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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Ventilation rates calculated from hydrogen release data in tanks equipped with standard hydrogen monitoring systems (SHMS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a method for estimating the ventilation rates of the high-level radioactive waste tank headspaces at the Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington state. The method, using hydrogen concentration data, is applied to all passively ventilated and selected mechanically ventilated tanks equipped with Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems (SHMS) and covers the time period from when the SHMS were installed through July 12, 1998. Results of the analyses are tabulated and compared with results from tracer gas studies and similar analyses of SHMS data. The method relies on instances of above-normal hydrogen releases and assumes the rate at which hydrogen is released by the waste is otherwise approximately constant. It also assumes that hydrogen is uniformly distributed in the tank headspace, so that at any given time the concentration of hydrogen in the effluent is approximately equal to the average headspace concentration and that measured by the SHMS. In general, the greatest single source of error in the method is the determination of the baseline hydrogen concentration, which in this study has been estimated by visual inspection of plotted data. Uncertainties in the calculated ventilation rates due to inaccurate baseline measurements are examined by performing a sensitivity analysis with upper and lower bounding values for the baseline concentration (in addition to the best estimate). A table lists the tanks considered in this report and the range of estimated ventilation rates obtained for each tank. When multiple events of above-normal hydrogen releases were observed, the range of estimated ventilation rates is given. Resulting values and their variability are consistent with those determined using tracer gases.

Sklarew, D.S.; Huckaby, J.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems Title Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation...

3

Residential ventilation standards scoping study  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant could be exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. ASHRAE Standards including standards 62, 119, and 136 have all considered the contribution of infiltration in various ways, using methods and data from 20 years ago. The vast majority of homes in the United States and indeed the world are ventilated through natural means such as infiltration caused by air leakage. Newer homes in the western world are tight and require mechanical ventilation. As we seek to provide acceptable indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate norunder-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to correctly evaluate the contribution infiltration makes to both energy consumption and equivalent ventilation. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 specifies how much mechanical ventilation is considered necessary to provide acceptable indoor air quality, but that standard is weak on how infiltration can contribute towards meeting the total requirement. In the past ASHRAE Standard 136 was used to do this, but new theoretical approaches and expanded weather data have made that standard out of date. This article will describe how to properly treat infiltration as an equivalent ventilation approach and then use new data and these new approaches to demonstrate how these calculations might be done both in general and to update Standard 136.

Sherman, Max

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography Title Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6142E Year of Publication 2013 Authors J. Chris Stratton, and Craig P. Wray Keywords ASHRAE 62.2, commissioning, procedures, residential, standards, ventilation Abstract Beginning with the 2008 version of Title 24, new homes in California must comply with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007 requirements for residential ventilation. Where installed, the limited data available indicate that mechanical ventilation systems do not always perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and acceptable IAQ. Work funded by the California Energy Commission about a decade ago at Berkeley Lab documented procedures for residential commissioning, but did not focus on ventilation systems. Since then, standards and approaches for commissioning ventilation systems have been an active area of work in Europe. This report describes our efforts to collect new literature on commissioning procedures and to identify information that can be used to support the future development of residential-ventilation-specific procedures and standards. We recommend that a standardized commissioning process and a commissioning guide for practitioners be developed, along with a combined energy and IAQ benefit assessment standard and tool, and a diagnostic guide for estimating continuous pollutant emission rates of concern in residences (including a database that lists emission test data for commercially-available labeled products).

7

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rudd. 2007. Review of residential ventilation technologies.2009. EISG Final Report: Residential Integrated VentilationDesign and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems. Proc.

Sherman, Max H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Quantitative relationship of sick building syndrome symptoms with ventilation rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

32%), and as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-0.85) as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-29% as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-person.

Fisk, William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Related  to  Residential  Ventilation  Requirements”.  Rudd,  A.   2005.   “Review  of  Residential  Ventilation and  Matson  N.E. ,  “Residential  Ventilation  and  Energy 

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates vary Title Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates vary Publication Type Conference Paper...

11

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increased cost per unit of energy at times of peak demandminimizing energy costs and operation during peak timesenergy and cost impacts of ventilation vary with weather and time

Sherman, Max H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The impact of ventilation rate on the emission rates of volatile...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

impact of ventilation rate on the emission rates of volatile organic compounds in residences Title The impact of ventilation rate on the emission rates of volatile organic...

13

Quantitative relationship of sick building syndrome symptoms with ventilation rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at two outdoor air supply rates." Indoor Air 14 Suppl 8: 7-Miettinen (1995). "Ventilation rate in office buildings andAssociation of ventilation rates and CO 2 concentrations

Fisk, William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally Ventilated Building Speaker(s): Sezin Eren Ozcan Date: May 16, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Due to limited energy sources, countries are looking for alternative solutions to decrease energy needs. In that context, natural ventilation can be seen as a very attractive sustainable technique in building design. However, understanding of ventilation dynamics is needed to provide an efficient control. Ventilation rate has to be determined not only in terms of energy, but also for controlling indoor air quality and emissions. For these reasons, agricultural buildings (livestock houses, greenhouses, etc.), naturally ventilated industrial buildings, and residences require a reliable ventilation rate measuring technique. Measuring techniques suffer

15

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineers, Atlanta, GA.  (1993)  ASTM, Standard E1827?96, “Standard Test Methods for Determining Airtightness of Door”,  ASTM  Book  of  Standards,  American  Society  of 

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standard: Exegesis of Proposed Standard 62.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In February 2000, ASHRAE's Standard Project Committee on "Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings", SPC 62.2P7 recommended ASHRAE's first complete standard on residential ventilation for public review. The standard is an attempt by the Society to address concerns over indoor air quality in dwellings and to set minimum standards that would allow for energy efficiency measures to be evaluated. The standard has requirements for whole-house ventilation, local exhaust ventilation, and source control. In addition to code-intended requirements, the standard also contains guidance information for the designer and/or user of the standard. This report summarizes the draft standard and attempts to address questions and concerns that those potentially affected by the standard might have. This report may also be of use to those considering public review comments on the draft standard.

Sherman, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Quantification of the association of ventilation rates with sick building syndrome symptoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

42%) as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-person.0.85) as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-29% as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-person.

Fisk, William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air Temperature Speaker(s): Henry Willem Date: July 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of...

19

Formaldehyde as a basis for residential ventilation rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large numbers of houses using passive monitoring techniques.rates by passive techniques in 61 occupied houses, half ofhouses in the U.S. have been ventilated by passive

Sherman, M.H.; Hodgson, A.T.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1168-2013 October 2013 DOE STANDARD CONFINEMENT VENTILATION AND PROCESS GAS TREATMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1168-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/department-energy-technical-standards-program ii DOE-STD-1168-2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK iv DOE-STD-1168-2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT...................................................................................................................vii

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

22

Measurements of waste tank passive ventilation rates using tracer gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation rate studies of eight passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks using tracer gases. Head space ventilation rates were determined for Tanks A-101, AX-102, AX-103, BY-105, C-107, S-102, U-103, and U-105 using sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and/or helium (He) as tracer gases. Passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of several key safety issues. These safety issues are associated with the rates of flammable gas production and ventilation, the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out, and the estimation of organic solvent waste surface areas. This tracer gas study involves injecting a tracer gas into the tank headspace and measuring its concentration at different times to establish the rate at which the tracer is removed by ventilation. Tracer gas injection and sample collection were performed by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation and/or Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Characterization Project Operations. Headspace samples were analyzed for He and SF{sub 6} by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The tracer gas method was first demonstrated on Tank S-102. Tests were conducted on Tank S-102 to verify that the tracer gas was uniformly distributed throughout the tank headspace before baseline samples were collected, and that mixing was sufficiently vigorous to maintain an approximately uniform distribution of tracer gas in the headspace during the course of the study. Headspace samples, collected from a location about 4 in away from the injection point and 15, 30, and 60 minutes after the injection of He and SF{sub 6}, indicated that both tracer gases were rapidly mixed. The samples were found to have the same concentration of tracer gases after 1 hour as after 24 hours, suggesting that mixing of the tracer gas was essentially complete within 1 hour.

Huckaby, J.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Sklarew, D.S.; Evans, J.C.; Remund, K.M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation Standards in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but also because passive, whole-house ventilation systemsPassive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses",

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliam, Jennifer A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Benefits and costs of increasing ventilation rates in U.S. offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and costs of increasing ventilation rates in U.S. offices Title Benefits and costs of increasing ventilation rates in U.S. offices Publication Type Conference Paper Year...

25

CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air Temperature Speaker(s): Henry Willem Date: July 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Max Sherman (THIS SEMINAR TO BE RESCHEDULED.) Sustainability of the built-environment must be achieved in parallel with the sustenance of occupants' health and comfort. Actions to conserve energy and resources require much forethought and careful consideration due to possible consequences on the human aspects. Thus, many extensive works in the recent decades have focused on identifying the associations between indoor environment and human responses. Results have shown moderate to strong implications of thermal and indoor air quality factors on the prevalence and intensity of sick

26

Recommended Changes to Specifications for Demand Controlled Ventilation in California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards  

SciTech Connect

In demand-controlled ventilation (DCV), rates of outdoor air ventilation are automatically modulated as occupant density varies. The objective is to keep ventilation rates at or above design specifications and code requirements and also to save energy by avoiding excessive ventilation rates. DCV is most often used in spaces with highly variable and sometime dense occupancy. In almost all cases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sensors installed in buildings provide the signal to the ventilation rate control system. People produce and exhale CO{sub 2} as a consequence of their normal metabolic processes; thus, the concentrations of CO{sub 2} inside occupied buildings are higher than the concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the outdoor air. The magnitude of the indoor-outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration difference decreases as the building's ventilation rate per person increases. The difference between the indoor and outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration is also a proxy for the indoor concentrations of other occupant-generated bioeffluents, such as body odors. Reviews of the research literature on DCV indicate a significant potential for energy savings, particularly in buildings or spaces with a high and variable occupancy. Based on modeling, cooling energy savings from applications of DCV are as high as 20%. With support from the California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has performed research on the performance of CO{sub 2} sensing technologies and optical people counters for DCV. In addition, modeling was performed to evaluate the potential energy savings and cost effectiveness of using DCV in general office spaces within the range of California climates. The above-described research has implications for the specifications pertaining to DCV in section 121 of the California Title 24 Standard. Consequently, this document suggests possible changes in these specifications based on the research findings. The suggested changes in specifications were developed in consultation with staff from the Iowa Energy Center who evaluated the accuracy of new CO{sub 2} sensors in laboratory-based research. In addition, staff of the California Energy Commission, and their consultants in the area of DCV, provided input for the suggested changes in specifications.

Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Ocean’s Memory of the Atmosphere: Residence-Time and Ventilation-Rate Distributions of Water Masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptually new approach to diagnosing tracer-independent ventilation rates is developed. Tracer Green functions are exploited to partition ventilation rates according to the ventilated fluid’s residence time in the ocean interior and ...

François W. Primeau; Mark Holzer

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Standard Rates, Budget Office, Brookhaven National Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standard Rates Standard Rates for Brookhaven National Laboratory is available in PDF file formats. This file contains rates for Distributed Technical Services, Scientific Devices...

29

Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bldg. 90 Due to limited energy sources, countries are looking for alternative solutions to decrease energy needs. In that context, natural ventilation can be seen as a very...

30

Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation Standards in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Book of ASTM Standards. Vol. 04.11. American SocietyCalifornia's Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential andSystems" Canadian Standards Association, Mississauga,

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliam, Jennifer A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Ventilation Rates Estimated from Tracers in the Presence of Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intimate relationship among ventilation, transit-time distributions, and transient tracer budgets is analyzed. To characterize the advective–diffusive transport from the mixed layer to the interior ocean in terms of flux we employ a ...

Timothy M. Hall; Thomas W. N. Haine; Darryn W. Waugh; Mark Holzer; Francesca Terenzi; Deborah A. LeBel

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation Standards in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion appliances. The standard also requires an air inlet and glass doors for fireplaces, wood,

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliam, Jennifer A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Title Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 2 Pagination 168-173 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13- week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings

35

Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Performance, Energy, and Associated Economics Title Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Performance, Energy, and Associated Economics Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5035E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Fisk, William J., Douglas R. Black, and Gregory Brunner Journal Building and Environment Volume 47 Pagination 368-372 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords cost-benefit analysis, economizer, health, office, ventilation rate, work performance Abstract This paper provides quantitative estimates of benefits and costs of providing different amounts of outdoor air ventilation in U.S. offices. For four scenarios that modify ventilation rates, we estimated changes in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, work performance, short-term absence, and building energy consumption. The estimated annual economic benefits were $13 billion from increasing minimum ventilation rates (VRs) from 8 to 10 L/s per person, $38 billion from increasing minimum VRs from 8 to 15 L/s per person, and $33 billion from increasing VRs by adding outdoor air economizers for the 50% of the office floor area that currently lacks economizers. The estimated $0.04 billion in annual energy-related benefits of decreasing minimum VRs from 8 to 6.5 L/s per person are very small compared to the projected annual costs of $12 billion. Benefits of increasing minimum VRs far exceeded energy costs while adding economizers yielded health, performance, and absence benefits with energy savings.

36

An ASAE/CSAE Meeting Presentation Paper Number: 044177 Comparison of Direct vs. Indirect Ventilation Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ASAE/CSAE Meeting Presentation Paper Number: 044177 Comparison of Direct vs. Indirect. Direct measurement of ventilation rate in livestock housing can be a formidable task due of a commercial laying hen house with manure belt (manure removed daily) obtained from direct measurement based

Kentucky, University of

37

Modeling attic humidity as a function of weather, building construction, and ventilation rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic model for predicting attic relative humidity (RH) and roof-sheathing moisture content (MC) was developed for microcomputer application. The model accepts standard hourly weather data and building-design parameters as input. Model predictions gave good agreement with measured data from a house located in Madison, Wisconsin. Solar radiation varies with roof orientation and plays an important role in determining moisture transfer to and from the roof sheathing. Opposing roof surfaces must be differentiated in attic humidity models to account for the effect of solar radiation. The model described in this paper is capable of such differentiation. Snow accumulation on a roof can significantly alter the temperature and moisture conditions in an attic, but further research is needed to understand the effect of a snow layer on attic temperatures. Various scenarios were simulated with this model to determine the effect of building practice and ventilation strategies on roof sheathing MC. Direct control of RH in the living space by ventilation is very effective in lowering attic moisture conditions. Where natural ventilation is not adequate, a timer-controlled attic fan shows great promise for ensuring efficient and economical attic ventilation.

Gorman, T.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Summary of human responses to ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

low ventilation rates and increase in health problems:rate. As ventilation rates increase, benefits gained fordetermined that increases in ventilation rates above 10 Ls -

Seppanen, Olli A.; Fisk, William J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Ventilation measurements in large office buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ventilation rates were measured in nine office buildings using an automated tracer gas measuring system. The buildings range in size from a two-story federal building with a floor area of about 20,000 ft/sup 2/ (1900 m/sup 2/) to a 26-story office building with a floor area of 700,000 ft/sup 2/ (65,000 m/sup 2/). The ventilation rates were measured for about 100 hours in each building over a range of weather conditions. The results are presented and examined for variation with time and weather. In most cases, the ventilation rate of a building is similar for hot and cold weather. In mild weather, outdoor air is used to cool the building and the ventilation rate increases. In the buildings where infiltration is a significant portion of the total ventilation rate, this total rate exhibits a dependence on weather conditions. The measured ventilation rates are discussed in relation to the outdoor air intake strategy in each building. The ventilation rates are also compared to the design rates in the buildings and ventilation rates based on the ASHRAE Standard 62-81. Some of the buildings are at times operated at lower ventilation rates than recommended in Standard 62-81.

Persily, A.K.; Grot, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Title Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5968E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., and Iain S. Walker Date Published 12/2012 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, passive ventilation, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health, and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. At the same time we wish to reduce the energy use in homes and therefore minimize the energy used to provide ventilation. This study examined several approaches to reducing the energy requirements of providing acceptable IAQ in residential buildings. Two approaches were taken. The first used RIVEC - the Residential Integrated VEntilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. The second used passive and hybrid ventilation systems, rather than mechanical systems, to provide whole-house ventilation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Title Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-57730 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Russell, Marion L., Max H. Sherman, and Armin F. Rudd Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 13 Start Page Chapter Pagination 325-348 Abstract This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings in North America and a few in Europe. The major technologies reviewed include a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. Key parameters that are related to each system include operating costs, installation costs, ventilation rates, heat recovery potential. It also examines related issues such as infiltration, duct systems, filtration options, noise, and construction issues. This report describes a wide variety of systems currently on the market that can be used to meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2. While these systems generally fall into the categories of supply, exhaust or balanced, the specifics of each system are driven by concerns that extend beyond those in the standard and are discussed. Some of these systems go beyond the current standard by providing additional features (such as air distribution or pressurization control). The market will decide the immediate value of such features, but ASHRAE may wish to consider modifications to the standard in the future.

42

Sensitivity of Ventilation Rates and Radiocarbon Uptake to Subgrid-Scale Mixing in Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of ventilation timescales and radiocarbon (14C) uptake to subgrid-scale mixing parameterization is studied in a global ocean model. Seven experiments are examined that are identical in every manner except their representation of ...

Matthew H. England; Stefan Rahmstorf

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

ASHRAE and residential ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conditioning Engineers. 2001. ASHRAE, “Indoor Air QualityABOUT/IAQ_papr01.htm ASHRAE. “Standard 62.2-2003:Ventilation Requirements. ” ASHRAE Journal, pp. 51- 55, June

Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Changing ventilation rates in U.S. offices: Implications for health, work performance, energy, and associated economics  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides quantitative estimates of benefits and costs of providing different amounts of outdoor air ventilation in U.S. offices. For four scenarios that modify ventilation rates, we estimated changes in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, work performance, short-term absence, and building energy consumption. The estimated annual economic benefits were $13 billion from increasing minimum ventilation rates (VRs) from 8 to 10 L/s per person, $38 billion from increasing minimum VRs from 8 to 15 L/s per person, and $33 billion from increasing VRs by adding outdoor air economizers for the 50% of the office floor area that currently lacks economizers. The estimated $0.04 billion in annual energy-related benefits of decreasing minimum VRs from 8 to 6.5 L/s per person are very small compared to the projected annual costs of $12 billion. Benefits of increasing minimum VRs far exceeded energy costs while adding economizers yielded health, performance, and absence benefits with energy savings.

Fisk, William; Black, Douglas; Brunner, Gregory

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Ventilation and Work Performance in Office Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A). When ventilation rate increases from V to V\\, the ratiowork when ventilation rates increase. Field studies withper 10 L/s person increase in ventilation rate and relative

Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.; Lei, Q.H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Authors Fisk, William J., Mark J. Mendell, Molly Davies, Ekaterina Eliseeva, David Faulkner, Tienzen Hong, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords absence, building s, carbon dioxide, demand - controlled ventilation, energy, indoor air quality, schools, ventilation Abstract This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included:  The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).  Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.

47

Recommended Changes to Specifications for Demand Controlled Ventilation in California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was supported by the California Energy Commission PublicStandards Report to the California Energy Commission PublicLaboratory: Berkeley, CA. California Energy Commission, 2008

Fisk, William J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fume Hoods Standards and Practices Laboratory exhaust ventilation systems designed, constructed, maintained, and used at Cal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for capturing discharges from gas chromatographs, pipe nipples or the end of tubing. However, the effectiveness. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Handbook 45, Standard on Fire Protection for Laboratories Using

de Lijser, Peter

49

Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing...

50

Simulations of Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation Impacts of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... lighting load from ASHRAE Standard 90.1 (ANSI/ASHRAE ... with a nonzero base ventilation rate, such ... and C-T24, will help to temper such exposure. ...

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

51

May 1999 LBNL -42975 ASHRAE'S RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 1999 LBNL - 42975 ASHRAE'S RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION STANDARD: EXEGESIS OF PROPOSED STANDARD 62 Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 April 1999 In January 1999 ASHRAE's Standard Project, approved ASHRAE's first complete standard on residential ventilation for public review

52

HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A REVIEW OF GOVERNMENTAL AND PRIVATE AGENCY ENERGY CONSERVATION INITIATIVES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a recent research project originally concerned with review of governmental initiatives for changes to hospital design and operation standards at both the federal and state levels. However. it quickly became apparent that concern with energy conservation was not impacting hospital environmental standards, especially at the state level, irrespective of the energy implications. Consequently, the study was redirected to consider all energy conservation initiatives directed toward design and operating practices unique to the hospital environment. The scope was limited to agency programs (i.e., not undertaken at the initiative of individual hospitals), applicable to non-federal public and private hospitals.

Banks, Robert S.; Rainer, David

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measured. The local exhaust flows can be measured or can meet prescriptive ducting and fan labeling requirements that use ratings provided by the Home Ventilating Institute (HVI,...

54

RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

while still providing ventilation for adequate indoor air quality. Various ASHRAE Standards (e.g., 62 to the ASHRAE Standard 119 levels while still providing adequate ventilation through infiltration or mechanical alternatives. Various ASHRAE Standards are used to assist us. ASHRAE Standard 119-19885 classifies the envelope

55

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Title Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5889E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., and Max H. Sherman Journal Building and Environment Volume 59 Start Page 456 Pagination 456-465 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, filtration, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, ozone, simulation Abstract Elevated outdoor ozone levels are associated with adverse health effects. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone of outdoor origin would lower population exposures and might also lead to a reduction in ozone---associated adverse health effects. In most buildings, indoor ozone levels are diminished with respect to outdoor levels to an extent that depends on surface reactions and on the degree to which ozone penetrates the building envelope. Ozone enters buildings from outdoors together with the airflows that are driven by natural and mechanical means, including deliberate ventilation used to reduce concentrations of indoor---generated pollutants. When assessing the effect of deliberate ventilation on occupant health one should consider not only the positive effects on removing pollutants of indoor origin but also the possibility that enhanced ventilation might increase indoor levels of pollutants originating outdoors. This study considers how changes in residential ventilation that are designed to comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.2 might influence indoor levels of ozone. Simulation results show that the building envelope can contribute significantly to filtration of ozone. Consequently, the use of exhaust ventilation systems is predicted to produce lower indoor ozone concentrations than would occur with balanced ventilation systems operating at the same air---exchange rate. We also investigated a strategy for reducing exposure to ozone that would deliberately reduce ventilation rates during times of high outdoor ozone concentration while still meeting daily average ventilation requirements.

56

Why We Ventilate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why We Ventilate Why We Ventilate Title Why We Ventilate Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-5093E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Phillip N. Price, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Conference Name Proceedings of the 2011 32nd AIVC Conference and 1st Tightvent Conference Date Published October 2011 Conference Location Brussels, Belgium Keywords indoor environment department, resave, ventilation and air cleaning Abstract It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of "good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

57

Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences  

SciTech Connect

Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Why We Ventilate  

SciTech Connect

It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of"good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Price, Phil N.; Singer, Brett C.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Whole Building Ventilation Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Whole-Building Whole-Building Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Home Performance / Weatherization  Addressing ventilation is the exception  Max tightness, e.g. BPI's "Building Airflow Standard" (BAS)  References ASHRAE 62-89  BAS = Max [0.35 ACH, 15 CFM/person], CFM50 eq.  If BD tests show natural infiltration below BAS...  Ventilation must be recommended or installed.  SO DON'T AIR SEAL TO MUCH! © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Ventilation Requirements Ventilation systems for existing homes that are:

60

Ventilative cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Ventilation Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings....

62

Effect of building airtightness and fan size on the performance of mechanical ventilation systems in new U.S. houses: a critique of ASHRAE standard 62.2-2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as sizing a fan to deliver the design ventilation rate (fans and natural infiltration, in order to properly designfans should be as small as necessary to deliver the effective design

Roberson, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Review of Literature Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

typical existing house. Designed passive ventilation systemsPassive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses."House Ventilation Rates Local Exhaust Rates Air Distribution and Duct Leakage Infiltration Windows and Passive

McWilliams, Jennifer; Sherman, Max

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A SUMMARY OF THE LITERATURE WITH CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS, FY 78 FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~. ASHRAE Transac_tions. standard, E. and R. G. NEVINS. Aquality health criteria and standards. Report No. EPA-600/7-basis of health standards for dwellings. Geneva: World

DeRoos, R.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Sound quality descriptors for HVAC equipment from ARI Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) has several standards that provide methods to evaluate the sound quality of heating ventilating and air?conditioning (HVAC) equipment. These include Standard 270 Sound rating of outdoor unitary equipment

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Why We Ventilate - Recent Advances  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WHY WE VENTILATE: WHY WE VENTILATE: Recent Advances Max Sherman BA Stakeholders meeting ASHRAE BIO  Distinguished Lecturer  Exceptional Service Award  Board of Directors; TechC  Chair of committees:  62.2; Standards Committee  TC 4.3; TC 2.5  Holladay Distinguished Fellow OVERVIEW QUESTIONS  What is Ventilation? What is IAQ?  What functions does it provide?  How much do we need? Why?  How should ventilations standards be made? LBL has working on these problems Who Are You?  Engineers (ASHRAE Members & not);  architects,  contractors,  reps,  builders,  vendors,  code officials WHAT IS VENTILATION  Medicine: To Exchange Air In the Lungs  Latin: Ventilare, "to expose to the wind"  Today: To Bring In Outdoor Air And Replace

67

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Transpired Air Collectors - Ventilation Preheating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many commercial and industrial buildings have high ventilation rates. Although all that fresh air is great for indoor air quality, heating it can be very expensive. This short (2-page) fact sheet describes a technology available to use solar energy to preheat ventilation air and dramatically reduce utility bills.

