nonlinear matter power spectrum Ongoing and future large scale structure surveys targeted at the investigation of dark energy will enter the nonlinear regime of structure formation. In order

  18. Hurricane Earl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Historical/Selected Significant Energy Disruptions > Hurricane Earl Hurricane Earl Released: September 3, 2010 2:00 p.m. EDT Map Sources: Infrastructure-Energy Information Administration (GasTran System), Ventyx (Energy Velocity); Hurricane path with 67% likelihood cone-National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Uncheck or check an item to hide or show it in the map. Electric Power Plants (>=100 MW) Coal Hydroelectric Natural Gas Nuclear Petroleum Wood Wind Other Electricity

  19. Quench propagation velocity for highly stabilized conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mints, R.G. |; Ogitsu, T. |; Devred, A.

    1995-05-01

    Quench propagation velocity in conductors having a large amount of stabilizer outside the multifilamentary area is considered. It is shown that the current redistribution process between the multifilamentary area and the stabilizer can strongly effect the quench propagation. A criterion is derived determining the conditions under which the current redistribution process becomes significant, and a model of effective stabilizer area is suggested to describe its influence on the quench propagation velocity. As an illustration, the model is applied to calculate the adiabatic quench propagation velocity for a conductor geometry with a multifilamentary area embedded inside the stabilizer.

  20. Equation-of-State Test Suite for the DYNA3D Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Russell D.

    2015-11-05

    This document describes the creation and implementation of a test suite for the Equationof- State models in the DYNA3D code. A customized input deck has been created for each model, as well as a script that extracts the relevant data from the high-speed edit file created by DYNA3D. Each equation-of-state model is broken apart and individual elements of the model are tested, as well as testing the entire model. The input deck for each model is described and the results of the tests are discussed. The intent of this work is to add this test suite to the validation suite presently used for DYNA3D.

  1. Internal Detonation Velocity Measurements Inside High Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benterou, J; Bennett, C V; Cole, G; Hare, D E; May, C; Udd, E

    2009-01-16

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/{micro}sec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

  2. ARM - Evaluation Product - Convective Vertical Velocity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsConvective Vertical Velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Convective Vertical Velocity Convective processes play an important role in Earth's energy balance by distributing heat and moisture throughout the atmosphere. In particular, vertical air motions associated with these

  3. Property:Maximum Velocity(m/s) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity(ms) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Velocity(ms) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Velocity(ms)" Showing 25 pages using this...

  4. Property:Velocity(m/s) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity(ms) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Velocity(ms) Property Type String Pages using the property "Velocity(ms)" Showing 21 pages using this property. A Alden...

  5. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS A protostellar jet and outflow...

  6. RESRAD Family of Codes - A Suite of Tools for Environmental Radiological Dose Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RESRAD Family of Codes - A Suite of Tools for Environmental Radiological Dose Assessment Charley Yu, PhD, CHP RESRAD Program Manager Environmental Science Division Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL Presented at Environmental Radiological Assistance Directory Web Conference June 27, 2012 Presentation Outline ぉ RESRAD Family of Codes Overview ぉ Brief Overview of the RESRAD Methodology ぉ RESRAD-BUILD Overview ぉ RESRAD-OFFSITE Overview ぉ RESRAD-BIOTA Overview ぉ Summary 2 RESRAD

  7. Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency Increases Accountability and Staff Engagement Throughout the Organization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency Increases Accountability and Staff Engagement Throughout the Organization Alcoa's corporate leadership recognizes the benefits of working with the U.S. Department of Energy through the Save Energy Now LEADER initiative to advance the company's industrial energy efficiency initiatives. Alcoa is the largest manufacturer of aluminum and aluminum products in the United States, and one of the largest consumers of electricity on the North American

  8. Cloud Properties from Doppler Radar Spectra - a Growing Suite of Information Extraction Algorithms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Doppler Radar Spectra - a Growing Suite of Information Extraction Algorithms Edward Luke 1 , Pavlos Kollias 2 , Matthew Shupe 3 , Karen Johnson 1 , Eugene Clothiaux 4 1. Brookhaven National Laboratory 2. McGill University 3. CIRES/NOAA/ETL 4. Penn State University C F B A E D Lidar Prediction Algorithm Depolarization C F B A E D Backscatter DOPPLER RADAR SPECTRA HYDROMETEOR PHASE CLASSIFICATION MIXED LIQUID SOLID MIXED LIQUID SOLID Shupe Multi-instrument Technique Doppler Radar Spectra

  9. BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT Farmington District Office 6251 College Blvd., Suite A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT Farmington District Office 6251 College Blvd., Suite A NMNM 122352 Farmington, New Mexico 87402 www.blm.gov/nm 2920 (21240-mr) Dear Render: Enclosed ror your review and comment is the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (Draft EIS) for the proposed San Juan Basin Energy Connect Project (Project). The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) prepared a Draft EIS in consultation with cooperating agencies and in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act

  10. Defending mining claims and mineral leases in environmental suits against federal land managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twelker, E. )

    1989-01-01

    Suits in the last 4-5 years jeopardize the title of thousands of mining claims and mineral leases. The cases presenting the most striking examples are National Wildlife Federation v. Burford, Connor v. Burford, Sierra Club V. Watt, and Bob Marshall Alliance v. Watt. From the claimants' and lessees' point of view, these decisions granted environmental groups sweeping, though somewhat ill-defined, relief. The challenges by environmental groups are based on statutes designed to bring environmental considerations before federal decision makers. The claimants and lessees are caught in the middle of the exchange between environmentalists and federal agencies. Lawsuits that indirectly challenge leases and claims are unlike environmental challenges to fixed projects such as highways or dams. Those affected often times do not know exactly what is at stake. When the challenge is indirect, unexplored, or partially explored, proper ties have only speculative value and the claimants and lessees are often unwilling or unable to engage in a fight with well-heeled environmental public interest law firms. While the federal government has defended the suits, their interests and those of the claimants and lessees may diverge. In the context of the four cases mentioned above, this paper addresses the rights and remedies of claimants and lessees before, during, and after environmental procedural suits that indirectly challenge federal mining claims and mineral leases.

  11. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanton, Philip L.; Sweatt, William C.; Crump, Jr., O. B.; Bonzon, Lloyd L.

    1993-09-14

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  12. Coiled tubing velocity strings keep wells unloaded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesson, H.R.; Shursen, J.L.

    1989-07-01

    Liquid loading is a problem in many older and even some newer gas wells, particularly in pressure depletion type reservoirs. This liquid loading results in decreased production and may even kill the well. The use of coiled tubing as a velocity string (or siphon string) has proved to be an economically viable alternative to allow continued and thus, increased cumulative production for wells experiencing liquid loading problems. Coiled tubing run inside the existing production string reduces the flow area, whether the well is produced up the tubing or up the annulus. This reduction in flow area results in an increase in flow velocity and thus, an increase in the well's ability to unload fluids.

  13. Radial velocities of southern visual multiple stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Pribulla, Theodor; Fischer, Debra E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of visual multiple stars were taken in 20082009 to detect or confirm spectroscopic subsystems and to determine their orbits. Radial velocities of 93 late-type stars belonging to visual multiple systems were measured by numerical cross-correlation. We provide the individual velocities, the width, and the amplitude of the Gaussians that approximate the correlations. The new information on the multiple systems resulting from these data is discussed. We discovered double-lined binaries in HD 41742B, HD 56593C, and HD 122613AB, confirmed several other known subsystems, and constrained the existence of subsystems in some visual binaries where both components turned out to have similar velocities. The orbits of double-lined subsystems with periods of 148 and 13 days are computed for HD 104471 Aa,Ab and HD 210349 Aa,Ab, respectively. We estimate individual magnitudes and masses of the components in these triple systems and update the outer orbit of HD 104471 AB.

  14. The Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar Markets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar Markets D. Steward and E. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP- 7A40-62506 November 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

  15. Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite) Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. Zip Code: - If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 - - Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey - - U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free:

  16. DOE-STD-1167-2003; Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1167-2003 OCTOBER 2003 DOE STANDARD THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RESPIRATORY ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM FOR SUPPLIED-AIR SUITS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301)

  17. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, D.; Gota, H.; Hayashi, R.; Kiyashko, V.; Morehouse, M.; Primavera, S.; Bolte, N.; Marsili, P.; Roche, T.; Wessel, F.

    2010-10-15

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  18. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machida, Masahiro N.

    2014-11-20

    A protostellar jet and outflow are calculated for ?270yr following the protostar formation using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation, in which both the protostar and its parent cloud are spatially resolved. A high-velocity (?100 km s{sup 1}) jet with good collimation is driven near the disk's inner edge, while a low-velocity (? 10 km s{sup 1}) outflow with a wide opening angle appears in the outer-disk region. The high-velocity jet propagates into the low-velocity outflow, forming a nested velocity structure in which a narrow high-velocity flow is enclosed by a wide low-velocity flow. The low-velocity outflow is in a nearly steady state, while the high-velocity jet appears intermittently. The time-variability of the jet is related to the episodic accretion from the disk onto the protostar, which is caused by gravitational instability and magnetic effects such as magnetic braking and magnetorotational instability. Although the high-velocity jet has a large kinetic energy, the mass and momentum of the jet are much smaller than those of the low-velocity outflow. A large fraction of the infalling gas is ejected by the low-velocity outflow. Thus, the low-velocity outflow actually has a more significant effect than the high-velocity jet in the very early phase of the star formation.

  19. Suite of Software Objects for Arbitrary Spatial Partitioning of Modeling Dataset

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-04-30

    SpatialDataSet is an abstract superclass for a suite of object classes which associate data structures with specific regions (Cells) or points (PCells) in two or three-dimensional space. The data structure carried by these Cells/PCells are arbitrary in layout, but the same layout is used for every Cell/PCell within the SpatialDataSet. The SpatialDataSet objects are used within ANL''s Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) to carry spatially distributed attributes of terrestrial, aquatic, and atmospheric objects in amoreツツサ simulation domain. DIAS is a flexible object based software framework for concurrent, multidisciplinary modeling. The SpatialDataSet allows access to the information carried within them without requiring knowledge of the details of the spatial partitioning of the data on the part of the requesting agent. The suite of SpatialDataSet objects can be used within object based software architectures other than DIAS. SpatialDataSet has many subclasses covering different modes of partitioning two or three dimensional space, including various forms of grids, meshes, networks, patchworks, etc.ツォツless

  20. Modeling coiled tubing velocity strings for gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, J.; Martinez, A.

    1995-12-31

    Multiphase flowing pressure and velocity prediction models are necessary to coiled tubing velocity string design. A model used by most of the coiled tubing service companies or manufacturers is reviewed. Guidance is provided for selecting a coiled tubing of the proper size. The steps include: (1) Measured data matching; (2) Fluid property adjustment; (3) Pressure, velocity, and holdup selection; (4) Correlation choice; (5) Coiled tubing selection. A velocity range for the lift of liquid is given.

  1. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium-heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth System Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Abernathey, R.; Pradal, M.-A.

    2014-11-20

    This paper uses a suite of Earth System models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science. The helium-heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in the earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedi that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a fewmoreツツサ hundred m2 s竏1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Because helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere, but radiocarbon equilibrates slowly, it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the Southeast Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi in the deep ocean than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.ツォツless

  2. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manz, P.; Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching ; Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Mller, H. W.; Scott, B. D.; Mller, S. H.; Fuchert, G.; Stroth, U.; Physik-Department E28, Technische Universit舩 Mnchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching

    2013-10-15

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfv駭 fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  3. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium窶塗eat paradoxes in a suite of Earth system models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Pradal, M.-A.; Abernathey, R.

    2015-07-27

    This paper uses a suite of Earth system models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science, each of which results from an inconsistency between theoretically motivated global energy balances and direct observations. The helium窶塗eat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in Earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedimoreツツサ that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a few hundred m2 s竏1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere and thus exhibit large gradients along isopycnals while radiocarbon equilibrates slowly and thus exhibits smaller gradients along isopycnals. Thus it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox, by increasing the transport of mantle helium to the surface more than it would radiocarbon. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the southeastern Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi below the thermocline than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so-called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.ツォツless

  4. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Maclin S.; Brodeur, Pierre H.; Jackson, Theodore G.

    1998-01-01

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

  5. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1998-07-14

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

  6. MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop The Department of Energy's Chief of Nuclear Safety hosted a MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop on June 5-6, 2012, in Germantown, Maryland. Approximately 70 participants attended. The purpose of the workshop was to: Discuss MACCS2 and atmospheric dispersion models as applied to DOE consequence analysis. Discuss implementation of HSS Safety Bulletin 2011-2, Accident Analysis Parameter Update, at field sites. Develop a

  7. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.; Park, HyeKyoung

    2014-12-01

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, ?0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, ?0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  8. Property:Current Velocity Range(m/s) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Current Velocity Range(ms) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Current Velocity Range(ms) Property Type String Pages using the property "Current Velocity Range(ms)"...

  9. Property:Maximum Velocity with Constriction(m/s) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity with Constriction(ms) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Velocity with Constriction(ms) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Velocity...

  10. P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    defined with layers of blocks. Slowness variations in the surface layer reflect local geology, including slow velocities for the sedimentary basins of Indian Wells and Rose...

  11. USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    some cases, although a significant portion of seismicity remains diffuse and does not cluster into sharply defined structures. The seismic velocity structure reveals heterogeneous...

  12. Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    some cases, although a significant portion of seismicity remains diffuse and does not cluster into sharply defined structures. The seismic velocity structure reveals heterogeneous...

  13. Anisotropic parameter estimation using velocity variation with offset analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herawati, I.; Saladin, M.; Pranowo, W.; Winardhie, S.; Priyono, A.

    2013-09-09

    Seismic anisotropy is defined as velocity dependent upon angle or offset. Knowledge about anisotropy effect on seismic data is important in amplitude analysis, stacking process and time to depth conversion. Due to this anisotropic effect, reflector can not be flattened using single velocity based on hyperbolic moveout equation. Therefore, after normal moveout correction, there will still be residual moveout that relates to velocity information. This research aims to obtain anisotropic parameters, ? and ?, using two proposed methods. The first method is called velocity variation with offset (VVO) which is based on simplification of weak anisotropy equation. In VVO method, velocity at each offset is calculated and plotted to obtain vertical velocity and parameter ?. The second method is inversion method using linear approach where vertical velocity, ?, and ? is estimated simultaneously. Both methods are tested on synthetic models using ray-tracing forward modelling. Results show that ? value can be estimated appropriately using both methods. Meanwhile, inversion based method give better estimation for obtaining ? value. This study shows that estimation on anisotropic parameters rely on the accuracy of normal moveout velocity, residual moveout and offset to angle transformation.

  14. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moos, Daniel (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  15. Integration & Co-development of a Geophysical CO2 Monitoring Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedmann, S J

    2007-07-24

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has emerged as a key technology for dramatic short-term reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in particular from large stationary. A key challenge in this arena is the monitoring and verification (M&V) of CO2 plumes in the deep subsurface. Towards that end, we have developed a tool that can simultaneously invert multiple sub-surface data sets to constrain the location, geometry, and saturation of subsurface CO2 plumes. We have focused on a suite of unconventional geophysical approaches that measure changes in electrical properties (electrical resistance tomography, electromagnetic induction tomography) and bulk crustal deformation (til-meters). We had also used constraints of the geology as rendered in a shared earth model (ShEM) and of the injection (e.g., total injected CO{sub 2}). We describe a stochastic inversion method for mapping subsurface regions where CO{sub 2} saturation is changing. The technique combines prior information with measurements of injected CO{sub 2} volume, reservoir deformation and electrical resistivity. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. The method can (a) jointly reconstruct disparate data types such as surface or subsurface tilt, electrical resistivity, and injected CO{sub 2} volume measurements, (b) provide quantitative measures of the result uncertainty, (c) identify competing models when the available data are insufficient to definitively identify a single optimal model and (d) rank the alternative models based on how well they fit available data. We present results from general simulations of a hypothetical case derived from a real site. We also apply the technique to a field in Wyoming, where measurements collected during CO{sub 2} injection for enhanced oil recovery serve to illustrate the method's performance. The stochastic inversions provide estimates of the most probable location, shape, volume of the plume and most likely CO{sub 2} saturation. The results suggest that the method can reconstruct data with poor signal to noise ratio and use hard constraints available from many sites and applications. External interest in the approach and method is high, and already commercial and DOE entities have requested technical work using the newly developed methodology for CO{sub 2} monitoring.

  16. Tracking moving radar targets with parallel, velocity-tuned filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickel, Douglas L.; Harmony, David W.; Bielek, Timothy P.; Hollowell, Jeff A.; Murray, Margaret S.; Martinez, Ana

    2013-04-30

    Radar data associated with radar illumination of a movable target is processed to monitor motion of the target. A plurality of filter operations are performed in parallel on the radar data so that each filter operation produces target image information. The filter operations are defined to have respectively corresponding velocity ranges that differ from one another. The target image information produced by one of the filter operations represents the target more accurately than the target image information produced by the remainder of the filter operations when a current velocity of the target is within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation. In response to the current velocity of the target being within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation, motion of the target is tracked based on the target image information produced by the one filter operation.

  17. Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

  18. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2015-11-17

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  19. Ground water flow velocity in the bank of the Columbia River, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, S.

    1995-12-01

    To properly characterize the transport of contaminants from the sediments beneath the Hanford Site into the Columbia River, a suite of In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors was deployed to accurately characterize the hydrologic regime in the banks of the river. The three dimensional flow velocity was recorded on an hourly basis from mid May to mid July, 1994 and for one week in September. The first data collection interval coincided with the seasonal high water level in the river while the second interval reflected conditions during relatively low seasonal river stage. Two flow sensors located approximately 50 feet from the river recorded flow directions which correlated very well with river stage, both on seasonal and diurnal time scales. During time intervals characterized by falling river stage, the flow sensors recorded flow toward the river while flow away from the river was recorded during times of rising river stage. The flow sensor near the river in the Hanford Formation recorded a component of flow oriented vertically downward, probably reflecting the details of the hydrostratigraphy in close proximity to the probe. The flow sensor near the river in the Ringold Formation recorded an upward component of flow which dominated the horizontal components most of the time. The upward flow in the Ringold probably reflects regional groundwater flow into the river. The magnitudes of the flow velocities recorded by the flow sensors were lower than expected, probably as a result of drilling induced disturbance of the hydraulic properties of the sediments around the probes. The probes were installed with resonant sonic drilling which may have compacted the sediments immediately surrounding the probes, thereby reducing the hydraulic conductivity adjacent to the probes and diverting the groundwater flow away from the sensors.

  20. Verification Test Suite (VERTS) For Rail Gun Applications using ALE3D: 2-D Hydrodynamics & Thermal Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najjar, F M; Solberg, J; White, D

    2008-04-17

    A verification test suite has been assessed with primary focus on low reynolds number flow of liquid metals. This is representative of the interface between the armature and rail in gun applications. The computational multiphysics framework, ALE3D, is used. The main objective of the current study is to provide guidance and gain confidence in the results obtained with ALE3D. A verification test suite based on 2-D cases is proposed and includes the lid-driven cavity and the Couette flow are investigated. The hydro and thermal fields are assumed to be steady and laminar in nature. Results are compared with analytical solutions and previously published data. Mesh resolution studies are performed along with various models for the equation of state.

  1. Lower bound on the electroweak wall velocity from hydrodynamic instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mテゥgevand, Ariel; Membiela, Federico Agustテュn; Sテ。nchez, Alejandro D.

    2015-03-27

    The subsonic expansion of bubbles in a strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is a convenient scenario for electroweak baryogenesis. For most extensions of the Standard Model, stationary subsonic solutions (i.e., deflagrations) exist for the propagation of phase transition fronts. However, deflagrations are known to be hydrodynamically unstable for wall velocities below a certain critical value. We calculate this critical velocity for several extensions of the Standard Model and compare with an estimation of the wall velocity. In general, we find a region in parameter space which gives stable deflagrations as well as favorable conditions for electroweak baryogenesis.

  2. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-26

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. The stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  3. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING STELLAR RADIAL VELOCITY JITTER AS A FUNCTION OF WAVELENGTH: THE SUN AS A PROXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchwinski, Robert C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Robertson, Paul; Ramsey, Lawrence; Harder, Jerald E-mail: suvrath@astro.psu.edu E-mail: lwr@psu.edu

    2015-01-01

    Using solar spectral irradiance measurements from the SORCE spacecraft and the F/F' technique, we have estimated the radial velocity (RV) scatter induced on the Sun by stellar activity as a function of wavelength. Our goal was to evaluate the potential advantages of using new near-infrared (NIR) spectrographs to search for low-mass planets around bright F, G, and K stars by beating down activity effects. Unlike M dwarfs, which have higher fluxes and therefore greater RV information content in the NIR, solar-type stars are brightest at visible wavelengths, and, based solely on information content, are better suited to traditional optical RV surveys. However, we find that the F/F' estimated RV noise induced by stellar activity is diminished by up to a factor of four in the NIR versus the visible. Observations with the upcoming future generation of NIR instruments can be a valuable addition to the search for low-mass planets around bright FGK stars in reducing the amount of stellar noise affecting RV measurements.

  4. The PDV Velocity History and Shock Arrival Time Analyzer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-08-29

    This software allows the user to analyze heterodyne beat signals generated when a Doppler-shifted laser light interacts with un-shifted laser light. The software analyzes the data in a joint time frequency domain to extract instantaneous velocity.

  5. Prop transport in vertical fractures: settling velocity correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, P.E.; Guler, N.

    1983-03-01

    The settling velocity of propping agents is a critical variable in the calculation of proppant distribution in a fracture. Most computer programs available in the industry today base estimates of settling velocity on a Stokes' Law type calculation. We have found that significant deviations from Stokes' Law settling velocities occur in cross-linked fluids and uncrosslinked fluids (concentrations in excess of 0.48%). This paper discusses experimental results obtained with a dynamic system and the implications which these data have on prop transport calculations. In addition, correlations have been derived which can be used to predict the settling velocities of particles in cross-linked gels. A discussion of these correlations will be included.

  6. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, RK; Sivaraman, C; Shippert, TR; Riihimaki, LD

    2015-07-01

    fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  7. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  8. Nonrelativistic QCD factorization and the velocity dependence of NNLO poles

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in heavy quarkonium production (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Nonrelativistic QCD factorization and the velocity dependence of NNLO poles in heavy quarkonium production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nonrelativistic QCD factorization and the velocity dependence of NNLO poles in heavy quarkonium production We study the transition of a heavy quark pair from octet to singlet color configurations at next-to-next-to-leading order in heavy quarkonium production. We show that the

  9. Longitudinal dispersion coefficient depending on superficial velocity of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    hydrogen isotopes flowing in column packed with zeolite pellets at 77.4 K (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Longitudinal dispersion coefficient depending on superficial velocity of hydrogen isotopes flowing in column packed with zeolite pellets at 77.4 K Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Longitudinal dispersion coefficient depending on superficial velocity of hydrogen isotopes flowing in column packed with zeolite pellets at 77.4 K Authors have been developing a cryogenic pressure

  10. Elastic wave velocity measurement combined with synchrotron X-ray

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measurements at high pressure and high temperature conditions: Towards prediction and reproduction of MoHole rocks (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Elastic wave velocity measurement combined with synchrotron X-ray measurements at high pressure and high temperature conditions: Towards prediction and reproduction of MoHole rocks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Elastic wave velocity measurement combined with synchrotron X-ray measurements at high pressure and high temperature

  11. Noise pair velocity and range echo location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-02-16

    An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution is disclosed. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna. 46 figs.

  12. Noise pair velocity and range echo location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna.

  13. Implementation of Remaining Useful Lifetime Transformer Models in the Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Lybeck, Nancy J.; Pham, Binh; Rusaw, Richard; Bickford, Randall

    2015-02-01

    Research and development efforts are required to address aging and reliability concerns of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants. As most plants continue to operate beyond the license life (i.e., towards 60 or 80 years), plant components are more likely to incur age-related degradation mechanisms. To assess and manage the health of aging plant assets across the nuclear industry, the Electric Power Research Institute has developed a web-based Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite for diagnosis and prognosis. FW-PHM is a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases, comprised of the Diagnostic Advisor, the Asset Fault Signature Database, the Remaining Useful Life Advisor, and the Remaining Useful Life Database, that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. The main focus of this paper is the implementation of prognostic models for generator step-up transformers in the FW-PHM Suite. One prognostic model discussed is based on the functional relationship between degree of polymerization, (the most commonly used metrics to assess the health of the winding insulation in a transformer) and furfural concentration in the insulating oil. The other model is based on thermal-induced degradation of the transformer insulation. By utilizing transformer loading information, established thermal models are used to estimate the hot spot temperature inside the transformer winding. Both models are implemented in the Remaining Useful Life Database of the FW-PHM Suite. The Remaining Useful Life Advisor utilizes the implemented prognostic models to estimate the remaining useful life of the paper winding insulation in the transformer based on actual oil testing and operational data.

  14. SNR Denton US LLP 1301 K Street, NW Suite 600, East Tower Washington, DC 20005-3364 USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SNR Denton US LLP 1301 K Street, NW Suite 600, East Tower Washington, DC 20005-3364 USA Thomas C. Jensen Partner thomas.jensen@snrdenton.com D +1 202 408 3956 M 703 304 5211 T +1 202 408 6400 F +1 202 408 6399 snrdenton.com March 28, 2012 BY E-MAIL Lamont Jackson Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code: OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 20585 Re: OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 Dear Mr. Jackson:: This letter is submitted on behalf of PPL

  15. Using the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Maguire, J.; Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important as a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes models that isolate the impacts of specific building components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models; these discrepancies are caused by differences in the models used by the engines or coding errors.

  16. Using the Beopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares-Velasco, Paulo Cesar; Maguire, Jeff; Horowitz, Scott; Christensen, Craig

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures to follow when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important because a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes building models that isolate the impacts of specific components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models. These discrepancies are caused by differences in the algorithms used by the engines or coding errors.

  17. 3610 N. 44th Street, Suite 250, Phoenix, AZ 85018 笳 Phone 602-808-2004 笳

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 N. 44th Street, Suite 250, Phoenix, AZ 85018 笳 Phone 602-808-2004 笳 Fax 602-808-2099 笳 www.sunzia.net October 17, 2013 Transmitted via electronic mail to juliea.smith@hq.doe.gov and christopher.lawrence@hq.doe.gov Subject: SunZia Southwest Transmission Project comments on Department of Energy's August 29, 2013 Federal Register Notice regarding Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects. The following comments are provided to the Department of

  18. Effects of increasing tip velocity on wind turbine rotor design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resor, Brian Ray; Maniaci, David Charles; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-05-01

    A reduction in cost of energy from wind is anticipated when maximum allowable tip velocity is allowed to increase. Rotor torque decreases as tip velocity increases and rotor size and power rating are held constant. Reduction in rotor torque yields a lighter weight gearbox, a decrease in the turbine cost, and an increase in the capacity for the turbine to deliver cost competitive electricity. The high speed rotor incurs costs attributable to rotor aero-acoustics and system loads. The increased loads of high speed rotors drive the sizing and cost of other components in the system. Rotor, drivetrain, and tower designs at 80 m/s maximum tip velocity and 100 m/s maximum tip velocity are created to quantify these effects. Component costs, annualized energy production, and cost of energy are computed for each design to quantify the change in overall cost of energy resulting from the increase in turbine tip velocity. High fidelity physics based models rather than cost and scaling models are used to perform the work. Results provide a quantitative assessment of anticipated costs and benefits for high speed rotors. Finally, important lessons regarding full system optimization of wind turbines are documented.

  19. Ion velocities in a micro-cathode arc thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang Taisen; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael; Beilis, Isak

    2012-06-15

    Ion velocities in the plasma jet generated by the micro-cathode arc thruster are studied by means of time-of-flight method using enhanced ion detection system (EIDS). The EIDS triggers perturbations (spikes) on arc current waveform, and the larger current in the spike generates denser plasma bunches propagating along with the mainstream plasma. The EIDS utilizes double electrostatic probes rather than single probes. The average Ti ion velocity is measured to be around 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} m/s without a magnetic field. It was found that the application of a magnetic field does not change ion velocities in the interelectrode region while leads to ion acceleration in the free expanding plasma plume by a factor of about 2. Ion velocities of about 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} m/s were detected for the magnetic field of about 300 mT at distance of about 100-200 mm from the cathode. It is proposed that plasma is accelerated due to Lorentz force. The average thrust is calculated using the ion velocity measurements and the cathode mass consumption rate, and its increase with the magnetic field is demonstrated.

  20. Exceptional Ground Accelerations and Velocities Caused by Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, John

    2008-01-17

    This project aims to understand the characteristics of the free-field strong-motion records that have yielded the 100 largest peak accelerations and the 100 largest peak velocities recorded to date. The peak is defined as the maximum magnitude of the acceleration or velocity vector during the strong shaking. This compilation includes 35 records with peak acceleration greater than gravity, and 41 records with peak velocities greater than 100 cm/s. The results represent an estimated 150,000 instrument-years of strong-motion recordings. The mean horizontal acceleration or velocity, as used for the NGA ground motion models, is typically 0.76 times the magnitude of this vector peak. Accelerations in the top 100 come from earthquakes as small as magnitude 5, while velocities in the top 100 all come from earthquakes with magnitude 6 or larger. Records are dominated by crustal earthquakes with thrust, oblique-thrust, or strike-slip mechanisms. Normal faulting mechanisms in crustal earthquakes constitute under 5% of the records in the databases searched, and an even smaller percentage of the exceptional records. All NEHRP site categories have contributed exceptional records, in proportions similar to the extent that they are represented in the larger database.

  1. Mixing between high velocity clouds and the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  2. Property:Wind Velocity Range(m/s) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Range(ms) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wind Velocity Range(ms) Property Type String Pages using the property "Wind Velocity Range(ms)" Showing 10 pages...

  3. Clutter in the GMTI range-velocity map.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-04-01

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar maps echo data to range and range-rate, which is a function of a moving target's velocity and its position within the antenna beam footprint. Even stationary clutter will exhibit an apparent motion spectrum and can interfere with moving vehicle detections. Consequently it is very important for a radar to understand how stationary clutter maps into radar measurements of range and velocity. This mapping depends on a wide variety of factors, including details of the radar motion, orientation, and the 3-D topography of the clutter.

  4. Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, A.; Zweben, S. J.; Stotler, D. P.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2012-08-10

    Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

  5. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kalesse, Heike

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  6. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  7. Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feldmann, Herman F. (Worthington, OH); Paisley, Mark A. (Upper Arlington, OH)

    1989-01-01

    The present invention discloses a novel method of operating a gasifier for production of fuel gas from carbonaceous fuels. The process disclosed enables operating in an entrained mode using inlet gas velocities of less than 7 feet per second, feedstock throughputs exceeding 4000 lbs/ft.sup.2 -hr, and pressures below 100 psia.

  8. Measurement of turbulent wind velocities using a rotating boom apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandborn, V.A.; Connell, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The present report covers both the development of a rotating-boom facility and the evaluation of the spectral energy of the turbulence measured relative to the rotating boom. The rotating boom is composed of a helicopter blade driven through a pulley speed reducer by a variable speed motor. The boom is mounted on a semiportable tower that can be raised to provide various ratios of hub height to rotor diameter. The boom can be mounted to rotate in either the vertical or horizontal plane. Probes that measure the three components of turbulence can be mounted at any location along the radius of the boom. Special hot-film sensors measured two components of the turbulence at a point directly in front of the rotating blade. By using the probe rotated 90/sup 0/ about its axis, the third turbulent velocity component was measured. Evaluation of the spectral energy distributions for the three components of velocity indicates a large concentration of energy at the rotational frequency. At frequencies slightly below the rotational frequency, the spectral energy is greatly reduced over that measured for the nonrotating case measurements. Peaks in the energy at frequencies that are multiples of the rotation frequency were also observed. We conclude that the rotating boom apparatus is suitable and ready to be used in experiments for developing and testing sensors for rotational measurement of wind velocity from wind turbine rotors. It also can be used to accurately measure turbulent wind for testing theories of rotationally sampled wind velocity.

  9. Velocity Autocorrelation Functions and Diffusion of Dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Daniyarov, T. T.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.

    2008-09-07

    The velocity autocorrelation functions and square displacements were calculated on the basis of experimental data obtained on experimental setup with dc discharge. Computer simulation of the system of dust particles by the method of the Langevin dynamics was performed. The comparisons of experimental and theoretical results are given.

  10. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  11. Forging of compressor blades: Temperature and ram velocity effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saigal, A.; Zhen, K.; Chan, T.S.

    1995-07-01

    Forging is one of the most widely used manufacturing process for making high-strength, structurally integrated, impact and creep-resistant Ti-6Al-4V compressor blades for jet engines. In addition, in modern metal forming technology, finite element analysis method and computer modeling are being extensively employed for initial evaluation and optimization of various processes, including forging. In this study, DEFORM, a rigid viscoplastic two-dimensional finite element code was used to study the effects of initial die temperature and initial ram velocity on the forging process. For a given billet, die temperature and ram velocity influence the strain rate, temperature distribution,and thus the flow stress of the material. The die temperature and the ram velocity were varied over the range 300 to 700 F and 15--25 in./sec, respectively, to estimate the maximum forging load and the total energy required to forge compressor blades. The ram velocity was assumed to vary linearly as a function of stroke. Based on the analysis,it was found the increasing the die temperature from 300 to 700 F decreases the forging loads by 19.9 percent and increases the average temperature of the workpiece by 43 F. Similarly, increasing the initial ram velocity from 15 to 25 in./sec decreases the forging loads by 25.2 percent and increases the average temperature of the workpiece by 36 F. The nodal temperature distribution is bimodal in each case. The forging energy required to forge the blades is approximately 18 kips *in./in.

  12. A Low-Velocity Zone in the Basement Beneath the Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone in the Basement Beneath the Valles Caldera, New Mexico Abstract We present quantitative results of forward modeling applied to a suite of travel time delays observed...

  13. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  14. VE-Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-10-01

    an open source virtual engineering software toolkit that simplifies information management so users can simultaneously interact with engineering analyses and graphical models to create a virtual decision-making environment.

  15. LANL Go Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    libraries, utilities, and software patches related to Google's Go programming language (http:www.golang.org). September 24, 2013 software Available for thumbnail of...

  16. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): FOURTH DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Carrillo, I.; Boeche, C.; Roeser, S.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Zwitter, T.; Binney, J.; De Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bijaoui, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Freeman, K.; Munari, U.; Anguiano, B.; and others

    2013-11-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atmospheric parameters are computed using a new pipeline, based on the algorithms of MATISSE and DEGAS. The spectral degeneracies and the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometric information are now better taken into consideration, improving the parameter determination compared to the previous RAVE data releases. The individual abundances for six elements (magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, iron, and nickel) are also given, based on a special-purpose pipeline that is also improved compared to that available for the RAVE DR3 and Chemical DR1 data releases. Together with photometric information and proper motions, these data can be retrieved from the RAVE collaboration Web site and the Vizier database.

  17. Low velocity ion stopping in binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tashev, Bekbolat; Baimbetov, Fazylkhan; Deutsch, Claude; Fromy, Patrice

    2008-10-15

    Attention is focused on the low ion velocity stopping mechanisms in multicomponent and dense target plasmas built of quasiclassical electron fluids neutralizing binary ionic mixtures, such as, deuterium-tritium of current fusion interest, proton-heliumlike iron in the solar interior or proton-helium ions considered in planetology, as well as other mixtures of fiducial concern in the heavy ion beam production of warm dense matter at Bragg peak conditions. The target plasma is taken in a multicomponent dielectric formulation a la Fried-Conte. The occurrence of projectile ion velocities (so-called critical) for which target electron slowing down equals that of given target ion components is also considered. The corresponding multiquadrature computations, albeit rather heavy, can be monitored analytical through a very compact code operating a PC cluster. Slowing down results are systematically scanned with respect to target temperature and electron density, as well as ion composition.

  18. Measuring In-Situ Mdf Velocity Of Detonation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horine, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); James, Jr., Forrest B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-10-25

    A system for determining the velocity of detonation of a mild detonation fuse mounted on the surface of a device includes placing the device in a predetermined position with respect to an apparatus that carries a couple of sensors that sense the passage of a detonation wave at first and second spaced locations along the fuse. The sensors operate a timer and the time and distance between the locations is used to determine the velocity of detonation. The sensors are preferably electrical contacts that are held spaced from but close to the fuse such that expansion of the fuse caused by detonation causes the fuse to touch the contact, causing an electrical signal to actuate the timer.

  19. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    49 Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman TR Shippert LD Riihimaki July 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or

  20. Slow Neutron Velocity Spectrometer Transmission Studies Of Pu

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Havens, W. W. Jr.; Melkonian, E.; Rainwater, L. J.; Levin, M.

    1951-05-28

    The slow neutron transmission of several samples of Pu has been investigated with the Columbia Neutron Velocity Spectrometer. Data are presented in two groups, those covering the energy region from 0 to 6 ev, and those covering the region above 6 ev. Below 6 ev the resolution was relatively good, and a detailed study of the cross section variation was made. Work above 6 ev consisted of merely locating levels and obtaining a rough idea of their strengths.

  1. Creating unstable velocity-space distributions with barium injections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pongratz, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    Large Debye lengths relative to detector dimensions and the absence of confining walls makes space an attractive laboratory for studying fundamental theories of plasma instabilities. However, natural space plasmas are rarely found displaced from equilibrium enough to permit isolation and diagnosis of the controlling parameters and driving conditions. Furthermore, any plasma or field response to the departure from equilibrium can be masked by noise in the natural system. Active experiments provide a technique for addressing the chicken or egg dilemma. Early thermite barium releases were generally conducted at low altitudes from sounding rockets to trace electric fields passively or to study configuration-space instabilities. One can also study velocity-space instabilities with barium releases. Neutral barium vapor releases wherein a typical speed greatly exceeds the thermal speed can be used to produce barium ion velocity-space distributions that should be subject to a number of microinstabilities. We examine the ion velocity-space distributions resulting from barium injections from orbiting spacecraft and shaped-charges.

  2. Supernova 2010as: the lowest-velocity member of a family of flat-velocity type IIb supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folatelli, Gastn; Bersten, Melina C.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Hamuy, Mario [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Olivares Estay, Felipe; Pignata, Giuliano [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, Joseph P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Holmbo, Simon; Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Morrell, Nidia; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, Mark M. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Frster, Francisco [Center for Mathematical Modelling, Universidad de Chile, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2120 Piso 7, Santiago (Chile); Prieto, Jos Luis [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Valenti, Stefano [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Afonso, Paulo; Altenmller, Konrad; Elliott, Jonny, E-mail: gaston.folatelli@ipmu.jp [Max-Planck-Institut fr extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstra゚e 1, D-85740 Garching (Germany); and others

    2014-09-01

    We present extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the stripped-envelope supernova SN 2010as. Spectroscopic peculiarities such as initially weak helium features and low expansion velocities with a nearly flat evolution place this object in the small family of events previously identified as transitional Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe). There is ubiquitous evidence of hydrogen, albeit weak, in this family of SNe, indicating that they are in fact a peculiar kind of Type IIb SNe that we name 'flat-velocity' Type IIb. The flat-velocity evolution謡hich occurs at different levels between 6000 and 8000 km s{sup 1} for different SNe耀uggests the presence of a dense shell in the ejecta. Despite the spectroscopic similarities, these objects show surprisingly diverse luminosities. We discuss the possible physical or geometrical unification picture for such diversity. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope images, we associate SN 2010as with a massive cluster and derive a progenitor age of ?6 Myr, assuming a single star-formation burst, which is compatible with a Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Our hydrodynamical modeling, on the contrary, indicates that the pre-explosion mass was relatively low, ?4 M {sub ?}. The seeming contradiction between a young age and low pre-SN mass may be solved by a massive interacting binary progenitor.

