Sample records for velocity wave probe

  1. Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

  2. Millimeter-wave active probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza (Sunnyvale, CA); Bloom, David M. (Portola Valley, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

  3. Irregular wave induced velocities in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sultan, Nels John

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    probabil- ity density function. This thesis applies this expanded distribution to fluid particle velocities instead of wave elevations. Ochi (1982) presents a review of recent ad- vances in the stochastic analysis of random seas. He notes that the first..., (Longuet-Higgins 1963), that purely linear waves will have a Gaussian distribu- tion. Therefore, any deviation from a Gaussian distribution must be attributed to wave nonlinearities. Ochi (1982) discusses a series of experiments by Honda and Mitsuyasu...

  4. acoustic wave velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the offered analytical method the determinant relation for a phase velocities of elastic waves for an arbitrary propagation directions in a piezoelectric crystal are received. The...

  5. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  6. P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    times Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived from local earthquake...

  7. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  8. Impact of Phase Transitions on P Wave Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Weidner; L Li

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In regions where a high pressure phase is in equilibrium with a low pressure phase, the bulk modulus defined by the P-V relationship is greatly reduced. Here we evaluate the effect of such transitions on the P wave velocity. A model, where cation diffusion is the rate limiting factor, is used to project laboratory data to the conditions of a seismic wave propagating in the two-phase region. We demonstrate that for the minimum expected effect there is a significant reduction of the seismic velocity, as large as 10% over a narrow depth range.

  9. Compressional-wave and shear-wave velocities from long-spaced sonic waveforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake, Leonard Cornelius

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE AND SHEAR-WAVE VELOCITIES FROM LONG- SPACED SONIC WAVEFORMS A Thesis LEONARD CORNELIUS LAKE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AdtM University in partial fulftllment of the requirements for thc degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE Mav 19S6 Major Subject: Geophystcs COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE AND SHEAR-WAVE VELOCITIES FROM LONG- SPACED SONIC WAVEFORMS A Thesis LEONARD CORNELIUS LAKE Approved as to style and content by: erry W. neer (C)tairman of Commtttee) R bert. R. Unterb...

  10. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, 203 Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense ({omega}{sub pe} > {omega}{sub ce}). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub ce}. As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation {omega}-k{sub ||v||} = {omega}{sub ce}. The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  11. Velocity bunching in travelling wave accelerator with low acceleration gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui-Xuan; Li, Wei-Wei; Jia, Qi-Ka

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analytical and simulated results concerning the influences of the acceleration gradient in the velocity bunching process, which is a bunch compression scheme that uses a traveling wave accelerating structure as a compressor. Our study shows that the bunch compression application with low acceleration gradient is more tolerant to phase jitter and more successful to obtain compressed electron beam with symmetrical longitudinal distribution and low energy spread. We also present a transverse emittance compensation scheme to compensate the emittance growth caused by the increasing of the space charge force in the compressing process that is easy to be adjusted for different compressing factors.

  12. Warm wave breaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phase velocities C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, and B. A. Shadwick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    Warm wave breaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phase velocities C. B. Schroeder, E, collisionless plasma is developed to analyze nonlinear plasma waves excited by intense drive beams. The maximum amplitude and wavelength are calculated for nonrelativistic plasma temperatures and arbitrary plasma wave

  13. STANDING WAVE PROBES FOR DIMENSIONAL METROLOGY OF LOW DENSITY FOAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seugling, R M; Woody, S C; Bauza, M B

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Typically, parts and geometries of interest to LLNL are made from a combination of complex geometries and a wide array of different materials ranging from metals and ceramics to low density foams and plastic foils. These parts are combined to develop physics experiments for studying material properties, equation of state (EOS) and radiation transport. Understanding the dimensional uncertainty of the parts contained within an experiment is critical to the physical understanding of the phenomena being observed and represents the motivation for developing probe metrology capability that can address LLNL's unique problems. Standing wave probes were developed for measuring high aspect ratio, micrometer scaled features with nanometer resolution. Originally conceived of for the use in the automotive industry for characterizing fuel injector bores and similar geometries, this concept was investigated and improved for use on geometries and materials important to LLNL needs within target fabrication. As part of the original project, detailed understanding of the probe dynamics and interactions with the surface of the sample was investigated. In addition, the upgraded system was utilized for measuring fuel injector bores and micro-lenses as a means of demonstrating capability. This report discusses the use of the standing wave probe for measuring features in low density foams, 55 mg/cc SiO{sub 2} and 982 mg/cc (%6 relative density) copper foam respectively. These two foam materials represent a difficult metrology challenge because of their material properties and surface topography. Traditional non-contact metrology systems such as normal incident interferometry and/or confocal microscopy have difficulty obtaining a signal from the relatively absorptive characteristics of these materials. In addition to the foam samples, a solid copper and plastic (Rexolite{trademark}) sample of similar geometry was measured with the standing wave probe as a reference for both conductive and dielectric materials.

  14. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Kulikov, Stanislav (Sarov, RU); Osorio, Ivan (Leawood, KS); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  15. Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso geothermal area, California, from...

  16. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet [Terahertz Systems Laboratory (TeSLa) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  17. The Electric Field and Waves Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wygant, J. R.

    The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency ...

  18. Variation of seismic-wave velocities in westerly granite under stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz Muhareb

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -wave Results. S-wave Results. SUMMARY. REFERENCES. . . . :. 10 . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . 17 . . . . . 21 . . . . . 24 . . . . . 24 . . . . . 28 . . . . . 35 . . . . . . . 36 LIST OF TABLES Page TABLE la. Compressional-wave velocities, Vp.... . 17 Figure 7 Crosscorrelation between two P-wave traces along one direction at two different pressure levels to determine the relative time delays. . . . . 20 Figure 8. (a, b and c). P-wave traces measured at the center of the faces along x-, y...

  19. Orthogonal-Phase-Velocity Propagation of Electromagnetic Plane Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom G. Mackay; Akhlesh Lakhtakia

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In an isotropic, homogeneous, nondissipative, dielectric-magnetic medium that is simply moving with respect to an inertial reference frame, planewave solutions of the Maxwell curl postulates can be such that the phase velocity and the time-averaged Poynting vector are mutually orthogonal. Orthogonal-phase-velocity propagation thus adds to the conventional positive-phase-velocity propagation and the recently discovered negative-phase-velocity propagation that is associated with the phenomenon of negative refraction.

  20. Argon–oxygen dc magnetron discharge plasma probed with ion acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikia, Partha, E-mail: partha.008@gmail.com; Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Goswami, Kalyan Sindhu [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur, Kamrup, Assam 782 402 (India); Phukan, Arindam [Madhabdev College, Narayanpur, Lakhimpur, Assam 784164 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The precise determination of the relative concentration of negative ions is very important for the optimization of magnetron sputtering processes, especially for those undertaken in a multicomponent background produced by adding electronegative gases, such as oxygen, to the discharge. The temporal behavior of an ion acoustic wave excited from a stainless steel grid inside the plasma chamber is used to determine the relative negative ion concentration in the magnetron discharge plasma. The phase velocity of the ion acoustic wave in the presence of negative ions is found to be faster than in a pure argon plasma, and the phase velocity increases with the oxygen partial pressure. Optical emission spectroscopy further confirms the increase in the oxygen negative ion density, along with a decrease in the argon positive ion density under the same discharge conditions. The relative negative ion concentration values measured by ion acoustic waves are compared with those measured by a single Langmuir probe, and a similarity in the results obtained by both techniques is observed.

  1. A restoration model of distorted electron density in wave-cutoff probe measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jun, Hyun-Su, E-mail: mtsconst@kaist.ac.kr; Lee, Yun-Seong [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the problem of electron density distortion and how the density can be restored in a wave-cutoff probe. Despite recent plasma diagnostics research using a wave-cutoff probe, the problem of electron density distortion caused by plasma conditions has not been resolved. Experimental results indicate that electron density measured using the wave-cutoff method is highly susceptible to variations in the probe tip gap. This electron density distortion is caused by the bulk plasma disturbance between probe tips, and it must be removed for calculating the absolute electron density. To do this, a detailed analytic model was developed using the power balance equation near probe tips. This model demonstrates the characteristics of plasma distortion in wave-cutoff probe measurement and successfully restored the absolute value of electron density with varying probe tip gaps.

  2. Electromagnetic plane waves with negative phase velocity in charged black strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Manzoor, R., E-mail: rubabmanzoor9@yahoo.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the propagation regions of electromagnetic plane waves with negative phase velocity in the ergosphere of static charged black strings. For such a propagation, some conditions for negative phase velocity are established that depend on the metric components and the choice of the octant. We conclude that these conditions remain unaffected by the negative values of the cosmological constant.

  3. Wave-induced velocities inside a model seagrass bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhar, Mitul

    Laboratory measurements reveal the flow structure within and above a model seagrass meadow (dynamically similar to Zostera marina) forced by progressive waves. Despite being driven by purely oscillatory flow, a mean current ...

  4. Wave Packet for Massless Fermions and its Implication to the Superluminal Velocity Statistics of Neutrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelin Wang; Zexian Cao

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-dispersive wave packet for massless fermions is formulated on the basis of squeezed coherent states that are put in a form of common eigenfunction for the Hamiltonian and the helicity operator, starting from the Dirac equation. The wave packet thus constructed is demonstrated to propagate at a constant velocity as that of light. This explicit expression of wave packet for the massless fermions can facilitate theoretical analysis of problems where a wave packet is of formal significance. Furthermore, extensive wave packet may result in a superluminal velocity statistics if determined from the time-of-flight measurement, as recently done on muon neutrinos, when a threshold particle flux or energy transfer, which is eventually referred to the propagation of wave packet, to invoke a detection event is assumed.