Christensen, C.

2006-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

69

California abandons standard rates, adopts second price auction approach  

SciTech Connect

The California Public Utility Commission is replacing the standard offers, which encouraged cogeneration and small power in the state, with a bidding system which uses a second price auction approach. Sealed bids to provide electricity at a percentage of projected avoided cost will be submitted, with contracts awarded for needed capacity at the price bid by the lowest losing bidder. The author describes alternative auction strategies and potential pitfalls in the system, particularly the opportunity for delay and the chance that bidding suppliers will try to eliminate competition through underbidding.

Not Available

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

THE EFFECTS OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY AT AN OHIO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inorganic pollutants: carbon dioxides carbon monoxides ozonetotal aldehydes, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfurquality standards. Carbon dioxide concentrations increased

Berk, J.V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... About Circular A-119About Us. Standards. Definition of Standards. Finding Standards. Information on Biometrics Standards.

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Different MechanicalVentilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of dilution depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on work being done to both model the impact of different systems and measurements using a new multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The ultimate objective of this project is to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Effect of building airtightness and fan size on the performance of mechanical ventilation systems in new U.S. houses: a critique of ASHRAE standard 62.2-2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Infiltration. Handbook: Fundamentals. American Societyand Ventilation. Handbook: Fundamentals. American Society ofand Ventilation. Handbook: Fundamentals. American Society of

Roberson, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

ASHRAE and residential ventilation  

SciTech Connect

In the last quarter of a century, the western world has become increasingly aware of environmental threats to health and safety. During this period, people psychologically retreated away from outdoors hazards such as pesticides, smog, lead, oil spills, and dioxin to the seeming security of their homes. However, the indoor environment may not be healthier than the outdoor environment, as has become more apparent over the past few years with issues such as mold, formaldehyde, and sick-building syndrome. While the built human environment has changed substantially over the past 10,000 years, human biology has not; poor indoor air quality creates health risks and can be uncomfortable. The human race has found, over time, that it is essential to manage the indoor environments of their homes. ASHRAE has long been in the business of ventilation, but most of the focus of that effort has been in the area of commercial and institutional buildings. Residential ventilation was traditionally not a major concern because it was felt that, between operable windows and envelope leakage, people were getting enough outside air in their homes. In the quarter of a century since the first oil shock, houses have gotten much more energy efficient. At the same time, the kinds of materials and functions in houses changed in character in response to people's needs. People became more environmentally conscious and aware not only about the resources they were consuming but about the environment in which they lived. All of these factors contributed to an increasing level of public concern about residential indoor air quality and ventilation. Where once there was an easy feeling about the residential indoor environment, there is now a desire to define levels of acceptability and performance. Many institutions--both public and private--have interests in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), but ASHRAE, as the professional society that has had ventilation as part of its mission for over 100 years, is the logical place to provide leadership. This leadership has been demonstrated most recently by the publication of the first nationally recognized standard on ventilation in homes, ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2003, which builds on work that has been part of ASHRAE for many years and will presumably continue. Homeowners and occupants, which includes virtually all of us, will benefit from the application of Standard 62.2 and use of the top ten list. This activity is exactly the kind of benefit to society that the founders of ASHRAE envisioned and is consistent with ASHRAE's mission and vision. ASHRAE members should be proud of their Society for taking leadership in residential ventilation.

Sherman, Max H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Residential ventilation standards scoping study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of new residences. The Hawaii Model Energy Code (HMEC) is aHawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Residential Energy Code

McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Existing and Past Methods of Test and Rating Standards Related to Integrated Heat Pump Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates existing and past US methods of test and rating standards related to electrically operated air, water, and ground source air conditioners and heat pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and under in capacity, that potentiality incorporate a potable water heating function. Two AHRI (formerly ARI) standards and three DOE waivers were identified as directly related. Six other AHRI standards related to the test and rating of base units were identified as of interest, as they would form the basis of any new comprehensive test procedure. Numerous other AHRI and ASHRAE component test standards were also identified as perhaps being of help in developing a comprehensive test procedure.

Reedy, Wayne R. [Sentech, Inc.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Title Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed Year of Publication 2012 Authors Bennett, Deborah H., William J. Fisk, Michael G. Apte, X. Wu, Amber L. Trout, David Faulkner, and Douglas P. Sullivan Journal Indoor Air Volume 22 Issue 4 Pagination 309-20 Abstract This field study of 37 small and medium commercial buildings throughout California obtained information on ventilation rate, temperature, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system characteristics. The study included seven retail establishments; five restaurants; eight offices; two each of gas stations, hair salons, healthcare facilities, grocery stores, dental offices, and fitness centers; and five other buildings. Fourteen (38%) of the buildings either could not or did not provide outdoor air through the HVAC system. The air exchange rate averaged 1.6 (s.d. = 1.7) exchanges per hour and was similar between buildings with and without outdoor air supplied through the HVAC system, indicating that some buildings have significant leakage or ventilation through open windows and doors. Not all buildings had sufficient air exchange to meet ASHRAE 62.1 Standards, including buildings used for fitness centers, hair salons, offices, and retail establishments. The majority of the time, buildings were within the ASHRAE temperature comfort range. Offices were frequently overcooled in the summer. All of the buildings had filters, but over half the buildings had a filter with a minimum efficiency reporting value rating of 4 or lower, which are not very effective for removing fine particles. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Most U.S. commercial buildings (96%) are small- to medium-sized, using nearly 18% of the country's energy, and sheltering a large population daily. Little is known about the ventilation systems in these buildings. This study found a wide variety of ventilation conditions, with many buildings failing to meet relevant ventilation standards. Regulators may want to consider implementing more complete building inspections at commissioning and point of sale.

78

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Title Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5554E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20%, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

79

Passive ventilation for residential air quality control  

SciTech Connect

Infiltration has long served the residential ventilation needs in North America. In Northern Europe it has been augmented by purpose-provided natural ventilation systems--so-called passive ventilation systems--to better control moisture problems in dwellings smaller than their North American counterparts and in a generally wetter climate. The growing concern for energy consumption, and the environmental impacts associated with it, has however led to tighter residential construction standards on both continents and as a result problems associated with insufficient background ventilation have surfaced. Can European passive ventilation systems be adapted for use in North American dwellings to provide general background ventilation for air quality control? This paper attempts to answer this question. The configuration, specifications and performance of the preferred European passive ventilation system--the passive stack ventilation (PSV) system--will be reviewed; innovative components and system design strategies recently developed to improve the traditional PSV system performance will be outlined; and alternative system configurations will be presented that may better serve the climatic extremes and more urban contexts of North America. While these innovative and alternative passive ventilation systems hold great promise for the future, a rational method to size the components of these systems to achieve the control and precision needed to meet the conflicting constraints of new ventilation and air tightness standards has not been forthcoming. Such a method will be introduced in this paper and an application of this method will be presented.

Axley, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

Eric Loros

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

NONE

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation Controlled ventilation keeps energy-efficient homes healthy and comfortable. Learn more about ventilation. Controlled ventilation keeps energy-efficient homes healthy and comfortable. Learn more about ventilation. When creating an energy-efficient, airtight home through air sealing, it's very important to consider ventilation. Unless properly ventilated, an airtight home can seal in indoor air pollutants. Ventilation also helps control moisture-another important consideration for a healthy, energy-efficient home. Featured Whole-House Ventilation A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. Tight, energy-efficient homes require mechanical -- usually whole-house --

83

Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix the air thus the indoor conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of exposure depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on field measurements using a unique multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The paper will derive seven different metrics for the evaluation of air distribution. Measured data from two homes with different levels of natural infiltration will be used to evaluate these metrics for three different ASHRAE Standard 62.2 compliant ventilation systems. Such information can be used to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation of Hydrogen from Buildings: Laboratory Test and Model Validation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive, buoyancy-driven ventilation is one approach to limiting hydrogen concentration. We explored the relationship between leak rate, ventilation design, and hydrogen concentrations.

Barley, C. D.; Gawlik, K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Liquid ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For 350 million years, fish have breathed liquid through gills. Mammals evolved lungs to breathe air. Rarely, circumstances can occur when a mammal needs to `turn back the clock' to breathe through a special liquid medium. This is particularly true if surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung is increased, as in acute lung injury. In this condition, surface tension increases because the pulmonary surfactant system is damaged, causing alveolar collapse, atelectasis, increased right-to-left shunt and hypoxaemia. 69 The aims of treatment are: (i) to offset increased forces causing lung collapse by applying mechanical ventilation with PEEP; (ii) to decrease alveolar surface tension with exogenous surfactant; (iii) to eliminate the air-liquid interface by filling the lung with a fluid in

U. Kaisers; K. P. Kelly; T. Busch

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

C.R. Gorrell

1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

88

On The Valuation of Infiltration towards Meeting Residential Ventilation Needs  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. In most homes, especially existing homes, infiltration provides the dominant fraction of the ventilation. As we seek to provide acceptable indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate nor under-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to correctly evaluate the contribution infiltration makes to both energy consumption and equivalent ventilation. ASHRAE Standards including standards 62, 119, and 136 have all considered the contribution of infiltration in various ways, using methods and data from 20 years ago.

Sherman, Max H.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989: Energy, Cost, and Program Implications.  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 (Standard 62-89) Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality'' is the new heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry consensus for ventilation air in commercial buildings. Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) references ASHRAE Standard 62-81 (the predecessor to Standard 62-89) in their current environmental documents for required ventilation rates. Through its use, it had become evident to Bonneville that Standard 62-81 needed interpretation. Now that the revised Standard (Standard 62-89) is available, its usefulness needs to be evaluated. Based on current information and public comment, the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) revised Standard 62-1981 to Standard 62-89. Bonneville's study estimated the energy and cost implications of ASHRAE Standard 62-89 using simulations based on DOE-2.1D, a computer simulation program which estimates building use hourly as a function of building characteristics and climatic location. Ten types of prototypical commercial buildings used by Bonneville for load forecasting purposes were examined: Large and Small Office, Large and Small Retail, Restaurant, Warehouse, Hospital, Hotel, School, and Grocery. These building characterizations are based on survey and energy metering data and represent average or typical construction and operation practices and mechanical system types. Prototypical building ventilation rates were varied in five steps to estimate the impacts of outside air on building energy use. 11 refs., 14 tabs.

Steele, Tim R.; Brown, Marilyn A.

1990-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989: Energy, Cost, and Program Implications.  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 (Standard 62-89) Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality'' is the new heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry consensus for ventilation air in commercial buildings. Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) references ASHRAE Standard 62-81 (the predecessor to Standard 62-89) in their current environmental documents for required ventilation rates. Through its use, it had become evident to Bonneville that Standard 62-81 needed interpretation. Now that the revised Standard (Standard 62-89) is available, its usefulness needs to be evaluated. Based on current information and public comment, the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) revised Standard 62-1981 to Standard 62-89. Bonneville's study estimated the energy and cost implications of ASHRAE Standard 62-89 using simulations based on DOE-2.1D, a computer simulation program which estimates building use hourly as a function of building characteristics and climatic location. Ten types of prototypical commercial buildings used by Bonneville for load forecasting purposes were examined: Large and Small Office, Large and Small Retail, Restaurant, Warehouse, Hospital, Hotel, School, and Grocery. These building characterizations are based on survey and energy metering data and represent average or typical construction and operation practices and mechanical system types. Prototypical building ventilation rates were varied in five steps to estimate the impacts of outside air on building energy use. 11 refs., 14 tabs.

Steele, Tim R.; Brown, Marilyn A.

1990-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

ON THE STANDARD METABOLIC RATES OF TROPICAL TUNAS, INCLUDING THE EFFECf OF BODY SIZE AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE STANDARD METABOLIC RATES OF TROPICAL TUNAS, INCLUDING THE EFFECf OF BODY SIZE AND ACUTE. This study was undertaken to obtain these data for the tropical tuna species, yellowfin tuna, Tkunnl tuna, KatsltWOO1t8 pelamis, previously published. The effect of acute temperature change on the SMR

92

Energy Impacts of Envelope Tightening and Mechanical Ventilation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or absolute standards along with mechanical ventilation throughout the U.S. housing stock. We used a physics-based modeling framework to simulate the impact of envelope...

93

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

94

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

95

The Ventilated Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adiabatic theories of ocean circulation and density structure have a long tradition, from the concept of the ventilated thermocline to the notion that deep ocean ventilation is controlled by westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. This study ...

Patrick Haertel; Alexey Fedorov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

VENTILATION MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses.

V. Chipman

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools Title Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6259E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Mendell, Mark J., Ekaterina Eliseeva, Morris G. Davies, Michael Spears, Agnes B. Lobscheid, William J. Fisk, and Michael G. Apte Journal Indoor Air Keywords carbon dioxide, Illness absence, indoor environmental quality, schools, ventilation Abstract Limited evidence associates inadequate classroom ventilation rates (VRs) with increased illness absence (IA). We investigated relationships between VRs and IA in Californiaelementary schools over two school years in 162 3rd-5th grade classrooms in 28 schools in three school districts: South Coast (SC), Bay Area (BA), and Central Valley (CV). We estimated relationships between daily IA and VR (estimated from real-time carbon dioxide) in zero-inflated negative binomial models. We also compared IA benefits and energy costs of increased VRs. All school districts had median VRs below the 7.1 L/sec-person California standard. For each additional 1 L/sec-person of VR, IA was reduced significantly (p<0.05) in models for combined districts (-1.6%) and for SC (-1.2%), and non-significantly for districts providing less data: BA (-1.5%) and CV (-1.0%). Assuming associations were causal and generalizable, increasing classroom VRs from the California average (4 L/sec-person) to the State standard would decrease IA by 3.4%, increase attendance-linked funding to schools by $33 million annually, and increase costs only $4 million. Further increasing VRs would provide additional benefits. These findings, while requiring confirmation, suggest that increasing classroom VRs above the State

98

Classroom HVAC: Improving ventilation and saving energy -- field study plan  

SciTech Connect

The primary goals of this research effort are to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a very practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms (CRs) with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research is motivated by the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many CRs are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in CRs. This document provides a summary of the detailed plans developed for the field study that will take place in 2005 to evaluate the energy and IAQ performance of a new classroom HVAC technology. The field study will include measurements of HVAC energy use, ventilation rates, and IEQ conditions in 10 classrooms with the new HVAC technology and in six control classrooms with a standard HVAC system. Energy use and many IEQ parameters will be monitored continuously, while other IEQ measurements will be will be performed seasonally. Continuously monitored data will be remotely accessed via a LonWorks network. Instrument calibration plans that vary with the type of instrumentation used are established. Statistical tests will be employed to compare energy use and IEQ conditions with the new and standard HVAC systems. Strengths of this study plan include the collection of real time data for a full school year, the use of high quality instrumentation, the incorporation of many quality control measures, and the extensive collaborations with industry that limit costs to the sponsors.

Apte, Michael G.; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

99

Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Controlled Ventilation in General Office Spaces in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototypical office building meeting the prescriptive requirements of the 2008 California building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) was used in EnergyPlus simulations to calculate the energy savings potential of demand controlled ventilation (DCV) in five typical California climates per three design occupancy densities and two minimum ventilation rates. The assumed minimum ventilation rates in offices without DCV, based on two different measurement methods employed in a large survey, were 38 and 13 L/s per occupant. The results of the life cycle cost analysis show DCV is cost effective for office spaces if the typical minimum ventilation rate without DCV is 38 L/s per person, except at the low design occupancy of 10.8 people per 100 m2 in climate zones 3 (north coast) and 6 (south Coast). DCV was not found to be cost effective if the typical minimum ventilation rate without DCV is 13 L/s per occupant, except at high design occupancy of 21.5 people per 100 m2 in climate zones 14 (desert) and 16 (mountains). Until the large uncertainties about the base case ventilation rates in offices without DCV are reduced, the case for requiring DCV in general office spaces will be a weak case. Under the Title 24 Standards office occupant density of 10.8 people per 100 m2, DCV becomes cost effective when the base case minimum ventilation rate is greater than 42.5, 43.0, 24.0, 19.0, and 18.0 L/s per person for climate zone 3, 6, 12, 14, and 16 respectively.

Hong, Tianzhen; Fisk, William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

ACT sup 2 project report: Ventilation and air tightness measurement of the Sunset Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation and air tightness measurements made on the test section of the Sunset Building as part of the ACT{sup 2} project. Real-time measurements were made over a two-week period in July 1991 to determine the building's performance; most of the results derive from intensive measurements made during (unoccupied) weekend periods. The ventilation rate of the entire building was measured to be about 2 air changes per hour of outdoor air which exceeds ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 design requirements by over a factor of two. Ventilation in all specific locations was found to be adequate, except for conference rooms -- some of which were significantly under ventilated. Opportunities exist for energy savings with better control of the ventilation. Ventilation efficiency was measured for the test section and selected sub-sections as well. In order to account for interzonal and intrazonal interactions, axillary information was collected and used to adjust the data. The implications of this data may be important for future interpretation of the building's performance.

Sherman, M.; Dickerhoff, D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ACT{sup 2} project report: Ventilation and air tightness measurement of the Sunset Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of ventilation and air tightness measurements made on the test section of the Sunset Building as part of the ACT{sup 2} project. Real-time measurements were made over a two-week period in July 1991 to determine the building`s performance; most of the results derive from intensive measurements made during (unoccupied) weekend periods. The ventilation rate of the entire building was measured to be about 2 air changes per hour of outdoor air which exceeds ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 design requirements by over a factor of two. Ventilation in all specific locations was found to be adequate, except for conference rooms -- some of which were significantly under ventilated. Opportunities exist for energy savings with better control of the ventilation. Ventilation efficiency was measured for the test section and selected sub-sections as well. In order to account for interzonal and intrazonal interactions, axillary information was collected and used to adjust the data. The implications of this data may be important for future interpretation of the building`s performance.

Sherman, M.; Dickerhoff, D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Ventilation | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation Ventilation The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on ventilation air; exhaust air; control strategies; carbon dioxide sensors; economizers. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_ventilation.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Contractor Engineer State: All States Contacts Web Site Policies

103

Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation  

SciTech Connect

In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

De Almeida, A.T. [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dep. Eng. Electrotecnica; Fisk, W.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Building Science - Ventilation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Ventilation Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com Build Tight - Ventilate Right Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Build Tight - Ventilate Right How Tight? What's Right? Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Air Barrier Metrics Material 0.02 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa Assembly 0.20 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa Enclosure 2.00 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa 0.35 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa 0.25 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa 0.15 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Getting rid of big holes 3 ach@50 Getting rid of smaller holes 1.5 ach@50 Getting German 0.6 ach@50 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Best As Tight as Possible - with - Balanced Ventilation Energy Recovery Distribution Source Control - Spot exhaust ventilation Filtration

105

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

Sippola, Mark R.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies  

SciTech Connect

In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.; Bergey, D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Dianne Griffiths April 29, 2013 Presentation Outline * Basic Objectives * Exhaust Systems * Make-up Air Systems Two Primary Ventilation Objectives 1) Providing Fresh Air - Whole-House 2) Removing Pollutants - Local Exhaust Our goal is to find the simplest solution that satisfies both objectives while minimizing cost and energy impacts. Common Solution: Align local exhaust with fresh air requirements (Ex: 25 Bath + 25 Kitchen) Exhaust-Driven Fresh Air Design * Exhaust slightly depressurizes the units * Outside air enters through leaks, cracks, or planned inlets * Widely used in the North Multifamily Ventilation Best Practice * Step 1: Understand ventilation requirements * Step 2: Select the simplest design that can

108

Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standard Standard rock For at least two generations, the depth of underground muon experiments has been reduced to depth in "standard rock." This is by definition the overburden of the Cayuga Rock Salt Mine near Ithaca, New York, where K. Greisen and collaborators made seminal observations of muons at substantial depths[1]. Ref. 1 says only "Most of the ground consists of shales of various types, with average density 2.65 g/cm 2 and average atomic number 11." Menon and Murthy later extended the definition: Z 2 /A = 5.5, Z/A = 0.5, and and ρ = 2.65 g/cm 2 [2]. It was thus not-quite-sodium. Lohmann[3] further assumed the mean excitation energy and density effect parameters were those of calcium carbonate, with no adjustments for the slight density difference. We use their definition for this most important material. (Extracted from D.E. Groom, N.V. Mokhov, and S.I. Striganov,

109

Evaluation of design ventilation requirements for enclosed parking facilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a new design approach to determine the ventilation requirements for enclosed parking garages. The design approach accounts for various factors that affect the indoor air quality within a parking facility, including the average CO emission rate, the average travel time, the number of cars, and the acceptable CO level within the parking garage. This paper first describes the results of a parametric analysis based on the design method that was developed. Then the design method is presented to explain how the ventilation flow rate can be determined for any enclosed parking facility. Finally, some suggestions are proposed to save fan energy for ventilating parking garages using demand ventilation control strategies.

Ayari, A.; Krarti, M.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Natural Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Ventilation Natural Ventilation Natural Ventilation May 30, 2012 - 7:56pm Addthis Opening a window is a simple natural ventilation strategy. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/Simotion Opening a window is a simple natural ventilation strategy. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/Simotion What does this mean for me? If you live in a part of the country with cool nights and breezes, you may be able to cool your house with natural ventilation. If you're building a new home, design it to take advantage of natural ventilation. Natural ventilation relies on the wind and the "chimney effect" to keep a home cool. Natural ventilation works best in climates with cool nights and regular breezes. The wind will naturally ventilate your home by entering or leaving windows, depending on their orientation to the wind. When wind blows against your

111

Residential Ventilation & Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Residential Ventilation & Energy Figure 1: Annual Average Ventilation Costs of the Current U.S. Single-Family Housing Stock ($/year/house). Infiltration and ventilation in dwellings is conventionally believed to account for one-third to one-half of space conditioning energy. Unfortunately, there is not a great deal of measurement data or analysis to substantiate this assumption. As energy conservation improvements to the thermal envelope continue, the fraction of energy consumed by the conditioning of air may increase. Air-tightening programs, while decreasing energy requirements, have the tendency to decrease ventilation and its associated energy penalty at the possible expense of adequate indoor air quality. Therefore, more energy may be spent on conditioning air.

112

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(often required by building codes) will help to reduce your use of air conditioning, and attic fans may also help keep cooling costs down. Learn More Whole-House Ventilation...

113

Effect of building airtightness and fan size on the performance of mechanical ventilation systems in new U.S. houses: a critique of ASHRAE standard 62.2-2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002. When Does a House Need Passive Air Inlets? June. VolStudy on Passive Ventilation in Airtight Houses in Coldsupply. Because houses are so tight, passive vents are a

Roberson, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Typer Lab Houses  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Effectiveness Research Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Tyler Lab Houses Source Of Outside Air, Distribution, Filtration Armin Rudd Twin (almost) Lab Houses at UT-Tyler House 2: Unvented attic, House 1: Vented attic lower loads + PV Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 2 * 1475 ft 2 , 3-bedroom houses * House 2 was mirrored plan * 45 cfm 62.2 ventilation rate * Garage connected to house on only one wall * Access to attic via pull-down stairs in garage * Further access to House 2 unvented attic through gasket sealed door Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 3 Testing Approach  Building enclosure and building mechanical systems characterization by measurement of building enclosure air leakage, central air distribution system airflows, and ventilation system airflows.

115

Development of a Rating System for a Comparative Accelerated Test Standard (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation discusses methods of developing and structuring a useful rating system and communicating the results.

Kurtz, S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Minimum Energy Ventilation for Fast Food Restaurant Kitchens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooking equipment exhaust systems have a significant impact on the energy consumption of fast food restaurants. This research investigated issues that relate to the energy performance of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and demonstrated that significant energy and cost savings can be achieved by reducing ventilation rates.

1996-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Design methods for displacement ventilation: Critical review.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Displacement Ventilation. ASHRAE Research project-RP-949.displacement ventilation. ASHRAE Transaction, 96 (1). Ar ???due to displacement ventilation. ASHRAE Transaction, 96 (1).