  3. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Ferber, Mattison K; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Fox, Ethan E

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Borofloat borosilicate glass, and is a follow-up to a similar study completed by the authors on Starphire soda-lime silicate glass last year. The response of the borosilicate glass to impact testing at different angles was also studied. The Borofloat glass was supplied by the US Army Research Laboratory and its tin-side was impacted or indented. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Borofloat. Seven sphere materials were used whose densities bracket that of rock: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, carbon steel, and a chrome steel. A gas gun or a ball-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against the glass tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Borofloat were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the seven sphere-Borofloat-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) BS glass responded similarly to soda-lime silicate glass when spherically indented but quite differently under sphere impact conditions; (2) Frictional effects contributed to fracture initiation in BS glass when it spherically indented. This effect was also observed with soda-lime silicate glass; (3) The force necessary to initiate fracture in BS glass under spherical impact decreases with increasing elastic modulus of the sphere material. This trend is opposite to what was observed with soda-lime silicate glass. Friction cannot explain this trend and the authors do not have a legitimate explanation for it yet; (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than under quasi-static conditions. That difference decreases with increasing elastic modulus mismatch between the sphere material and borosilicate This trend was opposite in soda-lime silicate glass; (5) Fracture in borosilicate glass occurs at lower velocities (i.e., easier) at 24{sup o} than at 0{sup o} (orthogonal) and 46{sup o} of impact for the same probability of failure. Though not analyzed yet, this suggests that a convolution of kinetic energy and friction is contributing to that trend; (6) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation RCIF. This likely is not a material property nor exclusive to borosilicate glass, rather, it is a statistical response of a combination of local, surface-located flaw and imposed tensile stress. Understanding of the surface flaw population and flaw positioning can likely enable prediction of spherical indentation RCIF; and (7) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Borofloat BS for impact kinetic energies up to {approx} 20 mJ. For kinetic energies between {approx} 20-150 mJ, fracture sometimes initiated. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 150 mJ. The energy values, and their boundaries, were much lower for BS glass than they were for soda-lime silicate glass.

  4. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  5. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raptis, A.C.

    1983-09-06

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions. 8 figs.

  6. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    2013-05-22

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  7. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  8. Characterizing the convective velocity fields in massive stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M.

    2014-11-01

    We apply the mathematical formalism of vector spherical harmonics decomposition to convective stellar velocity fields from multidimensional hydrodynamics simulations and show that the resulting power spectra furnish a robust and stable statistical description of stellar convective turbulence. Analysis of the power spectra helps identify key physical parameters of the convective process such as the dominant scale of the turbulent motions that influence the structure of massive evolved pre-supernova stars. We introduce the numerical method that can be used to calculate vector spherical harmonics power spectra from two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) convective shell simulation data. Using this method we study the properties of oxygen shell burning and convection for a 15 M {sub 笘厭 star simulated by the hydrodynamics code FLASH in 2D and 3D. We discuss the importance of realistic initial conditions to achieving successful core-collapse supernova explosions in multidimensional simulations. We show that the calculated power spectra can be used to generate realizations of the velocity fields of presupernova convective shells. We find that the slope of the solenoidal mode power spectrum remains mostly constant throughout the evolution of convection in the oxygen shell in both 2D and 3D simulations. We also find that the characteristic radial scales of the convective elements are smaller in 3D than in 2D, while the angular scales are larger in 3D.

  9. Discretising the velocity distribution for directional dark matter experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavanagh, Bradley J.

    2015-07-13

    Dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments which are directionally-sensitive may be the only method of probing the full velocity distribution function (VDF) of the Galactic DM halo. We present an angular basis for the DM VDF which can be used to parametrise the distribution in order to mitigate astrophysical uncertainties in future directional experiments and extract information about the DM halo. This basis consists of discretising the VDF in a series of angular bins, with the VDF being only a function of the DM speed v within each bin. In contrast to other methods, such as spherical harmonic expansions, the use of this basis allows us to guarantee that the resulting VDF is everywhere positive and therefore physical. We present a recipe for calculating the event rates corresponding to the discrete VDF for an arbitrary number of angular bins N and investigate the discretisation error which is introduced in this way. For smooth, Standard Halo Model-like distribution functions, only N=3 angular bins are required to achieve an accuracy of around 10窶30% in the number of events in each bin. Shortly after confirmation of the DM origin of the signal with around 50 events, this accuracy should be sufficient to allow the discretised velocity distribution to be employed reliably. For more extreme VDFs (such as streams), the discretisation error is typically much larger, but can be improved with increasing N. This method paves the way towards an astrophysics-independent analysis framework for the directional detection of dark matter.

  10. DETECTION OF LOW-VELOCITY COLLISIONS IN SATURN'S F RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attree, N. O.; Murray, C. D.; Cooper, N. J.; Williams, G. A.

    2012-08-20

    Jets of material extending several hundred kilometers from Saturn's F ring are thought to be caused by collisions at speeds of several tens of ms{sup -1} between {approx}10 km diameter objects such as S/2004 S 6 and the core of the ring. The subsequent effects of Keplerian shear give rise to the multi-stranded nature of the F ring. Observations of the ring by the Imaging Science Subsystem experiment on the Cassini spacecraft have provided evidence that some smaller protrusions from the ring's core are the result of low-velocity collisions with nearby objects. We refer to these protrusions as 'mini-jets' and one such feature has been observed for {approx}7.5 hr as its length changed from {approx}75 km to {approx}250 km while it simultaneously appeared to collapse into the core. Orbit determinations suggest that such mini-jets consist of ring material displaced by a {approx}1 ms{sup -1} collision with a nearby moonlet, resulting in paths relative to the core that are due to a combination of Keplerian shear and epicyclic motion. Detections of mini-jets in the Cassini images suggest that it may now be possible to understand most small-scale F ring structure as the result of such collisions. A study of these mini-jets will therefore put constraints on the properties of the colliding population as well as improve our understanding of low-velocity collisions between icy objects.

  11. Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Fox, Ethan E; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Ferber, Mattison K

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) sphere impact testing of two materials from the lithium aluminosilicate family reinforced with different amounts of ceramic particulate, i.e., glass-ceramic materials, SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-G1 and SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-L. Both materials are provided by SCHOTT Glass (Duryea, PA). This work is a follow-up to similar sphere impact studies completed by the authors on PPG's Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass and SCHOTT BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. A gas gun or a sphere-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) spheres against the glass ceramic tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the glass-ceramics were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between sphere and target material. Quasistatic spherical indentation was also performed on both glass ceramics and their contact damage responses were compared to those of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses. Lastly, variability of contact damage response was assessed by performing spherical indentation testing across the area of an entire glass ceramic tile. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Resistan{trademark}-L glass ceramic required the highest velocity of sphere impact for damage to initiate. Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass was second best, then Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and then BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (2) Glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-L also required the largest force to initiate ring crack from quasi-static indentation. That ranking was followed, in descending order, by Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass, Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (3) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in Resistan{trademark}-G1 from quasi-static spherical indentation. This indicates that friction is affecting ring crack initiation in Resistan{trademark}-G1. Friction also affected ring crack initiation in Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glasses. Among these three materials, friction was the most pronounced (largest slope in the RCIF-elastic modulus graph) in the Starphire{reg_sign} and least pronounced in the BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. The reason for this is not understood, but differences in deformation behavior under high contact stresses could be a cause or contributor to this. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than it is under quasi-static conditions in Resistan{trademark}-L and Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramics. This is a trend observed too in Starphire{reg_sign} and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. (5) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation-induced ring crack initiation forces. This is not a material property nor is it exclusive to glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, rather, it is a statistical mechanical response to an accumulated history of processing and handling of that specific tile.

  12. Mass-velocity and size-velocity distributions of ejecta cloud from shock-loaded tin surface using atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L.

    2015-04-28

    The mass (volume and areal densities) versus velocity as well as the size versus velocity distributions of a shock-induced cloud of particles are investigated using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. A generic three-dimensional tin crystal with a sinusoidal free surface roughness (single wavelength) is set in contact with vacuum and shock-loaded so that it melts directly on shock. At the reflection of the shock wave onto the perturbations of the free surface, two-dimensional sheets/jets of liquid metal are ejected. The simulations show that the distributions may be described by an analytical model based on the propagation of a fragmentation zone, from the tip of the sheets to the free surface, in which the kinetic energy of the atoms decreases as this zone comes closer to the free surface on late times. As this kinetic energy drives (i) the (self-similar) expansion of the zone once it has broken away from the sheet and (ii) the average size of the particles which result from fragmentation in the zone, the ejected mass and the average size of the particles progressively increase in the cloud as fragmentation occurs closer to the free surface. Though relative to nanometric scales, our model may help in the analysis of experimental profiles.

  13. Low velocity impact of inclined CSM composite laminates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, W.S.; Madjidi, S.; Marshall, I.H.; Robb, M.D.

    1993-12-31

    The damage tolerance of composite laminates subject to low velocity impact is an important aspect of current design philosophies required to ensure the integrity of primary load bearing structures. To the authors knowledge, no work published in the open literature has addressed the damage tolerance of composites subject to impacts at non-perpendicular inclinations, which in practical situations is the most common form of impact. This paper describes an experimental study, devised to assess the influence of inclined impact on the residual strength characteristics of CSM laminates. Preliminary experimental results and comparisons with previous work on flat plate impact tests are presented. The influence of the degree of inclination and impact energy are correlated with the laminates damage area and residual tensile properties.

  14. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-08-08

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphics pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  15. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  16. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, Edwin F. (Alamo, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  17. Two-dimensional Imaging Velocity Interferometry: Technique and Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erskine, D J; Smith, R F; Bolme, C; Celliers, P; Collins, G

    2011-03-23

    We describe the data analysis procedures for an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image at a moment in time, i.e. a snapshot 2d-VISAR. Velocity interferometers (VISAR) measuring target motion to high precision have been an important diagnostic in shockwave physics for many years Until recently, this diagnostic has been limited to measuring motion at points or lines across a target. We introduce an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image, which could be called a snapshot 2d-VISAR. If a sufficiently fast movie camera technology existed, it could be placed behind a traditional VISAR optical system and record a 2d image vs time. But since that technology is not yet available, we use a CCD detector to record a single 2d image, with the pulsed nature of the illumination providing the time resolution. Consequently, since we are using pulsed illumination having a coherence length shorter than the VISAR interferometer delay ({approx}0.1 ns), we must use the white light velocimetry configuration to produce fringes with significant visibility. In this scheme, two interferometers (illuminating, detecting) having nearly identical delays are used in series, with one before the target and one after. This produces fringes with at most 50% visibility, but otherwise has the same fringe shift per target motion of a traditional VISAR. The 2d-VISAR observes a new world of information about shock behavior not readily accessible by traditional point or 1d-VISARS, simultaneously providing both a velocity map and an 'ordinary' snapshot photograph of the target. The 2d-VISAR has been used to observe nonuniformities in NIF related targets (polycrystalline diamond, Be), and in Si and Al.

  18. DIFFERENTIAL GROUP-VELOCITY DETECTION OF FLUID PATHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leland Timothy Long

    2005-12-20

    For nearly 50 years, surface waves that propagate through near-surface soils have been utilized in engineering for the determination of the small-strain dynamic properties of soils. These techniques, although useful, have not been sufficiently precise to use in detecting the subtle changes in soil properties that accompany short-term changes in fluid content. The differential techniques developed in this research now make it possible to monitor small changes (less than 3 cm) in the water level of shallow soil aquifers. Using inversion techniques and tomography, differential seismic techniques could track the water level distribution in aquifers with water being pumped in or out. Differential surface wave analysis could lead to new ways to monitor reservoir levels and verify hydrologic models. Field data obtained during this investigation have measured changes in surface-wave phase and group velocity before and after major rain events, and have detected subtle changes associated with pumping water into an aquifer and pumping water out of an aquifer. This research has established analysis techniques for observing these changes. These techniques combine time domain measurements to isolate surface wave arrivals with frequency domain techniques to determine the effects as a function of frequency. Understanding the differences in response as a function of wave frequency facilitates the inversion of this data for soil velocity structure. These techniques have also quantified many aspects of data acquisition and analysis that are important for significant results. These include tight control on the character of the source and proper placement of the geophones. One important application is the possibility that surface waves could be used to monitor and/or track fluid movement during clean-up operations, verifying that the fluid reached all affected areas. Extending this to a larger scale could facilitate monitoring of water resources in basins without having to drill many expensive wells. The next step is to investigate the commercial applications of differential surface wave analysis.

  19. Assessing the CAM5 Physics Suite in the WRF-Chem Model: Implementation, Resolution Sensitivity, and a First Evaluation for a Regional Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-05-06

    A suite of physical parameterizations (deep and shallow convection, turbulent boundary layer, aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud fraction) from the global climate model Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) has been implemented in the regional model Weather Research and Forecasting with chemistry (WRF-Chem). A downscaling modeling framework with consistent physics has also been established in which both global and regional simulations use the same emissions and surface fluxes. The WRF-Chem model with the CAM5 physics suite is run at multiple horizontal resolutions over a domain encompassing the northern Pacific Ocean, northeast Asia, and northwest North America for April 2008 when the ARCTAS, ARCPAC, and ISDAC field campaigns took place. These simulations are evaluated against field campaign measurements, satellite retrievals, and ground-based observations, and are compared with simulations that use a set of common WRF-Chem Parameterizations. This manuscript describes the implementation of the CAM5 physics suite in WRF-Chem provides an overview of the modeling framework and an initial evaluation of the simulated meteorology, clouds, and aerosols, and quantifies the resolution dependence of the cloud and aerosol parameterizations. We demonstrate that some of the CAM5 biases, such as high estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols and the underestimation of aerosol concentrations in the Arctic, can be reduced simply by increasing horizontal resolution. We also show that the CAM5 physics suite performs similarly to a set of parameterizations commonly used in WRF-Chem, but produces higher ice and liquid water condensate amounts and near-surface black carbon concentration. Further evaluations that use other mesoscale model parameterizations and perform other case studies are needed to infer whether one parameterization consistently produces results more consistent with observations.

  20. Coiled tubing velocity string hangoff method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gipson, T.C.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes a method for hanging off a coiled tube velocity string in an active gas production well tubing run, the run having at least a master valve and a first line valve. It includes installing a hangoff assembly in the production well tubing run between the master valve and the first line valve the hangoff assembly comprising a hangoff head, a second line valve, an upper valve, and a hydraulic packoff valve, the hangoff head further comprising a threaded body member, a slip bowl and a threaded cap; inserting through the hydraulic packoff valve, the upper valve, and the hangoff head, coiled tubing for fluid communication with well gases and fluids in the production well tubing run, the coiled tubing having a first downhole end being open to immediately receive and conduct the gases and fluids; opening gas and fluid communication between the production well tubing run and the open end of the coiled tubing whereby the well gases and fluid may pass up through the coiled tubing, the hangoff head sealing the gases and fluids from passing to the hydraulic packoff valve, the upper valve and the second line valve; further inserting the coiled tubing to a desired depth in the production well tubing run; and rotating the cap of the hangoff head to expose the slip bowl.

  1. Radiation Hydrodynamics Test Problems with Linear Velocity Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendon, Raymond C.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-08-22

    As an extension of the works of Coggeshall and Ramsey, a class of analytic solutions to the radiation hydrodynamics equations is derived for code verification purposes. These solutions are valid under assumptions including diffusive radiation transport, a polytropic gas equation of state, constant conductivity, separable flow velocity proportional to the curvilinear radial coordinate, and divergence-free heat flux. In accordance with these assumptions, the derived solution class is mathematically invariant with respect to the presence of radiative heat conduction, and thus represents a solution to the compressible flow (Euler) equations with or without conduction terms included. With this solution class, a quantitative code verification study (using spatial convergence rates) is performed for the cell-centered, finite volume, Eulerian compressible flow code xRAGE developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Simulation results show near second order spatial convergence in all physical variables when using the hydrodynamics solver only, consistent with that solver's underlying order of accuracy. However, contrary to the mathematical properties of the solution class, when heat conduction algorithms are enabled the calculation does not converge to the analytic solution.

  2. Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmann, H.F.; Paisley, M.A.

    1989-05-09

    A method is described for operating a gasifier which comprises: introducing inlet gas at a velocity of about 0.5 to 7 ft/sec to fluidize a bed in a gasifier vessel; forming the bed into a fluidized bed in a first space region by means of the inlet gas, the fluidized bed containing a circulating hot relatively fine and inert solid bed particle component; inputting and throughputting carbonaceous material into and through the first space region with fluidized bed at a rate from 500-4400 lbs/ft/sup 2/-hr; endothermally pyrolyzing the carbonaceous material by means of the circulating hot inert particle component so as to form a product gas; forming contiguous to and above the fluidized bed a lower average density entrained space region containing an entrained mixture of inert solid particles, char, and carbonaceous material and the product gas; gradually and continuously removing the entrained mixture and the product gas from the lower average density entrained space region of the gasifier to a separator, residence time of the carbonaceous material in the gasifier not exceeding 3 minutes on average; separating the entrained mixture from the product gas; passing the entrained mixture containing inert solid particles, char, and carbonaceous material through an exothermic reaction zone to add heat; and returning at least the inert solid particles to the first space region.

  3. Seismic Velocity Measurements at Expanded Seismic Network Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woolery, Edward W; Wang, Zhenming

    2005-01-01

    Structures at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), as well as at other locations in the northern Jackson Purchase of western Kentucky may be subjected to large far-field earthquake ground motions from the New Madrid seismic zone, as well as those from small and moderate-sized local events. The resultant ground motion a particular structure is exposed from such event will be a consequence of the earthquake magnitude, the structures' proximity to the event, and the dynamic and geometrical characteristics of the thick soils upon which they are, of necessity, constructed. This investigation evaluated the latter. Downhole and surface (i.e., refraction and reflection) seismic velocity data were collected at the Kentucky Seismic and Strong-Motion Network expansion sites in the vicinity of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to define the dynamic properties of the deep sediment overburden that can produce modifying effects on earthquake waves. These effects are manifested as modifications of the earthquake waves' amplitude, frequency, and duration. Each of these three ground motion manifestations is also fundamental to the assessment of secondary earthquake engineering hazards such as liquefaction.

  4. Sound velocity of tantalum under shock compression in the 18窶142窶烏Pa range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xi, Feng Jin, Ke; Cai, Lingcang Geng, Huayun; Tan, Ye; Li, Jun

    2015-05-14

    Dynamic compression experiments of tantalum (Ta) within a shock pressure range from 18窶142窶烏Pa were conducted driven by explosive, a two-stage light gas gun, and a powder gun, respectively. The time-resolved Ta/LiF (lithium fluoride) interface velocity profiles were recorded with a displacement interferometer system for any reflector. Sound velocities of Ta were obtained from the peak state time duration measurements with the step-sample technique and the direct-reverse impact technique. The uncertainty of measured sound velocities were analyzed carefully, which suggests that the symmetrical impact method with step-samples is more accurate for sound velocity measurement, and the most important parameter in this type experiment is the accurate sample/window particle velocity profile, especially the accurate peak state time duration. From these carefully analyzed sound velocity data, no evidence of a phase transition was found up to the shock melting pressure of Ta.

  5. Determination of plasma velocity from light fluctuations in a cutting torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2009-09-01

    Measurements of plasma velocities in a 30 A high energy density cutting torch are reported. The velocity diagnostic is based on the analysis of the light fluctuations emitted by the arc which are assumed to propagate with the flow velocity. These light fluctuations originate from plasma temperature and plasma density fluctuations mainly due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Fast photodiodes are employed as the light sensors. The arc core velocity was obtained from spectrally filtered light fluctuations measurements using a band-pass filter to detect light emission fluctuations emitted only from the arc axis. Maximum plasma jet velocities of 5000 m s{sup -1} close to the nozzle exit and about 2000 m s{sup -1} close to the anode were found. The obtained velocity values are in good agreement with those values predicted by a numerical code for a similar torch to that employed in this work.

  6. Peak Ground Velocities for Seismic Events at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Coppersmith; R. Quittmeyer

    2005-02-16

    This report describes a scientific analysis to bound credible horizontal peak ground velocities (PGV) for the repository waste emplacement level at Yucca Mountain. Results are presented as a probability distribution for horizontal PGV to represent uncertainties in the analysis. The analysis also combines the bound to horizontal PGV with results of ground motion site-response modeling (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027]) to develop a composite hazard curve for horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level. This result provides input to an abstraction of seismic consequences (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169183]). The seismic consequence abstraction, in turn, defines the input data and computational algorithms for the seismic scenario class of the total system performance assessment (TSPA). Planning for the analysis is documented in Technical Work Plan TWP-MGR-GS-000001 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171850]). The bound on horizontal PGV at the repository waste emplacement level developed in this analysis complements ground motions developed on the basis of PSHA results. In the PSHA, ground motion experts characterized the epistemic uncertainty and aleatory variability in their ground motion interpretations. To characterize the aleatory variability they used unbounded lognormal distributions. As a consequence of these characterizations, as seismic hazard calculations are extended to lower and lower annual frequencies of being exceeded, the ground motion level increases without bound, eventually reaching levels that are not credible (Corradini 2003 [DIRS 171191]). To provide credible seismic inputs for TSPA, in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 63.102(j) [DIRS 156605], this complementary analysis is carried out to determine reasonable bounding values of horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level for annual frequencies of exceedance as low as 10{sup -8}. For each realization of the TSPA seismic scenario, the results of this analysis provide a constraint on the values sampled from the horizontal PGV hazard curve for the waste emplacement level. The relation of this analysis to other work feeding the seismic consequence abstraction and the TSPA is shown on Figure 1-1. The ground motion hazard results from the PSHA provide the basis for inputs to a site-response model that determines the effect of site materials on the ground motion at a location of interest (e.g., the waste emplacement level). Peak ground velocity values determined from the site-response model for the waste emplacement level are then used to develop time histories (seismograms) that form input to a model of drift degradation under seismic loads potentially producing rockfall. The time histories are also used to carry out dynamic seismic structural response calculations of the drip shield and waste package system. For the drip shield, damage from seismically induced rockfall also is considered. In the seismic consequence abstraction, residual stress results from the structural response calculations are interpreted in terms of the percentage of the component (drip shield, waste package) damaged as a function of horizontal PGV. The composite hazard curve developed in this analysis, which reflects the results of site-response modeling and the bound to credible horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level, also feeds the seismic consequence abstraction. The composite hazard curve is incorporated into the TSPA sampling process to bound horizontal PGV and related seismic consequences to values that are credible.

  7. DEPOSITION VELOCITY ESTIMATION WITH THE GENII V2 SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchins, H.

    2012-04-23

    In 2010, the Department of Energy (DOE) Chief of Nuclear Safety and Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), with the support of industry experts in atmospheric sciences and accident dose consequences analysis, performed detailed analyses of the basis for the dry deposition velocity (DV) values used in the MACCS2 computer code. As a result of these analyses, DOE concluded that the historically used default DV values of 1 centimeter/second (cm/s) for unfiltered/unmitigated releases and 0.1 cm/s for filtered/mitigated releases may not be reasonably conservative for all DOE sites and accident scenarios. HSS recently issued Safety Bulletin 2011-02, Accident Analysis Parameter Update, recommending the use of the newly developed default DV, 0.1 cm/s for an unmitigated/unfiltered release. Alternatively site specific DV values can be developed using GENII version 2 (GENII v2) computer code. Key input parameters for calculating DV values include surface roughness, maximum wind speed for calm, particle size, particle density and meteorological data (wind speed and stability class). This paper will include reasonably conservative inputs, and a truncated parametric study. In lieu of the highly-conservative recommended DV value (0.1cm/s) for unmitigated/unfiltered release, GENII v2 has been used to justify estimated 95th percentile DV values. Also presented here are atmospheric dilution factors ({chi}/Q values) calculated with the MACCS2 code using the DV values form GENII v2, {chi}/Q values calculated directly with GENII v2, and a discussion of these results compare with one another. This paper will give an overview of the process of calculating DV with GENII v2 including a discussion of the sensitivity of input parameters.

  8. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a

  9. Test Loop Demonstration and Evaluation of Slurry Transfer Line Critical Velocity Measurement Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Morgen, Gerald P.; Peters, Timothy J.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Baer, Ellen BK

    2010-07-31

    This report presents the results of the evaluation of three ultrasonic sensors for detecting critical velocity during slurry transfer between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  10. Use of traveltime skips in refraction analysis to delineate velocity inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, H.C.; Dixit, M.M.; Murty, P.R.K.

    1995-08-01

    First arrival refraction data does not normally provide any indication of the velocity inversion problem. However, under certain favorable circumstances, when the low-velocity layer (LVL) is considerably thicker than the overlying higher-velocity layer (HVL), the velocity inversion can be seen in the form of a traveltime skip. Model studies show that in such cases the length of the HVL traveltime branch can be used to determine the thickness of the HVL and the magnitude of the traveltime skip in order to determine the thickness of the LVL. This is also applicable in the case of field data.

  11. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  12. THE A.EROSPACE CORPORATION Suite 4000, 955 L'Enfk Plaza, S. W,, Wash&-ton, D,C: 200.24~ZJ74, Telephone:'(

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -t / . \; ', THE A.EROSPACE CORPORATION Suite 4000, 955 L'Enfk Plaza, S. W,, Wash&-ton, D,C: 200.24~ZJ74, Telephone:'( Mr: Edward DeLaney, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S; Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. DeLaney: AUTHORITY REVIEW FOR MED OPERATIONS CONDUCTED AT AMES LABDRATORY :@*oi-l 12) 488-6000 1 I Enclosed please find Attachment 1, I a summary of the facts and issues relating to the authority for remedial action at Ames; of

  13. Temporal evolution of bubble tip velocity in classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability at arbitrary Atwood numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, W. H.; HEDPS and CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 ; Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088; Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 ; He, X. T.; Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088

    2013-06-15

    In this research, the temporal evolution of the bubble tip velocity in Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at arbitrary Atwood numbers and different initial perturbation velocities with a discontinuous profile in irrotational, incompressible, and inviscid fluids (i.e., classical RTI) is investigated. Potential models from Layzer [Astrophys. J. 122, 1 (1955)] and perturbation velocity potentials from Goncharov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 134502 (2002)] are introduced. It is found that the temporal evolution of bubble tip velocity [u(t)] depends essentially on the initial perturbation velocity [u(0)]. First, when the u(0)velocity increases smoothly up to the asymptotic velocity (u{sup asp}) or terminal velocity. Second, when C{sup (1)}u{sup asp}?u(0)velocity increases quickly, reaching a maximum velocity and then drops slowly to the u{sup asp}. Third, when C{sup (2)}u{sup asp}?u(0)velocity decays rapidly to a minimum velocity and then increases gradually toward the u{sup asp}. Finally, when u(0)?C{sup (3)}u{sup asp}, the bubble tip velocity decays monotonically to the u{sup asp}. Here, the critical coefficients C{sup (1)},C{sup (2)}, and C{sup (3)}, which depend sensitively on the Atwood number (A) and the initial perturbation amplitude of the bubble tip [h(0)], are determined by a numerical approach. The model proposed here agrees with hydrodynamic simulations. Thus, it should be included in applications where the bubble tip velocity plays an important role, such as the design of the ignition target of inertial confinement fusion where the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) can create the seed of RTI with u(0)?u{sup asp}, and stellar formation and evolution in astrophysics where the deflagration wave front propagating outwardly from the star is subject to the combined RMI and RTI.

  14. Velocity scaling for filament motion in scrape-off layer plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kube, R.; Garcia, O. E.

    2011-10-15

    The velocity scaling for isolated plasma filaments in non-uniformly magnetized plasmas with respect to filament amplitude and cross-field size has been investigated by means of numerical simulations. The model includes electric currents due to magnetic gradient and curvature drifts, polarization drifts, and parallel currents through sheaths, where the magnetic field lines intersect material walls. In the ideal limit, the radial velocity of the filament increases with the square root of its size. When sheath currents dominate over polarization currents, the filament velocity is inversely proportional to the square of its size. In the presence of sheath currents, the velocity is maximum for an intermediate filament size determined by the balance between diamagnetic, polarization, and sheath currents. The parameter dependence of this filament size and velocity is elucidated. The results are discussed in the context of blob-like structures in basic laboratory plasma experiments and in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas.

  15. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ? log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

  16. Extracting Short Rise-Time Velocity Profiles with Digital Down-Shift Analysis of Optically Up-Converted PDV Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel Diaz, Nathan Riley, Cenobio Gallegos, Matthew Teel, Michael Berninger, Thomas W. Tunnell

    2010-09-08

    This work describes the digital down-shift (DDS) technique, a new method of extracting short rise-time velocity profiles in the analysis of optically up-converted PDV data. The DDS technique manipulates the PDV data by subtracting a constant velocity (i.e., the DDS velocity ?DDS) from the velocity profile. DDS exploits the simple fact that the optically up-converted data ride on top of a base velocity (?0, the apparent velocity at no motion) with a rapid rise to a high velocity (?f) of a few km/s or more. Consequently, the frequency content of the signal must describe a velocity profile that increases from ?0 to ?0 + ?f. The DDS technique produces velocity reversals in the processed data before shock breakout when ?0 < ?DDS < ?0 + ?f. The DDS analysis process strategically selects specific DDS velocities (velocity at which the user down shifts the data) that produce anomalous reversals (maxima and/or minima), which are predictable and easy to identify in the mid-range of the data. Additional analysis determines when these maxima and minima occur. By successive application of the DDS technique and iterative analysis, velocity profiles are extracted as time as a function of velocity rather than as a function of time as it would be in a conventional velocity profile. Presented results include a description of DDS, velocity profiles extracted from laser-driven shock data with rise times of 200 ps or less, and a comparison with other techniques.

  17. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Fritz, I.J.; Osbourn, G.C.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1984-04-19

    In a field-effect transistor comprising a semiconductor having therein a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship, there is provided an improvement wherein said semiconductor is a superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers comprising a first direct gap semiconductor material which in bulk form has a certain bandgap and a curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field which has a maximum electron velocity at a certain electric field, the barrier layers comprising a second semiconductor material having a bandgap wider than that of said first semiconductor material, wherein the layer thicknesses of said quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice having a curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field which has a maximum electron velocity at a certain electric field, and wherein the thicknesses of said quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice curve of electron velocity versus applied electric field whereby, at applied electric fields higher than that at which the maximum electron velocity occurs in said first material when in bulk form, the electron velocities are higher in said superlattice than they are in said first semiconductor material in bulk form.

  18. Using the depth-velocity-size diagram to interpret equilibrium bed configurations in river flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southard, J.B. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Data from flume studies that report equilibrium bed configuration as well as water temperature, flow depth, flow velocity, and sediment size were used to develop the best approximation to the relationships among the various bed phases (ripples, dunes, lower regime plane bed, upper regime plane bed, and antidunes) in a three-axis graph (depth-velocity-size diagram) with dimensionless measures of mean flow depth, mean flow velocity, and sediment size along the axis. Relationships are shown in a series of depth-velocity and velocity-size sections through the diagram. Boundaries between bed-phase stability fields are drawn as surfaces that minimize, misplacement of data points. A large subset of the data, for which reliable values of bed shear stress are reported, was also used to represent the stability relationships in a graph of dimensionless boundary shear stress against dimensionless sediment size, but with results less useful for fluvial flow interpretation. The diagram covers about one order of magnitude in flow depth. To be useful for river flows, the diagram must be extrapolated in flow depth by about one more order of magnitude, but this is not a serious problem for approximate work. The depth-velocity-size diagram permits prediction of equilibrium bed configuration in river flows when the approximate flow depth and mean flow velocity are known. Because the diagram is essentially dimensionless, the effect of water temperature (via the fluid viscosity) on the bed configuration is easily accounted for by use of the diagram.

  19. Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

    2011-11-22

    Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

  20. Alignments of the galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster with the local velocity shear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jounghun; Rey, Soo Chang; Kim, Suk

    2014-08-10

    Observational evidence is presented for the alignment between the cosmic sheet and the principal axis of the velocity shear field at the position of the Virgo cluster. The galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster from the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog that was recently constructed by Kim et al. are used to determine the direction of the local sheet. The peculiar velocity field reconstructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 is analyzed to estimate the local velocity shear tensor at the Virgo center. Showing first that the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear tensor is almost parallel to the direction of the line of sight, we detect a clear signal of alignment between the positions of the Virgo satellites and the intermediate principal axis of the local velocity shear projected onto the plane of the sky. Furthermore, the dwarf satellites are found to appear more strongly aligned than their normal counterparts, which is interpreted as an indication of the following. (1) The normal satellites and the dwarf satellites fall in the Virgo cluster preferentially along the local filament and the local sheet, respectively. (2) The local filament is aligned with the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear while the local sheet is parallel to the plane spanned by the minor and intermediate principal axes. Our result is consistent with the recent numerical claim that the velocity shear is a good tracer of the cosmic web.

  1. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA COLORS AND EJECTA VELOCITIES: HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN REGRESSION WITH NON-GAUSSIAN DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Foley, Ryan J., E-mail: kmandel@cfa.harvard.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We investigate the statistical dependence of the peak intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) on their expansion velocities at maximum light, measured from the Si II ?6355 spectral feature. We construct a new hierarchical Bayesian regression model, accounting for the random effects of intrinsic scatter, measurement error, and reddening by host galaxy dust, and implement a Gibbs sampler and deviance information criteria to estimate the correlation. The method is applied to the apparent colors from BVRI light curves and Si II velocity data for 79 nearby SNe Ia. The apparent color distributions of high-velocity (HV) and normal velocity (NV) supernovae exhibit significant discrepancies for B V and B R, but not other colors. Hence, they are likely due to intrinsic color differences originating in the B band, rather than dust reddening. The mean intrinsic B V and B R color differences between HV and NV groups are 0.06 ア 0.02 and 0.09 ア 0.02 mag, respectively. A linear model finds significant slopes of 0.021 ア 0.006 and 0.030 ア 0.009 mag (10{sup 3} km s{sup 1}){sup 1} for intrinsic B V and B R colors versus velocity, respectively. Because the ejecta velocity distribution is skewed toward high velocities, these effects imply non-Gaussian intrinsic color distributions with skewness up to +0.3. Accounting for the intrinsic-color-velocity correlation results in corrections to A{sub V} extinction estimates as large as 0.12 mag for HV SNe Ia and +0.06 mag for NV events. Velocity measurements from SN Ia spectra have the potential to diminish systematic errors from the confounding of intrinsic colors and dust reddening affecting supernova distances.

  2. Contribution from cosmological scalar perturbations to the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marakulin, A. O. Sazhina, O. S.; Sazhin, M. V.

    2012-07-15

    The possibility of the influence of adiabatic scalar perturbations on the angular velocity spectrum of extragalactic sources is considered. The multipole expansion coefficients of the angular velocity field in terms of vector spherical harmonics are calculated. We show that there is no contribution from adiabatic perturbations to the angular spectrum for a spatially flat Universe at the dusty stage, while there is a contribution only to the electric multiple coefficients at the stage of {Lambda}-term domination. The cases of long-wavelength and short-wavelength perturbations are considered separately. The relationship between the multipole angular velocity spectrum and the primordial scalar perturbation spectrum is discussed.

  3. ARM - PI Product - Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rate Retrievals ProductsCloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files

  4. The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters The distribution of galaxies in position and velocity around the centers of galaxy clusters encodes important information about cluster mass and structure. Using the maxBCG galaxy cluster

  5. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S; Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  6. A combined Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and U-Pb isotopic study of Mg-suite norite 78238: Further evidence for early differentiation of the Moon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmunson, J; E.Borg, L; Nyquist, L E; Asmerom, Y

    2008-11-17

    Lunar Mg-suite norite 78238 was dated using the Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and U-Pb isotopic systems in order to constrain the age of lunar magma ocean solidification and the beginning of Mg-suite magmatism, as well as to provide a direct comparison between the three isotopic systems. The Sm-Nd isotopic system yields a crystallization age for 78238 of 4334 {+-} 37 Ma and an initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value of -0.27 {+-} 0.74. The age-initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} (T-I) systematics of a variety of KREEP-rich samples, including 78238 and other Mg-suite rocks, KREEP basalts, and olivine cumulate NWA 773, suggest that lunar differentiation was completed by 4492 {+-} 61 Ma assuming a Chondritic Uniform Reservoir bulk composition for the Moon. The Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of 78238 were disturbed by post-crystallization processes. Nevertheless, selected data points yield two Rb-Sr isochrons. One is concordant with the Sm-Nd crystallization age, 4366 {+-} 53 Ma. The other is 4003 {+-} 95 Ma and is concordant with an Ar-Ar age for 78236. The {sup 207}Pb-{sup 206}Pb age of 4333 {+-} 59 Ma is concordant with the Sm-Nd age. The U-Pb isotopic systematics of 78238 yield linear arrays equivalent to younger ages than the Pb-Pb system, and may reflect fractionation of U and Pb during sample handling. Despite the disturbed nature of the U-Pb systems, a time-averaged {mu} ({sup 238}U/{sup 204}Pb) value of the source can be estimated at 27 {+-} 30 from the Pb-Pb isotopic systematics. Because KREEP-rich samples are likely to be derived from source regions with the highest U/Pb ratios, the relatively low {mu} value calculated for the 78238 source suggests the bulk Moon does not have an exceedingly high {mu} value.

  7. Compensation for phase mismatch of high harmonics by the group-velocity mismatch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulagin, I A; Kim, V V; Usmanov, T

    2011-09-30

    A mechanism providing an essential enhancement of the conversion efficiency of a single high harmonic in gaseous media is first proposed using an appropriate change in the phase mismatch and group-velocity mismatch in the vicinity of resonance.

