Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Climate Zones Robinson Projection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Zones Africa ´Robinson Projection Copyright 2007. The Trustees of Columbia University University. Population, Landscape, and Climate Estimates (PLACE). Further information available at: http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/place/ Publish Date: 03/13/07 0 500 km Climate zones were taken from the Köppen Climate Classification map

Columbia University

2

Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate Zones to Climate Zones to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Climate Zones on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

3

Climate Zones | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings » Building America » Climate Zones Residential Buildings » Building America » Climate Zones Climate Zones Building America determines building practices based on climate zones to achieve the most energy savings in a home. This page offers some general guidelines on the definitions of the various climate regions based on heating degree-days, average temperatures, and precipitation. You can also view the Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County. Hot-Humid A hot-humid climate is generally defined as a region that receives more than 20 in. (50 cm) of annual precipitation and where one or both of the following occur: A 67°F (19.5°C) or higher wet bulb temperature for 3,000 or more hours during the warmest 6 consecutive months of the year; or A 73°F (23°C) or higher wet bulb temperature for 1,500 or more

4

Category:ASHRAE Climate Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASHRAE Climate Zones ASHRAE Climate Zones Jump to: navigation, search Climate Zones defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standards. Pages in category "ASHRAE Climate Zones" The following 30 pages are in this category, out of 30 total. C Climate Zone 1A Climate Zone 1B Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2B Climate Zone 3A Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3C Climate Zone 4A Climate Zone 4B Climate Zone 4C C cont. Climate Zone 5A Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5C Climate Zone 6A Climate Zone 6B Climate Zone 7A Climate Zone 7B Climate Zone 8A Climate Zone 8B Climate Zone Number 1 C cont. Climate Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Number 8 Climate Zone Subtype A Climate Zone Subtype B Climate Zone Subtype C Retrieved from

5

Ventilation Requirements in Hot Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Building America program, LBNL has simulated the effects of mechanical ventilation systems that meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2 on ventilation, energy use and indoor humidity levels. In order to capture moisture related HVAC system operation..., LBNL has simulated the effects of mechanical ventilation systems that meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2 on ventilation, energy use and indoor humidity levels for houses that meet current (2005) International Energy Conservation Code requirements...

Walker, I. S.; Sherman, M. H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Subtype" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Acadia Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype B + Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Adair County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A + Adair County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Subtype A +

7

Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Pages using the property "ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 + Acadia Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 2 + Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 4 + Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 4 + Adair County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 +

8

U.S. Climate Zones Map for Commercial Buildings  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

U.S. Climate Zone U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS: climate zones map Note:Map updated with corrections, February 2012 Further Explanation on How Climate Zones are Defined...

9

U.S. Climate Zones Map for Commercial Buildings  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Past Climate Zones U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS: climate zone map Return to Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS Return to CBECS Home Page Note:Map updated with corrections,...

10

Property:Buildings/ModelClimateZone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ModelClimateZone ModelClimateZone Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. It links to pages that use the form Buildings Model. The allowed values for this property are: Climate Zone 1A Climate Zone 1B Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2B Climate Zone 3A Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3C Climate Zone 4A Climate Zone 4B Climate Zone 4C Climate Zone 5A Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5C Climate Zone 6A Climate Zone 6B Climate Zone 7A Climate Zone 7B Climate Zone 8A Climate Zone 8B Pages using the property "Buildings/ModelClimateZone" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A +

11

Climate Zone 5B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 5 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 5B is defined as Dry with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5B climate zones: Ada County, Idaho Adams County, Colorado Adams County, Washington Apache County, Arizona Arapahoe County, Colorado Asotin County, Washington Baker County, Oregon Beaver County, Utah Benewah County, Idaho Bent County, Colorado Benton County, Washington Boulder County, Colorado Broomfield County, Colorado Canyon County, Idaho Carson City County, Nevada Cassia County, Idaho Catron County, New Mexico Chelan County, Washington Cheyenne County, Colorado

12

Climate Zone Number 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 1 Climate Zone Number 1 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 1 is defined as Very Hot - Humid(1A) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC Dry(1B) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC . The following places are categorized as class 1 climate zones: Broward County, Florida Hawaii County, Hawaii Honolulu County, Hawaii Kalawao County, Hawaii Kauai County, Hawaii Maui County, Hawaii Miami-Dade County, Florida Monroe County, Florida Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Zone_Number_1&oldid=21604" Category: ASHRAE Climate Zones What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

13

Climate Zone 2A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 2 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 2A is defined as Hot - Humid with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 2A climate zones: Acadia Parish, Louisiana Alachua County, Florida Allen Parish, Louisiana Anderson County, Texas Angelina County, Texas Appling County, Georgia Aransas County, Texas Ascension Parish, Louisiana Assumption Parish, Louisiana Atascosa County, Texas Atkinson County, Georgia Austin County, Texas Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana Bacon County, Georgia Baker County, Florida Baker County, Georgia Baldwin County, Alabama Bastrop County, Texas

14

Climate Zone 3B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 3 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 3B is defined as Dry with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 . The following places are categorized as class 3B climate zones: Andrews County, Texas Baylor County, Texas Borden County, Texas Brewster County, Texas Butte County, California Callahan County, Texas Chaves County, New Mexico Childress County, Texas Clark County, Nevada Cochise County, Arizona Coke County, Texas Coleman County, Texas Collingsworth County, Texas Colusa County, California Concho County, Texas Contra Costa County, California Cottle County, Texas Crane County, Texas Crockett County, Texas

15

Climate Zone 5A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone 5A Zone 5A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 5 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 5A is defined as Cool- Humid with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5A climate zones: Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Missouri Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, Pennsylvania Albany County, New York Allegan County, Michigan Alleghany County, North Carolina Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Allen County, Indiana Allen County, Ohio Andrew County, Missouri Antelope County, Nebraska Appanoose County, Iowa Armstrong County, Pennsylvania Arthur County, Nebraska

16

Climate Zone 7B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 7 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 7A is defined as Very Cold with IP Units 9000 < HDD65ºF ≤ 12600 and SI Units 5000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 7000 . The following places are categorized as class 7B climate zones: Clear Creek County, Colorado Grand County, Colorado Gunnison County, Colorado Hinsdale County, Colorado Jackson County, Colorado Lake County, Colorado Lincoln County, Wyoming Mineral County, Colorado Park County, Colorado Pitkin County, Colorado Rio Grande County, Colorado Routt County, Colorado San Juan County, Colorado Sublette County, Wyoming Summit County, Colorado Teton County, Wyoming Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Zone_7B&oldid=2161

17

Climate Zone 6B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Climate Zone 6B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 6 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 6B is defined as Dry with IP Units 7200 < HDD65ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 4000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 6B climate zones: Adams County, Idaho Alamosa County, Colorado Albany County, Wyoming Alpine County, California Archuleta County, Colorado Bannock County, Idaho Bear Lake County, Idaho Beaverhead County, Montana Big Horn County, Montana Big Horn County, Wyoming

18

Climate Zone 4C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Climate Zone 4C Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 4 and Climate Zone Subtype C. Climate Zone 4C is defined as Mixed - Marine with IP Units 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units 2000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 . The following places are categorized as class 4C climate zones: Benton County, Oregon Clackamas County, Oregon Clallam County, Washington Clark County, Washington Clatsop County, Oregon Columbia County, Oregon Coos County, Oregon Cowlitz County, Washington Curry County, Oregon Douglas County, Oregon

19

Details of U.S. Climate Zones:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones Details of U.S. Climate Zones: The CBECS climate zones are groups of climate divisions, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which are regions within a state that are as climatically homogeneous as possible. Each NOAA climate division is placed into one of five CBECS climate zones based on its 30-year average heating degree-days (HDD) and cooling degree-days (CDD) for the period 1971 through 2000. (These climate zones have been updated for the 2003 CBECS. All previous CBECS used averages for the 45-year period from 1931 through 1975.) A HDD is a measure of how cold a location was over a period of time, relative to a base temperature (in CBECS, 65 degrees Fahrenheit). The heating degree-day is the difference between that day's average temperature and 65 degrees if the daily average is less than 65; it is zero if the daily average temperature is greater than or equal to 65. For example, if the average temperature for a given day is 40 degrees, then the heating degree-days for that single day equal 25. Heating degree-days for a year are the sum of the daily heating degree-days that year.

20

Category:County Climate Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Climate Zones County Climate Zones Jump to: navigation, search This category contains county climate zone information in the United States of America. Contents: Top - 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pages in category "County Climate Zones" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 3,141 total. (previous 200) (next 200) A Abbeville County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Acadia Parish, Louisiana ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Accomack County, Virginia ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Ada County, Idaho ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Iowa ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Missouri ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Climate Zone Number 7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Number 7 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 7 is defined as Very Cold with IP Units 9000 < HDD65ºF ≤ 12600 and SI Units 5000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 7000 . The following places are categorized as class 7 climate zones: Aitkin County, Minnesota Aleutians East Borough, Alaska Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska Anchorage Borough, Alaska Aroostook County, Maine Ashland County, Wisconsin Baraga County, Michigan Barnes County, North Dakota Bayfield County, Wisconsin Becker County, Minnesota Beltrami County, Minnesota Benson County, North Dakota Bottineau County, North Dakota Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska Burke County, North Dakota Burnett County, Wisconsin Carlton County, Minnesota Cass County, Minnesota

22

Climate Zone 2B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 2 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 2B is defined as Dry with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 2B climate zones: Bandera County, Texas Dimmit County, Texas Edwards County, Texas Frio County, Texas Imperial County, California Kinney County, Texas La Paz County, Arizona La Salle County, Texas Maricopa County, Arizona Maverick County, Texas Medina County, Texas Pima County, Arizona Pinal County, Arizona Real County, Texas Uvalde County, Texas Val Verde County, Texas Webb County, Texas Yuma County, Arizona Zapata County, Texas Zavala County, Texas Retrieved from

23

Climate Zone 4A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 4 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 4A is defined as Mixed - Humid with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 . The following places are categorized as class 4A climate zones: Accomack County, Virginia Adair County, Kentucky Adams County, Ohio Alamance County, North Carolina Albemarle County, Virginia Alexander County, Illinois Alexander County, North Carolina Alexandria County, Virginia Allegany County, Maryland Alleghany County, Virginia Allen County, Kansas Allen County, Kentucky Amelia County, Virginia Amherst County, Virginia Anderson County, Kansas Anderson County, Kentucky

24

Climate Zone 4B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 4 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 4B is defined as Dry with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 . The following places are categorized as class 4B climate zones: Amador County, California Armstrong County, Texas Baca County, Colorado Bailey County, Texas Beaver County, Oklahoma Bernalillo County, New Mexico Briscoe County, Texas Calaveras County, California Carson County, Texas Castro County, Texas Cibola County, New Mexico Cimarron County, Oklahoma Cochran County, Texas Curry County, New Mexico Dallam County, Texas De Baca County, New Mexico Deaf Smith County, Texas

25

Climate Zone 6A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 6 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 6A is defined as Cold - Humid with IP Units 7200 < HDD65ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 4000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 6A climate zones: Adams County, North Dakota Adams County, Wisconsin Addison County, Vermont Alcona County, Michigan Alger County, Michigan Allamakee County, Iowa Allegany County, New York Alpena County, Michigan Androscoggin County, Maine Anoka County, Minnesota Antrim County, Michigan Arenac County, Michigan Aurora County, South Dakota Barron County, Wisconsin Beadle County, South Dakota Belknap County, New Hampshire Bennington County, Vermont

26

Climate Zone 3C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

C C Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 3 and Climate Zone Subtype C. Climate Zone 3C is defined as Warm - Marine with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND HDD65ºF ≤ 3600 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 2000 . The following places are categorized as class 3C climate zones: Alameda County, California Marin County, California Mendocino County, California Monterey County, California Napa County, California San Benito County, California San Francisco County, California San Luis Obispo County, California San Mateo County, California Santa Barbara County, California Santa Clara County, California Santa Cruz County, California Sonoma County, California Ventura County, California

27

Climate Zone 3A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 3 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 3A is defined as Warm - Humid with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 . The following places are categorized as class 3A climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina Anson County, North Carolina Archer County, Texas Arkansas County, Arkansas Ashley County, Arkansas Atoka County, Oklahoma Attala County, Mississippi Autauga County, Alabama Baldwin County, Georgia

28

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 7 Duluth, Minnesota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

29

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

30

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 7 Duluth, Minnesota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

31

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

32

Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 5 is defined as Cool- Humid(5A) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Dry(5B) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Marine(5C) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5 climate zones: Ada County, Idaho Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Missouri Adams County, Colorado Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, Pennsylvania Adams County, Washington Albany County, New York Allegan County, Michigan Alleghany County, North Carolina

33

Climate Zone Number 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number 3 Number 3 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 3 is defined as Warm - Humid(3A) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Dry(3B) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Warm - Marine(3C) with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND HDD65ºF ≤ 3600 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 2000 . The following places are categorized as class 3 climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alameda County, California Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina

34

Climate zones for maritime clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we use a commercially available lidar ceilometer to investigate how the basic structure of marine boundary-layer clouds varies for four different marine climate regimes. We obtained most of the data used in this analysis from ship-based ceilometer measurements recorded during several different atmospheric and oceanographic field programs conducted in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. For comparison, we show the results obtained at a mid-latitude continental location and at an ice camp on the Arctic ice shelf. For each analyzed case, we use an extended time series to generate meaningful cloud base and cloud fraction statistics. The Vaisala CT 12K ceilometer uses a GaAs diode laser to produce short (150 ns), high-intensity pulses of infrared radiation (904 nm wavelength). The return signals from a large number of consecutive pulses are coherently summed to boost the signal-to-noise ratio. Each resulting 30-s profile of backscattered power (15-m resolution) is analyzed to detect cloud layers using a specified cloud detection limit. In addition to measurements of cloud base, the ceilometer can also provide information on cloud fraction using a time series of the {open_quotes}cloud{close_quotes} or {open_quotes} no cloud{close_quotes} status reported in the 30-s data.

White, A.B.; Ruffieux, D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Climate Zone Subtype A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subtype A Subtype A Jump to: navigation, search Moist (A) definition-Locations that are not marine and not dry. The following places are categorized as subtype A climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Acadia Parish, Louisiana Accomack County, Virginia Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Kentucky Adair County, Missouri Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Mississippi Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, North Dakota Adams County, Ohio Adams County, Pennsylvania Adams County, Wisconsin Addison County, Vermont Aiken County, South Carolina Aitkin County, Minnesota Alachua County, Florida Alamance County, North Carolina Albany County, New York Albemarle County, Virginia Alcona County, Michigan Alcorn County, Mississippi

36

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly...

37

Climate Zone Number 6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 is defined as 6 is defined as Cold - Humid(6A) with IP Units 7200 < HDD65ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 4000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 5000 Dry(6B) with IP Units 7200 < HDD65ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 4000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 6 climate zones: Adams County, Idaho Adams County, North Dakota Adams County, Wisconsin Addison County, Vermont Alamosa County, Colorado Albany County, Wyoming Alcona County, Michigan Alger County, Michigan Allamakee County, Iowa Allegany County, New York Alpena County, Michigan Alpine County, California Androscoggin County, Maine Anoka County, Minnesota Antrim County, Michigan Archuleta County, Colorado Arenac County, Michigan Aurora County, South Dakota Bannock County, Idaho Barron County, Wisconsin Beadle County, South Dakota

38

Climate Zone Subtype B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search Dry (B) definition-Locations meeting the following criteria: not marine and P < 0.44 × (T - 19.5) [I-P units] P < 2.0 × (T + 7) [SI units] where P = annual precipitation in inches (cm) and T = annual mean temperature in °F (°C). The following places are categorized as subtype B climate zones: Ada County, Idaho Adams County, Colorado Adams County, Idaho Adams County, Washington Alamosa County, Colorado Albany County, Wyoming Alpine County, California Amador County, California Andrews County, Texas Apache County, Arizona Arapahoe County, Colorado Archuleta County, Colorado Armstrong County, Texas Asotin County, Washington Baca County, Colorado Bailey County, Texas Baker County, Oregon Bandera County, Texas Bannock County, Idaho

39

Climate Zone Subtype C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

C C Jump to: navigation, search Marine (C) definition-Locations meeting all four criteria: 1. Mean temperature of coldest month between 27°F (-3°C) and 65°F (18°C) 2. Warmest month mean < 72°F (22°C) 3. At least four months with mean temperatures over 50°F (10°C) 4. Dry season in summer. The month with the heaviest precipitation in the cold season has at least three times as much precipitation as the month with the least precipitation in the rest of the year. The cold season is October through March in the Northern Hemisphere and April through September in the Southern Hemisphere. The following places are categorized as subtype C climate zones: Alameda County, California Benton County, Oregon Clackamas County, Oregon Clallam County, Washington Clark County, Washington

40

Climate Zone Number 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 is defined as 2 is defined as Hot - Humid(2A) with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 Dry(2B) with IP Units 6300 < CDD50ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 3500 < CDD10ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 2 climate zones: Acadia Parish, Louisiana Alachua County, Florida Allen Parish, Louisiana Anderson County, Texas Angelina County, Texas Appling County, Georgia Aransas County, Texas Ascension Parish, Louisiana Assumption Parish, Louisiana Atascosa County, Texas Atkinson County, Georgia Austin County, Texas Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana Bacon County, Georgia Baker County, Florida Baker County, Georgia Baldwin County, Alabama Bandera County, Texas Bastrop County, Texas Bay County, Florida Beauregard Parish, Louisiana Bee County, Texas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_8a_usa_ak_fairbanks_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Building Type: Secondary school

42

Climate Zone Number 4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 is defined as 4 is defined as Mixed - Humid(4A) with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 Dry(4B) with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 Mixed - Marine(4C) with IP Units 3600 < HDD65ºF ≤ 5400 and SI Units 2000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 3000 . The following places are categorized as class 4 climate zones: Accomack County, Virginia Adair County, Kentucky Adams County, Ohio Alamance County, North Carolina Albemarle County, Virginia Alexander County, Illinois Alexander County, North Carolina Alexandria County, Virginia Allegany County, Maryland Alleghany County, Virginia Allen County, Kansas Allen County, Kentucky Amador County, California

43

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_7a_usa_mn_duluth_pre1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois

44

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_6a_usa_mn_minneapolis_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder,

45

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1A Miami, Florida Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

46

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

47

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

48

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Phoenix, Arizona Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

49

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

50

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

51

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

52

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

53

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

54

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

55

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

56

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

57

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

58

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

59

Armstrong County, Pennsylvania ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleArmstrongCounty,PennsylvaniaASHRAE169-2006ClimateZone&oldid37304...

60

DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits.? Confirming these findings in intervention studies is recommended. ? Energy costs of heating/cooling unoccupied classrooms statewide are modest, but a large portion occurs in relatively few classrooms.

Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CO 2 - Based Demand-Controlled Ventilation Control Strategies for Multi-Zone HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2-based demand-controlled ventilation DCV strategy offers a great opportunity to reduce energy consumption in HVAC systems while providing the required ventilation. However, implementing CO 2-based DCV under ASHRAE 62.1.2004 through 2010...

Nassif, N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 2B Phoenix, Arizona  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

63

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 2B Phoenix, Arizona  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

64

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4C Seattle, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

65

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3C San Francisco, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

66

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3B Los Angeles, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

67

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

68

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3A Atlanta, Georgia  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

69

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4A Baltimore, Maryland  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

70

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

71

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 1A Miami, Florida  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

72

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

73

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 5B Boulder, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

74

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

75

Archived Reference Climate Zone: TMY2 Weather Data  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

76

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 5A Chicago, Illinois  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

77

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 5A Chicago, Illinois  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

78

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 2A Houston, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

79

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

80

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 5B Boulder, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3B Los Angeles, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

82

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3C San Francisco, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

83

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3A Atlanta, Georgia  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

84

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

85

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

86

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 2A Houston, Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

87

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4C Seattle, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

88

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 4A Baltimore, Maryland  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

89

Archived Reference Climate Zone: 1A Miami, Florida  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

90

Archived Reference Climate Zone: TMY2 Weather Data  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

91

A robust CO2-based demand-controlled ventilation control strategy for multi-zone HVAC systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There have been increasingly growing concerns over the quality of the air inside buildings and the associated energy use. The CO2-based demand-controlled ventilation DCV is one of the strategies that could offer a great opportunity to reduce energy consumption in HVAC systems. However, implementing CO2-based DCV under ASHRAE Standard 62.1 20042010 is not simple as it was under previous versions due to the changes in breathing-zone ventilating rate calculations. Thus, this paper provides insight into the performance of a multi-zone VAV system under different operating and ventilation conditions, discusses the difficulties in the CO2-based DCV, and proposes a robust DCV strategy based on the supply air CO2 concentration. The proposed strategy offers great benefits in terms of better indoor air control and improved energy efficiency. To evaluate the proposed strategy, energy simulations were performed on various USA locations and for a typical two-story office building conditioned by a VAV system. The results show that a significant energy saving could be achieved by implementing the proposed strategy as compared to the design-occupancy ASHRAE Standard 62.1 2010 multi-zone procedure and the amount of saving that could be up to 23% depends mainly on locations and the actual occupancy profile.

Nabil Nassif

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

"Table HC9.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Climate Zone...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000...

93

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 5A Chicago, Illinois |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Chicago, Illinois A Chicago, Illinois Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 5A Chicago, Illinois Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-5a_il_chicago.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare.zip More Documents & Publications

94

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Minneapolis, A Minneapolis, Minnesota Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-6a_mn_minneapolis.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-6a_usa_mn_minneapolis.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-6a_usa_mn_minneapolis.zip

95

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 4A Baltimore, Maryland |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Baltimore, Maryland A Baltimore, Maryland Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 4A Baltimore, Maryland Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-4a_md_baltimore.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-4a_usa_md_baltimore.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-4a_usa_md_baltimore.zip More Documents & Publications

96

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 7 Duluth, Minnesota |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Duluth, Minnesota 7 Duluth, Minnesota Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 7 Duluth, Minnesota Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-7a_mn_duluth.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-7a_usa_mn_duluth.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-7a_usa_mn_duluth.zip More Documents & Publications

97

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 4C Seattle, Washington |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

C Seattle, Washington C Seattle, Washington Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 4C Seattle, Washington Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-4c_wa_seattle.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-4c_usa_wa_seattle.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-4c_usa_wa_seattle.zip More Documents & Publications

98

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 2B Phoenix, Arizona |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Phoenix, Arizona B Phoenix, Arizona Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 2B Phoenix, Arizona Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-2b_az_phoenix.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-2b_usa_az_phoenix.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-2b_usa_az_phoenix.zip More Documents & Publications

99

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 5B Boulder, Colorado |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Boulder, Colorado B Boulder, Colorado Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 5B Boulder, Colorado Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-5b_co_boulder.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-5b_usa_co_boulder.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-5b_usa_co_boulder.zip More Documents & Publications

100

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Helena, Montana B Helena, Montana Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 6B Helena, Montana Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-6b_mt_helena.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-6b_usa_mt_helena.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-6b_usa_mt_helena.zip More Documents & Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 Fairbanks, Alaska 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-8a_ak_fairbanks.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-8a_usa_ak_fairbanks.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-8a_usa_ak_fairbanks.zip More Documents & Publications

102

Natural Ventilation Applications in Hot-humid Climate: A Preliminary Design for the College of Design at NTUST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to create a comfortable architectural environment, especially in a hot, humid climate such as that of Taiwan. However, the air currents of urban wind fields are unpredictable and whimsical. The conventional architectural design process does not employ... awkward. In addition, with increased awareness of the impact of climate change and greenhouse emissions, the effective usage of natural ventilation will likely become a crucial element in reducing the energy consumption of buildings. In improving...