Schiavon, Stefano

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals.    (While we could References  ASHRAE  Handbook  of  Fundamentals,  Ch  27, 

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing Indoor Air Quality, ASHRAE Trans.   97(2), pp896?Indoor Air Quality”  ASHRAE Trans.  pp 93?101 Vol.  111 (I) Energy  Characteristics”,  ASHRAE  Transactions, Vol.103 (

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

=2_california_climate_zones/cname=California %20Climate%tailoring for specific climate zones and seasonal variationsaving for the ten climate zones studied, which represents a

Apte, Michael G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial rooftop constant-air-volume direct expansion (DX) cooling units, with natural gas heat. Independent compressor/condenser

Apte, Michael G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

SURVEY OF THE EXISTING APPROACHES TO ASSESS AND DESIGN NATURAL VENTILATION AND NEED FOR FURTHER DEVELOPMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ventilation CIBSE (1986) proposes two analytical expressions for the calculation of the airflow rate for wind-sided ventilation: o Warren (1985) o Phaff & De Gids (1982) o Larsen (2006) Cross ventilation: o CIBSE (1986 and handbooks, as Allard (1996) and CIBSE (2005). Etheridge (2001) proposes the use of graphs and non

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

123

Ventilation Systems Operating Experience Review for Fusion Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for air ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. These experiences are applicable for magnetic and inertial fusion facilities since air ventilation systems are support systems that can be considered generic to nuclear facilities. The report contains descriptions of ventilation system components, operating experiences with these systems, component failure rates, and component repair times. Since ventilation systems have a role in mitigating accident releases in nuclear facilities, these data are useful in safety analysis and risk assessment of public safety. An effort has also been given to identifying any safety issues with personnel operating or maintaining ventilation systems. Finally, the recommended failure data were compared to an independent data set to determine the accuracy of individual values. This comparison is useful for the International Energy Agency task on fusion component failure rate data collection.

L. C. Cadwallader

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification J. Chris Stratton, Iain S. Walker, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5982E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

125

Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System provides heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for the contaminated, potentially contaminated, and uncontaminated areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository's (MGR) Waste Handling Building (WHB). In the uncontaminated areas, the non-confinement area ventilation system maintains the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort. In the contaminated and potentially contaminated areas, in addition to maintaining the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort, the contamination confinement area ventilation system directs potentially contaminated air away from personnel in the WHB and confines the contamination within high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units. The contamination confinement areas ventilation system creates airflow paths and pressure zones to minimize the potential for spreading contamination within the building. The contamination confinement ventilation system also protects the environment and the public by limiting airborne releases of radioactive or other hazardous contaminants from the WHB. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System is designed to perform its safety functions under accident conditions and other Design Basis Events (DBEs) (such as earthquakes, tornadoes, fires, and loss of the primary electric power). Additional system design features (such as compartmentalization with independent subsystems) limit the potential for cross-contamination within the WHB. The system provides status of important system parameters and equipment operation, and provides audible and/or visual indication of off-normal conditions and equipment failures. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System confines the radioactive and hazardous material within the building such that the release rates comply with regulatory limits. The system design, operations, and maintenance activities incorporate ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principles to maintain personnel radiation doses to all occupational workers below regulatory limits and as low as is reasonably achievable. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System by being located within the WHB and by maintaining specific pressures, temperatures, and humidity within the building. The system also depends on the WHB for water supply. The system interfaces with the Site Radiological Monitoring System for continuous monitoring of the exhaust air; the Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System for detection of fire and smoke; the Waste Handling Building Electrical System for normal, emergency, and standby power; and the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control of the system.

P.A. Kumar

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

WASTE TREATMENT BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System provides heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for the contaminated, potentially contaminated, and uncontaminated areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository's (MGR) Waste Treatment Building (WTB). In the uncontaminated areas, the non-confinement area ventilation system maintains the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort. In the contaminated and potentially contaminated areas, in addition to maintaining the proper environmental conditions for personnel comfort and equipment operation, the contamination confinement area ventilation system directs potentially contaminated air away from personnel in the WTB and confines the contamination within high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units. The contamination confinement area ventilation system creates airflow paths and pressure zones to minimize the potential for spreading contamination with the building. The contamination confinement ventilation system also protects the environment and the public by limiting airborne releases of radioactive or other hazardous contaminants from the WTB. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System confines the radioactive and hazardous material within the building such that the release rates comply with regulatory limits, The system design, operations, and maintenance activities incorporate ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principles to maintain personnel radiation doses to all occupational workers below regulatory limits and as low as is reasonably achievable. The system provides status of important system parameters and equipment operation, and provides audible and/or visual indication of off-normal conditions and equipment failures. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Waste Treatment Building System by being located in the WTB, and by maintaining specific pressure, temperature, and humidity environments within the building. The system also depends on the WTB for normal electric power supply and the required supply of water for heating, cooling, and humidification. Interface with the Waste Treatment Building System includes the WTB fire protection subsystem for detection of fire and smoke. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Site Radiological Monitoring System for continuous monitoring of the exhaust air and key areas within the WTB, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control of system operations, and the Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System and Site Generated Hazardous, Non-Hazardous & Sanitary Waste Disposal System for routing of pretreated toxic, corrosive, and radiologically contaminated effluent from process equipment to the HEPA filter exhaust ductwork and air-cleaning unit.

P.A. Kumar

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

128

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches  

SciTech Connect

The prevailing residential ventilation standard in North America, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specifies volumetric airflow requirements as a function of the overall size of the home and the number of bedrooms, assumes a fixed, minimal amount of infiltration, and requires mechanical ventilation to achieve the remainder. The standard allows for infiltration credits and intermittent ventilation patterns that can be shown to provide comparable performance. Whole-house ventilation methods have a substantial effect on time-varying indoor pollutant concentrations. If alternatives specified by Standard 62.2, such as intermittent ventilation, are used, short-term pollutant concentrations could exceed acute health standards even if chronic health standards are met.The authors present a methodology for comparing ASHRAE- and non-ASHRAE-specified ventilation scenarios on relative indoor pollutant concentrations. We use numerical modeling to compare the maximum time-averaged concentrations for acute exposure relevant (1-hour, 8-hour, 24-hour ) and chronic exposure relevant (1-year) time periods for four different ventilation scenarios in six climates with a range of normalized leakage values. The results suggest that long-term concentrations are the most important metric for assessing the effectiveness of whole-house ventilation systems in meeting exposure standards and that, if chronic health exposure standards are met, acute standards will also be met.

Sherman, Max; Logue, Jennifer; Singer, Brett

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Laboratory Evaluation of Energy Recovery Ventilators  

SciTech Connect

As deep retrofit measures and new construction practices are realizing lower infiltration levels in increasingly tighter envelopes, performance issues can arise with water vapor intrusion in building envelopes and the operation of exhaust only appliances in a depressurized home. Unbalancing (reducing exhaust airflows) of an energy recovery ventilator (ERV) can provide a means to supply makeup air and reduce the level of home depressurization to mitigate these issues, helping realize exhaust-only appliance rated performance, achieve safe atmospherically vented combustion, and/or improve envelope durability. ERV balanced flow operation is well documented, but there is not public domain information available that empirically establishes the effect of unbalanced flow on sensible and latent exchange, especially in the now dominant membrane type ERV used in residential applications. This laboratory evaluation focused on unbalanced flow performance of a membrane type ERV delivering 200 standard cubic feet per minute (SCFM )of supply air. The dataset generated yielded a limited set of curve fit algorithms for unbalanced flow performance that can be used to supplement current modeling approaches in simulation tools like EnergyPlus. Building America BA teams can then utilize such models to analyze whole house effects and determine best practices associated with unbalanced ERV operations.

Kosar, D.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Upgrade energy building standards and develop rating system for existing low-income housing  

SciTech Connect

The city of Memphis Division of Housing and Community Development (HCD) receives grant funding each year from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to provide local housing assistance to low-income residents. Through the years, HCD has found that many of the program recipients have had difficulty in managing their households, particularly in meeting monthly financial obligations. One of the major operating costs to low-income households is the utility bill. Furthermore, HCD`s experience has revealed that many low-income residents are simply unaware of ways to reduce their utility bill. Most of the HCD funds are distributed to low-income persons as grants or no/low interest loans for the construction or rehabilitation of single-family dwellings. With these funds, HCD builds 80 to 100 new houses and renovates about 500 homes each year. Houses constructed or renovated by HCD must meet HUD`s minimum energy efficiency standards. While these minimum standards are more than adequate to meet local building codes, they are not as aggressive as the energy efficiency standards being promoted by the national utility organizations and the home building industry. Memphis Light, Gas and Water (MLGW), a city-owned utility, has developed an award-winning program named Comfort Plus which promotes energy efficiency{open_quote} in new residential construction. Under Comfort Plus, MLGW models house plans on computer for a fee and recommends cost-effective alterations which improve the energy efficiency of the house. If the builder agrees to include these recommendations, MLGW will certify the house and guarantee a maximum annual heating/cooling bill for two years. While the Comfort Plus program has received recognition in the new construction market, it does not address the existing housing stock.

Muller, D.; Norville, C. [Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Development of a Dedicated 100 Percent Ventilation Air Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of using dedicated 100 percent ventilation makeup air conditioning units to meet indoor air quality standards is attractive because of the inherent advantages. However, it is challenging to design and build direct expansion unitary equipment for this purpose. EPRI teamed with ClimateMaster to develop and test a prototype of a vapor compression heat pump to advance the state of the art in such equipment. The prototype unit provides deep dehumidification and cooling of ventilation air in the su...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

132

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable ClassroomField Study Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goals of this research effort are to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a very practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research is motivated by the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This report presents an interim status update and preliminary findings from energy and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) measurements in sixteen relocatable classrooms in California. The field study includes measurements of HVAC energy use, ventilation rates, and IEQ conditions. Ten of the classrooms were equipped with a new HVAC technology and six control classrooms were equipped with a standard HVAC system. Energy use and many IEQ parameters have been monitored continuously, while unoccupied acoustic measurements were measured in one of four planned seasonal measurement campaigns. Continuously monitored data are remotely accessed via a LonWorks{reg_sign} network and stored in a relational database at LBNL. Preliminary results are presented here.

Apte, Michael G.; Buchanan, Ian S.; Faulkner, David; Hotchi,Toshifumi; Spears,Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy  

SciTech Connect

Approximately ten percent of the energy consumed in U.S. commercial buildings is used by HVAC systems to condition outdoor ventilation air. Reducing ventilation rates would be a simple and broadly-applicable energy retrofit option, if practical counter measures were available that maintained acceptable concentrations of indoor-generated air pollutants. The two general categories of countermeasures are: 1) indoor pollutant source control, and 2) air cleaning. Although pollutant source control should be used to the degree possible, source control is complicated by the large number and changing nature of indoor pollutant sources. Particle air cleaning is already routinely applied in commercial buildings. Previous calculations indicate that particle filtration consumes only 10percent to 25percent of the energy that would otherwise be required to achieve an equivalent amount of particle removal with ventilation. If cost-effective air cleaning technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also available, outdoor air ventilation rates could be reduced substantially and broadly in the commercial building stock to save energy. The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel VOC air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. The minimum required VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50percent reduction in ventilation rate for air cleaning systems installed in the HVAC supply airstream is modest (generally 20percent or less).

Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

134

Experimental Evaluation of a Downsized Residential Air Distribution System: Comfort and Ventilation Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

Good air mixing not only improves thermal comfort Human thermal comfort is the state of mind that expresses satisfaction with the surrounding environment, according to ASHRAE Standard 55. Achieving thermal comfort for most occupants of buildings or other enclosures is a goal of HVAC design engineers. but also enhances ventilation effectiveness by inducing uniform supply-air diffusion. In general, the performance of an air distribution system in terms of comfort and ventilation effectiveness is influenced by the supply air temperature, velocity, and flow rate, all of which are in part dictated by the HVAC (Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning) In the home or small office with a handful of computers, HVAC is more for human comfort than the machines. In large datacenters, a humidity-free room with a steady, cool temperature is essential for the trouble-free system as well as the thermal load attributes. Any potential deficiencies associated with these design variables can be further exacerbated by an improper proximity of the supply and return outlets with respect to the thermal and geometrical characteristics of the indoor space. For high-performance houses, the factors influencing air distribution performance take on an even greater significance because of a reduced supply-air design flow rate resulting from downsized HVAC systems.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Ventilating system for reprocessing of nuclear fuel rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a nuclear facility such as a reprocessing plant for nuclear fuel rods, the central air cleaner discharging ventilating gas to the atmosphere must meet preselected standards not only as to the momentary concentration of radioactive components, but also as to total quantity per year. In order to comply more satisfactorily with such standards, reprocessing steps are conducted by remote control in a plurality of separate compartments. The air flow for each compartment is regulated so that the air inventory for each compartment has a slow turnover rate of more than a day but less than a year, which slow rate is conveniently designated as quasihermetic sealing. The air inventory in each such compartment is recirculated through a specialized processing unit adapted to cool and/or filter and/or otherwise process the gas. Stale air is withdrawn from such recirculating inventory and fresh air is injected (eg., By the less than perfect sealing of a compartment) into such recirculating inventory so that the air turnover rate is more than a day but less than a year. The amount of air directed through the manifold and duct system from the reprocessing units to the central air cleaner is less than in reprocessing plants of conventional design.

Szulinski, M.J.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

136

VENTILATION (HVAC) FAILURE (BUILDING WIDE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VENTILATION (HVAC) FAILURE (BUILDING WIDE) A failure or shutdown of the ventilation system will be signaled by cessation of the audible background "rumbling" sound of the building's HVAC system. As building durations. NOTE: Due to unpredictable pressure differentials in and around the labs during an HVAC failure

Strynadka, Natalie

137

Innovative Energy Efficient Industrial Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper was written to describe an innovative “on-demand” industrial ventilation system for woodworking, metalworking, food processing, pharmaceutical, chemical, and other industries. Having analyzed existing industrial ventilation in 130 factories, we found striking dichotomy between the classical “static” design of ventilation systems and constantly changing workflow and business demands. Using data from real factories, we are able to prove that classical industrial ventilation design consumes 70 % more energy than necessary. Total potential electricity saving achieved by using on-demand systems instead of classically designed industrial ventilation in the U.S. could be 26 billion kWh. At the average electricity cost of 7 cents per kWh, this would represent $1.875 billion. Eighty such systems are already installed in the USA and European Union.

Litomisky, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Infiltration as ventilation: Weather-induced dilution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infiltration as ventilation: Weather-induced dilution Title Infiltration as ventilation: Weather-induced dilution Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5795E Year of...

139

Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 11:50am Addthis Photo of a dark brown perforated metal...

140

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom Field Study Interim Report Title Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom Field Study Interim...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

air quality. There are four basic mechanical whole-house ventilation systems -- exhaust, supply, balanced, and energy recovery. Comparison of Whole-House Ventilation Systems...

142

RESIDENTIAL INTEGRATED VENTILATION ENERGY CONTROLLER - Energy ...  

A residential controller is described which is used to manage the mechanical ventilation systems of a home, installed to meet whole-house ventilation requirements, at ...

143

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses. ”Passive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses."

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

designs of personalized ventilation, International Journal of heating, Ventilation and Refrigeration

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing > RATES Marketing > RATES RATES Current Rates Past Rates 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Rates Schedules Power CV-F13 CPP-2 Transmissions CV-T3 CV-NWT5 PACI-T3 COTP-T3 CV-TPT7 CV-UUP1 Ancillary CV-RFS4 CV-SPR4 CV-SUR4 CV-EID4 CV-GID1 Future and Other Rates SNR Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K)

146

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning & Projects Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing > RATES Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current Rates Power Revenue Requirement Worksheet (FY 2014) (Oct 2013 - Sep 2014) (PDF - 30K) PRR Notification Letter (Sep 27, 2013) (PDF - 959K) FY 2012 FP% True-Up Calculations(PDF - 387K) Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) PRR Forecast FY14-FY17 (May 23, 2013) (PDF - 100K) Forecasted Transmission Rates (May 2013) (PDF - 164K) Past Rates 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Historical CVP Transmission Rates (April 2013) (PDF - 287K) Rate Schedules Power - CV-F13 - CPP-2 Transmission - CV-T3 - CV-NWT5 - PACI-T3 - COTP-T3 - CV-TPT7 - CV-UUP1 Ancillary - CV-RFS4 - CV-SPR4 - CV-SUR4 - CV-EID4 - CV-GID1 Federal Register Notices - CVP, COTP and PACI

147

Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2011 , 2011 Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-324-9601; Pass code: 5551971 Download the presentation at: www.buildingamerica.gov/meetings.html Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Building America: Introduction November 1, 2011 Cheryn Engebrecht Cheryn.engebrecht@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved * Accelerate adoption of high performance technologies

148

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Title Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5796E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Date Published 06/2012 Abstract Changing the rate of airflow through a home affects the annual thermal conditioning energy.Large-scale changes to airflow rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the energy consumption of the residential energy sector. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models hampers the ability to estimate the impact of policy changes on a state or nationwide level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study was designed to combine the output of simple airflow models and a limited set of home characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modelers to use existing databases of home characteristics to determine the impact of policy on ventilation at a population scale. In this report, we describe the IVE model and demonstrate that its estimates of energy change are comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model when applied to homes with limited parameterization. Homes with extensive parameterization would be more accurately characterized by complex residential energy models. The demonstration included a range of home types, climates, and ventilation systems that cover a large fraction of the residential housing sector.

149

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RATES RATES Rates Document Library SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K) Appendix D - Western Transmission System Facilities Map (PDF - 274K) Appendix E - Estimated FY12 FP and BR Customer (PDF - 1144K) Appendix F - Forecasted Replacements and Additions FY11 - FY16 (PDF - 491K) Appendix G - Definitions (PDF - 1758K) Appendix H - Acronyms (PDF - 720K)

150

Effect of building airtightness and fan size on the performance of mechanical ventilation systems in new U.S. houses: a critique of ASHRAE standard 62.2-2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vol 22, No 6. pg 10-11. 2003. ASHRAE 62.2 Recommended for6, 7, 10, 33, 37. ANSI/ASHRAE. 1988 (RA 94). Standard 119–Inc. , Atlanta GA. ANSI/ASHRAE. 1993 (RA 2001). Standard

Roberson, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, Ventilation andleakage. The ASHRAE Handbook of fundamentals (ASHRAE 2009),

Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

154

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

155

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

156

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

157

Status of Revisions to ASHRAE Standard 62  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62- 1989 "Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor air Quality", adopted in 1989, is widely used by HVAC engineers to determine ventilation rates for various occupancies. This standard has also been cited in court to help demonstrate compliance with state-of the- art indoor environmental design. In August 1996, ASHRAE released for public review Standard 62-1989R, the highly controversial proposed revisions to the Standard 62- 1989. Over 8,000 comments were received on the proposed revision. Due to the significant number of concerns expressed by ASHRAE members as well as others, ASHRAE withdrew the proposed new standard and placed the current standard in "continuous maintenance." As part of the continuous maintenance process ASHRAE is transforming the current Standard 62- 1989 from a design standard to code ready document. Furthermore, two code documents will be produced4ne for low-rise residential buildings and another for other types of occupancy. Finally, two new documents, a user's manual and an IAQ guideline, will be written concurrent with the code documents. The guideline document is intended to provide state-of-the-art guidance to designers while good IAQ practices not appropriate for codification will be incorporated into the guideline. It is likely that many of the provision in Standard 62-1989R will survive in some manner in one or more of the new documents to be produced. This paper will detail some of the more significant changes that were proposed in Standard 62-1989R and review the current state of standard development.

Gallo, F. M.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Demonstration of Demand Control Ventilation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Control Ventilation (DCV) is one of the control strategies that can be used modulate the amount of ventilation air for space conditioning in commercial buildings. DCV modulates the amount of ventilation air introduced into the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system based on carbon dioxide levels sensed in the areas served. The carbon dioxide level is a proxy for the number of people within the space, from which the required quantity of ventilation air is determined. By using this ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Air Exchange Rates in New Energy-Efficient Manufactured Housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the 1989-1990 heating season, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, for the Bonneville Power Administration, measured the ventilation characteristics of 139 newly constructed energy-efficient manufactured homes and a control sample of 35 newer manufactured homes. A standard door fan pressurization technique was used to estimate shell leakiness, and a passive perfluorocarbon tracer technique was used to estimate overall air exchange rates. A measurement of the designated whole-house exhaust system flow rate was taken as well as an occupant and structure survey. The energy-efficient manufactured homes have very low air exchange rates, significantly lower than either existing manufactured homes or site-built homes. The standard deviation of the effective leakage area for this sample of homes is small (25% to 30% of the mean), indicating that the leakiness of manufactured housing stock can be confidently characterized by the mean value. There is some indication of increased ventilation due to the energy-efficient whole-house ventilation specification, but not directly related to the operation of the wholehouse system. The mechanical systems as installed and operated do not provide the intended ventilation; consequently indoor air quality could possibly be adversely impacted and moisture/condensation in the living space is a potential problem.

Hadley, D. L.; Bailey, S. A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ventilation Model and Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This model and analysis report develops, validates, and implements a conceptual model for heat transfer in and around a ventilated emplacement drift. This conceptual model includes thermal radiation between the waste package and the drift wall, convection from the waste package and drift wall surfaces into the flowing air, and conduction in the surrounding host rock. These heat transfer processes are coupled and vary both temporally and spatially, so numerical and analytical methods are used to implement the mathematical equations which describe the conceptual model. These numerical and analytical methods predict the transient response of the system, at the drift scale, in terms of spatially varying temperatures and ventilation efficiencies. The ventilation efficiency describes the effectiveness of the ventilation process in removing radionuclide decay heat from the drift environment. An alternative conceptual model is also developed which evaluates the influence of water and water vapor mass transport on the ventilation efficiency. These effects are described using analytical methods which bound the contribution of latent heat to the system, quantify the effects of varying degrees of host rock saturation (and hence host rock thermal conductivity) on the ventilation efficiency, and evaluate the effects of vapor and enhanced vapor diffusion on the host rock thermal conductivity.

V. Chipman

2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Revised fact sheet describes the transpired solar collector that was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

162

Classroom HVAC: Improving ventilation and saving energy -- field study plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this study. Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation andV8doc.sas.com/sashtml. Classroom HVAC: Improving VentilationBerkeley, CA 94720. Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation

Apte, Michael G.; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

On The Valuation of Infiltration towards Meeting Residential Ventilation Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Literature Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements”.A. 2005. “Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies”,M.H. and Matson N.E. , “Residential Ventilation and Energy

Sherman, Max H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Effect of building airtightness and fan size on the performance of mechanical ventilation systems in new U.S. houses: a critique of ASHRAE standard 62.2-2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pg 4. 2000c. Industry News: Vermont to Require Mechanicalpgs 816-827. ICCI. 2003. Vermont Residential Building EnergyNew Construction in Vermont: A Review of Codes, Standards,

Roberson, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses  

SciTech Connect

A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Positive Pressure Ventilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to the fire and can increase the rate of heat and energy being released. ... of vents open were altered to examine capability and optimization of each. ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weightavg_rates.html California Energy Commission. 2005. “of Regulations: California's Energy Efficiency Standards forBuildings. ” California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA.

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Effect of building airtightness and fan size on the performance of mechanical ventilation systems in new U.S. houses: a critique of ASHRAE standard 62.2-2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining Air Leakage Rate by Fan Pressurization. Americanof Building Envelopes by the Fan Pressurization Method.Dominated by Strong Exhaust Fan. ASHRAE Transactions. Vol

Roberson, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Midlevel Ventilation’s Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a tropical cyclone’s intensity. An idealized framework based ...

Brian Tang; Kerry Emanuel

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation May 30, 2012 - 2:37pm Addthis A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. What does this mean for me? Whole-house ventilation is critical in an energy-efficient home to maintain adequate indoor air quality and comfort. The whole-house ventilation system you choose will depend upon your climate, budget, and the availability of experienced contractors in your area. Energy-efficient homes -- both new and existing -- require mechanical ventilation to maintain indoor air quality. There are four basic mechanical

171

Ventilation Controller for Improved Indoor Air Quality  

Iain Walker and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have developed a dynamic control system for whole-house ventilation fans that provides maximal air quality while reducing by 18-44% the energy spent on ventilation. The system, the Residential Integrated ...

172

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. References ASHRAE.2009. ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, Ventilation andChapter. Atlanta GA: ASHRAE. ASHRAE. 2007. “Ventilation and

Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Modeling study of ventilation, IAQ and energy impacts of residential mechanical ventilation  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a simulation study of indoor air quality, ventilation and energy impacts of several mechanical ventilation approaches in a single-family residential building. The study focused on a fictitious two-story house in Spokane, Washington and employed the multizone airflow and contaminant dispersal model CONTAM. The model of the house included a number of factors related to airflow including exhaust fan and forced-air system operation, duct leakage and weather effects, as well as factors related to contaminant dispersal including adsorption/desorption of water vapor and volatile organic compounds, surface losses of particles and nitrogen dioxide, outdoor contaminant concentrations, and occupant activities. The contaminants studied include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor, fine and coarse particles, and volatile organic compounds. One-year simulations were performed for four different ventilation approaches: a base case of envelope infiltration only, passive inlet vents in combination with exhaust fan operation, an outdoor intake duct connected to the forced-air system return balanced by exhaust fan operation, and a continuously-operated exhaust fan. Results discussed include whole building air change rates, air distribution within the house, heating and cooling loads, contaminants concentrations, and occupant exposure to contaminants.