  5. Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially-saturated sand in the sonic frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

    2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensional wave attenuation and velocity measurements on a high permeability Monterey sand were performed over a range of gas saturations for imbibition and degassing conditions. These measurements were conducted using extensional wave pulse propagation and resonance over a 1 - 9 kHz frequency range for a hydrostatic confining pressure of 8.3 MPa. Analysis of the extensional wave data and the corresponding X-ray CT images of the gas saturation show strong attenuation resulting from the presence of the gas (QE dropped from 300 for the dry sand to 30 for the partially-saturated sand), with larger attenuation at a given saturation resulting from heterogeneous gas distributions. The extensional wave velocities are in agreement with Gassmann theory for the test with near-homogeneous gas saturation and with a patchy saturation model for the test with heterogeneous gas saturation. These results show that partially-saturated sands under moderate confining pressure can produce strong intrinsic attenuation for extensional waves.

  6. Electromagnetic wave propagation with negative phase velocity in regular black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Manzoor, R., E-mail: rubabmanzoor9@yahoo.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the propagation of electromagnetic plane waves with negative phase velocity in regular black holes. For this purpose, we consider the Bardeen model as a nonlinear magnetic monopole and the Bardeen model coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics with a cosmological constant. It turns out that the region outside the event horizon of each regular black hole does not support negative phase velocity propagation, while its possibility in the region inside the event horizon is discussed.

  7. Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Measurements in Unlithified Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rickards, Benjamin Thomas

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    with an average S-wave velocity of 600 ft/sec in the top 30 meters as having a relatively high risk for amplifying destructive earthquake waves (Hunter et al., 2010). S-wave studies have also been used to identify subsidence and liquefaction risks for wind-turbine... the method is more challenging geometrically (Kanli, 2008). In fact, it has become common practice to run geological core samples through CAT scans to help determine composition and image bedforms for oil exploration (Stewart, 1991). Medical...

  8. Control of the chaotic velocity dispersion of a cold electron beam interacting with electrostatic waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guido Ciraolo; Cristel Chandre; Ricardo Lima; Marco Pettini; Michel Vittot

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we present an application of a method of control of Hamiltonian systems to the chaotic velocity diffusion of a cold electron beam interacting with electrostatic waves. We numerically show the efficiency and robustness of the additional small control term in restoring kinetic coherence of the injected electron beam.

  9. Increase of shear wave velocity before the 1998 eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Increase of shear wave velocity before the 1998 eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia) U. Wegler,1 of the edifice of Merapi volcano (Java, Indonesia) before its eruption in 1998 by analyzing multiply scattered eruption of Merapi volcano (Indonesia), Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L09303, doi:10.1029/2006GL025928. 1

  10. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the western half of the study area (Eurasia and the Middle East) and (ii) identify well located seismic events with event-station paths isolated to individual tectonic provinces within the study area and collect broadband waveforms and source parameters for the selected events. The 1D models obtained from the joint inversion will then be combined with published geologic terrain maps to produce regionalized models for distinctive tectonic areas within the study area, and the models will be validated through full waveform modeling of well-located seismic events recorded at local and regional distances.

  11. The relation between seismic P- and S-wave velocity dispersion in saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics; Jizba, D. [CSTJF, Pau (France)] [CSTJF, Pau (France)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic velocity dispersion in fluid-saturated rocks appears to be dominated by two mechanisms: the large scale mechanism modeled by Biot, and the local flow or squirt mechanism. The two mechanisms can be distinguished by the ratio of P- to S-wave dispersions, or more conveniently, by the ratio of dynamic bulk to shear compliance dispersions derived from the wave velocities. The authors` formulation suggests that when local flow dominates, the dispersion of the shear compliance will be approximately 4/15 the dispersion of the compressibility. When the Biot mechanism dominates, the constant of proportionality is much smaller. Their examination of ultrasonic velocities from 40 sandstones and granites shows that most, but not all, of the samples were dominated by local flow dispersion, particularly at effective pressures below 40 MPa.

  12. Extensional wave attenuation and velocity in partially saturated sand in the sonic frequency range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Rector, J.W.; Nihei, K.T.; Tomutsa, L.; Myer, L.R.; Nakagawa, S.

    2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensional wave attenuation and velocity measurements on a high permeability Monterey sand were performed over a range of gas saturations for imbibition and degassing conditions. These measurements were conducted using extensional wave pulse propagation and resonance over a 1-9 kHz frequency range for a hydrostatic confining pressure of 8.3 MPa. Analysis of the extensional wave data and the corresponding X-ray CT images of the gas saturation show strong attenuation resulting from the presence of the gas (Q{sub E} dropped from 300 for the dry sand to 30 for the partially-saturated sand), with larger attenuation at a given saturation resulting from heterogeneous gas distributions. The extensional wave velocities are in agreement with Gassmann theory for the test with near-homogeneous gas saturation and with a patchy saturation model for the test with heterogeneous gas saturation. These results show that partially-saturated sands under moderate confining pressure can produce strong intrinsic attenuation for extensional waves.

  13. Accurate seismic phase-velocities from interfering surface-waves using homomorphic deconvolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szerbiak, Robert Bruce

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -deconvolution-technique results, with SN = 3 92 95 99 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figure Figur e Figure Figuze Figure 4 5 6 7 8 9 10... IL -1. 0 0 0 0. 2 0. 4 0. 0 0. 8 1. 0 TllNE (SEC) Fig. 1. Surface-wave simulation. Two methods used in computing phase-velocity are: 1) the one-station method uses two passages of the same wave to compute phase differences of the phase spectrum...

  14. Probing dark energy models with extreme pairwise velocities of galaxy clusters from the DEUS-FUR simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouillot, Vincent R; Corasaniti, Pier-Stefano; Rasera, Yann

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of colliding galaxy clusters with high relative velocity probe the tail of the halo pairwise velocity distribution with the potential of providing a powerful test of cosmology. As an example it has been argued that the discovery of the Bullet Cluster challenges standard $\\Lambda$CDM model predictions. Halo catalogs from N-body simulations have been used to estimate the probability of Bullet-like clusters. However, due to simulation volume effects previous studies had to rely on a Gaussian extrapolation of the pairwise velocity distribution to high velocities. Here, we perform a detail analysis using the halo catalogs from the Dark Energy Universe Simulation Full Universe Runs (DEUS-FUR), which enables us to resolve the high-velocity tail of the distribution and study its dependence on the halo mass definition, redshift and cosmology. Building upon these results we estimate the probability of Bullet-like systems in the framework of Extreme Value Statistics. We show that the tail of extreme pairwis...

  15. Exploring Classically Chaotic Potentials with a Matter Wave Quantum Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gattobigio, G. L. [Laboratoire de Collisions Agregats Reactivite, CNRS UMR 5589, IRSAMC, Universite de Toulouse (UPS), 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse CEDEX 4 (France); Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Couvert, A. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Georgeot, B. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (IRSAMC), Universite de Toulouse (UPS), 31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, LPT UMR5152 (IRSAMC), 31062 Toulouse (France); Guery-Odelin, D. [Laboratoire de Collisions Agregats Reactivite, CNRS UMR 5589, IRSAMC, Universite de Toulouse (UPS), 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse CEDEX 4 (France)

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study an experimental setup in which a quantum probe, provided by a quasimonomode guided atom laser, interacts with a static localized attractive potential whose characteristic parameters are tunable. In this system, classical mechanics predicts a transition from regular to chaotic behavior as a result of the coupling between the different degrees of freedom. Our experimental results display a clear signature of this transition. On the basis of extensive numerical simulations, we discuss the quantum versus classical physics predictions in this context. This system opens new possibilities for investigating quantum scattering, provides a new testing ground for classical and quantum chaos, and enables us to revisit the quantum-classical correspondence.

  16. Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure 1 Victor C. Tsai and Sarun Atiganyanun* 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure 1 and Green's functions have been well established 14 for many decades. However, or Green's function surface displacement. We address this gap in the 19 literature

  17. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave velocity of rock.

  18. Ion Bernstein waves in a plasma with a kappa velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsengiyumva, F.; Mace, R. L.; Hellberg, M. A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa)] [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Vlasov-Poisson model, a numerical investigation of the dispersion relation for ion Bernstein waves in a kappa-distributed plasma has been carried out. The dispersion relation is found to depend significantly on the spectral index of the ions, ?{sub i}, the parameter whose smallness is a measure of the departure from thermal equilibrium of the distribution function. Over all cyclotron harmonics, the typical Bernstein wave curves are shifted to higher wavenumbers (k) if ?{sub i} is reduced. For waves whose frequency lies above the lower hybrid frequency, ?{sub LH}, an increasing excess of superthermal particles (decreasing ?{sub i}) reduces the frequency, ?{sub peak}, of the characteristic peak at which the group velocity vanishes, while the associated k{sub peak} is increased. As the ratio of ion plasma to cyclotron frequency (?{sub pi}/?{sub ci}) is increased, the fall-off of ? at large k is smaller for lower ?{sub i} and curves are shifted towards larger wavenumbers. In the lower hybrid frequency band and harmonic bands above it, the frequency in a low-?{sub i} plasma spans only a part of the intraharmonic space, unlike the Maxwellian case, thus exhibiting considerably less coupling between adjacent bands for low ?{sub i}. It is suggested that the presence of the ensuing stopbands may be a useful diagnostic for the velocity distribution characteristics. The model is applied to the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer in which waves propagating perpendicularly to the ambient magnetic field at frequencies between harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency are frequently observed.