Lin, M. T.; Wei, H. Y.; Lin, Y. J.; Wu, H. F.; Liu, P. H.

103

Organic-rich sediments in ventilated deep-sea environments: Relationship to climate, sea level, and trophic changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic-rich sediments in ventilated deep-sea environments: Relationship to climate, sea level. [1] Sediments on the Namibian Margin in the SE Atlantic between water depths of $1000 and $3600 m are highly enriched in hydrocarbon-prone organic matter. Such sedimentation has occurred for more than 2

Boyer, Edmond

104

The Potential for Wind Induced Ventilation to Meet Occupant Comfort Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes a simple graphic tool that enables a building designer to evaluate the potential for wind induced ventilation cooling in several climate zones. Long term weather data were analyzed to determine the conditions for which available...

Byrne, S. J.; Huang, Y. J.; Ritschard, R. L.; Foley, D. M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_5a_usa_il_chicago-ohare_post1980_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena,

106

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included. refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1.3_5.0.zip refbldg_4c_usa_wa_seattle_new2004_v1-4_7-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix,

107

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project investigates the impact of air infiltration and ventilation on space cooling and moisture in residential buildings; research was conducted in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

108

ENERGY ANALYSISF FOR WORKSHOPS WITH FLOOR-SUPPLY DISPLACEMENT VENTILATION UNDER THE U.S. CLIMATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use more fan and boiler energy but less chiller energy than the mixing ventilation system. The total in order to handle the high cooling loads found in U.S. buildings. Thus, the displacement ventilation, the chiller efficiency is increased. Besides, the

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

109

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida Manufactured Housing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Duct leakage was a key factor in moisture Duct leakage was a key factor in moisture damage in manufactured homes in humid climates. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 2. House-as-a-System Solutions 2.1 New Homes with Whole-House Packages Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida Manufactured Housing Research by Building America diagnosed the causes and prescribed a cure that dramatically reduced moisture problems in manufactured housing in Florida. In the late 1990s, Building America researchers at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) worked with manufactured home builders to diagnose moisture problems in homes in Florida. Moisture issues were so severe that in some homes researchers could push their fingers through the saturated drywall. Using a

110

Test Plan to Evaluate the Relationship Among IAQ, Comfort, Moisture, and Ventilation in Humid Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This experimental plan describes research being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in coordinatation with Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), Florida HERO, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to evaluate the impact of ventilation rate on interior moisture levels, temperature distributions, and indoor air contaminant concentrations. Specifically, the research team will measure concentrations of indoor air contaminants, ventilation system flow rates, energy consumption, and temperature and relative humidity in ten homes in Gainesville, FL to characterize indoor pollutant levels and energy consumption associated with the observed ventilation rates. PNNL and FSEC have collaboratively prepared this experimental test plan, which describes background and context for the proposed study; the experimental design; specific monitoring points, including monitoring equipment, and sampling frequency; key research questions and the associated data analysis approach; experimental logistics, including schedule, milestones, and team member contact information; and clearly identifies the roles and responsibilities of each team in support of project objectives.

Widder, Sarah H.; Martin, Eric

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season. ?

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Advanced Controls for Residential Whole-House Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. Ventilation systems incur an energy penalty on the home via fan power used to drive the airflow, and the additional space-conditioning load associated with heating or cooling the ventilation air. Finding a balance between IAQ and energy use is important if homes are to be adequately ventilated while not increasing the energy burden. This study used computer simulations to examine RIVEC the Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. Four different whole-house ventilation systems were simulated, both with and without RIVEC, so that the energy and IAQ results could be compared. Simulations were conducted for 13 US climate zones, three house designs, and three envelope leakage values. The results showed that the RIVEC controller could typically return ventilation energy savings greater than 40percent without compromising long-term chronic or short-term acute exposures to relevant indoor contaminants. Critical and average peak power loads were also reduced as a consequence of using RIVEC.

Turner, William; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Armstrong County, Texas ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2006-01-01 Source: ASHRAE 169 Standards http:www.ashrae.org Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleArmstrongCounty,TexasASHRAE169-2006ClimateZone&oldid3840...

114

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

115

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

116

Natural ventilation generates building form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural ventilation is an efficient design strategy for thermal comfort in hot and humid climates. The building forms can generate different pressures and temperatures to induce natural ventilation. This thesis develops a ...

Chen, Shaw-Bing

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Natural Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Ventilation Natural Ventilation Natural Ventilation May 30, 2012 - 7:56pm Addthis Opening a window is a simple natural ventilation strategy. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/Simotion Opening a window is a simple natural ventilation strategy. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/Simotion What does this mean for me? If you live in a part of the country with cool nights and breezes, you may be able to cool your house with natural ventilation. If you're building a new home, design it to take advantage of natural ventilation. Natural ventilation relies on the wind and the "chimney effect" to keep a home cool. Natural ventilation works best in climates with cool nights and regular breezes. The wind will naturally ventilate your home by entering or leaving windows, depending on their orientation to the wind. When wind blows against your

118

"Table HC9.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,3.2,8.3,8.9,7.7,7.5 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,7.8,17.8,18.4,16.3,15.3 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,6.2,14.3,14.2,12.1,11.9

119

Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study describes research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Limited hydrologic response to Pleistocene climate change in deep vadose zones --Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sites viewed as favorable for long-term disposal or storage of hazardous waste. Hydrologic responses, and as these environments are being considered as sites for long-term isolation of toxic waste. However, the flow of small the movement of water through thick vadose zones, especially on time scales encompassing long-term climate

Reiners, Peter W.

122

Design of double skin (envelope) as a solar chimney: adapting natural ventilation in double envelope for mild or warm climates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In United States, space heating, space cooling and ventilation of buildings consume 33% of the annual building energy consumption and 15% of the total annual (more)

Wang, Lutao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Database of Low-e Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an update of a report that describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone.

Culp, Thomas D.; Cort, Katherine A.

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

124

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Las Vegas, Nevada Las Vegas, Nevada Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-3b_nv_las_vegas.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-3b_usa_nv_las_vegas.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-3b_usa_nv_las_vegas.zip More Documents & Publications

125

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 3C San Francisco, California |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

C San Francisco, C San Francisco, California Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 3C San Francisco, California Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-3c_ca_san_francisco.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-3c_usa_ca_san_francisco.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-3c_usa_ca_san_francisco.zip

126

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B Albuquerque, New B Albuquerque, New Mexico Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-4b_nm_albuquerque.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-4b_usa_nm_albuquerque.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-4b_usa_nm_albuquerque.zip

127

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 1A Miami, Florida | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1A Miami, Florida 1A Miami, Florida Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 1A Miami, Florida Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-1a_fl_miami.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-1a_usa_fl_miami.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-1a_usa_fl_miami.zip More Documents & Publications

128

Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 2A Houston, Texas | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Houston, Texas A Houston, Texas Archive Reference Buildings by Climate Zone: 2A Houston, Texas Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. You can download ZIP files that contain the following: An EnergyPlus software input file (.idf) An html file showing the results from the EnergyPlus simulation (.html) A spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location (.xls) The EnergyPlus TMY2 weather file (.epw). benchmark-v1.0_3.0-2a_tx_houston.zip benchmark-v1.1_3.1-2a_usa_tx_houston.zip benchmark-new-v1.2_4.0-2a_usa_tx_houston.zip More Documents & Publications

129

Table HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 8.0 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 1.9 10.0 8.4 Q Q 6.8 New England .............................. 5.4 1.4 4.0 Q Q Q 18.4 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 0.5 6.0 8.4 Q Q 4.6 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 5.4 14.8 4.3 Q Q 19.0 East North Central ...................... 17.1

130

The impact of demand-controlled ventilation on energy use in buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this work was to evaluate typical energy requirements associated with alternative ventilation control strategies. The strategies included different combinations of economizer and demand-controlled ventilation controls and energy analyses were performed for a range of typical buildings, systems, and climates. Only single zone buildings were considered, so that simultaneous heating and cooling did not exist. The energy savings associated with economizer and demand-controlled ventilation strategies were found to be very significant for both heating and cooling. In general, the greatest savings in electrical usage for cooling with the addition of demand-controlled ventilation occur in situations where the opportunities for economizer cooling are less. This is true for warm and humid climates, and for buildings that have low relative internal gains (i.e., low occupant densities). As much as 10% savings in electrical energy for cooling were possible with demand-controlled ventilation. The savings in heating energy associated with demand-controlled ventilation were generally much larger, but were strongly dependent upon the occupancy schedule. Significantly greater savings were found for buildings with highly variable occupancy schedules (e.g., stores and restaurants) as compared with office buildings. In some cases, the primary heating energy was reduced by a factor of 10 with demand-controlled ventilation as compared with fixed ventilation rates.

Braun, J.E.; Brandemuehl, M.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Energy and first costs analysis of displacement and mixing ventilation systems for U.S. buildings and climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past two decades, displacement ventilation has been increasingly used in Scandinavia and Western Europe to improve indoor air quality and to save energy. By using a detailed computer simulation method, this study ...

Hu, ShiPing, 1970-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Analysis of energy saving potential of air-side free cooling for data centers in worldwide climate zones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Based on the climate classification of ASHRAE 90.1 and the required operating environment conditions for data centers suggested by the ASHRAE Technical Committee TC 9.9, a dynamic building energy simulation program was used to examine the potential energy savings of the air-side free cooling technology with differential enthalpy control used in data centers in 17 climate zones. The results showed that significant free cooling potential was achieved in data centers located in mixed-humid, warm-marine, and mixed-marine climate zones. Because significant humidification is required to adjust outdoor air in climate zones with a lower dew point temperature, such as very-cold, subarctic, cool-dry, and cold-dry climate zones, the power consumed is even higher. Although the cooling degree day (CDD) and heating degree day (HDD) are key factors of climate classification and air conditioning energy consumption, they are not entirely correlated to the specific operating environment conditions of data centers. The results of this study showed that for every 2C decline in the indoor temperature of a data center, the energy saving of free cooling technology may decrease by 2.88.5%. The rate of decline varies in different climate zones.

Kuei-Peng Lee; Hsiang-Lun Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Literature Review of Displacement Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and Nielsen et al. (1988) showed the impact of supply diffusers whereby increasing the entrainment of room air can decrease the temperature gradient in the occupied zone. #0;? Two important parameters to evaluate the performance of displacement ventilation... of Ventilated Rooms, Oslo, Norway. Nielsen, P.V., Hoff, L., Pedersen, L.G. 1988. Displacement Ventilation by Different Types of Diffusers. Proceedings of the 9 th AIVC Conference, Warwick. Niu, J. 1994. Modeling of Cooled-Ceiling Air-Conditioning Systems Ph...

Cho, S.; Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.

134

The impact of demand-controlled and economizer ventilation strategies on energy use in buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this work was to evaluate typical energy requirements associated with alternative ventilation control strategies for constant-air-volume (CAV) systems in commercial buildings. The strategies included different combinations of economizer and demand-controlled ventilation, and energy analyses were performed for four typical building types, eight alternative ventilation systems, and twenty US climates. Only single-zone buildings were considered so that simultaneous heating and cooling did not exist. The energy savings associated with economizer and demand-controlled ventilation strategies were found to be very significant for both heating and cooling. In general, the greatest savings in electrical usage for cooling with the addition of demand-controlled ventilation occur in situations where the opportunities for economizer cooling are less. This is true for warm and humid climates and for buildings that have relatively low internal gains (i.e., low occupant densities). As much as 20% savings in electrical energy for cooling were possible with demand-controlled ventilation. The savings in heating energy associated with demand-controlled ventilation were generally much larger but were strongly dependent upon the building type and occupancy schedule. Significantly greater savings were found for buildings with highly variable occupancy schedules and large internal gains (i.e., restaurants) as compared with office buildings. In some cases, the primary heating energy was virtually eliminated by demand-controlled ventilation as compared with fixed ventilation rates. For both heating and cooling, the savings associated with demand-controlled ventilation are dependent on the fixed minimum ventilation rate of the base case at design conditions.

Brandemuehl, M.J.; Braun, J.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

136

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

137

Ventilative cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

Graa, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Table HC9.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005 11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................... 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 3.2 8.3 8.9 7.7 7.5 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 7.8 17.8 18.4 16.3 15.3 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 5.1 12.4 11.9 10.5 10.4 2.............................................................. 16.2 1.8 3.4 4.2 3.6 3.2 3 or More................................................. 9.0 0.9 2.0 2.3 2.2 1.7 Number of Laptop PCs 1.............................................................. 22.5 2.1 4.9 5.8 5.1 4.6 2..............................................................

139

Table HC9.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005 9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S............................................................ 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................... 109.6 10.9 25.7 27.1 23.4 22.4 1.............................................................. 103.3 10.2 24.3 25.3 22.2 21.3 2 or More................................................. 6.2 0.6 1.5 1.8 1.2 1.1 Do Not Use an Oven................................... 1.5 Q 0.3 Q 0.6 0.4 Most-Used Oven Fuel Electric..................................................... 67.9 7.2 14.1 16.7 13.2 16.7 Natural Gas.............................................. 36.4 2.5 10.6 9.6 9.0 4.8 Propane/LPG...........................................

140

Table HC9.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total......................................................................... 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment........................... 17.8 3.2 4.7 3.6 5.5 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment........................................ 93.3 7.7 21.4 23.7 18.5 21.9 Use Cooling Equipment......................................... 91.4 7.6 21.0 23.4 17.9 21.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it........................ 1.9 Q 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.3 Air-Conditioning Equipment 2, 3 Central System...................................................... 65.9 4.8 12.3 15.1 14.9 18.7 Without a Heat Pump......................................... 53.5 4.7 11.5 11.6 12.3 13.6 With a Heat Pump..............................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation May 30, 2012 - 2:37pm Addthis A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. What does this mean for me? Whole-house ventilation is critical in an energy-efficient home to maintain adequate indoor air quality and comfort. The whole-house ventilation system you choose will depend upon your climate, budget, and the availability of experienced contractors in your area. Energy-efficient homes -- both new and existing -- require mechanical ventilation to maintain indoor air quality. There are four basic mechanical

142

Building ventilation and acoustics for people who dont know much about building ventilation.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The architectural composition required for building ventilation used both for low energy cooling and improved air quality can be anathema to acoustical goals of speech privacy and noise control. This paper presents a short tutorial on the basics of cross ventilation stack ventilation comfort ventilation and indoor air quality as it relates to climate building type and indoor pollutants. It is geared to those without significant prior knowledge and follows a similar tutorial on geothermal systems presented at the Miami ASA conference.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Issue #9: What are the Best Ventilation Techniques?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

How do we address ventilation in all climates? What is the best compromise between occupant health and safety and energy efficiency?

144

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Title Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5554E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20%, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

145

A. Buonomano, M. Sherman, USA: Analysis of residential hybrid ventilation performance in U.S. climates 1 Intern. Symposium on Building and Ductwork Air tightness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Buonomano, M. Sherman, USA: Analysis of residential hybrid ventilation performance in U Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley 94720, CA, USA. (phone:+1 510 486 4022, fax: +1 510 486 6658, email on analysis methods for hybrid ventilation system is limited. #12;2 A. Buonomano, M. Sherman, USA: Analysis

146

The International Journal of Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Buildings: Harrington C and Modera M 345 Estimates of Uncertainty in Multi-Zone Air Leakage Measurements. Introduction Heating, cooling and ventilation can account for 50 percent of total building energy use flow rate. Over the past 15 years, the subject of duct leakage in buildings other than single-family

California at Davis, University of

147

Posters Climate Zones for Maritime Clouds A. B. White and D....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

marine climate regimes. We obtained most of the data used in this analysis from ship-based ceilometer measurements recorded during several different atmospheric and...

148

Design of industrial ventilation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This latest edition has a title change to reflect an expansion to cover the interrelated areas of general exhaust ventilation and makeup air supply. More coverage is also given the need for energy conservation and for the physical isolation of the workspace from major contaminant generation zones. Excellent and generous illustrative matter is included. Contents, abridged are as follows: flow of fluids; air flow through hoods; pipe resistance; piping design; centrifugal exhaust fans; axial-flow fans; monitoring industrial ventilization systems; isolation; and energy conservation.

Alden, J.L.; Kane, J.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation Controlled ventilation keeps energy-efficient homes healthy and comfortable. Learn more about ventilation. Controlled ventilation keeps energy-efficient homes healthy and comfortable. Learn more about ventilation. When creating an energy-efficient, airtight home through air sealing, it's very important to consider ventilation. Unless properly ventilated, an airtight home can seal in indoor air pollutants. Ventilation also helps control moisture-another important consideration for a healthy, energy-efficient home. Featured Whole-House Ventilation A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. Tight, energy-efficient homes require mechanical -- usually whole-house --

150

HOW THE LEED VENTILATION CREDIT IMPACTS ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF GSHP SYSTEMS A CASE STUDY FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a study on the impacts of increased outdoor air (OA) ventilation on the performance of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems that heat and cool typical primary schools. Four locations Phoenix, Miami, Seattle, and Chicago are selected in this study to represent different climate zones in the United States. eQUEST, an integrated building and HVAC system energy analysis program, is used to simulate a typical primary school and the GSHP system at the four locations with minimum and 30% more than minimum OA ventilation. The simulation results show that, without an energy recovery ventilator, the 30% more OA ventilation results in an 8.0 13.3% increase in total GSHP system energy consumption at the four locations. The peak heating and cooling loads increase by 20.2 30% and 14.9 18.4%, respectively, at the four locations. The load imbalance of the ground heat exchanger is increased in hot climates but reduced in mild and cold climates.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Authors Fisk, William J., Mark J. Mendell, Molly Davies, Ekaterina Eliseeva, David Faulkner, Tienzen Hong, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords absence, building s, carbon dioxide, demand - controlled ventilation, energy, indoor air quality, schools, ventilation Abstract This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included:  The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).  Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.

152

Evaluation on energy and thermal performance for office building envelope in different climate zones of China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Effective evaluation on the thermal performance of envelope plays an important role towards the reduction of energy consumption for space cooling and heating. In order to calculate the energy consumption for cooling and heating and assess the whole energy efficiency of envelop designs, a new evaluation index on energy and thermal performance for office building envelop (EETPO) is put forward. Three cities of Shenyang, Wuhan and Guangzhou in China are selected for EETPO analysis, which represent the cold zone, hot summer cold winter zone and hot summer warm winter zone, respectively. The regression equations between EETPO and energy use for cooling/heating are studied in three cities, illustrations indicate that the regression lines fit extremely well and the algorithm is accurate and simple. According to the compulsory indices stipulated by standard (GB50189-2005), the maximum allowable values of EETPO are determined in three cities, the maximum \\{EETPOc\\} in cooling period is 1.750W/m3K in Wuhan and 1.733W/m3K in Guangzhou, the maximum \\{EETPOh\\} in heating period is 0.200W/m3K in Shenyang and 0.414W/m3K in Wuhan. This index and energy use calculation method can help designers to evaluate the whole energy and thermal performance of the proposed envelopes and analyze energy saving effects for different energy conservation measures.

Jinghua Yu; Liwei Tian; Xinhua Xu; Jinbo Wang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5, Boulder, Colorado (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluation of a Multifamily Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5 Boulder, Colorado PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Evaluation of a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, CO Location: Boulder, CO Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings www.carb-swa.com Building Component: Building envelope, lighting, appliances, water conservation Application: Retrofit Years Tested: 2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold, very cold PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $3,300-$6,100 per unit with total complex cost estimate of ~$150,000 Projected Energy Savings: 27%-41% depending on unit location/orientation Projected Energy Cost Savings: $154-$304 utility savings per year In 2009, a 37-unit apartment complex located in Boulder, Colorado, underwent

154

DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

columns indicate the energy and cost savings for demandand class size. (The energy costs of classroom ventilationTotal Increase in Energy Costs ($) Increased State Revenue

Fisk, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

columnsindicatetheenergyandcostsavingsfor demandclasssize. (Theenergycosts ofclassroomventilationTotal Increase in Energy Costs ($) Increased State Revenue

Fisk, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Heat balance for two commercial broiler barns with solar preheated ventilation air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In temperate climatic zones, solar air heaters can reduce heating loads, and increase winter ventilation rates thereby improving inside air quality and livestock performance without additional fuel input. A heat balance was carried out to measure bird heat production under field conditions on two commercial broiler barns to evaluate the impact of solar heated ventilation air on bird performance, and identify strategies to reduce winter heating load. Located 40km east of Montreal, Canada, the experimental broiler barns were identically built with three floors housing 6500 birds per floor in an all-in all-out fashion. Equipped with solar air pre-heaters over their fresh air inlets, the barns were instrumented to monitor inlet, inside and outside air conditions, ventilation rate and heating system operating time. The effects on bird performance were observed from November 2007 to March 2009 by alternating their operation between the barns. The measured sensible and total heat productions of 4.5W and 8.4W, respectively, for 1kg birds corresponded to laboratory measured values. Bird performance was not affected by the solar air pre-heaters which increased the ventilation rate above normal during only 20% of the daytime period. Room air temperature stratification resulted in 2040kW of heat losses during the winter, representing 25% of the total natural gas heat load. Because inside air moved directly to the fans, large and rapid increases in ventilation inlet air temperature, produced by the solar air pre-heaters, resulted in further heat losses equivalent to 15% of the solar energy recovered. Sustainable energy management in livestock barns requiring heating should incorporate an air mixing system to eliminate air temperature stratification and improve fan flows.

Sbastien Cordeau; Suzelle Barrington

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Building Science - Ventilation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Ventilation Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com Build Tight - Ventilate Right Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Build Tight - Ventilate Right How Tight? What's Right? Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Air Barrier Metrics Material 0.02 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa Assembly 0.20 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa Enclosure 2.00 l/(s-m2) @ 75 Pa 0.35 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa 0.25 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa 0.15 cfm/ft2 @ 50 Pa Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Getting rid of big holes 3 ach@50 Getting rid of smaller holes 1.5 ach@50 Getting German 0.6 ach@50 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Best As Tight as Possible - with - Balanced Ventilation Energy Recovery Distribution Source Control - Spot exhaust ventilation Filtration

159

Why We Ventilate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Why We Ventilate Why We Ventilate Title Why We Ventilate Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-5093E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Phillip N. Price, Max H. Sherman, and Brett C. Singer Conference Name Proceedings of the 2011 32nd AIVC Conference and 1st Tightvent Conference Date Published October 2011 Conference Location Brussels, Belgium Keywords indoor environment department, resave, ventilation and air cleaning Abstract It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of "good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

160

Ventilation of Electrical Substations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE type of construction used for substations is generally governed by requirements, for example, fire and air-raid precautions, which ... Electrical Engineers, F. Favell and E. W. Connon record their experiences in overcoming substation ventilation problems in particular cases. Adequate and suitably planned ventilation will maintain ...