Persily, A.K.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Ventilation Based on ASHRAE 62.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor Ventilation Based on ASHRAE 62.2 Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor California Energy Commission Ventilation (ASHRAE 62.2) Minimum Best Practices Guide - Exhaust-Only Ventilation Introduction: The California Energy Commission has created the following guide to provide assistance in complying with ANSI/ASHRAE

175

Ventilation problems in heritage buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The control of indoor conditions in heritage buildings, such as castles or museums, is of paramount importance for the proper preservation of the artworks kept in. As heritage buildings are often not equipped with HVAC systems, it is necessary to provide ... Keywords: CO2 concentration, IAQ, heritage buildings, ventilation

S. Costanzo; A. Cusumano; C. Giaconia; S. Mazzacane

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the UnitedStates  

SciTech Connect

The first and only national norm for residential ventilation in the United States is Standard 62.2-2004 published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This standard does not by itself have the force of regulation, but is being considered for adoption by various jurisdictions within the U.S. as well as by various voluntary programs. The adoption of 62.2 would require mechanical ventilation systems to be installed in virtually all new homes, but allows for a wide variety of design solutions. These solutions, however, may have a different energy costs and non-energy benefits. This report uses a detailed simulation model to evaluate the energy impacts of currently popular and proposed mechanical ventilation approaches that are 62.2 compliant for a variety of climates. These results separate the energy needed to ventilate from the energy needed to condition the ventilation air, from the energy needed to distribute and/or temper the ventilation air. The results show that exhaust systems are generally the most energy efficient method of meeting the proposed requirements. Balanced and supply systems have more ventilation resulting in greater energy and their associated distribution energy use can be significant.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Standard practice for measurement of the glass dissolution rate using the single-pass flow-through test method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice describes a single-pass flow-through (SPFT) test method that can be used to measure the dissolution rate of a homogeneous silicate glass, including nuclear waste glasses, in various test solutions at temperatures less than 100°C. Tests may be conducted under conditions in which the effects from dissolved species on the dissolution rate are minimized to measure the forward dissolution rate at specific values of temperature and pH, or to measure the dependence of the dissolution rate on the concentrations of various solute species. 1.2 Tests are conducted by pumping solutions in either a continuous or pulsed flow mode through a reaction cell that contains the test specimen. Tests must be conducted at several solution flow rates to evaluate the effect of the flow rate on the glass dissolution rate. 1.3 This practice excludes static test methods in which flow is simulated by manually removing solution from the reaction cell and replacing it with fresh solution. 1.4 Tests may be conducted wit...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Title Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2005 Authors Apte, Michael G., Ian S. Buchanan, David Faulkner, William J. Fisk, Chi-Ming Lai, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms

179

HVAC System Design Strategies to Address Indoor Air Quality Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes strategies that can be employed in the design and operation of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems to address the ASHRAE Standard 62 "Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality" requirements. The report examines a wide variety of approaches to meeting the standard and their impact on energy consumption, occupant comfort, and other factors.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

180

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, in exit ventilation ducts, from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Initially, methods were developed to cool fire-heated air by fine water spray upstream of the filters. It was recognized that smoke aerosol exposure to HEPA filters could also cause disruption of the containment system. Through testing and analysis, several methods to partially mitigate the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified. A continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. The technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total time duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modification of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, rolling filter media were laminated with the desired properties. The approach was Edisonian, but truncation in short order to a combination of prefilters was effective. The application of this technique was qualified, since it is of use only to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols. It is not believed that this technique is cost effective in the total spectrum of containment systems, especially if standard fire protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high-fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

Alvares, N.; Beason, D.; Bergman, V.; Creighton, J.; Ford, H.; Lipska, A.

1980-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent). The original ventilation design for the project was provided by a local engineer and consisted of a single large heat recovery ventilator (HRV) located in a mechanical room in the basement with a centralized duct system providing supply air to the main living space and exhausting stale air from the single bathroom in each apartment. This design was deemed to be far too costly to install and operate for several reasons: the large central HRV was oversized and the specified flows to each apartment were much higher than the ASHRAE 62.2 rate; an extensive system of ductwork, smoke and fire dampers, and duct chases were specified; ductwork required a significant area of dropped ceilings; and the system lacked individual ventilation control in the apartments

Metzger, C.; Ueno, K.; Kerrigan, P.; Wytrykowska, H.; Van Straaten, R.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Available Technologies: Ventilation Controller for Improved Indoor ...  

Iain Walker and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have developed a dynamic control system for whole-house ventilation fans that provides maximal air quality while reducing ...

184

Case Study 1 - Ventilation in Manufactured Houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ventilation in Manufactured Houses. ... fan operation, an outdoor air intake duct installed on the forced-air return, and whole house exhaust with and ...

185

Summary of human responses to ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coils of commercial air-conditioning systems. Proceedings ofrefrigerating and air-conditioning engineers, inc. pp 601-for ventilation and air-conditioning systems - offices and

Seppanen, Olli A.; Fisk, William J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Mixed-Mode Ventilation and Building Retrofits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 1994, ENTPE, Lyon. [CIBSE] Chartered Institution ofMixed-mode ventilation. CIBSE Applications Manual AM13.incorporated by the design. CIBSE, 2000 Mixed-mode

Brager, Gail; Ackerly, Katie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Indoor Air Quality & Ventilation Group Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation Group Staff. Staff Listing. Dr. Andrew K. Persily, Leader, Supervisory Mechanical Engineer, 301-975-6418. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective? Maxmanufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitutethe University of California. Does Mixing Make Residential

Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Analysis of Demand Controlled Ventilation Technology and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The actual health, comfort, and productivity impacts of mechanical ventilation ... p strat i csp o ... in California and elsewhere is the impact of ambient air ...

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

190

Mobile zone, spray booth ventilation system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This concept endeavors to reduce the volume of air (to be treated) from spray paint booths, thereby increasing efficiency and improving air pollution abatement (VOC emissions especially). Most of the ventilation air is recycled through the booth to maintain laminar flow; the machinery is located on the supply side of the booth rather than on the exhaust side. 60 to 95% reduction in spray booth exhaust rate should result. Although engineering and production prototypes have been made, demand is low.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

191

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and operations and maintenance documentation. 28. Baker, R.C. 2000. "Flow Measurement Handbook: Industrial Designs, Operating Principles, Performance, and Applications". New...

192

Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation Standards in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doors for fireplaces, wood, pellet and gas stoves. Whenfireplace and each wood, pellet or gas stove. The Minnesota

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliam, Jennifer A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Commissioning Ventilated Containment Systems in the Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This Best Practices Guide focuses on the specialized approaches required for ventilated containment systems, understood to be all components that drive and control ventilated enclosures and local exhaust systems within the laboratory. Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

Not Available

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system  

SciTech Connect

This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Ventilation Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products

196

CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial Buildings Title CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year...

197

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Title Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and...

198

Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools Title Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A...

199

Why We Ventilate Our Houses - An Historical Look  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The knowledge of how to ventilate buildings, and how much ventilation is necessary for human health and comfort, has evolved over centuries of trial and error. Humans and...

200

Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification Title Measuring Residential Ventilation System...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Title Improving Ventilation and Saving...

202

Demand-Controlled Ventilation Using CO2 Sensors - Federal Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fresh air in a building can be a problem. Over ventilation results in higher energy usage and costs than are necessary with appropriate ventilation while potentially increasing...

203

Effect of attic ventilation on the performance of radiant barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the experiments was to quantify how attic ventilation would affect the performance of a radiant barrier. Ceiling heat flux and space cooling load were both measured. Results of side-by-side radiant barrier experiments using two identical 13.38 m[sup 2] (nominal) test houses are presented in this paper. The test houses responded similarly to weather variations. Indoor temperatures of the test houses were controlled to within 0.2 [degrees] C. Ceiling heat fluxes and space cooling load were within a 2.5 percent difference between both test houses. The results showed that a critical attic ventilation flow rate of 1.3 (1/sec)/m[sup 2] of the attic floor existed after which the percentage reduction in ceiling heat fluxes produced by the radiant barriers did not change with increasing attic airflow rates. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barriers were between 25 and 35 percent, with 28 percent being the percent reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. The space-cooling load reductions observed were between two to four percent. All results compiled in this paper were for attics with unfaced fiberglass insulation with a resistance level of 3.35 m[sup 2]K/W (nominal) and for a perforated radiant barrier with low emissivities (less than 0.05) on both sides.

Medina, M.A.; O'Neal, D.L. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Turner, W.D. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Coll. of Engineering)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Potential for Wind Induced Ventilation to Meet Occupant Comfort Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a simple graphic tool that enables a building designer to evaluate the potential for wind induced ventilation cooling in several climate zones. Long term weather data were analyzed to determine the conditions for which available wind speed can be used to meet occupant comfort conditions. By calculating the change in enthalpy produced by a typical residential air conditioner during those hours when an occupant is uncomfortable, we were able to estimate the impact of natural ventilation on building cooling load. The graphic presentation of the results allows a designer to determine the potential energy savings of increasing the ventilation air flow rate as well as the orientation of building openings that will maximize ventilation cooling of the building occupants.

Byrne, S. J.; Huang, Y. J.; Ritschard, R. L.; Foley, D. M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Test Plan to Evaluate the Relationship Among IAQ, Comfort, Moisture, and Ventilation in Humid Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This experimental plan describes research being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in coordinatation with Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), Florida HERO, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to evaluate the impact of ventilation rate on interior moisture levels, temperature distributions, and indoor air contaminant concentrations. Specifically, the research team will measure concentrations of indoor air contaminants, ventilation system flow rates, energy consumption, and temperature and relative humidity in ten homes in Gainesville, FL to characterize indoor pollutant levels and energy consumption associated with the observed ventilation rates. PNNL and FSEC have collaboratively prepared this experimental test plan, which describes background and context for the proposed study; the experimental design; specific monitoring points, including monitoring equipment, and sampling frequency; key research questions and the associated data analysis approach; experimental logistics, including schedule, milestones, and team member contact information; and clearly identifies the roles and responsibilities of each team in support of project objectives.

Widder, Sarah H.; Martin, Eric

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Environmental Evaluation on Atmosphere Radioactive Pollution of Uranium Mine Shaft Ventilation Exhausts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study on calculation and evaluation on atmosphere radioactive pollution of uranium mine well ventilation exhaust gas is presented in this paper. Neutral atmosphere conditions were taken into consideration. Nuclear industry standards on safety protection ... Keywords: atmosphere pollution, radiation protection, environmental evaluation, control methods

Dong Xie; Zehua Liu; Jun Xiong; Jianxiang Liu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Infiltration as Ventilation: Weather-Induced Dilution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................................................................5 ASHRAE Standards ............................................................................................................................... 21 Implications for ASHRAE Standards

209

Floor-supply displacement ventilation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research on indoor environments has received more attention recently because reports of symptoms and other health complaints related to indoor environments have been increasing. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning ...

Kobayashi, Nobukazu, 1967-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Scale model studies of displacement ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Displacement ventilation is an air conditioning method that provides conditioned air to indoor environments with the goal to improve air quality while reducing energy consumption. This study investigates the performance ...

Okutan, Galip Mehmet

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a tropical cyclone’s intensity. An ...

Tang, Brian Hong-An

212

A Ventilation Index for Tropical Cyclones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An important environmental control of both tropical cyclone intensity and genesis is vertical wind shear. One hypothesized pathway by which vertical shear affects tropical cyclones is midlevel ventilation—or the flux of ...

Tang, Brian

213

Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

into the house to be filtered to remove pollen and dust or dehumidified to provide humidity control Supply ventilation systems work best in hot or mixed climates. Because they...

214

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.of Ventilation and Air Conditioning: Is CERN up to Date With

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Cooling airflow design tool for displacement ventilation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Equation  7.4 of the ASHRAE Design Guidelines for efficiency air diffusers. The ASHRAE method does not takeVentilation” Atlanta: ASHRAE. Jiang, Z. , Chen, Q. , and

Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Ventilation of the Subtropical North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ventilation of the subtropical North Pacific is studied using a simple analytical model. The model is forced by winter mixed layer density and depth calculated from the Levitus climatology and wind stress curl from the Hellerman and ...

Rui Xin Huang; Sarah Russell

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Midlevel ventilation's constraint on tropical cyclone intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a TC's intensity. An idealized ...

Tang, Brian Hong-An

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Chlorofluorocarbon Constraints on North Atlantic Ventilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North Atlantic Ocean vigorously ventilates the ocean interior. Thermocline and deep water masses are exposed to atmospheric contact there and are sequestered in two principal classes: Subtropical Mode Water (STMW: 26.5 ? ?? ? 26.8) and ...

Thomas W. N. Haine; Kelvin J. Richards; Yanli Jia

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controlling summer attic heat gain is important to reducing air conditioning energy use in homes in hot-humid climates. Both heat transfer through ceilings and t attic duct systems can make up a large part of peak cooling demand, Attic ventilation has long been identified as a method to abate such heat gains. We present test results from using the photovoltaic (PV) attic ventilator fans in a test home to assess impact on attic and cooling energy performance.

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Shut-off mechanism for ventilation hose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shut-off mechanism to provide automatic closure of a ventilation hose when the operation of drawing air through the hose is terminated. The mechanism includes a tube of light gauge metal inside of which are mounted a plurality of louver doors positioned in the closed position due to gravity when the ventilation unit is not operational. When the unit is operational, air flowing into the unit maintains the doors in the open position. 5 figs.

Huyett, J.D.; Meskanick, G.R.

1989-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Preconditioning Outside Air: Cooling Loads from Building Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC equipment manufacturers, specifiers and end users interacting in the marketplace today are only beginning to address the series of issues promulgated by the increased outside air requirements in ASHRAE Standard 62- 1989, "Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality", that has cascaded into building codes over the early to mid 1990's. There has been a twofold to fourfold increase in outside air requirements for many commercial building applications, compared to the 1981 version of the standard. To mitigate or nullify these additional weather loads, outdoor air preconditioning technologies are being promoted in combination with conventional HVAC operations downstream as a means to deliver the required fresh air and control humidity indoors. Preconditioning is the term applied for taking outside air to the indoor air setpoint (dry bulb temperature and relative humidity). The large humidity loads from outside air can now be readily recognized and quantified at cooling design point conditions using the extreme humidity ratios/dew points presented in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals Chapter 26 "Climatic Design Information". This paper presents an annual index called the Ventilation Load Index (VLI), recently developed by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) that measures the magnitude of latent (and sensible) loads for preconditioning outside air to indoor space conditions over the come of an entire year. The VLI has units of ton-hrs/scfm of outside air. The loads are generated using new weather data binning software called ~BinMaker, also from GRI, that organizes the 239 city, 8760 hour by hour, TMY2 weather data into user selected bidtables. The VLI provides a simple methodology for accessing the cooling load impact of increased ventilation air volumes and a potential basis for defining a "humid" climate location.

Kosar, D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Tracer dating and ocean ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interpretation of transient tracer observations depends on dif•cult to obtain information on the evolution in time of the tracer boundary conditions and interior distributions. Recent studies have attempted to circumvent this problem by making use of a derived quantity, age, based on the simultaneous distribution of two complementary tracers, such as tritium and its daughter, helium 3. The age is defined with reference to the surface such that the boundary condition takes on a constant value of zero. We use a two-dimensional model to explore the circumstances under which such a combination of conservation equations for two complementary tracers can lead to a cancellation of the time derivative terms. An interesting aspect of this approach is that mixing can serve as a source or sink of tracer based age. We define an idealized "ventilation age tracer " that is conservative with respect to mixing, and we explore how its behavior compares with that of the tracer-based ages over a range of advective and diffusive parameters. 1.

G. Thiele; J. L. Sarmiento

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M&O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M&O 2000a).

Yiming Sun

2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy ? FY11 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel volatile organic compounds (VOCs) air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. we targeted a VOC air cleaning system that could enable a 50% reduction in ventilation rates. In a typical commercial HVAC system that provides a mixture of recirculated and outdoor air, a VOC air cleaner in the supply airstream must have a 15% to 20% VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply.

Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Standard and routine metabolic rates of juvenile sandbar sharks (Carcharhinus plumbeus), including the effects of body mass and acute temperature change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. Gruber. 1989. The metabolic rate of an active, tropical1999. Oxygen consumption rate and swimming efficiency of theroutine oxygen consump- tion rates of the bonnethead shark.

Dowd, William Wesley; Brill, R W; Bushnell, P G; Musick, J A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Carbon-dioxide-controlled ventilation study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In-House Energy Management (IHEM) Program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide funds to federal laboratories to conduct research on energy-efficient technology. The Energy Sciences Department of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by IHEM to research the energy savings potential associated with reducing outdoor-air ventilation of buildings. By monitoring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels in a building, outdoor air provided by the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system can be reduced to the percentage required to maintain satisfactory CO{sub 2} levels rather than ventilating with a higher outdoor-air percentage based on an arbitrary minimum outdoor-air setting. During summer months, warm outdoor air brought into a building for ventilation must be cooled to meet the appropriate cooling supply-air temperature, and during winter months, cold outdoor air must be heated. By minimizing the amount of hot or cold outdoor air brought into the HVAC system, the supply air requires less cooling or heating, saving energy and money. Additionally, the CO{sub 2} levels in a building can be monitored to ensure that adequate outdoor air is supplied to a building to maintain air quality levels. The two main considerations prior to implementing CO{sub 2}-based ventilation control are its impact on energy consumption and the adequacy of indoor air quality (IAQ) and occupant comfort. To address these considerations, six portable CO{sub 2} monitors were placed in several Hanford Site buildings to estimate the adequacy of office/workspace ventilation. The monitors assessed the potential for reducing the flow of outdoor-air to the buildings. A candidate building was also identified to monitor various ventilation control strategies for use in developing a plan for implementing and assessing energy savings.

McMordie, K.L.; Carroll, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aerosol transport systems. NUREG/GR-0006, Washington DC:rate in turbulent flows. NUREG/CR-1262, BMI-2041, as cited

Sippola, Mark R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

CONTAM Applications - Airflow and Ventilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... rates, CONTAM provides a rich set of tools to analyze ... is not a formal fan-sizing tool, it does ... paths to take advantage of prevailing weather conditions ...

229

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study is made of several outstanding issues concerning the commercial development of environmental control systems for electric vehicles (EVs). Engineering design constraints such as federal regulations and consumer requirements are first identified. Next, heating and cooling loads in a sample automobile are calculated using a computer model available from the literature. The heating and cooling loads are then used as a basis for estimating the electrical consumption that is to be expected for heat pumps installed in EVs. The heat pump performance is evaluated using an automobile heat pump computer model which has been developed recently at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The heat pump design used as input to the model consists of typical finned-tube heat exchangers and a hermetic compressor driven by a variable-speed brushless dc motor. The simulations suggest that to attain reasonable system efficiencies, the interior heat exchangers that are currently installed as automobile air conditioning will need to be enlarged. Regarding the thermal envelope of the automobile itself, calculations are made which show that considerable energy savings will result if steps are taken to reduce {open_quote}hot soak{close_quote} temperatures and if the outdoor air ventilation rate is well controlled. When these changes are made, heating and cooling should consume less than 10% of the total stored electrical energy for steady driving in most U.S. climates. However, this result depends strongly upon the type of driving: The fraction of total power for heating and cooling ({open_quote}range penalty{close_quote}) increases sharply for driving scenarios having low average propulsion power, such as stop-and-go driving.

Kyle, D.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sullivan, R.A. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Sustainable Design Standards in India: The Excluded Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the recent emphasis on “Green Building” in different countries around the world, LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification has emerged as one of the major recognized standards for measuring building sustainability. In 2005, the Indian Green Building Council (IGBC) adopted the original US rating system without substantive modifications in response to the significant contextual differences between the United States and India. In 2007, the IGBC published the LEED INDIA NC Version 1.0 with changes to better respond to the Indian context. This version did not address climatic variations, which demand focused attention on particular sections, such as natural ventilation and daylighting. This paper highlights the essential significance of these critical issues in latest LEED Indian Guidelines in the current LEED standards with respect to comparison between performance of green buildings with and without the LEED certification.

Gupta, K.; Haider, J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air  

SciTech Connect

The importance of controlling humidity in buildings is cause for concern, in part, because of indoor air quality problems associated with excess moisture in air-conditioning systems. But more universally, the need for ventilation air has forced HVAC equipment (originally optimized for high efficiency in removing sensible heat loads) to remove high moisture loads. To assist cooling equipment and meet the challenge of larger ventilation loads, several technologies have succeeded in commercial buildings. Newer technologies such as subcool/reheat and heat pipe reheat show promise. These increase latent capacity of cooling-based systems by reducing their sensible capacity. Also, desiccant wheels have traditionally provided deeper-drying capacity by using thermal energy in place of electrical power to remove the latent load. Regardless of what mix of technologies is best for a particular application, there is a need for a more effective way of thinking about the cooling loads created by ventilation air. It is clear from the literature that all-too-frequently, HVAC systems do not perform well unless the ventilation air loads have been effectively addressed at the original design stage. This article proposes an engineering shorthand, an annual load index for ventilation air. This index will aid in the complex process of improving the ability of HVAC systems to deal efficiently with the amount of fresh air the industry has deemed useful for maintaining comfort in buildings. Examination of typical behavior of weather shows that latent loads usually exceed sensible loads in ventilation air by at least 3:1 and often as much as 8:1. A designer can use the engineering shorthand indexes presented to quickly assess the importance of this fact for a given system design. To size those components after they are selected, the designer can refer to Chapter 24 of the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals, which includes separate values for peak moisture and peak temperature.

Harriman, L.G. III [Mason-Grant, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Plager, D. [Quantitative Decision Support, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Kosar, D. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation Speaker(s): Hwataik Han Date: July 10, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone Heat recovery ventilators are frequently used to save heating/cooling loads of buildings for ventilation. There are several types of HRV's, including a parallel plate type, a rotary type, a capillary type, and a heat pipe type. The breathing HRV is a heat recovery ventilator of a new kind using the concept of alternating-current ventilation. The AC ventilation is the ventilation with the airflow directions reversed periodically. It has an advantage of using a single duct system, for both supply and exhaust purposes. In order to develop a breathing HRV system, the thermal recovery performance should be investigated depending on many parameters, such as

233

Modeling buoyancy-driven airflow in ventilation shafts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naturally ventilated buildings can significantly reduce the required energy for cooling and ventilating buildings by drawing in outdoor air using non-mechanical forces. Buoyancy-driven systems are common in naturally ...

Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Natural ventilation : design for suburban houses in Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Ventilation is the most effective passive cooling design strategy for architecture in hot and humid climates. In Thailand, natural ventilation has been the most essential element in the vernacular architecture such ...

Tantasavasdi, Chalermwat, 1971-

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A scale model study of displacement ventilation with chilled ceilings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Displacement ventilation is a form of air-conditioning which provides good air quality and some energy savings. The air quality is better than for a conventional mixed ventilation system. The maximum amount of cooling that ...

Holden, Katherine J. A. (Katherine Joan Adrienne)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Spot Ventilation: Source Control to Improve Indoor Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to employ spot ventilation in the home for comfort and safety.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Whole-House Ventilation Systems: Improved Control of Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to employ spot ventilation in the home for comfort and safety.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Project: Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Energy Buildings Project. Summary: NIST is developing tools and metrics to both ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ventilation planning at Energy West's Deer Creek mine  

SciTech Connect

In 2004 ventilation planning was initiated to exploit a remote area of Deer Creek mine's reserve (near Huntington, Utah), the Mill Fork Area, located under a mountain. A push-pull ventilation system was selected. This article details the design process of the ventilation system upgrade, the procurement process for the new fans, and the new fan startup testing. 5 figs., 1 photo.

Tonc, L.; Prosser, B.; Gamble, G. [Pacific Corp., Huntington, UT (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

A database of PFT ventilation measurements  

SciTech Connect

About five years ago, a method for measuring the ventilation flows of a building was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This method is based on the use of a family of compounds known as perfluorocarbon tracers or PFTs. Since 1982, BNL has measured ventilation in more than 4000 homes, comprising about 100 separate research projects throughout the world. This measurement set is unique in that it is the only set of ventilation measurements that acknowledge and measure the multizone characteristics of residences. Other large measurement sets assume that a home can be treated as a single well-mixed zone. This report describes the creation of a database of approximately half of the PFT ventilation measurements made by BNL over the last five years. The PFT database is currently available for use on any IBM PC or Apple Macintosh based personal computer system. In addition to its utility in modeling indoor pollutant dispersion, this database may also be useful to those people studying energy conservation, thermal comfort and heating system design in residential buildings. 2 refs.

