National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ventilation climate zone

  1. READ THIS: Before You Ventilate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-12-08

    This document reviews ventilation strategies for different climate zones and includes schematic drawings and photographs of various ventilation installations.

  2. Ventilation Requirements in Hot Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, I. S.; Sherman, M. H.

    2006-01-01

    ,” To be publicshed ASHRAE Trans. Sherman, M.H. and Matson, N.E “Residential Ventilation and Energy Characteristics,” ASHRAE Trans. 103(1), 1997, [LBNL- 39036]. Sherman M. H., “Over-ventilating in Hot, Humid Climates”, IAQ Applications, 7(1) pp. 1-4 ASHRAE, 2006...a. Sherman M. H. , “House Need to Breathe…Right?” Fine Homebuilding, April/May 2006; pp. 64-69, LBL Report 54496. Sherman M.H, Matson N.E. , “Air Tightness in New U.S. Housing” Proc. 22 nd AIVC Conference, Air Infiltration and Ventilation...

  3. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New...

  4. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    akfairbanksnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  5. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    atxhoustonnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  6. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    agaatlantanew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  7. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    usaflmiaminew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  8. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    samthelenanew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  9. Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

    2009-01-01

    Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation inon energy consumption and the energy-saving potentials of amixing ventilation alone if energy-saving strategies are not

  10. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    mdbaltimorenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate...

  11. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    acobouldernew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate...

  12. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    awaseattlenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate...

  13. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nvlasvegasnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate...

  14. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona In addition to the ZIP file for each...

  15. Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

    2009-01-01

    Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation inalone if energy-saving strategies are not applied. TheHowever, this energy- saving strategy can be recommended

  16. Climate Zone Subtype A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name:Climate Zone Number 2Subtype A

  17. Climate Zone Subtype B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name:Climate Zone Number 2Subtype

  18. Climate Zone Subtype C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name:Climate Zone Number

  19. Climate Zone Number 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name:Climate Zone Number 2 Jump to:

  20. Climate Zone Number 3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name:Climate Zone Number 2 Jump

  1. Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name:Climate Zone Number 2

  2. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hicago-oharenew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate...

  3. Thermal Comfort Study in a Naturally Ventilated Residential Building in a Tropical Hot-Humid Climate Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebarto, V. I.; Handjarinto, S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a thermal comfort study in a naturally ventilated residential building located in a tropical hot-humid climate region. The specific objective of this study is to investigate whether thermal comfort in this house can be achieved...

  4. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2014-01-06

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits.? Confirming these findings in intervention studies is recommended. ? Energy costs of heating/cooling unoccupied classrooms statewide are modest, but a large portion occurs in relatively few classrooms.

  5. Energy and Cost Associated with Ventilating Office Buildings in a Tropical Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rim, Donghyun; Schiavon, Stefano; Nazaroff, William W

    2015-01-01

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Energy and Cost Associated with VentilatingS, Nazaroff WW (2015) Energy and Cost Associated withcost on ventilation energy and cost; and 4) limitations and

  6. Ventilated Facade Design for Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, M.; Amato, A.

    2006-01-01

    systems. The Hong Kong climate offers short warm winters which together with a high internal heat gain make heating redundant. Figure 7 illustrates the simulation results of cooling energy savings. The results show significant cooling savings of up... the results significantly. 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% b a s e c a s e ( i n t e r n a l s h a d i n g ) b a s e c a s e w i t h r e f l e c t i v e g l a s s b a s e c a s e s o l a r c o n t r o l g l a s s D S F 1 - 1 D S F 1 - 2 D S F 2...

  7. CO2 - Based Demand-Controlled Ventilation Control Strategies for Multi-Zone HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassif, N.

    2011-01-01

    CO2-based demand-controlled ventilation DCV strategy offers a great opportunity to reduce energy consumption in HVAC systems while providing the required ventilation. However, implementing CO2-based DCV under ASHRAE 62.1.2004 through 2010...

  8. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3C San Francisco, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  9. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3C San Francisco, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  10. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4A Baltimore, Maryland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  11. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4A Baltimore, Maryland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  12. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  13. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  14. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 2B Phoenix, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  15. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 2B Phoenix, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  16. Climate Zone 7B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump5BClimate Zone

  17. Climate Zone 1A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action FundTrainingClimate

  18. Climate Zone 1B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action FundTrainingClimate1B

  19. Climate Zone 6A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump5B JumpClimate

  20. Climate Zone 6B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump5B JumpClimate6B

  1. Climate Zone 8B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump5BClimateClimate

  2. Climate Zone Number 7 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2BZone Number 4Climate

  3. Study of natural ventilation design by integrating the multi-zone model with CFD simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Gang, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    Natural ventilation is widely applied in sustainable building design because of its energy saving, indoor air qualify and indoor thermal environment improvement. It is important for architects and engineers to accurately ...

  4. The Potential for Wind Induced Ventilation to Meet Occupant Comfort Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, S. J.; Huang, Y. J.; Ritschard, R. L.; Foley, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a simple graphic tool that enables a building designer to evaluate the potential for wind induced ventilation cooling in several climate zones. Long term weather data were analyzed to determine the conditions for which available...

  5. Energy and IAQ Implications of Residential Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the energy, humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of residential ventilation cooling in all U.S. IECC climate zones. A computer modeling approach was adopted, using an advanced residential building simulation tool with airflow, energy and humidity models. An economizer (large supply fan) was simulated to provide ventilation cooling while outdoor air temperatures were lower than indoor air temperatures (typically at night). The simulations were performed for a full year using one-minute time steps to allow for scheduling of ventilation systems and to account for interactions between ventilation and heating/cooling systems.

  6. Using a Constant Volume Displacement Ventilation System to Create a Micro Climate in a Large Airport Terminal in Bangkok 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmonds, P.; Gaw, W.

    1996-01-01

    In order to conserve energy and create a comfortable climate for both passengers and workers at a new large international airport in Thailand, a design concept was created where only the first 2m above the occupied zone is conditioned...

  7. Category:ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village,8199089°, -86.3376761°AnadromousASHRAE Climate Zones Jump

  8. Energy and Cost Associated with Ventilating Office Buildings in a Tropical Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rim, Donghyun; Schiavon, Stefano; Nazaroff, William W

    2015-01-01

    Code of practice-air conditioning and mechanical ventilation62.1. Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. OlesenRefrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. ASHRAE (2013)

  9. Using a Ventilation Controller to Optimize Residential Passive Ventilation For Energy and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    One way to reduce the energy impact of providing residential ventilation is to use passive and hybrid systems. However, these passive and hybrid (sometimes called mixed-mode) systems must still meet chronic and acute health standards for ventilation. This study uses a computer simulation approach to examine the energy and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of passive and hybrid ventilation systems, in 16 California climate zones. Both uncontrolled and flow controlled passive stacks are assessed. A new hybrid ventilation system is outlined that uses an intelligent ventilation controller to minimise energy use, while ensuring chronic and acute IAQ standards are met. ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 – the United States standard for residential ventilation - is used as the chronic standard, and exposure limits for PM2.5, formaldehyde and NO2 are used as the acute standards.The results show that controlled passive ventilation and hybrid ventilation can be used in homes to provide equivalent IAQ to continuous mechanical ventilation, for less use of energy.

  10. Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones --Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones -- Yucca Mountain paleohydrogeology paleoclimate U-series dating secondary ion mass spectrometry Yucca Mountain Understanding to Pleistocene climate change within a deep vadose zone in the eastern Mojave Desert at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

  11. Enthalpy Wheels Come of Age: Applying Energy Recovery Ventilation to Hospitality Venues in Hot, Humid Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellford, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Energy recovery ventilation systems, including rotary heat exchangers or enthalpy wheels, utilize mature technologies that are routinely applied in commercial buildings. Energy recovery is particularly important in buildings with significant outdoor...

  12. Energy and Cost Associated with Ventilating Office Buildings in a Tropical Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rim, Donghyun; Schiavon, Stefano; Nazaroff, William W

    2015-01-01

    Building Ventilation and Energy Use in Tropical Climatesbuildings. Florida Solar Energy Center. USDOE (2011) ReportReview. U.S. Department of Energy. Pérez-Lombard L, Ortiz J,

  13. On the Single-Zone Modeling for Optimal Climate Control of a Real-Sized Livestock Stable System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenyu

    . As a typical modern and large-sized stable system, the considered stable uses hybrid ventilation and low described. The models for air inlets, outlets and their driving systems as well as the heating systems, one climate control systems. A typical modern stable system is usually equipped with a hybrid ventilation [3

  14. Energy and Cost Associated with Ventilating Office Buildings in a Tropical Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rim, Donghyun; Schiavon, Stefano; Nazaroff, William W

    2015-01-01

    the challenges of climate change for the built environment.Inf 35: Frank TH (2005) Climate change impacts on buildingDB, Scott MJ, Sands RD (1996) Climate change impacts on U.S.

  15. Natural ventilation generates building form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shaw-Bing

    1996-01-01

    Natural ventilation is an efficient design strategy for thermal comfort in hot and humid climates. The building forms can generate different pressures and temperatures to induce natural ventilation. This thesis develops a ...

  16. Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season. ?

  17. Technology Solutions Case Study: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  18. Effects of Radiant Barrier Systems on Ventilated Attics in a Hot and Humid Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, M. A.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    was not sensitive to increased airflows. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barrier systems were between 25 and 34 percent, with 28 percent being the reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. All results presented...

  19. Impact of Residential Mechanical Ventilation on Energy Cost and Humidity Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Optimizing whole house mechanical ventilation as part of the Building Ameerica program's systems engineered approach to constructing housing has been an important subject of the program's research. Ventilation in residential buildings is one component of an effective, comprehensive strategy for creation and maintenance of a comfortable and healthy indoor air environment. The study described in this report is based on building energy modeling with an important focus on the indoor humidity impacts of ventilation. The modeling tools used were EnergyPlus version 7.1 (E+) and EnergyGauge USA (EGUSA). Twelve U.S. cities and five climate zones were represented. A total of 864 simulations (2*2*3*3*12= 864) were run using two building archetypes, two building leakage rates, two building orientations, three ventilation systems, three ventilation rates, and twelve climates.

  20. Impact of Residential Mechanical Ventilation on Energy Cost and Humidity Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, E.

    2014-01-01

    The DOE Building America program has been conducting research leading to cost effective high performance homes since the early 1990's. Optimizing whole house mechanical ventilation as part of the program's systems engineered approach to constructing housing has been an important subject of the program's research. Ventilation in residential buildings is one component of an effective, comprehensive strategy for creation and maintenance of a comfortable and healthy indoor air environment. The study described in this white paper is based on building energy modeling with an important focus on the indoor humidity impacts of ventilation. The modeling tools used were EnergyPlus version 7.1 (E+) and EnergyGauge USA (EGUSA). Twelve U.S. cities and five climate zones were represented. A total of 864 simulations (2*2*3*3*12= 864) were run using two building archetypes, two building leakage rates, two building orientations, three ventilation systems, three ventilation rates, and twelve climates.

  1. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  2. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin; Bergey, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  3. Visualizing Life Zone Boundary Sensitivities Across Climate Models and Temporal Spans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisneros, Roberto R; Huang, Jian; Ostrouchov, George; Hoffman, Forrest M

    2011-01-01

    Life zones are a convenient and quantifiable method for delineating areas with similar plant and animal communities based on bioclimatic conditions. Such ecoregionalization techniques have proved useful for defining habitats and for studying how these habitats may shift due to environmental change. The ecological impacts of climate change are of particular interest. Here we show that visualizations of the geographic projection of life zones may be applied to the investigation of potential ecological impacts of climate change using the results of global climate model simulations. Using a multi-factor classification scheme, we show how life zones change over time based on quantitative model results into the next century. Using two straightforward metrics, we identify regions of high sensitivity to climate changes from two global climate simulations under two different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Finally, we identify how preferred human habitats may shift under these scenarios. We apply visualization methods developed for the purpose of displaying multivariate relationships within data, especially for situations that involve a large number of concurrent relationships. Our method is based on the concept of multivariate classification, and is implemented directly in VisIt, a production quality visualization package.

  4. The impact of demand-controlled ventilation on energy use in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, J.E.; Brandemuehl, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    The overall objective of this work was to evaluate typical energy requirements associated with alternative ventilation control strategies. The strategies included different combinations of economizer and demand-controlled ventilation controls and energy analyses were performed for a range of typical buildings, systems, and climates. Only single zone buildings were considered, so that simultaneous heating and cooling did not exist. The energy savings associated with economizer and demand-controlled ventilation strategies were found to be very significant for both heating and cooling. In general, the greatest savings in electrical usage for cooling with the addition of demand-controlled ventilation occur in situations where the opportunities for economizer cooling are less. This is true for warm and humid climates, and for buildings that have low relative internal gains (i.e., low occupant densities). As much as 10% savings in electrical energy for cooling were possible with demand-controlled ventilation. The savings in heating energy associated with demand-controlled ventilation were generally much larger, but were strongly dependent upon the occupancy schedule. Significantly greater savings were found for buildings with highly variable occupancy schedules (e.g., stores and restaurants) as compared with office buildings. In some cases, the primary heating energy was reduced by a factor of 10 with demand-controlled ventilation as compared with fixed ventilation rates.

  5. U.S. Climate Zones Map for Commercial Buildings

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0Proved ReservesData Files TransportationSales (BillionU.S. Climate

  6. The impact of demand-controlled and economizer ventilation strategies on energy use in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandemuehl, M.J.; Braun, J.E.

    1999-07-01

    The overall objective of this work was to evaluate typical energy requirements associated with alternative ventilation control strategies for constant-air-volume (CAV) systems in commercial buildings. The strategies included different combinations of economizer and demand-controlled ventilation, and energy analyses were performed for four typical building types, eight alternative ventilation systems, and twenty US climates. Only single-zone buildings were considered so that simultaneous heating and cooling did not exist. The energy savings associated with economizer and demand-controlled ventilation strategies were found to be very significant for both heating and cooling. In general, the greatest savings in electrical usage for cooling with the addition of demand-controlled ventilation occur in situations where the opportunities for economizer cooling are less. This is true for warm and humid climates and for buildings that have relatively low internal gains (i.e., low occupant densities). As much as 20% savings in electrical energy for cooling were possible with demand-controlled ventilation. The savings in heating energy associated with demand-controlled ventilation were generally much larger but were strongly dependent upon the building type and occupancy schedule. Significantly greater savings were found for buildings with highly variable occupancy schedules and large internal gains (i.e., restaurants) as compared with office buildings. In some cases, the primary heating energy was virtually eliminated by demand-controlled ventilation as compared with fixed ventilation rates. For both heating and cooling, the savings associated with demand-controlled ventilation are dependent on the fixed minimum ventilation rate of the base case at design conditions.

  7. Energy and first costs analysis of displacement and mixing ventilation systems for U.S. buildings and climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, ShiPing, 1970-

    1999-01-01

    In the past two decades, displacement ventilation has been increasingly used in Scandinavia and Western Europe to improve indoor air quality and to save energy. By using a detailed computer simulation method, this study ...

  8. Database of Low-e Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, Thomas D.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2014-09-04

    This is an update of a report that describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone.

  9. Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

    2012-03-01

    This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

  10. Ventilative cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

    1999-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

  11. Project EARTH-12-PPS1: Weathering Rates in the Critical Zone: Soil Erosion, River Chemistry and Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Project EARTH-12-PPS1: Weathering Rates in the Critical Zone: Soil Erosion, River Chemistry., Assessing the role of climate on uranium and lithium isotope behaviour in rivers draining a basaltic terrain

  12. Variability in North Pacific intermediate and deep water ventilation during Heinrich events in two coupled climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikamoto, Megumi O.

    ventilation and ocean biogeochemical properties to northern North Atlantic glacial freshwater perturbations the last glacial period (Dansgaard et al., 1993). Some of the associated warm­cold transitions discharge caused by melting icebergs reduces the surface water density in the North Atlantic Ocean, thereby

  13. Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Controlled Ventilation in General Office Spaces in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Fisk, William

    2010-01-01

    A prototypical office building meeting the prescriptive requirements of the 2008 California building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) was used in EnergyPlus simulations to calculate the energy savings potential of demand controlled ventilation (DCV) in five typical California climates per three design occupancy densities and two minimum ventilation rates. The assumed minimum ventilation rates in offices without DCV, based on two different measurement methods employed in a large survey, were 38 and 13 L/s per occupant. The results of the life cycle cost analysis show DCV is cost effective for office spaces if the typical minimum ventilation rate without DCV is 38 L/s per person, except at the low design occupancy of 10.8 people per 100 m2 in climate zones 3 (north coast) and 6 (south Coast). DCV was not found to be cost effective if the typical minimum ventilation rate without DCV is 13 L/s per occupant, except at high design occupancy of 21.5 people per 100 m2 in climate zones 14 (desert) and 16 (mountains). Until the large uncertainties about the base case ventilation rates in offices without DCV are reduced, the case for requiring DCV in general office spaces will be a weak case. Under the Title 24 Standards office occupant density of 10.8 people per 100 m2, DCV becomes cost effective when the base case minimum ventilation rate is greater than 42.5, 43.0, 24.0, 19.0, and 18.0 L/s per person for climate zone 3, 6, 12, 14, and 16 respectively.

  14. Beaufort County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation Beaufort County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone

  15. Allen County, Ohio ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5All Home > AllOhio ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone

  16. Modeling and Control of Passive Chilled Beams with Underfloor Air Distribution of Ventilation in Office Buildings in Humid Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negandhi, Vanita K

    2015-08-10

    other. Finally, summertime stratification measurements were taken in the offices and were combined with a CFD model of a single zone in Star CCM+ 9.04 to establish temperature and airflow profiles in the zones. These comfort studies were conducted...

  17. Natural ventilation : design for suburban houses in Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tantasavasdi, Chalermwat, 1971-

    1998-01-01

    Natural Ventilation is the most effective passive cooling design strategy for architecture in hot and humid climates. In Thailand, natural ventilation has been the most essential element in the vernacular architecture such ...

  18. Measured Cooling Season Results Relating the Impact of Mechanical Ventilation on Energy, Comfort, and Indoor Air Quality in Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Eric; Amos, Bryan; McIlvaine, Janet; Chasar, David; Widder, Sarah H.; Fonorow, Ken

    2014-08-22

    Conference Paper for ACEEE Summer Study in Buildings discussing results to date of a project evaluating the impact of ventialtion on energy use, comfort, durability, and cost in the hot humid climate.

  19. Exploring the Effectiveness of LEED Certification in LEED Certified Healthcare Settings in Climate Zone 2 and 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan, Xiaodong

    2012-10-19

    for case study, and 146 staff in the six LEED certified healthcare settings for the main study in climate zone 2 and 3. Telephone interviews with the six facility managers were used to verify the survey results and further examine the healthcare facilities...