1943-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Whole Building Ventilation Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Whole-Building Whole-Building Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Home Performance / Weatherization  Addressing ventilation is the exception  Max tightness, e.g. BPI's "Building Airflow Standard" (BAS)  References ASHRAE 62-89  BAS = Max [0.35 ACH, 15 CFM/person], CFM50 eq.  If BD tests show natural infiltration below BAS...  Ventilation must be recommended or installed.  SO DON'T AIR SEAL TO MUCH! © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Ventilation Requirements Ventilation systems for existing homes that are:

162

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice?  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Dianne Griffiths April 29, 2013 Presentation Outline * Basic Objectives * Exhaust Systems * Make-up Air Systems Two Primary Ventilation Objectives 1) Providing Fresh Air - Whole-House 2) Removing Pollutants - Local Exhaust Our goal is to find the simplest solution that satisfies both objectives while minimizing cost and energy impacts. Common Solution: Align local exhaust with fresh air requirements (Ex: 25 Bath + 25 Kitchen) Exhaust-Driven Fresh Air Design * Exhaust slightly depressurizes the units * Outside air enters through leaks, cracks, or planned inlets * Widely used in the North Multifamily Ventilation Best Practice * Step 1: Understand ventilation requirements * Step 2: Select the simplest design that can

163

Residential Ventilation & Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Residential Ventilation & Energy Figure 1: Annual Average Ventilation Costs of the Current U.S. Single-Family Housing Stock ($/year/house). Infiltration and ventilation in dwellings is conventionally believed to account for one-third to one-half of space conditioning energy. Unfortunately, there is not a great deal of measurement data or analysis to substantiate this assumption. As energy conservation improvements to the thermal envelope continue, the fraction of energy consumed by the conditioning of air may increase. Air-tightening programs, while decreasing energy requirements, have the tendency to decrease ventilation and its associated energy penalty at the possible expense of adequate indoor air quality. Therefore, more energy may be spent on conditioning air.

164

Energy consumption comparison analysis of high energy efficiency office buildings in typical climate zones of China and U.S. based on correction model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Actual operation energy consumption of the high energy efficiency buildings built and operated in China and U.S. has been quite different than expected. This paper compares actual energy consumption to expect high energy efficiency office buildings in U.S. and China. Considering the different indoor design temperature, climate conditions and operated period between the compared cases in the two countries impact on the building energy consumption, correction model was built to eliminate the influence of the three factors on the comparison result and put the comparison analysis of high energy efficiency office buildings in the two countries into the same level. Regard to building general information and climate condition, four pairs of buildings in typical climate zones of China and U.S. were selected to compare the building energy conservation technology and building energy consumption based on a large scale of investigation and testing. After corrected, the energy consumption data are analyzed, including total energy consumption, and sub-metering energy consumption such as heating, cooling, lighting, office equipment, etc.. The energy saving technologies applied in these four pairs of buildings was also compared to explain energy consumption differences.

Long Liu; Jing Zhao; Xin Liu; Zhaoxia Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifamily Individual Heating Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems Lawrence, Massachusetts PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Retrofit Type: Multifamily, affordable Builder: Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) www.merrimackvalleyhabitat.org Size: 840 to 1,170 ft 2 units Price Range: $125,000-$130,000 Date completed: Slated for 2014 Climate Zone: Cold (5A) PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index Range: 48 to 63 Projected annual energy cost savings: $1,797 Incremental cost of energy efficiency measures: $3,747 Incremental annual mortgage: $346 Annual cash flow: $1,451 Billing data: Not available The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley

166

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification J. Chris Stratton, Iain S. Walker, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5982E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

167

Detailed Analysis of the Builder Option Packages for Climate Zones 3,4,5, and 6 for Texas' Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the summary spreadsheets. BOPs for climate zones 3,4,5 and 6 were submitted for approval to ESL on April 29,2002. It was stated that the suggested BOPs were 10 to 15% less consumptive than the IECC chapter 4/5 house. Analysis was done on these BOPs...

Ahmad, M.; Haberl, J. S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Ventilation Air Preconditioning Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ventilation Air Preconditioning Systems Mukesh Khattar Michael J. Brandemuehl Manager, Space Conditioning and Refrigeration Associate Professor Customer Systems Group Joint Center for Energy Management Electric Power Research Institute Campus... costs, the small, modular nature of the system allows great flexibility for fitting into retrofit geometries and saves space in new construction. Moreover, a single chiller can serve multiple air-handling units-in stark contrast to packaged...

Khattar, M.; Brandemuehl, M. J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Title Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5796E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Date Published 06/2012 Abstract Changing the rate of airflow through a home affects the annual thermal conditioning energy.Large-scale changes to airflow rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the energy consumption of the residential energy sector. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models hampers the ability to estimate the impact of policy changes on a state or nationwide level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study was designed to combine the output of simple airflow models and a limited set of home characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modelers to use existing databases of home characteristics to determine the impact of policy on ventilation at a population scale. In this report, we describe the IVE model and demonstrate that its estimates of energy change are comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model when applied to homes with limited parameterization. Homes with extensive parameterization would be more accurately characterized by complex residential energy models. The demonstration included a range of home types, climates, and ventilation systems that cover a large fraction of the residential housing sector.

170

Why We Ventilate - Recent Advances  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WHY WE VENTILATE: WHY WE VENTILATE: Recent Advances Max Sherman BA Stakeholders meeting ASHRAE BIO  Distinguished Lecturer  Exceptional Service Award  Board of Directors; TechC  Chair of committees:  62.2; Standards Committee  TC 4.3; TC 2.5  Holladay Distinguished Fellow OVERVIEW QUESTIONS  What is Ventilation? What is IAQ?  What functions does it provide?  How much do we need? Why?  How should ventilations standards be made? LBL has working on these problems Who Are You?  Engineers (ASHRAE Members & not);  architects,  contractors,  reps,  builders,  vendors,  code officials WHAT IS VENTILATION  Medicine: To Exchange Air In the Lungs  Latin: Ventilare, "to expose to the wind"  Today: To Bring In Outdoor Air And Replace

171

An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system is provided in the following sections. Included are descriptions of the zone configurations, equipment-performance criteria, ventilation support systems, and the ventilation-system evaluation criteria. Section 4.2.1.1 provides a brief discussion of the ventilation system function. Section 4.2.1.2 provides details on the overall system configuration. Details of system interfaces and support systems are provided in Section 4.2.1.3. Section 4.2.1.4 describes instrumentation and control needed to operate the ventilation system. Finally, Sections 4.2.1.5 and 4.2.1.6 describe system surveillance/maintenance and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) Limitations, respectively. Note that the numerical parameters included in this description are considered nominal; set points and other specifications actually fall within operational bands.

NONE

1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

172

Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

, 2011 , 2011 Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-324-9601; Pass code: 5551971 Download the presentation at: www.buildingamerica.gov/meetings.html Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Building America: Introduction November 1, 2011 Cheryn Engebrecht Cheryn.engebrecht@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved * Accelerate adoption of high performance technologies

173

Solar ventilation and tempering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper presents basic information about solar panels designed realized and used for solar ventilation of rooms. Used method of numerical flow simulation gives good overview about warming and flowing of the air in several kinds of realized panels (window facade chimney). Yearlong measurements give a good base for calculations of economic return of invested capital. The operation of the system in transient period (spring autumn) prolongs the period without classical heating of the room or building in winter the classical heating is supported. In the summer period the system furnished with chimney can exhaust inner warm air together with necessary cooling of the system by gravity circulation only. System needs not any invoiced energy source; it is supplied entirely by solar energy. Large building systems are supported by classical electric fan respectively.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Title Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-57730 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Russell, Marion L., Max H. Sherman, and Armin F. Rudd Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 13 Start Page Chapter Pagination 325-348 Abstract This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings in North America and a few in Europe. The major technologies reviewed include a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. Key parameters that are related to each system include operating costs, installation costs, ventilation rates, heat recovery potential. It also examines related issues such as infiltration, duct systems, filtration options, noise, and construction issues. This report describes a wide variety of systems currently on the market that can be used to meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2. While these systems generally fall into the categories of supply, exhaust or balanced, the specifics of each system are driven by concerns that extend beyond those in the standard and are discussed. Some of these systems go beyond the current standard by providing additional features (such as air distribution or pressurization control). The market will decide the immediate value of such features, but ASHRAE may wish to consider modifications to the standard in the future.

175

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

176

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

177

Energy performance of a dual airflow window under different climates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ventilated windows have shown great potential in conserving energy in buildings and provide fresh air to improve indoor air quality. This paper reports our effort to use EnergyPlus to simulate the energy performance of a dual airflow window under different climates. Our investigation first developed a network model to account for the two-dimensional heat transfer in the window system and implemented it in EnergyPlus. The two-dimensional assumption and the modified EnergyPlus program were validated by the measured temperatures of the window and the energy demand of a test cell with the window under actual weather conditions. Then EnergyPlus was applied to analyze energy performance of a small apartment installed with the dual airflow windows in five different climate zones in China. The energy used by the apartment with blinds windows and low-e windows was also calculated for comparison. The dual airflow window can reduce heating energy of the apartment, especially in cold climate. The cooling energy reduction by the window was less important than that by shading solar radiation. The dual airflow window is recommended for colder climate. If improving air quality is a major consideration for a building, the window can be used in any climate.

Jingshu Wei; Jianing Zhao; Qingyan Chen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

179

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the UnitedStates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first and only national norm for residential ventilation in the United States is Standard 62.2-2004 published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This standard does not by itself have the force of regulation, but is being considered for adoption by various jurisdictions within the U.S. as well as by various voluntary programs. The adoption of 62.2 would require mechanical ventilation systems to be installed in virtually all new homes, but allows for a wide variety of design solutions. These solutions, however, may have a different energy costs and non-energy benefits. This report uses a detailed simulation model to evaluate the energy impacts of currently popular and proposed mechanical ventilation approaches that are 62.2 compliant for a variety of climates. These results separate the energy needed to ventilate from the energy needed to condition the ventilation air, from the energy needed to distribute and/or temper the ventilation air. The results show that exhaust systems are generally the most energy efficient method of meeting the proposed requirements. Balanced and supply systems have more ventilation resulting in greater energy and their associated distribution energy use can be significant.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Recovery Ventilator Membrane Efficiency Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A test setup was designed and built to test energy recovery ventilator membranes. The purpose of this test setup was to measure the heat transfer and water vapor transfer rates through energy recover ventilator membranes and find their effectiveness...

Rees, Jennifer Anne

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

Insulated Concrete Form Walls Integrated With Mechanical Systems in a Cold Climate Test House  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transitioning from standard light frame to a thermal mass wall system in a high performance home will require a higher level of design integration with the mechanical systems. The much higher mass in the ICF wall influences heat transfer through the wall and affects how the heating and cooling system responds to changing outdoor conditions. This is even more important for efficient, low-load homes with efficient heat pump systems in colder climates where the heating and cooling peak loads are significantly different from standard construction. This report analyzes a range of design features and component performance estimates in an effort to select practical, cost-effective solutions for high performance homes in a cold climate. Of primary interest is the influence of the ICF walls on developing an effective air sealing strategy and selecting an appropriate heating and cooling equipment type and capacity. The domestic water heating system is analyzed for costs and savings to investigate options for higher efficiency electric water heating. A method to ensure mechanical ventilation air flows is examined. The final solution package includes high-R mass walls, very low infiltration rates, multi-stage heat pump heating, solar thermal domestic hot water system, and energy recovery ventilation. This solution package can be used for homes to exceed 2012 International Energy Conservation Code requirements throughout all climate zones and achieves the DOE Challenge Home certification.

Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to account for 1/3 to 1/2 of the space conditioning energy. There is not a great deal of measurement data opportunities, the United States Department of Energy and others need to put into perspective the energy based on energy conservation and ventilation strategies. Because of the lack of direct measurements, we

184

Humidity Control Systems for Civil Buildings in Hot Summer and Cold Winter Zone in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the hot summer and cold winter zone, moisture-laden outside air poses real problems for proper ventilation, air-conditioner sizing, and strategies to overcome the reduced dehumidification capacity of more energy-efficient air-conditioning (AC...

Yu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page provides a brief overview of solar ventilation preheating (SVP) technologies supplemented by specific information to apply SVP within the Federal sector.

187

Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate-Specific Guidance Climate-Specific Guidance The Map of the United States shows climate zones in different colors. The Marine zone contains the Pacific coast from the Canadian border to mid-California. The Hot-dry/Mixed-Dry zone contains the rest of California and follows the US border to mid-Texas. The Hot-Humid zone covers eastern Texas through Florida and includes Puerto Rico and Hawaii. The Mixed-Humid zone covers the mid-central to mid-eastern regions of the country. The Cold/Very Cold zone contains all of the Northern United States. Hot-Dry / Mixed-Dry Marine Hot-Humid Mixed-Humid Cold / Very Cold Select a climate zone from the map above, and view a listing of climate regions by county in the Guide to Determining Climate Regions: Volume 7.1 to view climates by county.

188

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Outside Air Ventilation Controller  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

partner Davis Energy partner Davis Energy Group worked with Monley Cronin Construction to build 100 energy-efficient homes in Woodland, CA, with night- cooling ventilation systems. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.3 Assured Health, Safety, and Durability Outside Air Ventilation Controller Building America researchers developed technologies to harness the natural day-night temperature swings in the U.S. Southwest to cut cooling energy peak demand with no compromise in comfort. Building America research has shown that, in dry climates, the use of ventilation cooling can significantly reduce, delay, or completely eliminate air conditioner operation resulting in both energy savings and reduction of peak demand

189

Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Ventilation Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products

190

Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America Top Innovation This drawing shows simple...

191

Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS and Zero Energy Ready Homes Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS and Zero Energy...

192

Smart Ventilation (RIVEC) - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

technology. Their mechanical ventilation systems dominate for energy use; as the foundation, wall, and roof work together. Smart ventilation is expected to save at least 40% on...

193

Summer Infiltration/Ventilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory This presentation was delivered at the...

194

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated, commissioning, procedures, standards, ASHRAE 62.2 Please use the following citation for this report: Stratton, J.C. and C.P. Wray. 2013. Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning

195

Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in High-Performance Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. We attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in a research house located in Oak Ridge, TN, that was 20 months old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built (i.e., natural ventilation rate ~0.02 h-1), unoccupied, and unfurnished. We identified air pollutants of concern in the test home that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern among the contaminants that were sampled in the initial survey because it was the only compound that showed concentrations that were greater than the recommended exposure levels. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74 F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

Hun, Diana E [ORNL; Jackson, Mark C [University of Texas at Austin; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Adaptive HVAC zone modeling for sustainable buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Control of energy flows within a building is critical to achieving optimal performance of heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. To design optimal HVAC control strategies, a dynamic model of the HVAC system particularly the building zones that it services is essential. As analysis of building energy consumption is facilitated by the accurate prediction of indoor environmental conditions, techniques that dynamically model HVAC zones are crucial, and as such, is an active area of research. This paper focuses on real-time HVAC zone model fitting and prediction techniques based on physical principles, as well as the use of genetic algorithms for optimization. The proposed approach is validated by comparing real-time HVAC zone model fitting and prediction against the corresponding experimental measurements. In addition, comparison with prediction results using an algorithm based on feedback-delayed Kalman filters has demonstrated the superiority of the proposed approach in terms of prediction accuracy.

Glenn Platt; Jiaming Li; Ronxin Li; Geoff Poulton; Geoff James; Josh Wall

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a light load office. The loads follow the schedules of theheat load generated by occupants and equipment follows the

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Ventilated Facade Design for Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sustainable development is increasingly being recognized around the world (Behling 1996). There are basic explanations of what sustainable development is and how it is reached (SusDev). Looking at examples in European countries a strong emphasis on energy... 2003). Several paths for reducing energy consumption have been identified. One possibility is the use of energy efficient technology in the built environment (Baker 2002.; European Commission 1992.; Goulding et al. 1992; Krishan 2001.; Lee et al...

Haase, M.; Amato, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were modelled. Four-pipe fan coil units were used to controlthat is extracted by the fan coil units from the room in oneis supplied by the fan coil units to the room in one year (

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

measures included mastic sealing ducts, installing properly sized high-efficiency HVAC, thoroughly air sealing the building envelope, using water-resistant exterior finishes,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tropics, Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2003, Singapore,Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2000 Vol. 2, 2000, pp. 523-building. Proceeding of Healthy Building 2006. Vol. V, 2006,

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Energy-saving strategies with personalized ventilation in cold climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opportunity to control the supply air temperature. In Case 8the personalized supply air temperature control strategy onreveal that the supply air temperature control strategy has

Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Current Concepts: Weaning Patients from the Ventilator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...neurologic ICUs. Patients who require reintubation have an increased risk of death, a prolonged hospital stay, and a decreased likelihood of returning home, as compared with patients in whom discontinuation of mechanical ventilation is successful. Thus, it is essential that critical care physicians identify... In the United States, almost 800,000 patients who are hospitalized each year require mechanical ventilation.1 This estimate excludes neonates, and there is little doubt that mechanical ventilation will be increasingly used as the number of patients 65 ...

McConville J.F.; Kress J.P.

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

204

Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar will focus on key challenges in multifamily ventilation and strategies to address these challenges.

205

Future Climate Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada (Figure 1), the site of a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this AMR provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the infiltration model (USGS 2000) and for the total system performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) at YM. Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one method, among many, of establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Revision 00 of this AMR was prepared in accordance with the ''Work Direction and Planning Document for Future Climate Analysis'' (Peterman 1999) under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-97NV12033 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The planning document for the technical scope, content, and management of ICN 01 of this AMR is the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (BSC 2001a). The scope for the TBV resolution actions in this ICN is described in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department''. (BSC 2001b, Addendum B, Section 4.1).

James Houseworth

2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

206

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Ventilation | Building Energy Codes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ventilation Ventilation The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on ventilation air; exhaust air; control strategies; carbon dioxide sensors; economizers. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_ventilation.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Contractor Engineer State: All States Contacts Web Site Policies

207

Chlorofluorocarbon Constraints on North Atlantic Ventilation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The North Atlantic Ocean vigorously ventilates the ocean interior. Thermocline and deep water masses are exposed to atmospheric contact there and are sequestered in two principal classes: Subtropical Mode Water (STMW: 26.5 ? ?? ? 26.8) and ...

Thomas W. N. Haine; Kelvin J. Richards; Yanli Jia

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Scale model studies of displacement ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Displacement ventilation is an air conditioning method that provides conditioned air to indoor environments with the goal to improve air quality while reducing energy consumption. This study investigates the performance ...

Okutan, Galip Mehmet

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical VentilationQuality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical VentilationQuality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Student Zone  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Student Zone Student Zone Homework Helpers All About Atoms - Learn about the parts of the atom! Virginia State Standards of Learning Practice Tests - Practice taking the SOL tests! Subjects currently include algebra, math, science and technology. Table of Elements - Basic physical and historical information about the elements! [Printable Version] Questions and Answers - Have a question? Need an answer? Check here first! Glossary of Science Terms - Definitions of some of the terms used on this site. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour - How do scientists explore inside atoms? Video Resources Frostbite Theater - Short science experiments using liquid nitrogen, static electricity and more! Physics Out Loud - Jefferson Lab scientists and other experts explain some of the common words and terms used in nuclear physics research.

211

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Title Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5968E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., and Iain S. Walker Date Published 12/2012 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, passive ventilation, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health, and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. At the same time we wish to reduce the energy use in homes and therefore minimize the energy used to provide ventilation. This study examined several approaches to reducing the energy requirements of providing acceptable IAQ in residential buildings. Two approaches were taken. The first used RIVEC - the Residential Integrated VEntilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. The second used passive and hybrid ventilation systems, rather than mechanical systems, to provide whole-house ventilation.

212

Carbon-dioxide-controlled ventilation study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The In-House Energy Management (IHEM) Program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide funds to federal laboratories to conduct research on energy-efficient technology. The Energy Sciences Department of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by IHEM to research the energy savings potential associated with reducing outdoor-air ventilation of buildings. By monitoring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels in a building, outdoor air provided by the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system can be reduced to the percentage required to maintain satisfactory CO{sub 2} levels rather than ventilating with a higher outdoor-air percentage based on an arbitrary minimum outdoor-air setting. During summer months, warm outdoor air brought into a building for ventilation must be cooled to meet the appropriate cooling supply-air temperature, and during winter months, cold outdoor air must be heated. By minimizing the amount of hot or cold outdoor air brought into the HVAC system, the supply air requires less cooling or heating, saving energy and money. Additionally, the CO{sub 2} levels in a building can be monitored to ensure that adequate outdoor air is supplied to a building to maintain air quality levels. The two main considerations prior to implementing CO{sub 2}-based ventilation control are its impact on energy consumption and the adequacy of indoor air quality (IAQ) and occupant comfort. To address these considerations, six portable CO{sub 2} monitors were placed in several Hanford Site buildings to estimate the adequacy of office/workspace ventilation. The monitors assessed the potential for reducing the flow of outdoor-air to the buildings. A candidate building was also identified to monitor various ventilation control strategies for use in developing a plan for implementing and assessing energy savings.

McMordie, K.L.; Carroll, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Air heating of passive houses in cold climates: Investigation using detailed dynamic simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The passive house (PH) standard was originally defined for Central Europe and has subsequently been applied to many cold climate countries. In these conditions, the relation between this standard and the air heating (AH) is not clear while both concepts are usually associated. Furthermore, the AH provides a way to simplify the space-heating distribution system. The present contribution investigates the feasibility of the AH concept in PH along with its challenges in terms of thermal dynamics: the magnitude of the AH temperature needed, the temperature difference between rooms, the impact of internal gains, the influence of thermal losses from ventilation ducts and the AH control. This is performed using detailed dynamic simulations (TRNSYS) on a typical detached house typology. Practically, four cold climate zones are considered as well as different insulation levels and construction materials. Results show limitations related to a centralized AH as well as provide guidelines for a consistent AH design in cold climates. In addition, a simple analytical method used for the design of German PH is tested and proved accurate enough to estimate the maximal AH temperature during the heating season.

Laurent Georges; Monica Berner; Hans Martin Mathisen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Design Feature 7: Continuous Preclosure Ventilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This design feature (DF) is intended to evaluate the effects of continuous ventilation in the emplacement drifts during preclosure and how the effects, if any, compare to the Viability Assessment (VA) reference design for postclosure long term performance. This DF will be evaluated against a set of criteria provided by the License Application Design Selection (LADS) group. The VA reference design included a continuous ventilation airflow quantity of 0.1 m{sup 3}/s in the emplacement drifts in the design of the repository subsurface facilities. The effects of this continuous ventilation during the preclosure was considered to have a negligible effect on postclosure performance and therefore is not included during postclosure in the assessment of the long term performance. This DF discusses the effects of continuous ventilation on the emplacement drift environment and surrounding rock conditions during preclosure for three increased airflow quantities. The three cases of continuous ventilation systems are: System A, 1.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 8), System B, 5.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 9), and System C, 10.0 m{sup 3}/s (Section 10) in each emplacement drift split. An emplacement drift split is half total length of emplacement drift going from the east or west main to the exhaust main. The difference in each system is the quantity of airflow in the emplacement drifts.