D' Ottavio, T.W.; Goodrich, R.W.; Spandau, D.J.; Dietz, R.N.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Ventilation Index for Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important environmental control of both tropical cyclone intensity and genesis is vertical wind shear. One hypothesized pathway by which vertical shear affects tropical cyclones is midlevel ventilation—or the flux of low-entropy air into the center of ...

Brian Tang; Kerry Emanuel

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Solar ventilation preheating: FEMP fact sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Installing a ''solar wall'' to heat air before it enters a building, called solar ventilation preheating, is one of the most efficient ways of reducing energy costs using clean and renewable energy. A solar wall can be designed as an integral part of a new building or it can be added in a retrofit project.

Clyne, R.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hysteresis effects in hybrid building ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation, external wind forcing and internal heat gains e.g. due to electrical equipment or building chloride, etc. Developing world: By-products of cooking or heating fires Ghiaus & Allard (2005) · Exposure-breeze, displacement ventilation dissipate internal heat gains e.g. from kitchen stove · Wintertime: Spaces filled

Flynn, Morris R.

244

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

SciTech Connect

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

245

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

246

Climate, comfort, & natural ventilation: a new adaptive comfort standard for ASHRAE standard 55  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE began funding a series of field studies of thermal comfort in office buildings in four different climate zones.

Brager, G. S.; de Dear, R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Climate, comfort, & natural ventilation: a new adaptive comfort standard for ASHRAE standard 55  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guidelines for Comfort”. ASHRAE Journal, vol 42, no. 8,Comfort in Office Buildings”, ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 94,System in Office Buildings. ” ASHRAE Transactions, Vol 104 (

Brager, G. S.; de Dear, R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Formadehyde in New Homes: Ventilation vs. Source Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at at Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 1, 2012 Austin, Texas Formaldehyde in New Homes --- Ventilation vs. Source Control Brett C. Singer and Henry Willem Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Acknowledgments * Funding - U.S. Department of Energy - Building America Program - U.S. EPA - Indoor Environments Division - U.S. HUD - Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control - Cal. Energy Commission Public Interest Environmental Research * Technical Contributions - Fraunhofer - Ibacos - IEE-SF * LBNL Team - Sherman, Hotchi, Russell, Stratton, and Others Background 1  Formaldehyde is an irritant and a carcinogen  Odor threshold: about 800 ppb  Widely varying health standards  US HUD (8-h): 400 ppb

249

SY Tank Farm ventilation isolation option risk assessment report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The safety of the 241-SY Tank Farm ventilation system has been under extensive scrutiny due to safety concerns associated with tank 101-SY. Hydrogen and other gases are generated and trapped in the waste below the liquid surface. Periodically, these gases are released into the dome space and vented through the exhaust system. This attention to the ventilation system has resulted in the development of several alternative ventilation system designs. The ventilation system provides the primary means of mitigation of accidents associated with flammable gases. This report provides an assessment of various alternatives ventilation system designs.

Powers, T.B.; Morales, S.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission Pennsylvania's Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS), created by S.B. 1030 on November 30, 2004, requires each electric distribution company

251

Calculation note: project W-320 primary ventilation air flowrequirements for mitigation of steady state flammable gasconcentrations in the headspaces of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This calculation note analyzes headspace concentrations of hydrogen dependent upon assumed ventilation flow rates provided for tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The analyses are based on measured or estimated steady state hydrogen release rates. Tank 241-C-106 is analyzed prior to sluicing; tank 241-AY-102 is analyzed both prior to and after completion of sluicing. Specific analyses, using both best estimated and bounding hydrogen generation rates, include the minimum primary ventilation flow rates required in the tanks to ensure that the steady state hydrogen concentration in the respective tank headspace does not exceed 25% and 100% of the LFL. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of time as well as the time required to reach 25% and 100% of LFL upon complete loss of active ventilation, starting from the steady state hydrogen concentration based on a 200 CFM minimum flow rate in tank 241-C-106 and a 100 CFM minimum flow rate in tank241-AY-102. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of thee following partial loss of active ventilation (i.e., step changes to l60, l20, 80, and 40 CFM ventilation flow rates) in tank 241-C-106, staffing from a 200 CFM flow rate and the corresponding steady state hydrogen concentration based on the 200 CFM flow rate. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of the following partial loss of active ventilation i.e., step changes to 80, 60, 40, and 20 CFM ventilation flow rates) in tank 241-AY-102, starting from a 100 CFM flow rate and the corresponding steady state hydrogen concentration based on the 100 CFM flow rate.

Estey, S.D.

1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

252

Indoor Humidity Analysis of an Integrated Radiant Cooling and Desiccant Ventilation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiant cooling is credited with improving energy efficiency and enhancing the comfort level as an alternative method of space cooling in mild and dry climates, according to recent research. Since radiant cooling panels lack the capability to remove latent heat, they normally are used in conjunction with an independent ventilation system, which is capable of decoupling the space sensible and latent loads. Condensation concerns limit the application of radiant cooling. This paper studies the dehumidification processes of solid desiccant systems and investigates the factors that affect the humidity levels of a radiantly cooled space. Hourly indoor humidity is simulated at eight different operating conditions in a radiantly cooled test-bed office. The simulation results show that infiltration and ventilation flow rates are the main factors affecting indoor humidity level and energy consumption in a radiantly cooled space with relatively constant occupancy. It is found that condensation is hard to control in a leaky office operated with the required ventilation rate. Slightly pressurizing the space is recommended for radiant cooling. The energy consumption simulation shows that a passive desiccant wheel can recover about 50% of the ventilation load.

Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Natural vs. mechanical ventilation and cooling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cant and well-docu- mented. ASHRAE Standard 55 prescribes aless comfortable. ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 includes an “adap-and standards, includ- ing ASHRAE Standard 90.1. Mechanical

Brager, Gail; Alspach, Peter; Nall, Daniel H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Moisture and combustion products  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, moisture and combustion pollutants, are examined. A companion paper examines volatile organic compounds and radon. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. Moisture control puts significant restrictions on a ventilation system. The system should function continuously (averaged over days) and distribute ventilation throughout the habitable space. Combustion sources require task ventilation that functions reliably.

Hadlich, D.E.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

256

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Furnace Fans Furnace Fans Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Currently there are no energy conservation standards for residential furnace fans. A furnace fan is an electrically-powered device used in residential central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for the purposes of circulating air through duct work. A furnace fan consists of a fan motor and its controls, a centrifugal impeller, and sheet metal housing. The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting an energy conservation standard rulemaking for furnace fans. If any standard is established, its benefits will be explained in the final rule. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information

257

Evergreen Sustainable Development Standard for Affordable Housing |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evergreen Sustainable Development Standard for Affordable Housing Evergreen Sustainable Development Standard for Affordable Housing Evergreen Sustainable Development Standard for Affordable Housing < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider Housing Trust Fund The Washington State Department of Commerce created the Evergreen Sustainable Development Standard, a set of green building criteria that is required for any affordable housing project applying for state funds

258

Summer Infiltration/Ventilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory Building America Technical Review Meeting April 29-30, 2013 A Research Institute of the University of Central...

259

New and Underutilized Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2013 - 2:56pm Addthis The following heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) technologies are underutilized within the Federal sector. These technologies have been...

260

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5% of the total space conditioning) and the intermittentsupply lead to greater space conditioning energy use. AnnualkWh Distribution Ventilation Space Conditioning Leaky House

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Section 4.1.3 Natural Ventilation: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in and through build- ings. These airflows may be used both for ventilation air and for passive cooling strategies. Natural ventila- tion is often strongly preferred by building...

262

Review of Literature Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigerating, and Air -Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GRefrigerat ing, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, Gof Ventilation and Air Conditioning: Is C E R N up to Date

McWilliams, Jennifer; Sherman, Max

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Critical Question #2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Specific to Multifamily Buildings? What is the best practice to address ASHRAE 62.2 Addendum J (multifamily)? Why is exhaust only (with supply in hallway) the...

264

Characterization of air recirculation in multiple fan ventilation systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Booster fans, large underground fans, can increase the volumetric efficiency of ventilation systems by helping to balance the pressure and quantity distribution throughout a mine,… (more)

Wempen, Jessica Michelle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Ventilation and Solar Heat Storage System Offers Big Energy Savings  

Ventilation and Solar Heat Storage System Offers Big Energy Savings ... Heat is either reflected away from the building with radiant barriers, or heat is absorbed

266

Case Study 3 - Energy Impacts of Infiltration and Ventilation in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the energy use in commercial buildings due to infiltration and ventilation airflows and to investigate the potential for energy savings that could be ...

267

Guide to Closing and Conditioning Ventilated Crawlspaces  

SciTech Connect

This how-to guide explains the issues and concerns with conventional ventilated crawlspaces and provides prescriptive measures for improvements that will create healthier and more durable spaces. The methods described in this guide are not the only acceptable ways to treat a crawlspace but represent a proven strategy that works in many areas of the United States. The designs discussed in this guide may or may not meet the local building codes and as such will need to be researched before beginning the project.

Dickson, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

ELECTRIC POWER AND VENTILATION SYSTEM OF SILOE  

SciTech Connect

The 15-kv electric power of Siloe is supplied from a central substation, which serves all the laboratories in the Center. The substation transforms primary 3-phase power from 15 kv to 380 to 220 v. Control installations are supplied from sets of rectifiers and batteries with 127 and 48 v direct current. If the normal electric power supply fails, a 12000 kva diesel driven generator is automatically started and in a very short time supplies power. The ventilation system supplies the whole building with conditioned air, holds the shell in negative pressure, and exhausts radioactive effluents. (auth)

Mitault, G.; Faudou, J.-C.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Engineering study and conceptual design report for primary ventilation duct flow monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this engineering study is to develop the preferred method and concepts for measurement of the primary exhaust ventilation flow rates in Double Shell Tanks (DSTs) on the hydrogen watch list. This includes tanks 101-AW, 103, 104, and 105-AN, and 103-SY. A systems engineering approach is utilized to weight the desired characteristics of the flow monitoring system, and then select the best alternative

Hertelendy, N.A.

1995-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Coupled urban wind flow and indoor natural ventilation modelling on a high-resolution grid: A case study for the Amsterdam ArenA stadium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind flow in urban environments is an important factor governing the dispersion of heat and pollutants from streets, squares and buildings. This paper presents a coupled CFD modelling approach for urban wind flow and indoor natural ventilation. A specific ... Keywords: Air exchange rate, Air quality, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Cross-ventilation, Full-scale measurements, Grid generation technique, Integrated model, Model validation and solution verification, Numerical simulation, Outdoor and indoor air flow, Sports stadium

T. van Hooff; B. Blocken

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Residential Attic Ventilation In A Hot And Humid Climate: Effects Of Increased Ventilation On Thermal Performance And Moisture Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The reality of the effect of natural ventilation in a residential attic cavity has been the topic of many debates and scholarly reports since… (more)

Atherton, Stanley Arthur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Material: Four turbine- based ventilators and nine conventional servo-valve compressed-gas ventilators were1 A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators Arnaud W. Thille,1 MD; Aissam Lyazidi,1 Biomed Eng MS; Jean-Christophe M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

273

Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation of cooler, drier air into the inner core is examined using an axisymmetric tropical cyclone model with parameterized ventilation. Sufficiently strong ventilation ...

Tang, Brian

274

Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation of cooler, drier air into the inner core is examined using an axisymmetric tropical cyclone model with parameterized ventilation. Sufficiently strong ventilation induces cooling of the ...

Brian Tang; Kerry Emanuel

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Standards, Ethics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards, Ethics Ombuds Standards and Ethics Committed to the fair and equitable treatment of all employees, contractors, and persons doing business with the Laboratory. Contact...

276

Find Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

may not be available from IHS: AHRI standards - from the Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute AISC standards - from the American Institute of Steel Construction...

277

LBNL REPORT NUMBER 53776; OCTOBER 2003 ASHRAE &Residential Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL REPORT NUMBER 53776; OCTOBER 2003 ASHRAE &Residential Ventilation Max Sherman Energy Performance of Buildings Group IED/EETD Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory1 MHSherman@lbl.gov ASHRAE, the American of heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R). ASHRAE has recently released a new

278

Absolute Glovebox Ventilation Filtration System with Unique Filter Replacement Feature  

SciTech Connect

A glovebox ventilation system was designed for a new plutonium-238 processing facility that provided 1) downdraft ventilation, 2) a leak tight seal around the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, and 3) a method for changing the filters internally without risk of contaminating the laboratory.

Freeman, S. S.; Slusher, W. A.

1975-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and degradation of filter media additives Title Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and degradation of filter media additives Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Wenhao Chen, Michael G. Apte, Nuan Li, Michael Spears, Jérémie Almosni, Gregory Brunner, Jianshun(Jensen) Zhang, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 45 Start Page 3561 Issue 21 Pagination 3561-3568 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group

280

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants Speaker(s): Alexander M. Zhivov Date: April 3, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Dr. Alexander Zhivov is currently the chairman of the International Task Force "Autovent International" focusing on environmental problems within the Automotive Industry. This Task Force was formed in 1997 to develop the "Ventilation Guide for Automotive Industry". The guide was to be seen as a building block within the EU sponsored "Industrial Ventilation Design Guide Book" project, covering both theory and applications. In his presentation, Dr. Zhivov will talk about his work with the automotive industry, describe major highlights from the "Ventilation Guide for Automotive Industry" and talk about building, process and HVAC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:49pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options for HVAC Renovations Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHP) Solar Water Heating (SWH) Biomass Passive Solar Heating Biomass Heating Solar Ventilation Air Preheating Federal building renovations that encompass the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in a facility provide a range of renewable energy opportunities. The primary technology option for HVAC renovations is geothermal heat pumps (GHP). Other options include leveraging a solar water heating (SWH) system to offset heating load or using passive solar heating or a biomass-capable furnace or boiler. Some facilities may also take

282

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Simulated Performance Speaker(s): Emanuele Naboni Date: May 29, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Opaque ventilated façade systems are increasingly used in buildings, even though their effects on the overall thermal performance of buildings have not yet been fully understood. The research reported in this presentation focuses on the modeling of such systems with EnergyPlus. Ventilated façade systems are modeled in EnergyPlus with module "Exterior Naturally Vented Cavity." Not all façade systems can be modeled with this module; this research defined the types of systems that can be modeled, and the limitations of such simulation. The performance of a ventilated façade

283

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Volatile organic compounds and radon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, volatile organic compounds and radon, are examined. A companion paper examines moisture and combustion pollutants. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. They should have the extra capacity available to reduce short bursts of pollution, be located close to the expected source of the contamination, and be inexpensive. Mitigation of radon is technically a major success using a form of task ventilation. Whole-house ventilation is, at best, a secondary form of control of excess radon in residences.

Grimsrud, D.T.; Hadlich, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Strategic Standardization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Program Strategic Standardization Curriculum (CMGT 564 - 2010) ... com. Curriculum ks eport, 1992), Grading (Research paper, ...

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hardness Standardization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... metallic products. • NIST produces a variety of hardness Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) for industry. • The NIST ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

Effects of Radiant Barrier Systems on Ventilated Attics in a Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of side-by-side radiant barrier experiments using two identical 144 ft2 (nominal) test houses are presented. The test houses responded very similarly to weather variations prior to the retrofit. The temperatures of the test houses were controlled to within 0.3°F. Ceiling heat fluxes were within 2 percent for each house. The results showed that a critical attic ventilation flow rate (0.25 CFM/ft2 ) existed after which the percentage reduction produced by the radiant barrier systems was not sensitive to increased airflows. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barrier systems were between 25 and 34 percent, with 28 percent being the reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. All results presented in this paper were for attics with R-19 unfaced fiberglass insulation and for a perforated radiant barrier with low emissivities on both sides.

Medina, M. A.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

FEMP-FS--Solar Ventilation Preheating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Installing a "solar wall" to heat air before it enters a Installing a "solar wall" to heat air before it enters a building, called solar ventilation preheating, is one of the most efficient ways of reducing energy costs using clean and renewable energy. The system works by heating outside air with a south-facing solar collector-a dark-colored wall made of sheet metal and perforated with tiny holes. Outdoor air is drawn through the holes and heated as it absorbs the wall's warmth. The warm air rises in the space between the solar wall and the building wall and is moved into the air-duct system, usually by means of a fan, to heat the building. Any additional heating needed at night or on cloudy days is supplied by the build- ing's conventional heating system. During summer months, intake air bypasses the solar collector,

288

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE CEM, CEA, CLEP, CDSM, CPE Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system is to provide and maintain a comfortable environment within a building for the occupants or for the process being conducted Many HVAC systems were not designed with energy efficiency as one of the design factors 3 Air Air is the major conductor of heat. Lack of heat = air conditioning OR 4 Btu - Amount of heat required to raise one pound of water 1 F = 0.252 KgCal 1 Pound of Water = About 1 Pint of Water ~ 1 Large Glass 1 Kitchen Match Basics of Air Conditioning = 1 Btu 5 = 6 Low Cost Cooling Unit 7 8 Typical Design Conditions 75 degrees F temperature 50% relative humidity 30 - 50 FPM air movement

289

Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (Not Optional)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kitchen Ventilation Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (not Optional) Brett C. Singer Residential Building Systems & Indoor Environment Groups Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Denver, CO April 30, 2013 Acknowledgements PROGRAM SUPPORT *U.S. Department of Energy - Building America Program *U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Indoor Environments Division *U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - Office of Healthy Homes & Lead Hazard Control *California Energy Commission - Public Interest Energy Research Program TECHNICAL CONTRIBUTIONS *Woody Delp, Tosh Hotchi, Melissa Lunden, Nasim Mullen, Chris Stratton, Doug Sullivan, Iain Walker Kitchen Ventilation Simplified PROBLEM: * Cooking burners & cooking produce odors, moisture

290

Energy Crossroads: Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Suggest a Listing Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre (AIVC) The AIVC fulfills its objectives by providing a range of services and facilities which include: Information, Technical Analysis, Technical Interchange, and Coordination. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) The ACGIH offers high quality technical publications and learning opportunities. Americlean Services Corp. (ASC) ASC is a certified SBA 8(a) engineering/consulting firm specializing in HVAC contamination detection, abatement, and monitoring. In addition to highly professional ductwork cleaning and HVAC cleaning services, ASC offers a wide range of other engineering/ consulting/ management services

291

Interconnection Standards | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interconnection Standards Interconnection Standards Jump to: navigation, search Interconnection standards govern the technical and procedural process by which an electric customer connects an electric-generating system to the grid. Interconnection standards specify the technical, contractual, metering, and rate rules that system owners and utilities must abide by. Standards for systems interconnected at the distribution level are typically adopted by state public utility commissions, while the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has adopted standards for systems interconnected at the transmission level. Not all states have adopted interconnection standards, and some states’ standards apply only to investor-owned utilities – not to municipal utilities and electric cooperatives. [1]

292

Analysis of Demand Controlled Ventilation Technology and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the adoption of the Alaska Building Energy Efficiency Standard ... the methanol-fueled vehicle until warm, then parking it in the garage and shutting ...

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Analysis of Energy Recovery Ventilator Savings for Texas Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This analysis was conducted to identify the energy cost savings from retrofitting Texas buildings with air-to-air ERV (Energy Recovery Ventilator) systems. This analysis applied ERV and psychrometric equations in a bin-type procedure to determine the energy and costs required to condition outside air to return-air conditions. This analysis does not consider interactions with the air-handling system; therefore the effects of economizers, reheat schemes, variable flow rates and other adaptive components were not considered. This analysis demonstrates that ERV cost-effectiveness is largely dependent upon the building location in Texas (i.e., climate conditions) and outside air fraction: • For a typical laboratory building that requires 100% outside air, an ERV could save roughly $1.00 to $1.50 per cubic foot per minute (CFM) of outside air during a one year period. • For a typical office building that only requires 10% outside air, an ERV could save up to $1.00 per CFM of outside air over the period of one year.

Christman, K. D.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Natural ventilation possibilities for buildings in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the United States, many of the commercial buildings built in the last few decades are completely mechanically air conditioned, without the capability to use natural ventilation. This habit has occurred in building designs ...

Dean, Brian N. (Brian Nathan), 1974-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants Speaker(s): Alexander M. Zhivov Date: April 3, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Dr. Alexander Zhivov is currently the...

296

Issue #9: What are the Best Ventilation Techniques? | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

do we address ventilation in all climates? What is the best compromise between occupant health and safety and energy efficiency? issue9recommendashrae.pdf issue9ashrae622vent...

297

Evaluation of Existing Technologies for Meeting Residential Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ........................................................................... 9 5. Central Fan Integrated (CFI) Supply with air inlet in return and continuously operating exhaust................................................................................................ 10 7. CFI with 7% Outside Air (OA), without continuous exhaust ­ not 62.2 compliant Ventilation from ACM........................................................................ 11

298

Intelligent Control of Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposed a simulation-optimization energy saving strategy for heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems' condenser water loop through intelligent control of single speed cooling towers' components. An analysis of system components ...

Patrick Low Kie; Lau Bee Theng

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper sets up a mathematical model of three-dimensional steady turbulence heat transfer in an air-conditioned room of multi-polluting heat sources. Numerical simulation helps identify key factors in displacement ventilation systems that affect air-quality in rooms of multi-polluting heat sources. Results show that it is very important to determine the suitable air-intemperature , air-inflow, and heat source quantity and dispersion, to obtain better displacement ventilation results.

Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Capture and Use of Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., in conjunction with MEGTEC Systems, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, designed, built, and operated a commercial-size thermal flow reversal reactor (TFRR) to evaluate its suitability to oxidize coal mine ventilation air methane (VAM). Coal mining, and particularly coal mine ventilation air, is a major source of anthropogenic methane emissions, a greenhouse gas. Ventilation air volumes are large and the concentration of methane in the ventilation air is low; thus making it difficult to use or abate these emissions. This test program was conducted with simulated coal mine VAM in advance of deploying the technology on active coal mine ventilation fans. The demonstration project team installed and operated a 30,000 cfm MEGTEC VOCSIDIZER oxidation system on an inactive coal mine in West Liberty, WV. The performance of the unit was monitored and evaluated during months of unmanned operation at mostly constant conditions. The operating and maintenance history and how it impacts the implementation of the technology on mine fans were investigated. Emission tests showed very low levels of all criteria pollutants at the stack. Parametric studies showed that the equipment can successfully operate at the design specification limits. The results verified the ability of the TFRR to oxidize {ge}95% of the low and variable concentration of methane in the ventilation air. This technology provides new opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by the reduction of methane emissions from coal mine ventilation air. A large commercial-size installation (180,000 cfm) on a single typical mine ventilation bleeder fan would reduce methane emissions by 11,000 to 22,100 short tons per year (the equivalent of 183,000 to 366,000 metric tonnes carbon dioxide).

Deborah Kosmack

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Calif~rnia Energy Commission ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Code by the State Building Standards Commission, whichever is later. Sections applying to new-5816 2-5317 2-5317 2-5318 2-5319 Title Installation of Certified Insulation Material Piping Insulation Installation of Additional Insulation Installation of Appliances and Equipment HVAC Controls Ventilation

302

Building Design and Operation for Improving Thermal Comfort in Naturally Ventilated Buildings in a Hot-Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to develop new techniques for designing and operating unconditioned buildings in a hot-humid climate that could contribute to an improvement of thermal performance and comfort condition. The recommendations proposed in this research will also be useful for facility managers on how to maintain unconditioned buildings in this climate. This study investigated two unconditioned Thai Buddhist temples located in the urban area of Bangkok, Thailand. One is a 100-year-old, high-mass temple. The other is a 5-year-old, lower-mass temple. The indoor measurements revealed that the thermal condition inside both temples exceed the ASHRAE-recommended comfort zone. Surprisingly, the older temple maintained a more comfortable indoor condition due to its thermal inertia, shading, and earth contacts. A baseline thermal and airflow model of the old temple was established using a calibrated computer simulation method. To accomplish this, HEATX, a 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code, was coupled with the DOE-2 thermal simulation program. HEATX was used to calculate the airflow rate and the surface convection coefficients for DOE-2, and DOE-2 was used to provide physical input variables to form the boundary conditions for HEATX. In this way calibrated DOE-2/CFD simulation model was accomplished, and the baseline model was obtained. To investigate an improved design, four design options were studied: 1) a reflective or low-solar absorption roof, 2) R-30 ceiling insulation, 3) shading devices, and 4) attic ventilation. Each was operated using three modes of ventilation. The low-absorption roof and the R-30 ceiling insulation options were found to be the most effective options, whereas the shading devices and attic ventilation were less effective options, regardless of which ventilation mode was applied. All design options performed much better when nighttime-only ventilation was used. Based on this analysis, two prototype temples was proposed (i.e., low-mass and high-mass temples). From the simulation results of the two prototypes, design and operation guidelines are proposed, which consist of: 1) increased wall and ceiling insulation, 2) white-colored, low-absorption roof, 3) slab-on-ground floor, 4) shading devices, 5) nighttime-only ventilation, 6) attic ventilation, and 7) wider openings to increase the natural ventilation air flow windows, wing walls, and vertical fins.