  8. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Syahputra, Ahmad [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  9. Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of butanol isomers-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Xiaolei; Huang, Zuohua; Wu, Si; Li, Qianqian [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of the butanol-air premixed flames and its isomers are investigated using the spherically expanding flame with central ignition at initial temperature of 428 K and initial pressures of 0.10 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 0.75 MPa. Laminar burning velocities and sensitivity factor of n-butanol-air mixtures are computed using a newly developed kinetic mechanism. Unstretched laminar burning velocity, adiabatic temperature, Lewis number, Markstein length, critical flame radius and Peclet number are obtained over a wide range of equivalence ratios. Effect of molecular structure on laminar burning velocity of the isomers of butanol is analyzed from the aspect of C-H bond dissociation energy. Study indicates that although adiabatic flame temperatures of the isomers of butanol are the same, laminar burning velocities give an obvious difference among the isomers of butanol. This indicates that molecular structure has a large influence on laminar burning velocities of the isomers of butanol. Branching (-CH3) will decrease laminar burning velocity. Hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atoms gives higher laminar burning velocity compared to that attaching to the inner carbon atoms. Calculated dissociation bond energies show that terminal C-H bonds have larger bond energies than that of inner C-H bonds. n-Butanol, no branching and with hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atom, gives the largest laminar burning velocity. tert-Butanol, with highly branching and hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the inner carbon atom, gives the lowest laminar burning velocity. Laminar burning velocities of iso-butanol and sec-butanol are between those of n-butanol and tert-butanol. The instant of transition to cellularity is experimentally determined for the isomers of butanol and subsequently interpreted on the basis of hydrodynamic and diffusion-thermal instabilities. Little effect on flame instability is observed for the isomers of butanol. Critical flame radii are the same for the isomers of butanol. Peclet number decreases with the increase in equivalence ratio. (author)

  10. Linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Chen, S.L.

    1991-01-15

    A means and method for producing linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors in laser scanning system including presenting an elliptical convex surface to the scanning beam to reflect the scanning beam to the focal plane of the scanning line. The elliptical surface is shaped to produce linear velocity of the reflective scanning beam at the focal plane. Maximization of linearization is accomplished by considering sets of criteria for different scanning applications. 6 figures.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Polymer Foam Device (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device Interventional medical devices based on thermally responsive shape memory polymer (SMP) are under development to treat stroke victims. The goals of these catheter-delivered devices include re-establishing

  12. Dependence of dynamic fracture resistance on crack velocity in tungsten: Pt. 1. Single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liv, J.M.; Shen, B.W.

    1984-06-01

    The dependence of dynamic fracture resistance on crack propagation velocity on (100) in tungsten has been examined. A correlation is obtained between the measured local crack velocity with the surfac and subsurface deformations. Based on the experimental results on one pass, two passes, and prestrained, electron beam zone refined single crystals, a discussion is given on the slip modes activated at the crack tip, the contributions to the dynamic fracture resistance from dislocations and surface features and from the preexisting deformed microstructure.

  13. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally

  14. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-15

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium ExB velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or ''profile shear'' in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) ExB and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a ''null'' toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the ExB shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger ''diffusive'' parallel velocity shear driven component and the much smaller profile shear residual stress component.

  15. Effect of Ambient Pressure on Diesel Spray Axial Velocity and Internal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structure | Department of Energy Ambient Pressure on Diesel Spray Axial Velocity and Internal Structure Effect of Ambient Pressure on Diesel Spray Axial Velocity and Internal Structure Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_kastengren.pdf More Documents &

  16. Corrosion inhibitor selection for arctic and subsea high-velocity flowlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, J.A.

    2000-03-01

    Qualifying corrosion inhibitors for use in high-velocity multiphase flowlines in arctic or subsea environments is discussed. The criteria include high-velocity flow loop corrosion tests, pumpability through 0.125-in. (0.318-cm) capillary at low temperatures, compatibility with nylon 11, emulsion tendency testing, and partitioning characteristics. Laboratory and field data show the importance of using these criteria for inhibitor selection.

  17. Criteria for the selection of corrosion inhibitors for Arctic and subsea high velocity flowlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, J.A.; Ahn, Y.S.

    1999-11-01

    Qualifying corrosion inhibitors for use in high velocity multiphase flowlines in arctic or subsea environments is discussed. The tests include high velocity flow loop corrosion tests, pumpability through 0.125 (0.318 cm) inch capillary at low temperatures, compatibility with Nylon 11, emulsion tendency testing, and partitioning characteristics. Laboratory and field data show the importance for using the above criteria for inhibitor selection.

  18. TOWARD UNBIASED GALAXY CLUSTER MASSES FROM LINE-OF-SIGHT VELOCITY DISPERSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saro, Alex; Mohr, Joseph J.; Bazin, Gurvan; Dolag, Klaus

    2013-07-20

    We study the use of red-sequence-selected galaxy spectroscopy for unbiased estimation of galaxy cluster masses by using a publicly available simulated galaxy catalog. We explore the impact of selection using galaxy color, projected separation from the cluster center, galaxy luminosity, and spectroscopic redshift. We identify and characterize each of the following sources of bias and scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed mass: the intrinsic properties of halos in the form of halo triaxiality, sampling noise, the presence of multiple kinematic populations within the cluster, and the effect of interlopers. We show that even in red-sequence and spectroscopically selected galaxy samples, the interloper fraction is significant, and that the variations in the interloper population from cluster to cluster provide the dominant contribution to the velocity dispersion scatter at fixed mass. We present measurements of the total scatter in dispersion at fixed mass as a function of the number of redshifts. Results indicate that improvements in scatter are modest beyond samples of {approx}30 redshifts per cluster. Our results show that while cluster velocity dispersions extracted from a few dozen red-sequence-selected galaxies do not provide precise masses on a single cluster basis, an ensemble of cluster velocity dispersions can be combined to produce a precise calibration of a cluster survey-mass-observable relation. Currently, disagreements in the literature on simulated subhalo velocity dispersion-mass relations place a systematic floor on velocity dispersion mass calibration at the 5% level in dispersion.

  19. RADIAL VELOCITIES FROM VLT-KMOS SPECTRA OF GIANT STARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC6388

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universit degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Origlia, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani, 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Valenti, E. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Cirasuolo, M. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh and STFC, UK Astronomy Technology Center Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, EH9 3HJ, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    We present new radial velocity measurements for 82 stars, members of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC6388, obtained from ESO-VLT K-band Multi Object Spectrograph (KMOS) spectra acquired during the instrument Science Verification. The accuracy of the wavelength calibration is discussed and a number of tests of the KMOS response are presented. The cluster systemic velocity obtained (81.3 ア 1.5 km s{sup 1}) is in very good agreement with previous determinations. While a hint of ordered rotation is found between 9'' and 20'' from the cluster center, where the distribution of radial velocities is clearly bimodal, more data are needed before drawing any firm conclusions. The acquired sample of radial velocities has also been used to determine the cluster velocity dispersion (VD) profile between ?9'' and 70'', supplementing previous measurements at r < 2'' and r > 60'' obtained with ESO-SINFONI and ESO-FLAMES spectroscopy, respectively. The new portion of the VD profile nicely matches the previous ones, better defining the knee of the distribution. The present work clearly shows the effectiveness of a deployable integral field unit in measuring the radial velocities of individual stars for determining the VD profile of Galactic GCs. It represents the pilot project for an ongoing large program with KMOS and FLAMES at the ESO-VLT, aimed at determining the next generation of VD and rotation profiles for a representative sample of GCs.

  20. HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE GALACTIC ALL SKY SURVEY. I. CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, V. A.; Kummerfeld, J. K.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Pisano, D. J.; Curran, J. R.

    2013-11-01

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) from the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS) of southern sky neutral hydrogen, which has 57 mK sensitivity and 1 km s{sup 1} velocity resolution and was obtained with the Parkes Telescope. Our catalog has been derived from the stray-radiation-corrected second release of GASS. We describe the data and our method of identifying HVCs and analyze the overall properties of the GASS population. We catalog a total of 1693 HVCs at declinations <0ー, including 1111 positive velocity HVCs and 582 negative velocity HVCs. Our catalog also includes 295 anomalous velocity clouds (AVCs). The cloud line-widths of our HVC population have a median FWHM of ?19 km s{sup 1}, which is lower than that found in previous surveys. The completeness of our catalog is above 95% based on comparison with the HIPASS catalog of HVCs upon which we improve by an order of magnitude in spectral resolution. We find 758 new HVCs and AVCs with no HIPASS counterpart. The GASS catalog will shed unprecedented light on the distribution and kinematic structure of southern sky HVCs, as well as delve further into the cloud populations that make up the anomalous velocity gas of the Milky Way.

  1. A study of vacuum arc ion velocities using a linear set of probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohenbild, Stefan; Grubel, Christoph; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Oks, Efim M.; Anders, Andre

    2008-07-15

    The most likely velocity of ions moving away from vacuum arc cathode spots was measured using a set of probes along the path of plasma expansion. The goal was to determine how much, if any, change of the ion drift velocity occurs in the expanded plasma. The arc discharge current was perturbed to create plasma density markers whose travel is picked up by the set of probes. It was found that the perturbation with current oscillations did not result in consistent data because ion current maxima and minima are not only determined by the plasma production but by the transients of the arc pulse and by the asymmetry of the ion velocity distribution function. Perturbation with a short current spike was more conclusive. The ion velocity was measured to be slightly reduced with increasing distance from the cathode, which can be explained by collisions of ions with the background of neutrals. The ion velocity was increased when the arc current was increased, which correlated with enhanced arc voltage and power dissipation. The ion velocity could be enhanced when the plasma was produced in a non-uniform magnetic field.

  2. Experimental study of Markstein number effects on laminar flamelet velocity in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, M.; Zarzalis, N. [Division of Combustion Technology, Engler-Bunte-Institute, University of Karlsruhe (TH), Karlsruhe (Germany); Suntz, R. [Institute for Chemical Technology, University of Karlsruhe (TH), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    Effects of turbulent flame stretch on mean local laminar burning velocity of flamelets, u{sub n}, were investigated experimentally in an explosion vessel at normal temperature and pressure. In this context, the wrinkling, A{sub t}/A{sub l}, and the burning velocity, u{sub t}, of turbulent flames were measured simultaneously. With the flamelet assumption the mean local laminar burning velocity of flamelets, u{sub n}=u{sub t} x (A{sub t}/A{sub l}){sup -1}, was calculated for different turbulence intensities. The results were compared to the influence of stretch on spherically expanding laminar flames. For spherically expanding laminar flames the stretched laminar burning velocity, u{sub n}, varied linearly with the Karlovitz stretch factor, yielding Markstein numbers that depend on the mixture composition. Six different mixtures with positive and negative Markstein numbers were investigated. The measurements of the mean local laminar burning velocity of turbulent flamelets were used to derive an efficiency parameter, I, which reflects the impact of the Markstein number and turbulent flame stretch - expressed by the turbulent Karlovitz stretch factor - on the local laminar burning velocity of flamelets. The results showed that the efficiency is reduced with increasing turbulence intensity and the reduction can be correlated to unsteady effects. (author)

  3. Impact of the dark matter velocity distribution on capture rates in the Sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Rott, C. E-mail: rott@skku.edu

    2014-05-01

    Dark matter could be captured in the Sun and self-annihilate, giving rise to an observable neutrino flux. Indirect searches for dark matter looking for this signal with neutrino telescopes have resulted in tight constraints on the interaction cross-section of dark matter with ordinary matter. We investigate how robust limits are against astro-physical uncertainties. We study the effect of the velocity distribution of dark matter in our Galaxy on capture rates in the Sun. We investigate four sources of uncertainties: orbital speed of the Sun, escape velocity of dark matter from the halo, dark matter velocity distribution functions and existence of a dark disc. We find that even extreme cases currently discussed do not decrease the sensitivity of indirect detection significantly because the capture is achieved over a broad range of the velocity distribution by integration over the velocity distribution. The effect of the uncertainty in the high-velocity tail of dark matter halo is very marginal as the capture process is rather inefficient at this region. The difference in capture rate in the Sun for various scenarios is compared to the expected change in event rates for direct detection. The possibility of co-rotating structure with the Sun can largely boost the signal and hence makes the interpretation of indirect detection conservative compared to direct detection.

  4. Measurement of adiabatic burning velocity in natural gas-like mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratna Kishore, V.; Duhan, Nipun; Ravi, M.R.; Ray, Anjan

    2008-10-15

    Experimental measurements of the adiabatic burning velocities were carried out for natural gas-like mixtures burning in air over a range of equivalence ratios at atmospheric pressure. Effect of CO{sub 2} dilution up to 60%, N{sub 2} dilution up to 40% and 25% enrichment of ethane on burning velocity of methane-air flames were studied. Heat flux method with setup similar to that of [K.J. Bosschaart, L.P.H. de Goey, Detailed analysis of the heat flux method for measuring burning velocity, Combustion and Flame 132 (2003) 170-180] was used for measurement of burning velocities. Initially experiments were done for methane-air and ethane-air mixtures at various equivalence ratios and the results were in good agreement with published data in the literature. Computations were performed using PREMIX code with GRI 3.0 reaction mechanism for all the mixtures. Predicted flame structures were used to the explain the effect of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} dilution on burning velocity of methane-air flames. Peak burning velocity for CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2}-air mixtures occur near to {phi} = 1.0. (author)

  5. Observations of Velocity Conditions near a Hydroelectric Turbine Draft Tube Exit using ADCP Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Measurement of flow characteristics near hydraulic structures is an ongoing challenge because of the need to obtain rapid measurements of time-varying velocity over a relatively large spatial domain. This paper discusses use of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to measure the rapidly diverging flow exiting from an operating hydroelectric turbine draft tube exit. The resolved three-dimensional velocity vectors show a highly complex and helical flow pattern developed near to and downstream of the exit. Velocity vectors were integrated across the exit and we computed an uneven percentage of flow (67%/33%) passing through the two draft tube barrels at a mid-range turbine discharge, consistent with physical model results. In addition to the three-dimensional velocity vectors, the individual one-dimensional velocities measured by each of the four ADCP beams can be separately used as calibration and validation datasets for numerical and physical models. This technique is demonstrated by comparing along-beam ADCP velocity measurements to data collected in a scaled physical model.

  6. Characterization of the alumina-zirconia ceramic system by ultrasonic velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carreon, Hector; Ruiz, Alberto; Medina, Ariosto; Barrera, Gerardo; Zarate, Juan

    2009-08-15

    In this work an alumina-zirconia ceramic composites have been prepared with {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents from 10 to 95 wt.%. The alumina-zirconia ceramic system was characterized by means of precise ultrasonic velocity measurements. In order to find out the factors affecting the variation in wave velocity, the ceramic composite have been examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (SEM) scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the ultrasonic velocity measurements changed considerably with respect to the ceramic composite composition. In particular, we studied the behavior of the physical material property hardness, an important parameter of the ceramic composite mechanical properties, with respect to the variation in the longitudinal and shear wave velocities. Shear wave velocities exhibited a stronger interaction with microstructural and sub-structural features as compared to that of longitudinal waves. In particular, this phenomena was observed for the highest {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content composite. Interestingly, an excellent correlation between ultrasonic velocity measurements and ceramic composite hardness was observed.

  7. Response to 鼎omment on Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall樗 [Phys. Plasmas 21, 094701 (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-09-15

    A response is given to 鼎omment on Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall? [Phys. Plasmas 21, 094701 (2014)].

  8. SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drive, import it to his computer and manually manipulate and reconstruct it. Because each image file was about 20 gigabytes, this process was very time-intensive. And while he was...

  9. Automated Nuclear Data Test Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-01-09

    Provides python routines to create a database of test problems in a user-defined directory tree, to query the database using user-defined parameters, to generate a list of test urns, to automatically run with user-defined particle transport codes. Includes natural isotope abundance data, and a table of benchmark effective for fast critical assemblies. Does not include input decks, cross-section libraries, or particle transport codes.

  10. SensorNet Node Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-09-01

    The software in the SensorNet Node adopts and builds on IEEE 1451 interface principles to read data from and control sensors, stores the data in internal database structures, and transmits it in adapted Web Feature Services protocol packets to the SensorNet database. Failover software ensures that at least one available mode of communication remains alive.

  11. Uterine Artery Embolization for Leiomyomata: Optimization of the Radiation Dose to the Patient Using a Flat-Panel Detector Angiographic Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sapoval, Marc Pellerin, Olivier; Rehel, Jean-Luc; Houdoux, Nicolas; Rahmoune, Ghizlaine; Aubert, Bernard; Fitton, Isabelle

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy/angiography with a flat-panel detector angiographic suite to reduce the dose delivered to patients during uterine fibroid embolization (UFE). A two-step prospective dosimetric study was conducted, with a flat-panel detector angiography suite (Siemens Axiom Artis) integrating automatic exposure control (AEC), during 20 consecutive UFEs. Patient dosimetry was performed using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters placed on the lower posterior pelvis skin. The first step (10 patients; group A) consisted in UFE (bilateral embolization, calibrated microspheres) performed using the following parameters: standard fluoroscopy (15 pulses/s) and angiography (3 frames/s). The second step (next consecutive 10 patients; group B) used low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy (7.5 pulses/s for catheterization and 3 pulses/s for embolization) and angiography (1 frame/s). We also recorded the total dose-area product (DAP) delivered to the patient and the fluoroscopy time as reported by the manufacturer's dosimetry report. The mean peak skin dose decreased from 2.4 {+-} 1.3 to 0.4 {+-} 0.3 Gy (P = 0.001) for groups A and B, respectively. The DAP values decreased from 43,113 {+-} 27,207 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for group A to 9,515 {+-} 4,520 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for group B (P = 0.003). The dose to ovaries and uterus decreased from 378 {+-} 238 mGy (group A) to 83 {+-} 41 mGy (group B) and from 388 {+-} 246 mGy (group A) to 85 {+-} 39 mGy (group B), respectively. Effective doses decreased from 112 {+-} 71 mSv (group A) to 24 {+-} 12 mSv (group B) (P = 0.003). In conclusion, the use of low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy/angiography, based on a good understanding of the AEC system and also on the technique during uterine fibroid embolization, allows a significant decrease in the dose exposure to the patient.

  12. Radial velocity curves of ellipsoidal red giant binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, J. D.; Wood, P. R. E-mail: peter.wood@anu.edu.au

    2014-12-01

    Ellipsoidal red giant binaries are close binary systems where an unseen, relatively close companion distorts the red giant, leading to light variations as the red giant moves around its orbit. These binaries are likely to be the immediate evolutionary precursors of close binary planetary nebula and post-asymptotic giant branch and post-red giant branch stars. Due to the MACHO and OGLE photometric monitoring projects, the light variability nature of these ellipsoidal variables has been well studied. However, due to the lack of radial velocity curves, the nature of their masses, separations, and other orbital details has so far remained largely unknown. In order to improve this situation, we have carried out spectral monitoring observations of a large sample of 80 ellipsoidal variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud and we have derived radial velocity curves. At least 12 radial velocity points with good quality were obtained for most of the ellipsoidal variables. The radial velocity data are provided with this paper. Combining the photometric and radial velocity data, we present some statistical results related to the binary properties of these ellipsoidal variables.

  13. In-Situ Continuous Detonation Velocity Measurements Using Fiber-optic Bragg Grating Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benterou, J; Udd, E; Wilkins, P; Roeske, F; Roos, E; Jackson, D

    2007-07-25

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation and detonation research requires continuous measurement of low order detonation velocities as the detonation runs up to full order detonation for a given density and initiation pressure pulse. A novel detector of detonation velocity is presented using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber with an integral chirped fiber Bragg grating as an intrinsic sensor. This fiber is embedded in the explosive under study and interrogated during detonation as the fiber Bragg grating scatters light back along the fiber to a photodiode, producing a return signal dependant on the convolution integral of the grating reflection bandpass, the ASE intensity profile and the photodetector response curve. Detonation velocity is measured as the decrease in reflected light exiting the fiber as the grating is consumed when the detonation reaction zone proceeds along the fiber sensor axis. This small fiber probe causes minimal perturbation to the detonation wave and can measure detonation velocities along path lengths tens of millimeters long. Experimental details of the associated equipment and preliminary data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within nitromethane and PBX-9502 are presented.

  14. A summary of recent refinements to the WAKE dispersion model, a component of the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yambert, M.W.; Lombardi, D.A.; Goode, W.D. Jr.; Bloom, S.G.

    1998-08-01

    The original WAKE dispersion model a component of the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model suite, is based on Shell Research Ltd.`s HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 and was developed by the US Department of Energy for use in estimating downwind dispersion of materials due to accidental releases from gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) process buildings. The model is applicable to scenarios involving both ground-level and elevated releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant. Over the 2-year period since its creation, the WAKE model has been used to perform consequence analyses for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) associated with gaseous diffusion plants in Portsmouth (PORTS), Paducah (PGDP), and Oak Ridge. These applications have identified the need for additional model capabilities (such as the treatment of complex terrain and time-variant releases) not present in the original utilities which, in turn, has resulted in numerous modifications to these codes as well as the development of additional, stand-alone postprocessing utilities. Consequently, application of the model has become increasingly complex as the number of executable, input, and output files associated with a single model run has steadily grown. In response to these problems, a streamlined version of the WAKE model has been developed which integrates all calculations that are currently performed by the existing WAKE, and the various post-processing utilities. This report summarizes the efforts involved in developing this revised version of the WAKE model.

  15. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Surveys of Velocity Downstream of Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, William A.; Titzler, P. Scott; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Kallio, Sara E.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2010-09-30

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, is studying the potential to locate fish bypass systems at Albeni Falls Dam. The USACE requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to survey velocity magnitude and direction in the dam tailrace. The empirical data collected will be used to support future numerical modeling, physical modeling, and evaluation of fish bypass system alternatives. In May 2010, PNNL conducted velocity surveys of the Albeni Falls Dam using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler. The surveys were conducted over three days (May 25 through 27). During the survey period, total river discharge at the dam varied between 30.2 and 31.0 kcfs. A small amount of spill discharge, 2 kcfs, was present on two days (May 26 and 27). This report presents data plots showing measured velocity direction and magnitude averaged over the entire depth and over 5-ft depth increments from 5 to 30 ft.

  16. A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Forman; Williams, Forman A; Grcar, Joseph F

    2008-06-30

    Very lean hydrogen-air mixtures experience strong diffusive-thermal types of cellular instabilities that tend to increase the laminar burning velocity above the value that applies to steady, planar laminar flames that are homogeneous in transverse directions. Flame balls constitute an extreme limit of evolution of cellular flames. To account qualitatively for the ultimate effect of diffusive-thermal instability, a model is proposed in which the flame is a steadily propagating, planar, hexagonal, close-packed array of flame balls, each burning as if it were an isolated, stationary, ideal flame ball in an infinite, quiescent atmosphere. An expression for the laminar burning velocity is derived from this model, which theoretically may provide an upper limit for the experimental burning velocity.

  17. Measurement of particle size, velocity and temperature in the plasma spray coating process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fincke, J.R.; Swank, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    The quality and uniformity of coatings fabricated by the plasma spray process is controlled by the condition of the particles on impact. In this work a measurement technique for simultaneously obtaining particle size, velocity, and temperature is used to characterize the particle spray field. Particle size and velocity are obtained from a combination laser particle sizing system and laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). The particle temperature is determined by a two-color pyrometer technique and the relative particle number density is derived from the data rate. The fraction of unheated or unprocessed particles which result from temperature and velocity fluctuations is also obtained. This fraction can approach 10% by mass of the total particle flow. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Velocity-space sensitivity of the time-of-flight neutron spectrometer at JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, A. S. Salewski, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; Eriksson, J.; Ericsson, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.

    2014-11-15

    The velocity-space sensitivities of fast-ion diagnostics are often described by so-called weight functions. Recently, we formulated weight functions showing the velocity-space sensitivity of the often dominant beam-target part of neutron energy spectra. These weight functions for neutron emission spectrometry (NES) are independent of the particular NES diagnostic. Here we apply these NES weight functions to the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFOR at JET. By taking the instrumental response function of TOFOR into account, we calculate time-of-flight NES weight functions that enable us to directly determine the velocity-space sensitivity of a given part of a measured time-of-flight spectrum from TOFOR.

  19. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  20. SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION SYSTEM DESIGN: A CASE STUDY COMPARING VACUUM AND POREGAS VELOCITY CUTOFF CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K; Ralph Nichols, R

    2006-07-24

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) systems are typically designed based on the results of a vadose zone pumping test (transient or steady state) using a pressure criteria to establish the zone of influence (ZOI). A common problem associated with pressure based SVE design is overestimating the ZOI of the extraction well. The vacuum criteria commonly used to establish the boundary of the ZOI results in large areas with very low pore velocities and thus long cleanup times. As a result, design strategies based upon critical pore gas velocity (CPGV) have increased in popularity. The CPGV is used in an effort to loosely incorporate the effects of mass transfer limitations into the design of SVE systems. Critical pore gas velocity designs use a minimum pore gas velocity rather than minimum vacuum to identify the extent of the treatment zone of an SVE system. The CPGV is typically much larger than the pore gas velocity at the perimeter of vacuum based (ZOI) designs resulting in shorter cleanup times. In this paper, we report the results of testing performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to determine the influence of a vapor extraction well based upon both a pressure and pore gas velocity design criteria. Results from this testing show that a SVE system designed based upon a CPGV is more robust and will have shorter cleanup times due to increased flow throughout the treatment zone. Pressure based SVE design may be appropriate in applications where soil gas containment is the primary objective; however, in cases where the capture and removal of contaminated soil gas is the primary objective, CPGV is a better design criteria.

  1. Improvements to the Rocky Flats Metrology Laboratories Velocity Meter Calibration System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, K.R.

    1992-03-12

    The Rocky Flats Standards Laboratory has undertaken a project to improve calibration of air velocity meters by reducing the uncertainty of the Velocity Meter Calibration System. The project was accomplished by analyzing the governing equation in order to determine which areas within the system contributed most to the overall system uncertainty. Then, based upon this new analysis, new components were selected to replace the components identified in the analysis. Finally, the system was re-evaluated to determine the new systematic uncertainty for the system.

  2. Natural discharge after pulse and cooperative electrodes to enhance droplet velocity in digital microfluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Tianlan; Dong, Cheng; Gao, Jie; Jia, Yanwei; Mak, Pui-In, E-mail: pimak@umac.mo; Vai, Mang-I; Martins, Rui P. [State Key Laboratory of Analog and Mixed-Signal VLSI and FST-ECE, University of Macau, Macao (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Analog and Mixed-Signal VLSI and FST-ECE, University of Macau, Macao (China)

    2014-04-15

    Digital Microfluidics (DMF) is a promising technology for biological/chemical micro-reactions due to its distinct droplet manageability via electronic automation, but the limited velocity of droplet transportation has hindered DMF from utilization in high throughput applications. In this paper, by adaptively fitting the actuation voltages to the dynamic motions of droplet movement under real-time feedback monitoring, two control-engaged electrode-driving techniques: Natural Discharge after Pulse (NDAP) and Cooperative Electrodes (CE) are proposed. They together lead to, for the first time, enhanced droplet velocity with lower root mean square voltage value.

  3. Comment on ''The velocity field due to an oscillating plate in an Oldroyd-B

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fluid'' by C.C. Hopkins and J.R. de Bruyn [Can. J. Phys. 92, 533 (2014)] (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Comment on ''The velocity field due to an oscillating plate in an Oldroyd-B fluid'' by C.C. Hopkins and J.R. de Bruyn [Can. J. Phys. 92, 533 (2014)] Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on September 11, 2016 Title: Comment on ''The velocity field due to an oscillating plate in an Oldroyd-B fluid'' by C.C. Hopkins and J.R. de Bruyn [Can. J.

  4. Is the misalignment of the Local Group velocity and the dipole generated by

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the 2MASS Redshift Survey typical in {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies? (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Is the misalignment of the Local Group velocity and the dipole generated by the 2MASS Redshift Survey typical in {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Is the misalignment of the Local Group velocity and the dipole generated by the 2MASS Redshift Survey typical in {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo

  5. Deposition Velocities of Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Slurries in Pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Adkins, Harold E.; Abrefah, John; Casella, Andrew M.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; Nigl, Franz; Minette, Michael J.; Toth, James J.; Tingey, Joel M.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-03-25

    The WTP pipe plugging issue, as stated by the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Executive Summary, is as follows: 撤iping that transports slurries will plug unless it is properly designed to minimize this risk. This design approach has not been followed consistently, which will lead to frequent shutdowns due to line plugging. A strategy was employed to perform critical-velocity tests on several physical simulants. Critical velocity is defined as the point where a stationary bed of particles deposits on the bottom of a straight horizontal pipe during slurry transport operations. Results from the critical velocity testing provide an indication of slurry stability as a function of fluid rheological properties and transport conditions. The experimental results are compared to the WTP design guide on slurry transport velocity in an effort to confirm minimum waste velocity and flushing velocity requirements as established by calculations and critical line velocity correlations in the design guide. The major findings of this testing is discussed below. Experimental results indicate that the use of the Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation in the design guide is conservative祐lurry viscosity has a greater affect on particles with a large surface area to mass ratio. The increased viscous forces on these particles result in a decrease in predicted critical velocities from this traditional industry derived equations that focus on particles large than 100 ?m in size. Since the Hanford slurry particles generally have large surface area to mass ratios, the reliance on such equations in the Hall (2006) design guide is conservative. Additionally, the use of the 95% percentile particle size as an input to this equation is conservative. However, test results indicate that the use of an average particle density as an input to the equation is not conservative. Particle density has a large influence on the overall result returned by the correlation. Lastly, the viscosity correlation used in the WTP design guide has been shown to be inaccurate for Hanford waste feed materials. The use of the Thomas (1979) correlation in the design guide is not conservative悠n cases where 100% of the particles are smaller than 74 ?m or particles are considered to be homogeneous due to yield stress forces suspending the particles the homogeneous fraction of the slurry can be set to 100%. In such cases, the predicted critical velocity based on the conservative Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation is reduced to zero and the design guide returns a value from the Thomas (1979) correlation. The measured data in this report show that the Thomas (1979) correlation predictions often fall below that measured experimental values. A non-Newtonian deposition velocity design guide should be developed for the WTP Since the WTP design guide is limited to Newtonian fluids and the WTP expects to process large quantities of such materials, the existing design guide should be modified address such systems. A central experimental finding of this testing is that the flow velocity required to reach turbulent flow increases with slurry rheological properties due to viscous forces dampening the formation of turbulent eddies. The flow becomes dominated by viscous forces rather than turbulent eddies. Since the turbulent eddies necessary for particle transport are not present, the particles will settle when crossing this boundary called the transitional deposition boundary. This deposition mechanism should be expected and designed for in the WTP.

  6. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Dppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; and others

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in 塗igh foot implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1 ラ 10{sup 15} neutrons, the total yield ??v{sup 9.4}. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating (?v{sup 5.9}) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  7. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Dppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Rygg, J. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hatarik, R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nagel, S. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C. H.

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in 塗igh foot implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v???. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v???) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  8. Generalized Dix equation and analytic treatment of normal-movement velocity for anisotropic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grechka, V.; Tsvankin, I.; Cohen, J.K.

    1999-03-01

    Despite the complexity of wave propagation in anisotropic media, reflection moveout on conventional common-midpoint (CMP) spreads is usually well described by the normal-moveout (NMO) velocity defined in the zero-offset limit. In their recent work, Grechka and Tsvankin showed that the azimuthal variation of NMO velocity around a fixed CMP location generally has an elliptical form (i.e., plotting the NMO velocity in each azimuthal direction produces an ellipse) and is determined by the spatial derivatives of the slowness vector evaluated at the CMP location. This formalism is used here to develop exact solutions for the NMO velocity in anisotropic media of arbitrary symmetry. The high accuracy of the NMO expressions is illustrated by comparison with ray-traced reflection traveltimes in piecewise-homogeneous, azimuthally anisotropic models. The authors also apply the generalized Dix equation to field data collected over a fractured reservoir and show that P-wave moveout can be used to find the depth-dependent fracture orientation and to evaluate the magnitude of azimuthal anisotropy.

  9. Method and apparatus for optical Doppler tomographic imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, John Stuart (Laguna Niguel, CA); Milner, Thomas Edward (Irvine, CA); Chen, Zhongping (Irvine, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Optical Doppler tomography permits imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media. The tomography system combines Doppler velocimetry with high spatial resolution of partially coherent optical interferometry to measure fluid flow velocity at discrete spatial locations. Noninvasive in vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics and tissue structures with high spatial resolutions of the order of 2 to 10 microns is achieved in biological systems. The backscattered interference signals derived from the interferometer may be analyzed either through power spectrum determination to obtain the position and velocity of each particle in the fluid flow sample at each pixel, or the interference spectral density may be analyzed at each frequency in the spectrum to obtain the positions and velocities of the particles in a cross-section to which the interference spectral density corresponds. The realized resolutions of optical Doppler tomography allows noninvasive in vivo imaging of both blood microcirculation and tissue structure surrounding the vessel which has significance for biomedical research and clinical applications.

  10. Laser Doppler field sensor for high resolution flow velocity imaging without camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voigt, Andreas; Bayer, Christian; Shirai, Katsuaki; Buettner, Lars; Czarske, Juergen

    2008-09-20

    In this paper we present a laser sensor for highly spatially resolved flow imaging without using a camera. The sensor is an extension of the principle of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). Instead of a parallel fringe system, diverging and converging fringes are employed. This method facilitates the determination of the tracer particle position within the measurement volume and leads to an increased spatial and velocity resolution compared to conventional LDA. Using a total number of four fringe systems the flow is resolved in two spatial dimensions and the orthogonal velocity component. Since no camera is used, the resolution of the sensor is not influenced by pixel size effects. A spatial resolution of 4 {mu}m in the x direction and 16 {mu}m in the y direction and a relative velocity resolution of 1x10{sup -3} have been demonstrated up to now. As a first application we present the velocity measurement of an injection nozzle flow. The sensor is also highly suitable for applications in nano- and microfluidics, e.g., for the measurement of flow rates.

  11. Simultaneous velocity interferometry and electronic streak photography of laser-launched plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, D.L.; Stahl, D.B.; Garcia, I.A.

    1991-01-01

    Laser-launched, miniature, pseudo-one-dimensional flyer plates are evaluated by three distinct optical techniques that may be incorporated into an optical diagnostic system to give a complete understanding of the plate performance. These techniques are: velocity interferometry, streak photography, and pulsed laser stereo photography. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Dテカppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; et al

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in 窶徂igh foot窶 implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), andmoreツツサ the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v竅ケヒ吮エ. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v竅オヒ吮∋) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.ツォツless

  13. Seismic Velocities Contain Information About Depth, Lithology, Fluid Content, and Microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berge, P A; Bonner, B P

    2002-01-03

    Recent advances in field and laboratory methods for measuring elastic wave velocities provide incentive and opportunity for improving interpretation of geophysical data for engineering and environmental applications. Advancing the state-of-the-art of seismic imaging requires developing petrophysical relationships between measured velocities and the hydrogeology parameters and lithology. Our approach uses laboratory data and rock physics methods. Compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities, Vp/Vs ratios, and relative wave amplitudes show systematic changes related to composition, saturation, applied stress (analogous to depth), and distribution of clay for laboratory ultrasonic measurements on soils. The artificial soils were mixtures of Ottawa sand and a second phase, either Wyoming bentonite or peat moss used to represent clay or organic components found in natural soils. Compressional and shear wave velocities were measured for dry, saturated, and partially-saturated conditions, for applied stresses between about 7 and 100 kPa, representing approximately the top 5 m of the subsurface. Analysis of the results using rock physics methods shows the link between microstructure and wave propagation, and implications for future advances in seismic data interpretation. For example, we found that Vp in dry sand-clay mixtures initially increases as clay cements the sand grains and fills porosity, but then Vp decreases when the clay content is high enough that the clay matrix controls the elastic response of the material. Vs decreases monotonically with increasing clay content. This provides a method for using Vp/Vs ratios to estimate clay content in a dry soil.

  14. Experimental investigation on structures and velocity of liquid jets in a supersonic crossflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhen-guo Wu, Liyin; Li, Qinglian; Li, Chun

    2014-09-29

    Particle image velocimetry was applied in the study focusing on the structure and velocity of water jets injected into a Ma?=?2.1 crossflow. The instantaneous structures of the jet, including surface waves in the near-injector region and vortices in the far-field, were visualized clearly. Spray velocity increases rapidly to 66% of the mainstream velocity in the region of x/d?velocity grows slowly in the far-field region, where the liquid inside the spray is accelerated mainly by the continuous driven force provided by the mainstream with the gas-liquid shear. The injection and atomization of liquid jet in a supersonic crossflow serves as a foundation of scramjet combustion process, by affecting the combustion efficiency and some other performances. With various forces acting on the liquid jet (Mashayek et al. [AIAA J. 46, 26742686 (2008)] and Wang et al. [AIAA J. 50, 13601366 (2012)]), the atomization process involves very complex flow physics. These physical processes include strong vortical structures, small-scale wave formation, stripping of small droplets from the jet surface, formations of ligaments, and droplets with a wide range of sizes.

  15. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  16. Effects of light illumination on electron velocity of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures under high electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Lei; Yang, Xuelin Cheng, Jianpeng; Sang, Ling; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Feng, Zhihong; Lv, Yuanjie; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, B.; Ge, Weikun

    2014-12-15

    We have investigated the variation of electron velocity in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures depending on illuminating light intensity and wavelength. It is shown that the electron velocity at high electric field increases under above-band light illumination. This electron velocity enhancement is found to be related to the photo-generated cold holes which interact with hot electrons and thus accelerate the energy relaxation at high electric field. The results suggest an alternative way to improve the electron energy relaxation rate and hence the electron velocity in GaN based heterostructures.

  17. THE POWER SPECTRUM OF THE MILKY WAY: VELOCITY FLUCTUATIONS IN THE GALACTIC DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovy, Jo; Bird, Jonathan C.; P駻ez, Ana E. Garca; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-02-20

    We investigate the kinematics of stars in the mid-plane of the Milky Way (MW) on scales between 25 pc and 10 kpc with data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), and the Geneva-Copenhagen survey (GCS). Using red-clump (RC) stars in APOGEE, we determine the large-scale line-of-sight velocity field out to 5 kpc from the Sun in (0.75 kpc){sup 2} bins. The solar motion V{sub ?} {sub 凡 {sub c} with respect to the circular velocity V{sub c} is the largest contribution to the power on large scales after subtracting an axisymmetric rotation field; we determine the solar motion by minimizing the large-scale power to be V{sub ?} {sub 凡 {sub c} = 24 ア 1 (ran.) ア 2 (syst. [V{sub c} ]) ア 5 (syst.[large-scale]) km s{sup 1}, where the systematic uncertainty is due to (1) a conservative 20 km s{sup 1} uncertainty in V{sub c} and (2) the estimated power on unobserved larger scales. Combining the APOGEE peculiar-velocity field with RC stars in RAVE out to 2 kpc from the Sun and with local GCS stars, we determine the power spectrum of residual velocity fluctuations in the MW's disk on scales between 0.2 kpc{sup 1} ? k ? 40 kpc{sup 1}. Most of the power is contained in a broad peak between 0.2 kpc{sup 1} < k < 0.9 kpc{sup 1}. We investigate the expected power spectrum for various non-axisymmetric perturbations and demonstrate that the central bar with commonly used parameters but of relatively high mass can explain the bulk of velocity fluctuations in the plane of the Galactic disk near the Sun. Streaming motions ?10 km s{sup 1} on ? 3 kpc scales in the MW are in good agreement with observations of external galaxies and directly explain why local determinations of the solar motion are inconsistent with global measurements.