A.T. Watkins

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

215

Underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the design and installation of an underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This facility is designed to demonstrate safe underground disposal of U.S. defense generated transuranic nuclear waste. To improve the operability of the ventilation system, an underground remote monitoring and control system was designed and installed. The system consists of 15 air velocity sensors and 8 differential pressure sensors strategically located throughout the underground facility providing real-time data regarding the status of the ventilation system. In addition, a control system was installed on the main underground air regulators. The regulator control system gives indication of the regulator position and can be controlled either locally or remotely. The sensor output is displayed locally and at a central surface location through the site-wide Central Monitoring System (CMS). The CMS operator can review all sensor data and can remotely operate the main underground regulators. Furthermore, the Virtual Address Extension (VAX) network allows the ventilation engineer to retrieve real-time ventilation data on his personal computer located in his workstation. This paper describes the types of sensors selected, the installation of the instrumentation, and the initial operation of the remote monitoring system.

Strever, M.T.; Wallace, K.G. Jr.; McDaniel, K.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

MODELING VENTILATION SYSTEM RESPONSE TO FIRE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fires in facilities containing nuclear material have the potential to transport radioactive contamination throughout buildings and may lead to widespread downwind dispersal threatening both worker and public safety. Development and implementation of control strategies capable of providing adequate protection from fire requires realistic characterization of ventilation system response which, in turn, depends on an understanding of fire development timing and suppression system response. This paper discusses work in which published HEPA filter data was combined with CFAST fire modeling predictions to evaluate protective control strategies for a hypothetical DOE non-reactor nuclear facility. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate when safety significant active ventilation coupled with safety class passive ventilation might be a viable control strategy.

Coutts, D

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

Dehumidification and cooling loads from ventilation air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of controlling humidity in buildings is cause for concern, in part, because of indoor air quality problems associated with excess moisture in air-conditioning systems. But more universally, the need for ventilation air has forced HVAC equipment (originally optimized for high efficiency in removing sensible heat loads) to remove high moisture loads. To assist cooling equipment and meet the challenge of larger ventilation loads, several technologies have succeeded in commercial buildings. Newer technologies such as subcool/reheat and heat pipe reheat show promise. These increase latent capacity of cooling-based systems by reducing their sensible capacity. Also, desiccant wheels have traditionally provided deeper-drying capacity by using thermal energy in place of electrical power to remove the latent load. Regardless of what mix of technologies is best for a particular application, there is a need for a more effective way of thinking about the cooling loads created by ventilation air. It is clear from the literature that all-too-frequently, HVAC systems do not perform well unless the ventilation air loads have been effectively addressed at the original design stage. This article proposes an engineering shorthand, an annual load index for ventilation air. This index will aid in the complex process of improving the ability of HVAC systems to deal efficiently with the amount of fresh air the industry has deemed useful for maintaining comfort in buildings. Examination of typical behavior of weather shows that latent loads usually exceed sensible loads in ventilation air by at least 3:1 and often as much as 8:1. A designer can use the engineering shorthand indexes presented to quickly assess the importance of this fact for a given system design. To size those components after they are selected, the designer can refer to Chapter 24 of the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals, which includes separate values for peak moisture and peak temperature.

Harriman, L.G. III [Mason-Grant, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Plager, D. [Quantitative Decision Support, Portsmouth, NH (United States); Kosar, D. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally Review on Ventilation Rate Measuring and Modeling Techniques in Naturally Ventilated Building Speaker(s): Sezin Eren Ozcan Date: May 16, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Due to limited energy sources, countries are looking for alternative solutions to decrease energy needs. In that context, natural ventilation can be seen as a very attractive sustainable technique in building design. However, understanding of ventilation dynamics is needed to provide an efficient control. Ventilation rate has to be determined not only in terms of energy, but also for controlling indoor air quality and emissions. For these reasons, agricultural buildings (livestock houses, greenhouses, etc.), naturally ventilated industrial buildings, and residences require a reliable ventilation rate measuring technique. Measuring techniques suffer

219

Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation Speaker(s): Hwataik Han Date: July 10, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone Heat recovery ventilators are frequently used to save heating/cooling loads of buildings for ventilation. There are several types of HRV's, including a parallel plate type, a rotary type, a capillary type, and a heat pipe type. The breathing HRV is a heat recovery ventilator of a new kind using the concept of alternating-current ventilation. The AC ventilation is the ventilation with the airflow directions reversed periodically. It has an advantage of using a single duct system, for both supply and exhaust purposes. In order to develop a breathing HRV system, the thermal recovery performance should be investigated depending on many parameters, such as

220

Design of a Natural Ventilation System in the Dunhuang Museum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fresh air and good air quality can be obtained by a natural ventilation system, to fulfill the requirement of near natural conditions for the psychological health of mankind. A natural ventilation system is an ecological, energy saving system...

Zhang, Y.; Guan, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A scale model study of displacement ventilation with chilled ceilings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Displacement ventilation is a form of air-conditioning which provides good air quality and some energy savings. The air quality is better than for a conventional mixed ventilation system. The maximum amount of cooling that ...

Holden, Katherine J. A. (Katherine Joan Adrienne)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Future Climate Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this report provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the following reports: ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]), ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504]), ''Features, Events, and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170012]), and ''Features, Events, and Processes in SZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170013]). Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one available forecasting method for establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The selection of different methods is directly dependent on the available evidence used to build a forecasting argument. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. While alternative analyses are possible for the case presented for Yucca Mountain, the evidence (data) used would be the same and the conclusions would not be expected to drastically change. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Other alternative approaches could include simulation of climate over the 10,000-year period; however, this modeling extrapolation is well beyond the bounds of current scientific practice and would not provide results with better confidence. A corroborative alternative approach may be found in ''Future Climate Analysis-10,000 Years to 1,000,000 Years After Present'' (Sharpe 2003 [DIRS 161591]). The current revision of this report is prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]).

C. G. Cambell

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

223

Maintenance Guide for Greenhouse Ventilation, Evaporative Cooling Heating Systems1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

condensation in winter, reduced life and reliability of ventilation equipment, and high repair bills cooling and heating systems. VENTILATION SYSTEMS The operating efficiency of a ventilation fan can be pockets of stagnant air, inadequate cooling from evaporative cooling pads, high heating expenses, heavy

Watson, Craig A.

224

Effect of repository underground ventilation on emplacement drift temperature control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The repository advanced conceptual design (ACD) is being conducted by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Management & Operating Contractor. Underground ventilation analyses during ACD have resulted in preliminary ventilation concepts and design methodologies. This paper discusses one of the recent evaluations -- effects of ventilation on emplacement drift temperature management.

Yang, H.; Sun, Y.; McKenzie, D.G.; Bhattacharyya, K.K. [Morrison Knudson Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Experimental simulation of wind driven cross-ventilation in a naturally ventilated building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A device was designed and constructed to simulate cross-ventilation through a building due to natural wind. The wind driver device was designed for use with a one tenth scale model of an open floor plan office building in ...

Hult, Erin L. (Erin Luelle), 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Humidity Implications for Meeting Residential Ventilation Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residential ventilation standard, ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Because meeting this standard can significantly change, Kansas City, Seattle, Minneapolis and Phoenix). In order to capture moisture related HVAC system.2, design strategies for moisture control, humidity and comfort. #12;INTRODUCTION ASHRAE standards 62

227

May 1999 LBNL -42975 ASHRAE'S RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indoor air quality in dwellings and to set minimum standards that would allow for energy efficiency Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology of the U.S. Department measures to be evaluated. The standard has requirements for whole-house ventilation, local exhaust

228

Hysteresis effects in hybrid building ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cross- breeze Kitchen Stove Ambient air Case study #3 #12;· Wind plays an integral role in low-energy remains a central challenge for the successful implementation of natural ventilation Case study - summary of population, urban energy consumption grows by 2.1% · Buildings consume 40% of world's energy

Flynn, Morris R.

229

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Building Science-Based Climate Maps  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a a climate zone map for the DOE based on the IECC climate zone map. It may not be intuitively obvious why a U.S. climate zone map is so important to the construction industry. Thanks to this Building America innovation, building science education, energy code development, and residential design can much more effectively integrate climate-specific best practices and advanced technologies across the United States. Climate has a major impact on the energy use of residential buildings, and energy codes and standards rely on a clear definition of climate zones to convey requirements to builders. However, prior to 2004, there was no single, agreed- upon climate zone map for the United States for use with building codes. Four different methods for specifying climate-dependent requirements were used by

230

Climate Collections  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional/Global > Climate Collections Regional/Global > Climate Collections Climate Collections Overview Climate encompasses the statistics of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind, rainfall, atmospheric particle count, and numerous other meteorological elements in a given region over long periods of time. Climate can be contrasted to weather, which is the present condition of these same elements over periods up to two weeks. The climate collections project includes data sets containing measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and cloud cover and include station measurements as well as gridded mean values. The ORNL DAAC Climate Collections Data archive includes 10 data products from the following categories:

231

Cleaner Cooking Solutions to Achieve Health, Climate, and Economic Cobenefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cleaner Cooking Solutions to Achieve Health, Climate, and Economic Cobenefits ... Nearly half the worlds population must rely on solid fuels such as biomass (wood, charcoal, agricultural residues, and animal dung) and coal for household energy, burning them in inefficient open fires and stoves with inadequate ventilation. ... The political economy of energy poverty: A review of key challenges Energy Sustainable Dev. ...

Susan C. Anenberg; Kalpana Balakrishnan; James Jetter; Omar Masera; Sumi Mehta; Jacob Moss; Veerabhadran Ramanathan

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

232

Performance Assessment of Photovoltaic Attic Ventilator Fans  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A case study of photovoltaic attic ventilator fans was conducted on an occupied single family home in Central Florida. Two fans were installed at mid-summer in an instrumented home where attic air temperature, meteorological conditions and space cooling electric power were measured. The home already had an attic radiant barrier, but still experienced attic air temperatures in excess of 130oF.

233

Building America Climate-Specific Guidance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

America » Building America America » Building America Climate-Specific Guidance Building America Climate-Specific Guidance Building America Climate-Specific Guidance Building America's Best Practices guides and case studies demonstrate real world solutions for improving the energy performance and quality of new and existing homes in five major climate regions. Find examples of proven high-performance home building and remodeling in your area by selecting a climate zone below. In addition, you may view technology-specific building solutions that work across all climates. Cold and Very Cold Climates Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates Hot-Humid Climates Marine Climates Mixed-Humid Climates All Climates For additional, updated information on hundreds of building science topics that can help you build or retrofit to the most recent high-performance

234

Aquatic Sciences OVERVIEW Ecology of freshwater shore zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Freshwater shore zones are among the most ecologically valuable parts of the planet, but have been heavily damaged by human activities. Because the management and rehabilitation of freshwater shore zones could be improved by better use of ecological knowledge, we summarize here what is known about their ecological functioning. Shore zones are complexes of habitats that support high biodiversity, which is enhanced by high physical complexity and connectivity. Shore zones dissipate large amounts of physical energy, can receive and process extraordinarily high inputs of autochthonous and allochthonous organic matter, and are sites of intensive nutrient cycling. Interactions between organic matter inputs (including wood), physical energy, and the biota are especially important. In general, the ecological character of shore zone ecosystems is set by inputs of physical energy, geologic (or anthropogenic) structure, the hydrologic regime, nutrient inputs, the biota, and climate. Humans have affected freshwater shore zones by laterally compressing and stabilizing the shore zone, changing hydrologic regimes, shortening and simplifying shorelines, hardening shorelines, tidying shore zones, increasing inputs of physical energy that impinge on shore zones, pollution, recreational activities, resource extraction, introducing alien species, changing climate, and intensive development in the shore zone. Systems to guide management and restoration by quantifying ecological services provided by shore zones and balancing multiple (and sometimes conflicting) values are relatively recent and imperfect. We

D. L. Strayer; S. E. G. Findlay

235

Cooling airflow design tool for displacement ventilation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OverheadAirDistribution(Mixed) Design Temperature Tto Design Temperature, the Overhead Air DistributionT d DesignControl Strategy ZoneAir Distribution

Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Typer Lab Houses  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Effectiveness Research Ventilation Effectiveness Research at UT-Tyler Lab Houses Source Of Outside Air, Distribution, Filtration Armin Rudd Twin (almost) Lab Houses at UT-Tyler House 2: Unvented attic, House 1: Vented attic lower loads + PV Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 2 * 1475 ft 2 , 3-bedroom houses * House 2 was mirrored plan * 45 cfm 62.2 ventilation rate * Garage connected to house on only one wall * Access to attic via pull-down stairs in garage * Further access to House 2 unvented attic through gasket sealed door Ventilation Effectiveness Research 30 April 2013 3 Testing Approach  Building enclosure and building mechanical systems characterization by measurement of building enclosure air leakage, central air distribution system airflows, and ventilation system airflows.

237

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

238

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Title Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5889E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., and Max H. Sherman Journal Building and Environment Volume 59 Start Page 456 Pagination 456-465 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, filtration, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, ozone, simulation Abstract Elevated outdoor ozone levels are associated with adverse health effects. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone of outdoor origin would lower population exposures and might also lead to a reduction in ozone---associated adverse health effects. In most buildings, indoor ozone levels are diminished with respect to outdoor levels to an extent that depends on surface reactions and on the degree to which ozone penetrates the building envelope. Ozone enters buildings from outdoors together with the airflows that are driven by natural and mechanical means, including deliberate ventilation used to reduce concentrations of indoor---generated pollutants. When assessing the effect of deliberate ventilation on occupant health one should consider not only the positive effects on removing pollutants of indoor origin but also the possibility that enhanced ventilation might increase indoor levels of pollutants originating outdoors. This study considers how changes in residential ventilation that are designed to comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.2 might influence indoor levels of ozone. Simulation results show that the building envelope can contribute significantly to filtration of ozone. Consequently, the use of exhaust ventilation systems is predicted to produce lower indoor ozone concentrations than would occur with balanced ventilation systems operating at the same air---exchange rate. We also investigated a strategy for reducing exposure to ozone that would deliberately reduce ventilation rates during times of high outdoor ozone concentration while still meeting daily average ventilation requirements.

239

Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A process vessel ventilation system is being installed in a facility that houses two tanks that will process decontaminated salt solution at the Saltstone Production Facility. A...

240

Building America Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

requirements must be met? * What is the scope of the renovation project? * What heating, air conditioning, and ventilation systems are currently in the home? * What type of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

to provide needed ventilation under drier summer and winter conditions and reduce the air introduced during periods of peak space conditioning. For more information, see the...

242

Radionuclide Releases During Normal Operations for Ventilated Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculation estimates the design emissions of radionuclides from Ventilated Tanks used by various facilities. The calculation includes emissions due to processing and storage of radionuclide material.

Blunt, B.

2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

243

Summer Infiltration/Ventilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory Building America Technical Review Meeting April 29-30, 2013 A Research Institute of the University of Central...

244

Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America webinar, held on Sept. 24, 2014, focused on key challenges in multifamily ventilation and strategies to address these challenges.

245

Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hot-humid PERFORMANCE DATA Costs for reducing infiltration and incorporating mechanical ventilation in buildings will vary greatly depending on the condition and...

246

Phase-change wallboard and mechanical night ventilation in commercial buildings: Potential for HVAC system downsizing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As thermal storage media, phase-change materials (PCMs) such as paraffin, eutectic salts, etc. offer an order-of-magnitude increase in thermal storage capacity, and their discharge is almost isothermal. By embedding PCMs in dypsum board, plaster, or other wall-covering materials, the building structure acquires latent storage properties. Structural elements containing PCMs can store large amounts of energy while maintaining the indoor temperature within a relatively narrow range. As heat storage takes place inside the building where the loads occur, rather than at a central exterior location, the internal loads are removed without the need for additional transport energy. Distributed latent storage can thus be used to reduce the peak power demand of a building, downsize the cooling system, and/or switch to low-energy cooling sources. The authors used RADCOOL, a thermal building simulation program based on the finite difference approach, to numerically evaluate the thermal performance of PCM wallboard coupled with mechanical night ventilation in office buildings offers the opportunity for system downsizing in climates where the outside air temperature drops below 18 C at night. In climates where the outside air temperature remains above 19 C at night, the use of PCM wallboard should be coupled with discharge mechanisms other than mechanical night ventilation with outside air.

Stetiu, C.; Feustel, H.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Material: Four turbine- based ventilators and nine conventional servo-valve compressed-gas ventilators were1 A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators Arnaud W. Thille,1 MD; Aissam Lyazidi,1 Biomed Eng MS; Jean-Christophe M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

248

LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 1 Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Jennifer M. Logue, William J. N for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared

249

Results of the Evaluation Study DeAL Decentralized Facade Integrated Ventilation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most office buildings in Germany have either no mechanical ventilation system or a centralized ventilation system with fresh and exhaust air supply. Within the last 10 years some projects using decentralized ventilation systems (DVS) came up. Common...

Mahler, B.; Himmler, R.

250

Industrial Ventilation Statistics Confirm Energy Savings Opportunity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is based on installed on-demand ventilation systems, where sensors and PLC are installed with each system, so data is easily collected. Another critical factor for effective dust collecting is proper air velocities in duct system. Having measured air... of the cutting tool is active or not. Information from the sensor is transmitted to the Omron PLC. The Omron PLC saves data in binary form every 5 minutes (24/7) to the CompactFlash card (a similar card is used in digital cameras) along with the time...

Litomisky, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Numerical Simulation of a Displacement Ventilation System with Multi-heat Sources and Analysis of Influential Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Displacement ventilation (DV) is a promising ventilation concept due to its high ventilation efficiency. In this paper, the application of the CFD method, the velocity and temperature fields of three-dimensional displacement ventilation systems...

Wu, X.; Gao, J.; Wu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 7.2: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes the climate zone designations used by the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program, and is intended to help builders to identify the appropriate climate designation for the counties in which they are building.

253

What measures climate? A variety of variables including their variability and extreme values determine climate for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate zones? The sun is the ultimate power source for the climate "machine". The uneven distribution conditions. Typical variables to consider are temperature (maximum, miniumum), precipitation (includes rain, sleet, snow, hail, etc), sunlight/cloudiness, wind, humidity, ice cover, sea temperature, etc... Many

Allan, Richard P.

254

Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control with ventilation, given current ventilation and filtration system practices, are the indoor-sourced gaseous pollutants with low octanal-air

Mendell, Mark J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Natural Ventilation Design for Houses in Thailand Chalermwat Tantasavasdia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores the potential of using natural ventilation as a passive cooling system for new house windows in suburban houses can be opened. Passive cooling design elements are mostly ignored in modern1 Natural Ventilation Design for Houses in Thailand Chalermwat Tantasavasdia , Jelena Srebricb

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

256

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:49pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options for HVAC Renovations Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHP) Solar Water Heating (SWH) Biomass Passive Solar Heating Biomass Heating Solar Ventilation Air Preheating Federal building renovations that encompass the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in a facility provide a range of renewable energy opportunities. The primary technology option for HVAC renovations is geothermal heat pumps (GHP). Other options include leveraging a solar water heating (SWH) system to offset heating load or using passive solar heating or a biomass-capable furnace or boiler. Some facilities may also take

257

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Opaque Ventilated Facades - Performance Simulation Method and Assessment of Simulated Performance Speaker(s): Emanuele Naboni Date: May 29, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Opaque ventilated façade systems are increasingly used in buildings, even though their effects on the overall thermal performance of buildings have not yet been fully understood. The research reported in this presentation focuses on the modeling of such systems with EnergyPlus. Ventilated façade systems are modeled in EnergyPlus with module "Exterior Naturally Vented Cavity." Not all façade systems can be modeled with this module; this research defined the types of systems that can be modeled, and the limitations of such simulation. The performance of a ventilated façade

258

Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and degradation of filter media additives Title Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and degradation of filter media additives Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Wenhao Chen, Michael G. Apte, Nuan Li, Michael Spears, Jérémie Almosni, Gregory Brunner, Jianshun(Jensen) Zhang, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 45 Start Page 3561 Issue 21 Pagination 3561-3568 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group

259

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants Ventilation and Energy Saving in Auto Manufacturing Plants Speaker(s): Alexander M. Zhivov Date: April 3, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Dr. Alexander Zhivov is currently the chairman of the International Task Force "Autovent International" focusing on environmental problems within the Automotive Industry. This Task Force was formed in 1997 to develop the "Ventilation Guide for Automotive Industry". The guide was to be seen as a building block within the EU sponsored "Industrial Ventilation Design Guide Book" project, covering both theory and applications. In his presentation, Dr. Zhivov will talk about his work with the automotive industry, describe major highlights from the "Ventilation Guide for Automotive Industry" and talk about building, process and HVAC

260

Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

Aldrich, R.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Other Fresnel Zone Antennas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the preceding chapters, theoretical investigations and experiments on a number of Fresnel zone antennas are presented. This chapter is intended to introduce a wider range of Fresnel zone antennas. Section 7...

Y. Jay Guo; Stephen K. Barton

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Enterprise Zone Program (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Enterprise Zone Program provides eligible businesses that relocate or expand to a designated zone with tax incentives such as: 1) an investment tax credit; 2) a job tax credit for each job...

263

Alternative Energy Zone (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ohio's Alternative Energy Zones are made possible through Ohio's Senate Bill 232, which reduced taxes on alternative energy projects. The Alternative Energy Zones are designated on a county-by...

264

Zoning and Permitting Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Zoning and permitting is commonly controlled by local governments and may be applicable to both residential and commercial properties.

265

Guides and Case Studies for All Climates | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guides and Case Studies for All Climates Guides and Case Studies for All Climates Guides and Case Studies for All Climates The Map of the United States shows climate zones in different colors. The Marine zone contains the Pacific coast from the Canadi The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program has developed a series of best practices guides and technology-specific case studies that may be applicable to all climate zones. Technology Case Studies Guides for All Climates Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes These case studies from Building America research teams and national laboratories describe energy-saving solutions for both new and existing homes, classified into two basic categories: Building Envelope (insulation, air sealing, windows, foundations) Building Equipment (HVAC, water heating, lighting, appliances,

266

Climate Indices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indices Indices Climate Indices Climate indices are diagnostic tools used to describe the state of the climate system and monitor climate. They are most often represented with a time series, where each point in time corresponds to one index value. An index can be constructed to describe almost any atmospheric event; as such, they are myriad. Therefore, CDIAC provides these links to other web sites to help guide users to the most widely used climate indices, which in many cases are updated monthly. Data Set Website/Name NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, Monitoring and Data Index Page NOAA's Earth Systems Research Laboratory, Monthly Atmospheric and Ocean Time Series Page (plot, analyze, and compare time series) The Monthly Teleconnection Indices Page from NOAA's National

267

FEMP-FS--Solar Ventilation Preheating  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Installing a "solar wall" to heat air before it enters a Installing a "solar wall" to heat air before it enters a building, called solar ventilation preheating, is one of the most efficient ways of reducing energy costs using clean and renewable energy. The system works by heating outside air with a south-facing solar collector-a dark-colored wall made of sheet metal and perforated with tiny holes. Outdoor air is drawn through the holes and heated as it absorbs the wall's warmth. The warm air rises in the space between the solar wall and the building wall and is moved into the air-duct system, usually by means of a fan, to heat the building. Any additional heating needed at night or on cloudy days is supplied by the build- ing's conventional heating system. During summer months, intake air bypasses the solar collector,

268

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE Presented By: WALTER E. JOHNSTON, PE CEM, CEA, CLEP, CDSM, CPE Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system is to provide and maintain a comfortable environment within a building for the occupants or for the process being conducted Many HVAC systems were not designed with energy efficiency as one of the design factors 3 Air Air is the major conductor of heat. Lack of heat = air conditioning OR 4 Btu - Amount of heat required to raise one pound of water 1 F = 0.252 KgCal 1 Pound of Water = About 1 Pint of Water ~ 1 Large Glass 1 Kitchen Match Basics of Air Conditioning = 1 Btu 5 = 6 Low Cost Cooling Unit 7 8 Typical Design Conditions 75 degrees F temperature 50% relative humidity 30 - 50 FPM air movement

269

Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Il Rapporto

Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The Trade-off between Solar Reflectance and Above-Sheathing Ventilation for Metal Roofs on Residential and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alternative to white and cool-color roofs that meets prescriptive requirements for steep-slope (residential and non-residential) and low-slope (non-residential) roofing has been documented. Roofs fitted with an inclined air space above the sheathing (herein termed above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV), performed as well as if not better than high-reflectance, high-emittance roofs fastened directly to the deck. Field measurements demonstrated the benefit of roofs designed with ASV. A computer tool was benchmarked against the field data. Testing and benchmarks were conducted at roofs inclined at 18.34 ; the roof span from soffit to ridge was 18.7 ft (5.7 m). The tool was then exercised to compute the solar reflectance needed by a roof equipped with ASV to exhibit the same annual cooling load as that for a direct-to-deck cool-color roof. A painted metal roof with an air space height of 0.75 in. (0.019 m) and spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) up the roof incline of 18.34 needed only a 0.10 solar reflectance to exhibit the same annual cooling load as a direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof (solar reflectance of 0.25). This held for all eight ASHRAE climate zones complying with ASHRAE 90.1 (2007a). A dark heat-absorbing roof fitted with 1.5 in. (0.038 m) air space spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) and inclined at 18.34 was shown to have a seasonal cooling load equivalent to that of a conventional direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof. Computations for retrofit application based on ASHRAE 90.1 (1980) showed that ASV air spaces of either 0.75 or 1.5 in. (0.019 and 0.038 m) would permit black roofs to have annual cooling loads equivalent to the direct-to-deck cool roof. Results are encouraging, and a parametric study of roof slope and ASV aspect ratio is needed for developing guidelines applicable to all steep- and low-slope roof applications.

Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL] [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography Title Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6142E Year of Publication 2013 Authors J. Chris Stratton, and Craig P. Wray Keywords ASHRAE 62.2, commissioning, procedures, residential, standards, ventilation Abstract Beginning with the 2008 version of Title 24, new homes in California must comply with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007 requirements for residential ventilation. Where installed, the limited data available indicate that mechanical ventilation systems do not always perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and acceptable IAQ. Work funded by the California Energy Commission about a decade ago at Berkeley Lab documented procedures for residential commissioning, but did not focus on ventilation systems. Since then, standards and approaches for commissioning ventilation systems have been an active area of work in Europe. This report describes our efforts to collect new literature on commissioning procedures and to identify information that can be used to support the future development of residential-ventilation-specific procedures and standards. We recommend that a standardized commissioning process and a commissioning guide for practitioners be developed, along with a combined energy and IAQ benefit assessment standard and tool, and a diagnostic guide for estimating continuous pollutant emission rates of concern in residences (including a database that lists emission test data for commercially-available labeled products).

272

Feasibility of Retrofitting Centralized HVAC Systems for Room-Level Zoning Tamim Sookoor, Brian Holben, Kamin Whitehouse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feasibility of Retrofitting Centralized HVAC Systems for Room-Level Zoning Tamim Sookoor, Brian {sookoor,bnh4k,whitehouse}@cs.virginia.edu Abstract--Heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) accounts's largest energy consumers. Many attempts have been made to optimize the control of HVAC systems

Whitehouse, Kamin

273

The Impact of Above-Sheathing Ventilation on the Thermal and Moisture Performance of Steep-Slope Residential Roofs and Attics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

France of the Building Technologies Program. The IrBCP project team members are Andre? Desjarlais, William Miller, Tom Petrie, Jan Kosny and Achilles Karagiozis, all of ORNLs Buildings Envelope Program. The Metal Construction Association and its affiliate members.... Beal, D., and S. Chandra. 1995. The Measured Summer Performance of Tile Roof Systems and Attic Ventilation Strategies in Hot Humid Climates. In Proceedings of the Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelopes of Buildings VI. U.S. DOE/ORNL...

Miller, W.; Karagiozis, A.; Wilson, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy Crossroads: Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Suggest a Listing Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre (AIVC) The AIVC fulfills its objectives by providing a range of services and facilities which include: Information, Technical Analysis, Technical Interchange, and Coordination. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) The ACGIH offers high quality technical publications and learning opportunities. Americlean Services Corp. (ASC) ASC is a certified SBA 8(a) engineering/consulting firm specializing in HVAC contamination detection, abatement, and monitoring. In addition to highly professional ductwork cleaning and HVAC cleaning services, ASC offers a wide range of other engineering/ consulting/ management services

275

Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (Not Optional)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kitchen Ventilation Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (not Optional) Brett C. Singer Residential Building Systems & Indoor Environment Groups Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Denver, CO April 30, 2013 Acknowledgements PROGRAM SUPPORT *U.S. Department of Energy - Building America Program *U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Indoor Environments Division *U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - Office of Healthy Homes & Lead Hazard Control *California Energy Commission - Public Interest Energy Research Program TECHNICAL CONTRIBUTIONS *Woody Delp, Tosh Hotchi, Melissa Lunden, Nasim Mullen, Chris Stratton, Doug Sullivan, Iain Walker Kitchen Ventilation Simplified PROBLEM: * Cooking burners & cooking produce odors, moisture

276

Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollutant Control Index: A New Method of Characterizing Ventilation in Commercial Buildings." Proceedings of Indoor Air'

Lunden, Melissa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transcript of Building America webinar, "Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements," held on Sept. 24, 2014.

278

Experimental and numerical VOC concentration field analysis from flooring material in a ventilated room  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in "7th International Conference, Healthy Buildings 2003, Singapore : Singapore (2003)" #12;Ventilation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

279

Analyzing Ventilation Effects of Different Apartment Styles by CFD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Renewable Renewable Energy Resources and a Greener Future Vol.VIII-3-5 Analyzing Ventilation Effects of Different Apartment Styles by CFD Xiaodong Li Lina Wang Zhixing Ye Associate Professor School...

Li, X.; Wang, L.; Ye, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity and IAQ Vol.I-7-2 Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ1 Xiaotong Wang Junjun Chen Yike Li Zhiwei Wang Associate Professor...

Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Comparison of Two Ventilation Systems in a Chinese Commercial Kitchen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical simulation of an indoor thermal environment in a Chinese commercial kitchen has been carried out using indoor zero-equation turbulence model. Two different ventilation systems in a Chinese commercial kitchen have been simulated...

Wan, X.; Yu, L.; Hou, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Natural ventilation in buildings : modeling, control and optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural ventilation in buildings has the potential to reduce the energy consumption usually associated with mechanical cooling while maintaining thermal comfort and air quality. It is important to know how building parameters, ...

Ip Kiun Chong, Karine

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

SURFACE CIRCULATION AND VENTILATION Lynne D. Talley(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of autonomous subsurface profiling to include oxygen and turbulence profiling, and implementation of local of subsurface circulation in the wind-driven gyres (section 2), and (2) ventilation/upwelling processes

Talley, Lynne D.

284

Renaissance Zones (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Renaissance Zones allow qualifying businesses and individuals to claim one or more tax incentives for purchasing, leasing, or making improvements to real property located in a North Dakota...

285

Study on Influencing Factors of Night Ventilation in Office Rooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology Harbin P.R.China, 150090 wzjw02@yahoo.com.cn Abstract: A mathematical and physical model on night ventilation is set up. The fields of indoor air temperature, air velocity and thermal comfort... & Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology Harbin P.R.China, 150090 wzjw02@yahoo.com.cn Abstract: A mathematical and physical model on night ventilation is set up. The fields of indoor air temperature, air velocity and thermal comfort...

Wang, Z.; Sun, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

Pan, Feifei

287

Microsoft Word - Key-note-Cold climate_HVAC2009-neuer.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

software tools for moisture Protection of buildings in software tools for moisture Protection of buildings in different climate zones Special Example: Control of air humidifier in a cold climate for high comfort and no risk of mould growth in building room Krus Martin 1* , Thierry Nouidui 1 and Sedlbauer Klaus 1 1 Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Germany * Corresponding email: Martin.Krus@ibp.fraunhofer.de SUMMARY The application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in different climatic zones is demonstrated in this paper. The basics of the programs are presented together with a typical application for a problem specific for the chosen climatic zone. A 1-D calculation has been performed for tropical climate zone with the improvement of a flat roof in Bangkok as an example. For half timbered buildings, which are common in the temperate zone with the

288

China-Low Carbon Development Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-Low Carbon Development Zones China-Low Carbon Development Zones Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Low Carbon Development Zones Agency/Company /Organization Third Generation Environmentalism (E3G) Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Finance, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.chathamhouse.org.uk Country China UN Region Eastern Asia References Low Carbon Development Zones in China[1] Overview "Building on the successful work of the Interdependencies on Energy and Climate Security for China and Europe project, this 18 month project with E3G, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) and the Chinese Energy Research Institute (ERI), will focus on four key areas - low carbon zones;

289

Urban Enterprise Zone Program (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Urban Enterprise Zone Program (New Jersey) Urban Enterprise Zone Program (New Jersey) Urban Enterprise Zone Program (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Enterprise Zone New Jersey's Urban Enterprise (UEZ) Program operates under the Department of Community Affairs. The UEZ Program exists to foster an economic climate that revitalizes designated urban communities and stimulates their growth by encouraging businesses to develop and create private sector jobs through public and private investment. Applicant businesses must be registered, located in one of the designated zones, be in tax compliance with the state, and certified by the Program.

290

Evaluation of Humidity Control Options in Hot-Humid Climate Homes (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical highlight describes NREL research to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types in the hot-humid climate zone, and examine the impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls. As the Building America program researches construction of homes that achieve greater source energy savings over typical mid-1990s construction, proper modeling of whole-house latent loads and operation of humidity control equipment has become a high priority. Long-term high relative humidity can cause health and durability problems in homes, particularly in a hot-humid climate. In this study, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used the latest EnergyPlus tool equipped with the moisture capacitance model to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types: a Building America high-performance home; a mid-1990s reference home; and a 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)-compliant home in hot-humid climate zones. They examined the impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls on the high-performance home where the dehumidification equipment energy use can become a much larger portion of whole-house energy consumption. The research included a number of simulated cases: thermostat reset, A/C with energy recovery ventilator, heat exchanger assisted A/C, A/C with condenser reheat, A/C with desiccant wheel dehumidifier, A/C with DX dehumidifier, A/C with energy recovery ventilator, and DX dehumidifier. Space relative humidity, thermal comfort, and whole-house source energy consumption were compared for indoor relative humidity set points of 50%, 55%, and 60%. The study revealed why similar trends of high humidity were observed in all three homes regardless of energy efficiency, and why humidity problems are not necessarily unique in the high-performance home. Thermal comfort analysis indicated that occupants are unlikely to notice indoor humidity problems. The study confirmed that supplemental dehumidification is needed to maintain space relative humidity (RH) below 60% in a hot-humid climate home. Researchers also concluded that while all the active dehumidification options included in the study successfully controlled space relative humidity excursions, the increase in whole-house energy consumption was much more sensitive to the humidity set point than the chosen technology option. In the high-performance home, supplemental dehumidification equipment results in a significant source energy consumption penalty at 50% RH set point (12.6%-22.4%) compared to the consumption at 60% RH set point (1.5%-2.7%). At 50% and 55% RH set points, A/C with desiccant wheel dehumidifier and A/C with ERV and high-efficiency DX dehumidifier stand out as the two cases resulting in the smallest increase of source energy consumption. At an RH set point of 60%, all explicit dehumidification technologies result in similar insignificant increases in source energy consumption and thus are equally competitive.

Not Available

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Outside Air Ventilation Controller - Building America Top Innovation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

demand up to 50% in California's central valley climates and can eliminate the need for air conditioning altogether in the coastal climate. Variations of these systems are being...

292

Exploring the consequences of climate change for indoor air quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate change will affect the concentrations of air pollutants in buildings. The resulting shifts in human exposure may influence public health. Changes can be anticipated because of altered outdoor pollution and also owing to changes in buildings effected in response to changing climate. Three classes of factors govern indoor pollutant levels in occupied spaces: (a)properties of pollutants; (b) building factors, such as the ventilation rate; and (c) occupant behavior. Diversity of indoor conditions influences the public health significance of climate change. Potentially vulnerable subpopulations include not only the young and the infirm but also those who lack resources to respond effectively to changing conditions. Indoor air pollutant levels reflect the sum of contributions from indoor sources and from outdoor pollutants that enter with ventilation air. Pollutant classes with important indoor sources include the byproducts of combustion, radon, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. Outdoor pollutants of special concern include particulate matter and ozone. To ensure good indoor air quality it is important first to avoid high indoor emission rates for all pollutants and second to ensure adequate ventilation. A third factor is the use of air filtration or air cleaning to achieve further improvements where warranted.

William W Nazaroff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because airtightening is a significant part of Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs), concerns about ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) have emerged. To investigate this, ventilation and IAQ were assessed in 17 non-smoking California Deep Energy Retrofit homes. Inspections and surveys were used to assess household activities and ventilation systems. Pollutant sampling performed in 12 homes included six-day passive samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde and air exchange rate (AER); time-resolved data loggers were used to measure particle counts. Half of the homes provided continuous mechanical ventilation. Despite these homes being twice as airtight (3.0 and 7.6 ACH50, respectively), their median AER was indistinguishable from naturally vented homes (0.36 versus 0.37 hr--1). Numerous problems were found with ventilation systems; however, pollutant levels did not reach levels of concern in most homes. Ambient NO2 standards were exceeded in some gas cooking homes that used legacy ranges with standing pilots, and in Passive House-style homes without range hoods exhausted to outside. Cooking exhaust systems were installed and used inconsistently. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials, and formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional new CA homes (19.7 versus 36 ?g/m3), with emissions rates nearly 40percent less (12.3 versus 20.6 ?g/m2/hr.). Presence of air filtration systems led to lower indoor particle number concentrations (PN>0.5: 8.80E+06 PN/m3 versus 2.99E+06; PN>2.5: 5.46E+0.5 PN/m3 versus 2.59E+05). The results indicate that DERs can provide adequate ventilation and IAQ, and that DERs should prioritize source control, particle filtration and well-designed local exhaust systems, while still providing adequate continuous ventilation.

Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Title Ventilation, temperature, and HVAC characteristics in small and medium commercial buildings in California Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed Year of Publication 2012 Authors Bennett, Deborah H., William J. Fisk, Michael G. Apte, X. Wu, Amber L. Trout, David Faulkner, and Douglas P. Sullivan Journal Indoor Air Volume 22 Issue 4 Pagination 309-20 Abstract This field study of 37 small and medium commercial buildings throughout California obtained information on ventilation rate, temperature, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system characteristics. The study included seven retail establishments; five restaurants; eight offices; two each of gas stations, hair salons, healthcare facilities, grocery stores, dental offices, and fitness centers; and five other buildings. Fourteen (38%) of the buildings either could not or did not provide outdoor air through the HVAC system. The air exchange rate averaged 1.6 (s.d. = 1.7) exchanges per hour and was similar between buildings with and without outdoor air supplied through the HVAC system, indicating that some buildings have significant leakage or ventilation through open windows and doors. Not all buildings had sufficient air exchange to meet ASHRAE 62.1 Standards, including buildings used for fitness centers, hair salons, offices, and retail establishments. The majority of the time, buildings were within the ASHRAE temperature comfort range. Offices were frequently overcooled in the summer. All of the buildings had filters, but over half the buildings had a filter with a minimum efficiency reporting value rating of 4 or lower, which are not very effective for removing fine particles. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Most U.S. commercial buildings (96%) are small- to medium-sized, using nearly 18% of the country's energy, and sheltering a large population daily. Little is known about the ventilation systems in these buildings. This study found a wide variety of ventilation conditions, with many buildings failing to meet relevant ventilation standards. Regulators may want to consider implementing more complete building inspections at commissioning and point of sale.

295

Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD, RAP March 6, 2013 Presented by: John Morse DEEP VADOSE ZONE ACTIVITIES Page 2 Deep Vadose Zone Areas Page 3 Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities FY 2014...

296

Review: Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

introduction to global climate change, the greenhouseReview: Global Climate Change: A Primer By Orrin H PilkeyPilkey, Keith C. Global Climate Change: a primer. Durham,

Smith, Jennifer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Microsoft Word - Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation_Final2.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 1 Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Jennifer M. Logue, William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2012 LBNL-5796E LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor

298

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values Title Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5969E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., Jennifer M. Logue, and Craig P. Wray Date Published 07/2012 Keywords commissioning, energy, health, indoor air quality, residential, valuation, ventilation Abstract Due to changes in building codes, whole-house mechanical ventilation systems are being installed in new California homes. Few measurements are available, but the limited data suggest that these systems don't always perform as code and forecasts predict. Such deficiencies occur because systems are usually field assembled without design specifications, and there is no consistent process to identify and correct problems. The value of such activities in terms of reducing energy use and improving indoor air quality (IAQ) is poorly understood. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and IAQ.

299

Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 7.1: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report for DOE's Building America program helps builders identify which Building America climate region they are building in. The guide includes maps comparing the Building America regions with climate designations used in the International Energy Conservation Code for Residential Buildings and lists all U.S. counties by climate zone. A very brief history of the development of the Building America climate map and descriptions of each climate zone are provided. This report is available on the Building America website www.buildingamerica.gov.

Baechler, Michael C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Cole, Pamala C.; Hefty, Marye G.; Love, Pat M.

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development Opportunity Zone Credit  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Development Opportunity Zone Credits incent new and expanding businesses in the Cities of Beloit, Janesville and Kenosha by providing non-refundable tax credits to assist with the creation and...

302

Deep Vadose Zone  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Mission of the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative is to protect water resources across the DOE complex over the long-term by developing effective solutions to solve DOEs most...

303

Analysis and feasibility study of residential integrated heat and energy recovery ventilator with built-in economizer using an excel spreadsheet program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Currently, heat recovery ventilator (HRV) and energy recovery ventilator (ERV) are commonly studied. Nevertheless, there is limited information regarding the dual-core approach energy recovery. This paper investigates the feasibility of an integrated HRV and ERV system, namely HERV, with a built-in economizer used in the residential sector to reduce dependency on furnace and air conditioning systems. In order to achieve this goal, an excel-based analysis tool was developed, providing a quick estimate of system performance and comparison with the HRV and ERV that are currently being used in research houses. The potential of integrated heat and energy recovery ventilator was evaluated based on its calculated operating cost ratio (OCR) and its payback period. Results collected for Vancouver and Toronto, corresponding to temperate and continental climate, indicated that the \\{OCRs\\} of the HERV were four times smaller than the ERV's, meaning that the proposed system was cost-efficient. It was also evidenced that the high demand on the economizer resulted in higher energy saving and shorter payback period of the system. In conclusion, the integrated HERV system with a built-in economizer could be a feasible option for both temperate and continental climates.

Junlong Zhang; Alan S. Fung; Sumeet Jhingan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Queen Anne's County- Solar Zoning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Queen Anne's County zoning code allows for ground mounted solar arrays in areas zoned as "open space," "agricultural," and "countryside" districts.

305

Low Energy Buildings: CFD Techniques for Natural Ventilation and Thermal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Energy Buildings: CFD Techniques for Natural Ventilation and Thermal Low Energy Buildings: CFD Techniques for Natural Ventilation and Thermal Comfort Prediction Speaker(s): Malcolm Cook Date: February 14, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Wetter Malcolm's presentation will cover both his research and consultancy activities. This will cover the work he has undertaken during his time spent working with architects on low energy building design, with a particular focus on natural ventilation and passive cooling strategies, and the role computer simulation can play in this design process. Malcolm will talk about the simulation techniques employed, as well as the innovative passive design principles that have led to some of the UK's most energy efficient buildings. In addition to UK building projects, the talk will

306

Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals Building Air Quality & Ventilation Models: Review - Evaluation - Proposals Speaker(s): James Axley Date: March 12, 1999 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Developments in mathematical models for building air quality and ventilation analysis have changed the way we idealize buildings for purposes of analysis, the way we form system equations to effect the analysis, and the way we solve these equations to realize the analysis. While much has been achieved more is possible. This presentation will review the current state of the art - the building idealizations used, the system equations formed, and the solution methods applied - critically evaluate the completeness, complexity and utility of the most advanced models, and present proposals for future development

307

Capture and Use of Coal Mine Ventilation-Air Methane  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capture and use of Coal Mine Capture and use of Coal Mine Ventilation - air Methane Background Methane emissions from coal mines represent about 10 percent of the U.S. anthropogenic methane released to the atmosphere. Methane-the second most important non-water greenhouse gas-is 21 times as powerful as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in its global warming potential. Ventilation-air methane (VAM)-the exhaust air from underground coal mines-is the largest source of coal mine methane, accounting for about half of the methane emitted from coal mines in the United States. Unfortunately, because of the low methane concentration (0.3-1.5 percent) in ventilation air, its beneficial use is difficult. However, oxidizing the methane to CO 2 and water reduces its global warming potential by 87 percent. A thermal

308

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda smart home October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Honda Motor Company Inc is proceeding with plans to build a Smart Home in Davis, California, to demonstrate the latest in renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The home is expected to produce more energy than is consumed, demonstrating how the goal of "zero net energy" can be met in the near term future. A ventilation controller developed by researchers at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) will be included in the smart home. EETD is currently working with the developers of the home control system to integrate its control algorithms.

309

Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative humidity conditions Title Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative humidity conditions Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Wenhao Chen, Agatha Chang, Robert Miller, Sebastian Cohn, Douglas P. Sullivan, William J. Fisk, Kazukiyo Kumagai, and Hugo Destaillats Journal Environmental Science and Technology Date Published 04/18/2013 Abstract A method combining life cycle assessment (LCA) and real options analyses is developed to predict project environmental and financial performance over time, under market uncertainties and decision-making flexibility. The method is applied to examine alternative uses for oil sands coke, a carbonaceous byproduct of processing the unconventional petroleum found in northern Alberta, Canada. Under uncertainties in natural gas price and the imposition of a carbon price, our method identifies that selling the coke to China for electricity generation by integrated gasification combined cycle is

310

Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condenser cooling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This represents the preoperational test report for the Primary Ventilation Condenser Cooling System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system uses a closed chilled water piping loop to provide offgas effluent cooling for tanks AY101, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102; the offgas is cooled from a nominal 100 F to 40 F. Resulting condensation removes tritiated vapor from the exhaust stack stream. The piping system includes a package outdoor air-cooled water chiller with parallel redundant circulating pumps; the condenser coil is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

Section 38 - HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term HVAC is an acronym for Heating, Ventilation (and) Air Conditioning, the industry term for any of various efforts to control conditions in a building or other enclosed area to improve comfort and efficiency. A closely related section is Refrigeration, which follows this one. Some contemporary HVAC techniques have ancient roots. Early forms of central heating and solar home heating were in use in Rome in the first century A.D. The earliest use of glass in windows (as opposed to a covering of wood, cloth, or hide, or simply an opening) is also attributed to the Romans at this same time. The first known use of solar-oriented building design in North America dates back to about the year 1050; i.e., the cliff dwellings built by the Anasazi (Ancient Pueblo) people of the Colorado Plateau area. Geothermal district heating was employed as early as the 1300s, in the Auvergne region of southern France. The foundation for modern central heating was established in the 1700s, first in England and then in France. The 1800s saw significant advances in the use of water heaters, especially the first automatic storage water heater (Edwin Ruud, 1889) and the first commercial solar water heater (Clarence Kemp, 1891). In comparison with heating, cooling technology was late in developing. The first successful method of producing ice occurred in 1851, and it was not until 1902 that Willis Haviland Carrier designed the first industrial air-conditioning system. His Carrier Air Conditioning Corporation would go on to develop air-conditioning systems for stores and theaters (1924) and for residential buildings (1928). Carrier remains the global leader in air conditioner production. The first air-conditioned automobile was produced by Packard in 1939. Recent entries in this section emphasize the use of alternative energy sources in heating and cooling, such as solar, photovoltaic, geothermal, and fuel cells. These advances include the ground-source heat pump, the Trombe wall, the heat pipe, and the PV/thermal hybrid system.

