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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Upgrading coal plant damper drives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The replacement of damper drives on two coal-fired units at the James H. Miller Jr. electric generating plant by Intelligent Contrac electric rotary actuators is discussed. 2 figs.

Hood, N.R.; Simmons, K. [Alamaba Power (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Dampers for Natural Draft Heaters: Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy required for water heating accounts for approximately 40percent of national residential natural gas consumption in California. With water heating contributing such a substantial portion of natural gas consumption, it is important to pay attention to water heater efficiencies. This paper reports on an investigation of a patented, buoyancy-operated flue damper. It is an add-on design to a standard atmospherically vented natural-draft gas-fired storage water heater. The flue damper was expected to reduce off-cycle standby losses, which would lead to improvements in the efficiency of the water heater. The test results showed that the Energy Factor of the baseline water heater was 0.576. The recovery efficiency was 0.768. The standby heat loss coefficient was 10.619 (BTU/hr-oF). After the damper was installed, the test results show an Energy Factor for the baseline water heater of 0.605. The recovery efficiency was 0.786. The standby heat loss coefficient was 9.135 (BTU/hr-oF). The recovery efficiency increased 2.3percent and the standby heat loss coefficient decreased 14percent. When the burner was on, the baseline water heater caused 28.0 CFM of air to flow from the room. During standby, the flow was 12.4 CFM. The addition of the damper reduced the flow when the burner was on to 23.5 CFM. During standby, flow with the damper was reduced to 11.1 CFM. The flue damper reduced off-cycle standby losses, and improved the efficiency of the water heater. The flue damper also improved the recovery efficiency of the water heater by restricting on-cycle air flows through the flue.With or without the flue damper, off-cycle air flow upthe stack is nearly half the air flow rate as when the burner is firing.

Lutz, James D.; Biermayer, Peter; King, Derek

2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

Damper mechanism for nuclear reactor control elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A damper mechanism which provides a nuclear reactor control element decelerating function at the end of the scram stroke. The total damping function is produced by the combination of two assemblies, which operate in sequence. First, a tapered dashram assembly decelerates the control element to a lower velocity, after which a spring hydraulic damper assembly takes over to complete the final damping.

Taft, William Elwood (Los Gatos, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Battery venting system and method  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Casale, Thomas J. (Aurora, CO); Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO); Baer, Jose T. (Gaviota, CA); Swan, David H. (Monrovia, CA)

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

5

Battery Vent Mechanism And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

Ching, Larry K. W. (Littleton, CO)

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Battery venting system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

7

Coil spring venting arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

McCugh, R.M.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

8

The metallurgical integrity of the frit vent assembly diffusion bond  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVSs) are now being made by Energy Systems at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These CVSs are being made for the US Department of Energy`s (NE-53) General Purpose Heat Source- Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) program, which is to supply electrical power for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Cassini mission to Saturn. A GPHS-RTG has 72 CVSs. Each CVS encapsulates one {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet. The helium gas produced from the alpha decay of the {sup 238}Pu is vented through a nominal 0.45-mm-diam hole in the vent cup of each CVS. A frit vent assembly that is electron beam welded over the vent hole allows helium gas to escape but prevents plutonia fines from exiting. The metallurgical integrity of frit vent assemblies produced by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) were compared with those produced earlier by EG&G-Mound Applied Technology, Inc. (EG&G-MAT). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs were taken (at magnifications of from 126X to 1,000X) of the starting frit vent powder and the diffusion-bonded powder in finished frit vent assemblies produced by Energy Systems and EG&G-MAT. Frit vent assemblies also were metallographically prepared and visually examined/photographed at magnifications of from 50X to 1,000X. The SEM and metallographic examinations of the particle-to-particle and particle-to-foil component diffusion bonds indicated that the Energy Systems-produced and EG&G-MAT-produced frit vent assemblies have comparable metallurgical integrity. Statistical analysis of the Energy Systems production data shows that the frit vent manufacturing yield is 91%.

Ulrich, G.B. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States). Process Metallurgy Dept.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Life and hydrothermal vents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life and hydrothermal vents Life and hydrothermal vents Name: williamh Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Are there biological communities near hydrothermal vents in the ocean? Is there any life inside the hydrothermal vent? Replies: If the presence of microorganisms in hot springs and geysers are any indication, I am certain there is life inside hydrothermal vents. These heat loving organisms are termed "thermophiles" and thrive where other life dies. They are able to survive in extreme heat due to the unique way their proteins are synthesized. The May 1993 Discover has a special article on thermophiles. wizkid Life at high temperature became very interesting to molecular biologists recently. The enormously useful technique known as PCR, (polymerase chain reaction), by which very small amounts of rare DNA can be amplified to large concentrations (Jurassic Park!), depends on having a DNA polymerase (the enzyme that synthesizes complementary DNA strands during replication of chromosomes), that can work at high temperatures, or at least can survive repeated high temperature cycles. PCR depends on synthesis of DNA followed by forced separation of the daughter strands at high temperature, followed by new synthesis, to amplify DNA exponentially. At any rate, normal bacterial polymerase will not work because the high temperature cycles kill it. Enter the now infamous, patented Taq polymerase, isolated from Thermus aquaticus, a hot spring bacterium, which works after heating to up to 94 C! So knowledge of life at high temperature allowed molecular biologists to get PCR to work, with all its benefits in cloning very rare genes and amplifying small amounts of DNA for forensic work etc.

10

HVAC Fans and Dampers Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems serve an important function in nuclear power plants because these systems are responsible for maintaining many environmental conditions throughout the facility. Failure of these components can induce undesirable radiological conditions and stressful working conditions, and can compromise the life of qualified equipment. Some HVAC fan and damper failures are preventable by monitoring operating parameters and performing recommended maintenance activ...

1999-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

Dampers for Natural Draft Heaters: Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vented natural-draft gas-fired storage water heater. Thevented natural?draft gas?fired storage water heater. Thevented natural?draft gas?fired storage water heater. The

Lutz, James D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

Rogers, S.C.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

13

Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180.degree. intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

Rogers, Samuel C. (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The mathematical modeling of a Tuned Liquid Damper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research is the simplification of the mathematical modeling process of a Tuned Liquid Damper. In an environment of increasingly flexible and lightly damped structures, the suppression of structural vibrations is an important topic. The use of secondary mass systems (generally mass and liquid dampers) to control the displacements and accelerations in one or more vibration modes of the structure is a viable and popular solution. The development of a mathematical model to successfully model the response of a Tuned Liquid Damper will encourage its more frequent use in building systems. Using a simplified mathematical model, the secondary liquid system can be effectively 'linked' to the primary structural system model in specific locations, as necessary. The model is derived from conventional dynamic theories and fluid fundamentals to present an approximate solution for the response forces generated by a rectangular liquid tank subjected to an arbitrary excitation. The mathematical model is shown to generate stable solutions which correlate well with the results of extensive experimental work. The mathematical Tuned Liquid Damper model developed in this study is based on existing theoretical descriptions of wave action in a tank, and is calibrated and tested with data from a laboratory investigation. This laboratory study used a relatively massive (approximately 1000 pound) dynamic system consisting of two rigid masses, associated springs and dampers, and the attached Tuned Liquid Damper. Considerable effort has been directed towards the development of system identification methods for the structural model, as well as for the Tuned Liquid Damper. Mathematical parametric studies have then been used to further refine the mathematical model and to predict the effectiveness of the Tuned Liquid Damper for structures and excitations not tested in the laboratory. Finally, preliminary designs have been developed for hypothetical deployment of Tuned Liquid Dampers in two real high-rise buildings.

Tokarczyk, Bryan Lee

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hom dampers for ALS storage ring RF cavities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the HOM dampers on ALS rf cavities was an immediatesuccess. Now, the ALS storage ring can operate with the 312The cross-section of the ALS third harmonic cavity with two

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Passive tuned liquid damper for structural control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last two decades, structural control concepts have received considerable attention for the design of large civil structures. Particular attention has been paid in Tuned Liquid Damper(TLD) in this thesis. Extensive experiment have been performed. Effectiveness of TLD under harmonic and random excitation has been investigated. TLD damping has been assessed by various ways. Some optimal design parameters has been surveyed. TLD control mechanism has been studied by curve fitting technique in time domain and Laplace domain. Experimental results confirmed that TLD is effective to control the structural vibration when the TLD parameters are properly designed. Interaction of TLD with SDOF model has been simulated. The use of a transfer function to describe the slosh force of the liquid upon the tank motion to simulate the interaction has been proposed. The simulated values compare fairly well with experimental data. Also based on the transfer function method, the interaction of TLD with a building has been simulated. Large reduction in building response to earthquake has been observed.

Li, Jianxun

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Controlled deformation of critical truss members using magnetorheological dampers with reversed power requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A magnetorheological (MR) damper exhibits a variable damping coefficient depending on the strength of an accompanying magnetic field. A high magnetic field creates a nearly unyielding damper filled with a semi-solid fluid while no magnetic field produces an ordinary viscous damper. Presently, these dampers are being used in a variety of ways by supplying power to an electromagnet that causes stiffening of the damper. Reversing these power requirements allows development of new and innovative applications for MR dampers. For example, ephemeral deformation of critical truss members may be controlled through a reverse MR damper. The goal is to provide protection to truss structures during severe loading events. Implementation of a reverse damper for an application such as this presents two major tasks: (1) development of a control algorithm and (2) design of an MR damper with reverse power requirements. A control algorithm for dynamic response that uses fuzzy logic and neural networks is presented. A potential design for a reverse MR damper utilizing a combination of permanent magnets and electromagnets is also presented. It is further shown that design for MR dampers with reverse power requirements will be governed by minimization of detrimental effects due to creep of the damper under sustained static loading.

Dowd, Joseph A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

Sawabe, James K. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

19

Application of MR damper in structural control using ANFIS method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection of civil engineering structures from excessive vibration due to uncontrollable events such as earthquake has increasingly been of importance for the purpose of maintaining structural integrity and serviceability. This paper presents the development ... Keywords: ANFIS, Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system, Earthquake loading of structures, Fuzzy logic control theory, LQG control, MR damper, Smart materials, Smart structures, Structural control, Vibration control

Zhi Q. Gu; S. Olutunde Oyadiji

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

Sawabe, J.K.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Experimental study of rotordynamic coefficients of squeeze film dampers of an aircraft gas turbine engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The rotordynamic coefficients of squeeze film dampers of an aircraft gas turbine engine were investigated experimentally. Rotordynamic model(XLROTOR) for Gas Generator and Power Turbine were… (more)

Na, Uhn Joo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Identification of force coefficients in a squeeze film damper with a mechanical seal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Squeeze film dampers (SFDs) with low levels of external pressurization and poor end sealing are prone to air entrapment, thus reducing the damping capability. Furthermore,… (more)

Delgado-Marquez, Adolfo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Neuro-fuzzy control of vertical vibrations in railcars using magnetorheological dampers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of vertical vibrations in a railcar is a critical issue that has been addressed by many researchers in the past. This thesis presents a new approach to solving the problem by using a semi-active viscous damper in tandem with a neuro-fuzzy controller. A pair of magnetorheological (MR) dampers is designed and installed in a rail truck. Two neuro-fuzzy systems, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Neuro Fuzzy Controller (NEFCON), are used to emulate behavior of the MR dampers and to train a controller fuzzy inference system (FIS), respectively. In order to design the dampers, a series of numerical simulations is conducted for a fully loaded railcar traveling over a wide range of velocities to estimate the magnitude of critical accelerations. A variety of damping coefficients are assumed for a linear viscous damper to determine the force requirements of the MR dampers. Based on design parameters provided by Lord Corporation, two MR dampers are fabricated and assembled. These dampers are tested extensively in a laboratory and data obtained from these tests are used to train, test, and validate a fuzzy model of each damper. Two controller FIS are trained using NEFCON in a numerical environment to send a time varying voltage signal to the two MR dampers during motion in the railcar. Determination of the voltage signal to the dampers is based solely on feedback from accelerometers attached to the railcar. A detailed parametric study is carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the fuzzy controllers in reducing vibrations of a railcar for different haul conditions. The performance of MR dampers in their passive-off, passive-on, and semi-active operating condition is compared with that of four linear viscous dampers. Finally, an idealized model of each MR damper is developed and the ability of each corresponding controller to reduce vibrations is also evaluated. Results indicate that the semi-active vibration control strategy can reduce vibrations of the railcar to within a specified limit, provided that a sufficient level of resisting force is applied by both dampers. Further research into full-scale field-testing of railcars with MR dampers installed in them is advocated.

Atray, Vipul Sunil

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

January 2010 Venting Flammable Liquid Storage Cabinets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unless You Have To According to NFPA 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code Handbook, venting exhaust system using rigid metal piping equivalent or better than that used in construction of the cabinet. Cabinets shall NOT be vented directly into the fume hood, through the fume hood work surface. Piping must

Kolner, Brian H.

25

Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade...

26

Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Release Date: 9302013 Next Release Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Vented and Flared Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Vented and Flared...

27

Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

Campana, Robert J. (Solana Beach, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Experimental Dynamic Forced Performance of a Centrally Grooved, End Sealed Squeeze Film Damper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Squeeze film dampers (SFDs) provide viscous damping to attenuate excessive vibrations and enhance system stability in turbomachinery. SFDs are of special importance in aircraft engines which use rolling element support bearings that, by themselves, do not provide enough damping to ensure safe operation. A modular test rig capable of simulating actual operating conditions in aircraft jet engines is used to test two centrally grooved, end sealed, SFDs. Both SFDs have diameter D and nominal radial clearance c and consist of two parallel squeeze film lands separated by a deep circumferential groove of length LG and depth dG. A short length damper with film land lengths L and a long damper with land lengths 2L are tested. Piston rings seal the damper lands. An ISO VG2 lubricant is supplied to the SFD via three radial holes that discharge lubricant into the central groove. The lubricant passes through the damper lands and across the piston ring seals to finally exit the damper at ambient pressure. Circular orbit tests of amplitude ~0.5c and for static eccentricities varying from 0 to ~0.36c are conducted on the two sealed dampers. The instrumental variable filter method (IVFM) serves to identify the SFD dynamic force coefficients. The parameter identification range is 50Hz to 210Hz for the short damper and 110Hz to 250Hz for the long damper. Large amplitude dynamic pressures measured in the central groove demonstrate that the central groove does not divide the damper in two separate film lands, but the lubricant in the groove interacts with the squeeze film lands, hence contributing significantly to the SFD forced response. Dynamic pressures in the film lands and in the central groove reveal that both dampers operate free of air ingestion or cavitation for the tested static eccentricities and amplitudes of motion. Comparisons to test results for the same SFD configurations but with open ends demonstrate the effectiveness of the end seals on increasing the direct damping coefficients. For the sealed ends short length damper, the added mass coefficients are ~2 times larger and the damping coefficients are ~3.8 times larger than the respective coefficients of the open ends long damper. For the sealed ends long damper, the damping coefficients are ~2.8 times, and the added mass coefficients are ~3.1 times larger than coefficients from the open ends configuration. The identified SFD direct stiffness coefficients are nearly zero except at the maximum static eccentricity for the long damper. Predictions from a novel computational model that include the effects of the central groove, the lubricant feed holes and the end seals are in excellent agreement with results from the short length damper. For the long damper, the predicted damping coefficients are in good agreement with the test results, while the added mass coefficients are under predicted by ~25 percent. Experimental results from the two sealed SFD configurations lead to a better understanding of the effects of end seals as well as central feed groves on the SFD forced performance. The results presented in this thesis will help improve the effectiveness of SFDs aircraft jet engines.

Mahecha Mojica, Lady Paola

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY  

SciTech Connect

A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

New waveguide-type HOM damper for ALS storage ring cavities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WAVEGUIDE-TYPE HOM DAMPER FOR ALS STORAGE RING CAVITIES*.CA, 94720, USA Abstract The ALS storage ring 500 MHz RFoperations issue at the ALS. During three consecutive

Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Baptiste, Kenneth; Julian, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

32

Composition of gases vented from a condenser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designers of systems that involve condensers often need to predict the amount of process vapor that accompanies the noncondensable gases that are vented from the condensers. An approximation is given that appears to provide, in many cases, reasonably accurate values for the mole ratio of process vapor to noncondensable gases in the vented mixture. The approximation is particularly applicable to flash and direct-contact power systems for geothermal brines and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). More regorous relationships are available for exceptional cases.

Lyon, R.N.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA); Jackaway, Adam D. (Berkeley, CA)

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

34

Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

35

Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0...