Sreshthaputra, Atch

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

WELDING STANDARDS  

SciTech Connect

Hanford Atomic Production Operation specification guides and standards for welding and brazing are presented. Details of this manual are given in TID- 4100 (Suppl.). (N.W.R.)

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Exchange Rates, Information, and Crises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equation (5.4). Standard Bayesian inference implies that theAs before, standard Bayesian inference implies that Var 1 [f˜ so that standard Bayesian inference both exchange rate is

Fernholz, Ricardo Turrin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods and Alternate Rating Methods Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods and Alternate Rating Methods Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to revise and expand its existing regulations governing the use of alternative efficiency determination methods (AEDM) and alternate rating methods (ARM) for covered products as alternatives to testing for the purpose of certifying compliance. Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a final rule revising its existing regulations governing the use of particular methods as alternatives to testing for commercial heating, ventilating, air conditioning, water heating, and refrigeration equipment. 78 FR 79579 (December 31, 2013).

306

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson,; Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang; Apte, Michael; Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

307

The role of the US Department of Energy in indoor air quality and building ventilation policy development  

SciTech Connect

Building ventilation consumes about 5.8 exajoules of energy each year in the US The annual cost of this energy, used for commercial building fans (1.6 exajoules) and the heating and cooling of outside air (4.2 exajoules), is about $US 33 billion per year. Energy conservation measures that reduce heating and cooling season ventilation rates 15 to 35% in commercial and residential buildings can result in a national savings of about 0.6 to 1.5 exajoules ($US 3-8 billion) per year assuming no reduction of commercial building fan energy use. The most significant adverse environmental impact of reduced ventilation and infiltration is the potential degradation of the buildings indoor air quality. Potential benefits to the US from the implementation of sound indoor air quality and building ventilation reduction policies include reduced building-sector energy consumption; reduced indoor, outdoor, and global air pollution; reduced product costs; reduced worker absenteeism; reduced health care costs; reduced litigation; increased worker well-being and productivity; and increased product quality and competitiveness.

Traynor, G.W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Talbott, J.M.; Moses, D.O. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

ABSTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enginners ASHRAE Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is...

309

Quantitative troubleshooting of industrial exhaust ventilation systems  

SciTech Connect

This article proposes two troubleshooting tools that may allow precise and accurate assessment of changes to ventilation systems of any type. Both are useful in discovering and quantifying most modifications that affect the distribution of airflows among the branches and static pressures throughout the system. The approaches are derived from energy balance considerations, using power loss coefficients (X) computed for any contiguous section of the system from the duct velocities and static pressures measured at that section`s inlets and outlets. The value of X for a given portion of the system should be nearly constant with changes in airflow and with modifications to other portions of the system. Responsiveness to local modifications and insensitivity to changes elsewhere in the system - including gross changes in fan performance - make X coefficients a valuable troubleshooting tool. Static pressure ratios within a given branch are functionally related to ratios of X coefficients. Therefore, they vary with modifications to the branch and are highly insensitive to changes outside that branch. Unlike X coefficients, determination of static pressure ratios does not require velocity traverses, making them faster and easier to determine than X values. On the other hand, values of X are more universally applicable and have direct physical significance. Use of both static pressure ratios and X coefficients are described in a suggested troubleshooting procedure. Systematic measurement errors have surprisingly little impact on the usefulness of values of X or static pressure ratios. The major impediment to using either tool is the necessity for {open_quotes}baseline{close_quotes} measurements, which are often unavailable. On the other hand, a baseline for future comparisons can be created piecemeal, beginning at any time and extending over any period of time. 11 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Guffey, S.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in aModular Classroom Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms.

Apte, Michael G.; Buchanan, Ian S.; Faulkner, David; Fisk,William J.; Lai, Chi-Ming; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Standard for solar collectors  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this standard is to estabish for solar collectors: definitions; requirements for testing and rating; specifications, literature and advertising requirements; requirements for marking; requirements for safety; and conformance conditions. This standard is intended for the guidance of the industry including manufacturers, engineers, distributors, installers, contractors, and consumers. This standard applies to factory-made solar collectors using either air or a liquid as the heat transfer fluid for one or more of the following purposes: a) heating service water or other fluids and b) heating or cooling of buildings.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

EOS standards  

SciTech Connect

An approach to creating accurate EOS for pressure standards is described. Applications to Cu, Au, and Ta are shown. Extension of the method to high compressions using DFT is illustrated. Comparisons with modern functionals show promise.

Greeff, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values Title Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5969E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., Jennifer M. Logue, and Craig P. Wray Date Published 07/2012 Keywords commissioning, energy, health, indoor air quality, residential, valuation, ventilation Abstract Due to changes in building codes, whole-house mechanical ventilation systems are being installed in new California homes. Few measurements are available, but the limited data suggest that these systems don't always perform as code and forecasts predict. Such deficiencies occur because systems are usually field assembled without design specifications, and there is no consistent process to identify and correct problems. The value of such activities in terms of reducing energy use and improving indoor air quality (IAQ) is poorly understood. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and IAQ.

314

(Terminology standardization)  

SciTech Connect

Terminological requirements in information management was but one of the principal themes of the 2nd Congress on Terminology and Knowledge Engineering. The traveler represented the American Society for Testing and Materials' Committee on Terminology, of which he is the Chair. The traveler's invited workshop emphasized terminology standardization requirements in databases of material properties as well as practical terminology standardizing methods. The congress included six workshops in addition to approximately 82 lectures and papers from terminologists, artificial intelligence practitioners, and subject specialists from 18 countries. There were approximately 292 registrants from 33 countries who participated in the congress. The congress topics were broad. Examples were the increasing use of International Standards Organization (ISO) Standards in legislated systems such as the USSR Automated Data Bank of Standardized Terminology, the enhanced Physics Training Program based on terminology standardization in Physics in the Chinese province of Inner Mongolia, and the technical concept dictionary being developed at the Japan Electronic Dictionary Research Institute, which is considered to be the key to advanced artificial intelligence applications. The more usual roles of terminology work in the areas of machine translation. indexing protocols, knowledge theory, and data transfer in several subject specialties were also addressed, along with numerous special language terminology areas.

Strehlow, R.A.

1990-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

315

Microsoft Word - Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation_Final2.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 1 Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Jennifer M. Logue, William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2012 LBNL-5796E LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor

316

Steady State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation & Lower Flammability Level Evaluation for Hanford Tank Waste [SEC 1 & 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assess the steady state level at normal & off-normal ventilation conditions. Hydrogen generation rate calculated for 177 tanks using rate equation model. Flammability calc. based on hydrogen, ammonia, & methane proformed for tanks at various scenarios.

HU, T.A.

2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

317

Functional Area Qualification Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program » Services » Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program » Functional Area Qualification Standards Functional Area Qualification Standards Qualification Standard Qualification Standard Number Approved Aviation Manager DOE-STD-1165-2003 (CN-1) 2009-12 Aviation Safety Officer DOE-STD-1164-2003 (CN-1) 2010-01 Chemical Processing DOE-STD-1176-2010 2010-02 Civil/Structural Engineering DOE-STD-1182-2004 2004-03 Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment DOE-STD-1168-2013 2013-10 Construction Management DOE-STD-1180-2004 2004-03 Criticality Safety DOE-STD-1173-2009 2009-04 Deactivation and Decommissioning DOE-STD-1166-2003 2003-09 Electrical Systems and Safety Oversight DOE-STD-1170-2007 2007-08 Emergency Management DOE-STD-1177-2004 2004-01

318

Low Energy Buildings: CFD Techniques for Natural Ventilation and Thermal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Energy Buildings: CFD Techniques for Natural Ventilation and Thermal Low Energy Buildings: CFD Techniques for Natural Ventilation and Thermal Comfort Prediction Speaker(s): Malcolm Cook Date: February 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Wetter Malcolm's presentation will cover both his research and consultancy activities. This will cover the work he has undertaken during his time spent working with architects on low energy building design, with a particular focus on natural ventilation and passive cooling strategies, and the role computer simulation can play in this design process. Malcolm will talk about the simulation techniques employed, as well as the innovative passive design principles that have led to some of the UK's most energy efficient buildings. In addition to UK building projects, the talk will

319

Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals Speaker(s): James Axley Date: March 12, 1999 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Developments in mathematical models for building air quality and ventilation analysis have changed the way we idealize buildings for purposes of analysis, the way we form system equations to effect the analysis, and the way we solve these equations to realize the analysis. While much has been achieved more is possible. This presentation will review the current state of the art - the building idealizations used, the system equations formed, and the solution methods applied - critically evaluate the completeness, complexity and utility of the most advanced models, and present proposals for future development

320

Capture and Use of Coal Mine Ventilation-Air Methane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capture and use of Coal Mine Capture and use of Coal Mine Ventilation - air Methane Background Methane emissions from coal mines represent about 10 percent of the U.S. anthropogenic methane released to the atmosphere. Methane-the second most important non-water greenhouse gas-is 21 times as powerful as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in its global warming potential. Ventilation-air methane (VAM)-the exhaust air from underground coal mines-is the largest source of coal mine methane, accounting for about half of the methane emitted from coal mines in the United States. Unfortunately, because of the low methane concentration (0.3-1.5 percent) in ventilation air, its beneficial use is difficult. However, oxidizing the methane to CO 2 and water reduces its global warming potential by 87 percent. A thermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda smart home October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Honda Motor Company Inc is proceeding with plans to build a Smart Home in Davis, California, to demonstrate the latest in renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The home is expected to produce more energy than is consumed, demonstrating how the goal of "zero net energy" can be met in the near term future. A ventilation controller developed by researchers at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) will be included in the smart home. EETD is currently working with the developers of the home control system to integrate its control algorithms.

322

Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative humidity conditions Title Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative humidity conditions Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Wenhao Chen, Agatha Chang, Robert Miller, Sebastian Cohn, Douglas P. Sullivan, William J. Fisk, Kazukiyo Kumagai, and Hugo Destaillats Journal Environmental Science and Technology Date Published 04/18/2013 Abstract A method combining life cycle assessment (LCA) and real options analyses is developed to predict project environmental and financial performance over time, under market uncertainties and decision-making flexibility. The method is applied to examine alternative uses for oil sands coke, a carbonaceous byproduct of processing the unconventional petroleum found in northern Alberta, Canada. Under uncertainties in natural gas price and the imposition of a carbon price, our method identifies that selling the coke to China for electricity generation by integrated gasification combined cycle is

323

Ventilation/Perfusion Mismatch Caused by Positive Pressure Ventilatory Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a patient with lobar atelectasis who was on positive pressure ventilatorysupport, ventilationand perfusion images showed absent ventilationand normal perfusion (reverse mismatch) in the region of the atelectasis and normal ventilation and decreased perfusion (true mismatch) not caused by pulmonaryembolism in another lung zone. We report this case to emphasize that the lung scan findingsin patients on positive pressure ventilatorySUppOrt be carefullyinterpreted for the diagnosis of pulmonaryemboli. J NuciMed30:1268—1270, 1989 ulmonary embolism (PE) is often difficult to diag nose because the symptoms and signs can be nonspe cific or subtle. Lung ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scm tigraphy is the principal noninvasive imaging modality for its diagnosis. We report a case demonstrating both classical V/P mismatch (false positive for PE in this case) and reverse V/P mismatch (absent ventilation and normal perfusion, therefore negative for PE) in a patient

Chun K. Kim; Sydney Heyman

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Standard Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standard no es suficiente Standard no es suficiente Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO!!! Si bien el Modelo Standard proporciona una descripción muy buena de los fenómenos observados en los experimentos, todavía es una teoría incompleta. El problema es que el Modelo Standard no puede explicar la causa por la que existen algunas partículas, del modo en que lo hacen. Por ejemplo, aún cuando los físicos conocían las masas de todos los quarks, a excepción de la del quark top desde hace muchos años, no podían simplemente predecir en forma exacta la masa del top, sin utilizar evidencia experimental, dado que el Modelo Standard carece de un modelo matemático para calcular el patrón que siguen los valores de las masas de las partículas. Otra cuestión está relacionada con el hecho que existen tres pares de

325

TWRS hydrogen mitigation portable standard hydrogen monitoring system platform design and fabrication engineering task plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary function of portable gas monitoring is to quickly determine tank vapor space gas composition and gas release rate, and to detect gas release events. Characterization of the gas composition is needed for safety analysis. The lower flammability limit, as well as the peak burn temperature and pressure, are dependent upon the gas composition. If there is little or no knowledge about the gas composition, safety analysis utilize compositions that yield the worst case in a deflagration or detonation. This conservative approach to unknowns necessitates a significant increase in administrative and engineering costs. Knowledge of the true composition could lead to reductions in the assumptions and therefore contribute to a reduction in controls and work restrictions. Also, knowledge of the actual composition will be required information for the analysis that is needed to remove tanks from the Watch List. Similarly, the rate of generation and release of gases is required information for performing safety analysis, developing controls, designing equipment, and closing safety issues. To determine release rate, both the gas concentrations and the dome space ventilation rates (exhauster flow rate or passive dome/atmosphere exchange rate) are needed. Therefore, to quickly verify waste tank categorization or to provide additional characterization for tanks with installed gas monitoring, a temporary, portable standard hydrogen monitoring system is needed that can be used to measure gas compositions at both high and low sensitivities.

Philipp, B.L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

Page, Steven J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Mal, Thomas (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Synchrophasor Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development & Support Development & Support Kenneth Martin martin@electricpowergroup.com June 27-28, 2013 Washington, DC DOE/OE Transmission Reliability Program 2 Introduction  Synchrophasor measurement systems widely deployed  Enable a new generation of power system monitor & control capability - Improved power system analysis & system models - Wide area, high-resolution visibility - Basis for a new generation of controls  Research challenge - standards to enable interoperability - Measurement performance - Communications  Research focus - facilitate development, testing, and validation of standards to promote interoperability Basic phasor concept well known . A phasor is the complex form of the AC waveform √2 A cos (2 π ω 0 t + φ) A e

328

Standards Coordination Office Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standards Coordination Office. ... About the Standards Coordination Office (SCO). The Standards Coordination Office of the ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Methodology for the evaluation of natural ventilation in buildings using a reduced-scale air model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial office buildings predominantly are designed to be ventilated and cooled using mechanical systems. In temperate climates, passive ventilation and cooling techniques can be utilized to reduce energy consumption ...

Walker, Christine E. (Christine Elaine)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Beyond blue and red arrows : optimizing natural ventilation in large buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our growing understanding of technology and environment has expanded the complexities of producing large naturally ventilated buildings. While it may be argued that designing for natural ventilation is a straightforward, ...

Meguro, Wendy (Wendy Kei)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

An Overview of Residential Ventilation Activities in the Building America Program (Phase I)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of issues involved in residential ventilation; provides an overview of the various ventilation strategies being evaluated by the five teams, or consortia, currently involved in the Building America Program; and identifies unresolved technical issues.

Barley, D.

2001-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

332

Design and prototyping of a low-cost portable mechanical ventilator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and prototyping of a low-cost portable mechanical ventilator for use in mass casualty cases and resource-poor environments. The ventilator delivers breaths by compressing a conventional ...

Powelson, Stephen K. (Stephen Kirby)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Evaluating the performance of natural ventilation in buildings through simulation and on-site monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural ventilation in buildings is capable of reducing energy consumption while maintaining a comfortable indoor at the same time. It is important that natural ventilation is taken into consideration in the early design ...

Cheng, Haofan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Safety Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

US DOE Workshop US DOE Workshop September 19-20, 2012 International perspective on Fukushima accident Miroslav Lipár Head, Operational Safety Section M.Lipar@iaea.org +43 1 2600 22691 2 Content * The IAEA before Fukushima -Severe accidents management * The IAEA actions after Fukushima * The IAEA Action plan on nuclear safety * Measures to improve operational safety * Conclusions THE IAEA BEFORE FUKUSHIMA 4 IAEA Safety Standards IAEA Safety Standards F undamental S afety Principles Safety Fundamentals f o r p ro te c ti n g p e o p l e a n d t h e e n v i ro n m e n t IAEA Safety Standards Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material 2005 E dit ion Safety Requirements No. T S-R-1 f o r p ro te c ti n g p e o p l e a n d t h e e n v i ro n m e n t IAEA Safety Standards Design of the Reactor Core for Nuclear Power Plants

335

STANDARD REFERENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The profession is strongly urged to use the standard reference on the financial framework in the EU, concerning endorsed IFRS in order to give a clear message to the market and to users of financial statements in and outside the EU.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Can ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 Requirements be Satisfied while Maintaining Moisture Control using Stock HVAC Equipment in Hot, Humid Climates?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outdoor air intake rates are studied to determine their impacts on moisture control in buildings, especially in hot, humid climates. Key impacts of outdoor air intake rates can be readily modeled and studied using computer simulations of building energy costs. Increased ventilation rates create real capital and operating costs for building owners and operators, with implications beyond energy costs relating to increased ventilation requirements. In hot, humid climates, increased ventilation rates increase latent loads more than sensible loads, requiring lower sensible heat ratios. Stock HVAC package units and split systems are not available with the requisite sensible heat ratios, and cannot maintain moisture control in small commercial buildings without costly modifications.

Turner, S. C.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A thermal comfort levels investigation of a naturally ventilated and air-conditioned office  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate thermal comfort levels of a naturally ventilated and air-conditioner office. Field experiments conducted in an office room in Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) used survey questionnaires and physical measurements. ... Keywords: PMV, mechanically ventilation, naturally ventilated, neutral temperature, objective study, subjective approach, thermal comfort

R. Daghigh; N. M. Adam; K. Sopian; A. Zaharim; B. B. Sahari

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings Tom Rogg REU Student to assist HVAC has the potential to significantly reduce life cycle cost and energy consumption and electrical system that will tie thermostats to controlled valves in the actual HVAC system. Based on results

Mountziaris, T. J.

339

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-264 ­ 1.278. American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, Washington, DC. 14. Gusdorf, J., Swinton, MLBNL 62341 Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States Max H. Sherman and Iain S. Walker Environmental Energy Technologies Division February 2007 This work was supported

340

Operational test report integrated system test (ventilation upgrade)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operational Final Test Report for Integrated Systems, Project W-030 (Phase 2 test, RECIRC and HIGH-HEAT Modes). Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks, including upgraded vapor space cooling and filtered venting of tanks AY101, Ay102, AZ101, AZ102.

HARTY, W.M.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

702AZ aging waste ventilation facility year 2000 test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This test procedure was developed to determine if the 702AZ Tank Ventilation Facility system is Year 2000 Compliant. The procedure provides detailed instructions for performing the operations necessary and documenting the results. This verification procedure will document that the 702AZ Facility Systems are year 2000 compliant and will correctly meet the criteria established in this procedure.

Winkelman, W.D.

1998-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

342

Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB Jump to: navigation, search Name Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne (VIB) Place Ploudalmezeau, France Zip 29839 Sector Geothermal energy, Solar Product Ploudalmezeau-based company producing and marketing energy efficient and ventilation products including air source heat pumps, geothermal water source heat pumps, efficient air filtration systems and solar products. Coordinates 48.540325°, -4.657904° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.540325,"lon":-4.657904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated buildings: revisions to ASHRAE Standard 55  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE began funding a series of field studies of thermal comfort in office buildings spread across four different climate zones.

de Dear, Richard; Brager, Gail

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated buildings: revisions to ASHRAE Standard 55  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G.S. Brager, R.J. de Dear, ASHRAE Journal 42 (10) (2000) 21–M. Fountain, T. Doherty, ASHRAE Transactions 94 (2) (M.E. Fountain, C. Huizenga, ASHRAE Journal 38 (9) (1996) 39–

de Dear, Richard; Brager, Gail

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Energy Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hall Hall October 2011 Analysis of Impacts of a Clean www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Hall i Contacts This report, Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Hall, was prepared under the

346

Energy Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Bingaman Bingaman November 2011 Analysis of Impacts of a Clean www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Bingaman i Contacts This report, Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard, as requested by Chairman Bingaman, was prepared

347

Standard Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   ASTM standards applicable to element-level testing of composites...Composite Plates Subjected to a Distributed Load Plate flexure D 6484 Open-Hole Compression Strength of Polymer Matrix Composites Open-hole compression strength Z 5370Z Compression After Impact Strength of Fiber-Resin Composites Compression after impact Z 7225Z Mixed Mode I-Mode II...

348

Review Article Ventilation/Perfusion SPECT for Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism and Other Diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. V/PSPECT has the potential to become a first hand tool for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism based on standardized technology and new holistic interpretation criteria. Pretest probability helps clinicians choose the most appropriate objective test for diagnosis or exclusion of PE. Interpretation should also take into account all ventilation and perfusion patterns allowing diagnosis of other cardiopulmonary diseases than PE. In such contexts, V/PSPECT has excellent sensitivity and specificity. Nondiagnostic reports are ?3%. V/PSPECT has no contraindication; it is noninvasive and has very low radiation exposure. Moreover, acquisition time for V/PSPECT is only 20 minutes. It allows quantification of PE extension which has an impact on individual treatment. It is uniquely useful for followup and research. 1.

Marika Bajc; Björn Jonson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

December 2007 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Standards Forum & Standards Actions Page 1 December 2007 The Standards Forum & Standards Actions Page 1 December 2007 Continued on next page Technical Standards Program Manager's Note 1 Teaching Standards Development- Inspiring the Next Generation 2 The EPA Radiation Standard for Spent-Fuel Storage in a Geological Repository 3 Expanded Access to Hydrogen Codes and Standards 4 Really Following the Building Code 6 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 7

350

STEADY-STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The methodology of flammability analysis for Hanford tank waste is developed. The hydrogen generation rate model was applied to calculate the gas generation rate for 177 tanks. Flammability concentrations and the time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit, and the minimum ventilation rate to keep from 100 of the LFL are calculated for 177 tanks at various scenarios.

HU TA

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Confinement Ventillation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

For Expert, Working or Familiarity Level Competencies CVS/PGT FAQ Job Analysis Worksheet for Tasks Task Source Importance Frequency #1 Serves as SME D&R 5 4 #2 Reviews safety documentation D&R 4+ 3- #3 Participates in standards development and interpretation D&R 2 1 #4 Assesses contractor programs and implementation D&R 4 4 #5 Represents Site/DOE at CVS meetings/committees D&R 3 1 #6 Provides oversight of HEPA filter QA programs D&R 4 3+ #7 Evaluate designs D&R 4+ 2 #8 Maintain proficiency D&R 5 1 Importance Scale Frequency How important is this task to the job? How often is the task performed? 0 = Not Performed 0 = Not Performed 1 = Not Important 1 = Every few months to yearly 2 = Somewhat Important 2 = Every few weeks to monthly

352

May 2007 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2

353

Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening Process and Results Srinandini Parthasarathy, Thomas E. McKone, Michael G. Apte Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 April 29, 2111 Prepared for the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research Program, Energy Related Environmental Research Program Legal Notice The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a national laboratory of the DOE managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Number DE-AC02- 05CH11231. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the Sponsor and pursuant to an M&O Contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Neither the

354

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values William J.N. Turner, Jennifer M. Logue, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division July 2012 LBNL-5969E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

355

Dry Transfer Facility #1 - Ventilation Confinement Zoning Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to establish the preliminary Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) for the Dry Transfer Facility (DTF). The results of this document is used to determine the air quantities for each VCZ that will eventually be reflected in the development of the Ventilation Flow Diagrams. The calculations contained in this document were developed by D and E/Mechanical-HVAC and are intended solely for the use of the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department in its work regarding the HVAC system for the Dry Transfer Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department should be consulted before use of the calculation for purposes other than those stated herein or used by individuals other than authorized personnel in D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department.

K.D. Draper

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

356

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products...

357

Catalog of Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Catalog of Standards. ... As of May 2013, the number of standards or standards components added to the Catalog of Standards stands at 56. ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Utilization of ventilation air methane as a supplementary fuel at a circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ventilation air methane (VAM) accounts for 60-80% of the total emissions from underground coal mining activities in China, which is of serious greenhouse gas concerns as well as a waste of valuable fuel sources. This contribution evaluates the use of the VAM utilization methods as a supplementary fuel at a circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler. The paper describes the system design and discusses some potential technical challenges such as methane oxidation rate, corrosion, and efficiency. Laboratory experimentation has shown that the VAM can be burnt completely in circulated fluidized bed furnaces, and the VAM oxidation does not obviously affect the boiler operation when the methane concentration is less than 0.6%. The VAM decreased the incomplete combustion loss for the circulating fluidized bed combustion furnace. The economic benefit from the coal saving insures that the proposed system is more economically feasible. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Changfu You; Xuchang Xu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Federal Information Processing Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Federal Information Processing Standards Publications (FIPS PUBS). ... Replacement Standards for Withdrawn FIPS on Geographic Codes.