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standard: Exegesis of Proposed Standard 62.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In February 2000, ASHRAE's Standard Project Committee on "Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings", SPC 62.2P7 recommended ASHRAE's first complete standard on residential ventilation for public review...

Sherman, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Design and prototyping of a low-cost portable mechanical ventilator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the design and prototyping of a low-cost portable mechanical ventilator for use in mass casualty cases and resource-poor environments. The ventilator delivers breaths by compressing a conventional ...

Powelson, Stephen K. (Stephen Kirby)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A sweating model for the internal ventilation of a motorcycle Claudio Canutoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A sweating model for the internal ventilation of a motorcycle helmet Claudio Canutoa , Flavio and optimization of the internal ventilation of a motorcycle hel- met, with the purpose of enhancing the comfort

Ceragioli, Francesca

315

Climate Change and Extinctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

Sinervo, Barry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements- Sean Maxwell  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation is included in the Building America webinar, Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements, on September 24, 2014.

317

Performance Verification of Production-Scalable Energy-Efficient Solutions: Winchester/Camberley Homes Mixed-Humid Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Winchester/Camberley Homes with the Building America program and its NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership collaborated to develop a new set of high performance home designs that could be applicable on a production scale. The new home designs are to be constructed in the mixed humid climate zone four and could eventually apply to all of the builder's home designs to meet or exceed future energy codes or performance-based programs. However, the builder recognized that the combination of new wall framing designs and materials, higher levels of insulation in the wall cavity, and more detailed air sealing to achieve lower infiltration rates changes the moisture characteristics of the wall system. In order to ensure long term durability and repeatable successful implementation with few call-backs, this report demonstrates through measured data that the wall system functions as a dynamic system, responding to changing interior and outdoor environmental conditions within recognized limits of the materials that make up the wall system. A similar investigation was made with respect to the complete redesign of the heating, cooling, air distribution, and ventilation systems intended to optimize the equipment size and configuration to significantly improve efficiency while maintaining indoor comfort. Recognizing the need to demonstrate the benefits of these efficiency features, the builder offered a new house model to serve as a test case to develop framing designs, evaluate material selections and installation requirements, changes to work scopes and contractor learning curves, as well as to compare theoretical performance characteristics with measured results.

Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Air flow and particle control with different ventilation systems in a classroom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air flow and particle control with different ventilation systems in a classroom Sture Holmberg, Ph. For displacement ventilation systems, designers normally assume that all pollutants follow the buoyant air flow of the ventilation air flow are shown to play an important role in the control of air quality. Computer simulation

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

319

Uncertainty in climate science and climate policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This essay, written by a statistician and a climate scientist, describes our view of the gap that exists between current practice in mainstream climate science, and the practical needs of policymakers charged with exploring possible interventions in the context of climate change. By `mainstream' we mean the type of climate science that dominates in universities and research centres, which we will term `academic' climate science, in contrast to `policy' climate science; aspects of this distinction will become clearer in what follows. In a nutshell, we do not think that academic climate science equips climate scientists to be as helpful as they might be, when involved in climate policy assessment. Partly, we attribute this to an over-investment in high resolution climate simulators, and partly to a culture that is uncomfortable with the inherently subjective nature of climate uncertainty.

Rougier, Jonathan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 7.1- High-Performance Home Technologies: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes the climate zone designations used by the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program, and is intended to help builders to identify the appropriate climate designation for the counties in which they are building.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Egypt-World Bank Climate Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Bank Climate Projects World Bank Climate Projects Jump to: navigation, search Name Egypt-World Bank Climate Projects Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Biomass, Wind, Transportation Topics Background analysis Country Egypt Northern Africa References World Bank project database[1] Contents 1 World Bank Active Climate Projects in Egypt 1.1 Egypt Vehicle Scrapping and Recycling Program 1.2 EG-LAND FILLING AND PROCESING SERVICES FOR SOUTHERN ZONE IN CAIRO 1.3 Egypt - Wind Power Development Project 1.4 Pollution Abatement Project 1.5 ONYX solid Waste Alexandria 2 References World Bank Active Climate Projects in Egypt Egypt Vehicle Scrapping and Recycling Program (8.32M) Carbon Offset, Pipeline EG-LAND FILLING AND PROCESING SERVICES FOR SOUTHERN ZONE IN CAIRO

322

Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earth??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Energy Saving Guidelines for Portland State University Heating and Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Saving Guidelines for Portland State University Heating and Ventilation Conditioned spaces when a space is not being occupied and be selected with energy efficiency and safety as top priorities scheduling team to consolidate activities into energy efficient buildings on campus. Purchasing When

Caughman, John

324

Hottest spot temperatures in ventilated dry type transformers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hottest spot temperature allowance to be used for the different insulation system temperature classes is a major unknown facing IEEE Working Groups developing standards and loading guides for ventilated dry type transformers. In 1944, the hottest spot temperature allowance for ventilated dry type transformers was established as 30 C for 80 C average winding temperature rise. Since 1944, insulation temperature classes have increased to 220 C but IEEE standards continue to use a constant 30 C hottest spot temperature allowance. IEC standards use a variable hottest spot temperature allowance from 5 to 30 C. Six full size test windings were manufactured with imbedded thermocouples and 133 test runs performed to obtain temperature rise data. The test data indicated that the hottest spot temperature allowance used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA is too low. This is due to the large thermal gradient from the bottom to the top of the windings caused by natural convection air flow through the cooling ducts. A constant ratio of hottest spot winding temperature rise to average winding temperature rise should be used in product standards for all insulation temperature classes. A ratio of 1.5 is suggested for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA. This would increase the hottest spot temperature allowance from 30 C to 60 C and decrease the permissible average winding temperature rise from 150 C to 120 C for the 220 C insulation temperature class.

Pierce, L.W. (General Electric Co., Rome, GA (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent). The original ventilation design for the project was provided by a local engineer and consisted of a single large heat recovery ventilator (HRV) located in a mechanical room in the basement with a centralized duct system providing supply air to the main living space and exhausting stale air from the single bathroom in each apartment. This design was deemed to be far too costly to install and operate for several reasons: the large central HRV was oversized and the specified flows to each apartment were much higher than the ASHRAE 62.2 rate; an extensive system of ductwork, smoke and fire dampers, and duct chases were specified; ductwork required a significant area of dropped ceilings; and the system lacked individual ventilation control in the apartments

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air- conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This standard does but about the environment in which they lived. Historically, people have ventilated buildings to provide

327

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings Tom Rogg REU Student to assist HVAC has the potential to significantly reduce life cycle cost and energy consumption and electrical system that will tie thermostats to controlled valves in the actual HVAC system. Based on results

Mountziaris, T. J.

328

Control of airborne infectious diseases in ventilated spaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. Badeau, A. , A. Afshari, T. Goldsmith...control of SARS virus aerosols in indoor environment-transmission routes and ward ventilation...transmission of infectious agents in the built environment-a multidisciplinary systematic review...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Experimental analysis and model validation of an opaque ventilated facade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural ventilation is a convenient way of reducing energy consumption in buildings. In this study an experimental module of an opaque ventilated faade (OVF) was built and tested for assessing its potential of supplying free ventilation and air preheating for the building. A numerical model was created and validated against the experimental data. The experimental results showed that the flow rates induced in the faade cavity were due to mixed driving forces: wind and buoyancy. Depending on the weather conditions one of them was the main driving force, or both were of the same order. When the wind force was the main driving force, higher flow rates were found. In these cases buoyancy acted as supporting driving force. When the wind speed was low and buoyancy prevailed lower flow rates were found. Air and surface temperatures were predicted by the numerical model with a better accuracy than flow and energy rates. The model predicts correctly the influence of the wind and buoyancy driving forces. The experimental OVF module showed potential for free ventilation and air preheating, although it depends on weather and geometrical variables. The use of the numerical model using the right parameters was found viable for analyzing the performance of an OVF.

F. Peci Lpez; R.L. Jensen; P. Heiselberg; M. Ruiz de Adana Santiago

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne VIB Jump to: navigation, search Name Ventilation Industrielle de Bretagne (VIB) Place Ploudalmezeau, France Zip 29839 Sector Geothermal energy, Solar Product Ploudalmezeau-based company producing and marketing energy efficient and ventilation products including air source heat pumps, geothermal water source heat pumps, efficient air filtration systems and solar products. Coordinates 48.540325°, -4.657904° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.540325,"lon":-4.657904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

The Ventilation, Heating, and Management of Churches and Public Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THIS book is addressed chiefly to the architects, managers and caretakers of buildings, and its opening chapter deals with the physical principles bearing on ventilation. An interesting ... the writer makes the cryptic statement that "the friction caused by the wind passing over buildings is so great that it is scarcely possible to demonstrate it accurately,"and later ...

J. H. V.

1903-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

332

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Title Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2005 Authors Apte, Michael G., Ian S. Buchanan, David Faulkner, William J. Fisk, Chi-Ming Lai, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms

333

Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools Title Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6259E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Mendell, Mark J., Ekaterina Eliseeva, Morris G. Davies, Michael Spears, Agnes B. Lobscheid, William J. Fisk, and Michael G. Apte Journal Indoor Air Keywords carbon dioxide, Illness absence, indoor environmental quality, schools, ventilation Abstract Limited evidence associates inadequate classroom ventilation rates (VRs) with increased illness absence (IA). We investigated relationships between VRs and IA in Californiaelementary schools over two school years in 162 3rd-5th grade classrooms in 28 schools in three school districts: South Coast (SC), Bay Area (BA), and Central Valley (CV). We estimated relationships between daily IA and VR (estimated from real-time carbon dioxide) in zero-inflated negative binomial models. We also compared IA benefits and energy costs of increased VRs. All school districts had median VRs below the 7.1 L/sec-person California standard. For each additional 1 L/sec-person of VR, IA was reduced significantly (p<0.05) in models for combined districts (-1.6%) and for SC (-1.2%), and non-significantly for districts providing less data: BA (-1.5%) and CV (-1.0%). Assuming associations were causal and generalizable, increasing classroom VRs from the California average (4 L/sec-person) to the State standard would decrease IA by 3.4%, increase attendance-linked funding to schools by $33 million annually, and increase costs only $4 million. Further increasing VRs would provide additional benefits. These findings, while requiring confirmation, suggest that increasing classroom VRs above the State

334

Climate Change Development Policy Loan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Policy Loan Development Policy Loan Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change Development Policy Loan Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Finance, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://web.worldbank.org/WBSIT Country Indonesia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Indonesia Climate Change Project[1] "The project will support the Government's policy agenda on climate change, an issue of growing global concern. Indonesia is highly vulnerable to climate change impacts - sea level rise, changing weather patterns, and increased uncertainty. Potential impacts include: increased threats to food security and agricultural productivity; impacts on productive coastal zones and community livelihoods; consequences for water storage; intensification

335

Unsaturated Zone I. Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 2 Unsaturated Zone I. Overview If the Yucca Mountain site is deemed suitable for re of the extent of welding, the tuffs within the UZ at Yucca Mountain are grouped informally into hydrogeologic Yucca Mountain is illustrated in Figure 2-1 on page 14. A. Why UZ Was Chosen Initial studies of Yucca

336

Subduction Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subduction Zone Subduction Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Subduction Zone Dictionary.png Subduction Zone: A tectonic process in which one tectonic plate is forced beneath another and sinks into the mantle as the plates converge Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tectonic Settings List of tectonic settings known to host modern geothermal systems: Extensional Tectonics Subduction Zone Rift Zone Hot Spot Non-Tectonic Strike-Slip A classic cartoon illustrating a typical simplified subduction zone. http://www.columbia.edu/~vjd1/subd_zone_basic.htm Subduction zones occur where one tectonic plate is pulled under another. Most often the subducting plate is oceanic crust and contains many hydrous minerals. As the oceanic plate subducts it dewaters into the mantle,

337

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Arctic Methane, Hydrates, and Global Climate Speaker(s): Matthew T. Reagan Date: March 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane may have had a significant role in regulating past climate. However, the behavior of contemporary permafrost deposits and oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. A recent expedition to the west coast of Spitsbergen discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor at depths that correspond to the upper limit of the receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the

338

Saturated Zone I. Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Yucca Mountain is small (on the order of 7 mm/yr in the current climate) in compari- son to the groundwater flux laterally in the SZ be- low Yucca Mountain. Although there is a large spatial variability at Yucca Mountain to determine the amount of mixing that could occur at the SZ-UZ interface. There also

339

Accommodation Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Accommodation Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Accommodation Zone Dictionary.png Accommodation Zone: Accommodation zones occur at fault intersections consisting of belts of interlocking, oppositely dipping normal faults. Multiple subsurface fault intersections in these zones are a favorable host for geothermal activity. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones

340

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Title Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5887E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hult, Erin L., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and Phillip N. Price Date Published 09/2012 Keywords infiltration, leakage, residential ventilation Abstract Air leakage between adjacent zones of a building can lead to indoor air quality and energy efficiency concerns, however there is no existing standard for measuring inter-zonal leakage.In this study, synthesized data and field measurements are analyzed in order to explore the uncertainty associated with different methods for collecting and analyzing fan pressurization measurements to calculate inter- zone leakage. The best of the measurement and analysis methods was a method that uses two blower doors simultaneously based on the methods of Herrlin and Modera (1988) to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 16% of the inter-zone leakage flow at 4Pa, over the range of expected conditions for a house and attached garage. Methods were also identified that use a single blower door to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 30% of its value. The test configuration selected can have a large impact on the uncertainty of the results and there are testing configurations and methods that should definitely be avoided. The most rigorous calculation method identified assumes a fixed value for the pressure exponent for the interface between the two zones (rather than determining the interface pressure exponent from the measured data) and then uses an optimization routine to fit a single set of air leakage coefficients and pressure exponents for each of three wall interfaces using both pressurization and depressurization data. Multiple pressure station tests have much less uncertainty than single pressure station approaches. Analyses of field data sets confirm a similar level of variation between test methods as was expected from the analysis of synthesized data sets and confirm the selection of specific test methods to reduce experimental uncertainty.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Climate Change Scoping Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

342

Climate change action plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

343

Climate Change Scoping Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

344

Climate Survey  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Employee Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 Acknowledgements The Berkeley Lab Survey Team consisted of the following: Jim Krupnick, Sponsor Vera Potapenko, Project Lead Karen Ramorino, Project Manager Chris Paquette, MOR Associates Alexis Bywater, MOR Associates MOR Associates, an external consulting firm, acted as project manager for this effort, analyzing the data and preparing this report. MOR Associates specializes in continuous improve- ment, strategic thinking and leadership development. MOR Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and others. MOR Associates, Inc. 462 Main Street, Suite 300 Watertown, MA 02472 tel: 617.924.4501

345

Enthalpy Wheels Come of Age: Applying Energy Recovery Ventilation to Hospitality Venues in Hot, Humid Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air intake requirements and has recently become widely accepted in applications such as schools and theatres. Hospitality applications including restaurants, bars, casinos and similar settings also stand to benefit from application of the technology...

Wellford, B. W.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida Manufactured Housing- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes work by Building America researchers who visited 24 manufactured home factories between 1996 and 2003 to investigate moisture problems while improving energy efficiency and identified insufficient air sealing and poor HVAC installation as the biggest culprits. One manufacturer reported zero moisture-related issues in 35,000 homes built after implementing Building America recommendations.

347

Rift Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rift Zone Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Rift Zone Dictionary.png Rift Zone: A divergent plate boundary within a continent Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Tectonic Settings List of tectonic settings known to host modern geothermal systems: Extensional Tectonics Subduction Zone Rift Zone Hot Spot Non-Tectonic Strike-Slip The Rio Grande Rift exemplifies rift zone tectonics - increased volcanic activity and the formation of graben structures (reference: science-art.com) Rift valleys occur at divergent plate boundaries, resulting in large graben structures and increased volcanism. The East African Rift is an example of a continental rift zone with increased volcanism, while the Atlantic's spreading Mid-Ocean Ridge is host to an enormous amount of geothermal

348

The Enterprise Zone (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Enterprise Zone offers tax incentives to business expanding their workforce by 5% at facilities in designated enterprise zones. The tax credit is equal to 50% of the annual wages paid to a new...

349

Enterprise Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone Jump to: navigation, search This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEnterpriseZone&oldid542697"...

350

The Galactic Habitable Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose the concept of a "Galactic Habitable Zone" (GHZ). Similar to the circumstellar habitable zone (CHZ), the GHZ is that region in a spiral galaxy where life can exist. The width of the GHZ is controlled by two factors. The inner (closest to the center of the galaxy) limit is set by threats to complex life: nearby transient sources of ionizing radiation and comet impacts. Such threats tend to increase close to the galactic center. The outer limit is imposed by galactic chemical evolution, specifically the abundance of heavier elements. Observation of stars in the Milky Way galaxy suggests that the outer reaches of a spiral galaxy may be too poor in heavy elements to allow terrestrial complex life to exist.

Guillermo Gonzalez

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Code-compliant 2X4 Walls for Zones Marine 4-8 - Code Notes | Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Code-compliant 2X4 Walls for Zones Marine 4-8 - Code Notes Code-compliant 2X4 Walls for Zones Marine 4-8 - Code Notes The 2009 International Residential Code and International Energy Conservation Code do not permit trade-offs for installing high-efficiency heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment-installing a 90%+ furnace as a trade-off for 2" x 4" stud walls with R-13 insulation. The more permanent building insulation and sealing features now take precedence. However, there still remain optional strategies allowing 2" x 4" exterior stud walls. cn_code-compliant_2x4_walls_for_zones_marine_4-8.pdf Document Details Prepared by: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Compliance Building Type: Residential Code Referenced:

352

CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air CANCELLED: Mechanism of Human Responses to Ventilation Rates and Air Temperature Speaker(s): Henry Willem Date: July 2, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Max Sherman (THIS SEMINAR TO BE RESCHEDULED.) Sustainability of the built-environment must be achieved in parallel with the sustenance of occupants' health and comfort. Actions to conserve energy and resources require much forethought and careful consideration due to possible consequences on the human aspects. Thus, many extensive works in the recent decades have focused on identifying the associations between indoor environment and human responses. Results have shown moderate to strong implications of thermal and indoor air quality factors on the prevalence and intensity of sick

353

Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Ventilation Relevant Contaminants of Concern in Commercial Buildings Screening Process and Results Srinandini Parthasarathy, Thomas E. McKone, Michael G. Apte Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 April 29, 2111 Prepared for the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research Program, Energy Related Environmental Research Program Legal Notice The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a national laboratory of the DOE managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Number DE-AC02- 05CH11231. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the Sponsor and pursuant to an M&O Contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Neither the

354

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values William J.N. Turner, Jennifer M. Logue, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division July 2012 LBNL-5969E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

355

Alberta Health Services, Calgary Zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organizational Chart ­ AHS, Calgary Zone, Community, Rural and Mental Health Page 12 Organizational Chart ­ AHS, Calgary Zone, Addiction and Mental Health Page 13 Organizational Chart ­ AHS, Calgary Zone, Clinical specialty care clinics. 3) Increasing efficiency in our specialty clinics. 4) Standardizing care

Habib, Ayman

356

Future Climate Engineering Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Associations from around the world are part of the project `Future Climate - Engineering Solu- tions'. Within the project the participating associations have been developing national climate plansFuture Climate Engineering Solutions Joint report 13 engineering participating engeneering

357

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Good seal construction and ventilation controls improve airflow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As workings become deeper and more distant from the ventilation inlet, better seal construction technology is needed. Tekseal, a specially formulated pumpable grout which allows a seal to be erected quickly and safety, is Minova's answer to the limitations of traditional block seals. Its use is explained in this article. An alternative product is the Carbonfill range which comprises a two-component phenolic resin based foam generating by a pump. 3 photos.

NONE

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Predicting hottest spot temperatures in ventilated dry type transformer windings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Test data indicates that hottest spot allowances used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA are too low. A mathematical model to predict hottest spot temperature rises in ventilated dry type transformers was developed. Data from six layer type test windings and a 2500 kva prototype was used to refine the model. A correlation for the local heat transfer coefficient in the cooling ducts was developed. The model was used to study the effect of various parameters on the ratio of hottest spot to average winding temperature rise. The number of conductor layers, insulation thickness, and conductor strand size were found to have only a minor effect on the ratio. Winding height was found to be the main parameter influencing the ratio of hottest spot to average winding temperature rise. The study based on the mathematical model confirmed previous conclusions based on test data that the hottest spot allowances used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA should be revised.

Pierce, L.W. (General Electric Co., Rome, GA (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In multifamily buildings, particularly in the Northeast, exhaust ventilation strategies are the norm as a means of meeting both local exhaust and whole-unit mechanical ventilation rates. The issue of where the 'fresh' air is coming from is gaining significance as air-tightness standards for enclosures become more stringent, and the 'normal leakage paths through the building envelope' disappear. CARB researchers have found that the majority of high performance, new construction, multifamily housing in the Northeast use one of four general strategies for ventilation: continuous exhaust only with no designated supply or make-up air source, continuous exhaust with ducted make-up air to apartments, continuous exhaust with supply through a make-up air device integral to the unit HVAC, and continuous exhaust with supply through a passive inlet device, such as a trickle vent. Insufficient information is available to designers on how these various systems are best applied. Product performance data are based on laboratory tests, and the assumption is that products will perform similarly in the field. Proper application involves matching expected performance at expected building pressures, but there is no guarantee that those conditions will exist consistently in the finished building. This research effort, which included several weeks of building pressure monitoring, sought to provide field validation of system performance. The performance of four substantially different strategies for providing make-up air to apartments was evaluated.

Maxwell, S.; Berger, D.; Zuluaga, M.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ARM - Climate Change  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Climate Change A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change The U.S. Environmental...

362

Climate change cripples forests  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

363

Climate change cripples forests  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

364

Corporate Climate Change Adaptation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? On-going and future climate change is universally acknowledged. Climate changeincorporating global mean temperature rise, impacts on global hydrology and ecosystems willaffect human society and (more)

Herbertsson, Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Chapter 20 Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

climate Short-term interruption of construction, operation, and maintenance of the transmission line due to climate could occur, but could be mitigated No impact would occur where...

366

Coastal communities and climate change : a dynamic model of risk perception, storms, and adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change impacts, including sea-level rise and changes in tropical storm frequency and intensity, will pose signicant challenges to city planners and coastal zone managers trying to make wise investment and protection ...