  19. Measurement of shear wave velocity of heavy oil De-hua Han, Jiajin Liu, University of Houston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Measurement of shear wave velocity of heavy oil De-hua Han, Jiajin Liu, University of Houston modulus and therefore no shear wave can propagate through fluids. But heavy oils have properties that are much complex than lighter oils. At low temperatures, heavy oils are extremely viscous and begin to act

  20. Probing Long Gamma Ray Bursts progenitor mass by Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariafelicia De Laurentis; Fabio Garufi; Maria Giovanna Dainotti; Leopoldo Milano

    2015-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present a procedure to infer the mass of progenitors and remnants of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB), starting from the observed energy $E_{iso}^{GRB}$ emitted isotropically and considering the associated emission of Gravitational Waves (GW) $ E_{iso}^{GW}$ in the different phases. We assume that the GW energy of the progenitor $E_{PROG}^{GW}$ is emitted partially during a star collapse, and the residual energy is related to the GW energy emitted by the remnant. We take a sample of $237$ Long GRB, and use an hybrid Montecarlo procedure to explore, for each of them, a region of possible solutions of $ E_{iso}^{GW}$ as a function of the masses, radii, oblateness, rotation frequencies of progenitor and remnant and the fraction of energy $k$ emitted as GW by the GRB. We discriminate between a Neutron Star (NS) or Black Hole (BH) for the remnant and obtain interesting values for the GW emitted by the remnant NS or BH, for the conversion factor $k$ of and for the masses and radii of GRB progenitor stars. We also obtain remnant populations with mean masses, mean GW frequencies and GRB frequency of GW emission in agreement with the most accepted models.

  1. Probing Long Gamma Ray Bursts progenitor mass by Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Milano, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present a procedure to infer the mass of progenitors and remnants of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB), starting from the observed energy $E_{iso}^{GRB}$ emitted isotropically and considering the associated emission of Gravitational Waves (GW) $ E_{iso}^{GW}$ in the different phases. We assume that the GW energy of the progenitor $E_{PROG}^{GW}$ is emitted partially during a star collapse, and the residual energy is related to the GW energy emitted by the remnant. We take a sample of $237$ Long GRB, and use an hybrid Montecarlo procedure to explore, for each of them, a region of possible solutions of $ E_{iso}^{GW}$ as a function of the masses, radii, oblateness, rotation frequencies of progenitor and remnant and the fraction of energy $k$ emitted as GW by the GRB. We discriminate between a Neutron Star (NS) or Black Hole (BH) for the remnant and obtain interesting values for the GW emitted by the remnant NS or BH, for the conversion factor $k$ of and for the masses and radii of GRB progenitor stars. We ...

  2. MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSON SW

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

  3. Study on creating hydraulic tomography for crystalline rock using frequency dependent elastic wave velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, K.; Sakashita, S. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Ando, K.; Bruines, P. [Civil Engineering Technical Division, Obayashi Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Blechschmidt, I. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Wettingen (Switzerland); Kickmaier, W. [University of Applied Sciences, Northern Switzerland, Brugg (Switzerland); Onishi, Y.; Nishiyama, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to establish a technique to obtain hydraulic conductivity distribution in granite rock masses using seismic tomography. We apply the characteristic that elastic wave velocity disperses in fully saturated porous media on frequency and this velocity dispersion is governed by the hydraulic conductivity - this characteristic has been confirmed in laboratory experiments. The feasibility and design of the field experiment was demonstrated in a first step with numerical simulations. In a second step we applied the technique to the fractured granite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland. The emphasis of the field campaign was on the evaluation of the range of applicability of this technique. The field campaign was structured in three steps, each one corresponding to a larger spatial scale. First, the seismic tomography was applied to a small area - the two boreholes were located at a distance of 1.5 m. In the following step, we selected a larger area, in which the distance of the boreholes amounts to 10 m and the field corresponds to a more complex geology. Finally we applied the testing to a field where the borehole distance was of the order of 75 m. We also drilled a borehole to confirm hydraulic characteristic and reviewed hydraulic model in the 1.5 m cross-hole location area. The results from the field campaign are presented and their application to the various fields are discussed and evaluated. (authors)

  4. Ultrasonic probe deployment device for increased wave transmission and rapid area scan inspections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DiMambro, Joseph; Roach, Dennis P; Rackow, Kirk A; Nelson, Ciji L; Dasch, Cameron J; Moore, David G

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic probe deployment device in which an ultrasound-transmitting liquid forms the portion of the ultrasonic wave path in contact with the surface being inspected (i.e., the inspection surface). A seal constrains flow of the liquid, for example preventing the liquid from surging out and flooding the inspection surface. The seal is not rigid and conforms to variations in the shape and unevenness of the inspection surface, thus forming a seal (although possibly a leaky seal) around the liquid. The probe preferably is held in place to produce optimum ultrasonic focus on the area of interest. Use of encoders can facilitate the production of C-scan area maps of the material being inspected.

  5. Ultrasonic probe deployment device for increased wave transmission and rapid area scan inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiMambro, Joseph (Placitas, NM); Roach, Dennis P. (Albuquerque, NM); Rackow, Kirk A. (Albuquerque, NM); Nelson, Ciji L. (Albuquerque, NM); Dasch, Cameron J. (Boomfield Hills, MI); Moore, David G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic probe deployment device in which an ultrasound-transmitting liquid forms the portion of the ultrasonic wave path in contact with the surface being inspected (i.e., the inspection surface). A seal constrains flow of the liquid, for example preventing the liquid from surging out and flooding the inspection surface. The seal is not rigid and conforms to variations in the shape and unevenness of the inspection surface, thus forming a seal (although possibly a leaky seal) around the liquid. The probe preferably is held in place to produce optimum ultrasonic focus on the area of interest. Use of encoders can facilitate the production of C-scan area maps of the material being inspected.

  6. Coherent THz electromagnetic radiation emission as a shock wave diagnostic and probe of ultrafast phase transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, E J; Armstrong, M R; Kim, K Y; Glownia, J H; Howard, M; Piner, E; Roberts, J

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first experimental observations of terahertz frequency radiation emitted when a terahertz frequency acoustic wave propagates past an interface between materials of differing piezoelectric coefficients. We show that this fundamentally new phenomenon can be used to probe structural properties of thin films. Then, we present molecular dynamics simulations showing that detectable THz frequency radiation can be emitted when a wurtzite structure crystal transforms to a rocksalt structure under shock compression on picosecond timescales. We show that information about the kinetics of the transformation is contained in the time-dependence of the THz field.

  7. Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure by Victor C. Tsai and Sarun Atiganyanun*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short Note Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure by Victor C. Tsai displacement/stress eigenfunctions and Green's functions have been well established for many decades. However on frequency, or Green's function surface displacement. We address this gap in the liter- ature and here

  8. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  9. Estimating near-surface shear wave velocities in Japan by applying seismic interferometry to KiK-net data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Estimating near-surface shear wave velocities in Japan by applying seismic interferometry to KiK-net throughout Japan by applying seismic interferometry to the data recorded with KiK-net, a strong motion network in Japan. Each KiK-net station has two receivers; one receiver on the surface and the other

  10. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  11. Topographically induced internal solitary waves in a pycnocline: Ultrasonic probes and stereo-correlation measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dossmann, Yvan, E-mail: yvan.dossmann@anu.edu.au [Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia) [Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); CNRM-GAME, UMR3589 METEO-FRANCE and CNRS, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Laboratoire d’Aérologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Paci, Alexandre [CNRM-GAME, UMR3589 METEO-FRANCE and CNRS, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France)] [CNRM-GAME, UMR3589 METEO-FRANCE and CNRS, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Auclair, Francis [Laboratoire d’Aérologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)] [Laboratoire d’Aérologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Lepilliez, Mathieu [CNRM-GAME, UMR3589 METEO-FRANCE and CNRS, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France) [CNRM-GAME, UMR3589 METEO-FRANCE and CNRS, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Laboratoire d’Aérologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse, 2 Allée Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Cid, Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, UMR5503 INPT, UPS, CNRS, 4, Allée Emile Monso, F-31030 Toulouse (France)] [Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, UMR5503 INPT, UPS, CNRS, 4, Allée Emile Monso, F-31030 Toulouse (France)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal solitary waves (ISWs) are large amplitude stable waves propagating in regions of high density gradients such as the ocean pycnocline. Their dynamics has often been investigated in two-dimensional approaches, however, their three-dimensional evolution is still poorly known. Experiments have been conducted in the large stratified water tank of CNRM-GAME to study the generation of ISWs in two academic configurations inspired by oceanic regimes. First, ultrasonic probes are used to measure the interfacial displacement in the two configurations. In the primary generation case for which the two layers are of constant density, the generation of ISWs is investigated in two series of experiments with varying amplitude and forcing frequency. In the secondary generation case for which the lower layer is stratified, the generation of ISWs from the impact of an internal wave beam on the pycnocline and their subsequent dynamics is studied. The dynamics of ISWs in these two regimes accords well with analytical approaches and numerical simulations performed in analogous configurations. Then, recent developments of a stereo correlation technique are used to describe the three-dimensional structure of propagating ISWs. In the primary generation configuration, small transverse effects are observed in the course of the ISW propagation. In the secondary generation configuration, larger transverse structures are observed in the interfacial waves dynamics. The interaction between interfacial troughs and internal waves propagating in the lower stratified layer are a possible cause for the generation of these structures. The magnitude of these transverse structures is quantified with a nondimensional parameter in the two configurations. They are twice as large in the secondary generation case as in the primary generation case.