36

Hydrothermal vent complexes associated with sill intrusionsin sedimentarybasins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 477 Discussion on structure and evolution of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin, South the paper by Svensen et al. (2006) on South African hydrothermal vents within the Karoo Basin, particularly for their interest in our paper on hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin (Svensen et al. 2006). Based

Podladchikov, Yuri

37

Electrochemical cell having improved pressure vent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The electrochemical cell of the instant invention includes a case having a gas outlet, one or more positive electrodes positioned within the case, one or more negative electrodes positioned within the case electrode separators positioned between the positive and negative electrodes, electrolyte positioned within the case, and a pressure vent for releasing internal pressure occurring in the case to the surrounding atmosphere. The pressure vent is affixed to the case covering the gas outlet, the pressure vent includes a vent housing having a hollow interior area in gaseous communication with the surrounding atmosphere and the interior of the case via the gas outlet, a pressure release piston positioned within the hollow interior area, the pressure release piston sized to surround the gas outlet and having a seal groove configured to encapsulate all but one surface of a seal mounted within the seal groove, leaving the non-encapsulated surface of the seal exposed, and a compression spring positioned to urge the pressure release piston to compress the seal in the seal groove and block the gas outlet in the case.

Dean, Kevin (Pontiac, MI); Holland, Arthur (Troy, MI); Fillmore, Donn (Waterford, MI)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

39

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

40

Design of a Power Oscillation Damper for DFIG-based Wind Energy Conversion System Using Modified Particle Swarm Optimizer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method to design a Power Oscillation Damper (POD) for Double-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) based Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS), operating with voltage control loop. Based on eigen values information from Small Signal Stability ... Keywords: Computational Intelligence, double fed induction generator, power oscillation damper, modified particle swarm optimizer, small signal stability analysis, wind energy conversion system

Huazhang Huang; C. Y. Chung

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Development of nonlinear analytical model and seismic analyses of a steel frame with self-centering devices and viscoelastic dampers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights the role of advanced structural analysis tools on the conception of high-performance earthquake-resistant structural systems. A new steel frame equipped with self-centering devices and viscoelastic dampers is described. A prototype ... Keywords: Damage-free, High-performance, Seismic design, Self-centering, Steel MRF, Viscoelastic dampers

Theodore L. Karavasilis; Tony Blakeborough; Martin S. Williams

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Comparative Study of Vented vs. Unvented Crawlspaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been a significant amount of research in the area of building energy efficiency and durability. However, well-documented quantitative information on the impact of crawlspaces on the performance of residential structures is lacking. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of two crawlspace strategies on the whole-house performance of a pair of houses in a mixed humid climate. These houses were built with advanced envelope systems to provide energy savings of 50% or more compared to traditional 2010 new construction. One crawlspace contains insulated walls and is sealed and semi-conditioned. The other is a traditional vented crawlspace with insulation in the crawlspace ceiling. The vented (traditional) crawlspace contains fiberglass batts installed in the floor chase cavities above the crawl, while the sealed and insulated crawlspace contains foil-faced polyisocyanurate foam insulation on the interior side of the masonry walls. Various sensors to measure temperatures, heat flux through crawlspace walls and ceiling, and relative humidity were installed in the two crawlspaces. Data from these sensors have been analyzed to compare the performance of the two crawlspace designs. The analysis results indicated that the sealed and insulated crawlspace design is better than the traditional vented crawlspace in the mixed humid climate.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Experimental evaluation of a metal-mesh bearing damper in a high speed test rig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal mesh is a commercially available material used in many applications including seals, heat shields, filters, gaskets, aircraft engine mounts, and vibration absorbers. This material has been tested in the Turbomachinery Laboratory at Texas A&M University (TAMU) as a bearing damper in a rotordynamic test rig. The test facility was originally used to support the design of a turboprop engine at TAMU, developing squirrel cage bearing supports and squeeze film dampers for both the gas generator and power turbine rotors. To design the metal mesh damper, static stiffness and dynamic rap test measurements were first made on metal mesh samples in a specially designed non-rotating test fixture. These property tests were performed on samples of various densities and press fits. One sample was also tested in an Instron machine as an ancillary and redundant way to determine the stiffness. Using the stiffness test results and equations derived by a previous investigator, a spreadsheet program was written and used to size metal mesh donuts that have the radial stiffness value required to replace the squirrel cage in the power turbine. The squirrel cage and squeeze-film bearing damper developed for the power turbine rotor was then replaced by a metal mesh donut sized by the computer code. Coast-down tests were conducted through the first critical speed of the power turbine. The results of the metal mesh tests were compared with those obtained from previous testing with the squeeze film damper. The results show that the metal mesh damper has the same damping as the squeeze film at room temperature but does not lose its damping at elevated temperatures up to 210F?. Experiments were run under several different conditions including balanced rotor hot oil soaked, unbalanced rotor hot oil soaked, balanced dry, and unbalanced dry. Over all, metal mesh dampers appear to be a viable and attractive substitute for squeeze film dampers in gas turbine engines. The advantages shown to date include less variation of damping with temperature, ability to handle large rotor unbalance, and the ability (if required) to operate effectively in an oil free environment.

Zarzour, Mark Joseph

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

45

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

46

Why Sequence Bacteria in Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vents?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria in Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vents? The project focuses on using single-cell genomics to sequence nearly a dozen genomes of uncultivated bacteria that are found in...

47

Using the transverse digital damper as a real-time tune monitor for the Booster synchrotron at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fermilab Booster is a fast ramping (15Hz) synchrotron which accelerates protons from 400MeV to 8GeV. During commissioning of a transverse digital damper system, it was shown that the damper could provide a measurement of the machine tune throughout the cycle by exciting just 1 of the 84 bunches with minimal impact on the machine operation. The algorithms used to make the measurement have been incorporated into the damper FPGA firmware allowing for real-time tune monitoring of all Booster cycles. A new Booster tune monitor was implemented in the digital damper which has minimal impact on the Booster operation. The tune measures the tunes in two planes over the energy ramping cycle with an accuracy of 0.01 in real time.

Eddy, N.; Lysenko, O.; /FERMILAB

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Staged venting of fuel cell system during rapid shutdown  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A venting methodology and system for rapid shutdown of a fuel cell apparatus of the type used in a vehicle propulsion system. H.sub.2 and air flows to the fuel cell stack are slowly bypassed to the combustor upon receipt of a rapid shutdown command. The bypass occurs over a period of time (for example one to five seconds) using conveniently-sized bypass valves. Upon receipt of the rapid shutdown command, the anode inlet of the fuel cell stack is instantaneously vented to a remote vent to remove all H.sub.2 from the stack. Airflow to the cathode inlet of the fuel cell stack gradually diminishes over the bypass period, and when the airflow bypass is complete the cathode inlet is also instantaneously vented to a remote vent to eliminate pressure differentials across the stack.

Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Neuro-fuzzy control of an MDOF building with a magnetorheological damper using acceleration feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parameter specification of a fuzzy inference system (HS) with the aid of artificial neural networks allows the creation of complex, multi-dimensional models that are computationally efficient and numerically robust. An adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) model is designed to emulate the dynamic behavior of an SD-1000 magnetorheological (MR) damper. The fuzzy damper model enables design and testing of semi-active control strategies within a numerical environment. Modern neuro-fuzzy design techniques are again used with the introduction of a new form of expert control. With this new method, fuzzy logic controllers (FLC) are developed to diminish seismically induced vibrations of single and multiple DOF buildings. The controllers specify a time varying voltage to be applied to MR dampers installed in the buildings. Determination of the voltage signal is based solely on acceleration feedback from the structure being controlled. Effectiveness of the RC is tested through a series of numerical simulations during which the building models are subjected to five different earthquake signals. Signal noise and time delays are found to have only a small effect on operation of the fuzzy controllers. For both structures, performance of the semi-active control scheme is compared with that of similarly scaled passive damping strategies. With regards to the SDOF building, it is determined that a passive control system is superior to a semi-active strategy of similar strength for reduction of lateral displacement and acceleration. For a majority of the tests involving the MDOF building, a semi-active scheme is found to be more beneficial than passive damping approachs for the reduction of lateral acceleration. Thus, more research in the use of MR dampers with tall buildings is advocated.

Schurter, Kyle Christopher

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Final Report on Explosion Tests of Clogged Vented Covers for Con Edison at Lenox  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of vented manhole covers is a potential way of diminishing the severity of explosive events, but the vents in the covers often become blocked by debris. Manhole covers with blocked vents performed in much the same way as non-vented covers in explosion tests conducted at EPRI's Lenox, Massachusetts facility.

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems Title Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5798E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Rapp, Vi H., Brett C. Singer, J. Chris Stratton, and Craig P. Wray Date Published 06/2012 Abstract In many residential building retrofit programs, air tightening to increase energy efficiency is constrained by concerns about related impacts on the safety of naturally vented combustion appliances. Tighter housing units more readily depressurize when exhaust equipment is operated, making combustion appliances more prone to backdraft or spillage. Several test methods purportedly assess the potential for depressurization-induced backdrafting and spillage, but these tests are not robustly reliable and repeatable

52

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The...

53

Use a Vent Condenser to Recover Flash Steam Energy (Revised)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on vent condenser to recover flash steam energy provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 1,861: 1,120: 808 ...

55

Gas generation results and venting study for transuranic waste drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sixteen waste drums, containing six categories of plutonium-contaminated waste, were monitored for venting and gas generation for six months. The venting devices tested appeared adequate to relieve pressure and prevent hydrogen accumulation. Most of the gas generation, primarily H2 and CO2, was due to radiolytic decomposition of the hydrogenous wastes. Comparison of the gas yields with those obtained previously in laboratory tests showed very reasonable agreement with few exceptions.

Kazanjian, A.R.; Arnold, P.M.; Simmons, W.C.; D'Amico, E.L.

1985-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

56

Methodology for estimating volumes of flared and vented natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common perception in the United States that natural gas produced with oil is a valuable commodity probably dates from the 1940's. Before that time, most operators regarded natural gas associated with or dissolved in oil as a nuisance. Indeed, most associated/dissolved natural gas produced in the United States before World War II probably was flared or vented to the atmosphere. This situation has changed in the United States, where flaring and venting have decreased dramatically in recent years, in part because of environmental concerns, but also because of the changing view of the value of natural gas. The idea that gas is a nuisance is beginning to change almost everywhere, as markets for gas have developed in Europe, Japan, and elsewhere, and as operators have increasingly utilized or reinjected associated-dissolved gas in their oil-production activities. Nevertheless, in some areas natural gas continues to be flared or vented to the atmosphere. Gas flares in Russia, the Niger Delta, and the Middle East are some of the brightest lights on the nighttime Earth. As we increasingly consider the global availability and utility of natural gas, and the environmental impacts of the consumption of carbon-based fuels, it is important to know how much gas has been flared or vented, how much gas is currently being flared or vented, and the distribution of flaring or venting through time. Unfortunately, estimates of the volumes of flared and vented gas are generally not available. Despite the inconsistency and inavailability of data, the extrapolation method outlined provides a reliable technique for estimating amounts of natural gas flared and vented through time. 36 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Klett, T.R.; Gautier, D.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Neuro-fuzzy control of a multi-degree of freedom structure with semi-active magnetorheological dampers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research illustrates semi-active structural control of a three-story nonlinear building using magnetorheological dampers and a neuro-fuzzy algorithm. The structure being studied was developed for a third generation benchmark problem that is being investigated on a worldwide basis. A magnetorheological (MR) damper is tested experimentally and employed as a control device. An MRD-300kN-240 MR damper, which is manufactured by the Sanwa Tekki Corporation, is tested in a controlled laboratory environment to obtain a set of experimental data. A model of the damper is trained and validated via an adaptive neuro-fuzzy (ANFIS) algorithm. Next, an array of trained and validated MR damper models is inserted between the ground and the first floor of the benchmark building and numerically simulated under seismic excitation. To control response of the benchmark structure, a neuro-fuzzy control (NEFCON) strategy is applied with acceleration feedback. Training of a NEFCON controller is accomplished through use of an artificial earthquake. Next, performance of a fuzzy controller is validated by investigating time histories of the absolute acceleration response and the overall performance indices when the structure is subjected to a set of actual earthquakes. Numerical results indicate that the proposed semi-active control strategy satisfactorily mitigates absolute accelerations in comparison with response of the uncontrolled structure. In addition, performance indices indicate reduction in response of the structure in comparison with some passive-off and passive-on states of the control devices.

Likhitruangsilp, Visit

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

High-power Waveguide Dampers for the Short-Pulse X-Ray Project at the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-power waveguide dampers have been designed and prototyped for the Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) cavities at the Advanced Photon Source. The cavities will operate at 2.815 GHz and utilize the TM110 dipole mode. As a result, higher-order (HOM) and lower-order mode (LOM) in-vacuum dampers have been designed to satisfy the demanding broadband damping requirements in the APS storage ring. The SPX single-cell cavity consists of two WR284 waveguides for damping the HOMs and one WR284 waveguide for primarily damping the LOM where up to 2kW will be dissipated in the damping material. The damper designs and high-power experimental results will be discussed in this paper.

Waldschmidt, G J; Liu, J; Middendorf, M E; Nassiri, A; Smith, T L; Wu, G; Henry, J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the self-correction algorithms developed in the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls project funded jointly by the Bonneville Power Administration and the Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The algorithms address faults for temperature sensors, humidity sensors, and dampers in air-handling units and correction of persistent manual overrides of automated control systems. All faults considered create energy waste when left uncorrected as is frequently the case in actual systems.

Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Other States Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 408 1992 501 530 501 1993 501 522 515 533 536 531 583 546 1994 533 616 623 620 629 654 1995 667 594 663 634 643 626 643 663 603 553 567 578 1996 549 538 625 620 693 703 709 715 676 708 682 690 1997 133 124 135 142 147 142 149 177 160 150 159 161 1998 147 134 150 148 132 117 126 132 124 121 121 123 1999 754 406 686 588 693 611 708 340 590 811 785 592 2000 147 135 152 163 175 159 187 180 175 179 176 183 2001 166 149 171 206 224 208 221 218 229 222 222 238 2002 172 163 176 196 185 177 191 184 188 180 157 165

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: VentAir 62  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VentAir 62 VentAir 62 VentAir 62 logo. A ventilation airflow calculator that allows easy, accurate compliance with ASHRAE Standard 62-89. The program automates the cumbersome calculations presented by the Standard's Equation 6-1. The Windows-based program helps building designers design multiple-space ventilation systems that meet the requirements of the Standard. This tool analyzes space and system information from the VAV terminal and air handler unit schedules, calculates ventilation airflow requirements (space minimums and system-level required minimum), and provides additional or revised information for the VAV and AHU schedules. Keywords ventilation design, ASHRAE Standard 62 Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Knowledge of ASHRAE Standard 62 requirements and ventilation design.

62

Transport characteristics across drum filter vents and polymer bags  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate at which hydrogen (H {sub 2}) or a volatile organic compound (VOC) exits a layer of confinement in a vented waste drum is proportional to the concentration difference across the layer. The proportionality constant is the gas transport characteristic. A series of transport experiments were conducted to determine H{sub 2} and VOC transport characteristics across different drum filter vents and polymer bags. This report reviews the methods and results of past investigators in defining transport characteristics across filter vents and polymer bags, describes the apparatus and procedures used in these experiments, compares the reported and estimated transport characteristics with earlier results, and discusses the impact of changing the transport characteristic values used in model calculations.

Liekhus, K.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Experimental determination of dynamic force coefficients of a pocket damper seal at higher frequencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental results are presented for a two-bladed pocket damper seal (PDS) with eight partition walls on a high-speed test rig. The objective of these experiments is to measure damping coefficients, stiffness coefficients and leakage rates at higher frequencies than tested previously. The seal coefficients are determined by measuring the logarithmic decrement and damped natural frequency in non-rotating free vibration tests and by computer simulations of these results using a computer program called XLTRC. Rotating tests, which consist of coastdown tests from 14000 rpm to 0 rpm were also conducted to corroborate the effectiveness of the PDS in suppressing the vibration amplitudes at the critical speeds. The initial rotating tests on the originally designed PDS were discouraging, and highlight the importance of the optimum design of the inlet plenum chamber of the PDS in producing damping. Suitable modifications are carried out in the PDS inlet plenum design and the non-rotating tests were repeated on the modified PDS. These tests show positive damping and negative stiffness in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The tests also show that the magnitude of both the damping and the stiffness coefficients increase with the inlet pressure. The rotating tests corroborate the effectiveness of the PDS in suppressing the vibration at critical speeds around 13,000 cpm, which is about twice the frequencies tested previously. Subsequently a comparison is made with the predictions from previous pocket damper seal codes.