  18. Intraoperative Radiation Therapy in Early Breast Cancer Using a Linear Accelerator Outside of the Operative Suite: An 的mage-Guided Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Simes Dornellas de Barros, Alfredo Carlos; Martins de Andrade, Felipe Eduardo; Barbosa Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz; Morales Piato, Jos Roberto; Lopes Pelosi, Edilson; Martella, Eduardo; Fernandes da Silva, Jo縊 Luis; Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa de

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To present local control, complications, and cosmetic outcomes of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) for early breast cancer, as well as technical aspects related to the use of a nondedicated linear accelerator. Methods and Materials: This prospective trial began in May of 2004. Eligibility criteria were biopsy-proven breast-infiltrating ductal carcinoma, age >40years, tumor <3cm, and cN0. Exclusion criteria were in situ or lobular types, multicentricity, skin invasion, any contraindication for surgery and/or radiation therapy, sentinel lymph node involvement, metastasis, or another malignancy. Patients underwent classic quadrantectomy with intraoperative sentinel lymph node and margins evaluation. If both free, the patient was transferred from operative suite to linear accelerator room, and IORT was delivered (21 Gy). Primary endpoint: local recurrence (LR); secondary endpoints: toxicities and aesthetics. Quality assurance involved using a customized shield for chest wall protection, applying procedures to minimize infection caused by patient transportation, and using portal films to check collimator-shield alignment. Results: A total of 152 patients were included, with at least 1year follow-up. Median age (range) was 58.3 (40-85.4) years, and median follow-up time was 50.7 (12-110.5) months. The likelihood of 5-year local recurrence was 3.7%. There were 3 deaths, 2 of which were cancer related. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year actuarial estimates of overall, disease-free, and local recurrence-free survivals were 97.8%, 92.5%, and 96.3%, respectively. The overall incidences of acute and late toxicities were 12.5% and 29.6%, respectively. Excellent, good, fair, and bad cosmetic results were observed in 76.9%, 15.8%, 4.3%, and 2.8% of patients, respectively. Most treatments were performed with a 5-cm collimator, and in 39.8% of the patients the electron-beam energy used was ?12MeV. All patients underwent portal film evaluation, and the shielding was repositioned in 39.9% of cases. No infection or anesthesia complications were observed. Conclusions: Local control with IORT was adequate, with low complication rates and good cosmetic outcomes. More than one-third of patients benefited from the 妬mage-guidance approach, and almost 40% benefited from the option of higher electron beam energies.

  19. Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a gliding arc discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Ald駭, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Moseev, Dmitry; Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Alpers, Andreas E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Gritzmann, Peter; Schwenk, Martin

    2015-01-26

    A non-thermal gliding arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized high-speed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing the single camera image), we provide here a 3D data analysis that includes 3D reconstructions of the plasma column and 3D particle tracking velocimetry based on discrete tomography methods. The 3D analysis, in particular, the determination of the 3D slip velocity between the plasma column and the gas flow, gives more realistic insight into the convection cooling process. Additionally, with the determination of the 3D slip velocity and the 3D length of the plasma column, we give more accurate estimates for the drag force, the electric field strength, the power per unit length, and the radius of the conducting zone of the plasma column.

  20. Velocity map imaging of HBr photodissociation in large rare gas clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedor, J.; Kocisek, J.; Poterya, V.; Votava, O.; Pysanenko, A.; Farnik, M.; Lipciuc, M. L.; Kitsopoulos, T. N.

    2011-04-21

    We have implemented the velocity map imaging technique to study clustering in the pulsed supersonic expansions of hydrogen bromide in helium, argon, and xenon. The expansions are characterized by direct imaging of the beam velocity distributions. We have investigated the cluster generation by means of UV photodissociation and photoionization of HBr molecules. Two distinct features appear in the hydrogen atom photofragment images in the clustering regime: (i) photofragments with near zero kinetic energies and (ii) ''hot'' photofragments originating from vibrationally excited HBr molecules. The origin of both features is attributed to the fragment caging by the cluster. We discuss the nature of the formed clusters based on the change of the photofragment images with the expansion parameters and on the photoionization mass spectra and conclude that single HBr molecule encompassed with rare gas ''snowball'' is consistent with the experimental observations.

  1. Quantitative validation of carbon-fiber laminate low velocity impact simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    English, Shawn A.; Briggs, Timothy M.; Nelson, Stacy M.

    2015-09-26

    Simulations of low velocity impact with a flat cylindrical indenter upon a carbon fiber fabric reinforced polymer laminate are rigorously validated. Comparison of the impact energy absorption between the model and experiment is used as the validation metric. Additionally, non-destructive evaluation, including ultrasonic scans and three-dimensional computed tomography, provide qualitative validation of the models. The simulations include delamination, matrix cracks and fiber breaks. An orthotropic damage and failure constitutive model, capable of predicting progressive damage and failure, is developed in conjunction and described. An ensemble of simulations incorporating model parameter uncertainties is used to predict a response distribution which is then compared to experimental output using appropriate statistical methods. Lastly, the model form errors are exposed and corrected for use in an additional blind validation analysis. The result is a quantifiable confidence in material characterization and model physics when simulating low velocity impact in structures of interest.

  2. Quantitative validation of carbon-fiber laminate low velocity impact simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    English, Shawn A.; Briggs, Timothy M.; Nelson, Stacy M.

    2015-09-26

    Simulations of low velocity impact with a flat cylindrical indenter upon a carbon fiber fabric reinforced polymer laminate are rigorously validated. Comparison of the impact energy absorption between the model and experiment is used as the validation metric. Additionally, non-destructive evaluation, including ultrasonic scans and three-dimensional computed tomography, provide qualitative validation of the models. The simulations include delamination, matrix cracks and fiber breaks. An orthotropic damage and failure constitutive model, capable of predicting progressive damage and failure, is developed in conjunction and described. An ensemble of simulations incorporating model parameter uncertainties is used to predict a response distribution which ismoreツツサ then compared to experimental output using appropriate statistical methods. Lastly, the model form errors are exposed and corrected for use in an additional blind validation analysis. The result is a quantifiable confidence in material characterization and model physics when simulating low velocity impact in structures of interest.ツォツless

  3. 1-D seismic velocity model and hypocenter relocation using double difference method around West Papua region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabtaji, Agung E-mail: agung.sabtaji@bmkg.go.id; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    West Papua region has fairly high of seismicity activities due to tectonic setting and many inland faults. In addition, the region has a unique and complex tectonic conditions and this situation lead to high potency of seismic hazard in the region. The precise earthquake hypocenter location is very important, which could provide high quality of earthquake parameter information and the subsurface structure in this region to the society. We conducted 1-D P-wave velocity using earthquake data catalog from BMKG for April, 2009 up to March, 2014 around West Papua region. The obtained 1-D seismic velocity then was used as input for improving hypocenter location using double-difference method. The relocated hypocenter location shows fairly clearly the pattern of intraslab earthquake beneath New Guinea Trench (NGT). The relocated hypocenters related to the inland fault are also observed more focus in location around the fault.

  4. Electrical method and apparatus for impelling the extruded ejection of high-velocity material jets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weingart, Richard C. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus (10, 40) for producing high-velocity material jets provided. An electric current pulse generator (14, 42) is attached to an end of a coaxial two-conductor transmission line (16, 44) having an outer cylindrical conductor (18), an inner cylindrical conductor (20), and a solid plastic or ceramic insulator (21) therebetween. A coxial, thin-walled metal structure (22, 30) is conductively joined to the two conductors (18, 20) of the transmission line (16, 44). An electrical current pulse applies magnetic pressure to and possibly explosively vaporizes metal structure (22), thereby collapsing it and impelling the extruded ejection of a high-velocity material jet therefrom. The jet is comprised of the metal of the structure (22), together with the material that comprises any covering layers (32, 34) disposed on the structure. An electric current pulse generator of the explosively driven magnetic flux compression type or variety (42) may be advantageously used in the practice of this invention.

  5. Ab initio multiple cloning simulations of pyrrole photodissociation: TKER spectra and velocity map imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Saita, Kenichiro; Martinez, Todd J.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.

    2014-12-11

    In this study, we report a detailed computational simulation of the photodissociation of pyrrole using the ab initio Multiple Cloning (AIMC) method implemented within MOLPRO. The efficiency of the AIMC implementation, employing train basis sets, linear approximation for matrix elements, and Ehrenfest configuration cloning, allows us to accumulate significant statistics. We calculate and analyze the total kinetic energy release (TKER) spectrum and Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) of pyrrole and compare the results directly with experimental measurements. Both the TKER spectrum and the structure of the velocity map image (VMI) are well reproduced. Previously, it has been assumed that the isotropicmoreツツサ component of the VMI arises from long time statistical dissociation. Instead, our simulations suggest that ultrafast dynamics contributes significantly to both low and high energy portions of the TKER spectrum.ツォツless

  6. Effects of low velocity air flow over alumina-silica insulating boards in solar environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, C.R.; Mulholland, G.P.; Couch, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Results are reported from an experiment designed to determine whether low velocity air flow over insulating boards can increase their survivability in severe solar environments. The experiment was conducted at the Flux Gage Calibration Station located at Sandia National Laboratories' Solar Thermal Test Facility. Preliminary results indicate that the useful life for these boards can be significantly increased by air flowing over the hot surface of the board.

  7. Dependence of dynamic fracture resistance on crack velocity in tungsten: Pt. II. Bicrystals and polycrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liv, J.M.; Shen, B.W.

    1986-06-01

    The experimental techniques for crack velocity measurements have been applied to bicrystals of tungsten with twist orientations about (100) and polycrystals. The hesitation of the propagating cleavage crack in the vicinity of the grain boundary is examined. The contributions to energy dissipation from deformation and fracture processes in the grain boundary region as well as the in direct effects of crack deceleration are discussed. These findings have been applied to explain th dynamic fracture resistance and crack arrest in polycrystals.

  8. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. IV. THE COLLISION KERNEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-12-20

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, ?{sub p}. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with ?{sub p} corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub h}, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub l}, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at ?{sub p,} {sub l} = ?{sub p,} {sub h}, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For ?{sub p,} {sub h} in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with ?{sub p,} {sub l} and scales with ?{sub p,} {sub h} roughly as ? ?{sub p,h}{sup 1/2}. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  9. Determination of surface recombination velocity at a grain boundary using electron-beam-induced current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burk, D.E.; Kanner, S.; Muyshondt, J.E.; Shaulis, D.S.; Russell, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine the surface recombination velocity at a grain boundary surface, computer-aided calculations of the theoretical electron-beam-induced-current response to a point source excitation are fitted to data taken as a function of distance from the grain boundary. It is demonstrated that the data is in good agreement with this theoretical response for distances greater than two maximum penetration depths of the incident electron beam.

  10. Mean-atom-trajectory model for the velocity autocorrelation function of monatomic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisolm, Eric D.; Clements, Brad E.; Wallace, Duane C.

    2001-03-01

    We present a model for the motion of an average atom in a liquid or supercooled liquid state and apply it to calculations of the velocity autocorrelation function Z(t) and diffusion coefficient D. The model trajectory consists of oscillations at a distribution of frequencies characteristic of the normal modes of a single potential valley, interspersed with position- and velocity-conserving transits to similar adjacent valleys. The resulting predictions for Z(t) and D agree remarkably well with molecular dynamics simulations of Na at up to almost three times its melting temperature. Two independent processes in the model relax velocity autocorrelations: (a) dephasing due to the presence of many frequency components, which operates at all temperatures but which produces no diffusion, and (b) the transit process, which increases with increasing temperature and which produces diffusion. Because the model provides a single-atom trajectory in real space and time, including transits, it may be used to calculate all single-atom correlation functions.

  11. Asymmetric material impact: Achieving free surfaces velocities nearly double that of the projectile

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aslam, Tariq; Dattelbaum, Dana; Gustavsen, Richard; Scharff, Robert; Byers, Mark

    2015-05-19

    Hypervelocity impact speeds are often limited by practical considerations in guns and explosive driven systems. In particular, for gas guns (both powder driven and light gas guns), there is the general trend that higher projectile speeds often come at the expense of smaller diameters, and thus less time for examining shock phenomena prior to two dimensional release waves affecting the observed quantities of interest. Similarly, explosive driven systems have their own set of limiting conditions due to limitations in explosive energy and size of devices required as engineering dimensions increase. The focus in this study is to present a methodologymoreツツサ of obtaining free surface velocities well in excess of the projectile velocity. The key to this approach is in using a high impedance projectile that impacts a series of progressively lower impedance materials. The free surface velocity (if they were separated) of each of the progressively lower impedance materials would increase for each material. The theory behind this approach, as well as experimental results are presented.ツォツless

  12. Asymmetric material impact: Achieving free surfaces velocities nearly double that of the projectile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslam, Tariq; Dattelbaum, Dana; Gustavsen, Richard; Scharff, Robert; Byers, Mark

    2015-05-19

    Hypervelocity impact speeds are often limited by practical considerations in guns and explosive driven systems. In particular, for gas guns (both powder driven and light gas guns), there is the general trend that higher projectile speeds often come at the expense of smaller diameters, and thus less time for examining shock phenomena prior to two dimensional release waves affecting the observed quantities of interest. Similarly, explosive driven systems have their own set of limiting conditions due to limitations in explosive energy and size of devices required as engineering dimensions increase. The focus in this study is to present a methodology of obtaining free surface velocities well in excess of the projectile velocity. The key to this approach is in using a high impedance projectile that impacts a series of progressively lower impedance materials. The free surface velocity (if they were separated) of each of the progressively lower impedance materials would increase for each material. The theory behind this approach, as well as experimental results are presented.

  13. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-17

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  14. PTF 12gzk輸 rapidly declining, high-velocity type Ic radio supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Ofek, Eran O.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2013-11-20

    Only a few cases of Type Ic supernovae (SNe) with high-velocity ejecta (?0.2 c) have been discovered and studied. Here, we present our analysis of radio and X-ray observations of the Type Ic SN PTF 12gzk. The radio emission declined less than 10 days after explosion, suggesting SN ejecta expanding at high velocity (?0.3 c). The radio data also indicate that the density of the circumstellar material (CSM) around the supernova is lower by a factor of ?10 than the CSM around normal Type Ic SNe. PTF 12gzk may therefore be an intermediate event between a 'normal' SN Ic and a gamma-ray-burst-SN-like event. Our observations of this rapidly declining radio SN at a distance of 58 Mpc demonstrates the potential to detect many additional radio SNe, given the new capabilities of the Very Large Array (improved sensitivity and dynamic scheduling), which are currently missed, leading to a biased view of radio SNe Ic. Early optical discovery followed by rapid radio observations would provide a full description of the ejecta velocity distribution and CSM densities around stripped massive star explosions as well as strong clues about the nature of their progenitor stars.

  15. Effect of the q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution on a magnetized plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safa, N. Navab, E-mail: n-navabsafa@sbu.ac.ir; Ghomi, H.; Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran 1983963113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    In this work, a sheath model has been developed to investigate the effect of the q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution on the different characteristics of a magnetized plasma. By using Segdeev potential method, a modified Bohm criterion for a magnetized plasma with the nonextensive electron velocity distribution is derived. The sheath model is then used to analyze numerically the sheath structure under different q, the parameter quantifying the nonextensivity degree of the system. The results show that as the q-parameter decreases, the floating potential becomes more negative. The sheath length increases at the lower values of the q-parameter due to the increase in the electron population at the high-energy tail of the distribution function. As q-parameter decreases, the effective temperature of the electrons increases which results in a more extended plasma sheath. The ion velocity and density profiles for the different nonextensivity degrees of the system reflect the gyro-motion of the ions in the presence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the results coincide with those given by the Maxwellian electron distribution function, when q tends to 1.

  16. Ion velocities in direct current arc plasma generated from compound cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhirkov, I.; Rosen, J.; Eriksson, A. O.; Oerlikon Balzers Coating AG, Iramali 18, 9496 Balzers

    2013-12-07

    Arc plasma from Ti-C, Ti-Al, and Ti-Si cathodes was characterized with respect to charge-state-resolved ion energy. The evaluated peak velocities of different ion species in plasma generated from a compound cathode were found to be equal and independent on ion mass. Therefore, measured difference in kinetic energies can be inferred from the difference in ion mass, with no dependence on ion charge state. The latter is consistent with previous work. These findings can be explained by plasma quasineutrality, ion acceleration by pressure gradients, and electron-ion coupling. Increasing the C concentration in Ti-C cathodes resulted in increasing average and peak ion energies for all ion species. This effect can be explained by the 田ohesive energy rule, where material and phases of higher cohesive energy generally result in increasing energies (velocities). This is also consistent with the here obtained peak velocities around 1.37, 1.42, and 1.55 (10{sup 4} m/s) for ions from Ti{sub 0.84}Al{sub 0.16}, Ti{sub 0.90}Si{sub 0.10}, and Ti{sub 0.90}C{sub 0.10} cathodes, respectively.

  17. An instrument to measure extended particle size and velocity ranges in multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, C.P.; Hess, C.F.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a miniaturized particle sizing velocimeter developed and built by MetroLaser to measure the spatial and temporal distributions of particle size and velocity. The instrument is the first of its kind to utilize the pulse displacement technique (PDT) to measure particle size. PDT is based on the detection of scattered refraction and reflection pulses which sweep past a detector at different times as a particle traverses a narrow laser sheet. In conjunction with Mie scattering and a time-of-fight velocity measuring technique, the instrument provides detailed distributions of particle size from 2 {micro}m to 6,000 {micro}m in two optical configurations, and particle velocity from 0.5 m/s to 150 m/s. This paper summarizes the theoretical foundation of PDT which allows the calculation of particle diameter from various optical parameters such as refractive index and collection angle. An overview of the instrument is presented, followed by a brief description of the miniaturized optical probe. The processing of data is described and, lastly, the results of experimental studies are presented which verify the accuracy and versatility of the instrument.

  18. Asymmetric material impact: Achieving free surfaces velocities nearly double that of the projectile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslam, Tariq [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dattelbaum, Dana [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gustavsen, Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scharff, Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Byers, Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact speeds are often limited by practical considerations in guns and explosive driven systems. In particular, for gas guns (both powder driven and light gas guns), there is the general trend that higher projectile speeds often come at the expense of smaller diameters, and thus less time for examining shock phenomena prior to two dimensional release waves affecting the observed quantities of interest. Similarly, explosive driven systems have their own set of limiting conditions due to limitations in explosive energy and size of devices required as engineering dimensions increase. The focus in this study is to present a methodology of obtaining free surface velocities well in excess of the projectile velocity. The key to this approach is in using a high impedance projectile that impacts a series of progressively lower impedance materials. The free surface velocity (if they were separated) of each of the progressively lower impedance materials would increase for each material. The theory behind this approach, as well as experimental results, are presented.

  19. Minimal position-velocity uncertainty wave packets in relativistic and non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Hashimi, M.H. Wiese, U.-J.

    2009-12-15

    We consider wave packets of free particles with a general energy-momentum dispersion relation E(p). The spreading of the wave packet is determined by the velocity v={partial_derivative}{sub p}E. The position-velocity uncertainty relation {delta}x{delta}v{>=}1/2 |<{partial_derivative}{sub p}{sup 2}E>| is saturated by minimal uncertainty wave packets {phi}(p)=Aexp(-{alpha}E(p)+{beta}p). In addition to the standard minimal Gaussian wave packets corresponding to the non-relativistic dispersion relation E(p)=p{sup 2}/2m, analytic calculations are presented for the spreading of wave packets with minimal position-velocity uncertainty product for the lattice dispersion relation E(p)=-cos(pa)/ma{sup 2} as well as for the relativistic dispersion relation E(p)={radical}(p{sup 2}+m{sup 2}). The boost properties of moving relativistic wave packets as well as the propagation of wave packets in an expanding Universe are also discussed.

  20. Equation of State Measurements of Materials Using a Three-Stage Gun to Impact Velocities of 11km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REINHART,WILLIAM D.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; CARROLL,DANIEL E.; THORNHILL,T.G.; WINFREE,N.A.

    2000-09-26

    Understanding high pressure behavior of homogeneous as well as heterogeneous materials is necessary in order to address the physical processes associated with hypervelocity impact events related to space science applications including orbital debris impact and impact lethality. At very high impact velocities, material properties will be subjugated to phase-changes, such as melting and vaporization. These phase states cannot be obtained through conventional gun technology. These processes need to be represented accurately in hydrodynamic codes to allow credible computational analysis of impact events resulting from hypervelocity impact. In this paper, techniques that are being developed and implemented to obtain the needed shock loading parameters (Hugoniot states) for material characterization studies, namely shock velocity and particle velocity, will be described at impact velocities up to 11 km/s. What is new in this report is that these techniques are being implemented for use at engagement velocities never before attained utilizing two-stage light-gas gun technology.

  1. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardaya, P. D. Noh, K. A. B. M. Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave velocity of rock.

  2. Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-08-01

    To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

  3. Deposition Velocities of Non-Newtonian Slurries in Pipelines: Complex Simulant Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Bonebrake, Michael L.; Casella, Andrew M.; Johnson, Michael D.; Toth, James J.; Adkins, Harold E.; Chun, Jaehun; Denslow, Kayte M.; Luna, Maria; Tingey, Joel M.

    2009-07-01

    One of the concerns expressed by the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) is about the potential for pipe plugging at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Per the review痴 executive summary, 撤iping that transports slurries will plug unless it is properly designed to minimize this risk. This design approach has not been followed consistently, which will lead to frequent shutdowns due to line plugging. To evaluate the potential for plugging, deposition-velocity tests were performed on several physical simulants to determine whether the design approach is conservative. Deposition velocity is defined as the velocity below which particles begin to deposit to form a moving bed of particles on the bottom of a straight horizontal pipe during slurry-transport operations. The deposition velocity depends on the system geometry and the physical properties of the particles and fluid. An experimental program was implemented to test the stability-map concepts presented in WTP-RPT-175 Rev. 01. Two types of simulant were tested. The first type of simulant was similar to the glass-bead simulants discussed in WTP-RPT-175 Rev. 0 ; it consists of glass beads with a nominal particle size of 150 オm in a kaolin/water slurry. The initial simulant was prepared at a target yield stress of approximately 30 Pa. The yield stress was then reduced, stepwise, via dilution or rheological modifiers, ultimately to a level of <1 Pa. At each yield-stress step, deposition-velocity testing was performed. Testing over this range of yield-stress bounds the expected rheological operating window of the WTP and allows the results to be compared to stability-map predictions for this system. The second simulant was a precipitated hydroxide that simulates HLW pretreated sludge from Hanford waste tank AZ-101. Testing was performed in a manner similar to that for the first simulant over a wide range of yield stresses; however, an additional test of net-positive suction-head required (NPSHR) was performed at each yield stress condition. Unlike the previous simulant, the sizes and densities of the particles that can deposit in the piping are a result of the simulant precipitation process; there is expected to be a complex mixture of particles of various sizes and densities that make it difficult to predict a stability map. The objective of the testing is to observe whether behavior consistent with the stability-map concept occurs in complex simulants with mixtures of different sizes and densities.

  4. Planar velocity and scalar concentration measurements in shock-accelerated,unstable fluid interfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodenough, C.; Kumar, S.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Boyts, A.; Prestridge, K. P.; Rightley, P. M.; Tomkins, C. D.; Cannon, M. T.; Kamm, J. R.; Rider, William; Zoldi, C. A.; Orlicz, G.; Vorobieff, P. V.

    2004-01-01

    We report applications of several high-speed photographic techniques to diagnose fluid instability and the onset of turbulence in an ongoing experimental study of the evolution of shock-accelerated, heavy-gas cylinders. Results are at Reynolds numbers well above that associated with the turbulent and mixing transitions. Recent developments in diagnostics enable high-resolution, planar (2D) measurements of velocity fields (using particle image velocimetry, or PIV) and scalar concentration (using planar laser-induced fluorescence, or PLIF). The purpose of this work is to understand the basic science of complex, shock-driven flows and to provide high-quality data for code validation and development. The combination of these high-speed optical methods, PIV and PLIF, is setting a new standard in validating large codes for fluid simulations. The PIV velocity measurements provide quantitative evidence of transition to turbulence. In the PIV technique, a frame transfer camera with a 1 ms separation is used to image flows illuminated by two 10 ns laser pulses. Individual particles in a seeded flow are tracked from frame to frame to produce a velocity field. Dynamic PLIF measurements of the concentration field are high-resolution, quantitative dynamic data that reveal finely detailed structure at several instances after shock passage. These structures include those associated with the incipient secondary instability and late-time transition. Multiple instances of the flow are captured using a single frame Apogee camera and laser pulses with 140 {mu}s spacing. We describe tradeoffs of diagnostic instrumentation to provide PLIF images.

  5. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the western half of the study area (Eurasia and the Middle East) and (ii) identify well located seismic events with event-station paths isolated to individual tectonic provinces within the study area and collect broadband waveforms and source parameters for the selected events. The 1D models obtained from the joint inversion will then be combined with published geologic terrain maps to produce regionalized models for distinctive tectonic areas within the study area, and the models will be validated through full waveform modeling of well-located seismic events recorded at local and regional distances.

  6. Italy - Adriatic Sea - Barbara - A giant gas field marked by seismic velocity anomaly - A subtle trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianniello, A.; Bolelli, W.; Di Scala, L. )

    1990-09-01

    Barbara gas field, discovered in 1971, is located in the northern sector of the Adriatic offshore. The field is a gentle anticline involving Quaternary clastic sediments and shaped by carbonate Mesozoic morphology. The presence of shallow gas pockets at the crest of the structure distort the seismic signal to such an extent that structural reconstruction using seismic data is not possible. Moreover, time delays and ray-path anomalies do not allow the use of staking velocities for the depth conversion. Seismic attribute analysis, instead of velocities, and time delays on the isochrone maps are providing a key to the understanding of seismic anomalies and are an indirect tool for reconstructing the real structural configuration of the field. The appraisal story of the field illustrates how the previously mentioned complications influenced its delineation and how an understanding of these complications helped in upgrading the reserves from an initial value of 10 billion ECM of gas to 40 billion ECM. Additional data acquired with the development wells tend to increase the estimate. Therefore, Barbara field is the most important Italian gas field of the decade. The producing formation is composed of very thin-bedded sandstone and shale intercalations, representing the peculiarity of this reservoir. Development of the field is being achieved with six production platforms and 72 wells.

  7. Velocity Interferometer blanking due to preheating in a double pulse planar experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laffite, S.; Combis, P.; Clerouin, J.; Recoules, V.; Rousseaux, C.; Videau, L.; Baton, S. D.; Koenig, M.

    2014-08-15

    Optical diagnostics, such as VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) or SOP (Streaked Optical Pyrometry), have become essential in shock timing experiments. Their high precision allows for accurate measurements of shock velocities, chronometry, and brightness temperature. However, in some instances, these measurements can be compromised. In planar shock coalescence experiments recently performed at the LULI facility [Baton et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 195002 (2012)], VISAR signal loss was observed. In these experiments, a strong shock launched by a high-intensity spike catches up with a previously shock launched by an earlier, low-intensity beam. The disappearance of the VISAR signal is attributed to a preheating of the coronal plasma by x-rays generated by the high intensity spike. The signal does not disappear if the high-intensity spike starts after VISAR probe beam begins to reflect off of the first shock. The VISAR diagnostic, modeled using an assessment of the optical index in quartz, compares favorably to experimental results. This provides evidence that x-ray preheating can cause blanking of the VISAR signal in quartz.

  8. Characterization of Vertical Velocity and Drop Size Distribution Parameters in Widespread Precipitation at ARM Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giangrande S. E.; Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

    2012-02-01

    Extended, high-resolution measurements of vertical air motion and median volume drop diameter D0 in widespread precipitation from three diverse Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) locations [Lamont, Oklahoma, Southern Great Plains site (SGP); Niamey, Niger; and Black Forest, Germany] are presented. The analysis indicates a weak (0-10 cm{sup -1}) downward air motion beneath the melting layer for all three regions, a magnitude that is to within the typical uncertainty of the retrieval methods. On average, the hourly estimated standard deviation of the vertical air motion is 0.25 m s{sup -1} with no pronounced vertical structure. Profiles of D0 vary according to region and rainfall rate. The standard deviation of 1-min-averaged D0 profiles for isolated rainfall rate intervals is 0.3-0.4 mm. Additional insights into the form of the raindrop size distribution are provided using available dual-frequency Doppler velocity observations at SGP. The analysis suggests that gamma functions better explain paired velocity observations and radar retrievals for the Oklahoma dataset. This study will be useful in assessing uncertainties introduced in the measurement of precipitation parameters from ground-based and spaceborne remote sensors that are due to small-scale variability.

  9. Suppression of fiber modal noise induced radial velocity errors for bright emission-line calibration sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  10. DETECTION OF HIGH VELOCITY OUTFLOWS IN THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY Mrk 590

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, A.; Mathur, S.; Krongold, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the detection of ultra-fast outflows in the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 590. These outflows are identified through highly blueshifted absorption lines of O VIII and Ne IX in the medium energy grating spectrum and Si XIV and Mg XII in the high energy grating spectrum on board the Chandra X-ray observatory. Our best-fit photoionization model requires two absorber components at outflow velocities of 0.176c and 0.0738c and a third tentative component at 0.0867c. The components at 0.0738c and 0.0867c have high ionization parameters and high column densities, similar to other ultra-fast outflows detected at low resolution by Tombesi etal. We also found suggestive evidence for super-solar silicon in these components. These outflows carry sufficient mass and energy to provide effective feedback proposed by theoretical models. The component at 0.176c, on the other hand, has a low ionization parameter and low column density, similar to those detected by Gupta etal. in Ark 564. These absorbers occupy a different locus on the velocity versus ionization parameter plane and have opened up a new parameter space of active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows. The presence of ultra-fast outflows in moderate luminosity AGNs poses a challenge to models of AGN outflows.

  11. Verification and Validation of Carbon-Fiber Laminate Low Velocity Impact Simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    English, Shawn Allen; Nelson, Stacy Michelle; Briggs, Timothy; Brown, Arthur

    2014-10-01

    Presented is a model verification and validation effort using low - velocity impact (LVI) of carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminate experiments. A flat cylindrical indenter impacts the laminate with enough energy to produce delamination, matrix cracks and fiber breaks. Included in the experimental efforts are ultrasonic scans of the damage for qualitative validation of the models. However, the primary quantitative metrics of validation are the force time history measured through the instrumented indenter and initial and final velocities. The simulations, whi ch are run on Sandia's Sierra finite element codes , consist of all physics and material parameters of importance as determined by a sensitivity analysis conducted on the LVI simulation. A novel orthotropic damage and failure constitutive model that is cap able of predicting progressive composite damage and failure is described in detail and material properties are measured, estimated from micromechanics or optimized through calibration. A thorough verification and calibration to the accompanying experiment s are presented. Specia l emphasis is given to the four - point bend experiment. For all simulations of interest, the mesh and material behavior is verified through extensive convergence studies. An ensemble of simulations incorporating model parameter unc ertainties is used to predict a response distribution which is then compared to experimental output. The result is a quantifiable confidence in material characterization and model physics when simulating this phenomenon in structures of interest.

  12. Laminar burning velocities at high pressure for primary reference fuels and gasoline: Experimental and numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerzembeck, S.; Peters, N. [RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Pepiot-Desjardins, P.; Pitsch, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, CA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Spherical flames of n-heptane, iso-octane, PRF 87 and gasoline/air mixtures are experimentally investigated to determine laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths under engine-relevant conditions by using the constant volume bomb method. Data are obtained for an initial temperature of 373 K, equivalence ratios varying from {phi}=0.7 to {phi}=1.2, and initial pressures from 10 to 25 bar. To track the flame front in the vessel a dark field He-Ne laser Schlieren measurement technique and digital image processing were used. The propagating speed with respect to the burned gases and the stretch rate are determined from the rate of change of the flame radius. The laminar burning velocities are obtained through a linear extrapolation to zero stretch. The experimentally determined Markstein numbers are compared to theoretical predictions. A reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for n-heptane and iso-octane was derived from the Lawrence Livermore comprehensive mechanisms. This mechanism was validated for ignition delay times and flame propagation at low and high pressures. In summary an overall good agreement with the various experimental data sets used in the validation was obtained. (author)

  13. PoroTomo_Subtask_3.1_MeqRelocations_3D_VelocityModels_30Jun2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Foxall

    2015-06-30

    Hypocenters of local microearthquakes and 3D P- and S-velocity models computed by simultaneous inversion of arrival times recorded by the Brady seismic network Nov 2010-Mar 2015.

  14. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Improved seismic imaging of geology across high-velocity Earth surfaces will allow more rigorous evaluation of geothermal prospects beneath volcanic outcrops. Seismic-based quantification of fracture orientation and intensity will result in optimal positioning of geothermal wells.

  15. PoroTomo_Subtask_3.1_MeqRelocations_3D_VelocityModels_30Jun2015

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    William Foxall

    Hypocenters of local microearthquakes and 3D P- and S-velocity models computed by simultaneous inversion of arrival times recorded by the Brady seismic network Nov 2010-Mar 2015.

  16. The SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity survey of M dwarfs. I. Description of the survey and science goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshpande, R.; Bender, C. F.; Mahadevan, S.; Terrien, R. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Fleming, S. W.; Blake, C. H.; Carlberg, J. K.; Zasowski, G.; Hearty, F.; Crepp, J.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reyl, C.; Nidever, D. L.; Prieto, C. Allende; Hern疣dez, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Ebelke, G.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Ge, J.; and others

    2013-12-01

    We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object near-infrared APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations will be used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey, as well as results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that will be publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present radial velocities and rotational velocities of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsin i precision of ?2 km s{sup 1} and a measurement floor at vsin i = 4 km s{sup 1}. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for rotational velocities and radial velocity variability (at ?100-200 m s{sup 1}), and will inform and advance the target selection for planned radial velocity and photometric searches for low-mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as the Habitable Zone Planet Finder, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and adaptive optics imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution APOGEE spectra, covering the entire H band, provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and radial velocities for over 1400 stars spanning the spectral range M0-L0, providing the largest set of near-infrared M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsin i values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we hope to achieve a relative velocity precision floor of 50 m s{sup 1} for bright M dwarfs. With three or more epochs, this precision is adequate to detect substellar companions, including giant planets with short orbital periods, and flag them for higher-cadence followup. We present preliminary, and promising, results of this telluric modeling technique in this paper.

  17. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  18. WIYN open cluster study. LIX. Radial velocity membership of the evolved population of the old open cluster NGC 6791

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tofflemire, Benjamin M.; Gosnell, Natalie M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Platais, Imants E-mail: imants@pha.jhu.edu

    2014-10-01

    The open cluster NGC 6791 has been the focus of much recent study due to its intriguing combination of old age and high metallicity (?8 Gyr, [Fe/H] = +0.30), as well as its location within the Kepler field. As part of the WIYN Open Cluster Study, we present precise (? = 0.38 km s{sup 1}) radial velocities for proper motion candidate members of NGC 6791 from Platais et al. Our survey, extending down to g' ? 16.8, is comprised of the evolved cluster population, including blue stragglers, giants, and horizontal branch stars. Of the 280 proper-motion-selected stars above our magnitude limit, 93% have at least one radial velocity measurement and 79% have three measurements over the course of at least 200 days, sufficient for secure radial-velocity-determined membership of non-velocity-variable stars. The Platais et al. proper motion catalog includes 12 anomalous horizontal branch candidates blueward of the red clump, of which we find only 4 to be cluster members. Three fall slightly blueward of the red clump and the fourth is consistent with being a blue straggler. The cleaned color-magnitude diagram shows a richly populated red giant branch and a blue straggler population. Half of the blue stragglers are in binaries. From our radial velocity measurement distribution, we find the cluster's radial velocity dispersion to be ? {sub c} = 0.62 ア 0.10 km s{sup 1}. This corresponds to a dynamical mass of ?4600 M {sub ?}.

  19. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VII. THE LOW-VELOCITY COLLISION BEHAVIOR OF LARGE DUST AGGLOMERATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen; Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2012-10-10

    We performed micro-gravity collision experiments in our laboratory drop tower using 5 cm sized dust agglomerates with volume filling factors of 0.3 and 0.4, respectively. This work is an extension of our previous experiments reported in Beitz et al. to aggregates of more than one order of magnitude higher masses. The dust aggregates consisted of micrometer-sized silica particles and were macroscopically homogeneous. We measured the coefficient of restitution for collision velocities ranging from 1 cm s{sup -1} to 0.5 m s{sup -1}, and determined the fragmentation velocity. For low velocities, the coefficient of restitution decreases with increasing impact velocity, in contrast to findings by Beitz et al. At higher velocities, the value of the coefficient of restitution becomes constant, before the aggregates break at the onset of fragmentation. We interpret the qualitative change in the coefficient of restitution as the transition from a solid-body-dominated to a granular-medium-dominated behavior. We complement our experiments by molecular-dynamics simulations of porous aggregates and obtain a reasonable match to the experimental data. We discuss the importance of our experiments for protoplanetary disks, debris disks, and planetary rings. This work is an extension to the previous work of our group and gives new insight into the velocity dependency of the coefficient of restitution due to improved measurements, better statistics, and a theoretical approach.

  20. TWO DISTANT HALO VELOCITY GROUPS DISCOVERED BY THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sesar, Branimir; Cohen, Judith G.; Levitan, David; Kirby, Evan N.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Prince, Thomas A.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason A.; Juric, Mario; Ofek, Eran O.

    2012-08-20

    We report the discovery of two new halo velocity groups (Cancer groups A and B) traced by eight distant RR Lyrae stars and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory survey at R.A. {approx} 129 Degree-Sign , decl. {approx} 20 Degree-Sign (l {approx} 205 Degree-Sign , b {approx} 32 Degree-Sign ). Located at 92 kpc from the Galactic center (86 kpc from the Sun), these are some of the most distant substructures in the Galactic halo known to date. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the Palomar Observatory 5.1 m Hale telescope and W. M. Keck Observatory 10 m Keck I telescope indicate that the two groups are moving away from the Galaxy at v-bar{sub gsr}{sup A} = 78.0{+-}5.6 km s{sup -1} (Cancer group A) and v-bar{sub gsr}{sup B} = 16.3{+-}7.1 km s{sup -1} (Cancer group B). The groups have velocity dispersions of {sigma}{sub v{sub g{sub s{sub r}{sup A}}}} = 12.4{+-}5.0 km s{sup -1} and {sigma}B{sub v{sub g{sub s{sub r}{sup B}}}} =14.9{+-}6.2 km s{sup -1} and are spatially extended (about several kpc), making it very unlikely that they are bound systems, and more likely to be debris of tidally disrupted dwarf galaxies or globular clusters. Both groups are metal-poor (median metallicities of [Fe/H]{sup A} = -1.6 dex and [Fe/H]{sup B} = -2.1 dex) and have a somewhat uncertain (due to small sample size) metallicity dispersion of {approx}0.4 dex, suggesting dwarf galaxies as progenitors. Two additional RR Lyrae stars with velocities consistent with those of the Cancer groups have been observed {approx}25 Degree-Sign east, suggesting possible extension of the groups in that direction.