Franck, Travis Read

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Why sequence microbial communities in expanding dead zones?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

microbial communities in expanding dead zones? microbial communities in expanding dead zones? Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are widespread oceanographic features expanding due to global warming. There is increasing evidence that ocean warming trends will decrease dissolved oxygen concentrations, causing hypoxic boundary layer expansion that impacts the global carbon cycle, marine nutrient cycles and the climate system. To properly diagnose these transitions, this project launches a systems-level investigation of microbial community responses to OMZ expansion, charting the gene expression patterns of indigenous microbial communities found in coastal and open ocean OMZs in the eastern Subarctic Pacific Ocean as part of an ongoing time series program monitoring microbial community responses to changing levels of water column oxygen deficiency.

368

Liquid zone seal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Ventilation for an enclosure of a gas turbine and related method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ventilation scheme for a rotary machine supported on pedestals within an enclosure having a roof, end walls and side walls with the machine arranged parallel to the side walls, includes ventilation air inlets located in a first end wall of the enclosure; a barrier wall located within the enclosure, proximate the first end wall to thereby create a plenum chamber. The barrier wall is constructed to provide a substantially annular gap between the barrier wall and a casing of the turbine to thereby direct ventilation air axially along the turbine; one or more ventilation air outlets located proximate a second, opposite end wall on the roof of the enclosure. In addition, one or more fans are provided for pulling ventilating air into said plenum chamber via the ventilation air inlets.

Schroeder, Troy Joseph (Mauldin, SC); Leach, David (Simpsonville, SC); O'Toole, Michael Anthony (Greenfield Center, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America research on simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install and meet code requirements.

371

Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements- Joe Lstiburek  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation will be delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America webinar, Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements, on September 24, 2014. Joe...

372

THE IMPACT OF REDUCED VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide fron gas appliances;quality, infiltration, nitrogen dioxide, radon, ventilation.carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (N02) formaldehyde (

Berk, James V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Economizer system cost effectiveness: Accounting for the influence of ventilation rate on sick leave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIZER SYSTEM COST EFFECTIVENESS: ACCOUNTING FOR THEand economic benefits of an economizer ventilation controlanalyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs

Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality ventilation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: air quality ventilation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH Summary: control strategy impacts on indoor air...

375

Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality survey. In: Healthy Buildings 2006. Lisbon,In: Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006. Lisbon, Portugal:as ventilation varies. In: Healthy Buildings 2012. Brisbane,

Mendell, Mark J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Internal combuston engine having separated cylinder head oil drains and crankcase ventilation passages  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion engine includes separated oil drain-back and crankcase ventilation passages. The oil drain-back passages extend from the cylinder head to a position below the top level of oil in the engine's crankcase. The crankcase ventilation passages extend from passages formed in the main bearing bulkheads from positions above the oil level in the crankcase and ultimately through the cylinder head. Oil dams surrounding the uppermost portions of the crankcase ventilation passages prevent oil from running downwardly through the crankcase ventilation passages.

Boggs, David Lee (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Baraszu, Daniel James (Plymouth, MI); Foulkes, David Mark (Erfstadt, DE); Gomes, Enio Goyannes (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

"Managing Department Climate Change"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

Sheridan, Jennifer

378

programs in climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

379

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ocean projections. Mk3.5 captures a number of robust changes common to most climate models that contribute to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3), an initiative by the World Climate Research projected by climate models. However, the response of these currents to climate change may directly affect m

Feng, Ming

380

Calibration of Predicted Hourly Zone-Level Supply Air Flows with Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the chemical composition, then sends a signal to the control system to increase the ventilation rate, if necessary. This system cannot be modeled in eQuest. The null hypothesis H0 is true only if the t-value is less than tcritical; if t-value is greater..., daily and monthly calibration analysis: CV-RMSE[%] vs. t-test CV-RMSE [%] Zone Interval Time step t t,cr 2.1 NE Summer Hourly 18.8 Daily 9.5 Monthly 4.2 3 days Hourly 24.2 2.4 SW Summer Hourly 28.4 Daily 12.7 Monthly 4...

Mihai, A.; Zmeureanu, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Building America Best Practices Series: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the eight climate region designations used by the US Department of Energy Building America Program. In addition to describing the climate zones, the document includes a complete list of every county in the United States and their climate region designations. The county lists are grouped by state. The doucment is intended to assist builders to easily identify what climate region they are building in and therefore which climate-specific Building America best practices guide would be most appropriate for them.

Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Humid Climates Humid Climates Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates Map of the Hot and Humid Climate Zone of the United States. This zone covers eastern Texas through Florida and reaches up to mid-Georgia it also includes Puerto Rico and Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program has developed a series of best practices and case studies to help builders improve whole-house energy performance in buildings found in hot-humid climates. Best Practice Guides New Construction Case Studies Improvements to Existing Homes Case Studies Best Practice Guides 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Hot-Humid Climates - Volume 15 New Construction Case Studies Florida Project: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc. - Cape Coral Builder: Ravenwood Homes

383

Western Renewable Energy Zones (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes recent developments and trends pertaining to competitive renewable energy zones, transmission planning and the integration of renewable generation resources.

Hein, J.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Confinement Ventilation and Process Gas Treatment Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

. . NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1168-2013 October 2013 DOE STANDARD CONFINEMENT VENTILATION AND PROCESS GAS TREATMENT FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1168-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://energy.gov/hss/information-center/department-energy-technical-standards-program ii DOE-STD-1168-2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK iv DOE-STD-1168-2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENT...................................................................................................................vii

385

Evaluation of pulmonary ventilation in horses during methoxyflurane anesthesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and venous pH, pCO2, p02, and HCO3 in evaluating pulmonary ventilation and the metabolic status of the horse. LITERATURE REVIEW 8oth methoxyflurane and halothane were first used in the early 1960's as inhalation anesthetics ' ' ' ' ' . These agents were... 7)12, 13, 15, 28&36 primarily responsible for the increase in popularity of gas anesthesia in veterinary medicine. Inhalation anesthesia with these agents pro- duced some long awaited advantages over intravenous long-acting bar- biturates...

McDonald, Don Reed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

386

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Formulating Climate Change...

387

Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

Polz, Martin

388

Fuel conditioning facility zone-to-zone transfer administrative controls.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The administrative controls associated with transferring containers from one criticality hazard control zone to another in the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) are described. FCF, located at the ANL-West site near Idaho Falls, Idaho, is used to remotely process spent sodium bonded metallic fuel for disposition. The process involves nearly forty widely varying material forms and types, over fifty specific use container types, and over thirty distinct zones where work activities occur. During 1999, over five thousand transfers from one zone to another were conducted. Limits are placed on mass, material form and type, and container types for each zone. Ml material and containers are tracked using the Mass Tracking System (MTG). The MTG uses an Oracle database and numerous applications to manage the database. The database stores information specific to the process, including material composition and mass, container identification number and mass, transfer history, and the operators involved in each transfer. The process is controlled using written procedures which specify the zone, containers, and material involved in a task. Transferring a container from one zone to another is called a zone-to-zone transfer (ZZT). ZZTs consist of four distinct phases, select, request, identify, and completion.

Pope, C. L.

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Climate change risk and response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Kate Scow. 2006. Climate Change: Page 117 ChallengesLandscapes. California Climate Change Center White Paper.Sea Level. California Climate Change Center White Paper.

Kahrl, Fredrich; Roland-Holst, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Review: Preparing for Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Preparing for Climate Change By Michael D.Stephen, Preparing for Climate Change. A Boston Review Book.alkaline paper. Climate change is inevitable, but disaster

Kunnas, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 Climate change acts as a threat

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Global air quality and climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP;of chemistryclimate models with RCP emissions thus projectto project air quality responses to future climate change

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Economic Analysis and Optimization of Exterior Insulation Requirements for Ventilated Buildings at Power Generation Facilities with High Internal Heat Gain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial buildings require a large amount of heating and ventilation equipment to maintain the indoor environment within acceptable levels for personnel protection and equipment protection. The required heating and ventilation equipment...

Hughes, Douglas E.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

Effect of fluctuating wind direction on cross natural ventilation in buildings from large eddy simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind direction, and the simulated results agree reasonably with the corresponding experimental data is the use of small-scale models in a wind tunnel to simulate natural ventilation. In general, the mean flow1 Effect of fluctuating wind direction on cross natural ventilation in buildings from large eddy

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

395

Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 Laboratory Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 ­ Laboratory Ventilation 3-1 Section 3 ...................................................................................3-5 #12;Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 ­ Laboratory Ventilation 3-2 A without compromising safety or system integrity. The following should be included unless alternate design

Queitsch, Christine

396

Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Ventilation performance prediction for buildings: Model Assessment Qingyan Chena,b,* , Kisup Leeb building, but cannot provide detailed flow information in a room. The zonal model can be useful when a user ventilation systems for buildings requires a suitable model to assess system performance. The performance can

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

397

A New Empirical Model for Predicting Single-Sided, Wind-Driven Natural Ventilation in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ventilation rate due to the pulsating flow and eddy penetration of single-sided, wind-driven natural Normal to the opening q Fluctuating flow rate e Eddy penetration Wang, H. and Chen, Q. 2012. "A new buildings. A new empirical model was developed that can predict the mean ventilation rate and fluctuating

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

398

The Improvement of Natural Ventilation in an Industrial Workshop by Solar Chimney  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical simulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method on the enhancement of natural ventilation in an industrial workshop with heat source induced by solar chimney (SC). Four types of SC were designed to attach ... Keywords: natural ventilation, solar chimney, industrtial workshop, numerical simulation, thermal comfort

Yu-feng Xue; Ya-xin Su

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Ventilation and Air Quality in Indoor Ice Skating Arenas Chunxin Yang, Ph.D.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ventilation and Air Quality in Indoor Ice Skating Arenas Chunxin Yang, Ph.D.1 Philip Demokritou, and the operation strategy of the ventilation system are significant contributing factors to the indoor air quality contamination levels in the arenas. Keywords: Air distribution, health, skating rink, indoor air quality, space

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

400

A case study of boundary layer ventilation by convection and coastal processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the pollution in the atmosphere originates from emissions in the atmospheric boundary layer, the region; published 12 September 2007. [1] It is often assumed that ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer responsible for ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer during a nonfrontal day that occurred on 9 May

Dacre, Helen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Modeling Coupled Evaporation and Seepage in Ventilated Cavities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavities excavated in unsaturated geological formations are important to activities such as nuclear waste disposal and mining. Such cavities provide a unique setting for simultaneous occurrence of seepage and evaporation. Previously, inverse numerical modeling of field liquid-release tests and associated seepage into cavities were used to provide seepage-related large-scale formation properties by ignoring the impact of evaporation. The applicability of such models was limited to the narrow range of ventilation conditions under which the models were calibrated. The objective of this study was to alleviate this limitation by incorporating evaporation into the seepage models. We modeled evaporation as an isothermal vapor diffusion process. The semi-physical model accounts for the relative humidity, temperature, and ventilation conditions of the cavities. The evaporation boundary layer thickness (BLT) over which diffusion occurs was estimated by calibration against free-water evaporation data collected inside the experimental cavities. The estimated values of BLT were 5 to 7 mm for the open underground drifts and 20 mm for niches closed off by bulkheads. Compared to previous models that neglected the effect of evaporation, this new approach showed significant improvement in capturing seepage fluctuations into open cavities of low relative humidity. At high relative-humidity values (greater than 85%), the effect of evaporation on seepage was very small.

T. Ghezzehei; R. Trautz; S. Finsterle; P. Cook; C. Ahlers

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Overall Ventilation System Flow Network Calculation for Site Recommendation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this calculation is to determine ventilation system resistances, pressure drops, airflows, and operating cost estimates for the Site Recommendation (SR) design as detailed in the ''Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout'' (BSC (Bechtel SAIC Company) 2001a). The statutory limit for emplacement of waste in Yucca Mountain is 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) and is considered the base case for this report. The objective is to determine the overall repository system ventilation flow network for the monitoring phase during normal operations and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. Any values derived from this calculation will not be used to support construction, fabrication, or procurement. The work scope is identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY01 Work Activities'' (CRWMS M&O 2001, pp. 6 and 13). In accordance with the technical work plan this calculation was prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' and other procedures invoked by AP-3.12Q. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI1.Q, ''Software Management''.

Jeff J. Steinhoff

2001-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

Alternate Air Delivery Systems for Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-zone units in the Harris County Criminal Courts Building in Houston, one of the most hot and humid climates in the United States, as well as in several other facilities. This paper will discuss the adoption of ASHRAE 62, its effects on VAV systems, and how...

Wallace, M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Building America Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

Not Available

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R.J. : Effect of ventilation rate in a healthy building.IAQ '91: Healthy Buildings, American Society of Heating,

Thatcher, Tracy L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Thermal Comfort of Neutral Ventilated Buildings in Different Cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although the ASHRAE 55-1992 and ISO 7730 Standards are used all over the world, many researchers have pointed out that it is impossible to maintain a uniform thermal comfort standard worldwide because of differing climate conditions. Two field...

Ye, X.; Zhou, Z.; Lian, Z.; Wen, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Jiang, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

E3G-China-Low Carbon Development Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

G-China-Low Carbon Development Zones G-China-Low Carbon Development Zones Jump to: navigation, search Name Low Carbon Development Zones in China Agency/Company /Organization Third Generation Environmentalism (E3G) Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Finance, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.chathamhouse.org.uk Country China UN Region Eastern Asia References Low Carbon Development Zones in China[1] Overview "Building on the successful work of the Interdependencies on Energy and Climate Security for China and Europe project, this 18 month project with E3G, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) and the Chinese Energy Research Institute (ERI), will focus on four key areas - low carbon zones;

408

The Climate Policy Dilemma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists concerning ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

409

The Climate Policy Dilemma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate policy poses a dilemma for environmental economists. The economic argument for stringent GHG abatement is far from clear. There is disagreement among both climate scientists and economists over the likelihood of ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

410

Earth'future climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...their visions of the future I. Astronomy and Earth sciences compiled by J. M. T. Thompson Earth'future climate Mark A. Saunders 1 1 Benfield...provide informed scientific projections for Earth's climate into the next millennium. This...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to address the most challenging and demanding climate-change issues. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) is designed to accel-erate the development and applica-tion of...

412

Climate Leadership Conference  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Climate Leadership Conference is your annual exchange for addressing global climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. Forward-thinking leaders from business, govern...

413

Environment and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

Galles, David

414

Forest Research: Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

415

Climate Change Workshop 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

416

Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

review and input from scholars with expertise in climate change and communication. #12; Welcome Thank youCampus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE CAMPUS Southwestern Pennsylvania Program booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994

Attari, Shahzeen Z.

417

Climate Change Economics and Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

Romano, Daniela

418

Formadehyde in New Homes: Ventilation vs. Source Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at at Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 1, 2012 Austin, Texas Formaldehyde in New Homes --- Ventilation vs. Source Control Brett C. Singer and Henry Willem Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Acknowledgments * Funding - U.S. Department of Energy - Building America Program - U.S. EPA - Indoor Environments Division - U.S. HUD - Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control - Cal. Energy Commission Public Interest Environmental Research * Technical Contributions - Fraunhofer - Ibacos - IEE-SF * LBNL Team - Sherman, Hotchi, Russell, Stratton, and Others Background 1  Formaldehyde is an irritant and a carcinogen  Odor threshold: about 800 ppb  Widely varying health standards  US HUD (8-h): 400 ppb

419

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.climatefinanceoptions.org/cfo/node/256 Language: English Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies Screenshot References: Formulating Climate Change Scenarios to Inform Climate - Resilient Development Strategies[1] Tool Overview "This guidebook is part of a series of manuals, guidebooks, and toolkits that draw upon the experience and information generated by UNDP's support

420

The problem of vertical zoning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...deposits, genesis sheet silicates silicates talc United States Vermont Vertical zoning GeoRef, Copyright 2012, American Geosciences...levelgivingasmuchas29ouncesofgold per ton." Similar descriptionsof the Yankee Girl and other minesin the districtconvincinglydemonstrateverticalchangesin...

Charles Frederick Park

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Unsaturated Zone Hydrology Jasper Vrugt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CEE 271 Unsaturated Zone Hydrology Instructor Jasper Vrugt Engineering Tower #834E / #536 (LAB) Tel.: 505-231-2698 jasper @uci.edu Office Hours: By Appointment Lecture, 1 hour; discussion, 20 minutes: ICS

Vrugt, Jasper A.

422

Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates Map of the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Zone of the United States. The zone contains the eastern side of California and follows the US border to cover the western half of Texas. The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a series of best practices and case studies to help builders improve whole-house energy performance in buildings found in hot-dry and mixed-dry climates. Best Practice Guides New Construction Case Studies Improvements to Existing Homes Case Studies Best Practice Guides 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates - Volume 9 New Construction Case Studies Arizona Project: Gordon Estates - Phoenix Builder: Mandalay Homes Profile: Fourteen homes in this subdivision achieved Challenge Home

423

Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011 J. Hansen, M. Sato, coincident with increased global warming. The most dramatic and important change of the climate dice change is the natural variability of climate. How can a person discern long-term climate change, given

Hansen, James E.

424

Wetlands and Riparian Zones | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Riparian Zones Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWetlandsandRiparianZones&oldid612217" Category: NEPA Resources...

425

Climate Literacy Framework  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate Literacy Framework Print E-mail Climate Literacy Framework Print E-mail A Guide for Individuals and Communities The Essential Principles of Climate Science presents important information for individuals and communities to understand Earth's climate, impacts of climate change, and approaches for adapting and mitigating change. Principles in the guide can serve as discussion starters or launching points for scientific inquiry. The guide can also serve educators who teach climate science as part of their science curricula. Development of the guide began at a workshop sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Multiple science agencies, non-governmental organizations, and numerous individuals also contributed through extensive review and comment periods. Discussion at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and NOAA-sponsored Atmospheric Sciences and Climate Literacy workshop contributed substantially to the refinement of the document.

426

Little Climates -- Part One  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Part One Part One Nature Bulletin No. 478-A January 27, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation LITTLE CLIMATES -- Part One: Weather in the Soi. Climate vitally affects our lives. Wherever we live, climate has largely determined the plant and animal life in that region, the development of civilization there and what people do. The climate of any region represents its overall weather picture: the sum of its weather today, tomorrow, and during past centuries. We are accustomed to think of climate as a set of conditions occurring entirely in the atmosphere above the earth's surface, and it may sound silly when we say that there are climates underground -- little climates just as real as those above -- but it's true, There are special kinds of weather in the soil.

427

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models July 31, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of the report "Climate Models: An Assessment of Strengths and Limitations," the 10th in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs) managed by U.S. federal agencies. Developed under the leadership of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this report, SAP 3.1, describes computer models of the Earth's climate and their ability to simulate current climate change. "Complex climate models are tools that provide insights and knowledge into how future climate may evolve. To assure that future climate projections

428

MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Multicriteria Analysis for Climate (MCA4climate) Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), World Bank Climate Smart Planning Platform Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.mca4climate.info/ Program Start: 2011 Cost: Free Multicriteria Analysis for Climate (MCA4climate) Screenshot References: MCA4Climate - Guidance for scientifically sound climate change planning[1]

429

Climate Change Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change · Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from Physics for Future Society) controversy on climate change (e.g. resignation of Hal Lewis, Ivar Giaever and other notable. #12;Some climate changes basics · IPCC = Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change · The IPCC

Browder, Tom

430

Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict security" "increase risk of conflicts among and within nations" #12;· from `climatic change' to `climate-change

Hulme, Mike

431

Are We Ready to Propose Guidelines for Health-Based Ventilation?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Are We Ready to Propose Guidelines for Health-Based Ventilation? Are We Ready to Propose Guidelines for Health-Based Ventilation? Speaker(s): Pawel Wargocki Date: October 14, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Mark Mendell Guidelines for health-based ventilation in Europe are proposed. They follow the premise of controlling exposures to indoor air pollutants of both indoor and outdoor origin. Exposures are controlled through a two-step sequential approach, in which source control is the primary strategy, while ventilation is the secondary strategy once all options for source control have been fully implemented. World Health Organization (WHO) air quality (AQ) guidelines are used to set the exposure limits. A decision diagram is created for guidance through the process of source control and to aid in

432

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

simple, cost-effective techniques for providing fresh air throughout the home, including exhaust-only and central fan-integrated supply ventilation. Building America has refined simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.3 Assured Health, Safety, and Durability Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing As high-performance homes get more air-tight and better insulated, attention to good indoor air quality becomes essential. Building America has effectively guided the nation's home builders to embrace whole-house ventilation by developing low-cost options that adapt well to their production processes. When the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research teams began

433

Influence of ventilation arrangements on particle removal in industrial cleanrooms with various tool coverage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper aims to investigate the influence of comparative ventilation arrangements (wall-return, locally balanced ceiling-return, and four-way ceiling-return) on the airflow distribution and particle fates w...

Yun-Chun Tung; Shih-Cheng Hu; Tengfang Xu; Ren-Huei Wang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Behavior of a Nuclear Power Plant Ventilation Stack for Wind Loads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes behavior of self supporting tall reinforced concrete (RC) ventilation stack of a nuclear power plant (NPP) for wind loads. Since the static and equivalent dynamic wind loads are inter-dependa...

V. Venkatachalapathy

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China HVAC Technologies for Energy Efficiency, Vol. IV-11-4 Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation Yanli Ren1, Deying Li2, Yufeng Zhang1 1...

Ren, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Modeling Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings John Markley, University of California, Davis -Western Cooling Efficiency Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings John Markley, University of California, Davis outlines the results from energy models of several multifamily building configurations to improve airflow component of multifamily building design due to its effects on occupant health and comfort. Though

California at Davis, University of

437

Workers Remove Glove Boxes from Ventilation at Hanfords Plutonium Finishing Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An employee at Hanfords Plutonium Finishing Plant uses a portable band saw to cut the last ventilation duct attached to glove boxes inside the facilitys former processing area.

438

HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR. FINAL REPORT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBL-10475 EEB-Hosp 79-6 HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS ANDCHH1ICAL CONTAMINATION OF HOSPITAL AIR na 1 Report DavidMinnesota 55455 TWIN CITIES HOSPITAL VEtHILATION STANDARDS

Rainer, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Increasing ventilation in commercial cattle trailers to decrease shrink, morbidity, and mortality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

moving livestock trailers, an experimental treatment that increased cross-ventilation within commercial cattle trailers by installing aluminum scoops to punch-hole trailers was evaluated. Environmental factors including temperature, ammonia and carbon...

Giguere, Nicole Marie

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

440

Integrated Demand Controlled Ventilation for Single Duct VAV System with Conference Rooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This paper presents a new integrated demand controlled ventilation (IDCV) methodology which can ensure acceptable IAQ and energy savings with lower OA intake ratio. The requirement on hardware and software is simple and the implementation is easy. One office...