  12. Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

  13. Pump and probe waves in dynamic acousto-elasticity: Comprehensive description and comparison with nonlinear elastic theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - static stress).1 For isotropic materials, the speed of sound change with stress levels allows onePump and probe waves in dynamic acousto-elasticity: Comprehensive description and comparison with nonlinear elastic theories J. Rivie`re,1,a) G. Renaud,2 R. A. Guyer,1,b) and P. A. Johnson1 1 Earth

  14. Probing the thermal character of analogue Hawking radiation for shallow water waves?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florent Michel; Renaud Parentani

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study and numerically compute the scattering coefficients of shallow water waves blocked by a stationary counterflow. When the flow is transcritical, the coefficients closely follow Hawking's prediction according to which black holes should emit a thermal spectrum. We study how the spectrum deviates from thermality when reducing the maximal flow velocity, with a particular attention to subcritical flows since these have been recently used to test Hawking's prediction. For such flows, we show that the emission spectrum is strongly suppressed, and that its Planckian character is completely lost. For low frequencies, we also show that the scattering coefficients are dominated by elastic hydrodynamical channels. Our numerical results reproduce rather well the observations made by S. Weinfurtner {\\it et al.} in the Vancouver experiment. Nevertheless, we propose a new interpretation of what has been observed, as well as new experimental tests.

  15. Dispersive to nondispersive transition and phase velocity transient for travelling waves in plane wake and channel flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Santi, Francesca; Tordella, Daniela

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By varying the wave number over a large interval of values and by keeping the Reynolds number constant, we analyze the phase and group velocity of linear three-dimensional traveling waves in two sheared flows, the plane channel and wake flows. Evidences are given about the possible compresence of dispersive and nondispersive effects which are associated to the long and short ranges of wavelength, respectively. We solve the Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire eigenvalue problem and observe the least stable mode. At low wave numbers, a dispersive behavior amenable to the least stable eigenmodes belonging to the left branch of the eigenvalue spectrum is observed. By rising the wave number, in both flows, we observe a sharp dispersive to nondispersive transition which is located at a nondimensional wave number of the order of the unity. Beyond the transition, the asymptotically dominant mode belongs to the right branch of the spectrum. The Reynolds number was varied in the ranges 20-100, 1000-8000 for the wake and channel ...

  16. Statistics of amplitude and fluid velocity of large and rare waves in the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Il Ho

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The understanding of large and rare waves in the ocean is becoming more important as these rare events are turning into more common observances. In order to design a marine structure or vehicle to withstand such a potentially ...

  17. Molecular extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gases and wave velocities for increasing number of moments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arima, Takashi, E-mail: tks@stat.nitech.ac.jp [Center for Social Contribution and Collaboration, Nagoya Institute of Technology (Japan); Mentrelli, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.mentrelli@unibo.it [Department of Mathematics and Research Center of Applied Mathematics (CIRAM), University of Bologna (Italy); Ruggeri, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.ruggeri@unibo.it [Department of Mathematics and Research Center of Applied Mathematics (CIRAM), University of Bologna (Italy)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gases is characterized by two hierarchies of equations for moments of a suitable distribution function in which the internal degrees of freedom of a molecule is taken into account. On the basis of physical relevance the truncation orders of the two hierarchies are proven to be not independent on each other, and the closure procedures based on the maximum entropy principle (MEP) and on the entropy principle (EP) are proven to be equivalent. The characteristic velocities of the emerging hyperbolic system of differential equations are compared to those obtained for monatomic gases and the lower bound estimate for the maximum equilibrium characteristic velocity established for monatomic gases (characterized by only one hierarchy for moments with truncation order of moments N) by Boillat and Ruggeri (1997) (?{sub (N)}{sup E,max})/(c{sub 0}) ??(6/5 (N?1/2 )),(c{sub 0}=?(5/3 k/m T)) is proven to hold also for rarefied polyatomic gases independently from the degrees of freedom of a molecule. -- Highlights: •Molecular extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gases is studied. •The relation between two hierarchies of equations for moments is derived. •The equivalence of maximum entropy principle and entropy principle is proven. •The characteristic velocities are compared to those of monatomic gases. •The lower bound of the maximum characteristic velocity is estimated.

  18. Discrimination of the effects of saturation and optical pumping in velocity-dependent pump-probe spectroscopy of rubidium: A simple analytical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noh, Heung-Ryoul [Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Geol; Jhe, Wonho [School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a simple analytical theory for the velocity-dependent pump-probe laser spectroscopy of {sup 87}Rb and {sup 85}Rb atoms where the pump and the probe beams are circularly or linearly polarized. The analytical solutions of the line shapes of the velocity-selective optical pumping spectroscopy [G. Moon and H. R. Noh, Phys. Rev. A 78, 032506 (2008)] and saturated absorption spectroscopy [G. Moon and H. R. Noh, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25, 701 (2008); 27, 1741 (2010)] obtained in the previous reports, expressed as a sum of several Lorentzian functions, could be approximated as one (or in some cases, two) Lorentzian function(s). In particular, the contributions of the saturation and optical pumping effects could be discriminated explicitly in these simple analytical solutions, which is not possible in existing theories such as Nakayama's model. The simple analytical results for the saturation spectroscopy were compared with experimental results, and good agreement between them was observed.

  19. Electrostatic drift-wave instability in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma with parallel velocity shear flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tariq, Sabeen; Mirza, Arshad M. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Masood, W. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Box. Nilore, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan and National Center for Physics (NCP), Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of high and low frequency (in comparison with the cyclotron frequency) electrostatic drift-waves is investigated in a nonuniform, dense magnetoplasma (composed of electrons and ions), in the presence of parallel shear flow, by employing the quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. Using QMHD model, a new set of equations is presented in order to investigate linear properties of electrostatic drift-waves with sheared plasma flows for dense plasmas. In this regard, dispersion relations for coupled electron-thermal and drift-ion acoustic modes are derived and several interesting limiting cases are discussed. For instance, it is found that sheared ion flow parallel to the external magnetic field can drive the quantum drift-ion acoustic wave unstable, etc. The present investigation may have relevance in dense astrophysical environments where quantum effects are significant.

  20. Contribution of Velocity Vortices and Fast Shock Reflection and Refraction to the Formation of EUV Waves in Solar Eruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hongjuan; Gong, Jiancun; Wu, Ning; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically study the detailed evolutionary features of the wave-like disturbance and its propagation in the eruption. This work is a follow-up to Wang et al., using significantly upgraded new simulations. We focus on the contribution of the velocity vortices and the fast shock reflection and refraction in the solar corona to the formation of the EUV waves. Following the loss of equilibrium in the coronal magnetic structure, the flux rope exhibits rapid motions and invokes the fast-mode shock forward of the rope, which then produces the type II radio burst. The expansion of the fast shock, which is associated with outward motion, takes place in various directions, and the downward expansion shows the reflection and the refraction as a result of the non-uniform background plasma. The reflected component of the fast shock propagates upward and the refracted component propagates downward. As the refracted component reaches the boundary surface, a weak echo is excited. The Moreton wave is invoked as the fast s...

  1. Structure of the Crust beneath Cameroon, West Africa, from the Joint Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities and Receiver Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokam, A K; Tabod, C T; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Wiens, D A; Pasyanos, M E

    2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is a major geologic feature that cuts across Cameroon from the south west to the north east. It is a unique volcanic lineament which has both an oceanic and a continental sector and consists of a chain of Tertiary to Recent, generally alkaline volcanoes stretching from the Atlantic island of Pagalu to the interior of the African continent. The oceanic sector includes the islands of Bioko (formerly Fernando Po) and Sao Tome and Principe while the continental sector includes the Etinde, Cameroon, Manengouba, Bamboutos, Oku and Mandara mountains, as well as the Adamawa and Biu Plateaus. In addition to the CVL, three other major tectonic features characterize the region: the Benue Trough located northwest of the CVL, the Central African Shear Zone (CASZ), trending N70 degrees E, roughly parallel to the CVL, and the Congo Craton in southern Cameroon. The origin of the CVL is still the subject of considerable debate, with both plume and non-plume models invoked by many authors (e.g., Deruelle et al., 2007; Ngako et al, 2006; Ritsema and Allen, 2003; Burke, 2001; Ebinger and Sleep, 1998; Lee et al, 1994; Dorbath et al., 1986; Fairhead and Binks, 1991; King and Ritsema, 2000; Reusch et al., 2010). Crustal structure beneath Cameroon has been investigated previously using active (Stuart et al, 1985) and passive (Dorbath et al., 1986; Tabod, 1991; Tabod et al, 1992; Plomerova et al, 1993) source seismic data, revealing a crust about 33 km thick at the south-western end of the continental portion of the CVL (Tabod, 1991) and the Adamawa Plateau, and thinner crust (23 km thick) beneath the Garoua Rift in the north (Stuart et al, 1985) (Figure 1). Estimates of crustal thickness obtained using gravity data show similar variations between the Garoua rift, Adamawa Plateau, and southern part of the CVL (Poudjom et al., 1995; Nnange et al., 2000). In this study, we investigate further crustal structure beneath the CVL and the adjacent regions in Cameroon using 1-D shear wave velocity models obtained from the joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities and P-receiver functions for 32 broadband seismic stations. From the 1-D shear wave velocity models, we obtain new insights into the composition and structure of the crust and upper mantle across Cameroon. After briefly reviewing the geological framework of Cameroon, we describe the data and the joint inversion method, and then interpret variations in crustal structure found beneath Cameroon in terms of the tectonic history of the region.