  1. MEASUREMENTS OF ANISOTROPIC ION TEMPERATURES, NON-THERMAL VELOCITIES, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS IN A CORONAL HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2013-02-15

    We present a new diagnostic allowing one to measure the anisotropy of ion temperatures and non-thermal velocities, as well as Doppler shifts with respect to the ambient magnetic field. This method provides new results, as well as an independent test for previous measurements obtained with other techniques. Our spectral data come from observations of a low-latitude, on-disk coronal hole. A potential field source surface model was used to calculate the angle between the magnetic field lines and the line of sight for each spatial bin of the observation. A fit was performed to determine the line widths and Doppler shifts parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For each line width component we derived ion temperatures T {sub i,} and T {sub i, Parallel-To} and non-thermal velocities v {sub nt,} and v {sub nt, Parallel-To }. T {sub i,} was cooler than off-limb polar coronal hole measurements, suggesting increasing collisional cooling with decreasing height. T {sub i, Parallel-To} is consistent with a uniform temperature of (1.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K for each ion. Since parallel ion heating is expected to be weak, this ion temperature should reflect the proton temperature. A comparison between our results and others implies a large proton temperature gradient around 1.02 R {sub Sun }. The non-thermal velocities are thought to be proportional to the amplitudes of various waves. Our results for v {sub nt,} agree with Alfven wave amplitudes inferred from off-limb polar coronal hole line width measurements. Our v {sub nt, Parallel-To} results are consistent with slow magnetosonic wave amplitudes inferred from Fourier analysis of time-varying intensity fluctuations. Doppler shift measurements yield outflows of Almost-Equal-To 5 km s{sup -1} for ions formed over a broad temperature range. This differs from other studies that found a strong Doppler shift dependence on formation temperature.

  2. Optical pin apparatus for measuring the arrival time and velocity of shock waves and particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1983-10-18

    An apparatus for the detection of the arrival and for the determination of the velocity of disturbances such as shock-wave fronts and/or projectiles. Optical pins using fluid-filled microballoons as the light source and an optical fiber as a link to a photodetector have been used to investigate shock-waves and projectiles. A microballoon filled with a noble gas is affixed to one end of a fiber-optic cable, and the other end of the cable is attached to a high-speed streak camera. As the shock-front or projectile compresses the microballoon, the gas inside is heated and compressed producing a bright flash of light. The flash of light is transmitted via the optic cable to the streak camera where it is recorded. One image-converter streak camera is capable of recording information from more than 100 microballoon-cable combinations simultaneously.

  3. Optical pin apparatus for measuring the arrival time and velocity of shock waves and particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Robert F. (315 Rover Blvd., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for the detection of the arrival and for the determination of the velocity of disturbances such as shock-wave fronts and/or projectiles. Optical pins using fluid-filled microballoons as the light source and an optical fiber as a link to a photodetector have been used to investigate shock-waves and projectiles. A microballoon filled with a noble gas is affixed to one end of a fiber-optic cable, and the other end of the cable is attached to a high-speed streak camera. As the shock-front or projectile compresses the microballoon, the gas inside is heated and compressed producing a bright flash of light. The flash of light is transmitted via the optic cable to the streak camera where it is recorded. One image-converter streak camera is capable of recording information from more than 100 microballoon-cable combinations simultaneously.

  4. Optical pin apparatus for measuring the arrival time and velocity of shock waves and particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benjamin, R.F.

    1987-03-10

    An apparatus is disclosed for the detection of the arrival and for the determination of the velocity of disturbances such as shock-wave fronts and/or projectiles. Optical pins using fluid-filled microballoons as the light source and an optical fiber as a link to a photodetector have been used to investigate shock-waves and projectiles. A microballoon filled with a noble gas is affixed to one end of a fiber-optic cable, and the other end of the cable is attached to a high-speed streak camera. As the shock-front or projectile compresses the microballoon, the gas inside is heated and compressed producing a bright flash of light. The flash of light is transmitted via the optic cable to the streak camera where it is recorded. One image-converter streak camera is capable of recording information from more than 100 microballoon-cable combinations simultaneously. 3 figs.

  5. System and method for determining coolant level and flow velocity in a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brisson, Bruce William; Morris, William Guy; Zheng, Danian; Monk, David James; Fang, Biao; Surman, Cheryl Margaret; Anderson, David Deloyd

    2013-09-10

    A boiling water reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel having a feedwater inlet for the introduction of recycled steam condensate and/or makeup coolant into the vessel, and a steam outlet for the discharge of produced steam for appropriate work. A fuel core is located within a lower area of the pressure vessel. The fuel core is surrounded by a core shroud spaced inward from the wall of the pressure vessel to provide an annular downcomer forming a coolant flow path between the vessel wall and the core shroud. A probe system that includes a combination of conductivity/resistivity probes and/or one or more time-domain reflectometer (TDR) probes is at least partially located within the downcomer. The probe system measures the coolant level and flow velocity within the downcomer.

  6. Coiled tubing velocity string set at record 20,500 ft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, L.S. )

    1992-04-13

    This paper reports that coiled tubing, set at record depth, significantly reduced costs and posed lower mechanical failure risk for recompleting a gas well in the Delaware basin of West Texas. Alternative completions such as replacing the existing tubing string with smaller diameter conventional API production tubing was deemed less economical and effective. The gas well, George M. Shelton No. 2, was recompleted on July 18, 1991, by Chevron U.S.A. Production Co. The gas is produced from the deep, low-pressure Ellenburger formation in the Gomez field. The hang-off depth of 20,500 ft set a world record for the deepest permanently installed coiled tubing. The 1-1/2 in. coiled tubing velocity string, run within the existing 4-1/2 and 4-in. tapered production tubing string, consists of seven segments that vary in wall thickness from 0.087 to 0.156 in.

  7. Ion Bernstein waves in a plasma with a kappa velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsengiyumva, F.; Mace, R. L.; Hellberg, M. A.

    2013-10-15

    Using a Vlasov-Poisson model, a numerical investigation of the dispersion relation for ion Bernstein waves in a kappa-distributed plasma has been carried out. The dispersion relation is found to depend significantly on the spectral index of the ions, ホコ{sub i}, the parameter whose smallness is a measure of the departure from thermal equilibrium of the distribution function. Over all cyclotron harmonics, the typical Bernstein wave curves are shifted to higher wavenumbers (k) if ホコ{sub i} is reduced. For waves whose frequency lies above the lower hybrid frequency, マ閲sub LH}, an increasing excess of superthermal particles (decreasing ホコ{sub i}) reduces the frequency, マ閲sub peak}, of the characteristic peak at which the group velocity vanishes, while the associated k{sub peak} is increased. As the ratio of ion plasma to cyclotron frequency (マ閲sub pi}/マ閲sub ci}) is increased, the fall-off of マ at large k is smaller for lower ホコ{sub i} and curves are shifted towards larger wavenumbers. In the lower hybrid frequency band and harmonic bands above it, the frequency in a low-ホコ{sub i} plasma spans only a part of the intraharmonic space, unlike the Maxwellian case, thus exhibiting considerably less coupling between adjacent bands for low ホコ{sub i}. It is suggested that the presence of the ensuing stopbands may be a useful diagnostic for the velocity distribution characteristics. The model is applied to the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer in which waves propagating perpendicularly to the ambient magnetic field at frequencies between harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency are frequently observed.

  8. HIERARCHICAL STRUCTURE OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN POSITION-POSITION-VELOCITY SPACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Goodman, Alyssa; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2013-06-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is able to create hierarchical structures in the interstellar medium (ISM) that are correlated on a wide range of scales via the energy cascade. We use hierarchical tree diagrams known as dendrograms to characterize structures in synthetic position-position-velocity (PPV) emission cubes of isothermal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We show that the structures and degree of hierarchy observed in PPV space are related to the presence of self-gravity and the global sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers. Simulations with higher Alfvenic Mach number, self-gravity and supersonic flows display enhanced hierarchical structure. We observe a strong dependency on the sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers and self-gravity when we apply the statistical moments (i.e., mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis) to the leaf and node distribution of the dendrogram. Simulations with self-gravity, larger magnetic field and higher sonic Mach number have dendrogram distributions with higher statistical moments. Application of the dendrogram to three-dimensional density cubes, also known as position-position-position (PPP) cubes, reveals that the dominant emission contours in PPP and PPV are related for supersonic gas but not for subsonic. We also explore the effects of smoothing, thermal broadening, and velocity resolution on the dendrograms in order to make our study more applicable to observational data. These results all point to hierarchical tree diagrams as being a promising additional tool for studying ISM turbulence and star forming regions for obtaining information on the degree of self-gravity, the Mach numbers and the complicated relationship between PPV and PPP data.

  9. HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS AND THE PHYSICS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUD A0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2013-04-01

    The neutral hydrogen structure of high-velocity cloud A0 (at about -180 km s{sup -1}) has been mapped with a 9.'1 resolution. Gaussian decomposition of the profiles is used to separately map families of components defined by similarities in center velocities and line widths. About 70% of the H I gas is in the form of a narrow, twisted filament whose typical line widths are of the order of 24 km s{sup -1}. Many bright features with narrow line widths of the order of 6 km s{sup -1}, clouds, are located in and near the filament. A third category with properties between those of the filament and clouds appears in the data. The clouds are not always co-located with the broader line width filament emission as seen projected on the sky. Under the assumption that magnetic fields underlie the presence of the filament, a theorem is developed for its stability in terms of a toroidal magnetic field generated by the flow of gas along field lines. It is suggested that the axial magnetic field strength may be derived from the excess line width of the H I emission over and above that due to kinetic temperature by invoking the role of Alfven waves that create what is in essence a form of magnetic turbulence. At a distance of 200 pc the axial and the derived toroidal magnetic field strengths in the filament are then about 6 {mu}G while for the clouds they are about 4 {mu}G. The dependence of the derived field strength on distance is discussed.

  10. Microsoft Word - figure_03.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil and Gas Reserves"; PointLogic Energy; Ventyx; and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, and predecessor agencies. IN OH TN WV VA KY MD PA NY VT NH MA CT ME...

  11. Plasma screening effects on the energies of hydrogen atom under the influence of velocity-dependent potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahar, M. K.

    2014-07-15

    In order to examine the plasma screening and velocity-dependent potential effects on the hydrogen atom, the Schrdinger equation including a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb and velocity-dependent potential is solved numerically in the framework asymptotic iteration method. The more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential is used to model Debye and quantum plasma for the specific values of the parameters in its structure. However, in order to examine effects of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasma, the isotropic form factor of velocity-dependent potential is given as harmonic oscillator type, ?(r)=?{sub o}r{sup 2}. Then, the energies of s and p states are calculated numerically without any approximation. In order to investigate thoroughly plasma screening effects and contribution of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom, the corresponding calculations are carried out by using different values of parameters of more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential and isotropic dependence, results of which are discussed.

  12. MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSON SW

    2010-10-08

    Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

  13. Bounds imposed on the sheath velocity of a dense plasma focus by conservation laws and ionization stability condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auluck, S. K. H. E-mail: skauluck@barc.gov.in

    2014-09-15

    Experimental data compiled over five decades of dense plasma focus research are consistent with the snowplow model of sheath propagation, based on the hypothetical balance between magnetic pressure driving the plasma into neutral gas ahead and 努ind pressure resisting its motion. The resulting sheath velocity, or the numerically proportional 電rive parameter, is known to be approximately constant for devices optimized for neutron production over 8 decades of capacitor bank energy. This paper shows that the validity of the snowplow hypothesis, with some correction, as well as the non-dependence of sheath velocity on device parameters, have their roots in local conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy coupled with the ionization stability condition. Both upper and lower bounds on sheath velocity are shown to be related to material constants of the working gas and independent of the device geometry and capacitor bank impedance.

  14. THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W.; Meyer, B. S.

    2013-07-01

    A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

  15. Phase control of group velocity in a dielectric slab doped with three-level ladder-type atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafari, D. [Department of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sahrai, M. [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Motavalli, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Zanjan, P.O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Propagation of an electromagnetic pulse through a dielectric slab doped with three-level ladder-type atomic systems is discussed. It is shown that the group velocity of the reflected and transmitted pulses can be switched from subluminal to superluminal light propagation by the thickness of the slab or the intensity of the coupling field. Furthermore, it is found that, in the presence of quantum interference, the reflected and transmitted pulses are completely phase dependent. So, the group velocity of the reflected and transmitted pulses can only be switched from subluminal to superluminal by adjusting the relative phase of the applied fields.

  16. On the photoelectron velocity-map imaging of lutetium monoxide anion LuO{sup ?}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhiling; Xie, Hua; Qin, Zhengbo; Cong, Ran; Wu, Xia; Tang, Zichao, E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn; Fan, Hongjun, E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Li, Quanjiang [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, and College of Advanced Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, and College of Advanced Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-01-21

    We report a combined photoelectron velocity-map imaging spectroscopy and density functional theory investigation on lutetium monoxide anion. Transition between the X {sup 1}?{sup +} anion electronic ground state and the neutral X {sup 2}?{sup +} electronic ground state is observed. Vibrationally resolved spectra were obtained at four different photon energies, providing a wealth of spectroscopic information for the electronic ground states of the anionic lutetium monoxide and corresponding neutral species. Franck-Condon simulations of the ground-state transition are performed to assign vibrational structure in the spectra and to assist in identifying the observed spectral bands. The electronic ground state of LuO{sup ?} is found to have a vibrational frequency of 743 ア 10 cm{sup ?1} and an equilibrium bond length of 1.841 ナ. The electron affinity of LuO is measured to be 1.624 ア 0.002 eV. The fundamental frequency of ground-state LuO is estimated to be 839 ア 10 cm{sup ?1}.

  17. Preliminary assessment of the Velocity Pump Reaction Turbine as a geothermal total-flow expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demuth, O.J.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation was made of the Velocity Pump Reaction Turbine (VPRT) as a total flow expander in a geothermal-electric conversion cycle. Values of geofluid effectiveness of VPRT systems were estimated for conditions consisting of: a 360/sup 0/F geothermal resource, 60/sup 0/F wet-bulb ambient temperature, zero and 0.003 mass concentrations of dissolved noncondensible gas in the geofluid, 100 and 120/sup 0/F condensing temperature, and engine efficiencies ranging from 0.4 to 1.0. Achievable engine efficiencies were estimated to range from 0.47 to 0.77, with plant geofluid effectivenss values ranging as high as 9.5 Watt hr/lbm geofluid. This value is competitive with magnitudes of geofluid effectiveness projected for advanced binary plants, and is on the order of 40% higher than estimates for dual-flash steam systems and other total flow systems reviewed. Because of its potentially high performance and relative simplicity, the VPRT system appears to warrant further investigation toward its use in a well-head geothermal plant. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Preliminary assessment of the velocity pump reaction turbine as a geothermal total-flow expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demuth, O.J.

    1984-06-01

    A preliminary evaluation was made of the Velocity Pump Reaction Turbine (VPRT) as a total flow expander in a geothermal-electric conversion cycle. Values of geofluid effectiveness of VPRT systems were estimated for conditions consisting of: a 360/sup 0/ geothermal resource, 60/sup 0/F wet-bulb ambient temperature, zero and 0.003 mass concentrations of dissolved noncondensible gas in the geofluid, 100 and 120/sup 0/F condensing temperatures, and engine efficiencies ranging from 0.4 to 1.0. Achievable engine efficiencies were estimated to range from 0.47 to 0.77, with plant geofluid effectiveness values ranging as high as 9.5 Watt hr/lbm geofluid for the 360/sup 0/F resource temperature. This value is competitive with magnitudes of geofluid effectiveness projected for advanced binary plants, and is on the order of 40% higher than estimates for dual-flash steam and other total flow systems reviewed. Because of its potentially high performance and relative simplicity, the VPRT system appears to warrant further investigation toward its use in a well-head geothermal plant.

  19. Exact seismic velocities for VTI and HTI media and extendedThomsen Formulas for stronger anisotropies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2007-05-14

    I explore a different type of approximation to the exactanisotropic wave velocities as a function of incidence angle invertically transversely isotropic (VTI) media. This method extends theThomsen weak anisotropy approach to stronger anisotropy withoutsignificantly affecting the simplicity of the formulas. One importantimprovement is that the peak of the quasi-SV-wave speed vsv(theta) islocated at the correct incidence angle theta= theta max, rather thanalways being at the position theta = 45o, which universally holds forThomsen's approximation although max theta = 45o is actually nevercorrect for any VTI anisotropic medium. The magnitudes of all the wavespeeds are also more closely approximated for all values of the incidenceangle. Furthermore, the value of theta max (which is needed in the newformulas) can be deduced from the same data that are typically used inthe weak anisotropy data analysis. The two examples presented are basedon systems having vertical fractures. The first set of model fractureshas their axes of symmetry randomly oriented in the horizontal plane.Such a system is then isotropic in the horizontal plane and, therefore,exhibits vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) symmetry. The second set offractures also has axes of symmetry in the horizontal plane, but it isassumed these axes are aligned so that the system exhibits horizontaltransverse isotropic (HTI) symmetry. Both types of systems are easilytreated with the new wave speed formulation.

  20. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Gttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  1. High- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure, high-velocity gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halcomb, Danny L. (Camden, OH); Mohler, Jonathan H. (Spring Valley, OH)

    1990-10-16

    A high- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure and high-velocity gases comprises an oxidizable metal, an oxidizing reagent, and a high-temperature-stable gas-producing additive selected from the group consisting of metal carbides and metal nitrides.

  2. Dielectric waveguide with transverse index variation that support a zero group velocity mode at a non-zero longitudinal wavevector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoious, John D.; Fink, Yoel; Johnson, Steven G.; Fan, Shanhui

    2005-06-21

    Optical components including a laser based on a dielectric waveguide extending along a waveguide axis and having a refractive index cross-section perpendicular to the waveguide axis, the refractive index cross-section supporting an electromagnetic mode having a zero group velocity for a non-zero wavevector along the waveguide axis.

  3. How the 杜ain condition of phase stability can explain the effect of the velocity deviation of secondary electrons in DC-biased single-sided multipactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mostajeran, M.

    2014-11-15

    In this work, a 杜ain condition for phase stability has been employed to investigate the effects of the velocity deviation of the electrons in DC-biased single-sided multipactors (MPs). In a previous study [M. Mostajeran, Phys. Plasmas 21, 053108 (2014)], a stability equation was derived, where the secondary electron was assumed to have zero initial velocity and the phase deviation from the resonant phase was considered. In this work, both deviations in phase and velocity from the resonant condition are taken into account, assuming nonzero initial velocity for the secondary electrons. Using the main condition for stability, it is shown that MP discharge can rise in situations, where large velocity deviations from initial velocity and large phase deviations from resonant phase exist. This is contrary to what can be predicted on the basis of the 都imple stability condition. This result is further confirmed by numerical simulations.

  4. A Spitzer search for transits of radial velocity detected super-Earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kammer, J. A.; Knutson, H. A.; Desert, J.-M.; Howard, A. W.; Laughlin, G. P.; Fortney, J. J.; Deming, D.; Todorov, K. O.; Agol, E.; Burrows, A.; Showman, A. P.; Lewis, N. K.

    2014-02-01

    Unlike hot Jupiters or other gas giants, super-Earths are expected to have a wide variety of compositions, ranging from terrestrial bodies like our own to more gaseous planets like Neptune. Observations of transiting systems, which allow us to directly measure planet masses and radii and constrain atmospheric properties, are key to understanding the compositional diversity of the planets in this mass range. Although Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting super-Earth candidates over the past 4 yr, the majority of these planets orbit stars that are too far away and too faint to allow for detailed atmospheric characterization and reliable mass estimates. Ground-based transit surveys focus on much brighter stars, but most lack the sensitivity to detect planets in this size range. One way to get around the difficulty of finding these smaller planets in transit is to start by choosing targets that are already known to host super-Earth sized bodies detected using the radial velocity (RV) technique. Here we present results from a Spitzer program to observe six of the most favorable RV-detected super-Earth systems, including HD 1461, HD 7924, HD 156668, HIP 57274, and GJ 876. We find no evidence for transits in any of their 4.5 ?m flux light curves, and place limits on the allowed transit depths and corresponding planet radii that rule out even the most dense and iron-rich compositions for these objects. We also observed HD 97658, but the observation window was based on a possible ground-based transit detection that was later ruled out; thus the window did not include the predicted time for the transit detection recently made by the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars space telescope.

  5. ENERGY PRODUCTIVITY OF THE HIGH VELOCITY ALGAE RACEWAY INTEGRATED DESIGN (ARID-HV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attalah, Said; Waller, Peter; Khawam, G.; Ryan, Randy; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2015-01-31

    The original Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID) raceway was an effective method to increase algae culture temperature in open raceways. However, the energy input was high and flow mixing was poor. Thus, the High Velocity Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID-HV) raceway was developed to reduce energy input requirements and improve flow mixing in a serpentine flow path. A prototype ARID-HV system was installed in Tucson, Arizona. Based on algae growth simulation and hydraulic analysis, an optimal ARID-HV raceway was designed, and the electrical energy input requirement (kWh ha-1 d-1) was calculated. An algae growth model was used to compare the productivity of ARIDHV and conventional raceways. The model uses a pond surface energy balance to calculate water temperature as a function of environmental parameters. Algae growth and biomass loss are calculated based on rate constants during day and night, respectively. A 10 year simulation of DOE strain 1412 (Chlorella sorokiniana) showed that the ARID-HV raceway had significantly higher production than a conventional raceway for all months of the year in Tucson, Arizona. It should be noted that this difference is species and climate specific and is not observed in other climates and with other algae species. The algae growth model results and electrical energy input evaluation were used to compare the energy productivity (algae production rate/energy input) of the ARID-HV and conventional raceways for Chlorella sorokiniana in Tucson, Arizona. The energy productivity of the ARID-HV raceway was significantly greater than the energy productivity of a conventional raceway for all months of the year.

  6. WHAT GOVERNS THE BULK VELOCITY OF THE JET COMPONENTS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chai Bo; Cao Xinwu; Gu Minfeng E-mail: cxw@shao.ac.cn

    2012-11-10

    We use a sample of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with measured black hole masses to explore the jet formation mechanisms in these sources. Based on Koenigl's inhomogeneous jet model, the jet parameters, such as the bulk motion Lorentz factor, magnetic field strength, and electron density in the jet, can be estimated with the very long baseline interferometry and X-ray data.. We find a significant correlation between black hole mass and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components for this sample, while no significant correlation is present between the bulk Lorentz factor and the Eddington ratio. The massive black holes will be spun up through accretion, as the black holes acquire mass and angular momentum simultaneously through accretion. Recent investigation indeed suggested that most supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies have on average higher spins than the black holes in spiral galaxies, where random, small accretion episodes (e.g., tidally disrupted stars, accretion of molecular clouds) might have played a more important role. If this is true, then the correlation between black hole mass and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components found in this work implies that the motion velocity of the jet components is probably governed by the black hole spin. No correlation is found between the magnetic field strength at 10R {sub S} (R {sub S} = 2GM/c {sup 2} is the Schwarzschild radius) in the jets and the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet components for this sample. This is consistent with the black hole spin scenario, i.e., the faster moving jets are magnetically accelerated by the magnetic fields threading the horizon of more rapidly rotating black holes. The results imply that the Blandford-Znajek mechanism may dominate over the Blandford-Payne mechanism for the jet acceleration, at least in these radio-loud AGNs.

  7. ELLIPSOIDAL VARIABLE V1197 ORIONIS: ABSOLUTE LIGHT-VELOCITY ANALYSIS FOR KNOWN DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R. E.; Chochol, D.; KomzIk, R.; Van Hamme, W.; Pribulla, T.; Volkov, I.

    2009-09-01

    V1197 Orionis light curves from a long-term observing program for red giant binaries show ellipsoidal variation of small amplitude in the V and R{sub C} bands, although not clearly in U and B. Eclipses are not detected. All four bands show large irregular intrinsic variations, including fleeting quasi-periodicities identified by power spectra, that degrade analysis and may be caused by dynamical tides generated by orbital eccentricity. To deal with the absence of eclipses and consequent lack of astrophysical and geometrical information, direct use is made of the Hipparcos parallax distance while the V and R{sub C} light curves and (older) radial velocity curves are analyzed simultaneously in terms of absolute flux. The red giant's temperature is estimated from new spectra. This type of analysis, called Inverse Distance Estimation for brevity, is new and can also be applied to other ellipsoidal variables. Advantages gained by utilization of definite distance and temperature are discussed in regard to how radius, fractional lobe filling, and mass ratio information are expressed in the observations. The advantages were tested in solutions of noisy synthetic data. Also discussed and tested by simulations are ideas on the optimal number of light curves to be solved simultaneously under various conditions. The dim companion has not been observed or discussed in the literature but most solutions find its mass to be well below that of the red giant. Solutions show red giant masses that are too low for evolution to the red giant stage within the age of the Galaxy, although that result is probably an artifact of the intrinsic brightness fluctuations.

  8. Covariance statistics of turbulence velocity components for wind-energy-conversion system design-homogeneous, isotropic case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fichtl, G.H.

    1983-09-01

    When designing a wind energy converison system (WECS), it may be necessary to take into account the distribution of wind across the disc of rotation. The specific engineering applications include structural strength, fatigue, and control. This wind distribution consists of two parts, namely that associated with the mean wind profile and that associated with the turbulence velocity fluctuation field. The work reported herein is aimed at the latter, namely the distribution of turbulence velocity fluctuations across the WECS disk of rotation. A theory is developed for the two-time covariance matrix for turbulence velocity vector components for wind energy conversion system (WECS) design. The theory is developed for homogeneous and iotropic turbulance with the assumption that Taylor's hypothesis is valid. The Eulerian turbulence velocity vector field is expanded about the hub of the WECS. Formulae are developed for the turbulence velocity vector component covariance matrix following the WECS blade elements. It is shown that upon specification of the turbulence energy spectrum function and the WECS rotation rate, the two-point, two-time covariance matrix of the turbulent flow relative to the WECS bladed elements is determined. This covariance matrix is represented as the sum of nonstationary and stationary contributions. Generalized power spectral methods are used to obtain two-point, double frequency power spectral density functions for the turbulent flow following the blade elements. The Dryden turbulence model is used to demonstrate the theory. A discussion of linear system response analysis is provided to show how the double frequency turbulence spectra might be used to calculate response spectra of a WECS to turbulent flow. Finally the spectrum of the component of turbulence normal to the WECS disc of rotation, following the blade elements, is compared with experimental results.

  9. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  10. 3-D moveout inversion in azimuthally anisotropic media with lateral velocity variation: Theory and a case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grechka, V.; Tsvankin, I.

    1999-08-01

    Reflection moveout recorded over an azimuthally anisotropic medium (e.g., caused by vertical or dipping fractures) varies with the azimuth of the source-receiver line. Normal-moveout (NMO) velocity, responsible for the reflection traveltimes on conventional-length spreads, forms an elliptical curve in the horizontal plane. While this result remains valid in the presence of arbitrary anisotropy and heterogeneity, the inversion of the NMO ellipse for the medium parameters has been discussed so far only for horizontally homogeneous models above a horizontal or dipping reflector. Here, the authors develop an analytic moveout correction for weak lateral velocity variation in horizontally layered azimuthally anisotropic media. The correction term is proportional to the curvature of the zero-offset travel-time surface at the common midpoint and, therefore, can be estimated from surface seismic data. After the influence of lateral velocity variation on the effective NMO ellipses has been stripped, the generalized Dix equation can be used to compute the interval ellipses and evaluate the magnitude of azimuthal anisotropy (measured by P-wave NMO velocity) within the layer of interest. This methodology was applied to a 3-D wide-azimuth data set acquired over a fractured reservoir in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. The processing sequence included 3-D semblance analysis (based on the elliptical NMO equation) for a grid of common-midpoint supergathers, spatial smoothing of the effective NMO ellipses and zero-offset traveltimes, correction for lateral velocity variation, and generalized Dix differentiation. The estimates of depth-varying fracture trends in the survey area, based on the interval P-wave NMO ellipses, are in good agreement with the results of outcrop and borehole measurements and the rotational analysis of four component S-wave data.

  11. Extension arm for mobile travelers suit case

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byington, Gerald A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus for adjusting a luggage handle in relation to a luggage frame utilized to transport luggage by a traveler. The handle is connected to two extendable and retractable slide tube assemblies, the assemblies allow for the telescoping of the luggage handle to multiple positions in relation to a pair of fixed frame tubes connected to a luggage shell with wheels, to accommodate the height and personal stride of traveler. The luggage handle incorporates triggering buttons that allow ambidextrous and single-handed control of the height of the handle and slide tube assembly in relation to the luggage. The handle and slide tube assembly are connected by interior filaments to pulleys and filaments within two concentric light-weight slide tubes, which are inserted respectively into two fixed frame tubes, to allow a multitude of positions for the slide tubes to lock into the fixed frame tubes. The apparatus can be pushed or pulled by the traveler, and the support shell can accommodate multiple pieces of luggage.

  12. CODY: Continuum Dynamics Evaluation and Test Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    computer architectures. Our goals are operating system, computer architecture, and programming language agnostic, however, so we expect evolution over time. CODY is designed...

  13. Ames Lab 101: VE-Suite

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bryden, Mark

    2012-08-29

    Ames Laboratory scientist Mark Bryden talks about virtual engineering and the advantages it gives engineers when they can "walk through" designs visually.

  14. Acoustic Imaging Suite - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial...

  15. Middleware Automated Deployment Utilities - MRW Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-09-18

    The Middleware Automated Deployment Utilities consists the these three components: MAD: Utility designed to automate the deployment of java applications to multiple java application servers. The product contains a front end web utility and backend deployment scripts. MAR: Web front end to maintain and update the components inside database. MWR-Encrypt: Web utility to convert a text string to an encrypted string that is used by the Oracle Weblogic application server. The encryption is done usingmoreツツサ the built in functions if the Oracle Weblogic product and is mainly used to create an encrypted version of a database password.ツォツless

  16. Simultaneous sensing of light and sound velocities of fluids in a two-dimensional phoXonic crystal with defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoudache, Samira; Pennec, Yan Djafari Rouhani, Bahram; Khater, Antoine; Lucklum, Ralf; Tigrine, Rachid

    2014-04-07

    We theoretically investigate the potentiality of dual phononic-photonic (the so-called phoxonic) crystals for liquid sensing applications. We study the transmission through a two-dimensional (2D) crystal made of infinite cylindrical holes in a silicon substrate, where one row of holes oriented perpendicular to the propagation direction is filled with a liquid. The infiltrated holes may have a different radius than the regular holes. We show, in the defect structure, the existence of well-defined features (peaks or dips) in the transmission spectra of acoustic and optical waves and estimate their sensitivity to the sound and light velocity of the analyte. Some of the geometrical requirements behave in opposite directions when searching for an efficient sensing of either sound or light velocities. Hence, a compromise in the choice of the parameters may become necessary in making the phoxonic sensor.

  17. Ab initio multiple cloning simulations of pyrrole photodissociation: TKER spectra and velocity map imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Saita, Kenichiro; Martinez, Todd J.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.

    2014-12-11

    In this study, we report a detailed computational simulation of the photodissociation of pyrrole using the ab initio Multiple Cloning (AIMC) method implemented within MOLPRO. The efficiency of the AIMC implementation, employing train basis sets, linear approximation for matrix elements, and Ehrenfest configuration cloning, allows us to accumulate significant statistics. We calculate and analyze the total kinetic energy release (TKER) spectrum and Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) of pyrrole and compare the results directly with experimental measurements. Both the TKER spectrum and the structure of the velocity map image (VMI) are well reproduced. Previously, it has been assumed that the isotropic component of the VMI arises from long time statistical dissociation. Instead, our simulations suggest that ultrafast dynamics contributes significantly to both low and high energy portions of the TKER spectrum.

  18. Particle in cell simulations of Buneman instability of a current-driven plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R. Roozbahani, H.; Komaizi, D.; Hashemzadeh, M.

    2014-09-15

    The nonlinear evolution of low frequency Buneman instability in an unmagnetized current-driven plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution is investigated using particle in cell simulation. Simulation results show that the generation of electron phase space holes and the counter-streaming current induced in the plasma strongly depend on the q-parameter. It is found that by increasing the nonextensive parameter, the distribution of electron density becomes highly peaked. This density steepening or grating-like pattern occurs at the saturation time. In addition, a generalized dispersion relation is obtained using the kinetic theory. Analysis of the dispersion relation and the temporal evolution of the electric field energy density reveal that the growth rate of instability increases by increasing the q-parameter. Finally, the results of Maxwellian and q-nonextensive velocity distributions have been compared and discussed.

  19. Optical and ultraviolet observations of a low-velocity type II plateau supernova 2013am in M65

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jujia; Bai, Jinming; Fan, Yufeng; Wang, Jianguo; Yi, Weimin; Wang, Chuanjun; Xin, Yuxin; Liangchang; Zhang, Xiliang; Lun, Baoli; Wang, Xueli; He, Shousheng [Yunnan Observatories (YNAO), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650216 (China); Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Fang; Mo, Jun [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Mazzali, Paolo A.; Bersier, David [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Zhang, Tianmeng [National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Walker, Emma S., E-mail: jujia@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: baijinming@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Optical and ultraviolet observations for the nearby type II plateau supernova (SN IIP) 2013am in the nearby spiral galaxy M65 are presented in this paper. The early spectra are characterized by relatively narrow P-Cygni features, with ejecta velocities much lower than observed in normal SNe IIP (i.e., ?2000 km s{sup 1} versus ?5000 km {sup 1} in the middle of the plateau phase). Moreover, prominent Ca II absorptions are also detected in SN 2013am at relatively early phases. These spectral features are reminiscent of those seen in the low-velocity and low-luminosity SN IIP 2005cs. However, SN 2013am exhibits different photometric properties, having shorter plateau phases and brighter light curve tails if compared to SN 2005cs. Adopting R{sub V} = 3.1 and a mean value of total reddening derived from the photometric and spectroscopic methods (i.e., E(B V) = 0.55 ア 0.19 mag), we find that SN 2013am may have reached an absolute V-band peak magnitude of 15.83 ア 0.71 mag and produced an {sup 56}Ni mass of 0.016{sub ?0.006}{sup +0.010} M {sub ?} in the explosion. These parameters are close to those derived for SN 2008in and SN 2009N, which have been regarded as 'gap-filler' objects linking the faint SNe IIP to the normal ones. This indicates that some low-velocity SNe IIP may not necessarily result from the low-energetic explosions. The low expansion velocities could be due to a lower metallicity of the progenitor stars, a larger envelope mass ejected in the explosion, or the effect of viewing angle where these SNe were observed at an angle away from the polar direction.

  20. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer; Sullivan, Mark; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi; Nugent, Peter E.; Bersier, David; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fransson, Claes; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Quimby, Robert

    2014-06-20

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ?10{sup 4} km s{sup 1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  1. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, M.S.; Jackson, T.G.; Knerr, C.

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web. 37 figs.

  2. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Maclin S.; Jackson, Theodore G.; Knerr, Christopher

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web.

  3. Predicting the Velocity and Azimuth of Fragments Generated by the Range Destruction or Random Failure of Rocket Casings and Tankage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

    1988-10-01

    The details of a predictive analytical modeling process as well as the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed in this paper. Methods for applying similar modeling techniques to liquid-tankage-over-pressure failures are also discussed. These methods have been calibrated against observed SRM ascent failures and on-orbit tankage failures. Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities exceeding 100 m/s resulted from Titan 34D-SRM range destruct actions at 10 sec mission elapsed time (MET). Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities of approximately 200 m/s resulted from STS-SRM range destruct actions at 110 sec MET. Similar sized fragments for Ariane third stage and Delta second stage tankage were predicted to have maximum velocities of 260 m/s and 480 m/s respectively. Good agreement was found between the predictions and observations for five specific events and it was concluded that the methods developed have good potential for use in predicting the fragmentation process of a number of generically similar casing and tankage systems. There are three copies in the file, one of these is loose.

  4. A numerical study of geometry dependent errors in velocity, temperature, and density measurements from single grid planar retarding potential analyzers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R. L.; Earle, G. D.; Heelis, R. A.; Klenzing, J. H.

    2010-08-15

    Planar retarding potential analyzers (RPAs) have been utilized numerous times on high profile missions such as the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program to measure plasma composition, temperature, density, and the velocity component perpendicular to the plane of the instrument aperture. These instruments use biased grids to approximate ideal biased planes. These grids introduce perturbations in the electric potential distribution inside the instrument and when unaccounted for cause errors in the measured plasma parameters. Traditionally, the grids utilized in RPAs have been made of fine wires woven into a mesh. Previous studies on the errors caused by grids in RPAs have approximated woven grids with a truly flat grid. Using a commercial ion optics software package, errors in inferred parameters caused by both woven and flat grids are examined. A flat grid geometry shows the smallest temperature and density errors, while the double thick flat grid displays minimal errors for velocities over the temperature and velocity range used. Wire thickness along the dominant flow direction is found to be a critical design parameter in regard to errors in all three inferred plasma parameters. The results shown for each case provide valuable design guidelines for future RPA development.

  5. Horizontal-Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Yelena L.; Banta, Robert M.; Kelley, Neil D.; Jonkman, Bonnie J.; Tucker, Sara C.; Newsom, Rob K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--has been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA痴 High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be numerically equivalent to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance ?u2 were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a technique described in Banta, et al. (2002). The technique was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. It then describes several series of averaging tests that produced the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal velocity variance ?u2. The results show high correlation (0.71-0.97) of the mean U and average wind speed measured by sodar and in-situ instruments, independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging techniques.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wire-feed, high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch are analyzed using computational and experimental techniques. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire (DJRW) torch. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Premixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step finite-rate chemistry model with a total of 9 gas species which includes dissociation of combustion products. A continually-fed steel wire passes through the center of the nozzle and melting occurs at a conical tip near the exit of the aircap. Wire melting is simulated computationally by injecting liquid steel particles into the flow field near the tip of the wire. Experimental particle velocity measurements during wire feed were also taken using a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter system. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and particle velocity predictions are compared with experimental measurements outside of the aircap.

  7. Extended main sequence turnoffs in intermediate-age star clusters: a correlation between turnoff width and early escape velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Kalirai, Jason S.; Correnti, Matteo E-mail: verap@stsci.edu E-mail: correnti@stsci.edu; and others

    2014-12-10

    We present a color-magnitude diagram analysis of deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a mass-limited sample of 18 intermediate-age (1-2 Gyr old) star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds, including eight clusters for which new data were obtained. We find that all star clusters in our sample feature extended main-sequence turnoff (eMSTO) regions that are wider than can be accounted for by a simple stellar population (including unresolved binary stars). FWHM widths of the MSTOs indicate age spreads of 200-550 Myr. We evaluate the dynamical evolution of clusters with and without initial mass segregation. Our main results are (1) the fraction of red clump (RC) stars in secondary RCs in eMSTO clusters scales with the fraction of MSTO stars having pseudo-ages of ?1.35 Gyr; (2) the width of the pseudo-age distributions of eMSTO clusters is correlated with their central escape velocity v {sub esc}, both currently and at an age of 10 Myr. We find that these two results are unlikely to be reproduced by the effects of interactive binary stars or a range of stellar rotation velocities. We therefore argue that the eMSTO phenomenon is mainly caused by extended star formation within the clusters; and (3) we find that v {sub esc} ? 15 km s{sup 1} out to ages of at least 100 Myr for all clusters featuring eMSTOs, and v {sub esc} ? 12 km s{sup 1} at all ages for two lower-mass clusters in the same age range that do not show eMSTOs. We argue that eMSTOs only occur for clusters whose early escape velocities are higher than the wind velocities of stars that provide material from which second-generation stars can form. The threshold of 12-15 km s{sup 1} is consistent with wind velocities of intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars and massive binary stars in the literature.