  20. NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S. climate zones.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S. climate zones. Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have the potential to significantly reduce energy use is a function of surrounding air temperature, humidity, hot water usage, and the logic controlling the heat pump

  1. UNSATURATED ZONE CALCITE 813C EVIDENCE OF SOUTHERN NEVADA CLIMATES DURING THE PAST 9 MILLION YEARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOSEPH F. WHELAN AND RICHARD J. MOSCATI

    1998-01-26

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is presently the object of intense study as a potential permanent repository for the Nation's high-level radioactive wastes. The mountain consists of a thick sequence of volcanic tuffs in which the depth to the water table ranges from 500 to 700 meters below the land surface. This thick unsaturated zone (UZ), which would host the projected repository, coupled with the present-day arid to semi-arid environment, is considered a positive argument for the site. Evaluation of the site includes defining the relationship between climate variability, as the input function or driver of site- and regional-scale ground-water flow, and the possible transport and release of radionuclides. Secondary calcite and opal have been deposited in the UZ by meteoric waters that infiltrated through overlying soils and percolated through the tuffs. The oxygen isotopic composition ({delta}{sup 18}O values) of these minerals reflect contemporaneous meteoric waters and the {delta}{sup 13}C values reflect soil organic matter, and hence the resident plant community, at the time of infiltration (Whelan et al., 1994). Recent U/Pb age determinations of opal in these occurrences allows the {delta}{sup 13}C values of associated calcite to be used to reconstruct general climate variations during the past 9 M.y.

  2. Condensation Risk of Mechanically Attached Roof Systems in Cold Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A white roof, cool roof, is constructed to decrease thermal loads from solar radiation, therefore saving energy by decreasing the cooling demands. Unfortunately, cool roofs with mechanically attached membrane, have shown to have a higher risk of intermediate condensation in the materials below the membrane in certain climates (Ennis & Kehrer, 2011) and in comparisons with similar construction with a darker exterior surface (Bludau, Zirkelbach, & Kuenzel, 2009). As a consequence, questions have been raised regarding the sustainability and reliability of using cool roof membranes in Northern U.S. climate zones. A white roof surface reflects more of the incident solar radiation in comparisons with a dark surface, which makes a distinguished difference on the surface temperature of the roof. However, flat roofs with either a light or dark surface and if facing a clear sky, are constantly losing energy to the sky due to the exchange of infrared radiation. This phenomenon exists both during the night and the day. During the day, if the sun shines on the roof surface, the exchange of infrared radiation typically becomes insignificant. During nights and in cold climates, the temperature difference between the roof surface and the sky can deviate up to 20 C (Hagentoft, 2001) which could result in a very cold surface temperature compared to the ambient temperature. Further, a colder surface temperature of the roof increases the energy loss and the risk of condensation in the building materials below the membrane. In conclusion, both light and dark coated roof membranes are cooled by the infrared radiation exchange during the night, though a darker membrane is more heated by the solar radiation during the day, thus decreasing the risk of condensation. The phenomenon of night time cooling from the sky and the lack of solar gains during the day is not likely the exclusive problem concerning the risk of condensation in cool roofs with mechanically attached membranes. Roof systems with thermoplastic membranes are prone to be more effected by interior air intrusion into the roof construction; both due to the wind induced pressure differences and due to the flexibility and elasticity of the membrane (Molleti, Baskaran, Kalinger, & Beaulieu, 2011). Depending on the air permeability of the material underneath the membrane, wind forces increase the risk of fluttering (also referred as billowing) of the thermoplastic membrane. Expectably, the wind induced pressure differences creates a convective air flow into the construction i.e. Page 2 air intrusion. If the conditions are right, moisture from the exchanging air may condensate on surfaces with a temperature below dew-point. The definite path of convective airflows through the building envelope is usually very difficult to determine and therefore simplified models (K nzel, Zirkelbach, & Scfafaczek, 2011) help to estimate an additional moisture loads as a result of the air intrusion. The wind uplifting pressure in combination with wind gusts are important factors for a fluttering roof. Unfortunately, the effect from a fluctuating wind is difficult to estimate as this is a highly dynamic phenomenon and existing standards (ASTM, 2011a) only take into account a steady state approach i.e. there is no guidance or regulations on how to estimate the air intrusion rate. Obviously, a more detailed knowledge on the hygrothermal performance of mechanically attached cool roof system is requested; in consideration to varying surface colors, roof air tightness, climate zones and indoor moisture supply.

  3. Demand Controlled Ventilation for Improved Humidity Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, J. K.

    1996-01-01

    , outside air can be minimized without exceeding recommended IAQ guidelines. INTRODUCTION The greatest single contributor to building energy loads in humid climates is the cooling and dehumidifying of outside air which is brought in for ventilation...

  4. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

  5. Vadose zone lag time and potential 21st century climate change effects on spatially distributed groundwater recharge in the semi-arid Nebraska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    to centuries in semi-arid and arid environments. Yet, studies of future climate change impacts to GR have groundwater recharge in the semi-arid Nebraska Sand Hills N.R. Rossman a, , V.A. Zlotnik a , C.M. Rowe a , J Keywords: Groundwater recharge Climate change Vadose zone Lag time Groundwater modeling Nebraska Sand Hills

  6. HOW THE LEED VENTILATION CREDIT IMPACTS ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF GSHP SYSTEMS A CASE STUDY FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the impacts of increased outdoor air (OA) ventilation on the performance of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems that heat and cool typical primary schools. Four locations Phoenix, Miami, Seattle, and Chicago are selected in this study to represent different climate zones in the United States. eQUEST, an integrated building and HVAC system energy analysis program, is used to simulate a typical primary school and the GSHP system at the four locations with minimum and 30% more than minimum OA ventilation. The simulation results show that, without an energy recovery ventilator, the 30% more OA ventilation results in an 8.0 13.3% increase in total GSHP system energy consumption at the four locations. The peak heating and cooling loads increase by 20.2 30% and 14.9 18.4%, respectively, at the four locations. The load imbalance of the ground heat exchanger is increased in hot climates but reduced in mild and cold climates.

  7. Methodology for the evaluation of natural ventilation in buildings using a reduced-scale air model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Christine E. (Christine Elaine)

    2006-01-01

    Commercial office buildings predominantly are designed to be ventilated and cooled using mechanical systems. In temperate climates, passive ventilation and cooling techniques can be utilized to reduce energy consumption ...

  8. Recommended Ventilation Strategies for Energy-Efficient Production Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberson, J.; Brown, R.; Koomey, J.; Warner, J.; Greenberg, S.

    1998-12-01

    This report evaluates residential ventilation systems for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} Homes program and recommends mechanical ventilation strategies for new, low-infiltration, energy-efficient, single-family, ENERGY STAR production (site-built tract) homes in four climates: cold, mixed (cold and hot), hot humid, and hot arid. Our group in the Energy Analysis Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab compared residential ventilation strategies in four climates according to three criteria: total annualized costs (the sum of annualized capital cost and annual operating cost), predominant indoor pressure induced by the ventilation system, and distribution of ventilation air within the home. The mechanical ventilation systems modeled deliver 0.35 air changes per hour continuously, regardless of actual infiltration or occupant window-opening behavior. Based on the assumptions and analysis described in this report, we recommend independently ducted multi-port supply ventilation in all climates except cold because this strategy provides the safety and health benefits of positive indoor pressure as well as the ability to dehumidify and filter ventilation air. In cold climates, we recommend that multi-port supply ventilation be balanced by a single-port exhaust ventilation fan, and that builders offer balanced heat-recovery ventilation to buyers as an optional upgrade. For builders who continue to install forced-air integrated supply ventilation, we recommend ensuring ducts are airtight or in conditioned space, installing a control that automatically operates the forced-air fan 15-20 minutes during each hour that the fan does not operate for heating or cooling, and offering ICM forced-air fans to home buyers as an upgrade.

  9. CLIMATICALLY-ACTIVE GASES IN THE EASTERN BOUNDARY UPWELLING AND OXYGEN MINIMUM ZONE (OMZ) SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    . In this contribution we introduce Index Terms-- Air-Sea Interactions, Fluxes, Green House Gases, Satellite Retrieval) contribute very significantly to the gas exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere, notably with respect (Oxygen Minimum Zone) contribute very significantly to the gas exchange between the ocean

  10. Room air stratification in combined chilled ceiling and displacement ventilation systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred; Tully, Brad; Rimmer, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Environments. Proceedings of Indoor Air 2005: 10 thInternational Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate,displacement ventilation hybrid air conditioning system-

  11. Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Controlling summer attic heat gain is important to reducing air conditioning energy use in homes in hot-humid climates. Both heat transfer through ceilings and t attic duct systems can make up a large part of peak cooling demand, Attic ventilation...

  12. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01

    columns indicate the energy and cost savings for  demand class size.   (The energy costs  of classroom ventilation $6.2 M in increased energy costs.   Further VR  increases 

  13. Modeled Interactive Effects of Precipitation, temperature, and [CO2] on Ecosystem Carbon and Water Dynamics in Different Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Xuhuui [University of Oklahoma; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Emmett, Bridget [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service

    2008-01-01

    Interactive effects of multiple global change factors on ecosystem processes are complex. It is relatively expensive to explore those interactions in manipulative experiments. We conducted a modeling analysis to identify potentially important interactions and to stimulate hypothesis formulation for experimental research. Four models were used to quantify interactive effects of climate warming (T), altered precipitation amounts [doubled (DP) and halved (HP)] and seasonality (SP, moving precipitation in July and August to January and February to create summer drought), and elevated [CO2] (C) on net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), net ecosystem production (NEP), transpiration, and runoff.We examined those responses in seven ecosystems, including forests, grasslands, and heathlands in different climate zones. The modeling analysis showed that none of the threeway interactions among T, C, and altered precipitation was substantial for either carbon or water processes, nor consistent among the seven ecosystems. However, two-way interactive effects on NPP, Rh, and NEP were generally positive (i.e. amplification of one factor s effect by the other factor) between T and C or between T and DP. A negative interaction (i.e. depression of one factor s effect by the other factor) occurred for simulated NPP between T and HP. The interactive effects on runoff were positive between T and HP. Four pairs of two-way interactive effects on plant transpiration were positive and two pairs negative. In addition, wet sites generally had smaller relative changes in NPP, Rh, runoff, and transpiration but larger absolute changes in NEP than dry sites in response to the treatments. The modeling results suggest new hypotheses to be tested in multifactor global change experiments. Likewise, more experimental evidence is needed for the further improvement of ecosystem models in order to adequately simulate complex interactive processes.

  14. Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

    2007-06-01

    Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

  15. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2011-01-01

    heat recovery ventilator [HRV], central fan integratedfor a period of time. Heat recovery ventilator (HRV).A residential HRV includes both supply and exhaust airflows

  16. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    M. and Wang, D. (1999) Duct systems in large commercialin ventilation air supply ducts. Proceedings of Indoor Air ‘filtration efficiency of in-duct ventilation air cleaners.

  17. Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.; Bergey, D.

    2012-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

  18. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Outside Air Ventilation Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    venThis Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research showing how automated night ventilation can reduce cooling energy costs up to 40% and peak demand up to 50% in California’s hot-dry central valley climates and can eliminate the need for air conditioning altogether in the coastal marine climate.

  19. Promising Technology: Demand Control Ventilation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand control ventilation (DCV) measures carbon dioxide concentrations in return air or other strategies to measure occupancy, and accurately matches the ventilation requirement. This system reduces ventilation when spaces are vacant or at lower than peak occupancy. When ventilation is reduced, energy savings are accrued because it is not necessary to heat, cool, or dehumidify as much outside air.

  20. Ventilation Air Preconditioning Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khattar, M.; Brandemuehl, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Increased outside ventilation air requirements demand special attention to how that air will be conditioned. In winter, the incoming air may need preheating; in summer. the mixed air may be too humid for effective dehumidification. Part...

  1. Why We Ventilate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Price, Phil N.; Singer, Brett C.

    2011-09-01

    It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of"good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

  2. Can ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 Requirements be Satisfied while Maintaining Moisture Control using Stock HVAC Equipment in Hot, Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, S. C.

    1996-01-01

    energy costs. Increased ventilation rates create real capital and operating costs for building owners and operators, with implications beyond energy costs relating to increased ventilation requirements. In hot, humid climates, increased ventilation rates...

  3. Database of Low-E Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones (Task ET-WIN-PNNL-FY13-01_5.3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Culp, Thomas D.

    2013-09-01

    This report describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced in support of the Emerging Technologies Low-e Storm Windows Task 5.3: Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone. Both sets of calculation results will be made publicly available through the Building America Solution Center.

  4. Increased Natural Ventilation Flow Rates through Ventilation Shafts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Stephen D.

    Buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in ventilation shafts is investigated with a small scale physical experiment within a duct and CFD simulations of an office building. For a fixed exhaust opening, smaller shafts lead to ...

  5. Integrated Demand Controlled Ventilation for Single Duct VAV System with Conference Rooms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Y.; Liu, M.; Cho, Y.; Xu, K.

    2007-01-01

    building model is applied to demonstrate the energy saving and show how the indoor air ventilation be satisfied under different circumstance. THE IDCV VAV methodology can be generalized to other similar buildings where the occupancy of critical zones...

  6. Comparison of freezing control strategies for residential air-to-air heat recovery ventilators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, E.G.; Bradley, L.C. ); Chant, R.E. ); Fisher, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison of the energy performance of defrost and frost control strategies for residential air-to-air heat recovery ventilators (HRV) has been carried out by using computer simulations for various climatic conditions. This paper discusses the results and conclusions from the comparisons and their implications for the heat recovery ventilator manufacturers and system designers.

  7. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2011-04-01

    Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

  8. Ventilation technologies scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-09-30

    This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the needs of California, determining residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and level of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  9. Innovative Energy Efficient Industrial Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litomisky, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper was written to describe an innovative “on-demand” industrial ventilation system for woodworking, metalworking, food processing, pharmaceutical, chemical, and other industries. Having analyzed existing industrial ventilation in 130...

  10. RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    best available data, the energy liability as- sociated with providing the current levels of ventilationRESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS* Max Sherman Nance Matson Energy Performance of Buildings Group Energy and Environment Division Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University of California

  11. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01

    zone level that has an air?side  economizer if the design systems has an air?side  economizer which provides up to volume systems have air side economizers as required by the 

  12. Evaluation of Existing Technologies for Meeting Residential Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................ 8 4. Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV

  13. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

    2008-04-04

    An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

  14. Smart Ventilation - RIVEC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4 »DigitalanDepartmentSecondary Ventilation Activity Inputs

  15. Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvestingRenewableTeachDevelopment |of EnergyVentilation

  16. Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Photo showing climate zone maps based on...

  17. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-01-01

    particles in turbulent duct flows. Chemical EngineeringDeposition in Ventilation Ducts. Ph.D. Dissertation,Deposition in Ventilating Duct Systems. Ph.D. Dissertation,

  18. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

    2011-01-01

    Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

  19. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  20. Literature Review of Displacement Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, S.; Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    Performance Evaluation and Design Guidelines for Displacement Ventilation” by Chen and Clicksman (2003), were used to begin the literature search. Their references include papers, articles, and web sites presenting major contributions to the understanding...

  1. The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    two-phase zone, is the heat-pipe (i.e. , a zone of constant4a), when there is a heat pipe just above the emplacementduring ventilation, the heat-pipe signature is absent in

  2. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  3. Classroom HVAC: Improving ventilation and saving energy -- field study plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2004-01-01

    Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy (IVSE) Field StudyImproving Ventilation and Saving Energy (IVSE) Field StudyImproving Ventilation and Saving Energy (IVSE) Field Study

  4. Residential ventilation standards scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  5. Climate Zones | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) chargingWASHINGTON, DCTheBelow are resources

  6. Hybrid Ventilation Optimization and Control Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid Ventilation Optimization and Control Research and Development Hybrid Ventilation Optimization and Control Research and Development Credit: Massachusetts Institute of...

  7. Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the UnitedStates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2007-02-01

    The first and only national norm for residential ventilation in the United States is Standard 62.2-2004 published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This standard does not by itself have the force of regulation, but is being considered for adoption by various jurisdictions within the U.S. as well as by various voluntary programs. The adoption of 62.2 would require mechanical ventilation systems to be installed in virtually all new homes, but allows for a wide variety of design solutions. These solutions, however, may have a different energy costs and non-energy benefits. This report uses a detailed simulation model to evaluate the energy impacts of currently popular and proposed mechanical ventilation approaches that are 62.2 compliant for a variety of climates. These results separate the energy needed to ventilate from the energy needed to condition the ventilation air, from the energy needed to distribute and/or temper the ventilation air. The results show that exhaust systems are generally the most energy efficient method of meeting the proposed requirements. Balanced and supply systems have more ventilation resulting in greater energy and their associated distribution energy use can be significant.

  8. Development of a High Latent Effectiveness Energy Recovery Ventilator with Integration into Rooftop Package Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory M. Dobbs; Norberto O. Lemcoff; Frederick J. Cogswell; Jeffrey T. Benolt

    2006-03-01

    This Final Report covers the Cooperative Program carried out to design and optimize an enhanced flat-plate energy recovery ventilator and integrate it into a packaged unitary (rooftop) air conditioning unit. The project objective was to optimize the design of a flat plate energy recovery ventilator (ERV) core that compares favorably to flat plate air-to-air heat exchanger cores on the market and to cost wise to small enthalpy wheel devices. The benefits of an integrated unit incorporating an enhanced ERV core and a downsized heating/cooling unit were characterized and the design of an integrated unit considering performance and cost was optimized. Phase I was to develop and optimize the design of a membrane based heat exchanger core. Phase II was the creation and observation of a system integrated demonstrator unit consisting of the Enhanced Energy Recovery Ventilator (EERV) developed in Phase I coupled to a standard Carrier 50HJ rooftop packaged unitary air conditioning unit. Phase III was the optimization of the system prior to commercialization based on the knowledge gained in Phase II. To assure that the designs chosen have the possibility of meeting cost objectives, a preliminary manufacturability and production cost study was performed by the Center for Automation Technologies at RPI. Phase I also included a preliminary design for the integrated unit to be further developed in Phase II. This was to assure that the physical design of the heat exchanger designed in Phase I would be acceptable for use in Phase II. An extensive modeling program was performed by the Center for Building Performance & Diagnostics of CMU. Using EnergyPlus as the software, a typical office building with multiple system configurations in multiple climatic zones in the US was simulated. The performance of energy recovery technologies in packaged rooftop HVAC equipment was evaluated. The experimental program carried out in Phases II and III consisted of fabricating and testing a demonstrator unit using Carrier Comfort Network (CCN) based controls. Augmenting the control signals, CCN was also used to monitor and record additional performance data that supported modeling and conceptual understanding. The result of the testing showed that the EERV core developed in Phase I recovered energy in the demonstrator unit at the expected levels based on projections. In fact, at near-ARI conditions the core recovered about one ton of cooling enthalpy when operating with a three-ton rooftop packaged unit.

  9. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder P% postconsumer waste #12;iii Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Strategy for a Hot

  10. Energy Recovery Ventilator Membrane Efficiency Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees, Jennifer Anne

    2013-05-07

    A test setup was designed and built to test energy recovery ventilator membranes. The purpose of this test setup was to measure the heat transfer and water vapor transfer rates through energy recover ventilator membranes and find their effectiveness...

  11. Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - 2:37pm Addthis A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of iStockphotobrebca. A whole-house ventilation...

  12. High-Performance Home Technologies: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County-Volume 7.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2010-08-01

    This guide describes the climate zone designations used by Building America and compares them with the climate zone designations used in the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).

  13. Field-Evaluation of Alternative HVAC Strategies to Meet Ventilation, Comfort and Humidity Control Criteria at Three Full-Serve Restaurants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yborra, S. C.; Spears, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Lighting and ventilation represent the majority of the air conditioning loads in office buildings in hot humid climates. Use of motion sensors is one way to minimize the energy used for these loads. This paper describes the methods used...