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

March 2007 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2007 March 2007 Continued on next page TSP Manager's Notes 1 Domestic Programs (American National Standards) Overview 2 Aerospace Industry Advocates Standards Selection Based on Technical Merit, Not Semantics 3 Report Recommends Withdrawal of OMB Risk Assessment Bulletin 4 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 5 Topical Committee Developments 6 Welcome Aboard the TSMC! 7 Standards Actions 8 DOE Standards Actions 8

362

STANDARD DESIGN CRITERIA  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hanford Atomic Production Operation specification gaides for design criteria, structural engineering, civil engineering, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, fire alarm systems, noise control, lighting, railroad construction, corrosion protection, and electrical engineering are presented. Details of this manual are given in TID-4100 (Suppl.). (N.W.R.)

None

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Ventilation for an enclosure of a gas turbine and related method  

SciTech Connect

A ventilation scheme for a rotary machine supported on pedestals within an enclosure having a roof, end walls and side walls with the machine arranged parallel to the side walls, includes ventilation air inlets located in a first end wall of the enclosure; a barrier wall located within the enclosure, proximate the first end wall to thereby create a plenum chamber. The barrier wall is constructed to provide a substantially annular gap between the barrier wall and a casing of the turbine to thereby direct ventilation air axially along the turbine; one or more ventilation air outlets located proximate a second, opposite end wall on the roof of the enclosure. In addition, one or more fans are provided for pulling ventilating air into said plenum chamber via the ventilation air inlets.

Schroeder, Troy Joseph (Mauldin, SC); Leach, David (Simpsonville, SC); O' Toole, Michael Anthony (Greenfield Center, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

'Standard Quantum Limit' Smashed, Could Mean Better Fiber ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... easier, hints recent research* from the National Institute of Standards and Technology ... first time an error rate far below the "standard quantum limit ...

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

STANDARD SOLAR NEUTRINOS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The predictions of an improved standard solar model are compared with the observations of the four solar neutrino experiments. The improved model includes premain sequence evolution, element diffusion, partial ionization effects, and all the possible nuclear reactions between the main elements. It uses updated values for the initial solar element abundances, the solar age, the solar luminosity, the nuclear reaction rates and the radiative opacities. Neither nuclear equilibrium, nor complete ionization are assumed. The calculated 8 B solar neutrino flux is consistent, within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties, with the solar neutrino flux measured by Kamiokande. The results from the 37 Cl and 71 Ga radiochemical experiments seem to suggest that the terrestrial 7 Be solar neutrino flux is much smaller than that predicted. However, the present terrestrial “defecit ” of 7 Be solar neutrinos may be due to the use of inaccurate theoretical neutrino absorption cross sections near threshold for extracting solar neutrino fluxes from production rates. Conclusive evidence for a real deficit of 7 Be solar neutrinos will require experiments such as BOREXINO or HELLAZ. A real defecit of 7 Be solar neutrinos can be due to either astrophysical reasons or neutrino properties beyond the standard electroweak model. Only future neutrino experiments, such as SNO, Superkamiokande, BOREXINO and HELLAZ, will be able to provide conclusive evidence that the solar neutrino problem is a consequence of neutrino properties beyond the standard electroweak model. Earlier indications may be provided by long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. 1

Arnon Dar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inorganic pollutants: carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide,odor perception, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfurkeywords; pollution, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, energy

Young, Rodger A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

OCCUPANT-GENERATED CO2 AS AN INDICATOR OF VENTILATION RATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

XBL 7910-4478 Figure 3 Carbon dioxide decay curve for theday XBL 7910 Figure 4 Carbon dioxide deeay curve for the allKeywords: buildings, carbon dioxide • indoor air quali. ty,

Turiel, Isaac

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Dust and Ventilation Effects on Radiant Barriers: Cooling Season Energy Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study on the effects of attic ventilation area and type and dust buildup on horizontal and truss radiant barriers in insulated homes can help utilities reduce cooling season electric energy requirements. Increasing the ventilation area ratio and changing ventilation types had little effect on radiant barrier performance. Dust did degrade performance, but insulated homes with radiant barriers still had lower energy requirements than those without radiant barriers.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Standards Forum, June 2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

By Rick Serbu, Manager, Technical Standards Program, U.S. Department of Energy By Rick Serbu, Manager, Technical Standards Program, U.S. Department of Energy T his article provides some discussion and information on incorpo- rating DOE Orders in contracts in general, and DOE O 252.1 (Technical Standards Program) in particular. This information may be of use in making a realistic assessment, from both a business and a contractual per- spective, of whether or not a DOE site "needs" an Order. Much of this information is covered in DOE G 252.1-1 (Technical Standards Program Guide). In essence, the Technical Standards Program (TSP) provides the means for DOE (and its contractors) to comply with Federal law and policy, and it establishes the infrastructure for DOE to conduct standards-related business and implement commitments made by DOE in re-

370

Ventilating Existing Homes in the US Air Infiltration Review. 2010;31(2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programs refer to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 ­ or its predecessor 62-89 (www.ashrae.org). These standards provide rate estimated based on the local #12;climate. ASHRAE 62.2 refers to the weather factors in ASHRAE

371

NIST Global Standards Information The United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Rating of Heat Pump Pool Heaters", and ANSI/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 146 ...

372

Outdoor Air, Heat Wheels and JCPenney: A New Approach to Retail Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JCPenney Construction Services department is responsible for the construction of new stores, takeover of existing facilities to create a new store, repairs to existing JCPenney facilities and the expansion and modernization of stores across the nation and the world. Each year, JCPenney Construction Services handles approximately 50 projects along these lines. After the implementation of ASHRAE 62- 1989 by JCPenney and many major building codes, including BOCA, mechanical engineers at JCPenney noticed a sharp increase in the percentage of cooling capacity required to cool the outdoor ventilation air. In an effort to limit this impact, both in first cost and in operational costs, JCPenney is beginning to make an effort to use enthalpy heat wheels in the hot and humid climate areas where it is economically feasible. This paper discusses the efforts of JCPenney to implement this option to the treatment of outdoor air in a store in Baton Rouge, LA while maintaining indoor air quality requirements as stated in ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 and maintaining energy efficiency. This paper also discusses the projected energy savings and operations of this alternative to the standard treatment of outdoor air.

Smith, C. S.; Bartlett, T. A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Design of a ventilation system for carbon dioxide reduction in two gym rooms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This project is mainly focused on the improving and design of the ventilation system of two rooms at different levels of a gym (Friskis… (more)

Barroeta, Ander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing a database of residential air leakage in theTechnical Note AIVC 57: Residential Ventilation. Brussels,in personal samples and residential indoor, outdoor and

Sherman, Max

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom Field Study Interim Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potentially enhancing the energy savings beyond the break-order to maximize the energy savings potential of the IHPACImproving Ventilation and Saving Energy Field Study Plan,

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Functional Area Qualification Standard Job Task Analyses | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program » Services » Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program » Functional Area Qualification Standard Job Task Analyses Functional Area Qualification Standard Job Task Analyses DOE Aviation Manager DOE Aviation Safety Officer Chemical Processing Civil/Structural Engineering Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment Construction Management Deactivation and Decommissioning Electrical Systems and Safety Oversight Emergency Management Environmental Compliance Environmental Restoration Facility Representative Fire Protection Engineering General Technical Base Industrial Hygiene Instrument and Controls NNSA Package Certification Engineer Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Nuclear Safety Specialist Quality Assurance Radiation Protection Safeguards and Security Safeguards and Security General Technical Base

378

Functional Area Qualification Standard Qualification Cards | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program » Services » Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program » Functional Area Qualification Standard Qualification Cards Functional Area Qualification Standard Qualification Cards Note: 1. Save the document from the website onto your PC and close it. 2. Open the document on your PC. Answer "No" to the question regarding whether to open the documents as read only. Aviation Manager Aviation Safety Officer Chemical Processing Civil Structural Engineering Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment Construction Management Criticality Safety Deactivation and Decommissioning Electrical Systems and Safety Oversight Emergency Management Environmental Compliance Environmental Restoration Facility Maintenance Management Facility Representative Fire Protection

379

Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Program Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Large Projects: 12.5% of total budget; or $237,500 (Residential); $162,500 for Hard-To-Reach A/C and Heat Pump Program: $40,000 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Standard Offer: $250/kW + $0.081/kWh Hard To Reach Standard Offer Program (all measures except CFL): $440/kW +

380

Standard-D hydrogen monitoring system, system design description  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During most of the year, it is assumed that the vapor space in the 177 radioactive waste tanks on the Hanford Project site contain a uniform mixture of gases. Several of these waste tanks (currently twenty-five, 6 Double Shell Tanks and 19 Single Shell Tanks) were identified as having the potential for the buildup of gasses to a flammable level. An active ventilation system in the Double Shell Tanks and a passive ventilation system in the Single Shell Tanks provides a method of expelling gasses from the tanks. A gas release from a tank causes a temporary rise in the tank pressure, and a potential for increased concentration of hydrogen gas in the vapor space. The gas is released via the ventilation systems until a uniform gas mixture in the vapor space is once again achieved. The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System (SHMS) is designed to monitor and quantify the percent hydrogen concentration during these potential gas releases. This document describes the design of the Standard-D Hydrogen Monitoring System, (SHMS-D) and its components as it differs from the original SHMS.

Schneider, T.C.

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CFD Simulation of Airflow in Ventilated Wall System Report #9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to examine air movements in vinyl and brick ventilation cavities in detail, using a state of the art CFD commercial modeling tool. The CFD activity was planned to proceed the other activities in order to develop insight on the important magnitudes of scales occurring during ventilation air flow. This information generated by the CFD model was to be used to modify (if necessary) and to validate the air flow dynamics already imbedded in the hygrothermal model for the computer-based air flow simulation procedures. A comprehensive program of advanced, state-of-the-art hygrothermal modeling was then envisaged mainly to extend the knowledge to other wall systems and at least six representative climatic areas. These data were then to be used to provide the basis for the development of design guidelines. CFD results provided timely and much needed answers to many of the concerns and questions related to ventilation flows due to thermal buoyancy and wind-driven flow scenarios. The relative strength between these two mechanisms. Simple correlations were developed and are presented in the report providing the overall pressure drop, and flow through various cavities under different exterior solar and temperature scenarios. Brick Rainscreen Wall: It was initially expected that a 50 mm cavity would offer reduced pressure drops and increased air flow compared to a 19 mm cavity. However, these models showed that the size of the ventilation slots through the wall are the limiting factor rather than the cavity depth. Of course, once the slots are enlarged beyond a certain point, this could change. The effects of natural convection within the air cavities, driven by the temperature difference across the cavity, were shown to be less important than the external wind speed (for a wind direction normal to the wall surface), when wind action is present. Vinyl Rainscreen Wall: The CFD model of the vinyl rainscreen wall was simpler than that for the brick wall. Constant wall temperatures were used rather than conjugate heat transfer. Although this is appropriate for a thin surface with little heat capacity, it does mean that an empirical correlation between solar radiation (and perhaps wind speed) and vinyl temperature is required to use these results appropriately. The results developed from this CFD model were correlated to weather parameters and construction details so that they can be incorporated into ORNL s advanced hygrothermal models MOISTURE- EXPERT.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Karagiozis, Achilles N [ORNL

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

May 2006 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Actions 1 Standards Actions 1 New Projects and Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2

383

Appliance Energy Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stove, washer, dryer, refrigerator, Energy Star Label Appliance Energy Standards Energy Efficiency Standard The Energy Efficiency Standards Group analyzes technical, economic, and...

384

ISO Standards Documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ISO/TC 34: Food products and TC 34/SC 17: Management systems for food safety ISO Standards Documents iso3rss ISO Standards Development ISO Standards Development

385

September 2006 Standards Forum/Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 2006 September 2006 TSP Manager's Notes 1 TEN YEARS AFTER THE NTTAA: 1996-2006 2 Committee on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Approves Two New Standards 4 Renewable Portfolio Standards Help Wind Industry to Sail 5 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 5 World Standards Day 2006 in

386

Operating experience review - Ventilation systems at Department of Energy Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Office of Special Projects (DP-35), formerly Office of Self-Assessment (DP-9), analyzed occurrences caused by problems with equipment and material and recommended the following systems for an in-depth study: (1) Selective Alpha Air Monitor (SAAM), (2) Emergency Diesel Generator, (3) Ventilation System, (4) Fire Alarm System. Further, DP-35 conducted an in-depth review of the problems associated with SAAM and with diesel generators, and made several recommendations. This study focusses on ventilation system. The intent was to determine the causes for the events related to these system that were reported in the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), to identify components that failed, and to provide technical information from the commercial and nuclear industries on the design, operation, maintenance, and surveillance related to the system and its components. From these data, sites can develop a comprehensive program of maintenance management, including surveillance, to avoid similar occurrences, and to be in compliance with the following DOE orders.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Lower-Temperature Subsurface Layout and Ventilation Concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis combines work scope identified as subsurface facility (SSF) low temperature (LT) Facilities System and SSF LT Ventilation System in the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001b, pp. 6 and 7, and pp. 13 and 14). In accordance with this technical work plan (TWP), this analysis is performed using AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI.1Q, Software Management. The purpose of this analysis is to develop an overall subsurface layout system and the overall ventilation system concepts that address a lower-temperature operating mode for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The objective of this analysis is to provide a technical design product that supports the lower-temperature operating mode concept for the revision of the system description documents and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. The overall subsurface layout analysis develops and describes the overall subsurface layout, including performance confirmation facilities (also referred to as Test and Evaluation Facilities) for the Site Recommendation design. This analysis also incorporates current program directives for thermal management.

Christine L. Linden; Edward G. Thomas

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

Modeling Coupled Evaporation and Seepage in Ventilated Cavities  

SciTech Connect

Cavities excavated in unsaturated geological formations are important to activities such as nuclear waste disposal and mining. Such cavities provide a unique setting for simultaneous occurrence of seepage and evaporation. Previously, inverse numerical modeling of field liquid-release tests and associated seepage into cavities were used to provide seepage-related large-scale formation properties by ignoring the impact of evaporation. The applicability of such models was limited to the narrow range of ventilation conditions under which the models were calibrated. The objective of this study was to alleviate this limitation by incorporating evaporation into the seepage models. We modeled evaporation as an isothermal vapor diffusion process. The semi-physical model accounts for the relative humidity, temperature, and ventilation conditions of the cavities. The evaporation boundary layer thickness (BLT) over which diffusion occurs was estimated by calibration against free-water evaporation data collected inside the experimental cavities. The estimated values of BLT were 5 to 7 mm for the open underground drifts and 20 mm for niches closed off by bulkheads. Compared to previous models that neglected the effect of evaporation, this new approach showed significant improvement in capturing seepage fluctuations into open cavities of low relative humidity. At high relative-humidity values (greater than 85%), the effect of evaporation on seepage was very small.

T. Ghezzehei; R. Trautz; S. Finsterle; P. Cook; C. Ahlers

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Rate Schedules  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

390

April 2006 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 New Projects and Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status

391

Standard-Related Links  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Standard-Related Links. ... Association for Clinical Chemistry ACS - American Chemical Society ANSI - American National Standards Institute AOAC ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

392

Standard Reference Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Inn, KGW, Liggett, WS, and Hutchinson, JMR (1984), "The National Bureau of Standards Rocky Flats Soil Standard Reference Material," Nuclear ...

393

Federal Technical Standards Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... missions, authorities, priorities, and budget resources.". ... of developing a strategic standards management plan. ... Director of NIST's Office of Standards ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

394

Design and performance of a rule-based controller in a naturally ventilated room  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to design and implement a fuzzy controller for naturally ventilated buildings. The controller is implemented in a test room using MATLABTM. Initially the controller was validated using simulated data. Simulations ... Keywords: fuzzy logic control, naturally ventilated buildings, thermal comfort

M. Eftekhari; L. Marjanovic; P. Angelov

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Night-time naturally ventilated offices: Statistical simulations of window-use patterns from field monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates occupant behaviour of window-use in night-time naturally ventilated offices on the basis of a pilot field study, conducted during the summers of 2006 and 2007 in Cambridge, UK, and then demonstrates the effects of employing night-time ventilation on indoor thermal conditions using predictive models of occupant window-use. A longitudinal field study shows that occupants make good use of night-time natural ventilation strategies when provided with openings that allow secure ventilation, and that there is a noticeable time of day effect in window-use patterns (i.e. increased probability of action on arrival and departure). We develop logistic models of window-use for night-time naturally ventilated offices, which are subsequently applied to a behaviour algorithm, including Markov chains and Monte Carlo methods. The simulations using the behaviour algorithm demonstrate a good agreement with the observational data of window-use, and reveal how building design and occupant behaviour collectively affect the thermal performance of offices. They illustrate that the provision of secure ventilation leads to more frequent use of the window, and thus contributes significantly to the achievement of a comfortable indoor environment during the daytime occupied period. For example, the maximum temperature for a night-time ventilated office is found to be 3 C below the predicted value for a daytime-only ventilated office. (author)

Yun, Geun Young [Department of Architectural Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea); Steemers, Koen [Department of Architecture, University of Cambridge, 1-5 Scroope Terrace, Cambridge CB2 1PX (United Kingdom)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Gas Underfired Broiler Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for a gas underfired broiler under a wall-mounted canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

397

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Two Gas Pressure Fryers Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements two gas pressure fryers under a wall-mounted canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Electric Combination Oven Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for an electric combination oven under an exhaust-only canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Electric Underfired Broiler Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for a three-foot electric underfired broiler positioned under an exhaust-only canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

400

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Two Electric Pressure Fryers Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for two electric pressure fryers under a wall-mounted canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Commercial Kitchen Ventilation Performance Report: Gas Combination Oven Under Wall-Mounted Canopy Hood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents testing of ventilation requirements for a gas combination oven under an exhaust-only canopy hood. This appliance and hood combination is one of a series undertaken to provide electric utilities and the foodservice industry with data to optimize the design of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and integrate exhaust requirements with space conditioning design.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Interconnection Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Interconnection Standards Interconnection Standards < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Interconnection Provider Iowa Utilities Board Different rules govern the interconnection of distributed generation facilities in Iowa, depending on whether or not the interconnection is with a utility whose rates are regulated by the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB). Rate regulated utilities include only the state's two investor-owned utilities -- MidAmerican Energy and Interstate Power and Light (IPL) -- and Linn

403

An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system is provided in the following sections. Included are descriptions of the zone configurations, equipment-performance criteria, ventilation support systems, and the ventilation-system evaluation criteria. Section 4.2.1.1 provides a brief discussion of the ventilation system function. Section 4.2.1.2 provides details on the overall system configuration. Details of system interfaces and support systems are provided in Section 4.2.1.3. Section 4.2.1.4 describes instrumentation and control needed to operate the ventilation system. Finally, Sections 4.2.1.5 and 4.2.1.6 describe system surveillance/maintenance and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) Limitations, respectively. Note that the numerical parameters included in this description are considered nominal; set points and other specifications actually fall within operational bands.

NONE

1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Control Ventilation Systems in General Office Spaces in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonresidential ACM Manual 2.0.3 Outdoor Air Ventilation ACM Manual 3   Table 4 – Minimum Outdoor Air

Hong, Tianzhen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

NREL: Technology Deployment - Standard Work Specifications for Home Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standard Work Specifications for Home Energy Upgrades Standard Work Specifications for Home Energy Upgrades Online Tool Explore the Standard Work Specifications Online Tool now. The Standard Work Specifications (SWS) for Home Energy Upgrades is an industry resource developed under the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project. DOE chose NREL to drive the technical aspects of the project, along with the communication and outreach efforts. The SWS define the outcomes of quality work within the home energy upgrade industry, setting uniform expectations that can be leveraged in energy audits, scopes of work, quality control efforts, and training. The SWS reflect a whole-house approach to installing energy-efficiency measures and include ventilation, insulation, air sealing, and more. Safe work

406

October 2005 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Actions 1 Standards Actions 1 New Projects and DOE Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Published 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program

407

Rates - WAPA-137 Rate Order  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAPA-137 Rate Order WAPA-137 Rate Order 2009 CRSP Management Center Customer Rates Second Step Presentation from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Handout Materials from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Customer Comment Letters ATEA CREDA Farmington ITCA AMPUA Rate Adjustment Information The second step of WAPA-137 SLCA/IP Firm Power, CRSP Transmission and Ancillary Services rate adjustment. FERC Approval of Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Notice Of Filing for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Letter to Customers regarding the published Notice of Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 FRN Follow-up Public Information and Comment Forum Flier WAPA-137 Customer Meetings and Rate Adjustment Schedule

408

DOE Directives, Regulations, and Standards Portal - Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Globe Image Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program Home Search Approved Standards Recently Approved RevCom Logo RevCom for TSP Drafts for Review Registered Projects...

409

NIST Global Standards Information Global Standards News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2010 The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has advised the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ... DGI), Austin, Texas, were ...

410

NIST Global Standards Information Standards Education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Grants supporting the development of new learning resources and course modules integrating standards into the formal curriculum in Business and ...

411

Review: Effect of ventilator configuration on the distributed climate of greenhouses: A review of experimental and CFD studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ventilation processes inside the greenhouse strongly affect air renewal and internal climatic conditions, which themselves interact with the growth and homogeneity of the crop. Natural ventilation is often chosen since it is the most economic method ... Keywords: Buoyancy, Climate models, Convection, Navier-Stokes equations, Ventilation efficiency

Pierre-Emmanuel Bournet; Thierry Boulard

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

September 2005 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Page September 2005 Page September 2005 TSP Manager's Notes 1 The Halo Effect: American National Standards and the rest 2 Standards Development for Report- ing of Declarable Substances 5 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 8 DOE Revises "Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health

413

December 2006 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2006 December 2006 TSP Manager's Notes 1 Meeting In The Middle 2 Plain Talk for a New Generation 3 Licensing New Nuclear Power Plants 4 ANSI Government Affairs Overview 5 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 7 Topical Committee Developments 8 Welcome Aboard the TSMC! 8 Standards Actions 9 DOE Standards Actions 9

414

November 2005 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Technical DOE Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Revisions 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association

415

April 2007 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Projects and Technical Standards in Revision 1 DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 Technical Standards Published 2 Non-Government Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical

416

Air Temperature Measurement Errors in Naturally Ventilated Radiation Shields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two sources of systematic errors are considered for estimating air temperature. The first source is ambiguity of the definition of the standardized measurement height over vegetated surfaces of varying heights. Without such a standardization, ...

Reina Nakamura; L. Mahrt

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Ventilation and air-conditioning concept for CNGS underground areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of the CNGS project is to prove the existence of neutrino oscillation by generating an intense neutrino beam from CERN in the direction of the Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy, where two large neutrino detectors are built to detect the neutrinos. All the components for producing the neutrino beam will be situated in the underground tunnels, service galleries and chambers. The ventilation and air-conditioning systems installed in these underground areas have multiple tasks. Depending on the operating mode and structure to be air-conditioned, the systems are required to provide fresh air, cool the machine, dehumidify areas housing sensible equipment or assure the smoke removal in a case of a fire. This paper presents the technical solutions foreseen to meet these requirements.

Lindroos, J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

DOE Technical Standards Program Standards Actions Newsletter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* * New DOE Standard, Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements * Workshops and Events * The Annual Energy Facility Contractors Group Safety Analysis Workshop * 2012 Chemical Safety and Life Cycle Management Workshop * Nuclear Safety- Related Standards Activity INSIDE THIS ISSUE April 2012 Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Newsletter www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ New DOE Standard, Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has a challenging mission to solve many problems posed by the legacy of the Cold War, including the transportation of unprecedented amounts of contaminated waste,

419

Standards Actions, July 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards Program Document Status 07-01-2002 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 46 Out for Comment - 14 Published this Month - 2 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 11 Reaffirmation in Progress - 12 Cancellation Pending - 7 Cancellation in Progress - 1 No Current Action - 19 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated 1 DOE Technical Standards Re- cently Sent for Coordination 1 DOE Technical Standards Re- cently Published 1 American National Standards Institute 2 American Society for Testing and Materials International 4 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. Standards Actions- July 2002 Standards Actions DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated

420

Standards Actions, May 2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-2001 30-2001 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 39 Out for Comment - 19 Published this Month - 0 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress - 4 Reaffirmation in Progress - 23 Cancellation Pending - 9 Cancellation in Progress - 18 No Current Action - 12 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated 1 DOE Technical Standards Proposed for Reaffirmation 1 Proposed Cancellation of DOE Technical Standards 2 Published DOE Technical Standards 3 American National Standards Institute 3 American National Standards 6 American Society for Testing and Materials 6 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. May 2001 Standards Actions DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using the rate equation model. Flammability calculations based on hydrogen, ammonia, and methane were performed for 177 tanks for various scenarios.

HU TA

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

422

STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION & LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using the rate equation model. Flammability calculations based on hydrogen, ammonia, and methane were performed for 177 tanks for various scenarios.

HU, T.A.

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

Steady State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation and Lower Flammability Level Evaluation for Hanford Tank Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. Hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using rate equation model. Ammonia liquid/vapor equilibrium model is incorporated into the methodology for ammonia analysis.

HU, T.A.