Sharma, Ashish

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

An overview of BWR Mark-I containment venting risk implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Venting of boiling water reactors with Mark-I containments has been suggested as a way to prevent catastrophic failure and/or mitigate the consequences resulting from a severe accident. Based on phenomenological, human factors, and risk considerations, the potential benefits and downsides of venting Mark-I containments were analyzed. Several generic venting systems and two proposed utility systems were reviewed. Based on generic considerations, the offsite consequences during risk dominant accidents were qualitatively assessed for four different vent systems. A quantitative risk study of an early venting strategy was performed, based on the existing Peach Bottom hardware and the draft NUREG-1150 results for Peach Bottom. Appendices are also included which contain reviews of the Pilgrim and Vermont Yankee venting submitals, a response to the seven questions from the NRC about the Pilgrim venting strategy, and a review of the venting strategy directed by Revision 4 of the Boiling Water Reactor Emergency Procedures Guidelines. 16 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

Wagner, K.C.; Dallman, R.J.; Galyean, W.J.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Periodic deep?sea hydrothermal vent activities observed by hydrophones at Mariana, Okinawa, and Mid?Atlantic Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep?sea hydrothermal vent activities were studied done by digital OBS/Hs(Ocean Bottom Seismometer / Hydrophone) at three hydrothermal vent areas

Kasahara Junzo; Sato Toshinori; Nishizawa Azusa; Fujioka Kantaro

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 3,000: 2,906: 2,802 ...

67

Why Sequence Thermoacidophiles of deep-sea hydrothermal vents?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoacidophiles of Thermoacidophiles of deep-sea hydrothermal vents? Bacteria that live in hydrothermal vents on land and deep underwater need to be able to tolerate high temperatures and harsh, nutrient-poor environments with high concentrations of metals. As a result of living in such environments, however, these bacteria have enzymes that are stable at high temperatures, which could be useful for producing alternative fuels. Thermoacidophiles Photo: University of Delaware Aquificales bacteria are often found in thermal streams and associated with sulfide precipitation. Sequencing some of these bacterial genomes -- specifically, Thermocrinis ruber, S. rodmanii and S. kristjansonnii -- could provide researchers with so-called "anchor genomes" that would be applied in turn to studies already being done on microbial communities in

68

TRANSPORT OF WASTE SIMULANTS IN PJM VENT LINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental work was conducted to determine whether there is a potential for waste simulant to transport or 'creep' up the air link line and contaminate the pulse jet vent system, and possibly cause long term restriction of the air link line. Additionally, if simulant creep occurred, establish operating parameters for washing down the line. The amount of the addition of flush fluids and mixer downtime must be quantified.

Qureshi, Z

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

Potential VOC Deflagrations in a Vented TRU Drum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the analysis is to examine the potential for lid ejection from a vented transuranic (TRU) waste drum due to pressure buildup caused by the deflagration of hydrogen and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the drum. In this analysis, the AICC pressure for a stoichiometric mixture of VOCs is calculated and then compared against the experimental peak pressure of stoichiometric combustion of propane and hexane in a combustion chamber. The experimental peak pressures of propane and hexane are about 12 percent lower than the calculated AICC pressure. Additional losses in the drum are calculated due to venting of the gases, drum bulging, waste compaction, and heat losses from the presence of waste in the drum. After accounting for these losses, the final pressures are compared to the minimum observed pressure that ejects the lid from a TRU drum. The ejection pressure of 105 psig is derived from data that was recorded for a series of tests where hydrogen-air mixtures were ignited inside sealed TRU drums. Since the calculated pressures are below the minimum lid ejection pressure, none of the VOCs and the hydrogen (up to 4 percent) mixtures present in the TRU waste drum is expected to cause lid ejection if ignited. The analysis of potential VOC deflagrations in a vented TRU drum can be applied across the DOE-Complex since TRU waste is stored in drums throughout the complex.

Mukesh, GUPTA

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

70

Numerical Simulation of Squeeze Film Dampers and Study of the Effect of Central Groove on the Dynamic Pressure Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Squeeze film dampers are used in the high speed turbo machinery industry and aerospace industries as a means to reduce vibration amplitude, to provide damping, to improve dynamic stability of the rotor bearing system and to isolate structural components. The effects of cavitation included in previous studies were not effective. The effect of different design parameters were not studied thoroughly as experimental investigation of squeeze film dampers is very expensive. Few of them used numerical investigation but the methods they used are either time consuming or complicated. The present study investigated the feasibility of applying a steady state solver, which is computationally less expensive, for analyzing flow field inside the squeeze film dampers. The behavior of dynamic pressure profiles at different operating conditions, and the effect of a central groove on dynamic pressure profiles were also studied. Simulation results of a 3D case which is similar to the one experimentally studied by Delgado were used to establish if the moving reference frame (MRF) model in Fluent 12.1 can be used. A steady state solver in an absolute frame of reference was used to produce whirling motion of the rotor in this study. The inlet pressure of 31kpa and the whirling speed of 50 and 100Hz were used as boundary conditions. The mixture model with three percent dissolved air in lubricant is used to model multiphase flow. Singhal cavitation model is used to model cavitation. The simulations (50,000 iterations) were run until steady state solutions were reached. The results closely agreed with those obtained experimentally by San Andrés and Delgado. Numerical simulations of three-dimensional cases with an additional central groove on the squeeze film land were also performed to predict the effect of central groove on dynamic pressure profiles. Addition central groove reduces the pressures and forces generated by squeeze film damper.

Boppa, Praneetha

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Clad vent set cup closure-weld-zone grinding evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clad vent set (CVS) cups were ground in the closure-weld zone to reduce the wall-thickness variation created by the cup deep-drawing process. A significantly more uniform wall thickness would be beneficial for the CVS closure-weld operation. The goal was to reduce the average within-cup wall-thickness variation (defined as the range of wall thicknesses in the closure-weld zone) approximately 50% from the Cassini production value of 42 {micro}m. This goal was shown to be achievable but, unfortunately, not with the existing blank and formed cup thicknesses.

Ulrich, G.B.; Woods, A.T. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); Ohriner, E.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

Ă?nay, Devrim

73

Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

74

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

75

Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

76

Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

77

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

78

Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

79

Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

80

Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Device and method for remotely venting a container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Numerous incidents of fire, explosion, and ground contamination have occurred at various facilities over the last several years due to drum rupture on account of overpressurization. These incidents frequently are caused by an ignition source or a reaction between incompatible materials. The incidents may also occur simply as a result of climatic changes causing the drum to be over pressurized. A device for venting a container having a bung includes a saddle assembly securable to a container and having a support extending therefrom. A first arm is rotatably secured to the support, and the first arm extends in a first direction. A second arm has a first end portion drivingly engaged with the first arm, so that rotation of the first arm causes rotation of the second arm. A second end portion of the first arm is positionable proximate the bung of the container. A socket is operably associated and rotatable with the second end portion and is drivingly engageable with the bung, so that rotation of the socket causes corresponding rotation of the bung for thereby venting the container.

Vodila, J.M.; Bergersen, J.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

83

Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

84

Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

85

Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

86

Leakage and rotordynamic effects of pocket damper seals and see-through labyrinth seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses research on the leakage and rotordynamic characteristics of pocket damper seals (PDS) and see-through labyrinth seals, presents and evaluates models for labyrinth seal and PDS leakage and PDS force coefficients, and compares these seals to other annular gas seals. Low-pressure experimental results are used alongside previously-published high-pressure labyrinth and PDS data to evaluate the models. Effects of major seal design parameters; blade thickness, blade spacing, blade profile, and cavity depth; on seal leakage, as well as the effect of operating a seal in an off-center position, are examined through a series of non-rotating tests. Two reconfigurable seal designs were used, which enabled testing labyrinth seals and PDS with two to six blades. Leakage and pressure measurements were made with air as the working fluid on twenty-two seal configurations. Increasing seal blade thickness reduced leakage by the largest amount. Blade profile results were more equivocal, indicating that both profile and thickness affected leakage, but that the influence of one factor partially negated the influence of the other. Seal leakage increased with increased eccentricity at lower supply pressures, but that this effect was attenuated for higher pressure drops. While cavity depth effects were minor, reducing depths reduced leakage up to a point beyond which leakage increased, indicating that an optimum cavity depth existed. Changing blade spacing produced results almost as significant as those for blade thickness, showing that reducing spacing can detrimentally affect leakage to the point of negating the benefit of inserting additional blades. Tests to determine the effect of PDS partition walls showed that they reduce axial leakage. The pressure drop was found to be highest across the first blade of a seal for low pressure drops, but the pressure drop distribution became parabolic for high pressure drops with the largest drop across the last blade. Thirteen leakage equations made up of a base equations, a flow factor, and a kinetic energy carryover factor were examined. The importance of the carryover coefficient was made evident and a modified carryover coefficient is suggested. Existing fullypartitioned PDS models were expanded to accommodate seals of various geometries.

Gamal Eldin, Ahmed Mohamed

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans (Indiana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1232012 References DSIRE1 Summary Indiana allows taxpayers to take a deduction on solar-powered roof fans (or vent, also sometimes called an attic fan) installed in a home...

88

Rain Shedding and Rainwater Runoff Tests on Cast Iron Vented Manhole Covers for Con Edison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents work EPRIsolutions performed for Con Edison that compares water penetration characteristics of two types of vented manhole covers with a solid cover and a manhole with no cover under typical and very heavy rain conditions.

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

89

Implementation of vented fuel assemblies in the supercritical CO?-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis has been undertaken to investigate the utilization of fuel assembly venting in the reference design of the gas-cooled fast reactor under study as part of the larger research effort at MIT under Gen-IV NERI Project ...

McKee, Stephanie A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Vented target elements for use in an isotope-production reactor. [LMFBR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium gas in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins equipped with vents, and tritium gas is recovered from the coolant.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

91

Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Indiana allows taxpayers to take a deduction on solar-powered roof fans (or vent, also sometimes called an attic fan) installed in a home that the taxpayer owns or leases. The deduction is for 50%...

92

InnoVent InfraVest GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InfraVest GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name InnoVentInfraVest GmbH Place Varel, Germany Zip 26316 Sector Wind energy Product Wind farm project developer based in Germany....

93

A Handheld Sampler for Collecting Organic Samples from Shallow Hydrothermal Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes a new handheld sampler, specially designed to be deployed by scuba divers, to collect fluid samples from shallow hydrothermal vents. The new sampler utilizes a syringe-like titanium sampling bottle with a regulated filling ...

Shi-Jun Wu; Can-Jun Yang; Chen-Tung Arthur Chen

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Geochemistry of hydrothermal vent fluids from the northern Juan De Fuca Ridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of aqueous organic compounds derived from sedimentary organic matter has the potential to influence a range of chemical processes in hydrothermal vent environments. For example, hydrothermal alteration experiments ...

Cruse, Anna M. (Anna Marie)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A Handheld Sampler for Collecting Organic Samples from Shallow Hydrothermal Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe here a new handheld sampler, specially designed to be deployed by SCUBA divers, to collect fluid samples from shallow hydrothermal vents. The new sampler utilizes a syringe-like titanium sampling bottle with regulated filling rate to ...

Shi-Jun Wu; Can-Jun Yang; Chen-Tung Arthur Chen

96

Application of Multizone HVAC Control Using Wireless Sensor Networks and Actuating Vent Registers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most residential heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are designed to treat the home as a single zone. Single zone control consists of one thermostat, in a central area of the house that controls the HVAC operation. In a single zone system all of the vent registers are open, distributing air into all areas of the house at once. Single zone control leads to wasted energy for two reasons - all rooms being conditioned when they are not occupied, and conditioning occupied rooms, without maintaining them at the comfortable temperature for the occupants. Improved control of residential cooling and heating can be attained with a variable HVAC fan, duct, and vent system. Existing single zone systems are expensive to retrofit with the above mentioned features. Current techniques require replacing major components in the HVAC system which are both costly and time consuming, invading the user's home. An alternative to the extensive retrofit is detailed in this work. The experiments in this paper implement an automated vent louver system to solve two problems in heating homes: the problem of temperature stratification between floors and zonification between rooms, and the energy wasted to heat in unoccupied areas of the home. This paper considers the application of replacing the standard vents in each room with wireless controlled louvered vents. These vents allow for simpler, more cost effective retrofits which are also less invasive tithe end user's home. The experiments in this paper implement an automated vent louver system to reduce the energy wasted to heat unoccupied areas of the home. This test house in these experiments was a two story home. Wireless sensor-actuator networks were used to automate the test of closing off vent registers while maintaining the appropriate temperature set point in a control zone. A control zone consists of the house area where the vents are fully open. Controlling the vent registers allowed for reduced zonification between rooms on the same floor, and reduced stratification between the upstairs and downstairs. Energy savings were shown when vents were closed to heat the control zones containing the bedroom, of the office.

Watts, W.; Koplow, M.; Redfern, A.; Wright, P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hydrogen venting characteristics of commercial carbon-composite filters and applications to TRU waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The generation of hydrogen (by radiolysis) and of other potentially flammable gases in radioactive wastes which are in contact with hydrogenous materials is a source of concern, both from transportation and on-site storage considerations. Because very little experimental data on the generation and accumulation of hydrogen was available in actual waste materials, work was initiated to experimentally determine factors affecting the concentration of hydrogen in the waste containers, such as the hydrogen generation rate, (G-values) and the rate of loss of hydrogen through packaging and commercial filter-vents, including a new design suitable for plastic bags. This report deals only with the venting aspect of the problem. Hydrogen venting characteristics of two types of commercial carbon-composite filter-vents, and two types of PVC bag closures (heat-sealed and twist-and-tape) were measured. Techniques and equipment were developed to permit measurement of the hydrogen concentration in various layers of actual transuranic (TRU) waste packages, both with and without filter-vents. A test barrel was assembled containing known configuration and amounts of TRU wastes. Measurements of the hydrogen in the headspace verified a hydrogen release model developed by Benchmark Environmental Corporation. These data were used to calculate revised wattage Emits for TRU waste packages incorporating the new bag filter-vent.

Callis, E.L.; Marshall, R.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cappis, J.H. [DOE, International Safeguards Div., Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Vent Stack Liquid N2 RTD Temperature Sensor  

SciTech Connect

This engineering note documents the installation of two temperature sensing RTD's in the BC's. Previously, the temperature sensing device used in all three cryostats consisted of a FNAL designed liquid sensing probe (see EN-168, and drawing ME-273505). This device was necessary because of the concern that overfilling LN2 into the main vent line during cooldown could create an undesirable back pressure on the relief valves or rupture disks. This could possibly hinder the relieving of argon gas at the required flow rate in a safety situation. The probe was installed on the CC, and has been operating perfectly, therefore, this probe will not be changed. Figure 1 shows the location of TS232E, the CC liquid sensing probe. Note that the probe is located downstream of the condenser outlet valve (PV210N), therefore, it effectively operates under atmospheric pressure. On the BC's, however, the probe was originally installed at a different location, upstream of the condenser outlet valve (PV110N or PV310N). This resulted in the probe effectively sensing the condenser pressure, which varied from approximately 30 psia to 60 psia during cooldown. The changing pressure meant that the corresponding temperature at which liquid appeared also changed. The probe then became inaccurate, especially at higher condenser pressures, when the probe would be fail to trip at the higher liquid temperature. The solution was to replace the original probe with an RTD. This involved using the PLC to compare the temperature sensed by the RTD to the liquid saturation temperature, calculated using the measured condenser pressure. A formula was created to calculate the saturation temperature from the condenser pressure. This formula was derived by curve fitting points taken from the NBS Technical Note 129 for nitrogen. A 2nd order equation was used to fit the points, since the accuracy was not very important for temperature comparison. The entire equation was then shifted so that the curve was above all of the actual points. This was done to insure that the formula would provide higher temperatures, so the comparison to the RTD would be conservative, switching before the temperature reached saturation. Figure 2 shows the curve used to fit the data points. The lower curve is the actual data, and the higher curve is the formula to be used. Using the formula derived, the PLC calculates a conservative saturation temperature from the condenser pressure. The condenser pressure is measured by PT110N or PT310N, on the ECN and ECS, respectively. The transmitters are Rosemount 0-75 psia pressure transmitters. The PLC then compares the calculated temperature to the measured temperature from the RTD's, EIl32E and EI332E, which are Omega platinum RTD probes, model PR-14-2-100-1/4-12-E. If the measured temperature drops below the calculated saturation temperature, an alarm signals on the view page, and the PLC automatically closes the two inlet condenser valves (PV 101N and PV102N, or PV301N and PV302N). As a final note, there are various advantages and disadvantages to using the RTD's instead of the original probe. The advantages are that the RTD's provide constant monitoring of the temperature, whereas the probe was basically designed as a switch. The RTD's are more accurate in that they can respond over the range of the condenser pressure. The probe was designed to operate under atmospheric pressure. The only disadvantage of the RTD's is that they sense temperature, therefore, they cannot distinguish saturated GN2 from liquid, while the probe was designed specifically to do so. Overall, however, the RTD's provide an acceptable solution to the problem of liquid sensing in the vent line. Figure 3 shows the final location of the RTD on the ECN. The ECS location is the same.