  14. Promising Technology: Energy Recovery Ventilation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy recovery ventilation (ERV) systems exchange heat between outgoing exhaust air and the incoming outdoor air. Using exhaust air to pre-condition supply air can reduce the capacity of the heating and cooling system and save heating and cooling energy consumption.

  15. Numerical study of variable lung ventilation strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadav, Reena; Hiremath, Kirankumar; Bagler, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is used for patients with a variety of lung diseases. Traditionally, ventilators have been designed to monotonously deliver equal sized breaths. While it may seem intuitive that lungs may benefit from unvarying and stable ventilation pressure strategy, recently it has been reported that variable lung ventilation is advantageous. In this study, we analyze the mean tidal volume in response to different `variable ventilation pressure' strategies. We found that uniformly distributed variability in pressure gives the best tidal volume as compared to that of normal, scale- free, log normal and linear distributions.

  16. Insulated Concrete Form Walls Integrated With Mechanical Systems in a Cold Climate Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.

    2014-09-01

    Transitioning from standard light frame to a thermal mass wall system in a high performance home will require a higher level of design integration with the mechanical systems. The much higher mass in the ICF wall influences heat transfer through the wall and affects how the heating and cooling system responds to changing outdoor conditions. This is even more important for efficient, low-load homes with efficient heat pump systems in colder climates where the heating and cooling peak loads are significantly different from standard construction. This report analyzes a range of design features and component performance estimates in an effort to select practical, cost-effective solutions for high performance homes in a cold climate. Of primary interest is the influence of the ICF walls on developing an effective air sealing strategy and selecting an appropriate heating and cooling equipment type and capacity. The domestic water heating system is analyzed for costs and savings to investigate options for higher efficiency electric water heating. A method to ensure mechanical ventilation air flows is examined. The final solution package includes high-R mass walls, very low infiltration rates, multi-stage heat pump heating, solar thermal domestic hot water system, and energy recovery ventilation. This solution package can be used for homes to exceed 2012 International Energy Conservation Code requirements throughout all climate zones and achieves the DOE Challenge Home certification.

  17. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    2011-01-01

    of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings Dortheof passive stack ventilation in residential buildings Dorthepassive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings

  18. Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, A.; Siddiqui, A.; Dakin, B.

    2014-11-01

    The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated on a marine climate retrofit project designed to meet both Passive House (PH) and Building America program standards. The scope included sealing, installing wall, roof and floor insulation (previously lacking), replacing windows, upgrading the heating and cooling system, and installing mechanical ventilation.

  19. Commercial Building HVAC Energy Usage in Semi-Tropical Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worbs, H. E.

    1987-01-01

    . Another consideration is the high ventilation loads due to cooling the moist air prevalent in semi-tropical climates. This paper describes a computer program which assesses all the pertinent variables which comprise the annual heating and cooling energy...

  20. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

  1. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    HRV) efficient systems (i.e. , ERV or HRV systems) will not workHeat Recovery Ventilator (HRV) In this system, the primary

  2. Infiltration as Ventilation: Weather-Induced Dilution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2014-01-01

    LOGICS. 1999. Canadian Weather for Energy Calculations, In:natural ventilation rate with weather conditions, Renewablefor ASHRAE 136 [1/h] WSF Weather and Shielding Factor [1/h

  3. Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max

    2011-01-01

    Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective? Maxmanufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitutethe University of California. Does Mixing Make Residential

  4. Building America Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Location: Tyler, TX Partners: University of Texas, TxAIRE, uttyler.edutxairehouses Building Science Corporation, buildingscience.com Building Component: Heating, ventilating,...

  5. Building America Technologies Solutions Case Study: Ventilation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building America team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of various ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family lab homes at the University of Texas at...

  6. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

    2014-05-01

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  7. Sandia Energy - NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Process Experiment (MIZOPEX) Home Climate Office of Science News News & Events Research & Capabilities Monitoring Analysis...

  8. Summer Infiltration/Ventilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory This presentation was delivered at the...

  9. Critical Question #2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation Specific to Multifamily Buildings? Critical Question 2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation Specific to Multifamily...

  10. Advanced Controls for Residential Whole-House Ventilation Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AND MISCELLANEOUS Residential ventilation, ventilation controller, ASHRAE Standard 62.2, demand response Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full...

  11. Promising Technology: Variable-Air-Volume Ventilation System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Variable-air-volume (VAV) ventilation saves energy compared to a constant-air-volume (CAV) ventilation system, mainly by reducing energy consumption associated with fans.

  12. Case Study - The Challenge: Improving Ventilation System Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ventilation System Energy Efficiency in a Textile Plant Case Study - The Challenge: Improving Ventilation System Energy Efficiency in a Textile Plant This case study examines how...

  13. Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation This drawing shows simple...

  14. Commissioning Ventilated Containment Systems in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-08-01

    This Best Practices Guide focuses on the specialized approaches required for ventilated containment systems, understood to be all components that drive and control ventilated enclosures and local exhaust systems within the laboratory. Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  15. Summary -Procedure For Shutting Off The Oxygen Zone Valve 1. Implement RACE Call the Emergency Operator at 4-2012.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Summary - Procedure For Shutting Off The Oxygen Zone Valve 1. Implement RACE ­ Call the Emergency-cylinders for low oxygen needs and bag ventilated patients using E-cylinders. 4. Identify oxygen zone valve for the affected rooms/areas. 5. Turn off the flow of oxygen at the zone valve if the oxygen cannot be turned off

  16. Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in High-Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hun, Diana E; Jackson, Mark C; Shrestha, Som S

    2014-01-01

    High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. We attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in a research house located in Oak Ridge, TN, that was 20 months old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built (i.e., natural ventilation rate ~0.02 h-1), unoccupied, and unfurnished. We identified air pollutants of concern in the test home that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern among the contaminants that were sampled in the initial survey because it was the only compound that showed concentrations that were greater than the recommended exposure levels. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74 F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

  17. Definition and means of maintaining the ventilation system confinement portion of the PFP safety envelope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, J.D.; Grover, G.A.; O`Brien, P.M., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-05

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant Heating Ventilation and Cooling system provides for the confinement of radioactive releases to the environment and provides for the confinement of radioactive contamination within designated zones inside the facility. This document identifies the components and procedures necessary to ensure the HVAC system provides these functions. Appendices E through J provide a snapshot of non-safety class HVAC equipment and need not be updated when the remainder of the document and Appendices A through D are updated.

  18. Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The webinar will focus on key challenges in multifamily ventilation and strategies to address these challenges.

  19. Maintenance Guide for Greenhouse Ventilation, Evaporative Cooling Heating Systems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    AE26 Maintenance Guide for Greenhouse Ventilation, Evaporative Cooling Heating Systems1 D. E and preventive maintenance procedures for ventilation, evaporative cooling and heating systems. Ventilation a ventilation system is not operating properly, the results can be pockets of stagnant air, inadequate cooling

  20. SINGLE-ZONE STACK-DOMINATED INFILTRATION MODELING Max Sherman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dominates and total ventilation can be calculated by treating other effects (i.e., wind and small fansSINGLE-ZONE STACK-DOMINATED INFILTRATION MODELING Max Sherman Energy Performance of Buildings Group Energy, Office of Buildings and Community Systems Building Systems Division of the U.S. Department

  1. Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ventilation can help keep your home cool during hot days. To avoid heat buildup in your home, plan ahead by landscaping your lot to shade your house. If you replace your roof,...

  2. Scale model studies of displacement ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okutan, Galip Mehmet

    1995-01-01

    Displacement ventilation is an air conditioning method that provides conditioned air to indoor environments with the goal to improve air quality while reducing energy consumption. This study investigates the performance ...

  3. A Ventilation Index for Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    An important environmental control of both tropical cyclone intensity and genesis is vertical wind shear. One hypothesized pathway by which vertical shear affects tropical cyclones is midlevel ventilation—or the flux of ...

  4. Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Ventilation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family lab homes at the University of Texas at Tyler. The only difference was that House 1 had a vented attic and House 2 had an...

  5. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    B. , and Gan, G. 1998 “Heat Recovery with Low Pressure LossSherman, M.H. 2003. “Heat Recovery in Building Envelopes. ”1998. “Field Survey of Heat Recovery Ventilation Systems. ”

  6. Floor-supply displacement ventilation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Nobukazu, 1967-

    2001-01-01

    Research on indoor environments has received more attention recently because reports of symptoms and other health complaints related to indoor environments have been increasing. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning ...

  7. Evaluating Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, Robb; Arena, Lois

    2013-02-01

    In an effort to improve housing options near Las Vegas, Nevada, the Clark County Community Resources Division (CCCRD) performs substantial renovations to foreclosed homes. After dramatic energy, aesthetic, and health and safety improvements are made, homes are rented or sold to qualified residents. This report describes the evaluation and selection of ventilation systems for these homes, including key considerations when selecting an ideal system. The report then describes CCCRD’s decision process with respect to ventilation.

  8. Industrial Ventilation Statistics Confirm Energy Savings Opportunity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litomisky, A.

    2006-01-01

    ventilation designers, and factory owners alike. When asked how high the use of machinery is, they usually answer 90% of shift time. That’s far from the facts revealed by our measurements. The data published here is based on installed on...” design of ventilation systems, the constantly changing workflow and business demands (production increase, production decrease, new more effective machinery, and new production technology). I would like to prove that “the older the duct system...

  9. Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    home factories between 1996 and 2003. The recommended measures included mastic sealing ducts, installing properly sized high-efficiency HVAC, thoroughly air sealing the building...

  10. Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

    2009-01-01

    pollution in inhaled air and the risk of infection transmission [1, 2], PV improves occupants’ thermal

  11. Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment.EfficiencyDepartment of EnergyManufactured

  12. Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in the ZEBRAlliance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hun, D.; Jackson, M.; Shrestha, S.

    2013-09-01

    High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. In this project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in research houses located in Oak Ridge, TN, that were less than 2 years old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built, unoccupied, and unfurnished. The team identified air pollutants of concern in the test homes that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern from initial air sampling surveys. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74°F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused minimal to modest increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

  13. Invasive Mechanical Ventilation in California Over 2000-2009: Implications for Emergency Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    meta-analysis. BMJ. of mechanical ventilation: a population-NM, Dettmer M, et al. Mechanical ventilation and Westernet al. Invasive Mechanical Ventilation in California from

  14. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical VentilationQuality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical VentilationQuality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

  15. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom Field Study Interim Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy Field Study Plan,Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study inVentilation and Saving Energy: Relocatable Classroom Field

  16. Development and Construction of Bioclimatic Double Skin Active Facade for Hot and Humid Climate of UAE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karbor, R. G.; Mohamed, I.

    2010-01-01

    become still more advanced. The present paper deals with the development and construction of mechanically ventilated double skin facade with HVAC integration for hot and humid climate like UAE. A case study is presented, illustrating potential benefits...

  17. Future Climate Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Houseworth

    2001-10-12

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada (Figure 1), the site of a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this AMR provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the infiltration model (USGS 2000) and for the total system performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) at YM. Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one method, among many, of establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Revision 00 of this AMR was prepared in accordance with the ''Work Direction and Planning Document for Future Climate Analysis'' (Peterman 1999) under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-97NV12033 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The planning document for the technical scope, content, and management of ICN 01 of this AMR is the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (BSC 2001a). The scope for the TBV resolution actions in this ICN is described in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department''. (BSC 2001b, Addendum B, Section 4.1).

  18. Estimated costs of ventilation systems complying with the HUD ventilation standard for manufactured homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.D.; Conner, C.C.

    1993-11-01

    At the request of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory estimated the material, labor, and operating costs for ventilation equipment needed for compliance with HUD`s proposed revision to the ventilation standard for manufactured housing. This was intended to bound the financial impacts of the ventilation standard revision. Researchers evaluated five possible prototype ventilation systems that met the proposed ventilation requirements. Of those five, two systems were determined to be the most likely used by housing manufacturers: System 1 combines a fresh air duct with the existing central forced-air system to supply and circulate fresh air to conditioned spaces. System 2 uses a separate exhaust fan to remove air from the manufactured home. The estimated material and labor costs for these two systems range from $200 to $300 per home. Annual operating costs for the two ventilation systems were estimated for 20 US cities. The estimated operating costs for System 1 ranged from $55/year in Las Vegas, Nevada, to $83/year in Bismarck, North Dakota. Operating costs for System 2 ranged from a low of $35/year in Las Vegas to $63/year in Bismarck. Thus, HUD`s proposed increase in ventilation requirements will add less than $100/year to the energy cost of a manufactured home.

  19. Investigation of room ventilation for improved operation of a downdraft table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaraman, B.; Kristoffersen, A.; Finlayson, E.; Gadgil, A.

    2004-01-01

    Investigation of Room Ventilation for Improved Operation ofInvestigation of Room Ventilation for Improved Operation of

  20. Study of natural ventilation in buildings with large eddy simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yi, 1972-

    2002-01-01

    With the discovery of many economic, environmental, and health problems in sealed and mechanically ventilated buildings, the concept of natural ventilation has been revived. "Buildings that breathe" have become more and ...

  1. A scale model study of displacement ventilation with chilled ceilings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Katherine J. A. (Katherine Joan Adrienne)

    1995-01-01

    Displacement ventilation is a form of air-conditioning which provides good air quality and some energy savings. The air quality is better than for a conventional mixed ventilation system. The maximum amount of cooling that ...

  2. Modeling buoyancy-driven airflow in ventilation shafts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

    2012-01-01

    Naturally ventilated buildings can significantly reduce the required energy for cooling and ventilating buildings by drawing in outdoor air using non-mechanical forces. Buoyancy-driven systems are common in naturally ...

  3. Natural Ventilation for Energy Savings in California Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    hybrid natural ventilation system was unable to provide ample cooling during the winter months, which caused a heat pump

  4. Building America Webinar: Ventilation Strategies for High Performance Homes, Part I: Application-Specific Ventilation Guidelines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Aug. 26, 2015, covered what makes high-performance homes different from a ventilation perspective and how they might need to be treated differently than traditional construction.

  5. Air Distribution Effectiveness for Different Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-62700 Air Distribution Effectiveness for Different Mechanical Ventilation Systems Max H Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;1 Air Distribution depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants

  6. Mixed-Mode Ventilation and Building Retrofits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Ackerly, Katie

    2010-01-01

    of low-energy ventilation strategies in four generalized UKUK offices: How adaptive comfort theories might influence future low energy office refurbishment strategies’,UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions’ Energy Efficiency Best Practice Programme Numerous guidelines for developing the most appropriate design strategy

  7. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-04-01

    Empirical equations were developed and applied to predict losses of 0.01-100 {micro}m airborne particles making a single pass through 120 different ventilation duct runs typical of those found in mid-sized office buildings. For all duct runs, losses were negligible for submicron particles and nearly complete for particles larger than 50 {micro}m. The 50th percentile cut-point diameters were 15 {micro}m in supply runs and 25 {micro}m in return runs. Losses in supply duct runs were higher than in return duct runs, mostly because internal insulation was present in portions of supply duct runs, but absent from return duct runs. Single-pass equations for particle loss in duct runs were combined with models for predicting ventilation system filtration efficiency and particle deposition to indoor surfaces to evaluate the fates of particles of indoor and outdoor origin in an archetypal mechanically ventilated building. Results suggest that duct losses are a minor influence for determining indoor concentrations for most particle sizes. Losses in ducts were of a comparable magnitude to indoor surface losses for most particle sizes. For outdoor air drawn into an unfiltered ventilation system, most particles smaller than 1 {micro}m are exhausted from the building. Large particles deposit within the building, mostly in supply ducts or on indoor surfaces. When filters are present, most particles are either filtered or exhausted. The fates of particles generated indoors follow similar trends as outdoor particles drawn into the building.

  8. Study reveals urban smoke absorbs sunlight, exacerbating climate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    urban smoke absorbs sunlight Study reveals urban smoke absorbs sunlight, exacerbating climate warming Cloaking urban areas and wildfire zones, tiny smoke particles suspended in...

  9. SY Tank Farm ventilation isolation option risk assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, T.B.; Morales, S.D.

    1994-03-01

    The safety of the 241-SY Tank Farm ventilation system has been under extensive scrutiny due to safety concerns associated with tank 101-SY. Hydrogen and other gases are generated and trapped in the waste below the liquid surface. Periodically, these gases are released into the dome space and vented through the exhaust system. This attention to the ventilation system has resulted in the development of several alternative ventilation system designs. The ventilation system provides the primary means of mitigation of accidents associated with flammable gases. This report provides an assessment of various alternatives ventilation system designs.

  10. Climate Science and Climate Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    the World Bank by the Potsdam Institute for Climate ImpactResearch and Climate Analytics.of carbon under non-linear climate response. ESRI working

  11. Details of U.S. Climate Zones:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1 0Delaware2 1 03.

  12. Climate Zone 2A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action

  13. Climate Zone 2B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump to: navigation,

  14. Climate Zone 3A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump to:

  15. Climate Zone 3B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump to:3B Jump to:

  16. Climate Zone 3C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump to:3B Jump

  17. Climate Zone 4A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump to:3B

  18. Climate Zone 4B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump to:3BClimate

  19. Climate Zone 4C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump to:3BClimate4C

  20. Climate Zone 5A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump

  1. Climate Zone 5B | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump5B Jump to:

  2. Climate Zone 5C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump5B Jump

  3. Climate Zone 7A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump5B

  4. Climate Zone 8A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B Jump5BClimate

  5. Climate Zone Number 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2B

  6. Climate Zone Number 4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2BZone Number 4 Jump

  7. Climate Zone Number 6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2BZone Number 4

  8. Climate Zone Number 8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:NewMinnesota:Protection Action2BZone Number

  9. ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9)

  10. 2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES Zone Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES Zone Numbers & Detailed Definitions #12;2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES of Toronto Joint Program in Transportation January 2003 #12;PREFACE This report presents the 2001 traffic zone numbers by local municipalities in the 2001 TTS survey area. The second part presents detailed

  11. Future Climate Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. G. Cambell

    2004-09-03

    This report documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this report provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the following reports: ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]), ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504]), ''Features, Events, and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170012]), and ''Features, Events, and Processes in SZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170013]). Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one available forecasting method for establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The selection of different methods is directly dependent on the available evidence used to build a forecasting argument. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. While alternative analyses are possible for the case presented for Yucca Mountain, the evidence (data) used would be the same and the conclusions would not be expected to drastically change. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Other alternative approaches could include simulation of climate over the 10,000-year period; however, this modeling extrapolation is well beyond the bounds of current scientific practice and would not provide results with better confidence. A corroborative alternative approach may be found in ''Future Climate Analysis-10,000 Years to 1,000,000 Years After Present'' (Sharpe 2003 [DIRS 161591]). The current revision of this report is prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]).

  12. Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A case study of photovoltaic attic ventilator fans was conducted on an occupied single family home in Central Florida. Two fans were installed at mid-summer in an instrumented home where attic air temperature, meteorological conditions and space cooling electric power were measured. The home already had an attic radiant barrier, but still experienced attic air temperatures in excess of 130oF.