Yu, Y.; Liu, M.; Cho, Y.; Xu, K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UC-95d INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATIONVentilation on Indoor Air Quality and Energy Use in Schoo s,EEB~Vent INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION

Young, Rodger A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Economizer system cost effectiveness: Accounting for the influence of ventilation rate on sick leave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimated the health, energy, and economic benefits of an economizer ventilation control system that increases outside air supply during mild weather to save energy. A model of the influence of ventilation rate on airborne transmission of respiratory illnesses was used to extend the limited data relating ventilation rate with illness and sick leave. An energy simulation model calculated ventilation rates and energy use versus time for an office building in Washington, DC with fixed minimum outdoor air supply rates, with and without an economizer. Sick leave rates were estimated with the disease transmission model. In the modeled 72-person office building, our analyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs by approximately $2000 and, in addition, reduces sick leave. The financial benefit of the decrease in sick leave is estimated to be between $6,000 and $16,000. This modelling suggests that economizers are much more cost effective than currently recognized.

Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A Method for Evaluating the Application of Variable Frequency Drives with Coal Mine Ventilation Fans.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The adjustable-pitch setting on an axial-flow fan is the most common method of controlling airflow for primary coal mine ventilation. With this method, the fan (more)

Murphy, Tyson M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Control of the microclimate around the head with opposing jet local ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ventilation application. Healthy Buildings 2003, Singapore.21 (1996) 427-436. Healthy Buildings 2009, September 13-17,distance is 1.20m. Healthy Buildings 2009, September 13-17,

Liu, Chonghui; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui Ph.D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scaling the passive stack diameter with house size (floora single-story house ventilated by a passive stack with andTable 1: Passive stack diameters scaling with house size

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Innovation and Success in Planning and Zoning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document summarizes several successful initiatives to implement solar-friendly planes and zoning codes.

447

Sandia National Laboratories: Accelerated Climate Modeling for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy New Project Is the ACME of Computer Science to Address Climate Change On December 3, 2014, in Analysis, Climate, Global Climate & Energy,...

448

Additional Climate Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Additional Climate Reports Print E-mail Additional Climate Reports Print E-mail Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Reports Internationally, many assessments have been produced to address important questions related to environmental issues such as ozone depletion, climate change, and the loss of biodiversity. Many of these assessments have provided the scientific basis for the elaboration of international agreements, including the Assessment Report Series from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC is a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). IPCC assesses the scientific, technical and socio-economic information relevant for the understanding of the risk of human-induced climate change. Because of its intergovernmental nature, the IPCC is able to provide scientific technical and socio-economic information in a policy-relevant but policy neutral way to decision makers.

449

National Climate Assessment: Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production Team Production Team Indicators System Coastal Resilience Resources Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally National Climate Assessment: Overview Print E-mail What is the National Climate Assessment (NCA)? The NCA is an important resource for understanding and communicating climate change science and impacts in the United States. It informs the nation about already observed changes, the current status of the climate, and anticipated trends for the future. The NCA report process integrates scientific information from multiple sources and sectors to highlight key findings and significant gaps in our knowledge. The NCA also establishes consistent methods for evaluating climate impacts in the U.S. in the context of broader global change. Finally, findings from the NCA provide input to Federal science priorities and are used by U.S. citizens, communities, and businesses as they create more sustainable and environmentally sound plans for the nation's future.

450

Global Climate Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Data The climate data at the ORNL DAAC are used primarily as driving variables in terrestrial biogeochemistry models. These models typically use data on temperature (min,max), precipitation, humidity (relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit, dew point), radiation (PFD in PAR, shortwave, direct/diffuse, and UV radiation, daylength), and wind velocity. Climate / meteorology data are required at hourly to monthly time scales, either point or gridded, at spatial scales ranging from regional to continental to global. The ORNL DAAC currently distributes climate data from several related projects: VEMAP-1 Hydroclimatology, and Global Historical Climatology Network. We are also now distributing climate data developed at the East Anglia Climate Research Unit and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research.

451

International Finance and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Finance and Climate Change Thursday, October 17, 2013 Breakfast ­ 8:30 a Principal Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Group at International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group Vladimir Stenek Senior Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Department of the International

Zhang, Junshan

452

Drought Update Colorado Climate Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drought Update Colorado Climate Center Roger Pielke, Sr., Director Prepared by Tara Green and Odie Bliss http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;© 2003 by The Colorado Climate Center. 2 http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2003/mar/st005dv00pcp200303.html #12;© 2003 by The Colorado Climate Center. 3 #12;© 2003

453

Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

454

Conservation and Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

Landweber, Laura

455

Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

456

Climate Analysis, Monitoring, and Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and hydrological monitoring stations, and improving the projections on future climate change. Climate change. This project continues the state's climate monitoring and analysis program. Project Description in climate projections for the 21st century. · Provide analyses and interpretation of regional climate

457

The Climate Impacts LINK Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate change is relatively undeveloped.The Climate Impacts LINK Project was conceived to encourage research

Feigon, Brooke

458

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Title Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 2 Pagination 168-173 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13- week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings

459

Comparative study of the thermal and power performances of a semi-transparent photovoltaic faade under different ventilation modes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper studied the thermal and power performances of a ventilated photovoltaic faade under different ventilation modes, and appropriate operation strategies for different weather conditions were proposed accordingly to maximize its energy conversion efficiency. This ventilated PV double-skin faade (PV-DSF) consists of an outside layer of semi-transparent amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV laminate, an inward-openable window and a 400mm airflow cavity. Before installation, the electrical characteristics under standard testing conditions (STC) and the temperature coefficients of the semi-transparent PV module were tested and determined in the laboratory. Field measurements were carried out to investigate the impact of different ventilation modes, namely, ventilated, buoyancy-driven ventilated and non-ventilated, on the thermal and power performances of this PV-DSF. The results show that the ventilated PV-DSF provides the lowest average solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) and the non-ventilated PV-DSF provides the best thermal insulation performance. In terms of power performance, the energy output of the ventilated PV-DSF is greater than those of the buoyancy-driven ventilated and non-ventilated PV-DSFs by 1.9% and 3%, respectively, due to its much lower operating temperature. Based on the experimental results, a conclusion was drawn that the ventilation design can not only reduce the heat gain of PV-DSF but also improve the energy conversion efficiency of PV modules by bringing down their operating temperature. In addition, an optimum operation strategy is recommended for this kind of PV-DSF to maximize its overall energy efficiency under different weather conditions.

Jinqing Peng; Lin Lu; Hongxing Yang; Tao Ma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geoscience, Climate and Consequence Effect at Sandia National Laboratories presented on "Hydraulic Fracturing: Role of Government-Sponsored R&D." Marianne's presentation was part...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Climate Change, Drought & Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and EnvironmentMichael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

462

TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT NO. 1: CLIMATE AND INFILTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past 20 years, extensive field, laboratory, and modeling investigations have been performed at Yucca Mountain, which have led to the development of a number of conceptual models of infiltration and climate for the Yucca Mountain region around the repository site (Flint, A.L. et al. 2001; Wang and Bodvarsson 2003). Evaluating the amount of infiltrating water entering the subsurface is important, because this water may affect the percolation flux, which, in turn, controls seepage into the waste emplacement drifts and radionuclide transport from the repository to the water table. Forecasting of climatic data indicates that during the next 10,000 years at Yucca Mountain, the present-day climate should persist for 400 to 600 years, followed by a warmer and much wetter monsoon climate for 900 to 1,400 years, and by a cooler and wetter glacial-transition climate for the remaining 8,000 to 8,700 years. The analysis of climatic forecasting indicates that long-term climate conditions are generally predictable from a past climate sequence, while short-term climate conditions and weather predictions may be more variable and uncertain. The use of past climate sequences to bound future climate sequences involves several types of uncertainties, such as (1) uncertainty in the timing of future climate, (2) uncertainty in the methodology of climatic forecasting, and (3) uncertainty in the earth's future physical processes. Some of the uncertainties of the climatic forecasting are epistemic (reducible) and aleatoric (irreducible). Because of the size of the model domain, INFIL treats many flow processes in a simplified manner. For example, uptake of water by roots occurs according to the ''distributed model'', in which available water in each soil layer is withdrawn in proportion to the root density in that layer, multiplied by the total evapotranspirative demand. Runoff is calculated simply as the excess of precipitation over a sum of infiltration and water storage in the root zone. More significantly, water movement throughout the soil profile is treated according to the bucket model, in which the amount of water that moves down from one layer to the next is equal to the mass of water in excess of field capacity in the upper layer. The development of a numerical model of infiltration involves a number of abstractions and simplifications to represent the complexity of environmental conditions at Yucca Mountain, such as the arid climate, mountain-type topography, heterogeneous soils and fractured rock, and irregular soil-rock interface.

NA

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Model of ventilation flows during large tunnel fires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to describe the reduction in the longitudinal airflow velocity due to the fire and hot gases resistances in a large tunnel fire, a theoretical model, taking into consideration the pressure losses over the fire source and obstructions, the thermal stack effects, and the hydraulic resistance induced by the tunnel walls, fire protection boards and a HGV trailer mock-up, is developed and validated using the large-scale tests data from the fire tests performed in the Runehamar tunnel with longitudinal ventilation in Norway 2003. Two large mobile fan units were used to create a longitudinal flow within the tunnel and prevent smoke backlayering upstream of the fire. One fan was located outside the entrance of the tunnel and the other inside the tunnel. The fire load consisted of a mock-up simulating a heavy goods vehicle (HGV) trailer creating a maximum heat release rates in the range of 66202MW. Two methods of calculating the mean temperature related to the thermal expansion and stack effect are proposed and compared.

Haukur Ingason; Anders Lnnermark; Ying Zhen Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

465

Evaluation of Energy Efficiency Measures in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Prototype, Storefront Retail Building Prototype Stand-alone Retail Building Small Retail Location Hawaii West Africa Thailand various various various various Climate Zone(s) 1A 1A 1A 1A, 2A, 3B, 4A, 5A & 6A 1A, 2A, 3B, 4A, 5... External External Window-to- wall area ratio >40% 23% 31% 40%, window evenly distributed on exterior walls 35%, most windows on south and west walls 35% Various Proposed HVAC System VRV and DOAS VAV with reheat, air- cooled chillers VAV...

Zhao, Y.; Erwine, B.; Leonard, P.; Pease, B.; Dole, A.; Lee, A.

466

book review: Climate change mapped  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ofmillions 2 . Climatechangeisamovingtargetandintroductions to climatechange,theAtlasstandsoutmediareportingonclimatechange. CambridgeUniversity

Shanahan, Mike

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Climate Change at Annual Timescales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon cycling to global climate change, Nature, 393 (6682),2005. Meehl, G. , et al. , Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, chap. 10. Global

Stine, Alexander Robin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developing countries "can significantly offset the adverse effects of climate change").Climate Change, 2 which calls on developed countries (but not developing countries)developing countries that will bear the bulk of the effects of climate change.

Cole, Daniel H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Climate Change and National Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associ- ated with climate change are multi-dimensional, andpotential consequences of climate change in coming decades.designed to forecast climate changes at mid-cen- tury and

Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

471

Moving Toward Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a response to climate disruption. Even the most optimistic models forecast that if greenhouse-gas emissions Appendix 1 Solutions on the Ground 67 Appendix 2 Reliability of Trends and Forecasts 78 Literature Cited 81. In the absence of substantial reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, the climate of the Y2Y region

472

Climate VISION: News Archive  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

News Archive News Archive Collapse all | Expand all 2007 November 30, 2007 USTR Schwab to Announce New Climate Initiatives for WTO, Including a New Environmental Goods and Services Agreement November 28, 2007 U.S. Energy Information Administration Anounces U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Declined 1.5 Percent in 2006 November 20, 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for Research on Climate Change Awarded to U.S. Forest Service Scientists November 16, 2007 Our Changing Planet: The U.S. Climate Change Science Program for Fiscal Year 2008 Report Released October 18, 2007 U.S. DOE Issues Third U.S. Climate Change Science Program Report October 15, 2007 The Government of India Hosts the Second Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate Ministerial Meeting Fall 2007 EPA's 2nd measurement campaign to evaluate the performance of installed PFC

473

Climate VISION: News  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

News Climate Vison RSS Recent News Feed News Climate Vison RSS Recent News Feed July 20, 2010 Secretary Chu Announces Initiatives to Promote Clean Energy at First Clean Energy Ministerial Read the Press Release and Download Fact Sheet (PDF 76 KB) July 20, 2010 Government and corporate leaders announced a new public-private partnership, Global Superior Energy Performancecm at the Clean Energy Ministerial in Washington D.C. Read More and Download Fact Sheet (PDF 124 KB) June 20, 2010 Seventh Meeting of the Leaders' Representatives of the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate Read the Co-Chair's Summary June 1, 2010 Department of State releases Fifth U.S. Climate Action Report Read the Press Release December 18, 2009 Remarks by the President at the Morning Plenary Session of the United Nations Climate Change Conference

474

climate | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

climate climate Dataset Summary Description The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Services (NESDIS), in conjunction with the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) publish monthly and annual climate data by state for the U.S., including, cooling degree days (total number of days per month and per year). The average values for each state are weighted by population, using 2000 Census data. The base temperature for this dataset is 65 degrees F. Source NOAA Date Released Unknown Date Updated June 24th, 2005 (9 years ago) Keywords climate cooling degree days NOAA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon hcs_51_avg_cdd.xls (xls, 215.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

475

National Climate Assessment: Production Team  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NCA & Development Advisory Committee NCA & Development Advisory Committee Production Team Indicators System Coastal Resilience Resources Make Our Science Accessible Link Climate Change & Health Provide Data and Tools Coordinate Internationally National Climate Assessment: Production Team Print E-mail National Climate Assessment Staff (USGCRP National Coordination Office) Current NCA Staff Dr. Fabien Laurier, Director, Third National Climate Assessment Dr. Glynis Lough, Chief of Staff for the National Climate Assessment Emily Therese Cloyd, Engagement Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Bryce Golden-Chen, Program Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment Alison Delgado, Scientist Dr. Ilya Fischhoffkri, Scientist Melissa Kenney, Indicators Coordinator Dr. Fred Lipschultz, Regional Coordinator for the National Climate Assessment

476

Urban Growth and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1999, Climate Change, Agriculture, and Developing Countries:climate change matters because it is likely to be the case that local governments in developing countries

Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Climate Change/Paleoclimate & Geochronology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate ChangePaleoclimate & Geochronology "The instrumental record is generally considered not to be long enough to give a complete picture of climate variability... It is...

478

Climate Change | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

adaptive capacity and amplify potential impacts. Source: Gautam, M. R.; Chief, K.; Smith Jr., W.J. (2013). Climatic Change Climate Change Webinar Series Recordings and...

479

Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Performance, Energy, and Associated Economics Title Changing Ventilation Rates in U.S. Offices: Implications for Health, Work Performance, Energy, and Associated Economics Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5035E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Fisk, William J., Douglas R. Black, and Gregory Brunner Journal Building and Environment Volume 47 Pagination 368-372 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords cost-benefit analysis, economizer, health, office, ventilation rate, work performance Abstract This paper provides quantitative estimates of benefits and costs of providing different amounts of outdoor air ventilation in U.S. offices. For four scenarios that modify ventilation rates, we estimated changes in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, work performance, short-term absence, and building energy consumption. The estimated annual economic benefits were $13 billion from increasing minimum ventilation rates (VRs) from 8 to 10 L/s per person, $38 billion from increasing minimum VRs from 8 to 15 L/s per person, and $33 billion from increasing VRs by adding outdoor air economizers for the 50% of the office floor area that currently lacks economizers. The estimated $0.04 billion in annual energy-related benefits of decreasing minimum VRs from 8 to 6.5 L/s per person are very small compared to the projected annual costs of $12 billion. Benefits of increasing minimum VRs far exceeded energy costs while adding economizers yielded health, performance, and absence benefits with energy savings.

480

Enterprise Zone Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alabama) Alabama) Enterprise Zone Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Enterprise Zone Provider Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs The Enterprise Zone Program provides certain tax incentives to corporations, partnerships and proprietorships that locate or expand within designated Enterprise Zones. In addition to state-level tax incentives, businesses may also receive local tax and non-tax incentives for locating or expanding within a designated Enterprise Zone. Section 5 of the Alabama Enterprise Zone Program offers the following tax incentives: Credit based

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ventilation climate zone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Heating & Cooling Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Wind Maximum Rebate None Program Info Start Date 07/12/2006 State Michigan Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount 100% abatement of Michigan Business Tax, state education tax, personal and real property taxes, and local income taxes Provider Michigan Economic Development Corporation In 2006, Michigan enacted legislation allowing for the creation of Renewable Energy Renaissance Zones (RERZ). Renaissance zones -- renewable energy renaissance zones are just one type -- offer significant tax

482

Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) Enterprise Zone Program (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Enterprise Zone Provider Louisiana Economic Development The Enterprise Zone Program is a jobs incentive program providing Louisiana income and franchise tax credits to businesses hiring at least 35% of net, new jobs from targeted groups. Enterprise Zones (EZs) are areas with high unemployment, low income, or a high percentage of residents receiving some

483

TOPICS IN CLIMATE RESEARCH Course Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Projects 6 Climate Theory; Climate Forcing; Climate Feedbacks I 4 7 Climate Theory; Climate ForcingTOPICS IN CLIMATE RESEARCH AT 755 Course Description: This course is a survey of current topics in climate research, including the decadal to paleoclimate observational record, the impacts of climate

484

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS Webinar (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text version of the webinar, DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS, presented in August 2014.

485

Connection of the Panama fracture zone with the Galapagos rift zone, eastern tropical Pacific  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetic data recently collected in the eastern tropical Pacific confirm that the Galapagos rift zone is connected to the Panama fracture zone by a short north-south...

Paul J. Grim

1970-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Unsaturated Zone and Saturated Zone Transport Properties (U0100)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) summarizes transport properties for the lower unsaturated zone hydrogeologic units and the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain and provides a summary of data from the Busted Butte Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT). The purpose of this report is to summarize the sorption and transport knowledge relevant to flow and transport in the units below Yucca Mountain and to provide backup documentation for the sorption parameters decided upon for each rock type. Because of the complexity of processes such as sorption, and because of the lack of direct data for many conditions that may be relevant for Yucca Mountain, data from systems outside of Yucca Mountain are also included. The data reported in this AMR will be used in Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations and as general scientific support for various Process Model Reports (PMRs) requiring knowledge of the transport properties of different materials. This report provides, but is not limited to, sorption coefficients and other relevant thermodynamic and transport properties for the radioisotopes of concern, especially neptunium (Np), plutonium (Pu), Uranium (U), technetium (Tc), iodine (I), and selenium (Se). The unsaturated-zone (UZ) transport properties in the vitric Calico Hills (CHv) are discussed, as are colloidal transport data based on the Busted Butte UZTT, the saturated tuff, and alluvium. These values were determined through expert elicitation, direct measurements, and data analysis. The transport parameters include information on interactions of the fractures and matrix. In addition, core matrix permeability data from the Busted Butte UZTT are summarized by both percent alteration and dispersion.

J. Conca

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

487

Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate simulators and climate projections Jonathan Rougier1 Department of Mathematics University;Abstract We provide a statistical interpretation of current practice in climate mod- elling. This includes: definitions for weather and climate; clarifying the relationship between simulator output and simulator

Dixon, Peter

488

Cleanup and Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Ventilation Systems Using Robotic Tools - 13162  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UP1 plant reprocessed nearly 20,000 tons of used natural uranium gas cooled reactor fuel coming from the first generation of civil nuclear reactors in France. Following operating incidents in the eighties, the ventilation system of the continuous dissolution line facility was shut down and replaced. Two types of remote controlled tool carriers were developed to perform the decontamination and dismantling operations of the highly contaminated ventilation duct network. The first one, a dedicated small robot, was designed from scratch to retrieve a thick powder deposit within a duct. The robot, managed and confined by two dedicated glove boxes, was equipped for intervention inside the ventilation duct and used for carrying various cleanup and inspection tools. The second type, consisting of robotic tools developed on the base of an industrial platform, was used for the clean-up and dismantling of the ventilation duct system. Depending on the type of work to be performed, on the shape constraints of the rooms and any equipment to be dismantled, different kinds of robotic tools were developed and installed on a Brokk 40 carrier. After more than ten years of ventilation duct D and D operations at the UP1 plant, a lot of experience was acquired about remote operations. The three main important lessons learned in terms of remote controlled operation are: characterizing the initial conditions as much as reasonably possible, performing non-radioactive full scale testing and making it as simple and modular as possible. (authors)

Chambon, Frederic [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia MD (United States)] [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia MD (United States); CIZEL, Jean-Pierre [AREVA BE/NV, Marcoule (France)] [AREVA BE/NV, Marcoule (France); Blanchard, Samuel [CEA DEN/DPAD, Marcoule (France)] [CEA DEN/DPAD, Marcoule (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

491

The Border Cities Enterprise Zone Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Border Cities Enterprise Zone Program provides business tax credits to businesses that invest, develop, expand, and create jobs in identified Border-Cities Enterprise Zones. Companies may be...

492

Farmland Security Zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Farmland Security ZoneLegal Abstract California Department of Conservation,...

493

Enterprise Zone Sales Tax Exemption (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Enterprise Zone Sales Tax Exemption offers businesses located in such economic development zones a 100 percent sales tax exemption on the purchase of labor and materials to construct or remodel...

494

Local Option- Rural Renewable Energy Development Zones  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cities, counties, or several contiguous counties in Oregon can set up Rural Renewable Energy Development Zones. The zone can only cover territory outside of the urban growth boundary of any large...

495

Climate VISION: Program Mission  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

PROGRAM MISSION PROGRAM MISSION Climate VISION - Voluntary Innovative Sector Initiatives: Opportunities Now - is a voluntary public-private partnership initiative to improve energy efficiency and greenhouse gas intensity in energy-intensive industrial sectors. Climate VISION - Voluntary Innovative Sector Initiatives: Opportunities Now - is a public-private partnership initiative launched by the Department of Energy on February 12, 2003. Its primary goal is to identify and pursue cost-effective options to improve the energy or GHG intensity of industry operations by accelerating the transition to technologies, practices, and processes that are cleaner, more efficient, and capable of reducing, capturing or sequestering GHGs. Climate VISION links these objectives with technology development,

496

Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other stakeholders in the Eastern Interconnection identify geographic areas suitable for the development of clean energy resources (natural gas, sequestration or utilitization locations for C02 from coal, nuclear, and renewable) which can potentially provide significant amounts of new electric power generation.

497

Understanding and Attributing Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Understanding and Attributing Climate Change Coordinating Lead Authors: Gabriele C. Hegerl (USA. Nicholls, J.E. Penner and P.A. Stott, 2007: Under- standing and Attributing Climate Change. In: Climate of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M

Box, Jason E.

498

Biological Impacts of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

McCarty, John P.

499

"Bivariate Downscaling for Climate Projections"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Bivariate Downscaling for Climate Projections" Xuming He Department of Statistics University is a useful technique to localize global or regional climate model projections to assess the potential impact of climate changes. It requires quantifying a relationship between climate model output and local

Wang, Lily

500

Related Federal Climate Efforts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Related Federal Climate Efforts Print E-mail Related Federal Climate Efforts Print E-mail Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage The Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a group of technologies for capturing, compressing, transporting and permanently storing power plant and industrial source emissions of carbon dioxide. Rapid development and deployment of clean coal technologies, particularly CCS, will help position the United States as a leader in the global clean energy race. Climate Change Adaptation Task Force The Task Force's work has been guided by a strategic vision of a resilient, healthy, and prosperous Nation in the face of a changing climate. To achieve this vision, the Task Force identified a set of guiding principles that public and private decision-makers should consider in designing and implementing adaptation strategies.