  2. QUASI-PERIODIC PROPAGATING SIGNALS IN THE SOLAR CORONA: THE SIGNATURE OF MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OR HIGH-VELOCITY UPFLOWS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Pontieu, Bart [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); McIntosh, Scott W., E-mail: bdp@lmsal.co, E-mail: mscott@ucar.ed [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

    2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of quasi-periodic propagating oscillations with periods of order 3-10 minutes in coronal loops with TRACE and SOHO/EIT (and later with STEREO/EUVI and Hinode/EIS), they have been almost universally interpreted as evidence for propagating slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves in the low plasma {beta} coronal environment. Here we show that this interpretation is not unique, and that for coronal loops associated with plage regions (as opposed to sunspots), the presence of magnetoacoustic waves may not be the only cause for the observed quasi-periodicities. We focus instead on the ubiquitous, faint upflows at 50-150 km s{sup -1} that were recently discovered as blueward asymmetries of spectral line profiles in footpoint regions of coronal loops, and as faint disturbances propagating along coronal loops in EUV/X-ray imaging time series. These faint upflows are most likely driven from below and have been associated with chromospheric jets that are (partially) rapidly heated to coronal temperatures at low heights. These two scenarios (waves versus flows) are difficult to differentiate using only imaging data, but careful analysis of spectral line profiles indicates that faint upflows are likely responsible for some of the observed quasi-periodic oscillatory signals in the corona. We show that recent EIS measurements of intensity and velocity oscillations of coronal lines (which had previously been interpreted as direct evidence for propagating waves) are actually accompanied by significant oscillations in the line width that are driven by a quasi-periodically varying component of emission in the blue wing of the line. This faint additional component of blue-shifted emission quasi-periodically modulates the peak intensity and line centroid of a single Gaussian fit to the spectral profile with the same small amplitudes (respectively a few percent of background intensity and a few km s{sup -1}) that were previously used to infer the presence of slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves. Our results indicate that it is possible that a significant fraction of the quasi-periodicities observed with coronal imagers and spectrographs that have previously been interpreted as propagating magnetoacoustic waves are instead caused by these upflows. The different physical cause for coronal oscillations would significantly impact the prospects of successful coronal seismology using propagating disturbances in coronal loops.

  3. Submitted to J. Atmos. Oceanic Tech., Nov 13 2001 Continuous Time-Space Sampling of Near-Surface Velocities Using Sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    be sampled every second or less, with under 2 cm/s rms velocity error per sample. Radial velocity estimates. Free waves, bound harmonics, finite-amplitude effects, Doppler shifting by currents, etc., can systems are described that use sound to probe the velocity field over finite areas, "Phased-Array Doppler

  4. CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes and probe, to produce a fourth, the anti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    CARS is a four wave mixing process, combining three incident electric fields, pump, Stokes diagram for the production of a CARS signal. The three incident waves pump, probe (both of frequency p) and Stokes (S) combine to produce an anti-Stokes signal, frequency as. Figure 2. Schematic of the CARS system

  5. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C., E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [Laboratory for Acoustics and Thermal Physics, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Center for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 23, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vanstreels, K. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (?) of a 500?nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E?=?25?±?1?GPa and ?=42±1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  6. Probing strong-field gravity and black holes with gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Scott A.

    Gravitational wave observations will be excellent tools for making precise measurements of processes that occur in very strong- field regions of space time. Extreme mass

  7. Geophys. J. R. astr. SOC.(1987) 91,429437 On the relation between seismic wave velocity and stress in a solid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -elastic isotropic models (Zaichenko et al. 1984; Schukin 1984). Interpretation of seismic results based on the Hooke in seismic zones implies that the traditional interpretation of geophysical investigations basedGeophys. J. R. astr. SOC.(1987) 91,429437 On the relation between seismic wave velocity and stress

  8. 12A.4 VERTICAL VELOCITY AND BUOYANCY CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO PLUMES DETECTED BY AN AIRBORNE MM-WAVE RADAR IN THE CONVECTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geerts, Bart

    12A.4 VERTICAL VELOCITY AND BUOYANCY CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO PLUMES DETECTED BY AN AIRBORNE MM-WAVE, is the availability of in situ thermodynamic and kinematic observations, and the direct observation of horizontal, as part of IHOP_02 (The International Water Vapor Project, Weckwerth et al 2003). The key radar

  9. Integrated Optical Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Frogget, Douglas DeVore, Vincent Romero, David Esquibel, and David Holtkamp

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical probes used in velocimetry measurements have typically been individual probes that collect data for a single diagnostic at a single point. These probes have been used in diagnostics such as VISAR, PDV, and radiometry, which measure surface velocity, temperature, and other characteristics. When separate probes are used for these measurements, the different diagnostic points measured must be significantly separated. We have developed integrated probes that collect data for multiple optical diagnostics; these probes measure points in close proximity.

  10. Relation of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvatures of the slowness and ray{velocity surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Relation of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvatures of the slowness and ray The contravariant components of the wave{propagation metric tensor equal half the second{order partial derivatives. The relations of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvature matrix and Gaussian curvature

  11. Gravity and the Collapse of the Wave Function: a Probe into Diósi-Penrose model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Bahrami; Andrea Smirne; Angelo Bassi

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the Di\\'osi-Penrose (DP) proposal for connecting the collapse of the wave function to gravity. The DP model needs a free parameter, acting as a cut-off to regularize the dynamics, and the predictions of the model highly depend on the value of this cut-off. The Compton wavelength of a nucleon seems to be the most reasonable cut-off value since it justifies the non-relativistic approach. However, with this value, the DP model predicts an unrealistic high rate of energy increase. Thus, one either is forced to choose a much larger cut-off, which is not physically justified and totally arbitrary, or one needs to include dissipative effects in order to tame the energy increase. Taking the analogy with dissipative collisional decoherence seriously, we develop a dissipative generalization of the DP model. We show that even with dissipative effects, the DP model contradicts known physical facts, unless either the cut-off is kept artificially large, or one limits the applicability of the model to massive systems. We also provide an estimation for the mass range of this applicability.

  12. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA); Jackson, Theodore G. (Atlanta, GA); Knerr, Christopher (Lawrenceville, GA)

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web.

  13. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, M.S.; Jackson, T.G.; Knerr, C.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web. 37 figs.

  14. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 051302 (2012) Probing the shear-band formation in granular media with sound waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, Université

    , the application of these experimental methods to real 3D opaque granular materials appears difficult. Sound waves [13­17]. Speed measurements of long-wavelength sound waves allow one to determine the nonlinear scattered sound waves enable one to detect tiny changes of the contact network configuration at the grain

  15. Gravity Waves Gravity Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    ;14/03/2014 6 H L H L L Phase & Group Velocity #12;14/03/2014 7 Doppler Effect #12;14/03/2014 8 Shock Waves #12;14/03/2014 14 Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Supernova blast waves #12;14/03/2014 15 Tycho's Remnant (SN 1572AD A SNR flythrough Theory of Supernova Blast Waves Supernovae: Type Ia Subsonic deflagration wave turning

  16. ONR Symposium on Naval Hydrodynamics, Val de Reuil, France, 17-22 September. Forces, Moment and Wave Pattern for Naval Combatant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui, Lichuan

    ABSTRACT A model-scale naval surface combatant, DTMB 5512, is studied experimentally in steady forward and Stern (1996) applied traditional 5-hole pitot probes to measure the time mean velocities. Laser Ohkusu (1990) described two methods, i.e. with wave probes installed on the towing carriage for acquiring

  17. Calculations of Nonlinear Wave-Packet Interferometry Signals in the Pump-Probe Limit as Tests for Vibrational Control over Electronic Excitation Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason D. Biggs; Jeffrey A. Cina

    2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The preceding paper describes a strategy for externally influencing the course of short-time electronic excitation transfer (EET) in molecular dimers and observing the process by nonlinear wave-packet interferometry (nl-WPI). Within a sample of isotropically oriented dimers having a specified internal geometry, a vibrational mode internal to the acceptor chromophore can be preferentially driven by electronically nonresonant impulsive stimulated Raman (or resonant infrared) excitation with a short polarized control pulse. A subsequent electronically resonant polarized pump then preferentially excites the donor, and EET ensues. Here we test both the control strategy and its spectroscopic investigation-with some sacrifice of amplitude-level detail-by calculating the pump-probe difference signal. That signal is the limiting case of the control-influenced nl-WPI signal in which the two pulses in the pump pulse-pair coincide, as do the two pulses in the probe pulse-pair. We present calculated pump-probe difference signals for (1) a model excitation-transfer complex in which two equal-energy monomers each support one moderately Franck-Condon active intramolecular vibration; (2) a simplified model of the covalent dimer dithia-anthracenophane, representing its EET dynamics following selective impulsive excitation of the weakly Franck-Condon active anthracene vibration at 385 cm-1; and (3) a model complex featuring moderate electronic-vibrational coupling in which the site energy of the acceptor chromophore is lower than that of the donor.