Wu, J.; /Fermilab

1991-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

99

Aalborg Universitet An active damper for stabilizing power-electronics-based AC systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impedance profile seen from the point of common coupling of the converters, such that the potential for connecting renewable energy systems and at the load side as electric drives [1], [2]. The mutual interactions

Chen, Zhe

100

Venting and Rapid Recompression Increase Survival and Improve Recovery for Red Snapper with Barotrauma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red Snapper, Lutjanus campechanus, are the most economically important reef fish in the Gulf of Mexico. Population assessments that began in the mid-1980’s found red snapper to be severely overfished and lead to extensive regulations and harvest restrictions. As a result of these regulations many fish that are captured must be released and are known as regulatory discards. Red snapper live deep in the water column and when captured and rapidly brought to the surface they often suffer pressure-related injuries collectively known as barotrauma. These injuries include a distended abdomen and stomach eversion from the buccal cavity. High mortality of discards due to barotrauma injuries impedes recovery of the fishery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of two techniques designed to minimize barotrauma-related mortality: venting and rapid recompression. In laboratory experiments using hyperbaric chambers, I assessed sublethal effects of barotrauma and subsequent survival rates of red snapper after single and multiple simulated capture events from pressures corresponding to 30 and 60 m. I evaluated the use of rapid recompression and venting to increase survival and improve recovery indices, including the ability to evade a simulated predator. A condition index of impairment, the barotrauma reflex (BtR) score, was used to assess sublethal external barotrauma injuries, reflex responses, and behavioral responses. Greater capture depths resulted in higher BtR scores (more impairment). Non-vented fish had higher BtR scores than vented fish after both single and multiple decompression events. All fish in vented treatments from 30 and 60 m depths had 100% survival after a single capture event. Non-vented fish had 67% survival after decompression from 30 m and 17% survival from 60 m. Behaviorally, non-vented fish showed greater difficulty achieving an upright orientation upon release and less ability to evade a simulated predator than vented fish. Rapid recompression also greatly improved survival compared to surface-released fish with 96% of all rapidly recompressed fish surviving. These results clearly show that venting or rapid recompression can be effective tools for alleviating barotrauma symptoms, improving predator evasion after a catch-and-release event, and increasing survival. Fisheries managers should encourage the use of either of these two techniques to aid in the recovery of this important fishery.

Drumhiller, Karen L

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Evaluating and Avoiding HRSG Pressure Part Damage Influenced by Stack Damper Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) tube failure data indicate that thermal fatigue is currently the second most prevalent pressure part failure mechanism affecting heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs). It should be anticipated that as HRSGs accumulate more startups and the number of thermal cycles increases, thermal fatigue pressure part failures will occur more often.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

103

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A reconnaissance survey of Hg° was designed to model the 1912 Novarupta vent structure and delineate zones of near-surface high heat

104

The potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents: a new avenue for life in the Universe?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a quantitative assessment for the potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean. The photosynthetically active radiation in this case is from geothermal origin: the infrared thermal radiation emitted by hot water, at temperatures ranging from 473 up to 673 K. We find that at these temperatures the photosynthetic potential is rather low in these ecosystems for most known species. However, species which a very high efficiency in the use of light and which could use infrared photons till 1300nm, could achieve good rates of photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents. These organisms might also thrive in deep hydrothermal vents in other planetary bodies, such as one of the more astrobiologically promising Jupiter satellites: Europa.

Perez, Noel; Martin, Osmel; Leiva-Mora, Michel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nitrogen geochemistry as a tracer of fluid flow in a hydrothermal vent complex in the Karoo Basin, South Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen geochemistry as a tracer of fluid flow in a hydrothermal vent complex in the Karoo Basin and hydrothermal vent complexes (HVC) in the Karoo Basin in South Africa. The HVC formed during phreatic eruptions from the lower stratigraphic units of the Karoo Basin shows that the vitrinite reflectance and d15 N

Svensen, Henrik

106

Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

Siminovitch, M.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

Brassell, Gilbert W. (13237 W. 8th Ave., Golden, CO 80401); Brugger, Ronald P. (Lafayette, CO)

1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development of a model for predicting transient hydrogen venting in 55-gallon drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Remote drum venting was performed on a population of unvented high activity drums (HAD) in the range of 63 to 435 plutonium equivalent Curies (PEC). These 55-gallon Transuranic (TRU) drums will eventually be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). As a part of this process, the development of a calculational model was required to predict the transient hydrogen concentration response of the head space and polyethylene liner (if present) within the 55-gallon drum. The drum and liner were vented using a Remote Drum Venting System (RDVS) that provided a vent sampling path for measuring flammable hydrogen vapor concentrations and allow hydrogen to diffuse below lower flammability limit (LFL) concentrations. One key application of the model was to determine the transient behavior of hydrogen in the head space, within the liner, and the sensitivity to the number of holes made in the liner or number of filters. First-order differential mass transport equations were solved using Laplace transformations and numerically to verify the results. the Mathematica 6.0 computing tool was also used as a validation tool and for examining larger than two chamber systems. Results will be shown for a variety of configurations, including 85-gallon and 110-gallon overpack drums. The model was also validated against hydrogen vapor concentration assay measurements.

Apperson, Jason W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clemmons, James S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Michael D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sur, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Duan Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romero, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry  

SciTech Connect

A novel design for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment.

Siminovitch, Michael (El Sobrante, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery.

111

Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37 17'N, 32 16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36 13'N, 33 54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

Flores, Gilberto E [Portland State University; Campbell, James H [ORNL; Kirshtein, Julie D [United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Meneghin, Jennifer [Portland State University; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Steinberg, Joshua [Oregon Episcopal School, Portland, OR; Seewald, Jeffrey S [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Tivey, Margaret Kingston [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Voytek, Mary A [United States Geological Survey & National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise [Portland State University; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Biotic and abiotic interactions of deep-sea hydrothermal vent-endemic fish on the East Pacific Rise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the ecology of fish endemic to hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise was undertaken utilizing a variety of techniques, focusing on the bythitid Thermichthys hollisi. Stable isotope and gut content analyses ...

Buckman, Kate Lynn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Multi-slit self-sealing ignition-arrester battery vent  

SciTech Connect

A vented battery cap is provided which is adapted to engage at least one of a plurality of fill holes in an automotive storage battery or similar lead--acid battery and which has pressure release means for venting the combustible gases produced within that storage battery under conditions, such as overcharge conditions, into the atmosphere. The pressure release means comprise a plurality of extremely narrow slits having widths in the order of 0.003 to 0.005 of an inch. The remainder of the battery cap is tightly sealed to prevent any extraneous leaks of battery gases received from the automotive battery from leaking into the atmosphere. The slits are so constructed to facilitate the safe expulsion of any volume of gas normally produced by an automotive storage battery, while virtually eliminating the likelihood that ignition of gases within the atmosphere will result in explosive consequences either within the battery cap or within the battery itself.

Heiser, J.I.; Erb, E.M.

1978-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

114

Radiant Barrier Insulation Performance in Full Scale Attics with Soffit and Ridge Venting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a limited data base on the full scale performance of radiant barrier insulation in attics. The performance of RBS have been shown to be dependent on attic ventilation characteristics. Tests have been conducted on a duplex located in Florida with soffit and ridge venting to measure attic performance. The unique features of these experiments are accurate and extensive instrumentation with heat flow meters, field verification of HFM calibration, extensive characterization of the installed ceiling insulation, ventilation rate measurements and extensive temperature instrumentation. The attics are designed to facilitate experimental changes without damaging the installed insulation. RBS performance has been measured for two natural ventilation levels for soffit and ridge venting. Previously, no full scale data have been developed for these test configurations. Test data for each of the test configurations was acquired for a minimum of two weeks with some acquired over a five week period. The Rl9 insulation performed as expected.

Ober, D. G.; Volckhausen, T. W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Fuel cell electric power production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for generating electricity from a fuel cell includes generating a hydrogen-rich gas as the fuel for the fuel cell by treating a hydrocarbon feed, which may be a normally liquid feed, in an autothermal reformer utilizing a first monolithic catalyst zone having palladium and platinum catalytic components therein and a second, platinum group metal steam reforming catalyst. Air is used as the oxidant in the hydrocarbon reforming zone and a low oxygen to carbon ratio is maintained to control the amount of dilution of the hydrogen-rich gas with nitrogen of the air without sustaining an insupportable amount of carbon deposition on the catalyst. Anode vent gas may be utilized as the fuel to preheat the inlet stream to the reformer. The fuel cell and the reformer are preferably operated at elevated pressures, up to about a pressure of 150 psia for the fuel cell.

Hwang, Herng-Shinn (Livingston, NJ); Heck, Ronald M. (Frenchtown, NJ); Yarrington, Robert M. (Westfield, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

government incentives or subsidies in the near future. Companies active in the electric automobile area There are no companies directly active in the electric automobile...

117

Electricity Reliability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lines and bar graph Electricity Reliability The Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) conducts research, develops, and disseminates new methods, tools,...

118

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 1,994 1,804 1,837 1,504 1,798 1,541 1,890 1,954 1,742 2,018 1,823 1,711 2002 1,661 1,512 1,693 1,728 1,794 1,738 1,809 1,820 1,523 1,433 1,667 1,714 2003 1,728 1,590 1,801 1,753 1,774 1,675 1,639 1,702 1,612 1,661 1,555 1,617 2004 1,554 1,465 1,600 1,544 1,566 1,463 1,536 1,508 1,194 1,301 1,336 1,339 2005 1,368 1,266 1,430 1,362 1,429 1,351 1,291 1,204 609 607 862 1,021

119

Electricity Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

120

California Electric Energy Crisis - Electricity Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Information Available Formats; Status of Electric Industry Restructuring Activity in California: html: California State Electricity Profil ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal. Quantum Electrical Measurements Portal. Subject Areas. Electrical ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here Home Savings Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate...

124

Whitey Swagelok SCHe ball valves Provide Isolation between SCHe Purge Lines C and D and the Process Vent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These valves are 1/4 inch ball valves fabricated of 316 stainless steel. Packing is TFE (standard). They provide an isolation function betwen SCHe Purge Line C, (PV-V-*079), and Purge Line D, (PV-V-*080), and the Process Vent.

MISKA, C.R.

2000-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

Assessment of Literature and Simulation Software Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Literature Related to Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems V.H. Rapp, B.C. Singer, J.C. Stratton, C.P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2012 LBNL-5798E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

126

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

127

A linear fluid inertia model for improved prediction of force coefficients in grooved squeeze film dampers and grooved oil seal rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Squeeze Film Dampers, (SFD), grooves (deep or shallow) are used to feed oil into the damper and prevent oil starvation within the fluid film lands. In oil seals with film land of clearance c, short shallow grooves (depth ? 15c, length ? 30c) are machined to reduce the cross-coupled stiffness coefficients, and thus improve the seal stability characteristics. Moreover, test stands for these devices can also incorporate grooves or recesses as part of oil feeding/ discharge arrangements. A common assumption is that these grooves do not influence the test system forced response. However, unexpected large added mass coefficients are reported in these configurations and not adequately predicted. In the case of grooved oil seals, experimental results also show that circumferential grooves do aid to reduce cross-coupled force coefficients but to a lesser extent than predictions otherwise indicate. A linear fluid inertia model for analysis of multiple-groove SFD or oil seal configurations is advanced. A perturbation analysis for small motion about a journal centered and off-centered position yields zeroth and first order flow equations defined at each individual flow region (land and grooves) of constant clearance ( c ).The analysis considers both the circumferential and axial dynamic pressure variations across the groove and land regions. At the groove regions, an effective groove depth ( d? ) and effective clearance (c d c ? ? = + ) are defined based on qualitative observations of the laminar flow pattern through annular cavities. This depth differs from the actual physical groove depth. The boundary conditions at the inlet and exit plane are a function of the geometric configuration. Integration of the resulting dynamic pressure fields on the journal surface yields the force coefficients (stiffness, damping, and inertia). Comparisons between predicted and experimental force coefficients for a grooved oil seal and a SFD show excellent correlation over a narrow range of effective groove depths. The results confirm that large added mass coefficients are associated to the feed/discharge grooves in the scrutinized test configurations. Furthermore, predictions, benchmarking experimental data, corroborate that short inner land grooves in an oil seal do not isolate the pressure field of the adjacent film lands, and hence contribute greatly to the force response of the seal.

Delgado-Marquez, Adolfo

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Electric machine  

SciTech Connect

An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

129

Gas Explosion Tests on Pacific Gas and Electric Company Round Manhole Covers with the Swiveloc CPR-II - Controlled Pressure Release Manhole Cover Restraint System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents findings from the continuing research and development effort to manage and mitigate the effects of underground distribution manhole events. Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) approached the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to investigate the performance of several manhole covers, including the native PG&E solid and vented covers and new covers built by Swiveloc, LLC and designated as CPR-II. The tests were conducted at the EPRI-Lenox manhole research facility in Lenox, Massachus...

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The disequilibrium is likely limited to wells screened across the water table (i.e., open to the deep vadose zone) where the depth to water is large or a low-permeability layer occurs in the vadose zone. Such wells are a pathway for air movement between the deep vadose zone and land surface and this sustains the pressure disequilibrium between the well bore and the atmosphere for longer time periods. Barometric over-response was not observed with the absolute pressure transducers because barometric compensation was achieved by directly measuring the air pressure within the well. Users of vented pressure transducers should be aware of the over-response issue in certain Hanford Site wells and ascertain if it will affect the use of the data. Pressure disequilibrium between the well and the atmosphere can be identified by substantial air movement through the wellbore. In wells exhibiting pressure disequilibrium, it is recommended that absolute pressure transducers be used rather than vented transducers for applications that require precise automated determinations of well water-level changes in response to barometric pressure fluctuations.

MCDONALD JP

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

Electric moped  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two electrically powered mopeds were designed and built. These vehicles offer single-person transportation which is convenient, quiet, low-cost, smooth, and pollution-free. The first moped has a 12 volt electrical system. The second has a 24 volt electrical system. They both have top speeds of about 20 miles per hour. They both use transistorized speed controls and deep-discharge, lead-acid batteries. These mopeds were put through a 750 mile test program. In this program, the 12 volt bike had an average range of nine miles. The 24 volt bike, with a smaller battery capacity, had an average range of six miles.

Ferschl, M.S.

1981-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

132

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Trade and Reliability; All Reports ‹ See all Electricity Reports State Electricity Profiles. ... Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010:

133

Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 163, 2006, pp. 671682. Printed in Great Britain. Structure and evolution of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, formed at c. 183 Ma, is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic intrusive complexes within the Karoo Basin, extrusive lava sequences and hydrothermal vent complexes. These last are pipe

Svensen, Henrik

134

Expansion and user study of CoolVent : inclusion of thermal comfort models in an early-design natural ventilation tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CoolVent, a software design tool for architects, has been improved. The work of Maria- Alejandra Menchaca-B. and colleagues has been improved to include a more robust and intuitive building and window dimensioning scheme, ...

Rich, Rebecca E. (Rebecca Eileen)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II Vi H. Rapp, Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II Vi H. Rapp, Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division April 2013 In Press as: Vi H. Rapp, Albert Pastor-Perez, Brett C. Singer, and Craig P. Wray. 2013. "Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: A Validation of VENT-II". HVAC&R Research, DOI:10.1080/10789669.2013.771948 LBNL-6193E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof,

136

The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field data show that stone-coated metal shakes and S-mission tile, which exploit the use of infraredblocking color pigments (IrBCPs), along with underside venting reduce the heat flow penetrating the conditioned space of a residence by 70% compared with the amount of heat flow penetrating roofs with conventional asphalt shingles. Stone-coated metal roof products are typically placed on battens and counter-battens and nailed through the battens to the roof deck. The design provides venting on the underside of the metal roof that reduces the heat flow penetrating a home. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and its affiliate members installed stone-coated metal roofs with shake and S-mission tile profiles and a painted metal shake roof on a fully instrumented attic test assembly at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Measurements of roof, deck, attic, and ceiling temperatures; heat flows; solar reflectance; thermal emittance; and ambient weather were recorded for each of the test roofs and also for an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and direct nailed asphalt shingle roof. All attic assemblies had ridge and soffit venting; the ridge was open to the underside of the stone-coated metal roofs. A control assembly with a conventional asphalt shingle roof was used for comparing deck and ceiling heat transfer rates.