  13. Recommended Changes to Specifications for Demand Controlled Ventilation in California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David

    2010-04-08

    In demand-controlled ventilation (DCV), rates of outdoor air ventilation are automatically modulated as occupant density varies. The objective is to keep ventilation rates at or above design specifications and code requirements and also to save energy by avoiding excessive ventilation rates. DCV is most often used in spaces with highly variable and sometime dense occupancy. In almost all cases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sensors installed in buildings provide the signal to the ventilation rate control system. People produce and exhale CO{sub 2} as a consequence of their normal metabolic processes; thus, the concentrations of CO{sub 2} inside occupied buildings are higher than the concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the outdoor air. The magnitude of the indoor-outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration difference decreases as the building's ventilation rate per person increases. The difference between the indoor and outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration is also a proxy for the indoor concentrations of other occupant-generated bioeffluents, such as body odors. Reviews of the research literature on DCV indicate a significant potential for energy savings, particularly in buildings or spaces with a high and variable occupancy. Based on modeling, cooling energy savings from applications of DCV are as high as 20%. With support from the California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has performed research on the performance of CO{sub 2} sensing technologies and optical people counters for DCV. In addition, modeling was performed to evaluate the potential energy savings and cost effectiveness of using DCV in general office spaces within the range of California climates. The above-described research has implications for the specifications pertaining to DCV in section 121 of the California Title 24 Standard. Consequently, this document suggests possible changes in these specifications based on the research findings. The suggested changes in specifications were developed in consultation with staff from the Iowa Energy Center who evaluated the accuracy of new CO{sub 2} sensors in laboratory-based research. In addition, staff of the California Energy Commission, and their consultants in the area of DCV, provided input for the suggested changes in specifications.

  14. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, John B. (Grand Junction, CO)

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  15. Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2008-01-01

    In Review J. Indoor Air) 2007 LBNL-63193 Tarantola, Albert,Gas Measurement to Determine Air Movements in a House,Measurement Techniques”, Air Infiltration and Ventilation

  16. LBNL REPORT NUMBER 53776; OCTOBER 2003 ASHRAE &Residential Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .........................................................10 11. Water Intrusion Control.............................................................10 What control and ventilation are key control means. People spend, on average, nearly 90% of their time indoors

  17. Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Building America webinar, held on Sept. 24, 2014, focused on key challenges in multifamily ventilation and strategies to address these challenges.

  18. 2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning, Water Heating, and Refrigeration Equipment; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 2014-02-07 Issuance: Certification...

  19. AUTOMATIC VARIABLE VENTILATION CONTROL SYSTEMS BASED ON AIR QUALITY DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turiel, Isaac

    2011-01-01

    U"'"'''"'" - e "'~saon Automatic Variable Ventilation1979) LBL~8893 EEB Vent 79-3 Automatic variable ventilationmeasurement capabilities o Automatic operation o Low

  20. Building America Webinar: Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    as a critical measure for reducing heating load in homes in cold climates. webinarhybridinsulation20111130.wmv More Documents & Publications Building America Webinar:...

  1. CLIMATE RISK AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    CLIMATE RISK AND CLIMATE CHANGE Scenarios of what the climate will be like 50 to 100 years from now associated with climate change demand these efforts continue. However, the long time horizons have led many decision makers to regard climate change as a problem of the distant future. But is it? I n many regions

  2. A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Material: Four turbine- based ventilators and nine conventional servo-valve compressed-gas ventilators were1 A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators Arnaud W. Thille,1 MD; Aissam Lyazidi,1 Biomed Eng MS; Jean-Christophe M

  3. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation of cooler, drier air into the inner core is examined using an axisymmetric tropical cyclone model with parameterized ventilation. Sufficiently strong ventilation ...

  4. Guide to Closing and Conditioning Ventilated Crawlspaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickson, B.

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide explains the issues and concerns with conventional ventilated crawlspaces and provides prescriptive measures for improvements that will create healthier and more durable spaces. The methods described in this guide are not the only acceptable ways to treat a crawlspace but represent a proven strategy that works in many areas of the United States. The designs discussed in this guide may or may not meet the local building codes and as such will need to be researched before beginning the project.

  5. C-106 tank process ventilation test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-20

    Project W-320 Acceptance Test Report for tank 241-C-106, 296-C-006 Ventilation System Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) HNF-SD-W320-012, C-106 Tank Process Ventilation Test, was an in depth test of the 296-C-006 ventilation system and ventilation support systems required to perform the sluicing of tank C-106. Systems involved included electrical, instrumentation, chiller and HVAC. Tests began at component level, moved to loop level, up to system level and finally to an integrated systems level test. One criteria was to perform the test with the least amount of risk from a radioactive contamination potential stand point. To accomplish this a temporary configuration was designed that would simulate operation of the systems, without being connected directly to the waste tank air space. This was done by blanking off ducting to the tank and connecting temporary ducting and an inlet air filter and housing to the recirculation system. This configuration would eventually become the possible cause of exceptions. During the performance of the test, there were points where the equipment did not function per the directions listed in the ATP. These events fell into several different categories. The first and easiest problems were field configurations that did not match the design documentation. This was corrected by modifying the field configuration to meet design documentation and reperforming the applicable sections of the ATP. A second type of problem encountered was associated with equipment which did not operate correctly, at which point an exception was written against the ATP, to be resolved later. A third type of problem was with equipment that actually operated correctly but the directions in the ATP were in error. These were corrected by generating an Engineering Change Notice (ECN) against the ATP. The ATP with corrected directions was then re-performed. A fourth type of problem was where the directions in the ATP were as the equipment should operate, but the design of the equipment was not correct for that type of operation. To correct this problem an ECN was generated against the design documents, the equipment modified accordingly, and the ATP re-performed. The last type of problem was where the equipment operated per the direct ions in the ATP, agreed with the design documents, yet violated requirements of the Basis of Interim Operation (BIO). In this instance a Non Conformance Report (NCR) was generated. To correct problems documented on an NCR, an ECN was generated to modify the design and field work performed, followed by retesting to verify modifications corrected noted deficiencies. To expedite the completion of testing and maintain project schedules, testing was performed concurrent with construct on, calibrations and the performance of other ATP`s.

  6. Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryinEnable LowNews VehicleDepartmentVentilation in

  7. Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-01-01

    of Particles in Vertical Ducts with Smooth and RoughDeposition in Ventilation Ducts, Ph. D. Dissertation,Applicability to Ventilation Ducts in Commercial Buildings,

  8. Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation of Hydrogen from Buildings: Laboratory Test and Model Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Gawlik, K.

    2009-05-01

    Passive, buoyancy-driven ventilation is one approach to limiting hydrogen concentration. We explored the relationship between leak rate, ventilation design, and hydrogen concentrations.

  9. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low- Rise Residential Buildings - Building America Top Innovation ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and...

  10. Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petithuguenin, T.D.P.

    2009-01-01

    and strength, on occupants’ behavior, on the ventilationSince the occupants’ behavior drives ventilation (viaa more realistic approach to occupant behavior and exposure

  11. Improved Wireless Performance from Mode Scattering in Ventilation Ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    Improved Wireless Performance from Mode Scattering in Ventilation Ducts Benjamin E. Henty, PA 15230. henty@eirp.org and stancil@cmu.edu Abstract Ventilation ducts are a convenient undesirable in a ven- tilation duct setting. With this in mind we investigate the mode scattering effects

  12. Optimal decision making in ventilation control Andrew Kusiak*, Mingyang Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    . In addition, devices such as air-side economizers are also used in ventilation systems to reduce energy Accepted 24 July 2009 Available online 15 August 2009 Keywords: Ventilation Air quality Multi. Using the CO2 concentration as the major indoor air quality index and expected room occupancy schedule

  13. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.

    2014-02-01

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  14. UCC UNIVERSITIES CLIMATE UNIVERSITY CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidston, Joseph

    CONSORTIUM UCC UNIVERSITIES CLIMATE UNIVERSITY CLIMATE World-class excellence Internationally recognised Australia based www.monash.edu.au/climate-consortium CONSORTIUM An International Collaborative of the institutional leads within the UCC: The University Climate Consortium (UCC) comprises four research intensive

  15. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2011-05-01

    Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

  16. Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvares, N.; Beason, D.; Bergman, V.; Creighton, J.; Ford, H.; Lipska, A.

    1980-08-25

    The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, in exit ventilation ducts, from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Initially, methods were developed to cool fire-heated air by fine water spray upstream of the filters. It was recognized that smoke aerosol exposure to HEPA filters could also cause disruption of the containment system. Through testing and analysis, several methods to partially mitigate the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified. A continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. The technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total time duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modification of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, rolling filter media were laminated with the desired properties. The approach was Edisonian, but truncation in short order to a combination of prefilters was effective. The application of this technique was qualified, since it is of use only to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols. It is not believed that this technique is cost effective in the total spectrum of containment systems, especially if standard fire protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high-fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

  17. Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Bergman, W.; Ford, H.W.; Lipska, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect HEPA filters in exit ventilation ducts from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Several methods for partially mitigating the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified through testing and analysis. These independently involve controlling the fuel, controlling the fire, and intercepting the smoke aerosol prior to its sorption on the HEPA filter. Exit duct treatment of aerosols is not unusual in industrial applications and involves the use of scrubbers, prefilters, and inertial impaction, depending on the size, distribution, and concentration of the subject aerosol. However, when these unmodified techniques were applied to smoke aerosols from fires on materials, common to experimental laboratories of LLNL, it was found they offered minimal protection to the HEPA filters. Ultimately, a continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. This technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modificaton of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has a particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, we laminated rolling filter media with the desired properties. It is not true that the use of rolling prefilters solely to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols is cost effective in every type of containment system, especially if standard fire-protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

  18. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Transcript of Building America webinar, "Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements," held on Sept. 24, 2014.

  19. New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forowicz, T

    1997-01-01

    New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface

  20. The Trade-off between Solar Reflectance and Above-Sheathing Ventilation for Metal Roofs on Residential and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL] [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    An alternative to white and cool-color roofs that meets prescriptive requirements for steep-slope (residential and non-residential) and low-slope (non-residential) roofing has been documented. Roofs fitted with an inclined air space above the sheathing (herein termed above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV), performed as well as if not better than high-reflectance, high-emittance roofs fastened directly to the deck. Field measurements demonstrated the benefit of roofs designed with ASV. A computer tool was benchmarked against the field data. Testing and benchmarks were conducted at roofs inclined at 18.34 ; the roof span from soffit to ridge was 18.7 ft (5.7 m). The tool was then exercised to compute the solar reflectance needed by a roof equipped with ASV to exhibit the same annual cooling load as that for a direct-to-deck cool-color roof. A painted metal roof with an air space height of 0.75 in. (0.019 m) and spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) up the roof incline of 18.34 needed only a 0.10 solar reflectance to exhibit the same annual cooling load as a direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof (solar reflectance of 0.25). This held for all eight ASHRAE climate zones complying with ASHRAE 90.1 (2007a). A dark heat-absorbing roof fitted with 1.5 in. (0.038 m) air space spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) and inclined at 18.34 was shown to have a seasonal cooling load equivalent to that of a conventional direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof. Computations for retrofit application based on ASHRAE 90.1 (1980) showed that ASV air spaces of either 0.75 or 1.5 in. (0.019 and 0.038 m) would permit black roofs to have annual cooling loads equivalent to the direct-to-deck cool roof. Results are encouraging, and a parametric study of roof slope and ASV aspect ratio is needed for developing guidelines applicable to all steep- and low-slope roof applications.

  1. Training Workers to use Localized Ventilation for Radiological Work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-09-01

    Work on radiological systems and components needs to be accomplished using techniques that reduce radiation dose to workers, limit contamination spread, and minimize radioactive waste. One of the best methods to control contamination spread is to use localized ventilation to capture radioactive material and keep it from spreading. The Fluor Hanford ALARA Center teaches workers how to use ventilation in partnership with other engineered controls and this has resulted in improved work practices, minimized the impact on adjacent work operations, and decreased the amount of radioactive waste generated. This presentation will emphasize how the workers are trained to use localized ventilation for contamination control.

  2. What measures climate? A variety of variables including their variability and extreme values determine climate for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    climate zones? The sun is the ultimate power source for the climate "machine". The uneven distribution conditions. Typical variables to consider are temperature (maximum, miniumum), precipitation (includes rain, sleet, snow, hail, etc), sunlight/cloudiness, wind, humidity, ice cover, sea temperature, etc... Many

  3. Natural ventilation in buildings : modeling, control and optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ip Kiun Chong, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Natural ventilation in buildings has the potential to reduce the energy consumption usually associated with mechanical cooling while maintaining thermal comfort and air quality. It is important to know how building parameters, ...

  4. Outside Air Ventilation Controller - Building America Top Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    peak demand with no compromise in comfort. This automated night-cooling ventilation system can reduce cooling energy costs up to 40% and peak demand up to 50% in California's...

  5. Study of airflow and thermal stratification in naturally ventilated rooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menchaca Brandan, María Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Natural ventilation (NV) can considerably contribute to reducing the cooling energy consumption of a building and increase occupant productivity, if correctly implemented. Such energy savings depend on the number of hours ...

  6. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.

    2014-02-01

    This report, developed by Building America research team CARB, addresses adding or improving mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The goal of this report is to assist decision makers and contractors in making informed decisions when selecting ventilation systems for homes. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including examination of relevant codes and standards. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors.

  7. Natural ventilation possibilities for buildings in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Brian N. (Brian Nathan), 1974-

    2001-01-01

    In the United States, many of the commercial buildings built in the last few decades are completely mechanically air conditioned, without the capability to use natural ventilation. This habit has occurred in building designs ...

  8. Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2006-01-01

    This paper sets up a mathematical model of three-dimensional steady turbulence heat transfer in an air-conditioned room of multi-polluting heat sources. Numerical simulation helps identify key factors in displacement ventilation systems that affect...

  9. Thermal Comfort of Neutral Ventilated Buildings in Different Cities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, X.; Zhou, Z.; Lian, Z.; Wen, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Jiang, C.

    2006-01-01

    .Jiang. Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated houses in Beijing. Journal of HVAC [J], 1999, 29(2):1-5. (In Chinese) [16] N.Zhu. Studies on some key issues of thermal ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature..., China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity, and IAQ Vol. I-1-2 Thermal Comfort of Neutral Ventilated Buildings in Different Cities1 Xiaojiang Ye Zhaoxiao Zhou Zhiwei Lian Yuangao Wen Zhengping Zhou Chunxiao...

  10. Educational placements for children who are ventilator assisted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David E.; Clatterburk, Chris C.; Marquis, Janet; Turnbull, H. Rutherford; Moberly, Rebecca L.

    1996-01-01

    Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Educational placements for children who are ventilator assisted Jones, David E;Clatterbuck, Chris C;Marquis, Janet;Turnbull, H Rutherford, III...Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Educational placements for children who are ventilator assisted Jones, David E;Clatterbuck, Chris C;Marquis, Janet;Turnbull, H Rutherford, III...

  11. Commissioning Trial for Mechanical Ventilation System Installed in Houses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, I.; Fukushima, A.

    2004-01-01

    at the bottom of the main unit. Fig. 2 Floor plan and the ventilation system of the model house The ideal air flow pattern of the model house is shown in Figure 3. Each arrow shows the airflow direction...-8588 Summary Airflow rate of a mechanical ventilation system for houses may not exceed the designed or rated airflow rate because of construction problem and lack of maintenance. According to our survey, half of the houses were enjoying less than 50...

  12. Climate Models and Climate Change Guillaume Mauger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Models and Climate Change Guillaume Mauger gmauger@uw.edu Climate Impacts Group University of Washington Outline: · Climate Change 101 · Why do we care? · Climate models: · About, UncertainDes, Performance, and Projec

  13. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2010-10-27

    Approximately ten percent of the energy consumed in U.S. commercial buildings is used by HVAC systems to condition outdoor ventilation air. Reducing ventilation rates would be a simple and broadly-applicable energy retrofit option, if practical counter measures were available that maintained acceptable concentrations of indoor-generated air pollutants. The two general categories of countermeasures are: 1) indoor pollutant source control, and 2) air cleaning. Although pollutant source control should be used to the degree possible, source control is complicated by the large number and changing nature of indoor pollutant sources. Particle air cleaning is already routinely applied in commercial buildings. Previous calculations indicate that particle filtration consumes only 10percent to 25percent of the energy that would otherwise be required to achieve an equivalent amount of particle removal with ventilation. If cost-effective air cleaning technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also available, outdoor air ventilation rates could be reduced substantially and broadly in the commercial building stock to save energy. The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel VOC air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. The minimum required VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50percent reduction in ventilation rate for air cleaning systems installed in the HVAC supply airstream is modest (generally 20percent or less).

  14. MR-compatible ventilator for small animals: computer-controlled ventilation for proton and noble gas imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of normal breathing gas or experimental test gases. 2. Materials and methods 2.1. Overview of the ventilator/timers control electro-mechanical relays (S2072 relay board, National Instruments Interface Board), which in turn

  15. Massachusetts Takes On Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmell, Ken; Laurie, Burt

    2009-01-01

    efficiency heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems, duct sealing, extra roof and ceiling insulation, energy

  16. Demonstration of split-flow ventilation and recirculation as flow-reduction methods in an Air Force paint spray booth. Final technical report, February 1991-October 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, S.; Ayer, J.; Sutay, R.

    1994-07-01

    During a series of painting operations in a horizontal-flow paint spray booth at Travis AFB, CA, baseline concentrations of four classes of toxic airborne pollutants were measured at 24 locations across a plane immediately forward of the exhaust filters, in the exhaust duct, and inside and outside the respirator in the painter`s breathing zone (BZ). The resulting data were analyzed and used to design a modified ventilation system that (1) separates a portion of the exhaust exiting the lower portion of the booth, which contains a concentration of toxic pollutants greater than the average at the exhaust plane (split-flow); and (2) provides an option to return the flow from the upper portion of the exhaust to the intake plenum for mixing with fresh air and recirculation through the booth (recirculation). After critical review by cognizant Air Force offices and an experimental demonstration showing that a flame ionization detector monitoring the air entering the booth is able to detect excursions above the equivalent exposure limit for the solvents in the paint, the exhaust duct was reconfigured for split-flow and recirculating ventilation. A volunteer painter was briefed on the increased risk of exposure during recirculation, and on the purposes and possible benefits of this study. He then signed an informed consent form before participating in the recirculation tests. A series of tests generally equivalent to the baseline series was conducted during split-flow and recirculating ventilation, and three tests were performed during only split-flow ventilation.

  17. Human choice and climate change. Volume 2: Resources and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.; Malone, E.L.

    1997-12-31

    Foreward: Preface; Introduction; The natural science of global climate change; Land and water use; Coastal zones and oceans; Energy and industry; Energy and social systems; Technological change; and Sponsoring organizations, International Advisory Board, and project participants.

  18. Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purposes of renaissance zone designation, “renewable energy facility” means a facility that creates energy, fuels, or chemicals directly from the wind, the sun, trees, grasses, biosolids,...