  18. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 82, 013409 (2010) Theory of probing attosecond electron wave packets via two-path interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chii-Dong

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In quantum mechanics, each measurement is a projection of the dynamic system. Clearly, not all the probe for initiating a dynamical atomic or molecular system which evolves nontrivially in time, while retaining pulses (SAP) is still in its infancy. Thus, today only a handful of laboratories are capable

  19. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

  20. Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCure, Mari Mae

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

  1. Probing the plasma near high power wave launchers in fusion devices for static and dynamic electric fields (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klepper, C. C., E-mail: kleppercc@ornl.gov; Isler, R. C.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B.; Green, D. L.; Harris, J. H.; Hillis, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States); Martin, E. H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States); North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States); Colas, L.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Panayotis, S.; Pegourié, B.; Jacquot, J.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Shannon, S. C. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An exploratory study was carried out in the long-pulse tokamak Tore Supra, to determine if electric fields in the plasma around high-power, RF wave launchers could be measured with non-intrusive, passive, optical emission spectroscopy. The focus was in particular on the use of the external electric field Stark effect. The feasibility was found to be strongly dependent on the spatial extent of the electric fields and overlap between regions of strong (>?1 kV/cm) electric fields and regions of plasma particle recycling and plasma-induced, spectral line emission. Most amenable to the measurement was the RF electric field in edge plasma, in front of a lower hybrid heating and current drive launcher. Electric field strengths and direction, derived from fitting the acquired spectra to a model including time-dependent Stark effect and the tokamak-range magnetic field Zeeman-effect, were found to be in good agreement with full-wave modeling of the observed launcher.

  2. Probing the plasma near high power wave launchers in fusion devices for static and dynamic electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL; Martin, Elijah H [ORNL; Isler, Ralph C [ORNL; Colas, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Goniche, M. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Hillairet, J. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Panayotis, Stephanie [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Jacquot, Jonathan [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Lotte, Ph. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Colledani, G. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Caughman, J. B. O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Ekedahl, A. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Green, David L [ORNL; Harris, Jeffrey H [ORNL; Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Shannon, Prof. Steven [North Carolina State University; Litaudon, X [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An exploratory study was carried out in the long-pulse tokamak Tore Supra, to determine if electric fields in the plasma around high-power, RF wave launchers could be measured with non-intrusive, passive, optical emission spectroscopy. The focus was in particular on the use of the external electric field Stark effect. The feasibility was found to be strongly dependent on the spatial extent of the electric fields and overlap between regions of strong (> 1 kV/cm) electric fields and regions of plasma particle recycling and plasma-induced, spectral line emission. Most amenable to the measurement was the RF electric field in edge plasma, in front of a lower hybrid heating and current drive launcher. Electric field strengths and direction, derived from fitting the acquired spectra to a model including time-dependent Stark effect and the tokamak-range magnetic field Zeeman-effect, were found to be in good agreement with full-wave modeling of the observed launcher.

  3. Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 757-779, December 2006 Acoustic and Shear-Wave Velocities in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    for the presence of gas hydrate are strong. In this study, we perform velocity analysis of the 6 4-component OBS of the velocities are observed. We then investigate the large scale gas hydrate content through rock physic modeling, and the acoustic veloci- ties predicted for a set of gas hydrate, quartz and clay contents are com- pared

  4. SHIP VELOCITY FIELDS , Lichuan Guib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui, Lichuan

    directions. 1. Introduction Knowledge of flow around ships is important for design, model development, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation. Historically, five-hole pitot probes have been used for measuring of multi-hole pitot and Laser-doppler systems, they both require measurement of ship velocity fields

  5. Fast waves and electron current drive in the Irvine Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, R.C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work reports the results of experimental studies of the fast wave with frequencies near the mean gyro-frequency in magnetized, toroidal plasmas with comparison to theory. Experiment investigating fast-wave dispersion and damping, and the use of unidirectional fast waves to drive steady-state electron currents were performed on the Irvine Torus. The wave was excited in the plasmas by a phased array antenna which allowed launching of uni- or bi-directional fast waves around the torus. Probe measurements of the angle of propagation of wave energy, radial wavelengths, and the direction and magnitude of radial wave phase velocities were found to be in good agreement with predictions from cold plasma theory. Measurements of fast-wave damping showed the observed damping lengths to be anomalously short when compared to predictions for electron Landau damping, transit-time magnetic pumping, and collisional damping, but may be explained by effects due to fast-wave scattering from drift-wave density fluctuations. Steady-state electron currents were driven by unidirectional fast waves. Up to 14% of the wave energy was converted to poloidal magnetic field energy. The maximum current observed was found to be in rough agreement with a prediction from quasi-linear theory.

  6. Nonlinear Pulse Propagation and Phase Velocity of Laser-Driven Plasma Waves C. B. Schroeder, C. Benedetti, E. Esarey, and W. P. Leemans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    of high-quality GeV electron beams in centimeter-scale plasmas [2], the dynamics of the acceler- ated- ing length (distance for a relativistic particle to move out of an accelerating phase) and, hence=cm2 , or a0 * 1, to drive large ampli- tude plasma waves for particle acceleration. In the nonlinear

  7. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA); O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  8. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  9. WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE-MOMENTUM DENSITY OF EACH SPECIES OF A COLLISION-LESS PLASMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cary, John R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    case, the electrons have negative wave energy for 2w ne w wave energy for 2w .w > 0 nl Hence, unstable waves with negative phase velocity,

  10. aggregate sound velocities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an acoustic loop filter Physics Websites Summary: observation of negative group velocity propagation of sound waves through an asymmetric loop filterSound beyond the speed of...

  11. Local tunneling characteristics near a grain boundary of a d-wave superconductor as probed by a normal-metal or a low-Tc-superconductor STM tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hongwei

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the local single-particle tunneling characteristics [as observed with scanning tunnel microscopy (STM)] for N D and S D tunneling, where N is a normal metal, S is a s-wave superconductor, and D is a d-wave superconductor with a {100...

  12. A novel photonic Doppler velocimetry for transverse velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Guanghua; Wang Detian; Liu Jun; Meng Jianhua; Liu Shouxian; Yang Qingguo [Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-109, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber interferometry for transverse velocity measurement has been developed. This diagnostic is similar to photonic Doppler velocimetry in the way in which laser propagates and couples. The interferometer mainly consists of a fiber coupler, an emitting probe, and two receiving probes. A pair of scattered laser beams mix in the coupler and generates fringes with frequency proportional to transverse velocity. Measurement of transverse velocity is independent of longitudinal velocity. The feasibility of the technique has been verified by rotating wheel experiment and shock loading experiment.

  13. Local tunneling characteristics near a grain boundary of a d-wave superconductor as probed by a normal-metal or a low-T-c-superconductor STM tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, HW; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    minimum ~i.e., zero! for a $100% 5 PRB 620163-1829/2000/62~2!/1308~11!/$15.00 y of a d-wave superconductor as probed c-superconductor STM tip d Chia-Ren Hu , College Station, Texas 77843-4242 r 1999! s @as observed with scanning tunnel microscopy... direction is along the c axis in this figure, but it does not have to be so. PRB 62 LOCAL TUNNELING CHARACTERISTIC Elul~x1!5h? 0ul~xl!1E D~s,r!v l~x2!dx2, ~2! Elv l~xl!52h? 0v l~x1!1E D~s,r!ul~x2!dx2, ~3! where s[(x12x2), r[(x11x2)/2, and h? 0[2q2?x1 2...

  14. Single shot dynamic ellipsometry mesaurements of laser-driven shock waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolme, C. A. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 (United States)

    2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique has been developed to measure the time-resolved position of a laser-driven shock wave and the subsequent material flow. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry, using a chirped femtosecond laser pulse, probes picosecond material dynamics in a single shot by capitalizing on the refractive index changes in the shocked material. For transparent materials, the shock velocity, the particle velocity, and the shocked material's refractive index are extracted. Hugoniot data for poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene-co-vinylidene fluoride) (Kel-F 800) was obtained using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry, and the data agrees well with previous data on macroscopic samples obtained in plate impact gas gun experiments.

  15. Wave Mechanics and the Fifth Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson; James M. Overduin

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacing 4D Minkowski space by 5D canonical space leads to a clearer derivation of the main features of wave mechanics, including the wave function and the velocity of de Broglie waves. Recent tests of wave-particle duality could be adapted to investigate whether de Broglie waves are basically 4D or 5D in nature.

  16. IWA : an analysis program for isentropic wave measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ao, Tommy

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IWA (Isentropic Wave Analysis) is a program for analyzing velocity profiles of isentropic compression experiments. IWA applies incremental impedance matching correction to measured velocity profiles to obtain in-situ particle velocity profiles for Lagrangian wave analysis. From the in-situ velocity profiles, material properties such as wave velocities, stress, strain, strain rate, and strength are calculated. The program can be run in any current version of MATLAB (2008a or later) or as a Windows XP executable.

  17. The effect of rainfall on the velocity distribution in shallow channel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Larry Joe

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , gave the following equation for uniform two-dimensional open channel f low v v max ~2. Iog y Ve~~ in which v is the velocity at any distance, y, above the channel bed, v Is the maximum velocity, g is the acceleration of gravity, d is the Illa X... piezometer located at the same longi- tudinal position along the flume at the tip of the ve'locity probe. The velocity coefficient of the total head probe was obtained by two methods. 29 One method was determining the velocity by observing the time...

  18. Protective shield for an instrument probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Howard A.; Ross, James R.; Birtola, Sal R.

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A shield is disclosed that is particularly useful for protecting exposed optical elements at the end of optical probes used in the analysis of hazardous emissions in and around an industrial environment from the contaminating effects of those emissions. The instant invention provides a hood or cowl in the shape of a right circular cylinder that can be fitted over the end of such optical probes. The hood provides a clear aperture through which the probe can perform unobstructed analysis. The probe optical elements are protected from the external environment by passing a dry gas through the interior of the hood and out through the hood aperture in sufficient quantity and velocity to prevent any significant mixing between the internal and external environments. Additionally, the hood is provided with a cooling jacket to lessen the potential for damaging the probe due to temperature excursions.