Miller, William A [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Engineering work plan for container venting system drill press assembly troubleshooting. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This work plan is for troubleshooting the current CVS drill press to ensure that the drill bit assembly doesn`t bind in the press plate. A drill press assembly has been fabricated for the Container Venting System (CVS). The drill bit assembly has bound in the press plate in previous revisions of this design. Initial troubleshooting of the drill press per Rev. 0 of this work plan was performed at the 200W Kaiser Machine Shop under Work Package 2H9401670F, Internal Work Order E20027. The drill press operated without jamming. Then, during the pre-operational test on 11/14/17 and the operational test on 11/17/94, two drum lids were drilled. Immediately after the test on 11/17/94, the drill was again operated, and it jammed. An inspection found shavings at the bottom of the drill bit assembly, between the drill bit sleeve and the press plate bore. This revised work plan provides direction for the machine shop to diagnose and correct this recent problem.

Prather, M.C.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Engine cooling system air venting arrangement with buoyant air purge valve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An air vent arrangement is described for the cooling system of an automotive type engine having a radiator with a coolant inlet. The engine has coolant passages communicating with the radiator through an outlet essentially horizontally disposed, tubing connecting the radiator inlet and coolant outlet, and a thermostat in the outlet horizontally movable to open and closed positions. A horizontally disposed air bleed bypass passage is located vertically above the thermostat connecting the coolant outlet to a portion of the tubing downstream of the thermostat bypassing the same when the thermostat is in a closed position for bleeding air from the cooling system. The bypass passage has a valve therein moveable between a position blocking flow of coolant through the same and a second position opening the passage permitting the bleed of air therethrough. The valve is buoyant and constructed and arranged to pivot from a non flowblocking air bleed position into a flow blocking position in response to flow of coolant into the bypass passage acting thereagainst.

Schnizlein, M.E.

1987-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

139

Electricity 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 Electricity > Soliciting comments on EIA-111 EIA announces the proposal of Form EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report Released: August 15, 2011 Background On August 11, 2011, a Federal Register Notice was published soliciting comments for the new EIA-111 survey form. The EIA-111, Quarterly Electricity Imports and Exports Report will replace the OE-781R, Monthly Electricity Imports and Exports Report. The OE-781R has been suspended and will be terminated upon the approval of the EIA-111. The OE-781R administered from July 2010 through May 2011, proved complex and confusing for the repondents. As a result, the EIA-111 was developed to more effectively and efficiently collect more accurate and meaningful data. The Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 requires that each Federal agency obtains approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) before undertaking to collect information from ten or more persons, or continuing a collection for which the OMB approval and the OMB control number are about to expire. The approval process, which is popularly known as the "OMB clearance process," is extensive. It requires two Federal Register notices and a detailed application ("supporting statement") to OMB. The first Federal Register Notice was published on August 11, 2011. EIA is prepared to address the comments submitted by each individual.

140

Illinois Municipal Electric Agency - Electric Efficiency Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Agency - Electric Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Municipal Utility Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Home...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Electricity Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitating recovery from disruptions to energy supply. MajorElectricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization on the nation's energy delivery system Superconductors are important to meeting the nation's energy needs

142

BUILDOUT AND UPGRADE OF CENTRAL EMERGENCY GENERATOR SYSTEM, GENERATOR 3 AND 4 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SECTION 01000—SUMMARY OF WORK PART 1—GENERAL 1.1 SUMMARY The work to be performed under this project consists of providing the labor, equipment, and materials to perform "Buildout and Upgrade of Central Emergency Generator System, Generator 3 and 4 Electrical Installation" for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Dryden Flight Research Center (NASA/DFRC), Edwards, California 93523. All modifications to existing substations and electrical distribution systems are the responsibility of the contractor. It is the contractor’s responsibility to supply a complete and functionally operational system. The work shall be performed in accordance with these specifications and the related drawings. The work of this project is defined by the plans and specifications contained and referenced herein. This work specifically includes but is not limited to the following: Scope of Work - Installation 1. Install all electrical wiring and controls for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing electrical installation for generators 1 and 2 and in accordance with drawings. Contractor shall provide as-built details for electrical installation. 2. Install battery charger systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing battery charging equipment and installation for generators 1 and 2. This may require exchange of some battery charger parts already on-hand. Supply power to new battery chargers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 3. Install electrical wiring for fuel/lube systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Supply power to lube oil heaters and fuel system (day tanks) from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to fuel systems. 4. Install power to new dampers/louvers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Wiring shall be similar to installation to existing dampers/louvers. Utilize existing conduits already routed to louver areas to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to new dampers/louvers. 5. Install power to jacket water heaters for new generators 3 and 4 from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 6. Install new neutral grounding resistor and associated parts and wiring for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Grounding resistors will be Government Furnished Equipment (GFE). 7. Install two new switchgear sections, one for generator #3 and one for generator #4, to match existing generator #1 cubicle design and installation and in accordance with drawings and existing parts lists. This switchgear will be provided as GFE. 8. Ground all new switchgear, generators 3 and 4, and any other new equipment to match existing grounding connections for generators 1 and 2, switchgear and other equipment. See drawings for additional details. Grounding grid is already existing. Ensure that all grounding meets National Electrical Code requirements. 9. Cummins DMC control for the generator and switchgear syste

Gary D. Seifert; G. Shawn West; Kurt S. Myers; Jim Moncur

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Major transitions in evolution linked to thermal gradients above hydrothermal vents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of the main divisions of today's life: (1) unicellular prokaryotes, (2) unicellular eukaryotes, (3) multicellular eukaryotes, and (4) metazoans, are examples of the--still unexplained--major transitions in evolution. Regarding the origin of life, I have proposed that primordial life functioned as heat engine (thermosynthesis) while thermally cycled in convecting volcanic hot springs. Here I argue for a role of thermal gradients above submarine hydrothermal vents (SHV) in several major transitions. The last decade has witnessed the emergence of phononics, a novel discipline in physics based on controlled heat transport in thermal gradients. It builds thermal analogs to electronic devices: the thermal diode, the thermal transistor, the thermal switch, the thermal amplifier, the thermal memory--the thermal computer has been proposed. Encouraged by (1) the many similarities between microtubules (MT) and carbon nanotubes, which have a very high thermal conductivity, and (2) the recent discovery of a silk protein which also has a very high thermal conductivity, I combine and extend the mentioned ideas, and propose the general conjecture that several major transitions of evolution were effected by thermal processes, with four additional partial conjectures: (1) The first organisms used heat engines during thermosynthesis in convection cells; (2) The first eukaryotic cells used MT during thermosynthesis in the thermal gradient above SHV; (3) The first metazoans used transport of water or in water during thermosynthesis above SHV under an ice-covered ocean during the Gaskiers Snowball Earth; and (4) The first mammalian brain used a thermal machinery based on thermal gradients in or across the cortex. When experimentally proven these conjectures, which are testable by the methods of synthetic biology, would significantly enhance our understanding of life.

Anthonie W. J. Muller

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

144

Thrust stand for vertically oriented electric propulsion performance evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A noncontact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy-current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN level thrusts, while those tests conducted on a 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

Moeller, Trevor [University of Tennessee Space Institute, Tullahoma, Tennessee 37388 (United States); Polzin, Kurt A. [NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Electricity Transmission, A Primer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the electric power system, 2) gives electricity customers flexibility to diversify the mix of fuels that produces their electricity by giving them access to power plants, 3)...

146

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

147

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities...

148

Designing Electricity Auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. (2002) “Why Did Electricity Prices Fall in England &Why Did British Electricity Prices Fall After 1998? ,”The Fall in British Electricity Prices: Market Rules, Market

Fabra, Natalia; von der Fehr, Nils-Henrik; Harbord, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Retail Electricity Competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets” mimeo, MITCSEM WP 130 Retail Electricity Competition * Paul Joskow andwww.ucei.org Retail Electricity Competition ? Paul Joskow †

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market”, Power WorkingFelder (1996), “Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Designing Electricity Auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market performance in electricity auctions, it appears thatMcSorely (2001) “Regulating Electricity Markets: Experiencethe United Kingdom,” The Electricity Journal, December, 81-

Fabra, Natalia; von der Fehr, Nils-Henrik; Harbord, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric vehicle testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric Vehicle Testing (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Jim Francfort Discovery Center of Idaho - September 2005 INLCON-05-00693 HEV & EV Testing...

153

NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Electricity, Resources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together diverse groups of experts...

154

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting Rebate Program (New York) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as...

155

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, R.

1993-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, Robert (Dublin, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Electrical receptacle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

Leong, R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Electric Resistance Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to...

160

Energy Basics: Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of an electric bus driving up a hill. Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Sector ; Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector; Annual Totals: ...

162

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights ... Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating capacity;

163

Suppressant: Electric Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Suppressant:Electric Fields. Fire Extinguishment of Pool Flames by Means of a DC electric Field.. ...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

164

Concrete Electrical Conductivity Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concrete Electrical Conductivity Test. Description/Summary: ... Details. Type of software: Virtual concrete electrical conductivity test. Authors: ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

Electricity Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the Electricity Market Module as it was used for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Electricity Load and Demand (ELD) Submodule.

Jeff Jones

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

166

Electric Power Metrology Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid Our country's way of life depends on the electric power distribution system. ...

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

Electrical Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 July 2013 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C.20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is approved for use by the Office of Health, Safety and Security and is available to all DOE components and their contractors. 2. Specific comments (recommendations, additions, deletions, and any pertinent data) to enhance this document should be sent to: Patrick Tran

168

Heating effects on magnetorheological dampers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decades, scientists and engineers have tried to develop and improve various devices and control systems in order to mitigate and prevent civil structures against external dynamic forces such as strong wind ...

Larrecq, Geoffroy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Executive Director for Operations CONSIDERATION OF ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTAINMENT VENTING SYSTEMS FOR BOILING WATER REACTORS WITH MARK I AND MARK II CONTAINMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information, options, and a recommendation from the NRC staff to impose new requirements for containment venting systems for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) with Mark I and Mark II containments. This paper is provided in response to the Commission’s staff requirements memorandum (SRM) for SECY-11-0137, “Prioritization of Recommended Actions To Be

R. W. Borchardt

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Electrical Quantities Programs/Projects in Quantum Electrical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical Quantities Programs/Projects in Quantum Electrical Metrology. Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid. Contact. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electrical Equipment Inspection Program Electrical Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Electrical Safety" (DOE )-HDBK-1092-2004 Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations, "Labor" , Chapter 17

Wechsler, Risa H.

172

Electricity in the Body  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity in the Body Name: SEAN Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: OUR BRAINS SEND ELECTRICAL IMPULSES RIGHT. IS IT BASICALLY SAME AS NORMAL ELECTRICITY? IS IT LIKE...

173

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Electric Power Industry - U.S. Electricity Imports from and Electricity Exports to Canada and Mexico, 2001-2011 (Megawatthours) Canada Mexico U.S. Total Year Imports from...

174

Retail Electricity Competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the savings in their electricity bill. While these consumerssavings in their electricity bill. A potential argumentsurplus S(s) minus the electricity bill: E j [S(s) ? p j D

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Matter & Energy Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

See Also: Matter & Energy Electricity Energy Technology Computers & Math Distributed Computing Computer Science Science & Society Energy Issues Environmental Policies Reference Electric power transmission Distributed generation Electric power Grid computing ScienceDaily (Oct. 12, 2010) -- A new study

Hines, Paul

176

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The...

177

Electrical safety guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

DOE handbook electrical safety  

SciTech Connect

Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Sustainable Electricity | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Electricity SHARE Sustainable Electricity Outdoor power line accelerated testing. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Energy Efficiency and Electricity Technologies Program...

180

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. Net Generation from Wind by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2001 - 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors)...

182

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy....

183

Energy Basics: Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

185

2012 National Electricity Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 8, 2011 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study...

186

Electric:SpaceCharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Electric:SpaceCharge. Prev, 6.4.1. Material Properties, Next. Name. Electric:SpaceCharge — Spatial charge density. Details. ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3:30 - 3:40 pm Welcome and Opening Comments Kevin Kolevar, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Linda Stuntz, Chair, Electricity Advisory Committee...

188

Electric Power Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 3.19. Net Generation from Geothermal by State, by Sector, 2011 and 2010 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric...

189

California's electricity crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The collapse of California's electricity restructuring and competition program has attracted attention around the world. Prices in California's competitive wholesale electricity market increased by 500% between the second ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Electricity Monthly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

CorrectionUpdate November 28, 2012 Map of Electric System Selected for Daily Peak Demand was replaced with the correct map showing Selected Wholesale Electricity and Natural Gas...

191

EIA Energy Kids - Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The energy sources we use to make electricity can be renewable or non-renewable, but electricity itself is neither renewable nor non-renewable.

192

Electrical Safety Committee Charter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

safety and electrical safety awareness within the APS. The committee shall implement policies and practices adopted by the ANL Electrical Safety Committee and shall assist the ANL...

193

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles A neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) is 4-wheeled vehicle, larger than a golf cart but smaller than most light-duty passenger vehicles. NEVs are...

194

Electricity market module: Electricity fuel dispatch submodule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO), international electricity trade was represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Electricity Market Module (EMM) modeling framework as an exogenous input. The exception to this exogenous treatment was for firm power projections, i.e., new Canadian hydroelectric model builds. The AEO95 implementation of EMM allowed Canadian hydroelectric projects to be selected in the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) submodule on an annual basis and otherwise addressed as any other purchased power commitments. This technical memorandum addresses modifications to the Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule implemented in AEO96 to enhance the treatment of international electricity trade through the representation of economy imports from Canada.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Electricity Restructuring: Deregulation or Reregulation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power in the British Electricity Spot Market. ” American805. Catherine Wolfram. “Electricity Markets: Should thePower in Wholesale Electricity Markets. ” The Electricity

Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, James

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Energy Basics: Electric Resistance Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance...

197

Electrical Safety - Monthly Analyses of Electrical Safety Occurrences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Analysis Office of Analysis Operating Experience Committee Safety Alerts Safety Bulletins Annual Reports Special Operations Reports Safety Advisories Special Reports Causal Analysis Reviews Contact Us HSS Logo Electrical Safety Monthly Analyses of Electrical Safety Occurrences 2013 September 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences August 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences July 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences June 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences May 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences April 2013 Electrical Safety Occurrences March Electrical Safety Occurrence February Electrical Safety Occurrence January Electrical Safety Occurrence 2012 December Electrical Safety Occurrence November Electrical Safety Occurrence October Electrical Safety Occurrence September Electrical Safety Occurrence

198

Electric car Gasoline car  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENAC/ Electric car (Renault) Gasoline car (competitors) Gasoline car (Renault) Market shares of an electric vehicle? Electric car (Renault) Gasoline car (competitors) Gasoline car (Renault) Market shares preferences. · Identification of population segments with a strong interest for electric cars. · Forecasting

199

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 91 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M068(2012). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

200

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 95 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M068(2011). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Electricity Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Module Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 101 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2013, DOE/EIA-M068(2013). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

202

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

100 High Efficiency RangeOven: 500 Conveyor Oven: 500 Fryer: 500 Broiler: 100 Steam Cooker: 500 Vent Dampers for Boilers: 125 Custom: Two year buy down or 50% of...

203

Laclede Gas Company - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrared Heaters: 300unit Gas-fired Boiler Tune Up: 75% of cost (non-profit); 50% of cost (C&I Customers) Steam-Trap Replacements: 50% of cost Vent Dampers: 50% of cost...

204

Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Planning Electricity Portfolios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Planning Electricity Portfolios 2009/11/30­12/01 István Maros Electricity Portfolio #12;Introduction Computational Efficiency Electricity Portfolio Outline 1 Introduction 2 Computational Efficiency 3 Electricity Portfolio Approximate

205

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

electric customers who upgrade heating, cooling or ventilation systems with specific types of energy efficient equipment. These rebates include efficient central air...

206

Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Feasibility Study of H{sub 2}S Abatement by Incineration of Noncondensable Gases in Vented Steam Flow from Davies-State 5206-1 Geothermal Steam Well, Geysers Geothermal Steam Field, Lake County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determine feasibility of using an incineration-type device to accomplish the required reduction in vent steam H{sub 2}S content to meet ICAPCO rules. This approach is to be the only method considered in this feasibility study.

None

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

208

Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies important environment, health, and safety issues associated with nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and assesses the need for further testing and analysis. Among the issues discussed are cell and battery safety, workplace health and safety, shipping requirements, and in-vehicle safety. The manufacture and recycling of Ni-MH batteries are also examined. This report also overviews the ``FH&S`` issues associated with other nickel-based electric vehicle batteries; it examines venting characteristics, toxicity of battery materials, and the status of spent batteries as a hazardous waste.