  19. Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

  20. Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Control Ventilation Systems in General Office Spaces in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2010-01-01

    Use Gas Use Energy Energy Cost PV kWh/ft² kBtu/ft² kBtu/ft²n.a. n.a. HVAC Energy Cost Savings PV $/ft² n.a. n.a. n.a.6   Figure 2 – HVAC Energy Costs (PV $/ft 2 ), Climate Zone

  1. Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2007-01-01

    house in a Marine climate. Annual Energy Consumptionmarine climate has very little air conditioning - compressor energyEnergy Consumption Relative to Unvented House, kWh Marine -

  2. Evaluation of Humidity Control Options in Hot-Humid Climate Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types in the hot-humid climate zone, and examine the impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls. As the Building America program researches construction of homes that achieve greater source energy savings over typical mid-1990s construction, proper modeling of whole-house latent loads and operation of humidity control equipment has become a high priority. Long-term high relative humidity can cause health and durability problems in homes, particularly in a hot-humid climate. In this study, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used the latest EnergyPlus tool equipped with the moisture capacitance model to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types: a Building America high-performance home; a mid-1990s reference home; and a 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)-compliant home in hot-humid climate zones. They examined the impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls on the high-performance home where the dehumidification equipment energy use can become a much larger portion of whole-house energy consumption. The research included a number of simulated cases: thermostat reset, A/C with energy recovery ventilator, heat exchanger assisted A/C, A/C with condenser reheat, A/C with desiccant wheel dehumidifier, A/C with DX dehumidifier, A/C with energy recovery ventilator, and DX dehumidifier. Space relative humidity, thermal comfort, and whole-house source energy consumption were compared for indoor relative humidity set points of 50%, 55%, and 60%. The study revealed why similar trends of high humidity were observed in all three homes regardless of energy efficiency, and why humidity problems are not necessarily unique in the high-performance home. Thermal comfort analysis indicated that occupants are unlikely to notice indoor humidity problems. The study confirmed that supplemental dehumidification is needed to maintain space relative humidity (RH) below 60% in a hot-humid climate home. Researchers also concluded that while all the active dehumidification options included in the study successfully controlled space relative humidity excursions, the increase in whole-house energy consumption was much more sensitive to the humidity set point than the chosen technology option. In the high-performance home, supplemental dehumidification equipment results in a significant source energy consumption penalty at 50% RH set point (12.6%-22.4%) compared to the consumption at 60% RH set point (1.5%-2.7%). At 50% and 55% RH set points, A/C with desiccant wheel dehumidifier and A/C with ERV and high-efficiency DX dehumidifier stand out as the two cases resulting in the smallest increase of source energy consumption. At an RH set point of 60%, all explicit dehumidification technologies result in similar insignificant increases in source energy consumption and thus are equally competitive.

  3. An Experimental Investigation of Occupancy-Based Energy-Efficient Control of Commercial Building Indoor Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    An Experimental Investigation of Occupancy-Based Energy-Efficient Control of Commercial Building of the effect on indoor climate, we verify that the controller achieves the energy efficiency improvements to heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems [1]. Energy-efficient control of HVAC systems

  4. Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Research Ocean Climate Sta1ons PI: Meghan Cronin Co Lab Review 2 hClimate Sta-ons are moored buoys #12;Ocean Climate Sta1ons 2014 PMEL Lab Review 5 Contribu-ng to NOAA's Goals

  5. Design and prototyping of a low-cost portable mechanical ventilator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powelson, Stephen K. (Stephen Kirby)

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design and prototyping of a low-cost portable mechanical ventilator for use in mass casualty cases and resource-poor environments. The ventilator delivers breaths by compressing a conventional ...

  6. Internal Microclimate Resulting From Ventilated Attics in Hot and Humid Regions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mooney, B. L.; Porter, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Ventilated spaces in the built environment create unique and beneficial microclimates. While the current trends in building physics suggest sealing attics and crawlspaces, comprehensive research still supports the benefits of the ventilated...

  7. Commissioning of a Coupled Earth Tube and Natural Ventilation System at the Design Phase 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshida, H.; Pan, S.; Zheng, M.

    2007-01-01

    Natural ventilation airflow rate is generally calculated using indoor and outdoor temperature difference without consideration of thermal interaction between the ventilated air and the room in simple analytical method based on pressure balance...

  8. Beyond blue and red arrows : optimizing natural ventilation in large buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meguro, Wendy (Wendy Kei)

    2005-01-01

    Our growing understanding of technology and environment has expanded the complexities of producing large naturally ventilated buildings. While it may be argued that designing for natural ventilation is a straightforward, ...

  9. Airflow Simulation and Energy Analysis in Ventilated Room with a New Type of Air Conditioning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

    2006-01-01

    Airflow simulation in one ventilated room with radiant heating and natural ventilation has been carried out. Three cases are compared: the closed room, the room with full openings, and the room with small openings. The ...

  10. Evaluating the performance of natural ventilation in buildings through simulation and on-site monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Haofan

    2013-01-01

    Natural ventilation in buildings is capable of reducing energy consumption while maintaining a comfortable indoor at the same time. It is important that natural ventilation is taken into consideration in the early design ...

  11. ENERGY IMPACTS OF VARIOUS RESIDENTIAL MECHANICAL VENTILATION STRATEGIES 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vieira, R.; Parker, D.; Lixing, G.; Wichers, M.

    2008-01-01

    in Energy Use with Eight Ventilation Strategies Tampa -5.00% 0.00% 5.00% 10.00% 15.00% 20.00% 25.00% 30.00% 35.00% E n e r g y I n cr ea se fr o m N o V en t Supply Exhaust Balanced ERV 60% eff Runtime Vent (R-V) R-V 25% min R-V 25% max R-V 25% min... OF VARIOUS RESIDENTIAL MECHANICAL VENTILATION STRATEGIES Robin K. Vieira, Buildings. Research Division Director Danny S. Parker Principal Research Scientist Lixing Gu Principal Research Engineer Michael Wichers Technical Specialist Florida...

  12. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Page, Steven J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Mal, Thomas (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  13. Particle Concentration Dynamics in the Ventilation Duct after an Artificial Release: for Countering Potential Bioterriorist Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You , Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2014-01-01

    leads to In this work, the models of particle concentration dynamics in the ventilation duct following a resuspension

  14. CONTROL ID: 1187959 TITLE: Climate destabilization on tidally locked exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTROL ID: 1187959 TITLE: Climate destabilization on tidally locked exoplanets PRESENTATION TYPE-zone rocky planets, should be tidally locked. We will discuss two different feedbacks that can destabilize cause a runaway climate shift. We use an idealized energy balance model to illustrate the scope

  15. Multi-objective optimization of the HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) system performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Multi-objective optimization of the HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) system, ventilation, and air conditioning) system in a typical office facility is presented. A multi-layer perceptron. 1. Introduction HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) systems are designed to maintain

  16. On the role of mesoscale eddies in the ventilation of Antarctic intermediate water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    On the role of mesoscale eddies in the ventilation of Antarctic intermediate water Zouhair Lachkar Mesoscale eddies CFC-11 Ventilation Southern Ocean a b s t r a c t The spatial distribution of Antarctic and ventilation are substantially affected by mesoscale eddies. To diagnose the role of eddies, we made global CFC

  17. Data-driven classification of ventilated lung tissues using electrical impedance tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Data-driven classification of ventilated lung tissues using electrical impedance tomography Camille for identifying ventilated lung regions utilizing electrical impedance tomography (EIT) images rely on dividing of a data-driven classification method to identify ventilated lung ROI based on forming k clusters from

  18. Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

    2008-06-18

    The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

  19. Opportunity and Enterprise Zones (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Opportunity and Enterprise Zones provide enhanced financial incentives for businesses located in such zones aimed at stimulating economic expansion in rural and disadvantaged communities...

  20. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  1. MINING VENTILATION CONTROL: A NEW INDUSTRIAL CASE FOR WIRELESS AUTOMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MINING VENTILATION CONTROL: A NEW INDUSTRIAL CASE FOR WIRELESS AUTOMATION E. Witrant1, A. D- scribe a new industrial case on wireless automation, for a large scale system with high environmental- provements. Indeed, one of the first objectives of mod- ern mining industry is to fulfill ecological

  2. Mining ventilation control: a new industrial case for wireless automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    - lated to motor system energy [2] (p.19). Another inter- esting figure is given in [3] whereMining ventilation control: a new industrial case for wireless automation E. Witrant1, A. D, 2008 Abstract This paper describes a new industrial case on wireless automation, for a large scale

  3. Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent). The original ventilation design for the project was provided by a local engineer and consisted of a single large heat recovery ventilator (HRV) located in a mechanical room in the basement with a centralized duct system providing supply air to the main living space and exhausting stale air from the single bathroom in each apartment. This design was deemed to be far too costly to install and operate for several reasons: the large central HRV was oversized and the specified flows to each apartment were much higher than the ASHRAE 62.2 rate; an extensive system of ductwork, smoke and fire dampers, and duct chases were specified; ductwork required a significant area of dropped ceilings; and the system lacked individual ventilation control in the apartments

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the "fresh" air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the normal leakage paths through the building envelope disappear. Researchers from the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. In this project, the CARB team evaluated the four different strategies for providing make-up air to multifamily residential buildings and developed guidelines to help contractors and building owners choose the best ventilation systems.

  5. Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Standards in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U was also supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy underLBNL 61282 Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Standards in California Max H. Sherman and Iain

  6. Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U solutions. These solutions, however, may have a different energy costs and non- energy benefits. This reportLBNL 62341 Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States Max H. Sherman

  7. Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Zuluaga, M.

    2014-07-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the "fresh" air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent. CARB researchers have found that most new high performance, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. Product performance data are based on laboratory tests, but there is no guarantee that those conditions will exist consistently in the finished building. In this research project, CARB evaluated the four ventilation strategies in the field to validate system performance.

  8. TOP DOWN VENTILATION AND COOLING Stephen A. Gage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linden, Paul F.

    the problems inherent in passively ventilating and cooling low and medium rise urban buildings. We focus are reported which substantiate this concept, and two wind-driven devices which may be used to assist the top.K. The work at Cambridge by Hunt and Linden is part of an ongoing project in which laboratory modeling

  9. Study on Influencing Factors of Night Ventilation in Office Rooms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z.; Sun, X.

    2006-01-01

    in Harbin are simulated and analyzed. The results show that the inlet velocity and area can influence the effects of night ventilation. When the inlet velocity is 2.5m/s, both indoor air temperature and air velocity meet ASHRAE standard 55-2004. Indoor...

  10. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 7.1: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Cole, Pamala C.; Hefty, Marye G.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-08-30

    This report for DOE's Building America program helps builders identify which Building America climate region they are building in. The guide includes maps comparing the Building America regions with climate designations used in the International Energy Conservation Code for Residential Buildings and lists all U.S. counties by climate zone. A very brief history of the development of the Building America climate map and descriptions of each climate zone are provided. This report is available on the Building America website www.buildingamerica.gov.

  11. Performance Verification of Production-Scalable Energy-Efficient Solutions: Winchester/Camberley Homes Mixed-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.

    2014-07-01

    Winchester/Camberley Homes with the Building America program and its NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership collaborated to develop a new set of high performance home designs that could be applicable on a production scale. The new home designs are to be constructed in the mixed humid climate zone four and could eventually apply to all of the builder's home designs to meet or exceed future energy codes or performance-based programs. However, the builder recognized that the combination of new wall framing designs and materials, higher levels of insulation in the wall cavity, and more detailed air sealing to achieve lower infiltration rates changes the moisture characteristics of the wall system. In order to ensure long term durability and repeatable successful implementation with few call-backs, this report demonstrates through measured data that the wall system functions as a dynamic system, responding to changing interior and outdoor environmental conditions within recognized limits of the materials that make up the wall system. A similar investigation was made with respect to the complete redesign of the heating, cooling, air distribution, and ventilation systems intended to optimize the equipment size and configuration to significantly improve efficiency while maintaining indoor comfort. Recognizing the need to demonstrate the benefits of these efficiency features, the builder offered a new house model to serve as a test case to develop framing designs, evaluate material selections and installation requirements, changes to work scopes and contractor learning curves, as well as to compare theoretical performance characteristics with measured results.

  12. EnginEEring ZonE "The Engineering Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    EnginEEring ZonE "The Engineering Zone will push the limits in collaborative learning and research, and empower people to change the world. "Winthrop Professor John Dell Dean, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Mathematics #12;2 | nEw CEntury Campaign ­ EnginEEring ZonE #12;nEw CEntury Campaign ­ EnginEEring ZonE | 3

  13. Sandia Energy - Arctic Climate Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Climate Measurements Home Climate & Earth Systems Climate Measurement & Modeling Arctic Climate Measurements Arctic Climate Measurementscwdd2015-05-08T01:51:20+00:00 A...

  14. Review: Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

  15. Apportioning Climate Change Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farber, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Apportioning Climate Change Costs Daniel A. Farber* I. II.ON CLIMATE CHANGE FOUR QUESTIONS ABOUTof how to respond to climate change. Most public attention

  16. Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    Novim Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies Jason J. Blackstock David S. Battisti Santa Barbara, California #12;Climate Engineering Responses to Climate Emergencies This report should, A. A. N. Patrinos, D. P. Schrag, R. H. Socolow and S. E. Koonin, Climate Engineering Responses

  17. CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE CERTAINTIES AND UNCERTAINTIES Stephen E. Schwartz http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html December 4, 2001 Updated, March 4, 2002 #12;OUTLINE · Overview of the Earth climate system · Increased concentrations of "greenhouse gases" · Radiative forcing of climate change · Climate system response

  18. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  19. Climate Change and Extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinervo, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

  20. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR WASTE TREATMENT BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.E. Salzman

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) waste treatment building ventilation system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  1. Zone Level Occupant-Responsive Building Energy Systems at the GSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Alastair

    2014-03-01

    The General Services Administration (GSA) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement building energy system retrofits, aiming to reduce energy consumption of at least two building systems by a total of 30 percent or more, as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) Program. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) provided technical expertise in support of this DOE program, working with the GSA and a team of consultants. This case study reports expected energy savings from appropriate energy efficient design and operations modifications to lighting and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems at the selected study sites. These retrofits comprised installation of new lighting systems with dimming capability and occupancy-sensor control at the individual light fixture level, and utilized lighting system occupancy sensor signals to continually readjust zone-level ventilation airflow according to the number of people present, down to minimum rates when vacant.

  2. Climate Change, Energy Efficiency, and IEQ: Challenges and Opportunities for ASHRAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2009-01-01

    controlled ventilation, heat recovery, and gas phase airtemporal control Ventilation heat recovery Increased use of

  3. Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

    2010-12-14

    This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

  4. Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Zuluaga, M.

    2014-07-01

    In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the 'fresh' air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the 'normal leakage paths through the building envelope' disappear. CARB researchers have found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. Product performance data are based on laboratory tests, and the assumption is that products will perform similarly in the field. Proper application involves matching expected performance at expected building pressures, but there is no guarantee that those conditions will exist consistently in the finished building. This research effort, which included several weeks of building pressure monitoring, sought to provide field validation of system performance. The performance of four substantially different strategies for providing make-up air to apartments was evaluated.

  5. Unsaturated Zone I. Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 2 Unsaturated Zone I. Overview If the Yucca Mountain site is deemed suitable for re of the extent of welding, the tuffs within the UZ at Yucca Mountain are grouped informally into hydrogeologic Yucca Mountain is illustrated in Figure 2-1 on page 14. A. Why UZ Was Chosen Initial studies of Yucca

  6. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida Manufactured Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes work by Building America researchers who visited 24 manufactured home factories between 1996 and 2003 to investigate moisture problems while improving energy efficiency and identified insufficient air sealing and poor HVAC installation as the biggest culprits. One manufacturer reported zero moisture-related issues in 35,000 homes built after implementing Building America recommendations.

  7. Energy and Cost Associated with Ventilating Office Buildings in a Tropical Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rim, Donghyun; Schiavon, Stefano; Nazaroff, William W

    2015-01-01

    the specific heat of dry air and water vapor along with theto 0.024 kg of water vapor per kg of dry air with a mean ofdry air, 1.006 kJ/(kgK); C pw = speci?c heat of water vapor,

  8. Ventilation for an enclosure of a gas turbine and related method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Troy Joseph (Mauldin, SC); Leach, David (Simpsonville, SC); O'Toole, Michael Anthony (Greenfield Center, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A ventilation scheme for a rotary machine supported on pedestals within an enclosure having a roof, end walls and side walls with the machine arranged parallel to the side walls, includes ventilation air inlets located in a first end wall of the enclosure; a barrier wall located within the enclosure, proximate the first end wall to thereby create a plenum chamber. The barrier wall is constructed to provide a substantially annular gap between the barrier wall and a casing of the turbine to thereby direct ventilation air axially along the turbine; one or more ventilation air outlets located proximate a second, opposite end wall on the roof of the enclosure. In addition, one or more fans are provided for pulling ventilating air into said plenum chamber via the ventilation air inlets.

  9. Saturated Zone I. Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Yucca Mountain is small (on the order of 7 mm/yr in the current climate) in compari- son to the groundwater flux laterally in the SZ be- low Yucca Mountain. Although there is a large spatial variability at Yucca Mountain to determine the amount of mixing that could occur at the SZ-UZ interface. There also

  10. Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy Jonathan Rougier University of Bristol, UK Michel1.tex. 1 Introduction This essay, written by a statistician and a climate scientist, describes our view of the gap that exists between current practice in mainstream climate science, and the practical

  11. Use of Climate Data in Climate Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Storch, Hans

    Use of Climate Data in Climate Research A Random Walk Through the MPI Hans von Storch Max and Technical Committee of the Global Climate Observing System in Hamburg, Germany September 19 - 22, 1994 #12;For which- Purposes do we Use 0bserved Data · Climate modelling - Design of parameterisations

  12. RELATING CLIMATE FORCINGS AND CLIMATE RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    RELATING CLIMATE FORCINGS AND CLIMATE RESPONSE Stephen E. Schwartz Upton NY USA Bern, Switzerland change are tightly correlated. Forcing by GHGs only leads to extremely low climate sensitivity, well to rapid changes in forcings by stratospheric volcanic aerosols. Climate sensitivity is quite low, probably

  13. Climate Summary Working toward Climate Resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    1 Climate Summary Working toward Climate Resilience A Summary Prepared for the Town of Germantown and decision-making as requested by the Town of Germantown. It identifies historic climate trends and introduces future projections and strategies to address the climate hazards most likely to affect Hudson

  14. CLIMATE VARIABILITY, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND WESTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    CHAPTER 13 CLIMATE VARIABILITY, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND WESTERN WILDFIRE WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR THE URBAN­WILDLAND INTERFACE William S. Keeton, Philip W. Mote and Jerry F. Franklin ABSTRACT Climate change hazards by the warmer, drier summers projected for much of the western U.S. by climate models would

  15. CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND FOR INFORMED DECISION-MAKING Stephen E. Schwartz Climate Research Unit, East Anglia UK #12;INDICATIONS OF SYSTEMATIC WARMING IN RECENT YEARS The 1990s were call the anthropocene climate regime. Over the 20th century, human population quadrupled and energy

  16. Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats B A C K G R O U DN C H E C K ! Habitat, Food, Water. Disease,predation,pollution, accidents and climatic conditions are among other limiting factors which can affect an animal's ability to meet its needs. This section will look further into the impact of Climate

  17. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  18. Demonstration of split-flow ventilation and recirculation as flow-reduction methods in an Air Force paint spray booth. Final report, 15 February 1991-9 October 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, S.; Ayer, J.; Sutay, R.