  8. Investigation of nitrogen dilution effects on the laminar burning velocity and flame stability of syngas fuel at atmospheric condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prathap, C.; Ray, Anjan; Ravi, M.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2008-10-15

    The objective of this investigation was to study the effect of dilution with nitrogen on the laminar burning velocity and flame stability of syngas fuel (50% H{sub 2}-50% CO by volume)-air (21% O{sub 2}-79% N{sub 2} by volume) mixtures. The syngas fuel composition considered in this work comprised x% N{sub 2} by volume and (100-x)% an equimolar mixture of CO and H{sub 2}. The proportion x (i.e., %N{sub 2}) was varied from 0 to 60% while the H{sub 2}/CO ratio was always kept as unity. Spherically expanding flames were generated by centrally igniting homogeneous fuel-air gas mixtures in a 40-L cylindrical combustion chamber fitted with optical windows. Shadowgraphy technique with a high-speed imaging camera was used to record the propagating spherical flames. Unstretched burning velocity was calculated following the Karlovitz theory for weakly stretched flames. Also, Markstein length was calculated to investigate the flame stability conditions for the fuel-air mixtures under consideration. Experiments were conducted for syngas fuel with different nitrogen proportions (0-60%) at 0.1 MPa (absolute), 302{+-}3K, and equivalence ratios ranging from 0.6 to 3.5. All the measurements were compared with the numerical predictions obtained using RUN-1DL and PREMIX with a contemporary chemical kinetic scheme. Dilution with nitrogen in different proportions in syngas resulted in (a) decrease in laminar burning velocity due to reduction in heat release and increase in heat capacity of unburned gas mixture and hence the flame temperature, (b) shift in occurrence of peak laminar burning velocity from {phi}=2.0 for 0% N{sub 2} dilution to {phi}=1.4 for 60% N{sub 2} dilution, (c) augmentation of the coupled effect of flame stretch and preferential diffusion on laminar burning velocity, and (d) shift in the equivalence ratio for transition from stable to unstable flames from {phi}=0.6 for 0% N{sub 2} dilution to {phi}=1.0 for 60% N{sub 2} dilution. The present work also indicated that if the fuel mole fraction in the wide range of fuel-air mixtures investigated is less than 22%, then those fuel mixtures are in the unstable regime with regard to preferential diffusion. (author)

  9. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

    2013-02-28

    The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

  10. Effect of pressure anisotropy and flow velocity on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of anisotropic magnetized plasma using generalized polytrope laws

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prajapati, R. P.; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2010-11-15

    The effect of pressure anisotropy and flow velocity on the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of two magnetized anisotropic pressure plasmas flowing relative to each other is investigated using generalized polytrope laws. The anisotropic pressure with the generalized polytrope laws is considered with three-dimensional perturbations in the description of plasma using relevant magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) set of equations. The magnetic field is assumed in the x-direction and parallel to the direction of the flow of plasma streams. A complete polytrope model is given for the considered system in terms of pressure components, magnetic field, and density of the fluids to discuss the condition of KH instability, stability, and overstability. The problem is solved using the normal mode analysis and the general dispersion relation is obtained by applying the appropriate boundary conditions. The case of nonvanishing wavenumber transverse to the direction of the stream is obtained, which represents the stationery configuration without excitation of KH instability. The longitudinal mode of propagation is discussed with conditions of KH instability, stability, and overstability for collisionless (anisotropic) double-adiabatic Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) and collisional (isotropic) MHD media, depending on various values of polytrope indices. The effects of pressure anisotropy, different flow velocities, and magnetic field are also discussed on the growth rate of KH instability. We observe that the presence of flow velocity and pressure anisotropy of the plasmas has a destabilizing influence on the growth rate of the system. The growth rate is found larger for MHD set of equations in comparison to the CGL set of equations. The presence of magnetic field has a stabilizing role on the growth rate of the considered system.

  11. HST/COS OBSERVATIONS OF GALACTIC HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS: FOUR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SIGHT LINES THROUGH COMPLEX C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stevans, Matthew; Danforth, Charles; Penton, Steven V. [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Lockman, Felix J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, WV 29444 (United States); Arav, Nahum, E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu, E-mail: matthew.stevans@colorado.edu, E-mail: charles.danforth@colorado.edu, E-mail: steven.penton@colorado.edu, E-mail: jlockman@nrao.edu, E-mail: arav@vt.edu [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    We report ultraviolet spectra of Galactic high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in Complex C, taken by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), together with new 21 cm spectra from the Green Bank Telescope. The wide spectral coverage and higher signal-to-noise ratio, compared to previous HST spectra, provide better velocity definition of the HVC absorption, additional ionization species (including high ions), and improved abundances in this halo gas. Complex C has a metallicity of 10%-30% solar and a wide range of ions, suggesting dynamical and thermal interactions with hot gas in the Galactic halo. Spectra in the COS medium-resolution G130M (1133-1468 A) and G160M (1383-1796 A) gratings detect ultraviolet absorption lines from eight elements in low-ionization states (O I, N I, C II, S II, Si II, Al II, Fe II, P II) and three elements in intermediate- and high-ionization states (Si III, Si IV, C IV, N V). Our four active galactic nucleus sight lines toward Mrk 817, Mrk 290, Mrk 876, and PG 1259+593 have high-velocity H I and O VI column densities, log N{sub Hi}= 19.39-20.05 and log N{sub Ovi}= 13.58-14.10, with substantial amounts of kinematically associated photoionized gas. The high-ion abundance ratios are consistent with cooling interfaces between photoionized and collisionally ionized gas: N(C IV)/N(O VI) {approx} 0.3-0.5, N(Si IV)/N(O VI) {approx} 0.05-0.11, N(N V)/N(O VI) {approx} 0.07-0.13, and N(Si IV)/N(Si III) {approx}0.2.

  12. Effect of the Temperature of the Moderator on the Velocity Distribution of Neutrons with Numerical Calculations for H as Moderator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Wigner, E. P.; Wilkins, J. E. Jr.

    1944-09-14

    In this paper we set up an integral equation governing the energy distribution of neutrons that are being slowed down uniformly throughout the entire space by a uniformly distributed moderator whose atoms are in motion with a Maxwellian distribution of velocities. The effects of chemical binding and crystal reflection are ignored. When the moderator is hydrogen, the integral equation is reduced to a differential equation and solved by numerical methods. In this manner we obtain a refinement of the dv/v{sup 2} law. (auth)

  13. Horizontal Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Y. L.; Banta, R. M.; Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Tucker, S. C.; Newsom, R. K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--have been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA's high-resolution Doppler lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be approximately equal to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance {sigma}2u were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a method described by Banta et al., which uses an elevation (vertical slice) scanning technique. The method was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. The results for the mean U and mean wind speed measured by sodar and in situ instruments for all nights of LLLJP show high correlation (0.71-0.97), independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures, and correlation coefficients consistently >0.9 for four high-wind nights, when the low-level jet speeds exceeded 15 m s{sup -1} at some time during the night. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging parameters. Several series of averaging tests are described, to find the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal-velocity variance {sigma}{sup 2}{sub u}. Because of the nonstationarity of the SBL data, the best results were obtained when the velocity data were first averaged over intervals of 1 min, and then further averaged over 3-15 consecutive 1-min intervals, with best results for the 10- and 15-min averaging periods. For these cases, correlation coefficients exceeded 0.9. As a part of the analysis, Eulerian integral time scales ({tau}) were estimated for the four high-wind nights. Time series of {tau} through each night indicated erratic behavior consistent with the nonstationarity. Histograms of {tau} showed a mode at 4-5 s, but frequent occurrences of larger {tau} values, mostly between 10 and 100 s.

  14. Formation of an anisotropic electron velocity distribution function and production of multicharged ions in the micropinch discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgov, A. N.; Zemchenkova, N. V.; Klyachin, N. A.; Prokhorovich, D. E.

    2011-01-15

    Analysis of the results of polarimetric measurements of X-ray line radiation of multicharged ions in a Z-pinch discharge indicates that the formation of an anisotropic electron velocity distribution in the neck of the current channel and the generation of highly charged ions are separated in time. The generation of a fast electron beam in the longitudinal ohmic electric field in the stage of plasma compression in the neck results in the polarization of X-ray bremsstrahlung continuum. In the stage of expansion of the hot dense micropinch plasma, the radial electric field prevails, due to which X-ray line radiation of multicharged ions becomes linearly polarized.

  15. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  16. Discovery of star formation in the extreme outer galaxy possibly induced by a high-velocity cloud impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumi, Natsuko; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Yasui, Chikako; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Saito, Masao

    2014-11-01

    We report the discovery of star formation activity in perhaps the most distant molecular cloud in the extreme outer galaxy. We performed deep near-infrared imaging with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope, and found two young embedded clusters at two CO peaks of 'Digel Cloud 1' at the kinematic distance of D = 16 kpc (Galactocentric radius R {sub G} = 22 kpc). We identified 18 and 45 cluster members in the two peaks, and the estimated stellar densities are ?5 and ?3 pc{sup 2}, respectively. The observed K-band luminosity function suggests that the age of the clusters is less than 1 Myr and also that the distance to the clusters is consistent with the kinematic distance. On the sky, Cloud 1 is located very close to the H I peak of high-velocity cloud Complex H, and there are some H I intermediate velocity structures between the Complex H and the Galactic disk, which could indicate an interaction between them. We suggest the possibility that Complex H impacting on the Galactic disk has triggered star formation in Cloud 1 as well as the formation of the Cloud 1 molecular cloud.

  17. Kinetic transverse dispersion relation for relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with Maxwell-Jttner velocity distribution functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez, Rodrigo A.; Moya, Pablo S.; Muoz, Vctor; Vias, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, J. Alejandro

    2014-09-15

    We use a kinetic treatment to study the linear transverse dispersion relation for a magnetized isotropic relativistic electron-positron plasma with finite relativistic temperature. The explicit linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves propagating along a constant background magnetic field is presented, including an analytical continuation to the whole complex frequency plane for the case of Maxwell-Jttner velocity distribution functions. This dispersion relation is studied numerically for various temperatures. For left-handed solutions, the system presents two branches, the electromagnetic ordinary mode and the Alfv駭 mode. In the low frequency regime, the Alfv駭 branch has two dispersive zones, the normal zone (where ??/?k?>?0) and an anomalous zone (where ??/?k?velocity and effective plasma frequency with the temperature. We complemented the analytical and numerical approaches with relativistic full particle simulations, which consistently agree with the analytical results.

  18. A statistical analysis of systematic errors in temperature and ram velocity estimates from satellite-borne retarding potential analyzers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klenzing, J. H.; Earle, G. D.; Heelis, R. A.; Coley, W. R. [William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W. Campbell Rd. WT15, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The use of biased grids as energy filters for charged particles is common in satellite-borne instruments such as a planar retarding potential analyzer (RPA). Planar RPAs are currently flown on missions such as the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System and the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program to obtain estimates of geophysical parameters including ion velocity and temperature. It has been shown previously that the use of biased grids in such instruments creates a nonuniform potential in the grid plane, which leads to inherent errors in the inferred parameters. A simulation of ion interactions with various configurations of biased grids has been developed using a commercial finite-element analysis software package. Using a statistical approach, the simulation calculates collected flux from Maxwellian ion distributions with three-dimensional drift relative to the instrument. Perturbations in the performance of flight instrumentation relative to expectations from the idealized RPA flux equation are discussed. Both single grid and dual-grid systems are modeled to investigate design considerations. Relative errors in the inferred parameters for each geometry are characterized as functions of ion temperature and drift velocity.

  19. Rotational and radial velocities of 1.3-2.2 M {sub ?} red giants in open clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ?1.6M {sub ?} arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  20. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C.; Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M.; Vanstreels, K.

    2014-07-14

    MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (?) of a 500?nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E?=?25?ア?1?GPa and ?=42ア1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  1. LOW-VELOCITY SHOCKS TRACED BY EXTENDED SiO EMISSION ALONG THE W43 RIDGES: WITNESSING THE FORMATION OF YOUNG MASSIVE CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Martin, P. G.; Motte, F.; Louvet, F.; Hill, T.; Hennemann, M.; Didelon, P.; Lesaffre, P.; Gusdorf, A.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Bendo, G.; Roussel, H.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bronfman, L.; and others

    2013-10-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is tightly linked to that of their parental clouds. Here, we focus on the high-density parts of W43, a molecular cloud undergoing an efficient event of star formation. Using a column density image derived from Herschel continuum maps, we identify two high-density filamentary clouds, called the W43-MM1 and W43-MM2 ridges. Both have gas masses of 2.1 ラ 10{sup 4} M{sub ?} and 3.5 ラ 10{sup 4} M{sub ?} above >10{sup 23} cm{sup -2} and within areas of ?6 and ?14 pc{sup 2}, respectively. The W43-MM1 and W43-MM2 ridges are structures that are coherent in velocity and gravitationally bound, despite their large velocity dispersion measured by the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) lines of the W43-HERO IRAM large program. Another intriguing result is that these ridges harbor widespread (?10 pc{sup 2}) bright SiO (2-1) emission, which we interpret to be the result of low-velocity shocks (?10 km s{sup 1}). We measure a significant relationship between the SiO (2-1) luminosity and velocity extent and show that it distinguishes our observations from the high-velocity shocks associated with outflows. We use state-of-the-art shock models to demonstrate that a small percentage (10%) of Si atoms in low-velocity shocks, observed initially in gas phase or in grain mantles, can explain the observed SiO column density in the W43 ridges. The spatial and velocity overlaps between the ridges of high-density gas and the shocked SiO gas suggest that ridges could be forming via colliding flows driven by gravity and accompanied by low-velocity shocks. This mechanism may be the initial conditions for the formation of young massive clusters.

  2. The velocity dispersion profile of NGC 6388 from resolved-star spectroscopy: No evidence of a central cusp and new constraints on the black hole mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanzoni, B.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Miocchi, P.; Dalessandro, E.; Pallanca, C.; Massari, D.; Valenti, E.

    2013-06-01

    By combining high spatial resolution and wide-field spectroscopy performed, respectively, with SINFONI and FLAMES at the ESO/VLT we measured the radial velocities of more than 600 stars in the direction of NGC 6388, a Galactic globular cluster which is suspected to host an intermediate-mass black hole. Approximately 55% of the observed targets turned out to be cluster members. The cluster velocity dispersion has been derived from the radial velocity of individual stars: 52 measurements in the innermost 2'', and 276 stars located between 18'' and 600''. The velocity dispersion profile shows a central value of ?13 km s{sup 1}, a flat behavior out to ?60'' and a decreasing trend outward. The comparison with spherical and isotropic models shows that the observed density and velocity dispersion profiles are inconsistent with the presence of a central black hole more massive than ?2000 M {sub ?}. These findings are at odds with recent results obtained from integrated light spectra, showing a velocity dispersion profile with a steep central cusp of 23-25 km s{sup 1} at r < 2'' and suggesting the presence of a black hole with a mass of ?1.7 ラ 10{sup 4} M {sub ?}. We also found some evidence of systemic rotation with amplitude A {sub rot} ? 8 km s{sup 1} in the innermost 2'' (0.13 pc), decreasing to A {sub rot} = 3.2 km s{sup 1} at 18'' < r < 160''.

  3. Structure of the Crust beneath Cameroon, West Africa, from the Joint Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities and Receiver Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokam, A K; Tabod, C T; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Wiens, D A; Pasyanos, M E

    2010-02-18

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is a major geologic feature that cuts across Cameroon from the south west to the north east. It is a unique volcanic lineament which has both an oceanic and a continental sector and consists of a chain of Tertiary to Recent, generally alkaline volcanoes stretching from the Atlantic island of Pagalu to the interior of the African continent. The oceanic sector includes the islands of Bioko (formerly Fernando Po) and Sao Tome and Principe while the continental sector includes the Etinde, Cameroon, Manengouba, Bamboutos, Oku and Mandara mountains, as well as the Adamawa and Biu Plateaus. In addition to the CVL, three other major tectonic features characterize the region: the Benue Trough located northwest of the CVL, the Central African Shear Zone (CASZ), trending N70 degrees E, roughly parallel to the CVL, and the Congo Craton in southern Cameroon. The origin of the CVL is still the subject of considerable debate, with both plume and non-plume models invoked by many authors (e.g., Deruelle et al., 2007; Ngako et al, 2006; Ritsema and Allen, 2003; Burke, 2001; Ebinger and Sleep, 1998; Lee et al, 1994; Dorbath et al., 1986; Fairhead and Binks, 1991; King and Ritsema, 2000; Reusch et al., 2010). Crustal structure beneath Cameroon has been investigated previously using active (Stuart et al, 1985) and passive (Dorbath et al., 1986; Tabod, 1991; Tabod et al, 1992; Plomerova et al, 1993) source seismic data, revealing a crust about 33 km thick at the south-western end of the continental portion of the CVL (Tabod, 1991) and the Adamawa Plateau, and thinner crust (23 km thick) beneath the Garoua Rift in the north (Stuart et al, 1985) (Figure 1). Estimates of crustal thickness obtained using gravity data show similar variations between the Garoua rift, Adamawa Plateau, and southern part of the CVL (Poudjom et al., 1995; Nnange et al., 2000). In this study, we investigate further crustal structure beneath the CVL and the adjacent regions in Cameroon using 1-D shear wave velocity models obtained from the joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities and P-receiver functions for 32 broadband seismic stations. From the 1-D shear wave velocity models, we obtain new insights into the composition and structure of the crust and upper mantle across Cameroon. After briefly reviewing the geological framework of Cameroon, we describe the data and the joint inversion method, and then interpret variations in crustal structure found beneath Cameroon in terms of the tectonic history of the region.

  4. THE MASS OF HD 38529c FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ASTROMETRY AND HIGH-PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Bean, Jacob L.; Barnes, Rory; Harrison, Thomas E.; Hatzes, Artie; Martioli, Eder; Nelan, Edmund P.

    2010-05-15

    Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor astrometric observations of the G4 IV star HD 38529 are combined with the results of the analysis of extensive ground-based radial velocity (RV) data to determine the mass of the outermost of two previously known companions. Our new RVs obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and velocities from the Carnegie-California group now span over 11 yr. With these data we obtain improved RV orbital elements for both the inner companion, HD 38529b, and the outer companion, HD 38529c. We identify a rotational period of HD 38529 (P {sub rot} = 31.65 {+-} 0fd17) with Fine Guidance Sensor photometry. The inferred star spot fraction is consistent with the remaining scatter in velocities being caused by spot-related stellar activity. We then model the combined astrometric and RV measurements to obtain the parallax, proper motion, perturbation period, perturbation inclination, and perturbation size due to HD 38529c. For HD 38529c we find P = 2136.1 {+-} 0.3 d, perturbation semimajor axis {alpha} = 1.05 {+-} 0.06 mas, and inclination i = 48.{sup 0}3 {+-} 3.{sup 0}7. Assuming a primary mass M {sub *} = 1.48 M {sub sun}, we obtain a companion mass M{sub c} = 17.6{sup +1.5} {sub -1.2} M {sub Jup}, 3{sigma} above a 13 M {sub Jup} deuterium burning, brown dwarf lower limit. Dynamical simulations incorporating this accurate mass for HD 38529c indicate that a near-Saturn mass planet could exist between the two known companions. We find weak evidence of an additional low amplitude signal that can be modeled as a planetary-mass ({approx}0.17 M {sub Jup}) companion at P {approx}194 days. Including this component in our modeling lowers the error of the mass determined for HD 38529c. Additional observations (RVs and/or Gaia astrometry) are required to validate an interpretation of HD 38529d as a planetary-mass companion. If confirmed, the resulting HD 38529 planetary system may be an example of a 'Packed Planetary System'.

  5. A NOVEL X-RAY IMAGING CRYSTAL SPECTROMETER FOR DOPPLER MEASUREMENTS OF ION TEMPERATURE AND PLASMA ROTATION VELOCITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Ince-Cushman, A; Reinke, M; Rice, J E; Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F; Lee, S G; Broennimann, C; Eikenberry, E F

    2008-06-06

    A new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on Alcator CMod for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity profiles. The instrument consists of two spherically bent (102)-quartz crystals with radii of curvature of 1444 and 1385 mm and four 'PILATUS II' detector modules. It records spectra of He-like argon from the entire, 72 cm high, elongated plasma cross-section and spectra of H-like argon from a 20 cm high, central region of the plasma, with a spatial resolution of 1.3 cm and a time resolution of less than 20 ms. The new spectrometer concept is also of interest for the diagnosis of burning plasmas on future machines. This paper presents recent experimental results from Aclator C-Mod and discusses challenges in X-ray spectroscopy for the diagnosis of fusion plasmas on future machines.

  6. VELOCITY-SHEAR-INDUCED MODE COUPLING IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE AND SOLAR WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLASMA HEATING AND MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh. E-mail: ekaghash@aer.com

    2013-06-01

    We analytically consider how velocity shear in the corona and solar wind can cause an initial Alfven wave to drive up other propagating signals. The process is similar to the familiar coupling into other modes induced by non-WKB refraction in an inhomogeneous plasma, except here the refraction is a consequence of velocity shear. We limit our discussion to a low-beta plasma, and ignore couplings into signals resembling the slow mode. If the initial Alfven wave is propagating nearly parallel to the background magnetic field, then the induced signals are mainly a forward-going (i.e., propagating in the same sense as the original Alfven wave) fast mode, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; both signals are compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. For an initial Alfven wave propagating obliquely with respect to the magnetic field, the induced signals are mainly forward- and backward-going fast modes, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; these signals are all compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. A backward-going Alfven wave, thought to be important in the development of MHD turbulence, is also produced, but it is very weak. However, we suggest that for oblique propagation of the initial Alfven wave the induced fast-polarized signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave may interact coherently with the initial Alfven wave and distort it at a strong-turbulence-like rate.

  7. EVIDENCE FOR HIGHLY RELATIVISTIC VELOCITIES IN THE KILOPARSEC-SCALE JET OF THE QUASAR 3C 345

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, David H.; Wardle, John F. C.

    2012-11-10

    In this paper we use radio polarimetric observations of the jet of the nearby bright quasar 3C 345 to estimate the fluid velocity on kiloparsec scales. The jet is highly polarized, and surprisingly, the electric vector position angles in the jet are 'twisted' with respect to the jet axis. Simple models of magnetized jets are investigated in order to study various possible origins of the electric vector distribution. In a cylindrically symmetric transparent jet a helical magnetic field will appear either transverse or longitudinal due to partial cancellations of Stokes parameters between the front and back of the jet. Synchrotron opacity can break the symmetry, but it leads to fractional polarization less than that observed and to strong frequency dependence that is not seen. Modeling shows that differential Doppler boosting in a diverging jet can break the symmetry, allowing a helical magnetic field to produce a twisted electric vector pattern. Constraints on the jet inclination, magnetic field properties, intrinsic opening angle, and fluid velocities are obtained and show that highly relativistic speeds ({beta} {approx}> 0.95) are required. This is consistent with the observed jet opening angle, with the absence of a counter-jet, with the polarization of the knots at the end of the jet, and with some inverse-Compton models for the X-ray emission from the 3C 345 jet. This model can also apply on parsec scales and may help explain those sources where the electric vector position angles in the jet are neither parallel nor transverse to the jet axis.

  8. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2013-06-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of ?14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  9. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2013-07-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  10. CALIBRATING STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSIONS BASED ON SPATIALLY RESOLVED H-BAND SPECTRA FOR IMPROVING THE M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} RELATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Wol-Rang; Woo, Jong-Hak; Park, Daeseong; Schulze, Andreas; Riechers, Dominik A.; Kim, Sang Chul; Smolcic, Vernesa

    2013-04-10

    To calibrate stellar velocity dispersion measurements from optical and near-IR stellar lines, and to improve the black hole mass (M{sub BH})-stellar velocity dispersion ({sigma}{sub *}) relation, we measure {sigma}{sub *} based on high-quality H-band spectra for a sample of 31 nearby galaxies, for which dynamical M{sub BH} is available in the literature. By comparing velocity dispersions measured from stellar lines in the H-band with those measured from optical stellar lines, we find no significant difference, suggesting that optical and near-IR stellar lines represent the same kinematics and that dust effect is negligible for early-type galaxies. Based on the spatially resolved rotation and velocity dispersion measurements along the major axis of each galaxy, we find that a rotating stellar disk is present for 80% of galaxies in the sample. For galaxies with a rotation component, {sigma}{sub *} measured from a single aperture spectrum can vary by up to {approx}20%, depending on the size of the adopted extraction aperture. To correct for the rotational broadening, we derive luminosity-weighted {sigma}{sub *} within the effective radius of each galaxy, providing uniformly measured velocity dispersions to improve the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation.

  11. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

  12. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

  13. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1997-06-24

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  14. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  15. Vertical Velocity Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically...

  16. X-ray polarization spectroscopy to study anisotropic velocity distribution of hot electrons produced by an ultra-high-intensity laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inubushi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Cai, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Kai, T.; Fujioka, S.; Nakamura, T.; Johzaki, T.; Mima, K.; Kawamura, T.; Batani, D.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Malka, G.

    2010-03-15

    The anisotropy of the hot-electron velocity distribution in ultra-high-intensity laser produced plasma was studied with x-ray polarization spectroscopy using multilayer planar targets including x-ray emission tracer in the middle layer. This measurement serves as a diagnostic for hot-electron transport from the laser-plasma interaction region to the overdense region where drastic changes in the isotropy of the electron velocity distribution are observed. These polarization degrees are consistent with analysis of a three-dimensional polarization spectroscopy model coupled with particle-in-cell simulations. Electron velocity distribution in the underdense region is affected by the electric field of the laser and that in the overdense region becomes wider with increase in the tracer depth. A full-angular spread in the overdense region of 22.4 deg.{sub -2.4}{sup +5.4} was obtained from the measured polarization degree.

  17. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-11-10

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this Letter, based on the current knowledge of nanoflares, we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfv駭 wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This relation can be extended to the more general core-halo-strahl feature in the solar wind. The temperature ratio between the core and hot components is nearly independent of the heliospheric distance to the Sun. We show that the core-halo relative drift previously reported is a relic of the fully saturated two-stream instability. Our theoretical results are consistent with the observations while new tests for this model are provided.

  18. Computational analysis of a three-dimensional High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, B.; Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    An analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three-dimensional CFD results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire torch, but wire feed is not simulated. To the authors` knowledge, these are the first published 3-D results of a thermal spray device. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Argon is injected through the center of the nozzle. Pre-mixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled assuming instantaneous chemistry. A standard, two-equation, K-{var_epsilon} turbulence model is employed for the turbulent flow field. An implicit, iterative, finite volume numerical technique is used to solve the coupled conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the gas in a sequential manner. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and discussed.

  19. A compact single-camera system for high-speed, simultaneous 3-D velocity and temperature measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Louise; Sick, Volker; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2013-09-01

    The University of Michigan and Sandia National Laboratories collaborated on the initial development of a compact single-camera approach for simultaneously measuring 3-D gasphase velocity and temperature fields at high frame rates. A compact diagnostic tool is desired to enable investigations of flows with limited optical access, such as near-wall flows in an internal combustion engine. These in-cylinder flows play a crucial role in improving engine performance. Thermographic phosphors were proposed as flow and temperature tracers to extend the capabilities of a novel, compact 3D velocimetry diagnostic to include high-speed thermometry. Ratiometric measurements were performed using two spectral bands of laser-induced phosphorescence emission from BaMg2Al10O17:Eu (BAM) phosphors in a heated air flow to determine the optimal optical configuration for accurate temperature measurements. The originally planned multi-year research project ended prematurely after the first year due to the Sandia-sponsored student leaving the research group at the University of Michigan.

  20. A direct numerical simulation-based investigation and modeling of pressure Hessian effects on compressible velocity gradient dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danish, Mohammad Suman, Sawan Srinivasan, Balaji

    2014-12-15

    The pressure Hessian tensor plays a key role in shaping the behavior of the velocity gradient tensor, and in turn, that of many incumbent non-linear processes in a turbulent flow field. In compressible flows, the role of pressure Hessian is even more important because it represents the level of fluid-thermodynamic coupling existing in the flow field. In this work, we first perform a direct numerical simulation-based study to clearly identify, isolate, and understand various important inviscid mechanisms that govern the evolution of the pressure Hessian tensor in compressible turbulence. The ensuing understanding is then employed to introduce major improvements to the existing Lagrangian model of the pressure Hessian tensor (the enhanced Homogenized Euler equation or EHEE) in terms of (i) non-symmetric, non-isentropic effects and (ii) improved representation of the anisotropic portion of the pressure Hessian tensor. Finally, we evaluate the new model extensively by comparing the new model results against known turbulence behavior over a range of Reynolds and Mach numbers. Indeed, the new model shows much improved performance as compared to the EHEE model.

  1. Penetration Experiments with 6061-T6511 Aluminum Targets and Spherical-Nose Steel Projectiles at Striking Velocities Between 0.5 and 3.0 km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrestal, M.J.; Piekutowski, A.J.

    1999-02-04

    We conducted depth of penetration experiments with 7.11-mm-diameter, 74.7-mm-long, spherical-nose, 4340 steel projectiles launched into 250-mm-diameter, 6061-T6511 aluminum targets. To show the effect of projectile strength, we used projectiles that had average Rockwell harnesses of R{sub c} = 36.6, 39.5, and 46.2. A powder gun and two-stage, light-gas guns launched the 0.023 kg projectiles at striking velocities between 0.5 and 3.0 km/s. Post-test radiographs of the targets showed three response regions as striking velocities increased: (1) the projectiles remained visibly undeformed, (2) the projectiles permanently deformed without erosion, and (3) the projectiles eroded and lost mass. To show the effect of projectile strength, we compared depth-of-penetration data as a function of striking velocity for spherical-nose rods with three Rockwell harnesses at striking velocities ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 km/s. To show the effect of nose shape, we compared penetration data for the spherical-nose projectiles with previously published data for ogive-nose projectiles.

  2. METAL ABUNDANCES, RADIAL VELOCITIES, AND OTHER PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS FOR THE RR LYRAE STARS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemec, James M.; Cohen, Judith G.; Sesar, Branimir; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Derekas, Aliz; Moskalik, Pawel; Chadid, Merieme; Bruntt, Hans E-mail: jmn@isr.bc.ca E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu E-mail: derekas@konkoly.hu E-mail: chadid@marseille.fr

    2013-08-20

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude {delta} Sct star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which sixteen exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 {+-} 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 {+-} 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al. the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] {approx}-0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New P-{phi}{sub 31}{sup s}-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on {approx}970 days of quasi-continuous high-precision Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg)

  3. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  4. Methyl Formate Oxidation: Speciation Data, Laminar Burning Velocities, Ignition Delay Times and a Validated Chemical Kinetic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, S.; Burke, M. P.; Chaos, M.; Stein, Y.; Dryer, F. L.; Zhukov, V. P.; Finch, O.; Simmie, J. M.; Curran, H. J.

    2010-07-16

    The oxidation of methyl formate (CH{sub 3}OCHO) has been studied in three experimental environments over a range of applied combustion relevant conditions: 1. A variable-pressure flow reactor has been used to quantify reactant, major intermediate and product species as a function of residence time at 3 atm and 0.5% fuel concentration for oxygen/fuel stoichiometries of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at 900 K, and for pyrolysis at 975 K. 2. Shock tube ignition delays have been determined for CH{sub 3}OCHO/O{sub 2}/Ar mixtures at pressures of ? 2.7, 5.4, and 9.2 atm and temperatures of 12751935 K for mixture compositions of 0.5% fuel (at equivalence ratios of 1.0, 2.0, and 0.5) and 2.5% fuel (at an equivalence ratio of 1.0). 3. Laminar burning velocities of outwardly propagating spherical CH{sub 3}OCHO/air flames have been determined for stoichiometries ranging from 0.81.6, at atmospheric pressure using a pressure-release-type high-pressure chamber. A detailed chemical kinetic model has been constructed, validated against, and used to interpret these experimental data. The kinetic model shows that methyl formate oxidation proceeds through concerted elimination reactions, principally forming methanol and carbon monoxide as well as through bimolecular hydrogen abstraction reactions. The relative importance of elimination versus abstraction was found to depend on the particular environment. In general, methyl formate is consumed exclusively through molecular decomposition in shock tube environments, while at flow reactor and freely propagating premixed flame conditions, there is significant competition between hydrogen abstraction and concerted elimination channels. It is suspected that in diffusion flame configurations the elimination channels contribute more significantly than in premixed environments.

  5. Three-dimensional electromagnetic Monte Carlo particle-in-cell simulations of critical ionization velocity experiments in space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.; Biasca, R.; Liewer, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    Although the existence of the critical ionization velocity (CIV) is known from laboratory experiments, no agreement has been reached as to whether CIV exists in the natural space environment. In this paper the authors move towards more realistic models of CIV and present the first fully three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulations of typical space-based CIV experiments. In their model, the released neutral gas is taken to be a spherical cloud traveling across a magnetized ambient plasma. Simulations are performed for neutral clouds with various sizes and densities. The effects of the cloud parameters on ionization yield, wave energy growth, electron heating, momentum coupling, and the three-dimensional structure of the newly ionized plasma are discussed. The simulations suggest that the quantitative characteristics of momentum transfers among the ion beam, neutral cloud, and plasma waves is the key indicator of whether CIV can occur in space. The missing factors in space-based CIV experiments may be the conditions necessary for a continuous enhancement of the beam ion momentum. For a typical shaped charge release experiment, favorable CIV conditions may exist only in a very narrow, intermediate spatial region some distance from the release point due to the effects of the cloud density and size. When CIV does occur, the newly ionized plasma from the cloud forms a very complex structure due to the combined forces from the geomagnetic field, the motion induced emf, and the polarization. Hence the detection of CIV also critically depends on the sensor location. 32 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Independent wheel suspension system using constant velocity universal joints in combination with a single prop shaft joint and mounted differentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krude, W.

    1986-06-24

    An independent wheel suspension system is described for a vehicle having a chassis, vehicle support means for resiliently supporting the chassis for displacement with respect to a driving surface, a wheel assembly with a wheel rotatable about a wheel axis, and an engine adapted to provide driving torque about an engine output axis at an engine output, the independent wheel suspension system consists of: control arm means having a wheel end pivotably connected to the wheel assembly and a pair of frame ends pivotably connected to a respective pair of pivot bearings carried by the vehicle support means to define a swing axis therethrough; differential means comprising a differential housing, differential input means and differential output means within the differential housing establishing a respective differential input axis and a differential output axis substantially perpendicular thereto; transverse pivot means coupling the differential means and the vehicle support means for allowing the differential means to pivot relative to the vehicle support means about a transverse pivot axis substantially parallel to the differential output axis; and prop shaft means having a prop shaft axis and first and second prop shaft coupling means coupling, respectively, to the engine output and the differential input, the first prop shaft coupling means being a constant velocity universal joint, the second prop shaft coupling means being one of an axially splined joint or a fixed joint; whereby, as the first prop shaft coupling means undergoes articulation with respect to the prop shaft means as the chassis undergoes the displacement, the transverse pivot means allows the differential means to pivot relative to the vehicle support means about the transverse pivot axis to accommodate the articulation without articulation between the differential means and the prop shaft means.

  7. Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud Resolving and a Global Climate Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of the Vertical Velocity used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud-Resolving and a Global Climate Model H. Guo, J. E. Penner, M. Herzog, and X. Liu Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Introduction Anthropogenic aerosols are effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The availability of CCN affects the initial cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and droplet size; therefore, cloud optical

  8. Measurement of XeI and XeII velocity in the near exit plane of a low-power Hall effect thruster by light induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dancheva, Y.; Biancalana, V.; Pagano, D.; Scortecci, F.

    2013-06-15

    Near exit plane non-resonant light induced fluorescence spectroscopy is performed in a Hall effect low-power Xenon thruster at discharge voltage of 250 V and anode flow rate of 0.7 mg/s. Measurements of the axial and radial velocity components are performed, exciting the 6s{sup 2}[3/2]{sub 2}{sup o}{yields}6p{sup 2}[3/2]{sub 2} transition at 823.16 nm in XeI and the 5d[4]{sub 7/2}{yields}6p[3]{sub 5/2}{sup o} transition at 834.724 nm in XeII. No significant deviation from the thermal velocity is observed for XeI. Two most probable ion velocities are registered at a given position with respect to the thruster axis, which are mainly attributed to different areas of creation of ions inside the acceleration channel. The spatial resolution of the set-up is limited by the laser beam size (radius of the order of 0.5 mm) and the fluorescence collection optics, which have a view spot diameter of 8 mm.

  9. Methods for passivating silicon devices at low temperature to achieve low interface state density and low recombination velocity while preserving carrier lifetime

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhizhang; Rohatgi, Ajeet

    1995-01-01

    A new process has been developed to achieve a very low SiO.sub.x /Si interface state density D.sub.it, low recombination velocity S (<2 cm/s), and high effective carrier lifetime T.sub.eff (>5 ms) for oxides deposited on silicon substrates at low temperature. The technique involves direct plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), with appropriate growth conditions, followed by a photo-assisted rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process. Approximately 500-A-thick SiO.sub.x layers are deposited on Si by PECVD at 250.degree. C. with 0.02 W/cm.sup.-2 rf power, then covered with SiN or an evaporated thin aluminum layer, and subjected to a photo-assisted anneal in forming gas ambient at 350.degree. C., resulting in an interface state density D.sub.it in the range of about 1-4.times.10.sup.10 cm.sup.-2 eV.sup.-1, which sets a record for the lowest interface state density D.sub.it for PECVD oxides fabricated to date. Detailed analysis shows that the PECVD deposition conditions, photo-assisted anneal, forming gas ambient, and the presence of an aluminum layer on top of the oxides during the anneal, all contributed to this low value of interface state density D.sub.it. Detailed metal-oxide semiconductor analysis and model calculations show that such a low recombination velocity S is the result of moderately high positive oxide charge (5.times.10.sup.11 -1.times.10.sup.12 cm.sup.-2) and relatively low midgap interface state density (1.times.10.sup.10 -4.times.10.sup.10 cm.sup.-2 eV.sup.-1). Photo-assisted anneal was found to be superior to furnace annealing, and a forming gas ambient was better than a nitrogen ambient for achieving a very low surface recombination velocity S.