  19. Multipole seismoelectric logging while drilling (LWD) for acoustic velocity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhenya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In seismoelectric well logging, an acoustic wave propagates along a borehole and induces electrical signals along the borehole wall. The apparent velocities of these seismoelectric signals are equal to the formation ...

  20. Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient...

  1. Effective velocities in fractured media: a numerical study using the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    theories that predict the effective P- and S-wave velocities in fractured materials in ... can be treated only by numerical techniques because analyt- ... apply the rotated staggered grid (Saenger, Gold and Shapiro ..... (r ? 0:2) and for SH-

  2. Autoresonant beat-wave generation R. R. Lindberg,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    means for the ponderomotive excitation of nonlinear Langmuir waves by phase-locking of the plasma wave to resonantly excite a large- amplitude, high-phase-velocity Langmuir wave suitable for particle acceleration p-1 E0, where p 1-vp 2 /c2 -1/2 . Here, vp is the phase-velocity of the excited plasma wave

  3. Characterization of a Dipole Flow System Using Point Velocity Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ian Reed

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    body and secure detector wires. The detector wires were connected to a 12- conductor cable using heat-shrink butt connectors to transmit the signal to the surface. The diffusion stone was connected to an injection line that carried the tracer from...

  4. Airborne observations and numerical modeling of fetch- limited waves in the Gulf of Tehuantepec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Leonel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    velocity scaling in wind wave generation. Boundary-Layerlinear theory of of wind wave generation applied to waveSource terms in a third-generation wind wave model. J. Phys.

  5. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  6. Projected Constraints on Lorentz-Violating Gravity with Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devin Hansen; Nicolas Yunes; Kent Yagi

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational waves are excellent tools to probe the foundations of General Relativity in the strongly dynamical and non-linear regime. One such foundation is Lorentz symmetry, which can be broken in the gravitational sector by the existence of a preferred time direction, and thus, a preferred frame at each spacetime point. This leads to a modification in the orbital decay rate of binary systems, and also in the generation and chirping of their associated gravitational waves. We here study whether waves emitted in the late, quasi-circular inspiral of non-spinning, neutron star binaries can place competitive constraints on two proxies of gravitational Lorentz-violation: Einstein-\\AE{}ther theory and khronometric gravity. We model the waves in the small-coupling (or decoupling) limit and in the post-Newtonian approximation, by perturbatively solving the field equations in small deformations from General Relativity and in the small-velocity/weak-gravity approximation. We assume a gravitational wave consistent with General Relativity has been detected with second- and third-generation, ground-based detectors, and with the proposed space-based mission, DECIGO, with and without coincident electromagnetic counterparts. Without a counterpart, a detection consistent with General Relativity of neutron star binaries can only place competitive constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation when using future, third-generation or space-based instruments. On the other hand, a single counterpart is enough to place constraints that are 10 orders of magnitude more stringent than current binary pulsar bounds, even when using second-generation detectors. This is because Lorentz violation forces the group velocity of gravitational waves to be different from that of light, and this difference can be very accurately constrained with coincident observations.

  7. Simultaneous use of camera and probe diagnostics to unambiguously identify and study the dynamics of multiple underlying instabilities during the route to plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, S. C., E-mail: saikat@ucsd.edu; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Brandt, C.; Cui, L.; Gosselin, J. J. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Light, A. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Department of Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use multiple-tip Langmuir probes and fast imaging to unambiguously identify and study the dynamics of underlying instabilities during the controlled route to fully-developed plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized helicon plasma device. Langmuir probes measure radial profiles of electron temperature, plasma density and potential; from which we compute linear growth rates of instabilities, cross-phase between density and potential fluctuations, Reynold's stress, particle flux, vorticity, time-delay estimated velocity, etc. Fast imaging complements the 1D probe measurements by providing temporally and spatially resolved 2D details of plasma structures associated with the instabilities. We find that three radially separated plasma instabilities exist simultaneously. Density gradient driven resistive drift waves propagating in the electron diamagnetic drift direction separate the plasma into an edge region dominated by strong, velocity shear driven Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and a central core region which shows coherent Rayleigh-Taylor modes propagating in the ion diamagnetic drift direction. The simultaneous, complementary use of both probes and camera was crucial to identify the instabilities and understand the details of the very rich plasma dynamics.

  8. Development of a measurement system able to determine the ow velocity eld on models of hydraulic turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diggavi, Suhas

    . Antoine Bombenger Probing strategy in a Kaplan Turbine Such a probe typically has a spherical head with 5 turbines Christian Landry Motivations & Objectives The project was driven by the need to improve the measurement of velocity elds and pressures in a hydraulic turbine. The development of a new probing system

  9. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, Robert A. (Livermore, CA); Conti, Armond E. (San Jose, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  10. High-frequency Probing Diagnostic for Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.A. Litvak; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    High-frequency oscillations (1-100 MHz) in Hall thrusters have apparently eluded significant experimental scrutiny. A diagnostic setup, consisting of a single Langmuir probe, a special shielded probe connector-positioner, and an electronic impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been identified and characterized for various thruster operating conditions.

  11. Modified definition of group velocity and electromagnetic energy conservation equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical definition of group velocity has two flaws: (a) the group velocity can be greater than the phase velocity in a non-dispersive, lossless, non-conducting, anisotropic uniform medium; (b) the definition is not consistent with the principle of relativity for a plane wave in a moving isotropic uniform medium. To remove the flaws, a modified definition is proposed. A criterion is set up to identify the justification of group velocity definition. A "superluminal power flow" is constructed to show that the electromagnetic energy conservation equation cannot uniquely define the power flow if the principle of Fermat is not taken into account.

  12. Slow group velocity and Cherenkov radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Carusotto; M. Artoni; G. C. La Rocca; F. Bassani

    2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study the effect of ultraslow group velocities on the emission of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in a coherently driven medium. We show that in this case the aperture of the group cone on which the intensity of the radiation peaks is much smaller than that of the usual wave cone associated with the Cherenkov coherence condition. We show that such a singular behaviour may be observed in a coherently driven ultracold atomic gas.

  13. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  14. Developing de Broglie Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

    2006-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

  15. Tracking deep mantle reservoirs with ultra-low velocity zones Allen K. McNamara a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Tracking deep mantle reservoirs with ultra-low velocity zones Allen K. McNamara a, , Edward J, that directly overlies the core-mantle boundary (CMB). These regions have been dubbed Ultra-Low Velocity Zones. Introduction For over 15 yrs seismologists have mapped regions of ultra-low P- and S-wave velocities

  16. Calculation of Extreme Wave Loads on Coastal Highway Bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Bo

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    force on bridge decks. 2D Model is a linear wave model, which has the capability of calculating wave velocity potential components in time domain based on wave parameters such as wave height, wave period and water depth, and complex structural geometries...

  17. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  18. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Time-resolved particle velocity measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypervelocity launch capabilities (9--16 km/s) with macroscopic plates have become available in recent years. It is now feasible to conduct instrumented plane-wave tests using this capability. Successfully conducting such tests requires a planar launch and impact at hypervelocities, appropriate triggering for recording systems, and time-resolved measurements of motion or stress at a particular point or set of points within the target or projectile during impact. The authors have conducted the first time-resolved wave-profile experiments using velocity interferometric techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that aluminum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa shock pressure, with complete loss of strength of the shocked state. These experiments have allowed a determination of shock-wave window transparency in conditions produced by a hypervelocity impact. In particular, lithium fluoride appears to lose transparency at a shock stress of 200 GPa; this appears to be the upper limit for conventional wave profile measurements using velocity interferometric techniques.

  20. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  1. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  2. Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khlebnikov, Sergei; Kruczenski, Martin; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper, we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically AdS{sub 5} space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks, we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion, and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular, we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light v{yields}1 the penetration depth l scales as l{approx}(1-v{sup 2}){sup 1/4}. We compare the results with second-order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

  3. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon (El Cerrito, CA); Chemla, Daniel S. (Kensington, CA); Ogletree, D. Frank (El Cerrito, CA); Botkin, David (San Francisco, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  4. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  5. Visualizing the kinematics of relativistic wave packets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernd Thaller

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This article investigates some solutions of the time-dependent free Dirac equation. Visualizations of these solutions immediately reveal strange phenomena that are caused by the interference of positive- and negative-energy waves. The effects discussed here include the Zitterbewegung, the opposite direction of momentum and velocity in negative-energy wave packets, and the superluminal propagation of the wave packet's local maxima.

  6. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A CORONAL MORETON WAVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harra, Louise K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Sterling, Alphonse C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goemoery, Peter [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Veronig, Astrid, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: gomory@astro.s, E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed a coronal wave (EIT wave) on 2011 February 16, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV spectral data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The wave accompanied an M1.6 flare that produced a surge and a coronal mass ejection (CME). EIS data of the wave show a prominent redshifted signature indicating line-of-sight velocities of {approx}20 km s{sup -1} or greater. Following the main redshifted wave front, there is a low-velocity period (and perhaps slightly blueshifted), followed by a second redshift somewhat weaker than the first; this progression may be due to oscillations of the EUV atmosphere set in motion by the initial wave front, although alternative explanations may be possible. Along the direction of the EIS slit the wave front's velocity was {approx}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with its apparent propagation velocity projected against the solar disk as measured in the AIA images, and the second redshifted feature had propagation velocities between {approx}200 and 500 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the observed wave being generated by the outgoing CME, as in the scenario for the classic Moreton wave. This type of detailed spectral study of coronal waves has hitherto been a challenge, but is now possible due to the availability of concurrent AIA and EIS data.