Corbus, D.; Hammel, C.J.; Mark, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Preliminary Study of a Vented Attic Radiant Barrier System in Hot, Humid Climates Using Side-by-Side, Full-Scale Test Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of side-by-side tests was performed using two full scale test houses to determine the effectiveness of a Vented Radiant Barrier System (VRBS) in reducing the ceiling heat flux during the summer cooling season in North Florida. Another series of side-by-side tests was conducted to evaluate the effect of a VRBS on ceiling heat losses under typical North Florida winter conditions. The effect of a VRBS on the expected life of roof shingles was also evaluated.

Lear, W. E.; Barrup, T. E.; Davis, K. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Interim On-Site Storage of Low-Level Waste: Volume 4, Part 3: Waste Container Closures, Seals, and Gas Vents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume of the Interim On-Site Storage report series supplements Volume 4, Part 1, which includes an extensive methodology and detailed information on the types and availability of low-level waste (LLW) containers and container coatings for extended storage. Part 2, soon to be published, addresses monitoring and inspection requirements for stored LLW containers. Part 3 continues the series by providing detailed guidance on container closures, seals, and gas vents, including performance goals and key ...

1993-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

211

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

212

Electric arc saw apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

Deichelbohrer, Paul R. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A new opportunity for hydro: Using air turbines for generating electricity  

SciTech Connect

A concept that uses hydropower to compress air could increase the number of locations where hydro is economically and environmentally feasible. The idea is being tested in a demonstration project in the northeastern U.S. The hydroelectric industry could experience substantial growth in low-head hydro facilities if a concept now being developed proves successful. This concept aims to enable power developers to generate electricity economically at sites currently not feasible for hydropower because water heads are too low. Many areas of North America are studded with low-head dams that could provide considerable hydro capacity if low-head generation were economically feasible. The six New England states in the US, for example, contain approximately 15,000 dams that have never been used to generate electric power because they impound water with heads ranging from 3 to 13 feet. Conventional facilities are not economically practical for generating electricity at these low heads. However, a promising alternative approach is to use water at these low-head dams to compress air, and then to use the air to power an air turbine-generator that produces electricity. The concept, called hydropneumatic generation, can be visualized by imagining a container, such as a large teacup, inverted and submerged in tidal waters. As the tide rises, the water compresses the air trapped inside the container. When the tide ebbs, the pressure decreases, putting the air into a partial vacuum. If a vent pipe were installed from the container to the atmosphere, air would flow out of the container as the water depth increased, and flow back in as the water depth decreased. Hydropneumatic energy is generated by installing an air-powered turbine to harness the energy of this airflow through the vent pipe. The turbine can be installed to rotate in the same direction at all times, even though the airflow reverses direction.

Gorlov, A.M. (Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electricity Distribution System Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Discussion Summary Discussion Summary Electricity Transmission System Workshop 1 Grid Tech Team Discussion Summary Electricity Transmission System Workshop 2 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................. 4 Process ...................................................................................................................................................... 4 Synthesized Challenges ............................................................................................................................. 5

215

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

5.70 SUN PV 2011 10 10393 PUD No 1 of Klickitat County Electric Utility Roosevelt Biogas 1 WA 7832 7 10.00 LFG CT 2011 10 10393 PUD No 1 of Klickitat County Electric Utility...

216

Annual Power Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electric Power Annual Revision Final Data for 2011 Released: January 30, 2013 Revison Date: May 16, 2013 May 16, 2013 Data revision. 2011 Total (all sectors) and electric utility...

217

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Heart and Electric Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heart and Electric Potential Name: Pete Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What is the electrical output that the SA Node andor AV Node put out when emitting an...

220

Madrid Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Lighting Quality Page 1 of 2 ELECTRIC LIGHTING QUALITY MAGIC BOX is a versatile home. Its design allows to change the room size by opening and closing the movable walls...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M. M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Fish in electrical storms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish in electrical storms Name: Kelly A Krugeger Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I have always been told to stay out of water during an electrical storm...

223

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric...

225

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric...

226

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric...

227

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 36,636 7 Electric Utilities 26,639 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 9,998 11 Net Generation (megawatthours) 137,576,941 8 Electric...

228

Designing electricity transmission auctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The UK has ambitious plans for exploiting offshore wind for electricity production in order to meet its challenging target under the EU Renewable Energy Directive. This could involve investing up to 20bn in transmission assets to bring electricity...

Greve, Thomas; Pollitt, Michael G.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

229

International Electricity Regulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. trade in electric energy with Canada and Mexico is rising, bringing economic and reliability benefits to the United States and its trading partners. Within the Office of Electricity Delivery ...

230

2014 Electricity Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic) Survey Form Changes Proposed for Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic) Survey Form Changes Proposed for 2014 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is proposing changes to its electricity data collection in 2014. These changes involve the following surveys: Form EIA-63B, "Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report," Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," Form EIA-826, "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions," Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," Form EIA-860M, "Monthly Update to the Annual Electric Generator Report," Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report," Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form)," and

231

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vapor Retarder Vapor Retarder A component that retards water vapor diffusion but does not totally prevent its transmission. Vapor retarder material is usually a thin sheet or coating. However, a construction of several materials, some perhaps of substantial thickness, could also constitute a vapor retarder system. Variable Air Volume (VAV) HVAC system that controls the dry-bulb temperature within a space by varying the volumetric flow of heated or cooled supply air to the space. Variable Frequency Drive Changes the speed of the motor by changing the voltage and frequency of the electricity supplied to the motor based upon system requirements. Vent Damper A device intended for installation in the venting system of an individual, automatically operated, fossil-fuel-fired appliance in the outlet or

232

RMOTC_WO2008.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The damper module has two chambers separated by a restriction surrounded by a series of electric coils, Fig. 1. A MagnetoRheological Fluid (MRF) is used as the damper fluid. As...

233

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand forand distribution facilities that supply electricity demand.55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand for

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discusses how electricity demands for vehicle charging cantiming of vehicle electricity demands. challenges associatedand timing of vehicle electricity demand. As the number of

Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statewide California Electricity Demand. [accessed June 22,fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used into added vehicle electricity demand in the BAU (no IGCC)

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEC (2009) Statewide Electricity Rates by Utility, Class andrates if the marginal electricity rate from the LCFS isestimated marginal electricity emissions rate in California’

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Electric Vehicle (EV) Exemption from Vehicle Testing Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV)

238

Arizona Electricity Restructuring Suspended  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This inactivity strongly suggests that electricity restructuring in Arizona has ... demand side management, environmental, ... United States Departmen ...

239

Electric Power Metrology News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Next-generation "smart" electrical meters for residential and commercial ... NIST Team Demystifies Utility of Power Factor Correction Devices Release ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

240

General Dynamics, Electric Boat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Dynamics, Electric Boat. NVLAP Lab Code: 100560-0. Address and Contact Information: 75 Eastern Point Road ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Electric arc saw apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

Deichelbohrer, P.R.

1983-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 of 139 3.0 HAZARD ANALYSIS 3.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter provides tools for assessing electrical hazards error. This chapter does not provide an exhaustive list of sources of electrical energy

243

PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ELECTRIC SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Buying a PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ELECTRIC SYSTEM A Consumer Guide 2003 System: A Consumer Guide i Buying a Photovoltaic Solar Electric System A Consumer Guide California Energy water system that uses the sun's energy to heat water, solar electric or photovoltaic technology uses

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

244

CCPPolicyBriefing Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-57942 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY The Effects of Electricity Tariff of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State Prepared for the Distributed of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State #12;The Effects

Feigon, Brooke

245

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering University of Colorado--Boulder Monday, April 2, 2012, 11:00 a an Associate Professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder. He hadELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEMINAR "A Random Walk on Image Patches" by Prof. Francois Meyer

246

Electrically charged pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n the present work we investigate one possible variation on the usual electrically neutral pulsars: the inclusion of electric charge. We study the effect of electric charge in pulsars assuming that the charge distribution is proportional to the energy density. All calculations were performed for zero temperature and fixed entropy equations of state.

M. D. Alloy; D. P. Menezes

2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

247

Electrically charged pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n the present work we investigate one possible variation on the usual electrically neutral pulsars: the inclusion of electric charge. We study the effect of electric charge in pulsars assuming that the charge distribution is proportional to the energy density. All calculations were performed for zero temperature and fixed entropy equations of state.

Alloy, M D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The experimental implementation and comparison of active, semiactive, and passive vehicle suspensions utilizing a linear electric motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research is the investigation of the experimental implementation of an active automobile suspension, three types of semiactive suspensions, and a passive suspension. These suspensions are realized via computer control of a linear electric motor. The details of the suspensions are explained in full assuming no prior knowledge by the reader. A theoretical quarter car model is developed and used to provide baseline performance criteria. Details of the design and development of the experimental test rig are given. The experimental results are compared to the theoretical results to study the effectiveness of the motor at realizing the control strategies. This gives an indication of the feasibility of electric motors for implementation of active and semiactive suspension control strategies. Furthermore, the control algorithms are compared to each other to rate each for performance versus complexity. Also, the experimental results are compared to previous experimental results for a resistance controlled semiactive suspension using dual dampers. The experimental test rig and theoretical simulation results agreed fairly well for all suspension performance criteria. The relative comparisons of each suspension when implemented on the test rig were almost identical to the rankings resulting from theory. The performance criteria showed that an active suspension is substantially better than a passive one. Also, only minimal differences exist between the active suspension and the three semiactive suspensions. This indicates that an active suspension is not needed for excellent suspension performance.

Williams, Monte Glen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Machines to Electrical Machines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Power Electronics Electrical Machines Thermal Control & System Integration Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Electrical Machines Emphasis in the electrical machines activity is on advanced motor

250

Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavior in a Competitive Electricity Market,” InternationalDemand Response in Electricity Markets,” Hewlett FoundationGreen, R. (1999) “The Electricity Contract Market in England

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Case for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have put practical electric cars within reach, but politicsthat markets for electric cars might actually emergeratherTO CAR WorldResources Insnmte, 1994 TAKING CWARGE ELECTRIC

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Prospects for Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improved, neighborhood electric cars will likely be seen aseven general-purpose electric cars. They con- size orgasoline-like electric cars, they wilt undoubtedlybecome

Sperling, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Electric vehicles | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric vehicles Jump to: navigation, search TODO: add content Electric vehicles first came into existence in the mid-19th century, when electricity was among the preferred...

254

Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greenhouse effect, and electric vehicles," Proceedingso/9thInternational Electric Vehicles Symposium, 1988. 14. R. M.of 9th International Electric Vehicles Sympo- sium, 1988.

Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Case for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment More Documents &...

257

Electric Power Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Monthly Excel files zipped 2010 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2009 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2008 January February March March Supplement April May June July August September October November December 2007 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2006 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2005 January February March April May June July August September October November December

258

EIA Electric Power Forms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Forms Electric Power Forms EIA Electric Power Forms Listing of Publicly Available and Confidential Data EIA's statistical surveys encompass each significant electric supply and demand activity in the United States. Most of the electric power survey forms resulting data elements are published, but respondent confidentiality is required. The chart below shows the data elements for each survey form and how each data element is treated in regard to confidentiality. Data Categories Data collection forms EIA- 411 EIA- 826 EIA- 860 EIA- 860M EIA- 861 EIA- 923 Frame Information Utility identification and iocation -- -- -- -- X -- Plant identification and iocation -- -- -- X -- X Generation and fuel Latitude and longitude -- -- X -- -- --

259

Electric car arrives - again  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first mass-produced electric cars in modern times are here, although they are expensive, limited in capability and unfamiliar to most prospective consumers. This article presents a brief history of the reintroduction of the modern electric car as well as discussions of the limitations of development, alternative routes to both producing and selling electric cars or some modified version of electric cars, economic incentives and governmental policies, and finally a snapshot description of the future for electric cars. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Dunn, S.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The model electric restaurant  

SciTech Connect

Restaurants are the most intensive users of energy of all types of commercial buildings. As a result, they have some of the highest energy costs. New and existing restaurants are important customers to electric utilities. Many opportunities exist to use electricity to improve restaurant energy performance. This report discusses a project in which computer simulations were used to investigate restaurant energy subsystem performance and to assess the potential for electric equipment to reduce energy consumption, reduce peak demand improve load factors, and reduce energy cost in new all-electric restaurants. The project investigated typical restaurant designs for all-electric and gas/electric facilities and compared them to high efficiency electric options in all-electric restaurants. This analysis determined which investiments in high-efficiency electric equipment are attractive for restaurant operators. Improved equipment for food preparation, heating and cooling, ventilation, sanitation, and lighting subsystem was studied in cafeteria, full menu, fast food, and pizza restaurants in Atlanta, Cleveland, Los Angeles, and Phoenix. In addition to the actual rate structures, four synthetic rate structures were used to calculate energy costs, so that the results can be applied to other locations. The results indicate that high efficiency and improved all-electric equipment have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption, peak demand, and operating costs in almost all restaurants in all locations. The all-electric restaurants, with a combination of improved equipment, also offer the customer a competitive choice in fuels in most locations. 12 refs., 26 figs., 55 tabs.

Frey, D.J.; Oatman, P.A. (Architectural Energy Corp., Boulder, CO (USA)); Claar, C.N. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cybersecurity Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model Electricity Advisory Committee...

262

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey-level Detail Data Files Survey-level Detail Data Files Electric power data are collected on survey instruments. Data collection is mandated by Congress to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding. The most widely used data are disseminated in reports, such as the Electric Power Monthly and the Electric Power Annual. Publicly available electric power data is available down to the plant level in the Electricity Data Browser and in detailed spreadsheets by survey below. Description Data availability State-level data (consolidated across forms) Contains electricity generation; fuel consumption; emissions; retail sales, revenue, number of customers, and retail prices; generating capacity; and financial data. 1990-2012 (monthly and annual) Electric power sales and revenue data - monthly (Form EIA-826)

263

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

264

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

265

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

266

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

267

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

268

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

269

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

270

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

271

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology and Documentation Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy. Data published in the Electricity Monthly Update are compiled from the following sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-826,"Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenues with State Distributions Report," U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," fuel spot prices from Bloomberg Energy, electric power prices from SNL Energy, electric system demand data from Ventyx Energy Velocity Suite, and weather data and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

272

Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs), are among the most promising of the advanced vehicle

Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Electric:DielectricPermittivity:Isotropic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OOF2: The Manual. Electric:DielectricPermittivity:Isotropic. ... Name. Electric:DielectricPermittivity:Isotropic — Isotropic dielectric permittivity. Details. ...

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

274

Applied Electrical Metrology Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electric Power Metrology and the Smart Grid—Our country's way of life depends on the electric power distribution system. ...

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

275

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Stocks Above normal temperatures in January have allowed electric utilities to significantly replinish stockpiles of coal. The upswing in coal stockpiles corresponds to decreasing consumption of coal at electric generators seen in the resource use section across all regions of the country. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. Along with coal stockpiles at electric power plants, the supply of coal significantly increased in January of 2012. Total bituminous coal days of burn increased 10 percent from January 2011 to 87, while subbituminous supply increased nearly 10

276

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: December 2011 End Use: December 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

277

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: August 2011 End Use: August 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average revenue per kWh by state Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

278

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: November 2011 End Use: November 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

279

Electric Utility Industry Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Industry Update Electric Utility Industry Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets Edison Electric Institute FUPWG Spring 2012 April 12, 2012 Edison Electric Institute ď‚› Investor-Owned Electric Companies ď‚› Membership includes ď‚› 200 US companies, ď‚› More than 65 international affiliates and ď‚› 170 associates ď‚› US members ď‚› Serve more than 95% of the ultimate customers in the investor-owned segment of the industry and ď‚› Nearly 70% of all electric utility ultimate customers, and ď‚› Our mission focuses on advocating public policy; expanding market opportunities; and providing strategic business information Agenda ď‚›Significant Industry Trends ď‚›Utility Infrastructure Investments ď‚›Generation and Fuel Landscape

280

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: October 2011 End Use: October 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: March 2012 End Use: March 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of States have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

282

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: September 2011 End Use: September 2011 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

283

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: October 2013 End Use: October 2013 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

284

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: January 2012 End Use: January 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

285

Electrical system architecture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical system for a vehicle includes a first power source generating a first voltage level, the first power source being in electrical communication with a first bus. A second power source generates a second voltage level greater than the first voltage level, the second power source being in electrical communication with a second bus. A starter generator may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus, and at least one additional power source may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus. The electrical system also includes at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the first bus and at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the second bus.

Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

End Use: February 2012 End Use: February 2012 Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of States have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on retail sales revenues and volumes, we calculate average retail revenues per kWh as a proxy for retail rates and prices. Retail sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by State Percent Change ¢ Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent change in average revenue

288

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Neutron-induced prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) of metalsand non-metals in ocean floor geothermal vent-generated samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Neutron-induced prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) hasbeen used to analyze ocean floor geothermal vent-generated samples thatare composed of mixed metal sulfides, silicates, and aluminosilicates.The modern application of the PGAA technique is discussed, and elementalanalytical results are given for 25 elements observed in the samples. Theelemental analysis of the samples is consistent with the expectedmineralogical compositions, and very consistent results are obtained forcomparable samples. Special sensitivity to trace quantities of hydrogen,boron, cadmium, dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium isdiscussed.