    1994-07-27

    During a series of painting operations in a horizontal-flow paint spray booth at Travis AFB, CA, baseline concentrations of four classes of toxic airborne pollutants were measured at 24 locations across a plane immediately forward of the exhaust filters, in the exhaust duct, and inside and outside the respirator in the painter`s breathing zone (BZ). The resulting data were analyzed and used to design a modified ventilation system that (1) separates a portion of the exhaust exiting the lower portion of the booth, which contains a concentration of toxic pollutants greater than the average at the exhaust plane (split-flow); and (2) provides an option to return the flow from the upper portion of the exhaust to the intake plenum for mixing with fresh air and recirculation through the booth (recirculation). After critical review by cognizant Air Force offices and an experimental demonstration showing that a flame ionization detector monitoring the air entering the booth is able to detect excursions above the equivalent exposure limit for the solvents in the paint, the exhaust duct was reconfigured for split-flow and recirculating ventilation. A volunteer painter was briefed on the increased risk of exposure during recirculation, and on the purposes and possible benefits of this study. He then signed an informed consent form before participating in the recirculation tests. A series of tests generally equivalent to the baseline series was conducted during split-flow and recirculating ventilation, and three tests were performed during only split-flow ventilation.

  19. Santa Clara County- Zoning Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Santa Clara County's Zoning Ordinance includes standards for wind and solar structures for residential, agricultural, and commercial uses.

  20. Energy Impacts of Envelope Tightening and Mechanical Ventilation for the U.S. Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Residential Venitlaiton and Energy Characteristics. ASHRAEIncremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating ImpactsMethod. 2008, California Energy Commision. Walker, I.S. and

  1. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1998-01-01

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

  2. Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boggs, D.L.; Baraszu, D.J.; Foulkes, D.M.; Gomes, E.G.

    1998-12-29

    An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine`s crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages. 4 figs.

  3. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research on simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install and meet code requirements.

  4. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    was assumed that a heat recovery ventilator (HRV) was usedand that the HRV was connected to the home’s central heating

  5. Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements- Joe Lstiburek

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation will be delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America webinar, Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements, on September 24, 2014. Joe...

  6. Economizer system cost effectiveness: Accounting for the influence of ventilation rate on sick leave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

    2003-01-01

    ECONOMIZER SYSTEM COST EFFECTIVENESS: ACCOUNTING FOR THEand economic benefits of an economizer ventilation controlanalyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs

  7. Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 3A Atlanta, Georgia |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research at 1Comments|L.L.C.Whole-HouseDepartment

  8. Category:County Climate Zones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia: Energy014771°,NorthCLEAN WebinarNH Jump to:County

  9. Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,Information Promoting Clean Cars: CaseNumber Jump

  10. Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,Information Promoting Clean Cars: CaseNumber

  11. Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,Information Promoting Clean Cars: CaseNumberASHRAE

  12. Property:Buildings/ModelClimateZone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergy InformationInformation TotalProperty Edit with

  13. U.S. Climate Zones Map for Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of the National Energy ModelingFieldExtensionsSales

  14. INTERNATIONAL DATA Roaming Data Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    (including Canary Islands, Ceuta and Melilla), Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican City (Italy) Zones 3 ­ 7 All Islands Guernsey, Jersey, Republic of Ireland, Isle of Man Zone 2 EE Business Zone Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus (South), Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland (including Aland Islands

  15. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  16. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  17. Energy saving strategies with personalized ventilation in tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen; Chandra Sekhar, Chandra Sekhar

    2010-01-01

    A.K. Melikov, Energy saving strategies with personalizedand humid climate Energy saving Occupants’ comfort Controlranged between a 7% saving and 15% penalty in building

  18. Climate Action Plan 2013 Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    UC Irvine Climate Action Plan 2013 Update #12;CLIMATE ACTION PLAN - 2013 UPDATE 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS CLIMATE PROTECTION GOALS...............................................................18 OPPORTUNITIES-2050 CLIMATE NEUTRALITY.........................................................29 MEDICALCENTER IMPLEMENTATION

  19. CO2 MONITORING FOR DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David; Eliseeva, Ekaterina

    2010-03-17

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sensors are often deployed in commercial buildings to obtain CO{sub 2} data that are used, in a process called demand-controlled ventilation, to automatically modulate rates of outdoor air ventilation. The objective is to keep ventilation rates at or above design specifications and code requirements and also to save energy by avoiding excessive ventilation rates. Demand controlled ventilation is most often used in spaces with highly variable and sometime dense occupancy. Reasonably accurate CO{sub 2} measurements are needed for successful demand controlled ventilation; however, prior research has suggested substantial measurement errors. Accordingly, this study evaluated: (a) the accuracy of 208 CO{sub 2} single-location sensors located in 34 commercial buildings, (b) the accuracy of four multi-location CO{sub 2} measurement systems that utilize tubing, valves, and pumps to measure at multiple locations with single CO{sub 2} sensors, and (c) the spatial variability of CO{sub 2} concentrations within meeting rooms. The field studies of the accuracy of single-location CO{sub 2} sensors included multi-concentration calibration checks of 90 sensors in which sensor accuracy was checked at multiple CO{sub 2} concentrations using primary standard calibration gases. From these evaluations, average errors were small, -26 ppm and -9 ppm at 760 and 1010 ppm, respectively; however, the averages of the absolute values of error were 118 ppm (16%) and 138 ppm (14%), at concentrations of 760 and 1010 ppm, respectively. The calibration data are generally well fit by a straight line as indicated by high values of R{sup 2}. The Title 24 standard specifies that sensor error must be certified as no greater than 75 ppm for a period of five years after sensor installation. At 1010 ppm, 40% of sensors had errors greater than {+-}75 ppm and 31% of sensors has errors greater than {+-}100 ppm. At 760 ppm, 47% of sensors had errors greater than {+-}75 ppm and 37% of sensors had errors greater than {+-}100 ppm. A significant fraction of sensors had errors substantially larger than 100 ppm. For example, at 1010 ppm, 19% of sensors had an error greater than 200 ppm and 13% of sensors had errors greater than 300 ppm. The field studies also included single-concentration calibration checks of 118 sensors at the concentrations encountered in the buildings, which were normally less than 500 ppm during the testing. For analyses, these data were combined with data from the calibration challenges at 510 ppm obtained during the multi-concentration calibration checks. For the resulting data set, the average error was 60 ppm and the average of the absolute value of error was 154 ppm. Statistical analyses indicated that there were statistically significant differences between the average accuracies of sensors from different manufacturers. Sensors with a 'single lamp single wavelength' design tended to have a statistically significantly smaller average error than sensors with other designs except for 'single lamp dual wavelength' sensors, which did not have a statistically significantly lower accuracy. Sensor age was not consistently a statistically significant predictor of error.

  20. Coastal communities and climate change : a dynamic model of risk perception, storms, and adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck, Travis Read

    2009-01-01

    Climate change impacts, including sea-level rise and changes in tropical storm frequency and intensity, will pose signicant challenges to city planners and coastal zone managers trying to make wise investment and protection ...

  1. Climate Update Nolan Doesken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Update Nolan Doesken Colorado Climate Center Presented to Water Availability Task Force precip #12;Mtd ppt #12;Mtd ppt PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State University #12;Climate divisions defined by Dr. Klaus Wolter of NOAA's Climate Diagnostic Center in Boulder, CO #12;#12;Division 1 ­ Grand Lake 1

  2. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  3. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  4. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  5. The Benefits of Better Ventilation and Filtration Practices in Schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamping, G.

    2013-01-01

    Ventilation and Filtration Practices in Schools Gerald (Jerry) Lamping ASHRAE Member Director for IAQ (Retired) Green Classroom Professional USGBC December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-17 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas... can help children build real-world skill sets, cut school costs and provide healthy learning environments. ESL-KT-13-12-17 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Costs for Student Absences 12% of U...

  6. Liquid zone seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

  7. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

  8. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Ventilation Strategies for High Performance Homes, Part I: Application-Specific Ventilation Guidelines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Aug. 26, 2016, covered what makes high-performance homes different from a ventilation perspective and how they might need to be treated differently than traditional construction.

  9. Evaluation of the effects of contaminant injection location and injection method on the determination of overall relative room ventilation efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen Dale

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate an emerging concept called ventilation effectiveness at several points in a real room. Ventilation effectiveness was calculated using the pulse and step-up injection methods which were performed in four...

  10. Use of Statistical Approach to Design an Optimal Duct System for On-demand Industrial Exhaust Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litomisky, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper elaborates on how to use statistics to calculate optimal parameters (including duct diameters) of energy-efficient industrial ventilation systems. Based on the fan-law, on-demand ventilation can save up to 80% of electricity compared...

  11. Economic Analysis and Optimization of Exterior Insulation Requirements for Ventilated Buildings at Power Generation Facilities with High Internal Heat Gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Douglas E.

    2010-12-17

    Industrial buildings require a large amount of heating and ventilation equipment to maintain the indoor environment within acceptable levels for personnel protection and equipment protection. The required heating and ventilation equipment...

  12. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  13. Climate Code Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Nick; Jones, David

    2011-07-05

    Climate Code Foundation - who are we? A non-profit organisation founded in August 2010; our goal is to promote the public understanding of climate science, by increasing the visibility and clarity of the software used in climate science...

  14. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 34, GRIB including SZIP compression,...

  15. Analysis of Solar Passive Techniques and Natural Ventilation Concepts in a Residential Building Including CFD Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quince, N.; Ordonez, A.; Bruno, J. C.; Coronas, A.

    2010-01-01

    are double glazed (10mm + 8mm air + 10mm), with aluminium frame and cold bridge breaking. All apartments are designed to allow cross ventilation. The project of the building (Pastor and Toral 2006) plans two basic natural ventilation mechanisms: a stack...

  16. Experimental Demonstration of 2x2 MIMO Communications in a Reverberant Ventilation Duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    Experimental Demonstration of 2x2 MIMO Communications in a Reverberant Ventilation Duct Environment- tilation duct. We further demonstrate that MIMO coefficients applied to transmit and receive antennas can that ventilation ducts are an attractive media for distributing RF communication signals indoors (See for example

  17. Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 Laboratory Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...........................................................................3-2 C. Fume Hood Exhaust System Design Criteria (FHES) ........................................3-3 D Criteria (FHES) 1. Design to incorporate user needs, room configuration and general ventilation. 2Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 ­ Laboratory Ventilation 3-1 Section 3

  18. 1 Copyright 1999 by ASME MULTI-PHASE CFD ANALYSIS OF NATURAL AND VENTILATED CAVITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunz, Robert Francis

    volume fraction transport/generation for liquid, condensable vapor and non-con- densable gas fields reduction can be realized if bodies are partially or fully envel- oped in a large natural or ventilated gas1 Copyright © 1999 by ASME MULTI-PHASE CFD ANALYSIS OF NATURAL AND VENTILATED CAVITATION ABOUT

  19. Modeling Alveolar Volume Changes During Periodic Breathing in Heterogeneously Ventilated Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeavons, Peter

    Modeling Alveolar Volume Changes During Periodic Breathing in Heterogeneously Ventilated Lungs SARA-uniform breathing pattern for a lung with an inhomogeneous gas distribution, such as that observed in some subjects of irregular breathing caused by small, poorly ventilated regions of the lung. Presented here is an extension

  20. Video Article Characterization of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesler, Naomi C.

    Video Article Characterization of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung Perfused://www.jove.com/details.php?id=2690 DOI: 10.3791/2690 Keywords: Medicine, Issue 50, ex-vivo, mouse, lung, pulmonary vascular impedance of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung Perfused with Pulsatile Flow. J. Vis. Exp. (50), e2690

  1. A simplified approach to describe complex diffusers in displacement ventilation for CFD simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    for displacement ventilation systems include, but not lim ited to, quarter -circular-perforated, grille , floor dif fusers under cooling or heating conditions. The distributio ns of air v elocity, temperature in the 1970s. Due to the wide use of di splacement ventilation, ASHRAE (the Am erican Society of Heating

  2. Identifying Mathematical Models of the Mechanically Ventilated Lung Using Equation Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kersting, Kristian

    1 Identifying Mathematical Models of the Mechanically Ventilated Lung Using Equation Discovery in intensive care medicine by all means. Nevertheless, it can induce severe mechanical stress to the lung, which generally impairs the outcome of the therapy. To reduce the risk of a ventilator induced lung

  3. owi'3:%l OORNL/CON-75 Effect of Forced Ventilation on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    to determine the effect of a vented dryer on the house infiltration rate. The results of this study may alsoowi'3:%l OORNL/CON-75 Effect of Forced Ventilation on House Infiltration *CARBIDE W. P. Levins #12-eng-26 Energy Division EFFECT OF FORCED VENTILATION ON HOUSE INFILTRATION W. P. Levins DEPARTMENT

  4. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-08

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  5. Submitted to Building and Environment ON ESTIMATION OF MULTIZONE VENTILATION RATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBL-25772 Submitted to Building and Environment ON ESTIMATION OF MULTIZONE VENTILATION RATES FROM techniques are becoming widely used to measure the ventilation rates in buildings. As more detailed imprecise for real buildings. How- ever, exogenous information concerning physical constraints can allow

  6. Lower-Temperature Subsurface Layout and Ventilation Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christine L. Linden; Edward G. Thomas

    2001-06-20

    This analysis combines work scope identified as subsurface facility (SSF) low temperature (LT) Facilities System and SSF LT Ventilation System in the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001b, pp. 6 and 7, and pp. 13 and 14). In accordance with this technical work plan (TWP), this analysis is performed using AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI.1Q, Software Management. The purpose of this analysis is to develop an overall subsurface layout system and the overall ventilation system concepts that address a lower-temperature operating mode for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The objective of this analysis is to provide a technical design product that supports the lower-temperature operating mode concept for the revision of the system description documents and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. The overall subsurface layout analysis develops and describes the overall subsurface layout, including performance confirmation facilities (also referred to as Test and Evaluation Facilities) for the Site Recommendation design. This analysis also incorporates current program directives for thermal management.

  7. Proposed Adjudication of the Contract for the Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Installations for the ISR Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1968-01-01

    Proposed Adjudication of the Contract for the Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Installations for the ISR Buildings

  8. Nuclear facilities: criteria for the design and operation of ventilation systems for nuclear installations other than nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear facilities: criteria for the design and operation of ventilation systems for nuclear installations other than nuclear reactors

  9. Building America Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  10. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  11. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  12. Chapter 20 Climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 20 Climate This chapter describes existing climate conditions in the project area, and how the...

  13. Climatic Data Center Climatic Data Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA's ational Climatic Data Center NOAA's ational Climatic Data Center 2008 Annual Report 2008NerS 12-16 DAtA ceNter iNFrAStrUctUre 16-20 USer eNGAGemeNt 21-24 eDUcAtioN/oUtreAch/WorKShoPS 26-31 em) National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) served the Nation as an authoritative resource for climate information

  14. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering Thomas R. Karl Lead, NOAA climate services Director, NOAA National Climatic Data Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change

  15. International Finance and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    International Finance and Climate Change Thursday, October 17, 2013 Breakfast ­ 8:30 a Principal Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Group at International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group Vladimir Stenek Senior Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Department of the International

  16. Western Renewable Energy Zones (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hein, J.

    2011-06-01

    This presentation summarizes recent developments and trends pertaining to competitive renewable energy zones, transmission planning and the integration of renewable generation resources.

  17. Building America Best Practices Series: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-10-01

    This document describes the eight climate region designations used by the US Department of Energy Building America Program. In addition to describing the climate zones, the document includes a complete list of every county in the United States and their climate region designations. The county lists are grouped by state. The doucment is intended to assist builders to easily identify what climate region they are building in and therefore which climate-specific Building America best practices guide would be most appropriate for them.

  18. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reale, Marco

    1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 107 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2011) 107:247-265 DOI available until 12 months after publication. #12;Climatic Change (2011) 107:247­265 DOI 10.1007/s10584

  19. CLIMATE PRODUCTS Basic Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE PRODUCTS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral the computer or a telephone system Data are collected by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), where) The original observations relate to WEATHER, not CLIMATE. But if we look at this information over a much longer

  20. Climate Science Andreas Schmittner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    Climate Science Andreas Schmittner Associate Professor College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University Climate Change: A Workshop for Oregon Educators, Aug. 11, 2015 #12;Outline Past Present Future #12;Past Paleoclimate · How can we reconstruct past climate? · How did climate

  1. Climate Change and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Climate Change and Transportation Addressing Climate Change in the Absence of Federal Guidelines;6 WSDOT Efforts · Climate Change Team · Project Level GHG Approach · Planning Level GHG Approach · Alternative Fuels Corridor · Recent legislation and research #12;7 WSDOT Efforts: Climate Change Team

  2. Ventilation and air-conditioning concept for CNGS underground areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindroos, J

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the CNGS project is to prove the existence of neutrino oscillation by generating an intense neutrino beam from CERN in the direction of the Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy, where two large neutrino detectors are built to detect the neutrinos. All the components for producing the neutrino beam will be situated in the underground tunnels, service galleries and chambers. The ventilation and air-conditioning systems installed in these underground areas have multiple tasks. Depending on the operating mode and structure to be air-conditioned, the systems are required to provide fresh air, cool the machine, dehumidify areas housing sensible equipment or assure the smoke removal in a case of a fire. This paper presents the technical solutions foreseen to meet these requirements.

  3. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS IN TANK FARMS OPERATING SPECIFICATIONS DOCUMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERGLIN, E J

    2003-06-23

    This report provides the technical basis for high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA) for Hanford tank farm ventilation systems (sometimes known as heating, ventilation and air conditioning [HVAC]) to support limits defined in Process Engineering Operating Specification Documents (OSDs). This technical basis included a review of older technical basis and provides clarifications, as necessary, to technical basis limit revisions or justification. This document provides an updated technical basis for tank farm ventilation systems related to Operation Specification Documents (OSDs) for double-shell tanks (DSTs), single-shell tanks (SSTs), double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), catch tanks, and various other miscellaneous facilities.

  4. Predicting the Response of Electricity Load to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Patrick; Colman, Jesse; Kalendra, Eric

    2015-07-28

    Our purpose is to develop a methodology to quantify the impact of climate change on electric loads in the United States. We perform simple linear regression, assisted by geospatial smoothing, on paired temperature and load time-series to estimate the heating- and coolinginduced sensitivity to temperature across 300 transmission zones and 16 seasonal and diurnal time periods. The estimated load sensitivities can be coupled with climate scenarios to quantify the potential impact of climate change on load, with a primary application being long-term electricity scenarios. The method allows regional and seasonal differences in climate and load response to be reflected in the electricity scenarios. While the immediate product of this analysis was designed to mesh with the spatial and temporal resolution of a specific electricity model to enable climate change scenarios and analysis with that model, we also propose that the process could be applied for other models and purposes.

  5. Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    climate adaptation, ocean and coastal planning, and youth internships. SpeakersSean Hart, BIA Climate Change Coordinator, andRachael Novak, BIA Climate Science Coordinator,...

  6. Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

  7. Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA Climate Action Champions: Sonoma County Regional Climate Protection Authority, CA In 2005, nine cities and the County of...

  8. www.VadoseZoneJournal.org A Global Analysis of Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    www.VadoseZoneJournal.org A Global Analysis of Groundwater Recharge for Vegeta on, Climate, and Soils Because groundwater is an essen al resource for people and ecosystems, a be er under- standing >600 es mates of groundwater recharge to obtain the first global analysis of recharge and vegeta

  9. www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 11072010, Vol. 9 Understanding Vineyard Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 11072010, Vol. 9 Understanding Vineyard Soils Robert E. White. Oxford developing and cultivating vineyards, soil properties and their variations are often not considered with a particular wine. As a hydrogeolo- gist, I find the sensitivity of wine grape expression to climatic and soil

  10. Humidity Control Systems for Civil Buildings in Hot Summer and Cold Winter Zone in China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, X.