2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

Steady State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation and Lower Flammability Level Evaluation for Hanford Tank Waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is to assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions in the tank dome space for 177 double-shell and single-shell tanks at Hanford. Hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using rate equation model developed recently.

HU, T.A.

2000-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

425

STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION & LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using the rate equation model. Flammability calculations based on hydrogen, ammonia, and methane were performed for 177 tanks for various scenarios.

HU, T.A.

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

426

Standard-B Hydrogen Monitoring System, system design description  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During most of the year, it is assumed that the vapor in the 177 radioactive waste tanks on the Hanford Project site contain a uniform mixture of gases. Several of these waste tanks (currently twenty five, 6 Double Shell Tanks and 19 Single Shell Tanks) were identified as having the potential for the buildup of gases to a flammable level. An active ventilation system in the Double Shell Tanks and a passive ventilation system in the Single Shell Tanks provides a method of expelling gases from the tanks. A gas release from a tank causes a temporary rise in the tank pressure, and a potential for increased concentration of hydrogen gas in the vapor space. The gas is released via the ventilation systems until a uniform gas mixture in the vapor space is once again achieved. This document describes the design of the Standard-B Hydrogen Monitoring System, (SHMS) and its components as it differs from the original SHMS. The differences are derived from changes made to improve the system performance but not implemented in all the installed enclosures.

Schneider, T.C.

1995-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

427

Energy Rating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consistent, accurate, and uniform ratings based on a single statewide rating scale Reasonable estimates of potential utility bill savings and reliable recommendations on cost-effective measures to improve energy efficiency Training and certification procedures for home raters and quality assurance procedures to promote accurate ratings and to protect consumers Labeling procedures that will meet the needs of home buyers, homeowners, renters, the real estate industry, and mortgage lenders with an interest in home energy ratings

Cabec Conference; Rashid Mir P. E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Insertion Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HOME > Insertion Rates. TECH HEADLINES. Research Explores a New Layer in Additive Manufacturin... Grand Opening Slated for Electron Microscopy Facility.

429

May 2005 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Revisions 1 DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated 1 Non-Government Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 DOE Technical Standards Program Document Status 04-27-2005 Activity Summary In Conversion - 4 In Preparation - 25

430

Turbulent particle deposition in a rectangular chamber: Study of the effect of particle size and ventilation regimes  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of aerosol particles with wall surfaces is important in modeling their behavior. This interaction is usually represented in theoretical models as a loss term. The loss rate is the rate at which particles deposit or react with the surfaces. This loss term is important in many branches of aerosol science including human health and indoor air quality. Increased surface deposition usually means lower concentrations of airborne particles and hence, lower exposure to the inhabitants. If the efficiency of the particle deposition is influenced by factors other than the particle size, such as a natural convection of the air, this has to be taken into account to evaluate the results. In this research, test aerosol sized from 15 nm to 3 {micro}m are produced by several different aerosol generators; the gas burner, the Collison nebulizer, the condensation aerosol generator, the orifice atomizer and the Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG). A rectangular chamber whose dimensions are 75 x 75 x 180 cm{sup 3} was used in this study. The particles were injected into the chamber, with a known ventilation and the concentration decay was monitored by the Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (UCPC) and Optical Particle Counter (OPC). During the measurement, the air inside the chamber is moved by natural convection and ventilation effect. The results shows that the particle loss rate under the higher air exchange rate is larger and this is not only due to air exchange itself but also the wall deposition. The theoretical model presented by Benes and Holub (1996) agree with the experimental data better than the Crump and Seinfield (1981) model with the hypothesis of Plandtl`s mixing length. 118 refs.

Nomura, Yoshio

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

NETL: Publication Standards Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards Manual Publications Publication Standards Manual Click on the logo to access the NETL Publication Standards Manual 2003 APEX Logo Click on the logo or on the link below...

432

Thick Buildings [Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STANDARDS The idea of tracts of windowless indoor space hassider U.S. practices and standards? building with four sidesAs these codes and standards change future generations may

Coffin, Christie Johnson

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Questioning Copyright in Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adoption and use of privately drafted industry standards).arising from abuses of standard-setting processes are well-at 7. Compliance with standards has often implicated patent

Samuelson, Pam

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

February 2007 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Technical Standards Posted in RevCom for TSP 1 DOE Technical Standards in Reaffirmation 1 DOE Technical Standards Change Notices 1 DOE Technical Standards Published1 Non-Government Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society (ANS) 2 National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 2 Publication Staff Roster 2

435

Automated Voltage Standard Ready  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... “We wanted a standard that was ... as envisioned, then within our lifetimes there will no longer be a need for voltage transfer standards that have to be ...

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

436

complex dimensional standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mailing Address: National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 Bureau Drive ... of CMS Software: NIST-generated data sets, standard level (per ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

437

Surrogate protein particle standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The large particles may be useful as a standard for the counting of ... drugs require visual inspection, at present there are no standards available for ...

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

438

Appliance Efficiency Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appliance Efficiency Standards Part 1 of 2 In the National Energy Policy Conservation Act (1978), Congress required DOE to set energy-efficiency standards for 13 residential...

439

Cryptographic Standards Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... standard. We will continue in our mission to work with the cryptographic community to create the strongest possible encryption standards for the US ...

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

440

Cytomegalovirus Standard Reference Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and reagent manufacturers in production of their own calibrants and standards. ... control materials which would be traceable to a NIST standard. ...

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

April 2011 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3009 3009 Revision * DOE Standard 1066 Revision * New DOE Standards Projects * Incidents of Security Concern Technical Standard * Explosives Safety * Operations Assessment Field Handbook * Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources Program * Occurrence Reporting Causal Analysis Guide * Nuclear Safety-Related Standards Activity INSIDE THIS ISSUE April 2011 Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Newsletter www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE Standard 3009 Revision The Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance (HS-21), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted workshops in January and March to support a major revision of Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3009, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor

442

Battery Standard Scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scenario: Fast Tracking a Battery Standard. ... with developing a new standard specifying quality controls for the development of batteries used in ...

443

Sustainability Standards Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... links to the original standard/ directive developer website ... for harmonizing standards and directives (future work ... for information only; it does not imply ...

444

Rate schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Rate/Charges Effective Through (or until superceded) Firm Sales (SLIP-F9) Composite Rate SLIP 29.62 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Demand Charge SLIP $5.18/kW-month 9/30/2015 Energy Charge SLIP 12.19 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) SLIP 0 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Transmission Service Provided by Current Rates effective10/12 - 9/15 (or until superceded) Rate Schedule Effective Through Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-PTP7) CRSP $1.14 per kW-month $13.69/kW-year $0.00156/kW-hour $0.04/kW-day $0.26/kW-week 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Network Integration Transmission (SP-NW3) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Non-Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-NFT6) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Ancillary Services Provided by Rate Rate Schedule

445

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Lorenzetti, David M., Astrid H. Kristoffersen, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Indoor Air Pagination 7 Keywords recirculating ventilation, tracer decay rate Abstract Tracer gas measurements are used to estimate the flow rate of fresh air into a room or building. These methods commonly account for the decay of tracer gas concentration as the result of ventilation air supply and infiltration, using a well-mixed model of the space. Some researchers also have considered the effect of leakage in the ventilation ductwork. This paper considers the effect of recirculation through ventilation ducts on the calculated fresh air supply rate. Transport delay in the ducts can significantly alter the time evolution of tracer concentration, and hence alter the estimated air change rate.

446

Exchange Rates and Fundamentals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near–random walk behavior if fundamentals are I(1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs, inflation, and interest rates provide little help in predicting changes in floating exchange rates. As well, we show that the data do exhibit a related link suggested by standard models—that the exchange rate helps predict these fundamentals. The implication is that exchange rates and fundamentals are linked in a way that is broadly consistent with asset-pricing models of the exchange rate. I.

Charles Engel; Kenneth D. West

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

NIST Global Standards Information Global Standards News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (EPRI) to help it develop an interim "roadmap" for determining the architecture and initial key standards for an electric power "Smart Grid". ...

448

May 2010 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

449

An Ontology For Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper continues the exploration of standards that the authors initiated in [1] and continued in [2] and [3]. It provides an ontology for standards---a specification of the things and relationships relevant to the topic of standards. The ontology is presented using the ISO standard graphical language, EXPRESS-G. It uses concepts from mathematical logic to clarify the content, meaning, and use of standards. Characteristics and elements of standards that are independent of any particular usage of the standard are defined. The subject matter of standardization is classified and a taxo nomy is presented. Instances of earliest use of each part of the taxonomy are described. The means of establis hing standards is discussed, together with the question of voluntary versus mandatory compliance. The paper closes with a set of conclusions regarding management process standards. The paper concentrates on those aspects of standards of importance to systems engineering, and includes numerous illustrative exa mples.

J. R. Velman; E. R. Widmann

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

May 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2009 May 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

451

February 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 2009 February 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

452

July 2009 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) Standards Actions 1.0 DOE STANDARDS ACTIONS The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) publishes Standards Actions on a monthly basis to provide DOE headquarters and field elements with current information on DOE and select non-government standards activities. The complete list of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status is available on the TSP web page at: http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/. To access these standards, go to our web page, click on "DOE Technical Standards," then choose Projects, Approved Standards, Recently Approved Standards, or Drafts for Review, as

453

March 2006 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 March 2006 1 March 2006 TSP Manager's Notes 1 New ISO Policy Provides International Solutions to Market Needs 2 Plain Talk for a New Generation 5 The Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards within the Department of Energy 7 Two Change Notices for DOE Standard 1104 8

454

Are We Ready to Propose Guidelines for Health-Based Ventilation?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Are We Ready to Propose Guidelines for Health-Based Ventilation? Are We Ready to Propose Guidelines for Health-Based Ventilation? Speaker(s): Pawel Wargocki Date: October 14, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mark Mendell Guidelines for health-based ventilation in Europe are proposed. They follow the premise of controlling exposures to indoor air pollutants of both indoor and outdoor origin. Exposures are controlled through a two-step sequential approach, in which source control is the primary strategy, while ventilation is the secondary strategy once all options for source control have been fully implemented. World Health Organization (WHO) air quality (AQ) guidelines are used to set the exposure limits. A decision diagram is created for guidance through the process of source control and to aid in

455

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

simple, cost-effective techniques for providing fresh air throughout the home, including exhaust-only and central fan-integrated supply ventilation. Building America has refined simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.3 Assured Health, Safety, and Durability Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing As high-performance homes get more air-tight and better insulated, attention to good indoor air quality becomes essential. Building America has effectively guided the nation's home builders to embrace whole-house ventilation by developing low-cost options that adapt well to their production processes. When the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research teams began

456

Analysis of Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation of Hydrogen from Buildings (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of work for this project includes safe building design, vehicle leak in residential garage, continual slow leak, passive, buoyancy-driven ventilation (versus mechanical), and steady-state concentration of hydrogen versus vent size.

Barley, C. D.; Gawlik, K.; Ohi, J.; Hewett, R.

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

457

Internal Microclimate Resulting From Ventilated Attics in Hot and Humid Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ventilated spaces in the built environment create unique and beneficial microclimates. While the current trends in building physics suggest sealing attics and crawlspaces, comprehensive research still supports the benefits of the ventilated microclimate. Data collected at the University of Florida Energy Park show the attic environment of asphalt shingled roofs to be typically hotter than the outdoor conditions, but when properly ventilated sustains a much lower relative humidity. The hot, humid regions of the United States can utilize this internally convective, exchanging air mass to provide stable moisture levels within attic spaces. Positioning the buildings primary boundary at the ceiling deck allows for utilization of this buffer climate to minimize moisture trapping in insulation and maximize the insulation’s thermal benefits. This investigation concludes the conditions in a ventilated attic are stable through seasonal changes and promotes cost effective, energy efficient climate control of unconditioned spaces in hot, humid regions.

Mooney, B. L.; Porter, W. A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Study of natural ventilation design by integrating the multi-zone model with CFD simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural ventilation is widely applied in sustainable building design because of its energy saving, indoor air qualify and indoor thermal environment improvement. It is important for architects and engineers to accurately ...

Tan, Gang, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Early Morning Ventilation of a Gaseous Tracer from a Mountain Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important component of a joint Environmental Protection Agency–Department of Energy field experiment in Brush Creek Valley, Colorado in July–August 1982, was an aircraft sampling task to help verify the early morning ventilation of a gaseous ...

Montie M. Orgill

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Natural ventilation: it's as easy as opening the windows, or is it  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research consisted of an evaluation of the existing technologies available for passive cooling with an emphasis on strategies related to the use of natural ventilation. A preliminary data base for the study was established by three major efforts: 1. An extensive literature search of the architectural press was undertaken to ascertain the degree to which passive cooling strategies in general and natural ventilation in particular are designed into buildings at the present time. 2. An investigation of existing building stock profiles was undertaken to identify the existing and potential obstacles or advantages to the implementation of natural ventilation as a passive cooling strategy. The EIA Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey and two previous PNL studies were reviewed. 3. Components 1 and 2 were followed up with telephone interviews and site visits with the architects, building owners and operators of selected buildings from 1 and 2 above to gain more specific insights into the problems and pleasures typically associated with natural ventilation.

Siebein, G.W.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ventilation and Transformation of Labrador Sea Water and Its Rapid Export in the Deep Labrador Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean is used to study different aspects of ventilation and water mass transformation during a year with moderate convection intensity in the Labrador Sea. The model realistically describes the salient ...

Peter Brandt; Andreas Funk; Lars Czeschel; Carsten Eden; Claus W. Böning

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Sensitivity of the Ventilation Process in the North Pacific to Eddy-Induced Tracer Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coarse-resolution isopycnal model coupled with a bulk mixed layer model is used to examine the effect of isopycnal thickness diffusion, which parameterizes the subgrid-scale eddy-induced tracer transport, on ventilation of the North Pacific ...

Takahiro Endoh; Yanli Jia; Kelvin J. Richards

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Role of Finite Mixed-Layer Thickness in the Structure of the Ventilated Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the ventilated thermocline consisting of three adiabatic layers surmounted by a mixed layer of finite thickness is presented. The mixed-layer depth density increase continuously northward, and these attributes of the mixed layer are ...

Joseph Pedlosky; Paul Robbins

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Simulating Natural Ventilation in and Around Buildings by Fast Fluid Mingang Jin1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ventilation, CIBSE [6] proposed analytical expressions separately for wind-driven and buoyancy- driven cross Review, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 4­ 5, 1982. [6] CIBSE, Design data, in CIBSE Guid-Volum A, Chartered

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

465

Radiative Heating Errors in Naturally Ventilated Air Temperature Measurements Made from Buoys*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiative heating errors in buoy-mounted, naturally ventilated air temperature sensors are examined. Data from sensors with multiplate radiation shields and collocated, fan-aspirated air temperature sensors from three buoy deployments ...

Steven P. Anderson; Mark F. Baumgartner

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Recommendations for the analysis and design of naturally ventilated buildings in urban areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The motivation behind this work was to obtain a better understanding of how a building's natural ventilation potential is affected by the complexities introduced by the urban environment. To this end, we have derived in ...

Truong, Phan Hue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Computer Simulation of Cooling Effect of Wind Tower on Passively Ventilated Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional buildings are cooled and ventilated by mechanically induced drafts. Natural ventilation aspires to cool and ventilate a building by natural means, such as cross ventilation or wind towers, without mechanical equipment. A simple computer program was developed to simulate airflow through a wind tower based on tower dimensions and air temperature. The program was compared to experimental results with reasonable agreement. Parametric analysis indicates that interior air temperature approaches outdoor air temperature asymptotically as tower height and cross-sectional area are increased, and that it may be more cost effective to increase the tower?s height than its cross sectional area. The program was then used to simulate hour-by-hour indoor air temperatures of an occupied auditorium in Dayton, OH. The results indicate that a large wind tower was able to keep the temperature of an occupied auditorium at a comfortable level year round.

Seryak, J.; Kissock, J. K.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Assessment of Pollutant Spread from a Building Basement with three Ventilation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ventilation aims at providing a sufficient air renewal for ensuring a good indoor air quality (IAQ), yet building energy policies are leading to adapting various ventilation strategies minimising energy losses through air renewal. A recent IAQ evaluation campaign in French dwellings shows important pollution of living spaces by VOCs such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde or hexanal, particularly in buildings equipped with a garage. Besides, radon emission from soil is a subject of concern in many countries. Several studies are done to understand its release mode and deal with the spread of this carcinogen gas. This paper aims to experimentally assess a contaminant spread from a house basement using mechanical exhaust and balanced ventilation systems, and natural ventilation.

Koffi, Juslin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scaling the passive stack diameter with house size (floora single-story house ventilated by a passive stack with andTable 1: Passive stack diameters scaling with house size

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Standards and Certification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Standards and Certification. Voluntary Voting System Guidelines (VVSG). The Help America Vote Act instructed the Election ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

471

FMOC Standards Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spacer Facilities Management and Operations Center (FMOC) Standards Program (removed) Sandia Home...

472

December 2005 Standards Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Page December 2005 Page December 2005 TSP Manager's Notes 1 Overview of the U.S. Standardization System 2 A Call for Greater Collaboration 5 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 6 Topical Committee Developments 7 Welcome Aboard the TSMC! 8 DOE Standards Actions 9 Non-Government Standards

473

Standards Development Organization Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Standards Organizations NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) ... Fire News – Annual directory – NFPA Buyer's Guide ... Headquarters ...

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

474

February 2013 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Newsletter U . S . D E PA R T M E N T O F O ffi ce O f nuclear SaFety ENERGY inSide thiS iSSue * Featured DOE Technical Standards Activities * DOE Technical Standards Cost- Savings and Access Improvement Initiative * Domestic and International Nuclear Energy Voluntary Consensus Standards Needs * Nuclear Safety- Related Standards Activity Featured dOe technical StandardS activitieS DOE Technical Standards Cost-Savings and Access Improvement Initiative By Helen Todosow, Brookhaven National Laboratory The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Managers (TSM) are actively exploring ways to save the government and tax payers' money while at the same time significantly improving efficiencies in access and use of voluntary consensus

475

Airflow Simulation and Energy Analysis in Ventilated Room with a New Type of Air Conditioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airflow simulation in one ventilated room with radiant heating and natural ventilation has been carried out. Three cases are compared: the closed room, the room with full openings, and the room with small openings. The radiator heating room with small openings is recommended. The airflow and thermal comfort are discussed for the last case. It is suitable for two kinds of civil buildings, housing buildings and office buildings, which take up the largest part of all functional buildings.

Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

HVAC Technology Report: A Review of Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Technology and Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many of us, roughly 95 percent of our time is spent indoors. To enable humans to spend this much time inside, mechanical equipment is necessary to provide space conditioning to control the temperature (heating and cooling), ventilation, humidity, and indoor air quality. This report introduces the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry to EPRI member utility employees. The document describes the most common technologies and applications and provides an overview of industry statisti...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

477

NETL Publication Standards Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards NETL Publication Standards Manual Publication Standards Manual Click on topic below to view Click "Contents" in the bookmarks panel at the left of your screen to return to this page Introduction * Overview * About This Manual - Point of Contact - Download Files - Permission - Signage - Special Applications Publication Standards * Design Elements * Fact Sheets * Font (Typeface) * Full-Size Brochures * Logo * Presentations * Report Covers NETL Publication Standards Manual Overview For over 60 years, we have been at the forefront

478

Energy Efficiency Standard | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Standard Efficiency Standard Energy Efficiency Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Other Program Info State Iowa Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Provider Iowa Utilities Board In 2008, Iowa enacted S.B. 2386, which requires the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB) to create energy savings standards (electricity and natural gas) for all rate-regulated utilities. The IUB ordered utilities to reduce retail sales by 1.5% of average sales for the previous 3 years by December 31, 2011.* Utilities that are not rate-regulated (municipal and cooperative utilities) were required to establish their own energy efficiency goals. These goals were filed in December 2009. All utilities (rate-regulated and

479

Energy Efficient Ventilation for Maintaining Indoor Air Quality in Large Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper was presented at the 3rd International Conference on Cold Climate Heating, Ventilating and Air-conditioning, Sapporo, Japan, November 2000 C. Y. Shaw Rsum Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council Canada Achieving good indoor air quality in large residential and commercial buildings continues to be a top priority for owners, designers, building managers and occupants alike. Large buildings present a greater challenge in this regard than do smaller buildings and houses. The challenge is greater today because there are many new materials, furnishings, products and processes used in these buildings that are potential sources of air contaminants. There are three strategies for achieving acceptable indoor air quality: ventilation (dilution), source control and air cleaning/filtration. Of the three, the most frequently used strategy, and in most cases the only one available to building operators, is ventilation. Ventilation is the process of supplying outdoor air to an enclosed space and removing stale air from this space. It can control the indoor air quality by both diluting the indoor air with less contaminated outdoor air and removing the indoor contaminants with the exhaust air. Ventilation costs money because the outdoor air needs to be heated in winter and cooled in summer. To conserve energy, care must be taken to maximize the efficiency of the ventilation system. In this regard, a number of factors come into play

C. Y. Shaw; C. Y. Shaw Résumé

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Numerical Analysis of the Channel Wheel Fresh Air Ventilator Under Frosting Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As new equipment, the channel wheel fresh air ventilator has become increasingly popular in recent years. However, when such equipment is operated under low ambient temperature in the freezing area in winter, the formation of frost on the outdoor waste air surface becomes problematic, leading to the degradation of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator's performance or even the shutdown of equipment. Therefore, it is necessary to have a detailed investigation on the operational characteristics of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator under frosting in order to guide its application. This paper first reports on the development of a detailed model for the channel wheel heat exchanger, which is the core part of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator under frosting conditions. The model developed, first seen in open literature, consists of a frosting sub-model and a channel wheel heat exchanger sub-model. This is followed by reporting an evaluation of the operational characteristics of a frosted channel wheel heat exchanger under different ambient conditions using the model developed. These include frost formation on the surface of the channel wheel heat exchanger, and impacts on the operational performance of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator. Furthermore, the interval of defrosting is obtained, which provides the basis for the adoption of effective defrosting measures, and thus increasing the channel wheel fresh air ventilator's energy efficiency and operating reliability.

Gao, B.; Dong, Z.; Cheng, Z.; Luo, E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation rate standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

A survey and critical review of the literature on indoor air quality, ventilation and health symptoms in schools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey and critical review were undertaken of existing published literature and reports on indoor air quality (IAQ), ventilation, and IAQ- and building-related health problems in schools, including California schools. Over 450 relevant publications were obtained and reviewed, including papers published in the archival peer-reviewed scientific literature, proceedings of scientific meetings, government reports, 77 NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Reports (HHER) and 70 reports on investigations of problem schools in California. Most of the reviewed literature was for complaint or problem schools. The types of health symptoms reported in schools were very similar to those defined as sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, although this may be due, at least in part, to the type of health symptom questionnaires used. Some of the symptoms, e.g., wheezing, are indicative of asthma. In the studies in which complaint and noncomplaint buildings or areas were compared, complaint buildings generally had higher rates of health symptoms.

Daisey, J.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Angell, W.J. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Energy Efficiency Standard (Iowa) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In 2008, Iowa enacted S.B. 2386, which requires the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB) to create energy savings standards (electricity and natural gas) for all rate-regulated utilities....

483

August 2001 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7-31-2001 7-31-2001 Activity Summary In Conversion-4 In Preparation-43 Out for Comment-17 Published this Month-0 5-year Review Status Revision in Progress-6 Reaffirmation in Progress-23 Cancellation Pending-4 Cancellation in Progress-12 Proposed for Cancellation-13 No Current Action-11 Inside this issue: DOE Technical Standards Project Initiated 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Sent for Coordination 1 DOE Technical Standard Recently Reaffirmed 1 DOE Technical Standards Recently Published 2 American National Standards Institute 2 American National Standards 4 American Society for Testing and Materials 5 Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/. Standards Actions- August 2001 Standards

484

November 2000 Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2000 November 2000 Standards Technical Standards Program Document Status Visit the Technical Standards Program Web Site: http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE Technical Standards Projects Initiated If you have any questions or are interested in participating in the development of these standards, please contact the representatives listed below. Complete listings of all DOE Technical Standards projects and their status are given on the Technical Standards Pro- gram (TSP) Web Site referenced at the bottom of this page. To access these lists from the home page, click on “DOE Technical Standards,” then click on “Projects” in the left- hand frame to show the links to the project lists. The following DOE Technical Standards projects were recently initiated: • Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds, Project Number OCSH-

485

CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS TO NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS TO NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS TO NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS Purpose This procedure provides guidance on the...

486

Definition: Facility Rating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

any equipment comprising the facility.1 Related Terms reactive power, equipment rating, power, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inl...

487

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Room Air Conditioners Computer Room Air Conditioners Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of computer room air conditioners (CRACs) since 2012. A CRAC is a device that monitors and maintains the temperature, air distribution, and humidity in a network room or data center and is rated as a computer room air conditioner in accordance with 10 CFR 431.96. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Proced