Perry, D.L.; Firestone, R.B.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.; Kasztovszky, Zs.; Gatti, R.C.; Wilde, P.

2002-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

290

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Sheraton National Hotel May 20, 2008 Minutes Members Present: Linda Stuntz, Esquire, Stuntz, Davis, and Staffier, P.C. (Chair) Yakout Mansour, California ISO (Vice Chair) Paul J. Allen, Constellation Energy Guido Bartels, IBM Gerry Cauley, SERC Reliability Corporation Jose Delgado, American Transmission Company The Honorable Jeanne Fox, New Jersey Board of Public Utilities Rob Gramlich, American Wind Energy Association The Honorable Dian Grueneich, California Public Utilities Commission Michael Heyeck, American Electric Power Hunter Hunt, Sharyland Utilities Susan Kelly, American Public Power Association Irwin Kowenski, Occidental Energy Ventures Corporation Barry Lawson, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

291

ELECTRIC BLASTING INITIATOR  

SciTech Connect

An electric blasting initiator comprises a shell, a high explosive material within the shell, and an exploding bridge wire in contact with said explosive material. (AEC)

Johnston, L.H.

1962-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

Electric power annual 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

Not Available

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

293

2012 National Electricity Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 15, 2011 Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, 1380 Harbor Island Drive, San Diego, California 92101 Agenda 8:00 am...

294

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly with Data for October 2012. December 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy . ...

295

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Power Monthly with Data for August 2012. October 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov . U.S. Department of Energy . ...

296

Electricity Supply Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity Supply Sector Part 1 of 6 Supporting Documents Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary

297

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected Net Energy (Thousands of Megawatthours) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT...

298

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Total (All Sectors) by State, 2011 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts...

299

Texas Electricity Restructuring Active  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Under these two bills, a pilot program would first need to prove that electricity deregulation would lower rates before the entire service area could be deregulated.

300

2014 Electricity Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. ... “Monthly Electric Utility Sales and ... an increase in the number of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Electrically Deformable Liquid Marbles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid marbles, which are droplets coated with a hydrophobic powder, were exposed to a uniform electric field. It was established that a threshold value of the electric field, 15 cgse, should be surmounted for deformation of liquid marbles. The shape of the marbles was described as a prolate spheroid. The semi-quantitative theory describing deformation of liquid marbles in a uniform electric field is presented. The scaling law relating the radius of the contact area of the marble to the applied electric field shows a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

Edward Bormashenko; Roman Pogreb; Tamir Stein; Gene Whyman; Marcelo Schiffer; Doron Aurbach

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

302

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... 423 and FERC-423) Contains data on electricity generation, fuel consumption, useful thermal output, fossil fuel stocks, fuel deliveries, quantity delivered, ...

303

Efficiency of Electric Motors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the EEM program addresses testing the efficiency of electric ... 1 of Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Standard C390, 'Energy Efficient Test ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

304

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report;" and predecessor forms. Imports and Exports: Mexico data - DOE, Fossil Fuels, Office of Fuels Programs, Form OE-781R, "Annual Report of International Electrical Export...

305

ELECTRICITY APPENDIX D-4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 3.4 3.4 3.3 3.3 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.1 3.1 3.0 3.0 2.9 2.9 2.9 2.8 2.7 Industrial Sector Electricity Bill.92 Industrial coking 25.29 0.99 25.55 Other industrial 25.35 0.99 25.61 electric utility 25.48 0.99 25ELECTRICITY APPENDIX D-4 DETAILED RESULTS APPENDIX D #12;Electricity Sector Forecast Summary Page 1

306

Electric Power Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2011 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu)...

307

Electric Power Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

4. Weighted Average Cost of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2011 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Fossil Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite All Coal Ranks...

308

2012 National Electricity Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 U.S. Department of Energy 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Western Regional Workshops December 13, 2011 - Portland, Oregon Sheraton Portland Airport Hotel...

309

Electricity & Energy Reliability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENERGY RELIABILITY Human Capital Management Strategic Plan FY2007 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Human Capital Management Strategic Plan September 2006...

310

2012 National Electricity Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 6, 2011 Hilton Philadelphia Airport, 4509 Island Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19153 Hilton Philadelphia...

311

Electric Power Annual 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Annual 2004 iii Contacts Questions regarding this report may be directed to: Energy Information Administration, EI-53

312

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets”, Papers andand Steven Stoft, “Installed Capacity and Price Caps: Oil onElectricity Markets Have a Capacity requirement? If So, How

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Electric Power Annual 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected"...

314

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 5.6.A. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State . July 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration ...

315

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 5.6.A. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State . June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration ...

316

EIA - Electricity Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table A.6.A. Relative Standard Error for Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: by End-Use Sector, Census Division, and State, September ...

317

Electrical Circuit Tester  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical circuit testing device is provided, comprising a case, a digital voltage level testing circuit with a display means, a switch to initiate measurement using the device, a non-shorting switching means for selecting pre-determined electrical wiring configurations to be tested in an outlet, a terminal block, a five-pole electrical plug mounted on the case surface and a set of adapters that can be used for various multiple-pronged electrical outlet configurations for voltages from 100 600 VAC from 50 100 Hz.

Love, Frank (Amarillo, TX)

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

318

National Electrical Manufacturers Association  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... as fire safety and factory automation to cosponsoring ... This device, which was approved not long ... the new electric power distribution transformers that ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

319

Electric Vehicle Public Charging -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Public Charging - Time vs. Energy March, 2013 A critical factor for successful PEV adoption is the deployment and use of charging infrastructure in non-...

320

Electric Vehicle Fleet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A98 0577 Electric Vehicle Fleet Operations in the United States Jim Francfort Presented to: 31st International Symposium on Automotive Technology and Automation Dusseldorf, Germany...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Sales data for various models of electric and hybrid electric vehicles from December 2010 through June 2013. 062010-092013_EV_HEV Sales.xlsx Description Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (Excel) 062010-092013_EV_HEV Sales.csv Description Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (CSV) 062010-092013_EV_HEV Sales.jpeg Description Chart of Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (JPG) More Documents & Publications Federal Reporting Recipient Information Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Second Quarter Report 2013 Federal Reporting Recipient Information

322

Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Sales data for various models of electric and hybrid electric vehicles from December 2010 through June 2013. 062010-092013_EV_HEV Sales.xlsx Description Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (Excel) 062010-092013_EV_HEV Sales.csv Description Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (CSV) 062010-092013_EV_HEV Sales.jpeg Description Chart of Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (JPG) More Documents & Publications Federal Reporting Recipient Information Natural Gas Imports and Exports - Second Quarter Report 2013 Federal Reporting Recipient Information

323

Vented nuclear fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

Grossman, Leonard N. (Livermore, CA); Kaznoff, Alexis I. (Castro Valley, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electricity Electricity Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Electricity Fuel Prices Find electricity fuel prices and trends. Electricity can be used to power all-electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid

325

IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS ASSOCIATION OF ARIZONA R.D. JUSTICE SUITE 140 WILLIAM H. STACY PRESIDENT 340 E. PALM LANE SECRETARY-TREASURER PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85004-4603 ELSTON GRUBAUGH (602) 254-5908 ROBERT S. LYNCH VICE-PRESIDENT Fax (602) 257-9542 COUNSEL AND

326

Texas Electric Lighting Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electric lighting electric lighting The SNAP House's lighting design aims for elegant simplicity in concept, use, and maintenance. Throughout the house, soft, ambient light is juxtaposed with bright, direct task lighting. All ambient and most task lighting is integrated directly into the architectural design of the house. An accent light wall between the bedroom and bathroom provides a glowing light for nighttime navigation.

327

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

Hand, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Electrical Demand Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost every building owner or manager is interested in controlling electrical costs. Since the HVAC system is a large user of electricity, this article will discuss what can be done in the HVAC system to influence parts of the utility bill.

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

EFCOG / DOE Electrical Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&D Decontamination and Decommissioning dc direct current DOE Department of Energy EFCOG Energy Facility Contractors Purpose: This tool is intended to determine the severity of an electrical energy event based reportability. Scope: This tool establishes a standardized approach for tracking and trending electrical energy

331

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEMINAR "Considerations for Curriculum Planning and Revitalization in Engineering" by Prof. Michael A. de Miranda School of Education and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Colorado State University Monday, Feb. 20, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Location: LSC 210 Abstract

332

Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) combine the benefits of high fuel economy and low emissions with the power, range, and convenience of conventional diesel and gasoline fueling. HEV technologies also have potential to be combined with alternative fuels and fuel cells to provide additional benefits. Future offerings might also include plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

333

Electricity Real Options Valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper a real option approach for the valuation of real assets is presented. Two continuous time models used for valuation are described: geometric Brownian motion model and interest rate model. The valuation for electricity spread option under Vasicek interest model is placed and the formulas for parameter estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market.

Broszkiewicz-Suwaj, E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Electricity Real Options Valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper a real option approach for the valuation of real assets is presented. Two continuous time models used for valuation are described: geometric Brownian motion model and interest rate model. The valuation for electricity spread option under Vasicek interest model is placed and the formulas for parameter estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market.

Ewa Broszkiewicz-Suwaj

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

Hand, M.; Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Electrically conductive diamond electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

Swain, Greg (East Lansing, MI); Fischer, Anne (Arlington, VA),; Bennett, Jason (Lansing, MI); Lowe, Michael (Holt, MI)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

339

IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS IRRIGATION & ELECTRICAL DISTRICTS ASSOCIATION OF ARIZONA R. GALE PEARCE SUITE 140 ELSTON GRUBAUGH PRESIDENT 340 E. PALM LANE SECRETARY-TREASURER PHOENIX, ARIZONA 85004-4603 R.D. JUSTICE (602) 254-5908 ROBERT S. LYNCH VICE-PRESIDENT Fax (602) 257-9542 ASSISTANT SECRETARY-TREASURER

340

Hawaii electric system reliability.  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability "worth" and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: September 2011 Resource Use: September 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Fossil steam generation, primarily coal-fired, is most pronounced in the Central region and supplies close to half of the electricity in the

342

Canadian Electrical Association Petition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BEFORE THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY TransAlta Energy Marketing (U.S.) Inc. ) Docket No. EA-216-C PROTEST OF THE CANADIAN ELECTRICITY ASSOCIATION AND THE ELECTRIC POWER SUPPLY ASSOCIATION TO SIERRA CLUB'S NOTICE OF INTERVENTION AND MOTION TO INTERVENE Pursuant to Section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act ("FPA"), 16 U.s.c. § 824(e) (2006) and § 385.211 of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's ("FERC") Rules of Practice and Procedure, the Canadian Electricity Association ("CEA") and the Electric Power Supply Association ("EPSA") hereby submit this filing in protest to Sierra Club's Notice ofIntervention and Motion to Intervene and in support of TransAlta Energy Marketing (U.S

343

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: August 2011 Resource Use: August 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation output by region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Fossil steam generation, primarily coal-fired, predominants in the Central region and supplies close to half of the electricity in the Southeast and

344

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 3, 2011 Page 1 October 3, 2011 Page 1 Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Headquarters 4301 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, VA Agenda October 19, 2011 2:00 - 5:00 pm EDT 1:30 - 2:00 pm Registration 2:00 - 2:15 pm WELCOME and Introductions Richard Cowart, Chair, Electricity Advisory Committee Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2:15 - 3:15 pm Presentation on U.S. Department of Energy's Vision of a Future Grid Bill Parks, Senior Advisor, DOE Office Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 3:15 - 3:30 pm Break 3:30 - 4:15 pm Response to U.S. Department of Energy's Vision of a Future Grid Honorable Robert Curry, Commissioner, New York State Public Service

345

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: September 2011 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: September 2011 Stocks Electric power sector coal stocks continued to replenish after the summer burn in October, though stockpile levels remain well below 2010 levels. All coal stockpile levels declined from October 2010, with bituminous coal stockpile levels 12 percent lower than the same month of 2010. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants was generally flat in October 2011 compared to September of this year. The summer of 2011 saw significant declines in total U.S. stockpile levels, which were replenished in the

346

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: November 2011 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: November 2011 Stocks As discussed in this month's feature story, electric power sector coal stocks continued to replenish after the summer burn in November, though stockpile levels remain below 2010 and 2009 levels. All coal stockpile levels declined from November 2010, with bituminous coal stockpile levels 9 percent lower than the same month of 2010. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plantâ€(tm)s current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants dropped slightly from last month and remained below levels seen in November of 2010 or 2009. While

347

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Reports Electricity Reports Electricity Monthly Update With Data for October 2013 | Release Date: Dec. 20, 2013 | Next Release Date: Jan. 22, 2014 Previous Issues Issue: November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 Previous issues Format: html xls Go Highlights: October 2013 Thirty-one states saw the average cost of electricity increase by more than two percent, with fourteen states experiencing increases of at least five percent compared to a year ago. Texas (ERCOT) and the Midwest (MISO) experienced above average wholesale electricity prices for October due to unseasonable temperatures. The New York City (Transco Zone 6 NY) natural gas price was

348

Electric turbocompound control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Turbocompound systems can be used to affect engine operation using the energy in exhaust gas that is driving the available turbocharger. A first electrical device acts as a generator in response to turbocharger rotation. A second electrical device acts as a motor to put mechanical power into the engine, typically at the crankshaft. Apparatus, systems, steps, and methods are described to control the generator and motor operations to control the amount of power being recovered. This can control engine operation closer to desirable parameters for given engine-related operating conditions compared to actual. The electrical devices can also operate in "reverse," going between motor and generator functions. This permits the electrical device associated with the crankshaft to drive the electrical device associated with the turbocharger as a motor, overcoming deficient engine operating conditions such as associated with turbocharger lag.

Algrain, Marcelo C. (Dunlap, IL)

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

349

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, DOE/EIA- 6, DOE/EIA- M068(2006). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. This section describes the model parameters and assumptions used in EMM. It includes a discussion of legislation and regulations that are incorporated in EMM as well as information about the climate change action plan. The various electricity and technology cases are also described. EMM Regions The supply regions used in EMM are based on the North American Electric Reliability Council regions and

350

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: December 2011 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: December 2011 Stocks Temperate weather throughout the fall has allowed electric power sector coal stocks to replenish from the summer burn. All coal stockpile levels were essentially flat when compared to December 2010 and were a mostly up year-to-date. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plantâ€(tm)s current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants was essentially flat compared to last month and remained below levels seen in December of 2010 or 2009. While stockpile levels have recovered from summer lows, the increasing

351

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Definition: Electricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Electricity Energy resulting from the flow of charge particles[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electricity is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and flow of electric charge. Electricity gives a wide variety of well-known effects, such as lightning, static electricity, electromagnetic induction and the flow of electrical current. In addition, electricity permits the creation and reception of electromagnetic radiation such as radio waves. In electricity, charges produce electromagnetic fields which act on other charges. Electricity occurs due to several types of physics: electric charge: a property of some subatomic particles, which determines their electromagnetic interactions. Electrically charged matter is

353

How Green Will Electricity beHow Green Will Electricity be When Electric Vehicles Arrive?When Electric Vehicles Arrive?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How Green Will Electricity beHow Green Will Electricity be When Electric Vehicles Arrive?When Electric Vehicles Arrive? Edward S. Rubin Department of Engineering and Public Policy Department · How "green" is U.S. electricity today in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions? · What has been

354

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity, Wiley-IEEE Press. CEC (in Major Drivers in U.S. Electricity Markets, NREL/CP-620-and fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mail: ccyang@ucdavis.edu. Electricity Grid Impacts of Plug-by either gasoline or electricity, but unlike hybrids, PHEVsto use very low-carbon electricity resources, such as

Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regionalsuch as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and batteryof Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles on Electric Utilities and

Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on RegionalAnalysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2,of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 2: United States

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional PowerTransmission Area, in Electric Vehicle Symposium, Anaheim,of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2, Argonne

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Program on Technology Innovation: Electricity Use in the Electric Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While many utilities are encouraged by regulators to engage in end-use energy efficiency programs, few consider options to reduce energy losses along the electricity value chain, even though the electricity sector is the second largest electricity-consuming industry in the United States. Electricity used to facilitate power production, transmission, and distribution alone consumes approximately 11% of generated electricity. A number of technologies can be applied to reduce this electricity use. This repo...