    2006-01-01

    ) systems. Based on our research, this paper further provides the rate and characteristics of moisture resources in civil buildings. Although the ventilation rate is limited with the minimum ventilation rate in the sanitation ventilation mode of the air...

  11. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Changeand Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  12. Climate & Environment | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environment Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict...

  13. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    and Kate Scow. 2006. “Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. ” California Climate Change Center White Paper.

  14. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

  15. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    The Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Inshore Squid:Fifth Annual California Climate Change Research Conference,Potential Impacts of Climate Change on U.S. Transportation.

  16. Review: Preparing for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunnas, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Review: Preparing for Climate Change By Michael D.Stephen, Preparing for Climate Change. A Boston Review Book.alkaline paper. “Climate change is inevitable, but disaster

  17. Urban Growth and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01

    2007a The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence fromGreenstone. 2007b. Climate Change, Mortality and Adaptation:and Ariel Dinar, 1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and

  18. Occupant-generated CO/sub 2/ as an indicator of ventilation rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turiel, I.; Rudy, J.

    1980-04-01

    Ventilation rates in buildings are generally determined by means of tracer-gas techniques that permit calculation of the number of air changes per hour occurring in a given area, or, alternatively, by measuring the actual air flow in the ventilation ducts. There are difficulties associated with both of these methods. In this study in a San Francisco office building, we used occupant-generated CO/sub 2/ as an indicator of the actual ventilation rate. Two techniques were employed, a decay method and an integral method and, in both cases, measurements were conducted simultaneously at several locations. The decay method compared favorably with the conventional measurement methods in both the all-outside-air and recirculation modes, whereas the integral method showed a considerable deviation from the other methods in the recirculation mode. Both techniques show promise of being suitable methods for measuring ventilation rate in commercial or institutional buildings.

  19. Increasing ventilation in commercial cattle trailers to decrease shrink, morbidity, and mortality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giguere, Nicole Marie

    2009-06-02

    moving livestock trailers, an experimental treatment that increased cross-ventilation within commercial cattle trailers by installing aluminum scoops to punch-hole trailers was evaluated. Environmental factors including temperature, ammonia and carbon...

  20. Numerical Analysis of the Channel Wheel Fresh Air Ventilator Under Frosting Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, B.; Dong, Z.; Cheng, Z.; Luo, E.

    2006-01-01

    As new equipment, the channel wheel fresh air ventilator has become increasingly popular in recent years. However, when such equipment is operated under low ambient temperature in the freezing area in winter, the formation of frost on the outdoor...

  1. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    2011-01-01

    scaling the passive stack diameter with house size (floora single-story house ventilated by a passive stack with andTable 1: Passive stack diameters scaling with house size

  2. Recommendations for the analysis and design of naturally ventilated buildings in urban areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Phan Hue

    2012-01-01

    The motivation behind this work was to obtain a better understanding of how a building's natural ventilation potential is affected by the complexities introduced by the urban environment. To this end, we have derived in ...

  3. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    2011-01-01

    Heat Recovery Ventilation (HRV) systems (that are requireduse about 50 W. Similarly an HRV sized to produce the same50 W on average. A common HRV installation also uses the

  4. Indoor Humidity Analysis of an Integrated Radiant Cooling and Desiccant Ventilation System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    latent heat, they normally are used in conjunction with an independent ventilation system, which is capable of decoupling the space sensible and latent loads. Condensation concerns limit the application of radiant cooling. This paper studies...

  5. Mechanical ventilation in HUD-code manufactured housing in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubliner, M.; Stevens, D.T.; Davis, B.

    1997-12-31

    Electric utilities in the Pacific Northwest have spent more than $100 million to support energy-efficiency improvements in the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) code manufactured housing industry in the Pacific Northwest over the past several years. More than 65,000 manufactured housing units have been built since 1991 that exceed the new HUD standards for both thermal performance and mechanical ventilation that became effective in October 1994. All of these units included mechanical ventilation systems that were designed to meet or exceed the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62-1989. This paper addresses the ventilation solutions that were developed and compares the comfort and energy considerations of the various strategies that have evolved in the Pacific Northwest and nationally. The use and location of a variety of outside air inlets will be addressed, as will the acceptance by the occupants of the ventilation strategy.

  6. INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Rodger A.

    2013-01-01

    UC-95d INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATIONVentilation on Indoor Air Quality and Energy Use in Schoo s,EEB~Vent INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION

  7. Economizer system cost effectiveness: Accounting for the influence of ventilation rate on sick leave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

    2003-06-01

    This study estimated the health, energy, and economic benefits of an economizer ventilation control system that increases outside air supply during mild weather to save energy. A model of the influence of ventilation rate on airborne transmission of respiratory illnesses was used to extend the limited data relating ventilation rate with illness and sick leave. An energy simulation model calculated ventilation rates and energy use versus time for an office building in Washington, DC with fixed minimum outdoor air supply rates, with and without an economizer. Sick leave rates were estimated with the disease transmission model. In the modeled 72-person office building, our analyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs by approximately $2000 and, in addition, reduces sick leave. The financial benefit of the decrease in sick leave is estimated to be between $6,000 and $16,000. This modelling suggests that economizers are much more cost effective than currently recognized.

  8. The impact of pathological ventilation on aerosol deposition : imaging, insight and intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenblatt, Elliot (Elliot Eliyahu)

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol therapies are often used to treat lung diseases in which ventilation is distributed heterogeneously throughout the lung. As therapeutic aerosols are transported by the inhaled air, it is likely that deposition is ...

  9. Calculation and design of tunnel ventilation systems using a two-scale modelling approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colella, Francesco; Rein, Guillermo; Borchiellini, Romano; Carvel, Ricky O; Torero, Jose L; Verda, Vittorio

    This paper develops a novel modelling approach for ventilation flow in tunnels at ambient conditions (i.e. cold flow). The complexity of full CFD models of low in tunnels or the inaccuracies of simplistic assumptions are ...

  10. Energy Conservation Through Improved Industrial Ventilation in Small and Medium-Sized Industrial Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, N. F.; Nutter, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE 1994 ESL-PA-94/04-03 REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION ENERGY CONSERVATION THROUGH IMPROVED INDUSTRIAL VENTILATION IN SMALL AND MEDIUM-SIZED INDUSTRIAL PLANTS Namir Saman, Ph.D., P.E. Visiting Assistant Professor Energy System... Laboratory Texas A&M University ABSTRACT This paper discusses energy conservation projects in the area of industrial ventilation that have been recommended by the Texas A&M University Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADQ to small and medium...

  11. Alternatives generation and analysis for double-shell tank primary ventilation systems emissions control and monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEDERBURG, J.P.

    1999-09-30

    This AGA addresses the question: ''What equipment upgrades, operational changes, and/or other actions are required relative to the DST tanks farms' ventilation systems to support retrieval, staging (including feed sampling), and delivery of tank waste to the Phase I private contractor?'' Issues and options for the various components within the ventilation subsystem affect each other. Recommended design requirements are presented and the preferred alternatives are detailed.

  12. Project title: Natural ventilation, solar heating and integrated low-energy building design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-07-10

    emissions targets. That is why the Cambridge-MIT Institute set up a project to design buildings that consume less energy. The Challenge Their work focuses on the design of energy efficient buildings that use natural ventilation processes, solar... Awards E-stack brings a breath of fresh air to UK schools HOME ABOUT US FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES PROJECTS EDUCATION NEWS EVENTS DOWNLOADS CONTACT US PROJECTS Natural Ventilation Solar Heating and Integrated Low-Energy Building Design SEARCH: Go Page 1...

  13. Climate and Climate Change COURSE: .............................................................................. EAS B8800

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Climate and Climate Change COURSE with a focus on energy transport. Finally, we tackle natural and anthropogenic climate change. This course. Synthesize and apply theory of the various natural and anthropogenic climate change mechanisms to explain

  14. FUTURE CLIMATE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.M. Forester

    2000-03-14

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada (Figure l), the site of a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this AMR provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the infiltration model (USGS 2000) and for the total system performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) at YM. Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one method, among many, of establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog.

  15. Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilbury, Dawn

    Climate WorkshopsClimate Workshops for Department Chairsp University of Wisconsin ADVANCE-IT Slides) #12;Why focus on departmental climate? Individuals experience climate in their immediate workplace negative climate than male faculty Improving department climate is critical for retention and advancement

  16. Climate in China ! Climate is weather over time.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Climate in China #12;! Climate is weather over time. ! Climatology is the study of climate. ! Climatic regions are areas with similar weather statistics. ! Climate influences ecosystems. ! On land, the location of climatic regions determines the location of ecosystems (e.g., forest, grassland, savanna

  17. ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauve, Cedric

    ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN CLIMATE CHANGE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CANADIAN CLIMATE POLICY Roundtable Dialogue AND SELECTED THE FOLLOWING CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY AREAS FOR DETAILED DISCUSSION. PARTICIPANTS THEN WORKED Dilemmas in Climate Change roundtable dialogue, convened by Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue

  18. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists concerning ...

  19. The Climate Policy Dilemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent GHG abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists over the likelihood of ...

  20. Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium brings together Native speakers who are working to keep fossil fuels in the ground, by stopping coals terminals, oil trains and fracking, and protecting treaty resources from the threat of climate change.

  1. Climate Change Adaptation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is adapting to climate change by applying a risk-based resiliency approach to identify and minimize climate-related vulnerabilities across all DOE policies, programs and activities.

  2. Climate Leadership Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Climate Leadership Conference is your annual exchange for addressing global climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. Forward-thinking lead­ers from busi­ness, gov­ern...

  3. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    data needed to construct effective climate change models and forecasts. Academic “Centers of Excellence” that focus on climate change

  4. METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Climate EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary PDF it is available. © 201 American Meteorological Society1 #12;Sun et al. climate downscaling of the Australian currents 1 Marine downscaling of a future climate scenario for Australian boundary currents Chaojiao Sun

  5. CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIODIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIODIVERSITY THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY #12;At, the origin of which is mainly related to human activities. For the first time climate change sends a strong of climate change and that will fully find material expression in the debates. What will the world we shape

  6. CLIMATE CHANGE & THE GREENHOUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    CLIMATE CHANGE & THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;This development of these materials was supported under.nasa.gov/Features/BlueMarble/BlueMarble_history.php © 2014 University of Western Australia ISBN 978-0-646-93241-5 Title: Climate change and the greenhouse OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction to climate change resources 5 Alternative conceptions 6 References

  7. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  8. Climate change vulnerability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    Climate change vulnerability assessment of the Verde Island Passage, Philippines #12;ii This document should be cited as: R. Boquiren, G. Di Carlo, and M.C. Quibilan (Eds). 2010. Climate Change, Marine Climate Change Program Conservation International­Global Marine Division epidgeon

  9. Environment and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galles, David

    Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

  10. Campus Climate Camden Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Stephen José

    Campus Climate Report Camden Campus New Brunswick/Piscataway Campus Newark Campus Student Survey #12;I. INTRODUCTION Executive Summary The Rutgers Campus Climate Survey was designed to determine how University, the campus climate surveys revealed strong areas of satisfaction with the Rutgers University

  11. Climate Change Workshop 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

  12. Climate2012 State of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Climate2012 State of the #12;2 State of the Climate 2012 Climate2012 State of the The previous State of the Climate, released in March 2010 (www.csiro.au/Outcomes/Climate/Understanding/State-of-the- Climate.aspx) highlighted a multi-decadal warming trend over Australia's land and oceans, an increase

  13. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

  14. Kirchhoff integrals and Fresnel zones Ludek Klimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff integrals and Fresnel zones LudŸek KlimeŸs Department of Geophysics, Charles University of discrete values necessary for the numerical quadra­ ture. The Fresnel zones are then derived as the minimum of Fresnel zones is purely local, independent of the reference travel times. The definition of Fresnel zones

  15. A proposal for climate stability on H2-greenhouse planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbot, Dorian S

    2015-01-01

    A terrestrial planet in an orbit far outside of the standard habitable zone could maintain surface liquid water as a result of H2-H2 collision-induced absorption by a thick H2 atmosphere. Without a stabilizing climate feedback, however, habitability would be accidental and likely brief. In this letter I propose stabilizing climate feedbacks for such a planet that require only that biological functions have an optimal temperature and operate less efficiently at other temperatures. For example, on a planet with a net source of H2 from its interior, H2-consuming life (such as methanogens) could establish a stable climate. If a positive perturbation is added to the equilibrium temperature, H2 consumption by life will increase (cooling the planet) until the equilibrium climate is reestablished. The potential existence of such feedbacks makes H2-warmed planets more attractive astrobiological targets.

  16. CANDIDATE PLANETS IN THE HABITABLE ZONES OF KEPLER STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaidos, Eric

    2013-06-20

    A key goal of the Kepler mission is the discovery of Earth-size transiting planets in ''habitable zones'' where stellar irradiance maintains a temperate climate on an Earth-like planet. Robust estimates of planet radius and irradiance require accurate stellar parameters, but most Kepler systems are faint, making spectroscopy difficult and prioritization of targets desirable. The parameters of 2035 host stars were estimated by Bayesian analysis and the probabilities p{sub HZ} that 2738 candidate or confirmed planets orbit in the habitable zone were calculated. Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Program models were compared to photometry from the Kepler Input Catalog, priors for stellar mass, age, metallicity and distance, and planet transit duration. The analysis yielded probability density functions for calculating confidence intervals of planet radius and stellar irradiance, as well as p{sub HZ}. Sixty-two planets have p{sub HZ} > 0.5 and a most probable stellar irradiance within habitable zone limits. Fourteen of these have radii less than twice the Earth; the objects most resembling Earth in terms of radius and irradiance are KOIs 2626.01 and 3010.01, which orbit late K/M-type dwarf stars. The fraction of Kepler dwarf stars with Earth-size planets in the habitable zone ({eta}{sub Circled-Plus }) is 0.46, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.31-0.64. Parallaxes from the Gaia mission will reduce uncertainties by more than a factor of five and permit definitive assignments of transiting planets to the habitable zones of Kepler stars.

  17. Wind Tunnel Building - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    This paper describes a simple graphic tool that enables a building designer to evaluate the potential for wind induced ventilation cooling in several climate zones. Long term weather data were analyzed to determine the conditions for which available...

  18. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

    2013-05-13

    Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

  19. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

  20. Overlap zoned electrically heated particulate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Chapman, Mark R [Brighton, MI

    2011-07-19

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one, and wherein the N zones and the M sub-zones are arranged in P layers, where P is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  1. Climate Change Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browder, Tom

    Climate Change · Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from Physics for Future Society) controversy on climate change (e.g. resignation of Hal Lewis, Ivar Giaever and other notable. #12;Some climate changes basics · IPCC = Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change · The IPCC

  2. Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    Climate Sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4 C. M. Bitz 1 , K.M. Shell 2 , P. Equilibrium climate sensitivity of the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4) is 3.20 C for 1 version (CCSM3). The transient climate sensitivity of CCSM4 at 1 resolution is 1.72 C, which is about 0

  3. Climate Change: One, or Many? Professor of Climate and Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    Climate Change: One, or Many? Mike Hulme Professor of Climate and Culture Department of Geography Presidential Session: `Geographies of Climate Change' AAG Annual Conference, Tampa, Florida, 7-11 April 2014 climate system' 2 `The Plan' #12;One Climate? "... a complex, interactive system consisting

  4. Climate closure: Game over for climate skep4cs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Climate closure: Game over for climate skep4cs S. Lovejoy, McGill, Physics McGill, Macdonald College Campus 4 November, 2014 #12;What is the climate climate is what you expect... "Climate is what you expect, weather is what you get." -Lazarus Long

  5. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Future climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Future climate Climate History & Paleoclimate - December 9, 2011 1 #12;Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 IPCC 2007 4th Assessment report (AR4) More information can be found: http://www.ipcc.ch/ Remark: 5th assessment report is due in 2013/2014 2 #12;Climate

  6. Climate history and paleoclimate -HS 2011 Climate proxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 Climate proxies 18O Climate History & Paleoclimate ­ September 30, 2011 #12;How do we know about the past? Instrumental Historical Through proxies Climate proxies Climate history and paleoclimate - HS 2011 #12;What is a `proxy'? "Proxy, as used here

  7. CFD-based design of the ventilation system for the PHENIX detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parietti, L.; Martin, R.A.; Gregory, W.S.

    1996-10-01

    The three-dimensional flow and thermal fields surrounding the large PHENIX sub-atomic particle detector enclosed in the Major Facility Hall are simulated numerically in this study using the CFX finite volume, commercial, computer code. The predicted fields result from the interaction of an imposed downward ventilation system cooling flow and a buoyancy-driven thermal plume rising from the warm detector. An understanding of the thermal irregularities on the surface of the detector and in the flow surrounding is needed to assess the potential for adverse thermal expansion effects in detector subsystems, and to prevent ingestion of electronics cooling air from hot spots. With a computational model of the thermal fields on and surrounding the detector, HVAC engineers can evaluate and improve the ventilation system design prior to the start of construction. This paper summarizes modeling and results obtained for a conceptual MFH ventilation scheme.

  8. Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name:Climate ZoneUK Climate and

  9. Climate policies for road transport revisited (I): Evaluation of the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name:Climate ZoneUK Climate

  10. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT NO. 1: CLIMATE AND INFILTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2004-05-01

    For the past 20 years, extensive field, laboratory, and modeling investigations have been performed at Yucca Mountain, which have led to the development of a number of conceptual models of infiltration and climate for the Yucca Mountain region around the repository site (Flint, A.L. et al. 2001; Wang and Bodvarsson 2003). Evaluating the amount of infiltrating water entering the subsurface is important, because this water may affect the percolation flux, which, in turn, controls seepage into the waste emplacement drifts and radionuclide transport from the repository to the water table. Forecasting of climatic data indicates that during the next 10,000 years at Yucca Mountain, the present-day climate should persist for 400 to 600 years, followed by a warmer and much wetter monsoon climate for 900 to 1,400 years, and by a cooler and wetter glacial-transition climate for the remaining 8,000 to 8,700 years. The analysis of climatic forecasting indicates that long-term climate conditions are generally predictable from a past climate sequence, while short-term climate conditions and weather predictions may be more variable and uncertain. The use of past climate sequences to bound future climate sequences involves several types of uncertainties, such as (1) uncertainty in the timing of future climate, (2) uncertainty in the methodology of climatic forecasting, and (3) uncertainty in the earth's future physical processes. Some of the uncertainties of the climatic forecasting are epistemic (reducible) and aleatoric (irreducible). Because of the size of the model domain, INFIL treats many flow processes in a simplified manner. For example, uptake of water by roots occurs according to the ''distributed model'', in which available water in each soil layer is withdrawn in proportion to the root density in that layer, multiplied by the total evapotranspirative demand. Runoff is calculated simply as the excess of precipitation over a sum of infiltration and water storage in the root zone. More significantly, water movement throughout the soil profile is treated according to the bucket model, in which the amount of water that moves down from one layer to the next is equal to the mass of water in excess of field capacity in the upper layer. The development of a numerical model of infiltration involves a number of abstractions and simplifications to represent the complexity of environmental conditions at Yucca Mountain, such as the arid climate, mountain-type topography, heterogeneous soils and fractured rock, and irregular soil-rock interface.