  10. Friends of hot Jupiters. I. A radial velocity search for massive, long-period companions to close-in gas giant planets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knutson, Heather A.; Ngo, Henry; Johnson, John Asher; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Kao, Melodie; Hinkley, Sasha; Morton, Timothy D.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Crepp, Justin R.; Bakos, Gaspar チ.; Batygin, Konstantin

    2014-04-20

    In this paper we search for distant massive companions to known transiting gas giant planets that may have influenced the dynamical evolution of these systems. We present new radial velocity observations for a sample of 51 planets obtained using the Keck HIRES instrument, and find statistically significant accelerations in fifteen systems. Six of these systems have no previously reported accelerations in the published literature: HAT-P-10, HAT-P-22, HAT-P-29, HAT-P-32, WASP-10, and XO-2. We combine our radial velocity fits with Keck NIRC2 adaptive optics (AO) imaging data to place constraints on the allowed masses and orbital periods of the companions responsible for the detected accelerations. The estimated masses of the companions range between 1-500 M {sub Jup}, with orbital semi-major axes typically between 1-75 AU. A significant majority of the companions detected by our survey are constrained to have minimum masses comparable to or larger than those of the transiting planets in these systems, making them candidates for influencing the orbital evolution of the inner gas giant. We estimate a total occurrence rate of 51% ア 10% for companions with masses between 1-13 M {sub Jup} and orbital semi-major axes between 1-20 AU in our sample. We find no statistically significant difference between the frequency of companions to transiting planets with misaligned or eccentric orbits and those with well-aligned, circular orbits. We combine our expanded sample of radial velocity measurements with constraints from transit and secondary eclipse observations to provide improved measurements of the physical and orbital characteristics of all of the planets included in our survey.

  11. DropBot: An open-source digital microfluidic control system with precise control of electrostatic driving force and instantaneous drop velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fobel, Ryan; Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, 160 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1 ; Fobel, Christian; Wheeler, Aaron R.; Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, 160 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1; Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6

    2013-05-13

    We introduce DropBot: an open-source instrument for digital microfluidics (http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/dropbot). DropBot features two key functionalities for digital microfluidics: (1) real-time monitoring of instantaneous drop velocity (which we propose is a proxy for resistive forces), and (2) application of constant electrostatic driving forces through compensation for amplifier-loading and device capacitance. We anticipate that this system will enhance insight into failure modes and lead to new strategies for improved device reliability, and will be useful for the growing number of users who are adopting digital microfluidics for automated, miniaturized laboratory operation.

  12. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash E-mail: h.a.shiddiqi@gmail.com; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono,; Sutiyono,; Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-24

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  13. RADIAL VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS AND LIGHT CURVE NOISE MODELING CONFIRM THAT KEPLER-91b IS A GIANT PLANET ORBITING A GIANT STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-02-10

    Kepler-91b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a red giant star, providing the possibility to study the formation and composition of hot Jupiters under different conditions compared to main-sequence stars. However, the planetary nature of Kepler-91b, which was confirmed using phase-curve variations by Lillo-Box etal., was recently called into question based on a re-analysis of Kepler data. We have obtained ground-based radial velocity observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and unambiguously confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b by simultaneously modeling the Kepler and radial velocity data. The star exhibits temporally correlated noise due to stellar granulation which we model as a Gaussian Process. We hypothesize that it is this noise component that led previous studies to suspect Kepler-91b to be a false positive. Our work confirms the conclusions presented by Lillo-Box etal. that Kepler-91b is a 0.73 ア 0.13 M {sub Jup} planet orbiting a red giant star.

  14. NEW GUN CAPABILITY WITH INTERCHANGABLE BARRELS TO INVESTIGATE LOW VELOCITY IMPACT REGIMES AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH EXPLOSIVES APPLICATIONS FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandersall, K S; Behn, A; Gresshoff, M; Jr., L F; Chiao, P I

    2009-09-16

    A new gas gun capability is being activated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). The single stage light gas (dry air, nitrogen, or helium) gun has interchangeable barrels ranging from 25.4 mm to 76.2 mm in diameter with 1.8 meters in length and is being fabricated by Physics Applications, Inc. Because it is being used for safety studies involving explosives, the gun is planned for operation inside a large enclosed firing tank, with typical velocities planned in the range of 10-300 m/s. Three applications planned for this gun include: low velocity impact of detonator or detonator/booster assemblies with various projectile shapes, the Steven Impact test that involves impact initiation of a cased explosive target, and the Taylor impact test using a cylindrical explosive sample impacted onto a rigid anvil for fracture studies of energetic materials. A highlight of the gun features, outline on work in progress for implementing this capability, and discussion of the planned areas of research will be included.

  15. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Heitmann, Katrin 1 ; White, Martin 1 ; Higdon, David 1 ; Wagner, Christian 1 ; Lawrence, Earl 1 ; Habib, Salman 1 ; Williams, Brian 1 + Show Author ...

  16. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-04-01

    Accomplishments during the first six months of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers.

  17. New Optimal Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Coggin; Jonas Ivasauskas; Russell G. May; Michael B. Miller; Rena Wilson

    2006-09-30

    Accomplishments during Phase II of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring. During this program work period, major progress has been experienced in the development of the sensor hardware, and the planning of the system installation and operation. The major focus of the next work period will be the installation of sensors in the Hamilton, Ohio power plant, and demonstration of high-temperature strain gages during mechanical testing of SOFC components.

  18. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  19. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also, an unclad sapphire fiber was tested as a temperature sensor at moderate temperatures (up to 775 C).

  20. Managing Critical Infrastructures C.I.M. Suite

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    protect infrastructure during natural disasters, terrorist attacks and electrical outages. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. Monju Transparency Suite v. 1.0.0.4b

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    The software was developed achieve real-time detection and risk calculation by monitoring the sequence of operations from the Monju training model, as reported by intrinsic model sensors whose digital data is stored in XML files, and comparing these to a set of expectations based on previous declarations.

  2. New Atmospheric Profiling Instrument Added to SGP CART Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to those required by computer models, over the years ARM has deployed several additional ground-based remote-sensing instruments to collect temperature and water vapor data....

  3. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. Ongoing and future large scale structure surveys targeted at the investigation of dark energy will enter the nonlinear regime of...

  4. Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and tensile wall fractures, and were adequate to detect stratigraphic features. Density, photo-electric factor (PEF), neutron, and gamma ray (GR) logs provided sufficient...

  5. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION Suite X00, 955 L'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    X00, 955 L' Enfam Plaza, S. W., Washing on. D.C. 20024.2174~ Tekphonr: (202) 48&6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CR CA.& Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division bf Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance' - ltE.o= with your suggestion during ourmeeting on 22 September. The recommendation

  6. Microsoft Word - MHI Letterhead - 2111 Wilson Blvd, Suite 100.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    August 17, 2010 Office of the General Counsel Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 Memorandum for the Record Ex Parte Communication Department of Energy Meeting- Wednesday, July 14, 20103:00 - 4:00 p.m. The purpose of the meeting was to provide information to DOE staff on the Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Section 414 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 to establish energy standards for manufactured housing. In attendance

  7. Development of a spatially resolving x-ray crystal spectrometer for measurement of ion-temperature (T{sub i}) and rotation-velocity (v) profiles in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Johnson, D.; Feder, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Dunn, J.; Morris, K.; Wang, E.; Reinke, M.; Podpaly, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Barnsley, R.; O'Mullane, M.; Lee, S. G.

    2010-10-15

    Imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) arrays are being developed as a US-ITER activity for Doppler measurement of T{sub i} and v profiles of impurities (W, Kr, and Fe) with {approx}7 cm (a/30) and 10-100 ms resolution in ITER. The imaging XCS, modeled after a prototype instrument on Alcator C-Mod, uses a spherically bent crystal and 2D x-ray detectors to achieve high spectral resolving power (E/dE>6000) horizontally and spatial imaging vertically. Two arrays will measure T{sub i} and both poloidal and toroidal rotation velocity profiles. The measurement of many spatial chords permits tomographic inversion for the inference of local parameters. The instrument design, predictions of performance, and results from C-Mod are presented.

  8. Development of a Spatially Resolving X-Ray Crystal Spectrometer (XCS) for Measurement of Ion-Temperature (Ti) and Rotation-Velocity (v) Profiles in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K W; Delgado-Aprico, L; Johnson, D; Feder, R; Beiersdorfer,; Dunn, J; Morris, K; Wang, E; Reinke, M; Podpaly, Y; Rice, J E; Barnsley, R; O'Mullane, M; Lee, S G

    2010-05-21

    Imaging XCS arrays are being developed as a US-ITER activity for Doppler measurement of Ti and v profiles of impurities (W, Kr, Fe) with ~7 cm (a/30) and 10-100 ms resolution in ITER. The imaging XCS, modeled after a PPPL-MIT instrument on Alcator C-Mod, uses a spherically bent crystal and 2d x-ray detectors to achieve high spectral resolving power (E/dE>6000) horizontally and spatial imaging vertically. Two arrays will measure Ti and both poloidal and toroidal rotation velocity profiles. Measurement of many spatial chords permits tomographic inversion for inference of local parameters. The instrument design, predictions of performance, and results from C-Mod will be presented.

  9. A spatially resolving x-ray crystal spectrometer for measurement of ion-temperature and rotation-velocity profiles on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M. L.; Scott, S. D.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M.-F.; Lee, S. G.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.

    2008-10-15

    A new spatially resolving x-ray crystal spectrometer capable of measuring continuous spatial profiles of high resolution spectra ({lambda}/d{lambda}>6000) of He-like and H-like Ar K{alpha} lines with good spatial ({approx}1 cm) and temporal ({approx}10 ms) resolutions has been installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Two spherically bent crystals image the spectra onto four two-dimensional Pilatus II pixel detectors. Tomographic inversion enables inference of local line emissivity, ion temperature (T{sub i}), and toroidal plasma rotation velocity (v{sub {phi}}) from the line Doppler widths and shifts. The data analysis techniques, T{sub i} and v{sub {phi}} profiles, analysis of fusion-neutron background, and predictions of performance on other tokamaks, including ITER, will be presented.

  10. Determination of CdTe bulk carrier lifetime and interface recombination velocity of CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xin-Hao; Campbell, Calli M.; DiNezza, Michael J.; Liu, Shi; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Hang

    2014-12-22

    The bulk Shockley-Read-Hall carrier lifetime of CdTe and interface recombination velocity at the CdTe/Mg{sub 0.24}Cd{sub 0.76}Te heterointerface are estimated to be around 0.5??s and (4.7?ア?0.4)?ラ?10{sup 2?}cm/s, respectively, using time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Four CdTe/MgCdTe double heterostructures (DHs) with varying CdTe layer thicknesses were grown on nearly lattice-matched InSb (001) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. The longest lifetime of 179?ns is observed in the DH with a 2??m thick CdTe layer. It is also shown that the photon recycling effect has a strong influence on the bulk radiative lifetime, and the reabsorption process affects the measured PL spectrum shape and intensity.

  11. Study of Chelyabinsk LL5 meteorite fragment with a light lithology and its fusion crust using Mssbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maksimova, Alevtina A.; Petrova, Evgeniya V.; Grokhovsky, Victor I.; Oshtrakh, Michael I. Semionkin, Vladimir A.

    2014-10-27

    Study of Chelyabinsk LL5 ordinary chondrite fragment with a light lithology and its fusion crust, fallen on February 15, 2013, in Russian Federation, was carried out using Mssbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. The Mssbauer spectra of the internal matter and fusion crust were fitted and all components were related to iron-bearing phases such as olivine, pyroxene, troilite, Fe-Ni-Co alloy, and chromite in the internal matter and olivine, pyroxene, troilite, Fe-Ni-Co alloy, and magnesioferrite in the fusion crust. A comparison of the content of different phases in the internal matter and in the fusion crust of this fragment showed that ferric compounds resulted from olivine, pyroxene, and troilite combustion in the atmosphere.

  12. Final Data Report: P- and S-Wave Velocity Logging Borings C4993, C4996, and C4997 Part B: Overall Logs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diehl, John; Steller, Robert

    2007-03-20

    Insitu borehole P- and S-wave velocity measurements were collected in three borings located within the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) boundaries at the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington. Geophysical data acquisition was performed between August and October of 2006 by Rob Steller, Charles Carter, Antony Martin and John Diehl of GEOVision. Data analysis was performed by Rob Steller and John Diehl, and reviewed by Antony Martin of GEOVision, and report preparation was performed by John Diehl and reviewed by Rob Steller. The work was performed under subcontract with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division with Marty Gardner as Battelle痴 Technical Representative and Alan Rohay serving as the Technical Administrator for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This report describes the field measurements, data analysis, and results of this work.

  13. BONA FIDE, STRONG-VARIABLE GALACTIC LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE STARS ARE FAST ROTATORS: DETECTION OF A HIGH ROTATIONAL VELOCITY IN HR CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groh, J. H.; Damineli, A.; Moises, A. P.; Teodoro, M.; Hillier, D. J.; Barba, R.; Fernandez-Lajus, E.; Gamen, R. C.; Solivella, G.

    2009-11-01

    We report optical observations of the luminous blue variable (LBV) HR Carinae which show that the star has reached a visual minimum phase in 2009. More importantly, we detected absorptions due to Si IV lambdalambda4088-4116. To match their observed line profiles from 2009 May, a high rotational velocity of v{sub rot} approx = 150 +- 20 km s{sup -1} is needed (assuming an inclination angle of 30 deg.), implying that HR Car rotates at approx =0.88 +- 0.2 of its critical velocity for breakup (v{sub crit}). Our results suggest that fast rotation is typical in all strong-variable, bona fide galactic LBVs, which present S-Dor-type variability. Strong-variable LBVs are located in a well-defined region of the HR diagram during visual minimum (the 'LBV minimum instability strip'). We suggest this region corresponds to where v{sub crit} is reached. To the left of this strip, a forbidden zone with v{sub rot}/v{sub crit}>1 is present, explaining why no LBVs are detected in this zone. Since dormant/ex LBVs like P Cygni and HD 168625 have low v{sub rot}, we propose that LBVs can be separated into two groups: fast-rotating, strong-variable stars showing S-Dor cycles (such as AG Car and HR Car) and slow-rotating stars with much less variability (such as P Cygni and HD 168625). We speculate that supernova (SN) progenitors which had S-Dor cycles before exploding (such as in SN 2001ig, SN 2003bg, and SN 2005gj) could have been fast rotators. We suggest that the potential difficulty of fast-rotating Galactic LBVs to lose angular momentum is additional evidence that such stars could explode during the LBV phase.

  14. Characterization of self-propagating formation reactions in Ni/Zr multilayered foils using reaction heats, velocities, and temperature-time profiles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barron, S. C.; Knepper, R.; Walker, N.; Weihs, T. P.

    2011-01-11

    We report on intermetallic formation reactions in vapor-deposited multilayered foils of Ni/Zr with 70 nm bilayers and overall atomic ratios of Ni:Zr, 2 Ni:Zr, and 7 Ni:2 Zr. The sequence of alloy phase formation and the stored energy is evaluated at slow heating rates (~1 K/s) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) traces to 725ツコC. All three chemistries initially form a Ni-Zr amorphous phase which crystallizes first to the intermetallic NiZr. The heat of reaction to the final phase is 34-36 kJ/mol atom for all chemistries. Intermetallic formation reactions are also studied at rapid heating rates (greater than 105 K/s) inmoreツツサ high temperature, self-propagating reactions which can be ignited in these foils by an electric spark. We find that reaction velocities and maximum reaction temperatures (Tmax) are largely independent of foil chemistry at 0.6 ツア 0.1 m/s and 1220 ツア 50 K, respectively, and that the measured Tmax is more than 200 K lower than predicted adiabatic temperatures (Tad). The difference between Tmax and Tad is explained by the prediction that transformation to the final intermetallic phases occurs after Tmax and results in the release of 20-30 % of the total heat of reaction and a delay in rapid cooling.ツォツless

  15. Final Technical Report for DOE Award DE-FG02-07ER64403 [Modeling of Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for the Immobilization of Strontium-90 Using a Variable Velocity Streamtube Ensemble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginn, Timothy R.; Weathers, Tess

    2013-08-26

    Biogeochemical modeling using PHREEQC2 and a streamtube ensemble approach is utilized to understand a well-to-well subsurface treatment system at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Treatment involves in situ microbially-mediated ureolysis to induce calcite precipitation for the immobilization of strontium-90. PHREEQC2 is utilized to model the kinetically-controlled ureolysis and consequent calcite precipitation. Reaction kinetics, equilibrium phases, and cation exchange are used within PHREEQC2 to track pH and levels of calcium, ammonium, urea, and calcite precipitation over time, within a series of one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport paths creating a streamtube ensemble representation of the well-to-well transport. An understanding of the impact of physical heterogeneities within this radial flowfield is critical for remediation design; we address this via the streamtube approach: instead of depicting spatial extents of solutes in the subsurface we focus on their arrival distribution at the control well(s). Traditionally, each streamtube maintains uniform velocity; however in radial flow in homogeneous media, the velocity within any given streamtube is spatially-variable in a common way, being highest at the input and output wells and approaching a minimum at the midpoint between the wells. This idealized velocity variability is of significance in the case of ureolytically driven calcite precipitation. Streamtube velocity patterns for any particular configuration of injection and withdrawal wells are available as explicit calculations from potential theory, and also from particle tracking programs. To approximate the actual spatial distribution of velocity along streamtubes, we assume idealized radial non-uniform velocity associated with homogeneous media. This is implemented in PHREEQC2 via a non-uniform spatial discretization within each streamtube that honors both the streamtube痴 travel time and the idealized 吐ast-slow-fast pattern of non-uniform velocity along the streamline. Breakthrough curves produced by each simulation are weighted by the path-respective flux fractions (obtained by deconvolution of tracer tests conducted at the VZRP) to obtain the flux-average of flow contributions to the observation well.

  16. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  17. ASTROMETRY AND RADIAL VELOCITIES OF THE PLANET HOST M DWARF GJ 317: NEW TRIGONOMETRIC DISTANCE, METALLICITY, AND UPPER LIMIT TO THE MASS OF GJ 317b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Boss, Alan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Butler, R. Paul; Thompson, Ian B.; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.

    2012-02-10

    We have obtained precision astrometry of the planet host M dwarf GJ 317 in the framework of the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search project. The new astrometric measurements give a distance determination of 15.3 pc, 65% further than previous estimates. The resulting absolute magnitudes suggest that it is metal-rich and more massive than previously assumed. This result strengthens the correlation between high metallicity and the presence of gas giants around low-mass stars. At 15.3 pc, the minimal astrometric amplitude for planet candidate GJ 317b is 0.3 mas (edge-on orbit), just below our astrometric sensitivity. However, given the relatively large number of observations and good astrometric precision, a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis indicates that the mass of planet b has to be smaller than twice the minimum mass with a 99% confidence level, with a most likely value of 2.5 M{sub Jup}. Additional radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with Keck by the Lick-Carnegie Planet search program confirm the presence of an additional very long period planet candidate, with a period of 20 years or more. Even though such an object will imprint a large astrometric wobble on the star, its curvature is yet not evident in the astrometry. Given high metallicity, and the trend indicating that multiple systems are rich in low-mass companions, this system is likely to host additional low-mass planets in its habitable zone that can be readily detected with state-of-the-art optical and near-infrared RV measurements.

  18. THE M31 VELOCITY VECTOR. III. FUTURE MILKY WAY M31-M33 ORBITAL EVOLUTION, MERGING, AND FATE OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Anderson, Jay; Besla, Gurtina; Cox, T. J.

    2012-07-01

    We study the future orbital evolution and merging of the Milky Way (MW)-M31-M33 system, using a combination of collisionless N-body simulations and semi-analytic orbit integrations. Monte Carlo simulations are used to explore the consequences of varying all relevant initial phase-space and mass parameters within their observational uncertainties. The observed M31 transverse velocity from Papers I and II implies that the MW and M31 will merge t = 5.86{sup +1.61}{sub -0.72} Gyr from now. The first pericenter occurs at t = 3.87{sup +0.42}{sub -0.32} Gyr, at a pericenter distance of r = 31.0{sup +38.0}{sub -19.8} kpc. In 41% of Monte Carlo orbits, M31 makes a direct hit with the MW, defined here as a first-pericenter distance less than 25 kpc. For the M31-M33 system, the first-pericenter time and distance are t = 0.85{sup +0.18}{sub -0.13} Gyr and r = 80.8{sup +42.2}{sub -31.7} kpc. By the time M31 gets to its first pericenter with the MW, M33 is close to its second pericenter with M31. For the MW-M33 system, the first-pericenter time and distance are t = 3.70{sup +0.74}{sub -0.46} Gyr and r = 176.0{sup +239.0}{sub -136.9} kpc. The most likely outcome is for the MW and M31 to merge first, with M33 settling onto an orbit around them that may decay toward a merger later. However, there is a 9% probability that M33 makes a direct hit with the MW at its first pericenter, before M31 gets to or collides with the MW. Also, there is a 7% probability that M33 gets ejected from the Local Group, temporarily or permanently. The radial mass profile of the MW-M31 merger remnant is significantly more extended than the original profiles of either the MW or M31, and suggests that the merger remnant will resemble an elliptical galaxy. The Sun will most likely ({approx}85% probability) end up at a larger radius from the center of the MW-M31 merger remnant than its current distance from the MW center, possibly further than 50 kpc ({approx}10% probability). There is a {approx}20% probability that the Sun will at some time in the next 10 Gyr find itself moving through M33 (within 10 kpc), but while dynamically still bound to the MW-M31 merger remnant. The arrival and possible collision of M31 (and possibly M33) with the MW is the next major cosmic event affecting the environment of our Sun and solar system that can be predicted with some certainty.

  19. surf_cg

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    Purpose of the program is to perform a tomographic inversion of surface wave dispersion measurements for group velocity. Seismic tomography is a basic technique to get lateral variations in earth parameters (such as velocities) from a suite of path measurements.

  20. ABB Response to Smart Grid RFI. November 1, 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Response to Smart Grid RFI. November 1, 2010 ABB Response to Smart Grid RFI. November 1, 2010 Thank you for the opportunity to provide information to the Department of Energy Federal Register Doc. 2010-23251 filed September 16, 2010. With our recent acquisition of Ventyx, ABB is one of the few companies in the smart grid space that can approach the entire smart grid value chain, from distributed generation at the residential level to distribution automation and real-time conditioned based

  1. Microsoft Word - DOE RFI.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ms. Patricia Hoffman Assistant Secretary United States Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Room 8H033 Washington, DC 20585 RE: Smart Grid RFI Dear Assistant Secretary Hoffman, Thank you for the opportunity to provide information to the Department of Energy Federal Register Doc. 2010-23251 filed September 16, 2010. With our recent acquisition of Ventyx, ABB is one of the few companies in the smart grid space that can approach the entire smart grid value chain, from distributed

  2. Is the misalignment of the Local Group velocity and the dipole generated by the 2MASS Redshift Survey typical in {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdogdu, Pirin; Lahav, Ofer

    2009-08-15

    We predict the acceleration of the Local Group generated by the 2MASS Redshift Survey within the framework of {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies. We show that as the galaxy fluctuations derived from the halo model have more power on small scales compared with the mass fluctuations, the misalignment angle between the CMB velocity vector and the 2MASS Redshift Survey dipole is in reasonable agreement with the observed 21 deg. This statistical analysis suggests that it is not necessary to invoke a hypothetical nearby galaxy or a distant cluster to explain this misalignment.

  3. Velocity damper for electromagnetically levitated materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, R.J.

    1994-06-07

    A system for damping oscillatory and spinning motions induced in an electromagnetically levitated material is disclosed. Two opposed field magnets are located orthogonally to the existing levitation coils for providing a DC quadrupole field (cusp field) around the material. The material used for generating the DC quadrupole field must be nonconducting to avoid eddy-current heating and of low magnetic permeability to avoid distorting the induction fields providing the levitation. 1 fig.

  4. Velocity damper for electromagnetically levitated materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A system for damping oscillatory and spinning motions induced in an electromagnetically levitated material. Two opposed field magnets are located orthogonally to the existing levitation coils for providing a DC quadrupole field (cusp field) around the material. The material used for generating the DC quadrupole field must be nonconducting to avoid eddy-current heating and of low magnetic permeability to avoid distorting the induction fields providing the levitation.

  5. Vertical Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    out of BL & Aerosol processing by clouds * Variety of conditions - Useful to evaluate LES models and GCM parameterizations Slingo et al. 2004; Kollias et al. (2007) Need of...

  6. Research in Neutron Velocity Spectroscopy. Final Report

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Rainwater, J.

    1976-10-13

    A brief summary of papers published since the last progress report (June 1974) is presented. The research represents contributions to neutron resonance spectroscopy below 100 keV. (SDF)

  7. Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Doris, E.

    2014-11-01

    There are an increasing number of state and local policy initiatives with the goal of encouraging private investment and building robust solar photovoltaic (PV) markets. While some states have seen many-fold increases in solar PV installations over the last decade, many other states, some with very similar policies, have been less successful. The lack of a clear relationship between implementation of specific policies and increases in solar installations has been challenging to policymakers seeking to support such markets within their jurisdictions. This paper builds on recent work that has aimed at clarifying the relationships between policy implementation and successful solar PV markets.

  8. The GammeV suite of experimental searches for axion-like particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Upadhye, Amol; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI

    2009-08-01

    We report on the design and results of the GammeV search for axion-like particles and for chameleon particles. We also discuss plans for an improved experiment to search for chameleon particles, one which is sensitive to both cosmological and power-law chameleon models. Plans for an improved axion-like particle search using coupled resonant cavities are also presented. This experiment will be more sensitive to axion-like particles than stellar astrophysical models or current helioscope experiments.

  9. Alcoa: C-Suite Participation in Energy Efficiency Increases Accountability and Staff Engagement Throughout the Organization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study details how corporate leaders at Alcoa established energy efficiency as a priority throughout the organization and achieved plant-wide performance improvements as a result.

  10. Langmuir probe diagnostic suite in the C-2 field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roche, T. Armstrong, S.; Knapp, K.; Slepchenkov, M.; Sun, X.

    2014-11-15

    Several in situ probes have been designed and implemented into the diagnostic array of the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) at Tri Alpha Energy [M. Tuszewski et al. (the TAE Team), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)]. The probes are all variations on the traditional Langmuir probe. They include linear arrays of triple probes, linear arrays of single-tipped swept probes, a multi-faced Gundestrup probe, and an ion-sensitive probe. The probes vary from 5 to 7 mm diameter in size to minimize plasma perturbations. They also have boron nitride outer casings that prevent unwanted electrical breakdown and reduce the introduction of impurities. The probes are mounted on motorized linear-actuators allowing for programmatic scans of the various plasma parameters over the course of several shots. Each probe has a custom set of electronics that allows for measurement of the desired signals. High frequency ( > 5MHz) analog optical-isolators ensure that plasma parameters can be measured at sub-microsecond time scales while providing electrical isolation between machine and data acquisition systems. With these probes time-resolved plasma parameters (temperature, density, spatial potential, flow, and electric field) can be directly/locally measured in the FRC jet and edge/scrape-off layer.

  11. SNR Denton US LLP 1301 K Street, NW Suite 600, East Tower Washington...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5211 T +1 202 408 6400 F +1 202 408 6399 snrdenton.com March 28, 2012 BY E-MAIL Lamont Jackson Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code: OE-20 U.S....

  12. Modular, High-Volume Fuel Cell Leak-Test Suite and Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ru Chen; Ian Kaye

    2012-03-12

    Fuel cell stacks are typically hand-assembled and tested. As a result the manufacturing process is labor-intensive and time-consuming. The fluid leakage in fuel cell stacks may reduce fuel cell performance, damage fuel cell stack, or even cause fire and become a safety hazard. Leak check is a critical step in the fuel cell stack manufacturing. The fuel cell industry is in need of fuel cell leak-test processes and equipment that is automatic, robust, and high throughput. The equipment should reduce fuel cell manufacturing cost.

  13. C/O HELP PLLC, 750 SEVENTEETH STREET N.W. SUITE 900 Washington...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... infrastructure, and to generate significant job growth in the electric transmission sector. WIRES qualifies its recommendation for a strong, central role for DOE, in two ways. ...

  14. From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DSCN0904 Jennifer Watson Miami Valley Regional Crime Lab.jpg Jennifer Watson, forensic chemist from the Miami Valley Regional Crime Laboratory, spoke at the November 2014 MSEM ...

  15. Browser Testing Suite for Websites Outside of the Energy.gov Drupal Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When developing an EERE website or application outside the Energy.gov Drupal environment, you are required to test its performance on the browsers most used by EERE's visitors.

  16. Suite 4000. 9.5 L%nfcinr Pi& S. Ic:, W

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4000. 9.5 L%nfcinr Pi& S. Ic:, W ' ashingron. DC. 20024-217-1. Telephone: (202) 488 6000 7117-03.87.cdy.27 : 27 May 1987 Hr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE:23 Division of Facility.& Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland,.. 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: \. STATUS OF ACTIONS - FUSRAP SITE LIST Aerospace recently completed a comprehensive review of sites listed in the FUSRAP.Site Investigation and Remedial Action Summary Report, dated December 31, 1986. The primary

  17. White House Mapathon Progress | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ABB's Velocity Suite is continguing the effort by hosting their own mapathon (happening today), and OpenEI is helping to track progress, depicted on the latest map (as of622015...

  18. Basement Fill Model Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Concentrations for Initial Suite of Radionuclides. Zion Station Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Terry

    2014-12-10

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in order to establish a new water treatment plant. There is some residual radioactive particles from the plant which need to be brought down to levels so an individual who receives water from the new treatment plant does not receive a radioactive dose in excess of 25 mrem/y?ケ as specified in 10 CFR 20 Subpart E. The objectives of this report are: (a) To present a simplified conceptual model for release from the buildings with residual subsurface structures that can be used to provide an upper bound on radionuclide concentrations in the fill material and the water in the interstitial spaces of the fill. (b) Provide maximum water concentrations and the corresponding amount of mass sorbed to the solid fill material that could occur in each building for use by ZSRP in selecting ROCs for detailed dose assessment calculations.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSPECTION PLATFORM AND A SUITE OF SENSORS FOR ASSESSING CORROSION AND MECHANICAL DAMAGE ON UNPIGGABLE TRANSMISSION MAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George C. Vradis

    2003-07-01

    This development program is a joint effort among the Northeast Gas Association (formerly New York Gas Group), Foster-Miller, Inc., and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The DOE's contribution to this project is $572,525 out of a total of $772,525. The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its third three-month period (from April 2003 through June 2003). The project was initiated with delay in February 2003 due to contractual issues that emerged between NGA and Foster-Miller, Inc. The two organizations are working diligently to maintain the program's pace and expect to complete it in time. The efforts of the project focused during this period in finalizing the assessment of the tether technology, which is intended to be used as the means of communication between robot and operator. Results indicate that the tether is a viable option under certain pipeline operating conditions, but not all. Concerns also exist regarding the abrasion resistance of the tether, this issue being the last studied. Substantial work was also conducted on the design of the robotic platform, which has progressed very well. Finally, work on the MFL sensor, able to negotiate all pipeline obstacles (including plug valves), was initiated by PII following the successful completion of the subcontract negotiations between Foster-Miller and PII. The sensor design is at this point the critical path in the project's timetable.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSPECTION PLATFORM AND A SUITE OF SENSORS FOR ASSESSING CORROSION AND MECHANICAL DAMAGE ON UNPIGGABLE TRANSMISSION MAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George C. Vradis; Bill Leary

    2004-01-14

    This development program is a joint effort among the Northeast Gas Association (formerly New York Gas Group), Foster-Miller, Inc., and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The total cost of the project is $772,525, with the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the US Department of Energy contributing $572,525, and the Northeast Gas Association contributing $200,000. The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its fourth three-month period (from July 2003 through September 2003). The efforts of the project focused during this period in completing the assessment of the tether technology, which is intended to be used as the means of communication between robot and operator, in designing the MFL sensor module, in completing the kinematic studies, and in initiating tractor design. In addition, work on the ovality sensor progressed significantly, while work on system integration was initiated focusing at this point in time on module coupling. Results to date indicate that the robotic system under design will be able to meet most of the design specifications initially specified. Earlier concerns regarding the portability of the system are shown to be a non-issue, with new more detailed analysis showing that from a locomotor point of view an inspection of a 16 inch-24 inch pipe size range with a single platform is most likely possible However, the limitations imposed by the sensor are more restrictive, preliminary results indicating an inspection range of 16 inch-20 inch pipe sizes. In addition, tether use will most likely have to be limited to medium and low flow conditions in order to preserve tether integrity.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSPECTION PLATFORM AND A SUITE OR SENSORS FOR ASSESSING CORROSION AND MECHANICAL DAMAGE ON UNPIGGABLE TRANSMISSION MAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George C. Vradis

    2004-02-01

    This development program is a joint effort among the Northeast Gas Association (formerly New York Gas Group), Foster-Miller, Inc., GE Oil & Gas (PII), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The total cost of the project is $772,525, with the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the US Department of Energy contributing $572,525, and the Northeast Gas Association contributing $200,000. The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its fifth three-month period (from October 2003 through December 2003). The efforts of the project focused during this period in completing the assessment of the tether technology, which is intended to be used as the means of communication between robot and operator, in completing the design of the MFL sensor modules, and in completing the kinematic studies and tractor design. In addition, work on the ovality sensor has been completed, while work on system integration is nearly complete. Results to date indicate that the robotic system under design will be able to meet most of the design specifications initially prescribed. The kinematic analysis shows that from a locomotor point of view an inspection of a 16 inch-24 inch pipe size range with a single platform is most likely possible. However, the limitations imposed by the sensor are more restrictive, final preliminary design results showing that in order to cover this pipe range, two different sensor systems will be needed; one for the 16 inch-20 inch pipe size range and one for the 20 inch-24 inch range. Finally, the analysis has shown that tether operation will be limited to flows of less than 30 ft/sec; these results will have to be confirmed experimentally during the next phase of work.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSPECTION PLATFORM AND A SUITE OF SENSORS FOR ASSESSING CORROSION AND MECHANICAL DAMAGE ON UNPIGGABLE TRANSMISSION MAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George C. Vradis

    2003-05-01

    The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its second three-month period (from January 2003 through March 2003). The project was initiated with delay in February 2003 due to contractual issues that emerged between the NGA and Foster-Miller, Inc. The two organizations are working diligently to maintain the program's pace so that it is completed in time. The efforts of the project focused during this period in the assessment of the tether technology that is intended to be used as the means of communication between robot and operator. Preliminary results indicate that tether is a viable option under certain pipeline operating conditions but not all. The exact range of operating conditions that are viable for tether use are being determined as the study progresses. Work was also initiated regarding the design of the robotic platform.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSPECTION PLATFORM AND A SUITE OF SENSORS FOR ASSESSING CORROSION AND MECHANICAL DAMAGE ON UNPIGGABLE TRANSMISSION MAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George C. Vradis; William Leary

    2004-03-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory of the US Department of Energy (under Award DE-FC26-02NT41645) and the NYSEARCH Committee of the Northeast Gas Association (previous the New York Gas Group), have sponsored research to develop a robotic pipeline inspection system capable of navigation through the typical physical and operational obstacles that make transmission and distribution pipelines unpiggable. The research contractors, Foster-Miller and GE Oil & Gas (PII North America) have performed an engineering study and developed a conceptual design that meets all the requirements for navigating and inspecting unpiggable transmission pipelines. Based on Foster-Miller's previous efforts developing the Pipe Mouse robot, the RoboScan inspection robot (Figure ES-1) meets the navigational and physical challenges of unpiggable pipelines through an innovative modular platform design, segmented MFL inspection modules and improvements to the inter-module coupling design.

  4. Moderate Velocity Ball Impact of a Mock High-Explosive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furmanski, Jevan; Rae, Philip; Clements, Bradford E.

    2012-06-05

    Modeling of thermal and mechanical events in high-explosive materials is complicated by the composite nature of the material, which experiences viscoelastic and plastic deformations and sustains damage in the form of microcracks that can dominate its overall behavior. A mechanical event of interest is projectile interaction with the material, which leads to extreme local deformation and adiabatic heating, which can potentially lead to adverse outcomes in an energetic material. Simulations of such an event predicted large local temperature rises near the path of a spherical projectile, but these were experimentally unconfirmed and hence potentially non-physical. This work concerns the experimental verification of local temperatures both at the surface and in the wake of a spherical projectile penetrating a mock (unreactive) high-explosive at {approx}700 m/s. Fast response thermocouples were embedded radially in a mid-plane of a cylindrical target, which was bonded around the thermocouples with epoxy and recorded by an oscilloscope through a low-pass filter with a bandwidth of 500 Hz. A peak temperature rise of 70 K was measured both at the equator of the projectile and in its wake, in good agreement with the temperature predicted in the minimally distorted elements at those locations by a finite element model in ABAQUS employing the ViscoSCRAM constitutive model. Further work is needed to elucidate the extreme temperature rises in material undergoing crushing or fragmentation, which is difficult to predict with meshed finite element methods due to element distortion, and also challenging to quantify experimentally.

  5. Comparison of Hydrocode Simulations with Measured Shock Wave Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R.

    2014-11-30

    We have conducted detailed 1- and 2-dimensional hydrodynamics calculations to assess the quality of simulations commonly made to understand various shock processes in a sample and to design shock experiments. We began with relatively simple shock experiments, where we examined the effects of the equation of state and the viscoplastic strength models. Eventually we included spallation in copper and iron and a solid-solid phase transformation in iron to assess the quality of the damage and phase transformation simulations.

  6. Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Abstract Microseismic imaging can be an important tool for characterizing geothermal reservoirs....

  7. Y-12 Site Experience with Deposition Velocity Issues

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Stability Class Determinations * NRC RG 1.23 T-only method * EPA-454R-99-005 solar- radiation-delta-temperature (SRDT) method * Hybrid SR - DT method * wind direction...

  8. Modeling coiled-tubing velocity strings for gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, J.; Martinez, A.

    1998-02-01

    Because of its ability to prolong well life, its relatively low expense, and the relative ease with which it is installed, coiled tubing has become a preferred remedial method of tubular completion for gas wells. Of course, the difficulty in procuring wireline-test data is a drawback to verifying the accuracy of the assumptions and predictions used for coiled-tubing selection. This increases the importance of the prediction-making process, and, as a result, places great emphasis on the modeling methods that are used. This paper focuses on the processes and methods for achieving sound multiphase-flow predictions by looking at the steps necessary to arrive at coiled-tubing selection. Furthermore, this paper examines the variables that serve as indicators of the viability of each tubing size, especially liquid holdup. This means that in addition to methodology, emphasis is placed on the use of a good wellbore model. The computer model discussed is in use industry wide.

  9. Elastic wave velocity measurement combined with synchrotron X...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measurements at high pressure and high temperature conditions: Towards prediction and ... measurements at high pressure and high temperature conditions: Towards prediction and ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and temperature change inside and outside the laser-heated SMP foam device were acquired. Though non-physiological conditions were used in this initial study, the utility ...

  11. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by mantle-derived melts has occurred. Authors Lee K. Steck, Clifford H. Thurber, Michael C. Fehler, William J. Lutter, Peter M. Roberts, W. Scott Baldridge, Darrik G....

  12. Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. A key resource management issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir...

  13. Method for estimation of ocean current velocity from satellite images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mollo-Christensen, E.; Cornillon, P.; Da S. Mascarenhas, A. Jr.

    1981-05-08

    Barotropic instability waves on a shear interface propagate at the average speed of the water on the two sides. Assuming the instability to be excited by tidal oscillations, the phase speed is the wavelength divided by the tidal period. If the water is at rest on one side of the shear layer the current speed on the other side can be calculated. This method, applied to the Gulf Stream beyond Cape Hatteras as seen in satellite images, gives estimates of current speed in general agreement with in situ observations.