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

360

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 5, 2012 June 5, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Guido Bartels IBM Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council The Honorable Paul Centolella Public Utilities Commission of Ohio David Crane NRG Energy, Inc. The Honorable Robert Curry New York State Public Service Commission José Delgado American Transmission Company (Ret.) Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Robert Gramlich American Wind Energy Association Dian Grueneich Dian Grueneich Consulting, LLC. Michael Heyeck American Electric Power

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 Membership Roster 08 Membership Roster Linda Stuntz, Esquire Chair of the Electricity Advisory Committee Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. Paul J. Allen Constellation Energy Guido Bartels IBM Gerry Cauley SERC Reliability Corporation Ralph Cavanagh Natural Defense Resources Council Jose Delgado American Transmission Company The Honorable Jeanne Fox New Jersey Board of Public Utilities Joseph Garcia National Congress of American Indians Robert Gramlich American Wind Energy Association The Honorable Dian Grueneich California Public Utilities Commission Michael Heyeck American Electric Power Hunter Hunt Sharyland Utilities, LLP Susan Kelly American Public Power Association Yakout Mansour Vice-Chair of the Electricity Advisory Committee California Independent System Operator

362

Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2008 5, 2008 Minutes Members Present: Linda Stuntz, Esquire, Stuntz, Davis, and Staffier, P.C. (Chair) Yakout Mansour, California ISO (Vice Chair) Paul J. Allen, Constellation Energy Guido Bartels, IBM Gerry Cauley, SERC Reliability Corporation Jose Delgado, American Transmission Company Rob Gramlich, American Wind Energy Association The Honorable Dian Grueneich, California Public Utilities Commission Michael Heyeck, American Electric Power Hunter Hunt, Hunt Oil Susan Kelly, American Public Power Association Irwin Kowenski, Occidental Energy Ventures Corp. Barry Lawson, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Ralph D. Masiello, KEMA John McDonald, GE Energy Steve Nadel, American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy David Nevius, North American Electric Reliability Corporation

363

Atoms to electricity. [Booklet  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for over 16 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1986 and was second only to coal as a source of our electric power. In the 1990s, nuclear energy is expected to provide almost 20 percent of the Nation's electricity. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Atoms to electricity  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for some 12 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1982. In the 1990's, it is expected to become second only to coal as a source of our electric power, almost doubling its present contribution to our national electricity supply. 14 references, 40 figures, 5 tables.

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Atoms to electricity. [Booklet  

SciTech Connect

This booklet explains the basic technology of nuclear fission power reactors, the nuclear fuel cycle and the role of nuclear energy as one of the domestic energy resources being developed to help meet our national energy demand. Nuclear power accounted for over 16 percent of the US electric energy supply in 1986 and was second only to coal as a source of our electric power. In the 1990s, nuclear energy is expected to provide almost 20 percent of the Nation's electricity. 38 figs., 5 tabs.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

BEEST: Electric Vehicle Batteries  

SciTech Connect

BEEST Project: The U.S. spends nearly a $1 billion per day to import petroleum, but we need dramatically better batteries for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles (EV/PHEV) to truly compete with gasoline-powered cars. The 10 projects in ARPA-E’s BEEST Project, short for “Batteries for Electrical Energy Storage in Transportation,” could make that happen by developing a variety of rechargeable battery technologies that would enable EV/PHEVs to meet or beat the price and performance of gasoline-powered cars, and enable mass production of electric vehicles that people will be excited to drive.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Electricity Advisory Committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 20, 2012 December 20, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate (Ret.) VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Linda Blair ITC Holdings Corporation Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council Paul Centolella Analysis Group The Honorable Robert Curry New York State Public Service Commission Clark Gellings Electric Power Research Institute Dian Grueneich Dian Grueneich Consulting, LLC. Michael Heyeck American Electric Power Paul Hudson Stratus Energy Group Val Jensen Commonwealth Edison Susan Kelly American Public Power Association Barry Lawson

368

Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) Electric Utilities and Electric Cooperatives (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation authorizes the Public Service Commission to promulgate regulations related to investor owned utilities in South Carolina, and addresses service areas, rates and charges, and operating procedures for

369

Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with electricity generation and distribution is importantand distribution facilities that produces and delivers electricitydistribution lines that face congestion if local patterns of electricity

Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Electric Power Monthly - Monthly Data Tables Monthly electricity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Power Monthly - Monthly Data Tables Monthly electricity generation figures (and the fuel consumed to produce it). Source information available at

371

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Colorado service area, system electricity requirementsColorado from the Southwest. ) The definitions of the three regions used by the Western Electricity

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Coal-fired electric generators continue to dominate electric ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

More than 60% of electricity in the central region of the United States comes from coal-fired electric generators, down from 80% in the early part of ...

373

Electricity market clearing price forecasting under a deregulated electricity market .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Under deregulated electric market, electricity price is no longer set by the monopoly utility company rather it responds to the market and operating conditions. Offering… (more)

Yan, Xing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Electrical Contractors (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook answers basic questions about plug-in electric vehicles, charging stations, charging equipment, charging equipment installation, and training for electrical contractors.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Electricity 101 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources » Electricity 101 Resources » Electricity 101 Electricity 101 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: Why do other countries use different shaped plugs? Why do outlets have three holes? Why do we have AC electricity? Can we harness lightning as an energy source? Can we have wireless transmission of electricity? SYSTEM: What is electricity? Where does electricity come from? What is the "grid"? How much electricity does a typical household use? How did the electric system evolve? What does the future look like? PEOPLE: Who owns the electric system? Who runs the grid? Who uses electricity? Where can I find out more about potential careers? How can I improve my energy use? POLICY: How is electricity regulated? Where can I find out about State incentives for renewables? What is a national corridor?

376

Electrical safety in industrial plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most electrical engineers and electricians are aware that the principal danger from electricity is that of electrocution, but few really understand just how minute a quantity of electric energy is required for electrocution. Actually, the current drawn ...

Ralph H. Lee

1971-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Who Will Buy Electric Cars?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

most likely will he electric cars. By 2003, 10 percent mustbig manufacturers say electric cars cost too much to makeoff assembly lines. Early electric cars had the same disad-

Turrentine, Thomas

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Gearing Up for Electric Cars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ff sold now,they argue, electric cars would cost too muchandGearing Up for Electric Cars Daniel Sperhng Reprint UCTC Noor Gearing Up for Electric Cars Daniel Sperling Department

Sperling, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

380

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

382

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

383

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

384

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

385

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

386

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

387

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

388

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

389

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

390

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

391

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

392

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

393

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

394

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

395

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

396

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

397

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

398

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

399

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

400

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

402

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

403

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: October 2011 Resource Use: October 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Consistent with the retail sales numbers, generation output rose in Texas, as well as the Central and Mid-Atlantic regions and declined or remained

404

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

405

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: October 2013 Resource Use: October 2013 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below, electricity generation output by fuel type and generator type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By fuel type By generator type Region map map showing electricity regions In October 2013, net generation in the United States increased 1.0 percent compared to the previous year. This increase in electricity generation occurred mainly in the Mid-Atlantic, Central, and Southeast regions, along

406

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: March 2012 Resource Use: March 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined across much of the country in March due to unseasonably warm temperatures. The two regions that observed small

407

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

408

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

409

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

410

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

411

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

412

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

413

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

414

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

415

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

416

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

417

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

418

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

419

Electric Power Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Annual Technical Notes This appendix describes how the U.S. Energy Information Administration collects, estimates, and reports electric power data in the Electric Power Annual. Data Quality and Submission The Electric Power Annual (EPA) is prepared by the Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics (ERUS), U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ERUS performs routine reviews of the data collection respondent frames, survey forms, and reviews the quality of the data received. Data are entered directly by respondents into the ERUS Internet Data Collection (IDC) system. A small number of hard copy forms are keyed into the system by ERUS personnel. All data are subject to review via interactive edits built into the IDC system, internal quality assurance reports, and review by ERUS

420

NSLS Electrical Equipment Inspection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Equipment Inspection Information Electrical Equipment Inspection Information A note to vendors visiting NSLS A note to users visiting NSLS Proteus Electrical Conformity Remediation Currently Certified Electrical Equipment Inspectors: First Line Contacts Email Extension Poshka, Dennis poshka@bnl.gov 2825 Alternate Contacts Boerner Jr, Albert aboerner@bnl.gov 5990 Buda, Scott buda@bnl.gov 3914 Caruso, Michael caruso@bnl.gov 4100 Chmiel, Robert chmiel@bnl.gov 8141 Church, Randolph church@bnl.gov 2736 Clay, Barret clay@bnl.gov 7284 D'Alsace, Roy dalsace@bnl.gov 3973 Danneil, Christopher cdanneil@bnl.gov 8609 Davila, Peter davila@bnl.gov 7625 De Toll, Peter detoll@bnl.gov 4100 Durfee, Douglas ddurfee@bnl.gov 7625 Fulkerson, Michael fulkerso@bnl.gov 5194 Gallagher, John jgallagher@bnl.gov 5770 Harder, David dharder@bnl.gov 4978

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

422

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

423

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

424

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

425

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

426

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: March 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: March 2012 Stocks The seasonal winter drawdown of coal stocks was totally negated during the winter months this year due to low natural gas prices and unseasonably warm temperatures throughout the continental United States. In fact, March 2012 was the seventh straight month that coal stockpiles at power plants increased from the previous month. The largest driver of increasing stockpiles has been declining consumption of coal due to unseasonably warm weather and declining natural gas prices. Because much of the coal supplied to electric generators is purchased through long-term contracts, increasing coal stockpiles have proven difficult for electric power plant operators to handle. Some operators have inventories so high that they are refusing

427

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

428

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

429

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

430

electric | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electric electric Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

431

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

432

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

433

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: December 2011 Resource Use: December 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in all regions, with the exception of the West and Texas, due to unseasonably warm temperatures in December. Fossil steam

434

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

435

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: November 2011 Resource Use: November 2011 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined or remained relatively flat in all regions except for Texas and the Southeast. Both of these regions saw generation

436

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

437

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

438

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

439

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: February 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: February 2012 Stocks The unseasonably warm temperatures that the continental United States experienced throughout the winter, coupled with low natural gas prices, caused coal stocks at power plants to increase throughout the winter of 2011 - 2012. During this period, coal stocks usually see a seasonal decline due to the added need for electricity generation from coal plants for spacing heating load. However, it was the sixth straight month that coal stocks increased from the previous month, with this trend likely to continue as the country enters into spring. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current

440

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

442

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

443

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

444

Electricity Distribution System Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grid Tech Team Grid Tech Team Discussion Summary Electricity Distribution System Workshop 2 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................. 4 Process ...................................................................................................................................................... 4 Common Themes ...................................................................................................................................... 5 Discussion Topic Tables ............................................................................................................................. 8

445

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

446

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

447

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

448

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

449

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

450

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

451

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

452

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

453

2013 Electricity Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Survey Form Changes in 2013 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) proposed changes to its electricity data collection in 2013. These changes involve three forms: Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report" The addition of a new form, the Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form)" Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." The proposals were initially announced to the public via a Federal Register Notice published March 15, 2012. Comments regarding this proposed information collection were due by May 14, 2012. EIA reviewed all comments and made several revisions to the proposals as a result. A second Federal Register Notice was published on August 30, 2012. It outlined the proposals

454

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

455

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

456

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

457

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

458

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

459

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

460

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

462

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

463

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

464

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

465

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

466

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

467

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

468

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

469

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

470

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: January 2012 Resource Use: January 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in all regions due to unseasonably warm temperatures in January. Fossil steam generation followed total generation

471

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

472

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Monthly Update Explained Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general audience. The term rates/prices is used because charges for retail service are based primarily on set rates approved by State regulators. However, a number of

473

Singing the Brain Electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Singing the Brain Electric Brain pacemakers, scientists have found, can treat depression by correcting neural circuitry gone haywire. This thesis examines how such technology - a technique known as deep-brain stimulation, ...

Chua, Grace (Grace W. J.)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

2. Electrical safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Correct use of medical equipment within the clinical environment is of prime importance. This includes awareness of the safety issues regarding equipment, particular when it is an electrically powered device. Incidents can occur in the clinic in which ...

Jacques Jossinet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer...

476

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Regional Wholesale Markets: August 2011 The U.S. has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale prices at...

477

Sustainable Electrical Energy Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Electrical Energy Systems Speaker(s): Mark O'Malley Date: June 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Sila Kiliccote The process of making...

478

Electric Transmission Lines (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electric transmission lines capable of operating at 69 kV or greater cannot be constructed along, across, or over any public highways or grounds outside of cities without a franchise from the...

479

Electric Power Industry Restructuring:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Good morning. I was asked to speak to you today about EIA’s data collection efforts in a more competitive electric power industry. I know that you want to hear ...

480

Electric current locator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

King, Paul E. (Corvallis, OR); Woodside, Charles Rigel (Corvallis, OR)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vent damper electrical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Electrical Subsurface Grounding Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine the present grounding requirements of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) subsurface electrical system and to verify that the actual grounding system and devices satisfy the requirements.

J.M. Calle

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Retail electricity competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze a number of unstudied aspects of retail electricity competition. We first explore the implications of load profiling of consumers whose traditional meters do not allow for measurement of their real time consumption, ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Biomass for Electricity Generation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

Zia Haq

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Electric industry retail statistics by state State Retail sales (million kWh) Retail revenue (thousand dollars) Customers Alabama 89,995 8,100,051 2,505,190 Alaska 6,320 1,015,977...

485

Micromachined electrical cauterizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micromachined electrical cauterizer. Microstructures are combined with microelectrodes for highly localized electro cauterization. Using boron etch stops and surface micromachining, microneedles with very smooth surfaces are made. Micromachining also allows for precision placement of electrodes by photolithography with micron sized gaps to allow for concentrated electric fields. A microcauterizer is fabricated by bulk etching silicon to form knife edges, then parallelly placed microelectrodes with gaps as small as 5 .mu.m are patterned and aligned adjacent the knife edges to provide homeostasis while cutting tissue. While most of the microelectrode lines are electrically insulated from the atmosphere by depositing and patterning silicon dioxide on the electric feedthrough portions, a window is opened in the silicon dioxide to expose the parallel microelectrode portion. This helps reduce power loss and assist in focusing the power locally for more efficient and safer procedures.

Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Prospects for electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the current state-of- the-art of electric vehicles (EVs) with examples of recently developed prototype vehicles - Electric G-Van, Chrysler TEVan, Eaton DSEP and Ford/GE ETX-II. The acceleration, top speed and range of these electric vehicles are delineated to demonstrate their performance capabilities, which are comparable with conventional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. The prospects for the commercialization of the Electric G-van and the TEVan and the improvements expected from the AC drive systems of the DSEP and ETX-II vehicles are discussed. The impacts of progress being made in the development of a fuel cell/battery hybrid bus and advanced EVs on the competitiveness of EVs with ICE vehicles and their potential for reduction of air pollution and utility load management are postulated.

Patil, P.G. (Research and Development, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Div., U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (US))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Electric Vehicle Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure JOHN DAVIS: Nearly everyone who owns a plug-in electric vehicle has some capacity to replenish the battery at home, either with a dedicated 220-volt charger, or by...

488

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

489

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

490

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Resource Use: February 2012 Resource Use: February 2012 Supply and Fuel Consumption In this section, we look at what resources are used to produce electricity. Electricity supplied from the grid is consumed the moment it is produced. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below electricity generation output by generator type and fuel type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation Output by Region By generator type By fuel type Region map map showing electricity regions Generation output declined in almost all regions in February due to unseasonably warm temperatures. Following the same pattern as January,

491

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

492

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

493

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

494

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT No.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL DISTRICT No. 4 PINAL COUNTY POST OFFICE BOX 605- ELOY, ARIZONA 85131 Telephone: (520) 468-7338 BOARD OF DIRECTORS: DISTRICT MANAGER: MARK HAMILTON, CHAIRMAN RON McEACHERN CHARLES BUSH ThOMAS W. SCM JAMES F. SHEDD WILLIAM WARREN VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL TO: DSWFPP~2wapa.gov July 19, 2010 Mr. Darrick Moe Desert Southwest Regional Manager Western Area Power Authority P.O. Box 6457 Phoenix, AZ 85005-6457 Re: SPPR Proposed ED5 to Palo Verde Transmission Project Electrical District Number Four of Pinal County ("ED4") and Electrical District Number Five of Pinal County ("ED5") are members of the Southwest Public Power Resource ("SPPR") Group and support the ED5 to Palo Verde Project Statement of Interest ("SOT") submitted by the SPPR Group. ED4 is also a participant in the Southeast Valley C'SEV") Project and has offered to

495

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

496

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

497

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

498

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

499

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

500

Canadian Electrical Association Petition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Marketing (U.S .) Inc. 's ("TEMUS") Application to Export Electric Energy to Canada. CEA and EPSA seek leave to submit this Protest out of time. In the Federal Register...