  11. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts: Connectors, bends anddeveloping flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2004-03-01

    In ventilation duct flow the turbulent flow profile is commonly disturbed or not fully developed and these conditions are likely to influence particle deposition to duct surfaces. Particle deposition rates at eight S-connectors, in two 90{sup o} duct bends and in two ducts where the turbulent flow profile was not fully developed were measured in a laboratory duct system with both galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle diameters of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition of particles with nominal diameters of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m was measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces. Deposition at S-connectors, in bends and in straight ducts with developing turbulence was often greater than deposition in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence for equal particle sizes, air speeds and duct surface orientations. Deposition rates at all locations were found to increase with an increase in particle size or air speed. High deposition rates at S-connectors resulted from impaction and these rates were nearly independent of the orientation of the S-connector. Deposition rates in the two 90{sup o} bends differed by more than an order of magnitude in some cases, probably because of the difference in turbulence conditions at the bend inlets. In straight steel ducts where the turbulent flow profile was developing, the deposition enhancement relative to fully developed turbulence generally increased with air speed and decreased with downstream distance from the duct inlet. This enhancement was greater at the duct ceiling and wall than at the duct floor. In insulated ducts, deposition enhancement was less pronounced overall than in steel ducts. Trends that were observed in steel ducts were present, but weaker, in insulated ducts.

  12. ADMINISTRATIVE AND ENGINEERING CONTROLS FOR THE OPERATION OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS FOR UNDERGROUND RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.; Hansen, A.

    2013-11-13

    Liquid radioactive wastes from the Savannah River Site are stored in large underground carbon steel tanks. The majority of the waste is confined in double shell tanks, which have a primary shell, where the waste is stored, and a secondary shell, which creates an annular region between the two shells, that provides secondary containment and leak detection capabilities should leakage from the primary shell occur. Each of the DST is equipped with a purge ventilation system for the interior of the primary shell and annulus ventilation system for the secondary containment. Administrative flammability controls require continuous ventilation to remove hydrogen gas and other vapors from the waste tanks while preventing the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Should a leak from the primary to the annulus occur, the annulus ventilation would also serve this purpose. The functionality of the annulus ventilation is necessary to preserve the structural integrity of the primary shell and the secondary. An administrative corrosion control program is in place to ensure integrity of the tank. Given the critical functions of the purge and annulus ventilation systems, engineering controls are also necessary to ensure that the systems remain robust. The system consists of components that are constructed of metal (e.g., steel, stainless steel, aluminum, copper, etc.) and/or polymeric (polypropylene, polyethylene, silicone, polyurethane, etc.) materials. The performance of these materials in anticipated service environments (e.g., normal waste storage, waste removal, etc.) was evaluated. The most aggressive vapor space environment occurs during chemical cleaning of the residual heels by utilizing oxalic acid. The presence of NO{sub x} and mercury in the vapors generated from the process could potentially accelerate the degradation of aluminum, carbon steel, and copper. Once identified, the most susceptible materials were either replaced and/or plans for discontinuing operations are executed.

  13. A multiscale MDCT image-based breathing lung model with time-varying regional ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Youbing, E-mail: youbing-yin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Choi, Jiwoong, E-mail: jiwoong-choi@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Hoffman, Eric A., E-mail: eric-hoffman@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Tawhai, Merryn H., E-mail: m.tawhai@auckland.ac.nz [Auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Lin, Ching-Long, E-mail: ching-long-lin@uiowa.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States) [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A novel algorithm is presented that links local structural variables (regional ventilation and deforming central airways) to global function (total lung volume) in the lung over three imaged lung volumes, to derive a breathing lung model for computational fluid dynamics simulation. The algorithm constitutes the core of an integrative, image-based computational framework for subject-specific simulation of the breathing lung. For the first time, the algorithm is applied to three multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) volumetric lung images of the same individual. A key technique in linking global and local variables over multiple images is an in-house mass-preserving image registration method. Throughout breathing cycles, cubic interpolation is employed to ensure C{sub 1} continuity in constructing time-varying regional ventilation at the whole lung level, flow rate fractions exiting the terminal airways, and airway deformation. The imaged exit airway flow rate fractions are derived from regional ventilation with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) and one-dimensional (1D) coupled airway tree that connects the airways to the alveolar tissue. An in-house parallel large-eddy simulation (LES) technique is adopted to capture turbulent-transitional-laminar flows in both normal and deep breathing conditions. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm when using three lung volume images are compared with those using only one or two volume images. The three-volume-based lung model produces physiologically-consistent time-varying pressure and ventilation distribution. The one-volume-based lung model under-predicts pressure drop and yields un-physiological lobar ventilation. The two-volume-based model can account for airway deformation and non-uniform regional ventilation to some extent, but does not capture the non-linear features of the lung.

  14. Software Verification & Validation Report for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization Ventilation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    YEH, T.

    2002-11-20

    This document reports on the analysis, testing and conclusions of the software verification and validation for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization ventilation system. Automation control system will use the Allen-Bradley software tools for programming and programmable logic controller (PLC) configuration. The 244-AR Interim Stabilization Ventilation System will be used to control the release of radioactive particles to the environment in the containment tent, located inside the canyon of the 244-AR facility, and to assist the waste stabilization efforts. The HVAC equipment, ducts, instruments, PLC hardware, the ladder logic executable software (documented code), and message display terminal are considered part of the temporary ventilation system. The system consists of a supply air skid, temporary ductwork (to distribute airflow), and two skid-mounted, 500-cfm exhausters connected to the east filter building and the vessel vent system. The Interim Stabilization Ventilation System is a temporary, portable ventilation system consisting of supply side and exhaust side. Air is supplied to the containment tent from an air supply skid. This skid contains a constant speed fan, a pre-filter, an electric heating coil, a cooling coil, and a constant flow device (CFD). The CFD uses a passive component that allows a constant flow of air to pass through the device. Air is drawn out of the containment tent, cells, and tanks by two 500-cfm exhauster skids running in parallel. These skids are equipped with fans, filters, stack, stack monitoring instrumentation, and a PLC for control. The 500CFM exhaust skids were fabricated and tested previously for saltwell pumping activities. The objective of the temporary ventilation system is to maintain a higher pressure to the containment tent, relative to the canyon and cell areas, to prevent contaminants from reaching the containment tent.

  15. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  16. Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

  17. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  18. Climate Change and Runoff Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Change and Runoff Management in Wisconsin Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance May 10, 2011 David S of Engineering #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing climate · Expected impacts · Adaptation strategies #12;What is climate? "Climate is properly the long average of weather in a single place

  19. The Climate Impacts LINK Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded by the UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Contract Ref EPG 1/1/68 The Climate Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate

  20. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  1. Climate Change Webinar Series

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) and outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions as they relate to climate change and resilience for...

  2. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    much more than carbon sequestration does, and often in abiophysics, carbon sequestration, climate change, climatethe accompanying carbon sequestration does—and sometimes in

  3. Design of an Overmoded-Waveguide Directional Antenna for Use in In-Building Ventilation Duct Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    Design of an Overmoded-Waveguide Directional Antenna for Use in In-Building Ventilation Duct ventilation ducts. We obtain experimentally the element size and spacing of a reflector and driven element that can be used for IEEE 802.11b/g/n signals in a cylindrical duct to provide 3.1 dB of gain and a front

  4. Indoor air quality control for improving passenger health in subway platforms using an outdoor air quality dependent ventilation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor air quality control for improving passenger health in subway platforms using an outdoor air online 19 May 2015 Keywords: Ventilation control system Indoor air quality Indoor air pollution control Outdoor air quality Passenger health promotion Ventilation energy a b s t r a c t Indoor air quality (IAQ

  5. Policy on Building use during Ventilation Outage: School of Science Roger Bacon Hall and Morrell Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy on Building use during Ventilation Outage: School of Science Roger Bacon Hall and Morrell not only laboratories, but also the entire building, including non-laboratory space. When Roger Bacon Hall environment. When a laboratory in Roger Bacon Hall or Morrell Science Center has no ventilation or reduced

  6. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  7. Evaluation of energy savings related to building envelope retrofit techniques and ventilation strategies for low energy cooling in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    strategies for low energy cooling in offices and commercial sector Laurent Grignon-Massé, Dominique Marchio and automatic controls and the use of adequate ventilation strategies show great potential in energy savingsEvaluation of energy savings related to building envelope retrofit techniques and ventilation

  8. International Journal of Ventilation Volume 2 No 3 Application of CFD to Predict and Control Chemical and Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, John Z.

    in an office building in order to find the best locations for CBA sensors and to develop effective ventilation are especially hazardous when they are dispersed inside of a building, where traditional ventilation systems may in a building, even if the CBA release location is the same. Therefore, detailed information about the CBA

  9. H.N. Knudsen, P. Wargocki and J. Vondruskova (2006) "Effect of ventilation on perceived quality of air polluted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    quality of air polluted by building materials ­ a summary of reported data", Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Vol. 1, 57-62. #12;#12;Effect of ventilation on perceived quality of air polluted existing data on how varying ventilation rates affect the perceived quality of air polluted by building

  10. Development of an Outdoor Temperature Based Control Algorithm for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain; Tang, Yihuan

    2014-08-01

    The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study combines the output of simple air exchange models with a limited set of housing characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modellers to use existing databases of housing characteristics to determine the impact of ventilation policy change on a population scale. The IVE model estimates of energy change when applied to US homes with limited parameterisation are shown to be comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model.

  11. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy ? FY11 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2011-10-31

    The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel volatile organic compounds (VOCs) air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. we targeted a VOC air cleaning system that could enable a 50% reduction in ventilation rates. In a typical commercial HVAC system that provides a mixture of recirculated and outdoor air, a VOC air cleaner in the supply airstream must have a 15% to 20% VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply.

  12. Consideration of air jet angle in open surface tank push-pull ventilation system design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Wai-Hung David

    1983-01-01

    CONSIDERATION OF AIR JET ANGLE IN OPEN SURFACE TANK PUSH-PULL VENTILATION SYSTEM DESIGN A Thesis by WAI-HUNG DAVID CHAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree o... MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major Subjeot: Industrial Hygiene CONSIDERATION OF AIR JET ANGLE IN OPEN SURFACE TANK PUSH-PULL VENTILATION STSTEM DESIGN A Thesis by WAI-HUNG DAVID CHAN Approved as to style and content by: (C an of mmittee) J. Suggs...

  13. 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

  14. ClimateChangeLIVE Webcast: Join the Climate Conversation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join ClimateChangeLIVE's webcast, bringing together students and climate experts for a discussion about climate change and what students and classes around the country are doing to be part of the climate solution. Students will be able to interact with climate scientists and experts online through Facebook and Twitter. A GreenWorks! grant will be offered to help schools with climate action projects.

  15. The Histoty of Ventilation and Air Conditioning is CERN Up to Date with the latest Technological Developments?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühnl-Kinel, J

    2000-01-01

    The invention of ventilation cannot be ascribed to a certain date. It started with simple aeration when man brought fire into his abode and continued through different stages including air cooling using ice to finally arrive at the time when ventilation and air conditioning has become an essential part of our life and plays an important role in human evolution. This paper presents the history of ventilation and air conditioning, explains the key constraints over the centuries, and shows its influence on everyday life. Some examples of previous air-conditioning plants are described and different approaches to the way of calculation of ventilation systems discussed. It gives an overview of the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) installations at CERN and points out their particularities. It also compares them with the latest technological developments in the field as well as showing the new trends that are being applied at CERN.

  16. Proceedings of Coastal Zone 07 Portland, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    MODEL FOR PUGET SOUND: A CLASSROOM EXPERIENCE Timothy Nyerges, Scott Dudgeon, Tyanne Faulkes information systems, coastal zone management INTRODUCTION Coastal zone management (CZM) requires robust about how to management coastal resources (Wright and Scholz 2005). CZM applications of geographic

  17. Global air quality and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of Chemistry- Climate Models 5, 2010. 320 S. Wu,and R. Van Dorland, in Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalInter- governmental Panel on Climate Change, ed. D. Qin, M.

  18. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01

    1900–93, Journal of Climate, 10 (5), 1004–1020, 1997. Zhou,University of East Anglia’s Climate Research Unit (Jones etand those from WCRP “Climate of the Twentieth Century”

  19. Climate Change and Conceptual Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, David Joseph

    2013-01-01

    1.1.2 The Stark Reality of Climate Change . . . . . . . .1.2 Climate Change as a BehavioralEducation for Climate Change . . . . 1.4.1 The Numerically

  20. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    for the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threatand the Threat of Climate Change,” The CNA Corporation, 2007

  1. Climate Action Plan 2009 Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    Climate Action Plan September 2009 Sustainability Council This plan outlines methods by which. This document is publicly available at http://sustainability.uark.edu. #12;2 University of Arkansas Climate....................................................................................................................................7 Climate Action Plan Committee

  2. book review: Climate change mapped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanahan, Mike

    2012-01-01

    of millions 2 .   Climate change is a moving target and introductions  to  climate change’, the Atlas stands out media reporting on climate change.   Cambridge University 

  3. Climate Change at Annual Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stine, Alexander Robin

    2010-01-01

    carbon cycling to global climate change, Nature, 393 (6682),2005. Meehl, G. , et al. , Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, chap. 10. Global

  4. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  5. Massachusetts Takes On Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmell, Ken; Laurie, Burt

    2009-01-01

    to promote new technologies to fight climate change as theON CLIMATE CHANGE dard is a market-based, technology-neutraland technologies. 9. Facilities will calculate emissions using The Climate

  6. Global Climate Autumn 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    conservation concern: mitigation - reduce emissions of green house gases Climate Change and Wildlife · Pattern house gases · Secondary concern: adaptation - how do we lessen ongoing impacts of climate change - protect these areas - facilitate animal movement to these areas (corridors) #12;11/30/14 4 Fordham et al

  7. Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep Vadose Zone­ Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report #12;Prepared Tasks 25 References 25 Appendix: FY2012 Products for the Deep Vadose Zone­ Applied Field Research Initiative Contents #12;Message from the Deep Vadose Zone- Applied Field Research Initiative Project Manager

  8. Rift Zone | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, New York:Virginia: EnergyRidgeview BiomassRietbrock,Rift Zone

  9. Climate change risk and response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    Climate Change and Electricity Demand: Applying the NewClimate Change and Electricity Demand in California. ”Extreme Heat, and Electricity Demand in California. ”

  10. Climate Change/Paleoclimate & Geochronology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate ChangePaleoclimate & Geochronology "The instrumental record is generally considered not to be long enough to give a complete picture of climate variability... It is...

  11. SIMULATION OF NET INFILTRATION FOR MODERN AND POTENTIAL FUTURE CLIMATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Heveal

    2000-06-16

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes enhancements made to the infiltration model documented in Flint et al. (1996) and documents an analysis using the enhanced model to generate spatial and temporal distributions over a model domain encompassing the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada. Net infiltration is the component of infiltrated precipitation, snowmelt, or surface water run-on that has percolated below the zone of evapotranspiration as defined by the depth of the effective root zone, the average depth below the ground surface (at a given location) from which water is removed by evapotranspiration. The estimates of net infiltration are used for defining the upper boundary condition for the site-scale 3-dimensional Unsaturated-Zone Ground Water Flow and Transport (UZ flow and transport) Model (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The UZ flow and transport model is one of several process models abstracted by the Total System Performance Assessment model to evaluate expected performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in terms of radionuclide transport (CRWMS M&O 1998). The net-infiltration model is important for assessing potential repository-system performance because output from this model provides the upper boundary condition for the UZ flow and transport model that is used to generate flow fields for evaluating potential radionuclide transport through the unsaturated zone. Estimates of net infiltration are provided as raster-based, 2-dimensional grids of spatially distributed, time-averaged rates for three different climate stages estimated as likely conditions for the next 10,000 years beyond the present. Each climate stage is represented using a lower bound, a mean, and an upper bound climate and corresponding net-infiltration scenario for representing uncertainty in the characterization of daily climate conditions for each climate stage, as well as potential climate variability within each climate stage. The set of nine raster grid maps provide spatially detailed representations of the magnitude and distribution of net-infiltration rates that are used to define specified flux upper boundary conditions for the UZ flow and transport model.

  12. Mixed-mode simulations for climate feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgeson, Sam; Brager, Gail; Coffey, Brian; Haves, Phil

    2009-01-01

    efficient office buildings with passive cooling - Resultsefficient office buildings with passive cooling–Results andpassive cooling by night ventilation: evaluation of a parametric model and building

  13. Indoor airborne bacterial communities are influenced by ventilation, occupancy, and outdoor air source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohannan, Brendan

    , is an energy-efficient way to simultaneously cool building mass and avoid overnight and weekend microbial an intensive temporal study of indoor airborne bacterial communities in a high-traffic university building associated with differing ventilation strategies relevant to modern building design. Our results indicate

  14. Wireless Ventilation Control for Large-Scale Systems: the Mining Industrial Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    minimization thanks to a continuous operation of the fans. The second one, based on a hybrid description strategies for fluid systems (pumps, fans and compressors) represent approximately 20 % of the total % or more of the energy consumed by the mining process may go into the ventilation (including heating

  15. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF VENTILATION TEMPERATURES REGULATION BY ENERGY STORAGE IN PHASE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF VENTILATION TEMPERATURES REGULATION BY ENERGY STORAGE IN PHASE CHANGE, the use of thermal energy storage (TES) systems receives increasing interest. To allow high or low system using thermal energy storage with granules containing phase change material which leads to cooling

  16. PIERS ONLINE, VOL. 5, NO. 7, 2009 637 Ventilation Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    PIERS ONLINE, VOL. 5, NO. 7, 2009 637 Ventilation Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Concentration complex organic molecules being broken down to simpler molecules, such as carbon dioxide and water. Carbon dioxide waste is removed from the body through respiration. Carbon dioxide content in fresh air

  17. Cost effective combined axial fan and throttling valve control of ventilation rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    Cost effective combined axial fan and throttling valve control of ventilation rate C.J. Taylor 1 P. In partic- ular, it develops a unique fan and throttling valve control system for a 22m3 test chamber, the throttling valve is employed to restrict airflow at the outlet, so generating a higher static pressure differ

  18. Experimental evaluation of a naturally ventilated PV double-skin building envelope in real operating conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Introduction France is undergoing an energy transition towards technologies with a lower environmental impact Fax. +33472438811 Abstract Building integrated photovoltaic systems are fast becoming a feature of a prototype naturally-ventilated photovoltaic double-skin facade, designed to maintain favourable operating

  19. ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standard: Exegesis of Proposed Standard 62.2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, M.

    2000-01-01

    . The standard is an attempt by the Society to address concerns over indoor air quality in dwellings and to set minimum standards that would allow for energy efficiency measures to be evaluated. The standard has requirements for whole-house ventilation, local...

  20. Circulation during intermittent lung ventilation in the ~artel" snake Thamnophis WARREN B URG(;RFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burggren, Warren

    I .'11 Circulation during intermittent lung ventilation in the ~artel" snake Thamnophis WARREN B" Vi'lllW5 Received April 26, 1'177 RU\\lung "/-'r1t relationship, within the central arterial circulation ",'ere observed during intermittent. voluntary lung