  14. High-velocity interceptors for boost-phase intercepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1993-11-01

    Brilliant kill packages with existing booster technology, warning, and command and control could produce interceptors that could reduce the effectiveness of theater attacks in the boost phase.

  15. Effect of Ambient Pressure on Diesel Spray Axial Velocity and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    icon deer07kastengren.pdf More Documents & Publications Spray Structure Measured with X-Ray Radiography Ultrafast X-ray Phase-Enhanced Microimaging for Visualizing Fuel Injection...

  16. Minimum Velocity Required to Transport Solid Particles from the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    December 27, 1993. Robert Perry and Cecil Chilton, Eds., Chemical Engineers' Handbook, 5th Ed., New York: McGraw-Hill, 1973, p. 3-71. C. O. Bennett and J. E. Myers,...

  17. Behavior of Impurity Ion Velocities during the Pulsed Poloidal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Symmetric Torus Reversed-Field Pinch Hajime SAKAKITA , Darren CRAIG 1 , Jay K. ANDERSON 1 , Ted M. BIEWER 2 , Stephen D. TERRY 2 , Brett E. CHAPMAN 1 , Daniel J. DEN-HARTOG...

  18. Plasma Velocity Profile During The Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Poloidal Current Drive In The MST RFP Plasma H. Sakakita 1,2 , D. Craig 2 , J. K. Anderson 2 , T. M. Biewer 2 , S. D. Terry 3 , B. E. Chapman 2 and D. J. Den-Hartog 2 1 Energy...

  19. A unique gun application for both high velocity and low velocity projectiles in a standard 155mm long tom gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Terminal Ballistics Facility at Sandia National Laboratores in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed an inexpensive and reliable capability for environmental testing of nuclear and kinetic energy weapon systems using the standard military 155 mm long tom gun. An unusual priming technique and charge configuration developed by Sandia National laboratories provides repeatable results such that payloads may be launched outside of the normal operating regime (both high and low) for the 155 mm gun. A 15 pound payload was reliably launched at 1000 fps with a breech pressure of 3000 psi. Another 20 pound payload was reliably launched to 5000 fps with a breech pressure of 50000 psi. A detailed description of charge configuration and test results is presented. 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Integrated separation scheme for measuring a suite of fission and activation products from a fresh mixed fission and activation product sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, Shannon M.; Seiner, Brienne N.; Finn, Erin C.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Smith, Steven C.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Haney, Morgan M.; Lucas, Dawn D.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Beacham, Tere A.; Swearingen, Kevin J.; Friese, Judah I.; Douglas, Matthew; Metz, Lori A.

    2015-05-01

    Mixed fission and activation materials resulting from various nuclear processes and events contain a wide range of isotopes for analysis spanning almost the entire periodic table. In some applications such as environmental monitoring, nuclear waste management, and national security a very limited amount of material is available for analysis and characterization so an integrated analysis scheme is needed to measure multiple radionuclides from one sample. This work describes the production of a complex synthetic sample containing fission products, activation products, and irradiated soil and determines the percent recovery of select isotopes through the integrated chemical separation scheme. Results were determined using gamma energy analysis of separated fractions and demonstrate high yields of Ag (76 ア 6%), Au (94 ア 7%), Cd (59 ア 2%), Co (93 ア 5%), Cs (88 ア 3%), Fe (62 ア 1%), Mn (70 ア 7%), Np (65 ア 5%), Sr (73 ア 2%) and Zn (72 ア 3%). Lower yields (< 25%) were measured for Ga, Ir, Sc, and W. Based on the results of this experiment, a complex synthetic sample can be prepared with low atom/fission ratios and isotopes of interest accurately and precisely measured following an integrated chemical separation method.

  1. Absolute total and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine at electron and proton intermediate impact velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Wania Luna, Hugo; Sigaud, Lucas; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Tavares, Andre C.

    2014-02-14

    Absolute total non-dissociative and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine were measured for electron impact energies ranging from 70 to 400 eV and for proton impact energies from 125 up to 2500 keV. MOs ionization induced by coulomb interaction were studied by measuring both ionization and partial dissociative cross sections through time of flight mass spectrometry and by obtaining the branching ratios for fragment formation via a model calculation based on the Born approximation. The partial yields and the absolute cross sections measured as a function of the energy combined with the model calculation proved to be a useful tool to determine the vacancy population of the valence MOs from which several sets of fragment ions are produced. It was also a key point to distinguish the dissociation regimes induced by both particles. A comparison with previous experimental results is also presented.

  2. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, deceased, Roger J. (late of Albuquerque, NM); Dawson, Ralph (Albuquerque, NM); Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A field effect transistor comprises a semiconductor having a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship. The semiconductor is a strained layer superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers and barrier layers being selected from the group of layer pairs consisting of InGaAs/AlGaAs, InAs/InAlGaAs, and InAs/InAlAsP. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice which has a superlattice conduction band energy level structure in k-vector space which includes a lowest energy .GAMMA.-valley and a next lowest energy L-valley, each k-vector corresponding to one of the orthogonal directions defined by the planes of said layers and the directions perpendicular thereto. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice L.sub.2D -valley which has a shape which is substantially more two-dimensional than that of said bulk L-valley.

  3. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Fritz, I.J.; Osbourn, G.C.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-06-08

    A field effect transistor comprises a semiconductor having a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship. The semiconductor is a strained layer superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers and barrier layers being selected from the group of layer pairs consisting of InGaAs/AlGaAs, InAs/InAlGaAs, and InAs/InAlAsP. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice which has a superlattice conduction band energy level structure in k-vector space. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice L/sub 2D/-valley which has a shape which is substantially more two-dimensional than that of said bulk L-valley. 2 figs.

  4. Is the misalignment of the Local Group velocity and the dipole...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2MASS Redshift Survey typical in lambda cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies? ... 2MASS Redshift Survey typical in lambda cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies? ...

  5. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CORONA The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron ... We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic ...

  6. THIRD MOMENTS AND THE ROLE OF ANISOTROPY FROM VELOCITY SHEAR IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stawarz, Joshua E.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Smith, Charles W.; Forman, Miriam A.; Klewicki, Joseph E-mail: Bernie.Vasquez@unh.edu E-mail: Miriam.Forman@sunysb.edu

    2011-07-20

    We have extended the recent analyses of magnetohydrodynamic third moments as they relate to the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind to consider the effects of large-scale shear flows. Moments from a large set of Advanced Composition Explorer data have been taken, and chosen data intervals are characterized by the rate of change in the solar wind speed. Mean dissipation rates are obtained in accordance with the predictions of homogeneous shear-driven turbulence. Agreement with predictions is best made for rarefaction intervals where the solar wind speed is decreasing with time. For decreasing speed intervals, we find that the dissipation rates increase with increasing shear magnitude and that the shear-induced fluctuation anisotropy is consistent with a relatively small amount.

  7. THE M31 VELOCITY VECTOR. I. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PROPER-MOTION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Anderson, Jay; Van der Marel, Roeland P.

    2012-07-01

    We present the first proper-motion (PM) measurements for the galaxy M31. We obtained new V-band imaging data with the Hubble Space Telescope ACS/WFC and the WFC3/UVIS instruments of three fields: a spheroid field near the minor axis, an outer disk field along the major axis, and a field on the Giant Southern Stream. The data provide five to seven year time baselines with respect to pre-existing deep first-epoch observations of the same fields. We measure the positions of thousands of M31 stars and hundreds of compact background galaxies in each field. High accuracy and robustness is achieved by building and fitting a unique template for each individual object. The average PM for each field is obtained from the average motion of the M31 stars between the epochs with respect to the background galaxies. For the three fields, the observed PMs ({mu}{sub W}, {mu}{sub N}) are, in units of mas yr{sup -1}, (- 0.0458, -0.0376) {+-} (0.0165, 0.0154), (- 0.0533, -0.0104) {+-} (0.0246, 0.0244), and (- 0.0179, -0.0357) {+-} (0.0278, 0.0272), respectively. The ability to average over large numbers of objects and over the three fields yields a final displacement accuracy of a few thousandths of a pixel, corresponding to only 12 {mu}as yr{sup -1}. This is comparable to what has been achieved for other Local Group galaxies using Very Long Baseline Array observations of water masers. Potential systematic errors are controlled by an analysis strategy that corrects for detector charge transfer inefficiency, spatially and time-dependent geometric distortion, and point-spread function variations. The robustness of the PM measurements and uncertainties are supported by the fact that data from different instruments, taken at different times and with different telescope orientations, as well as measurements of different fields, all yield statistically consistent results. Papers II and III of this series explore the implications of the new measurements for our understanding of the history, future, and mass of the Local Group.

  8. Scalar and tensor spherical harmonics expansion of the velocity correlation in homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Kurien, Susan; Cambon, Claude

    2015-06-22

    The representation theory of the rotation group is applied to construct a series expansion of the correlation tensor in homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The resolution of angular dependence is the main analytical difficulty posed by anisotropic turbulence; representation theory parametrises this dependence by a tensor analogue of the standard spherical harmonics expansion of a scalar. As a result, the series expansion is formulated in terms of explicitly constructed tensor bases with scalar coefficients determined by angular moments of the correlation tensor.

  9. Technical Challenges in Low-velocity SRF Development ATLAS 25th...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SC cavities used RRR40 (reactor grade) 15 (EP collaboration between ANL and Karlsruhe) Paul Markovich - ANL chemistry II. Four Decades of RF Superconductivity at ANL 16 SARAF...

  10. A dynamo model of magnetic activity in solar-like stars with different rotational velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Kitchatinov, Leonid L.

    2014-08-10

    We attempt to provide a quantitative theoretical explanation for the observations that Ca II H/K emission and X-ray emission from solar-like stars increase with decreasing Rossby number (i.e., with faster rotation). Assuming that these emissions are caused by magnetic cycles similar to the sunspot cycle, we construct flux transport dynamo models of 1 M{sub 笘厭 stars rotating with different rotation periods. We first compute the differential rotation and the meridional circulation inside these stars from a mean-field hydrodynamics model. Then these are substituted in our dynamo code to produce periodic solutions. We find that the dimensionless amplitude f{sub m} of the toroidal flux through the star increases with decreasing rotation period. The observational data can be matched if we assume the emissions to go as the power 3-4 of f{sub m}. Assuming that the Babcock-Leighton mechanism saturates with increasing rotation, we can provide an explanation for the observed saturation of emission at low Rossby numbers. The main failure of our model is that it predicts an increase of the magnetic cycle period with increasing rotation rate, which is the opposite of what is found observationally. Much of our calculations are based on the assumption that the magnetic buoyancy makes the magnetic flux tubes rise radially from the bottom of the convection zone. Taking into account the fact that the Coriolis force diverts the magnetic flux tubes to rise parallel to the rotation axis in rapidly rotating stars, the results do not change qualitatively.

  11. Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    synthetic modeling of a cross model at critical locations, is estimated to be 0.35 km for V (sub p ) and 0.5 km for V (sub s ) . Model uncertainties are estimated by a jackknife...

  12. Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Bongard, M. W.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2012-10-15

    A passive ion temperature polychromator has been deployed on Pegasus to study power balance and non-thermal ion distributions that arise during point source helicity injection. Spectra are recorded from a 1 m F/8.6 Czerny-Turner polychromator whose output is recorded by an intensified high-speed camera. The use of high orders allows for a dispersion of 0.02 A/mm in 4th order and a bandpass of 0.14 A ({approx}13 km/s) at 3131 A in 4th order with 100 {mu}m entrance slit. The instrument temperature of the spectrometer is 15 eV. Light from the output of an image intensifier in the spectrometer focal plane is coupled to a high-speed CMOS camera. The system can accommodate up to 20 spatial points recorded at 0.5 ms time resolution. During helicity injection, stochastic magnetic fields keep T{sub e} low ({approx}100 eV) and thus low ionization impurities penetrate to the core. Under these conditions, high core ion temperatures are measured (T{sub i} Almost-Equal-To 1.2 keV, T{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 0.1 keV) using spectral lines from carbon III, nitrogen III, and boron IV.

  13. HIGH-VELOCITY LINE FORMING REGIONS IN THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2009ig...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    -14 days and +13 days with respect to the time of maximum B-band luminosity (B-max). ... ASTROPHYSICS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; LUMINOSITY; PHOTOSPHERE; SILICON IONS; SUPERNOVAE; ...

  14. Comment on ''The velocity field due to an oscillating plate in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING non-Newtonian fluid; start-up problem; continuum mechanics; Laplace transform; ...

  15. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  16. Method and apparatus for simultaneous determination of fluid mass flow rate, mean velocity and density

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamel, William R. (Farragut, TN)

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to a new method and new apparatus for determining fluid mass flowrate and density. In one aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through a straight cantilevered tube in which transient oscillation has been induced, thus generating Coriolis damping forces on the tube. The decay rate and frequency of the resulting damped oscillation are measured, and the fluid mass flowrate and density are determined therefrom. In another aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through the cantilevered tube while an electrically powered device imparts steady-state harmonic excitation to the tube. This generates Coriolis tube-damping forces which are dependent on the mass flowrate of the fluid. Means are provided to respond to incipient flow-induced changes in the amplitude of vibration by changing the power input to the excitation device as required to sustain the original amplitude of vibration. The fluid mass flowrate and density are determined from the required change in power input. The invention provides stable, rapid, and accurate measurements. It does not require bending of the fluid flow.

  17. Teleseismic evidence for a low-velocity body under the Coso geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTeleseismicevidenceforalow-velocitybodyundertheCosogeothermalarea&oldid791681" Feedback Contact needs updating Image...

  18. ARM - PI Product - SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    removed, however a multi-layer flag is included. Data Details Contact Heike Kalesse Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research kalesse@tropos.de Permoserstr. 15 Leipzig, 04318...

  19. The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    +- 10 km ssup -1 for small groups to more than 854 ... Survey DR2 spectroscopic sample, and in mock galaxy ... Research Org: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) ...

  20. Surface-wave and refraction tomography at the FACT Site, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Robert E.; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Pullammanappallil, Satish; Engler, Bruce Phillip

    2006-08-01

    We present a technique that allows for the simultaneous acquisition and interpretation of both shear-wave and compressive-wave 3-D velocities. The technique requires no special seismic sources or array geometries, and is suited to studies with small source-receiver offsets. The method also effectively deals with unwanted seismic arrivals by using the statistical properties of the data itself to discriminate against spurious picks. We demonstrate the technique with a field experiment at the Facility for Analysis, Calibration, and Testing at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The resulting 3-D shear-velocity and compressive-velocity distributions are consistent with surface geologic mapping. The averaged velocities and V{sub p}/V{sub s} ratio in the upper 30 meters are also consistent with examples found in the scientific literature.

  1. ARM - Data Announcements Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2, 2015 [Data Announcements] New Ship Navigation Corrections for MAGIC and ACAPEX Bookmark and Share Mean Doppler velocity shown here from the MAGIC deployment on June 26, 2013, from the KAZR copol for a) uncorrected and b) corrected. Mean Doppler velocity shown here from the MAGIC deployment on June 26, 2013, from the KAZR copol for a) uncorrected and b) corrected. A new suite of evaluation value-added products (VAPs) is now available for the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) to provide

  2. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with a q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bains, A. S.; Gill, T. S.; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2011-02-15

    The modulational instability (MI) of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) in a two-component plasma is investigated in the context of the nonextensive statistics proposed by Tsallis [J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)]. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) which governs the MI of the IAWs is obtained. The presence of the nonextensive electron distribution is shown to influence the MI of the waves. Three different ranges of the nonextensive q-parameter are considered and in each case the MI sets in under different conditions. Furthermore, the effects of the q-parameter on the growth rate of MI are discussed in detail.

  3. Influence of plasma beta on the generation of lower hybrid and whistler waves by an ion velocity ring distribution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Winske, D.; Daughton, W.

    2015-02-02

    We present results of three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the lower hybrid ion ring instability, similar to our earlier results [D. Winske and W. Daughton, Phys. Plasma, 19, 072109, 2012], but at higher electron beta (ホイe = ratio of electron thermal pressure to magnetic pressure = 0.06, rather than at 0.006) with Ti = Te. At higher electron beta the level of lower hybrid waves at saturation normalized to the ion thermal energy (ホイi = 0.06 also) is only slightly smaller, but the corresponding magnetic fluctuations are about an order of magnitude larger, consistent with linear theory. After saturation, themoreツツサ waves evolve into whistler waves, through a number of possible mechanisms, with an average growth rate considerably smaller than the linear growth rate of the lower hybrid waves, to a peak fluctuation level that is about 20% above the lower hybrid wave saturation level. The ratio of the peak magnetic fluctuations associated with the whistler waves relative to those of the saturated lower hybrid waves, the ratio of the nonlinear growth rate of whistlers relative to the linear growth rate of lower hybrid waves, the amount of energy extracted from the ring and the amount of heating of the background ions and electrons are comparable to those in the lower electron beta 3-D simulation. This suggests that even at higher electron beta, the linear and nonlinear physics of the lower hybrid ion ring instability is dominated by electrostatic, wave-particle rather than wave-wave interactions.ツォツless

  4. Microsoft Word - Klise_etal_39PVSC_Friday_velocity_talk_6_10_Paper_final.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standardizing Appraisals for PV Installations Geoffrey T. Klise 1 , Jamie L. Johnson 2 , and Sandra K. Adomatis 3 1 Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185, USA 2 Energy Sense Finance, LLC, Punta Gorda, FL, 33980, USA 3 Adomatis Appraisal Services, Punta Gorda, FL, 33951, USA ABSTRACT - As PV installations increase across the U.S., there will be a point when an appraiser will have the opportunity to value the PV system as part of a property sale or re-finance. Proper valuation

  5. Stochastic acceleration of electrons by fast magnetosonic waves in solar flares: the effects of anisotropy in velocity and wavenumber space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2014-11-20

    We develop a model for stochastic acceleration of electrons in solar flares. As in several previous models, the electrons are accelerated by turbulent fast magnetosonic waves ({sup f}ast waves{sup )} via transit-time-damping (TTD) interactions. (In TTD interactions, fast waves act like moving magnetic mirrors that push the electrons parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field). We also include the effects of Coulomb collisions and the waves' parallel electric fields. Unlike previous models, our model is two-dimensional in both momentum space and wavenumber space and takes into account the anisotropy of the wave power spectrum F{sub k} and electron distribution function f {sub e}. We use weak turbulence theory and quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of F{sub k} and f {sub e}. We solve these equations numerically and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail within a restricted range of energies E in (E {sub nt}, E {sub max}). We obtain approximate analytic expressions for E {sub nt} and E {sub max}, which describe how these minimum and maximum energies depend upon parameters such as the electron number density and the rate at which fast-wave energy is injected into the acceleration region at large scales. We contrast our results with previous studies that assume that F{sub k} and f {sub e} are isotropic, and we compare one of our numerical calculations with the time-dependent hard-X-ray spectrum observed during the 1980 June 27 flare. In our numerical calculations, the electron energy spectra are softer (steeper) than in models with isotropic F{sub k} and f {sub e} and closer to the values inferred from observations of solar flares.

  6. Velocity and concentration studies of flowing suspensions by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Technical progress report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Our search for a suitable combination of imageable particles in a carrier liquid which will not dissolve the particles has led us to try pharmaceutical particles in silicon oil. This combination doses not seem to last long enough for adequate NMR measurements. Results are discussed.

  7. A Galerkin least squares approach to viscoelastic flow.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Rekha R.; Schunk, Peter Randall

    2015-10-01

    A Galerkin/least-squares stabilization technique is applied to a discrete Elastic Viscous Stress Splitting formulation of for viscoelastic flow. From this, a possible viscoelastic stabilization method is proposed. This method is tested with the flow of an Oldroyd-B fluid past a rigid cylinder, where it is found to produce inaccurate drag coefficients. Furthermore, it fails for relatively low Weissenberg number indicating it is not suited for use as a general algorithm. In addition, a decoupled approach is used as a way separating the constitutive equation from the rest of the system. A Pressure Poisson equation is used when the velocity and pressure are sought to be decoupled, but this fails to produce a solution when inflow/outflow boundaries are considered. However, a coupled pressure-velocity equation with a decoupled constitutive equation is successful for the flow past a rigid cylinder and seems to be suitable as a general-use algorithm.

  8. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN A QUIESCENT PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillier, A.; Morton, R. J.; Erd駘yi, R.

    2013-12-20

    The launch of the Hinode satellite has allowed for seeing-free observations at high-resolution and high-cadence making it well suited to study the dynamics of quiescent prominences. In recent years it has become clear that quiescent prominences support small-amplitude transverse oscillations, however, sample sizes are usually too small for general conclusions to be drawn. We remedy this by providing a statistical study of transverse oscillations in vertical prominence threads. Over a 4 hr period of observations it was possible to measure the properties of 3436 waves, finding periods from 50 to 6000s with typical velocity amplitudes ranging between 0.2 and 23km s{sup 1}. The large number of observed waves allows the determination of the frequency dependence of the wave properties and derivation of the velocity power spectrum for the transverse waves. For frequencies less than 7mHz, the frequency dependence of the velocity power is consistent with the velocity power spectra generated from observations of the horizontal motions of magnetic elements in the photosphere, suggesting that the prominence transverse waves are driven by photospheric motions. However, at higher frequencies the two distributions significantly diverge, with relatively more power found at higher frequencies in the prominence oscillations. These results highlight that waves over a large frequency range are ubiquitous in prominences, and that a significant amount of the wave energy is found at higher frequency.

  9. Inversion of seismic reflection traveltimes using a nonlinear optimization scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pullammanappallil, S.K.; Louie, J.N. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines)

    1993-11-01

    The authors present the use of a nonlinear optimization scheme called generalized simulated annealing to invert seismic reflection times for velocities, reflector depths, and lengths. A finite-difference solution of the eikonal equation computes reflection traveltimes through the velocity model and avoids ray tracing. They test the optimization scheme on synthetic models and compare it with results from a linearized inversion. The synthetic tests illustrate that, unlike linear inversion schemes, the results obtained by the optimization scheme are independent of the initial model. The annealing method has the ability to produce a suite of models that satisfy the data equally well. They make use of this property to determine the uncertainties associated with the model parameters obtained. Synthetic examples demonstrate that allowing the reflector length to vary, along with its position, helps the optimization process obtain a better solution. The authors put this to use in imaging the Garlock fault, whose geometry at depth is poorly known. They use reflection times picked from shot gathers recorded along COCORP Mojave Line 5 to invert for the Garlock fault and velocities within the Cantil Basin below Fremont Valley, California. The velocities within the basin obtained by their optimization scheme are consistent with earlier studies, though their results suggest that the basin might extend 1--2 km further south. The reconstructed reflector seems to suggest shallowing of the dip of the Garlock fault at depth.

  10. Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Last-Out Energy Conservation Check List Office Symbol/ Name: Suite Room Number: Date/ Initials All Lights in Suite are Off? All Printers in Suite are Off? All Scanners in Suite are Off? Coffee Maker in Suite is Off? All Entrances to Suite are Locked?

  11. Longitudinal dispersion coefficient depending on superficial velocity of hydrogen isotopes flowing in column packed with zeolite pellets at 77.4 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotoh, K.; Kubo, K.; Takashima, S.; Moriyama, S.T.; Tanaka, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Authors have been developing a cryogenic pressure swing adsorption system for hydrogen isotope separation. In the problem of its design and operation, it is necessary to predict the concentration profiles developing in packed beds of adsorbent pellets. The profiling is affected by the longitudinal dispersion of gas flowing in packed beds, in addition to the mass transfer resistance in porous media of adsorbent pellets. In this work, an equation is derived for estimating the packed-bed dispersion coefficient of hydrogen isotopes, by analyzing the breakthrough curves of trace D{sub 2} or HD replacing H{sub 2} adsorbed in synthetic zeolite particles packed columns at the liquefied nitrogen temperature 77.4 K. Since specialized for hydrogen isotopes, this equation can be considered to estimate the dispersion coefficients more reliable for the cryogenic hydrogen isotope adsorption process, than the existing equations. (authors)

  12. Method and system using power modulation and velocity modulation producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montcalm, Claude (Livermore, CA); Folta, James Allen (Livermore, CA); Walton, Christopher Charles (Berkeley, CA)

    2003-12-23

    A method and system for determining a source flux modulation recipe for achieving a selected thickness profile of a film to be deposited (e.g., with highly uniform or highly accurate custom graded thickness) over a flat or curved substrate (such as concave or convex optics) by exposing the substrate to a vapor deposition source operated with time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the source is operated with time-varying power applied thereto during each sweep of the substrate to achieve the time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece held stationary while exposed to the source with the source operated at each of a number of different applied power levels), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of source flux modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a source flux modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal source flux modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. The method enables precise modulation of the deposition flux to which a substrate is exposed to provide a desired coating thickness distribution.

  13. Sandia Particle Holography Processor v. 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-12-09

    HoloSand is a suite of MATLABツョ functions for measurement of particle properties from digital holograms. Functions to read and display digital holograms are included along with scripts to extract three-dimensional particle positions, sizes, and velocities. This software is a research tool used to process experimental data. A user of this software would first record digital holograms of a particle field and then use this software to measure the three-dimensional particle information encoded in the hologram.moreツツサ Applications range from basic laboratory fluids research to applied particle measurements. The software has no known military applications. The software solves the diffraction integral equation to numerically refocus digital holograms and then applies the hybrid and cross-correlation methods described in the references to extract three-dimensional particle information. User input is required to read-in the hologram and select optimum settings for image segmentation.ツォツless

  14. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1992-01-01

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  15. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  16. Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    To address these issues, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed the Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) suite of tools. This suite of tools pairs ...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: MTEM 2014: Malware Technical Exchange...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pyramid North Andaluz Hotel (downtown ABQ) Candlewood Suites ABQ Courtyard Albuquerque Airport Embassy Suites ABQ Hilton Garden Inn Uptown Hyatt Place Uptown Residence Inn Airport...

  18. Transport Modeling Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mathematical modeling is ideally suited for this analysis because fuel cells are difficult ... This balance and its optimization is ideally suited to mathematical modeling. In addition, ...

  19. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Insects as Clear Air Vertical Velocity Profilers Edward Luke Brookhaven National Lab Pavlos Kollias McGill University Steve Klein LLNL Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Cloud Base Height Velocity Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity Velocity Updraft Insect Spectrum Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km)

  20. The Vainshtein mechanism in the cosmic web

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falck, Bridget; Koyama, Kazuya; Zhao, Gong-bo; Li, Baojiu E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the dependence of the Vainshtein screening mechanism on the cosmic web morphology of both dark matter particles and halos as determined by ORIGAMI. Unlike chameleon and symmetron screening, which come into effect in regions of high density, Vainshtein screening instead depends on the dimensionality of the system, and screened bodies can still feel external fields. ORIGAMI is well-suited to this problem because it defines morphologies according to the dimensionality of the collapsing structure and does not depend on a smoothing scale or density threshold parameter. We find that halo particles are screened while filament, wall, and void particles are unscreened, and this is independent of the particle density. However, after separating halos according to their large scale cosmic web environment, we find no difference in the screening properties of halos in filaments versus halos in clusters. We find that the fifth force enhancement of dark matter particles in halos is greatest well outside the virial radius. We confirm the theoretical expectation that even if the internal field is suppressed by the Vainshtein mechanism, the object still feels the fifth force generated by the external fields, by measuring peculiar velocities and velocity dispersions of halos. Finally, we investigate the morphology and gravity model dependence of halo spins, concentrations, and shapes.

  1. Metrics for Evaluating the Accuracy of Solar Power Forecasting (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Hodge, B.; Florita, A.; Lu, S.; Hamann, H.; Banunarayanan, V.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation proposes a suite of metrics for evaluating the performance of solar power forecasting.

  2. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehmani, Yashar; Schoenherr, Martin; Pasquali, Andrea; Perkins, William A.; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li -Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Trask, Nathaniel

    2015-09-28

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This paper provides support for confidence in a variety of pore-scale modeling methods and motivates further development and application of pore-scale simulation methods.

  3. Comment on ''The velocity field due to an oscillating plate in an Oldroyd-B fluid'' by C.C. Hopkins and J.R. de Bruyn [Can. J. Phys. 92, 533 (2014)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Christov, Ivan C.

    2015-09-11

    We correct certain errors and ambiguities in the recent pedagogical article by Hopkins and de Bruyn. The early-time asymptotics of the solution to the transient version of Stokes窶 second problem for an Oldroyd-B fluid in a half-space is presented, as Appendix A, to complement the late-time asymptotics given by Hopkins and de Bruyn.

  4. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6. Blast measurements. Part 5. Measurement of density, temperature, and material velocity in an air shock produced by a nuclear explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porzel, F.B.; Whitener, J.E.

    1985-09-01

    The results from laboratory tests and test firing were quite encouraging. It was concluded that: (1) the beta densitometer is a feasible device for the measurement of density as a function of time in the shock wave from a nuclear explosion. It is limited to pressure levels of 6 or 8 psi for bombs in the range of 50 kt, but is capable of higher-pressure levels on larger bombs where the interference from gamma rays is less serious; (2) dust-loading behind the shock wave is a major perturbation to the ideal hydrodynamics and can change the density by as large a factor as the shock itself; (3) the rise time at distances of 7,500 feet on Easy Shot was sharp within a resolution of approximately 0.2 msec; and (4) the field calibration used on Operation Greenhouse appeared reasonably accurate and was worthy of subsequent development.

  5. Orbital masses of nearby luminous galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kudrya, Yuri N. E-mail: yukudrya@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    We use observational properties of galaxies accumulated in the Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog to derive a dark matter mass of luminous galaxies via motions of their companions. The data on orbital-to-stellar mass ratio are presented for 15 luminous galaxies situated within 11 Mpc from us: the Milky Way, M31, M81, NGC 5128, IC342, NGC 253, NGC 4736, NGC 5236, NGC 6946, M101, NGC 4258, NGC 4594, NGC 3115, NGC 3627, and NGC 3368, as well as for a composite suite around other nearby galaxies of moderate and low luminosity. The typical ratio for these galaxies is M {sub orb}/M {sub *} = 31, corresponding to the mean local density of matter ? {sub m} = 0.09, i.e., one-third of the global cosmic density. This quantity seems to be rather an upper limit of dark matter density, since the peripheric population of the suites may suffer from the presence of fictitious unbound members. We note that the Milky Way and M31 halos have lower dimensions and lower stellar masses than those of the other 13 nearby luminous galaxies. However, the dark-to-stellar mass ratio for both the Milky Way and M31 is typical for other neighboring luminous galaxies. The distortion in the Hubble flow, observed around the Local Group and five other neighboring groups, yields their total masses within the radius of a zero velocity surface, R {sub 0}; these masses are slightly lower than the orbital and virial values. This difference may be due to the effect of dark energy producing a kind of 'mass defect' within R {sub 0}.

  6. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition of iodine-131 released from the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.; Stage, S.A.

    1994-06-01

    Approximately 2.6x10{sup 4} TBq (700,000 curies) of iodine-131 were released to the air from reactor fuel processing plants on the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington State from December 1944 through December 1949. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project developed a suite of codes to estimate the doses that might have resulted from these releases. The Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET) computer code is part of this suite. The RATCHET code implements a Lagrangian-trajectory, Gaussian-puff dispersion model that uses hourly meteorological and release rate data to estimate daily time-integrated air concentrations and surface contamination for use in dose estimates. In this model, iodine is treated as a mixture of three species (nominally, inorganic gases, organic gases, and particles). Model deposition parameters are functions of the mixture and meteorological conditions. A resistance model is used to calculate dry deposition velocities. Equilibrium between concentrations in the precipitation and the air near the ground is assumed in calculating wet deposition of gases, and irreversible washout of the particles is assumed. RATCHET explicitly treats the uncertainties in model parameters and meteorological conditions. Uncertainties in iodine-131 release rates and partitioning among the nominal species are treated by varying model input. The results of 100 model runs for December 1944 through December 1949 indicate that monthly average air concentrations and deposition have uncertainties ranging from a factor of two near the center of the time-integrated plume to more than an order of magnitude near the edge. These results indicate that -10% of the iodine-131 released to the atmosphere decayed during transit in the study area, -56% was deposited within the study area, and the remaining 34% was transported out of the study area while still in the air.

  7. Multi-Scale Initial Conditions For Cosmological Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, Oliver; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ZAH, Heidelberg /HITS, Heidelberg

    2011-11-04

    We discuss a new algorithm to generate multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological 'zoom-in' simulations. The method uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). The new algorithm achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10{sup -4} for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier-space-induced interference ringing. An optional hybrid multi-grid and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based scheme is introduced which has identical Fourier-space behaviour as traditional approaches. Using a suite of re-simulations of a galaxy cluster halo our real-space-based approach is found to reproduce correlation functions, density profiles, key halo properties and subhalo abundances with per cent level accuracy. Finally, we generalize our approach for two-component baryon and dark-matter simulations and demonstrate that the power spectrum evolution is in excellent agreement with linear perturbation theory. For initial baryon density fields, it is suggested to use the local Lagrangian approximation in order to generate a density field for mesh-based codes that is consistent with the Lagrangian perturbation theory instead of the current practice of using the Eulerian linearly scaled densities.

  8. Protective supplied-breathing-air garment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Childers, E.L.; von Hortenau, E.F.

    1982-05-28

    A breathing-air garment for isolating a wearer from hostile environments containing toxins or irritants is disclosed. The garment includes a suit and a separate head-protective enclosure or hood engaging a suit collar in sealing attachment. The hood and suit collar are cylindrically shaped and dimensioned to enable the wearer to withdraw his hands from the suit sleeves to perform manual tasks within the hood interior. Breathing air is supplied from an external air line with an air-delivery hose attached to the hood interior. The hose feeds air into an annular halo-like fiber-filled plenum having spaced discharge orifices attached to the hood top wall. A plurality of air exhaust/check valves located at the suit extremities cooperate with the hood air-delivery system to provide a cooling flow of circulating air from the hood throughout the suit interior. A suit entry seal provided on the suit sealed with an adhesive sealing flap.

  9. Past Lectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Videos Leveraging Algae 56:23 Leveraging Algae Shawn Starkenburg Building the Iron Man Suit 1:01:56 Building the Iron Man Suit Nathan Mara Radiochemistry with a Purpose...

  10. DOE Transition Team President-Elect's 2008

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Cir. 1998) tively established a method for allocating the **30 (holding that suit under the APA is pre- costs of developing, constructing, and operating eluded where "a suit in ...

  11. PCIRCLE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003870WKSTN00 pcircle - A Suite of Scalable Parallel File System Tools https://github.com/ORNL-TechInt/pcircle

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4c_FGA_EIS Scoping Meeting Presentation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a suite of comprehensive monitoring technologies, verification techniques, and accounting protocols for stored CO 2 * Establish visitor, research, and training...

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4b_FG2 scoping_FG Alliance_DC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a suite of comprehensive monitoring technologies, verification techniques, and accounting protocols for stored CO 2 * Establish visitor, research, and training...

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4a_FG2 scoping_FG Alliance_CC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a suite of comprehensive monitoring technologies, verification techniques, and accounting protocols for stored CO 2 * Establish visitor, research, and training...

  15. DIBS

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002429WKSTN00 Data-Intensive Benchmarking Suite https://computation.llnl.gov/case/dcca-pub/dcca/downloads.ht

  16. Matlab MEX-binding for SUNDIALS v2.1.1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-05-19

    sundialsTB is a Matlab interface to the SUNDIALS (Suite of Nonlinear, Algebraic/Differential equation Solvers).

  17. BPA-2012-01948-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Request The following is a New FOIA request: *** Name: Albert Tharnish Organization: Black & Veatch Corporation Address: 5885 Meadows Road, Suite...

  18. Bulk and mechanical properties of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-2, 2A, 2B, and 3: Data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.J.; Martin, R.J.; Noel, J.S. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-09-01

    An integral part of the licensing procedure for the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, involves characterization of the in situ rheology for the design and construction of the facility and the emplacement of canisters containing radioactive waste. The data used to model the thermal and mechanical behavior of the repository and surrounding lithologies include dry and saturated bulk densities, average grain density, porosity, compressional and shear wave velocities, elastic moduli, and compressional and tensional fracture strengths. In this study, a suite of experiments was performed on cores recovered from boreholes UE25 NRG-2, 2A, 2B, and 3 drilled in support of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The holes penetrated the Timber Mountain tuff and two thermal/mechanical units of the Paintbrush tuff. The thermal/mechanical stratigraphy was defined by Ortiz to group rock horizons of similar properties for the purpose of simplifying modeling efforts. The relationship between the geologic stratigraphy and the thermal/mechanical stratigraphy for each borehole is presented. The tuff samples in this study have a wide range of welding characteristics (usually reflected in sample porosity), and a smaller range of mineralogy and petrology characteristics. Generally, the samples are silicic, ash-fall tuffs that exhibit large variability in their elastic and strength properties.

  19. Bulk and mechanical properties of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from borehole USW NRG-7/7A: Data report. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.J.; Boyd, P.J.; Noel, J.S. [New England Research, Inc. White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    An integral part of the licensing procedure for the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, involves prediction of the in situ rheology for the design and construction of the facility and the emplacement of canisters containing radioactive waste. The data used to model the thermal and mechanical behavior of the repository and surrounding lithologies include dry and saturated bulk densities, average grain density, porosity, compressional and shear wave velocities, elastic moduli, and compressional and tensional fracture strengths. In this study, a suite of experiments was performed on cores recovered from the USW NRG-717A borehole drilled in support of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. USW NRG-7/7A was drilled to a depth of 1,513.4 feet through five thermal/mechanical units of Paintbrush tuff and terminating in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico IEUS. The thermal/mechanical stratigraphy was defined by Orfiz et al. to group rock horizons of similar properties for the purpose of simplifying modeling efforts. The relationship between the geologic stratigraphy and the thermal/mechanical stratigraphy is presented. The tuff samples in this study have a wide range of welding characteristics, and a smaller range of mineralogy and petrology characteristics. Generally, the samples are silicic, ash-fall tuffs that exhibit large variability in their elastic and strength properties.

  20. Taking Halo-Independent Dark Matter Methods Out of the Bin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fox, Patrick J.; Kahn, Yonatan; McCullough, Matthew

    2014-10-30

    We develop a new halo-independent strategy for analyzing emerging DM hints, utilizing the method of extended maximum likelihood. This approach does not require the binning of events, making it uniquely suited to the analysis of emerging DM direct detection hints. It determines a preferred envelope, at a given confidence level, for the DM velocity integral which best fits the data using all available information and can be used even in the case of a single anomalous scattering event. All of the halo-independent information from a direct detection result may then be presented in a single plot, allowing simple comparisons betweenmoreツツサ multiple experiments. This results in the halo-independent analogue of the usual mass and cross-section plots found in typical direct detection analyses, where limit curves may be compared with best-fit regions in halo-space. The method is straightforward to implement, using already-established techniques, and its utility is demonstrated through the first unbinned halo-independent comparison of the three anomalous events observed in the CDMS-Si detector with recent limits from the LUX experiment.ツォツless