  7. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J; Mathur, Manikandan; Gostiaux, Louis; Peacock, Thomas; Dauxois, Thierry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (2007). This mechanism, which involves a tunable source comprised of oscillating plates, has so far been used for a few fundamental studies of internal waves, but its full potential has yet to be realized. Our studies reveal that this approach is capable of producing a wide variety of two-dimensional wave fields, including plane waves, wave beams and discrete vertical modes in finite-depth stratifications. The effects of discretization by a finite number of plates, forcing amplitude and angle of propagation are investigated, and it is found that the method is remarkably efficient at generating a complete wave field despite forcing only one velocity component in a controllable manner. We furthermore find that the nature of the radiated wave field is well predicted using Fourier transforms of the spatial structure of the wave generator.

  8. Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

  9. Control of group velocity by phase-changing collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M. [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Wilson-Gordon, A.D.; Friedmann, H. [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the influence of phase-changing collisions on the group velocities in Doppler-broadened, cycling, degenerate two-level systems where F{sub e}=F{sub g}+1 and F{sub g}>0, interacting with pump and probe lasers, that exhibit electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA). Two model systems are considered: the N system where the pump and probe are polarized perpendicularly, and EIA is due to transfer of coherence (TOC), and the double two-level system (TLS) where both lasers have the same polarization, and EIA is due to transfer of population (TOP). For the case of Doppler-broadened EIA TOC, which occurs at low pump intensity, there is a switch from positive to negative dispersion and group velocity, as the rate of phase-changing collisions is increased. For the case of EIA TOP at low pump intensity, the dispersion and group velocity remain negative even when the collision rate is increased. Pressure-induced narrowing, accompanied by an increase in the magnitude of the negative dispersion and a decrease in the magnitude of the negative group velocity, occurs in both EIA TOC and EIA TOP, at low pump intensity. When the pump intensity is increased, a switch from negative to positive dispersion and group velocity, with increasing collision rate, also occurs in the double TLS system. However, the effect is far smaller than in the case of the N system at low pump intensity.

  10. Directional intraoperative probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Popov, Vladimir; Loutts, Georgii

    2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An introperative surgical probe incorporating both a fiber optic imaging system and multi-element beta/gamma radiation directional indicating system is described.

  11. The radial-velocity revolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, R. (Cambridge Univ., Observatories (England))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instruments and techniques designed for registering the minute Doppler shifts arising from stellar radial velocity are examined. Particular attention is given to the photographic spectrographs, the high-dispersion spectrographs ('digital speedometers'), and the Palomar spectrometer. The principle of using radial-velocity masks is described, and the use of interferometers for radial-velocity measurements is discussed. Results are presented of radial velocity observations for HD 114762, HD 210647, and Epsilon Tauri, together with interpretations of these results.

  12. Nonlinear three-wave interaction in marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. I. Pushkina

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear interaction of three acoustic waves in a sandy sediment is studied in the frequency range where there is a considerable wave velocity dispersion. The possibility of an experimental observation of the generation of a sound wave by two pump waves propagating at an angle to each other is estimated.

  13. Collective behavior of stabilized reaction-diffusion waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, Aaron J.; Tinsley, Mark; Showalter, Kenneth [Department of Chemistry, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6045 (United States)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Stabilized wave segments in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction are directionally controlled with intensity gradients in the applied illumination. The constant-velocity waves behave like self-propelled particles, and multiple waves interact via an applied interaction potential. Alignment arises from the intrinsic properties of the interacting waves, leading to processional and rotational behavior.

  14. Experimental investigation into operational characteristics of a shrouded probe for aerosol sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra, Sumit

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stream velocities of 15. 6 and 8. 9 m/s. All such velocity measurements provide information required for understanding aerodynamic operational behavior of the shrouded probe. Subsequently, aerosol experiments to determine aspiration ratio.... The following is a categorized review. Particle Deposition Sehmel was one of the earlier workers to present (2) results on aerosol deposition while sampling with sharp edged probes. In his experiments, wall losses increased with Reynolds Number (Re...

  15. White light velocity interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

  16. The Kinematic Wave Equation (KWE) In Tuesday's interrupted lecture we derived the Kinematic Wave Equation (KWE) for a density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbon, J. D.

    The Kinematic Wave Equation (KWE) In Tuesday's interrupted lecture we derived the Kinematic Wave refer to partial derivatives. Kinematic waves occur when we take Q = Q(), in which case t + c()x = 0 (2) where the propagation velocity is c() = dQ/d. (2) is called the Kinematic Wave Equation (KWE). We wish

  17. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  18. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  19. Propagation of gravitational waves in the nonperturbative spinor vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Dzhunushaliev; Vladimir Folomeev

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of gravitational waves on the background of a nonperturbative vacuum of a spinor field is considered. It is shown that there are several distinctive features in comparison with the propagation of plane gravitational waves through empty space: there exists the fixed phase difference between the $h_{yy,zz}$ and $h_{yz}$ components of the wave; the phase and group velocities of gravitational waves are not equal to the velocity of light; the group velocity is always less than the velocity of light; under some conditions the gravitational waves are either damped or absent; for given frequency, there exist two waves with different wave vectors. We also discuss the possibility of experimental verification of the obtained effects as a tool to investigate nonperurbative quantum field theories.

  20. Carbon nanotube based electromechanical probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaglioglu, Onnik, 1976-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromechanical probing applications continuously require smaller pitches, faster manufacturing and lower electrical resistance. Conventional techniques, such as MEMS based cantilever probes have their shortcomings in ...

  1. Backreacting p-wave Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raúl E. Arias; Ignacio Salazar Landea

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the gravitational backreaction of the non-abelian gauge field on the gravity dual to a 2+1 p-wave superconductor. We observe that as in the $p+ip$ system a second order phase transition exists between a superconducting and a normal state. Moreover, we conclude that, below the phase transition temperature $T_c$ the lowest free energy is achieved by the p-wave solution. In order to probe the solution, we compute the holographic entanglement entropy. For both $p$ and $p+ip$ systems the entanglement entropy satisfies an area law. For any given entangling surface, the p-wave superconductor has lower entanglement entropy.

  2. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laguna, George R. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  3. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  4. Ponderomotive Forces On Waves In Modulated Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodin, I.Y; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear interactions of waves via instantaneous cross-phase modulation can be cast in the same way as ponderomotive wave-particle interactions in high-frequency electromagnetic fi eld. The ponderomotive effect arises when rays of a probe wave scatter off perturbations of the underlying medium produced by a second, modulation wave, much like charged particles scatter off a quasiperiodic field. Parallels with the point-particle dynamics, which itself is generalized by this theory, lead to new methods of wave manipulation, including asymmetric barriers for light.

  5. Alfv'en Wave Solitons and Solar Intermediate Drift Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guedel, Manuel

    propagate at velocities of the order of the Alfv'en veloc­ ity in a direction inclined to the magnetic field, the solar wind, and possibly accretion disks, and extra­ galactic jets. In such magnetized plasmas Alfv'en waves are easily excited by various processes. Linear waves propagate at the Alfv'en speed v

  6. Pore fluid effects on seismic velocity in anisotropic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple new technique predicts the high- and low-frequency saturated velocities in anisotropic rocks entirely in terms of measurable dry rock properties without the need for idealized crack geometries. Measurements of dry velocity versus pressure and porosity versus pressure contain all of the necessary information for predicting the frequency-dependent effects of fluid saturation. Furthermore, these measurements automatically incorporate all pore interaction, so there is no limitation to low crack density. The velocities are found to depend on five key interrelated variables: frequency, the distribution of compliant crack-like porosity, the intrinsic or noncrack anisotropy, fluid viscosity and compressibility, and effective pressure. The sensitivity of velocities to saturation is generally greater at high frequencies than low frequencies. The magnitude of the differences from dry to saturated and from low frequency to high frequency is determined by the compliant or crack-like porosity. Predictions of saturated velocities based on dry data for sandstone and granite show that compressional velocities generally increase with saturation and with frequency. However, the degree of compressional wave anisotropy may either increase or decrease upon saturation depending on the crack distribution, the effective pressure, and the frequency at which the measurements are made. Shear-wave velocities can either increase or decrease with saturation, and the degree of anisotropy depends on the microstructure, pressure, and frequency. Consequently great care must be taken when interpreting observed velocity anisotropy for measurements at low frequencies, typical of in situ observations, will generally be different from those at high frequencies, typical of the laboratory.

  7. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich [University Observatory of the Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) (Germany); Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) (Germany); Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv [Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) (Germany); Fisher, David [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin (United States)

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  8. Sound velocities of ferropericlase in the Earth's lower mantle Jung-Fu Lin,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jung-Fu "Afu"

    . Introduction [2] The speed of seismic waves in the Earth's lower mantle is governed by the elastic properties a dramatic increase in the isothermal bulk modulus (KT) and bulk sound velocity (VF) at the electronic spinSound velocities of ferropericlase in the Earth's lower mantle Jung-Fu Lin,1 Steven D. Jacobsen,2

  9. Measurement of fast-changing low velocities by photonic Doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song Hongwei; Wu Xianqian; Huang Chenguang; Wei Yangpeng; Wang Xi [Key Laboratory for Hydrodynamics and Ocean Engineering, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the increasing popularity of photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) in shock wave experiments, its capability of capturing low particle velocities while changing rapidly is still questionable. The paper discusses the performance of short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) in processing fringe signals of fast-changing low velocities measured by PDV. Two typical experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance. In the laser shock peening test, the CWT gives a better interpretation to the free surface velocity history, where the elastic precursor, main plastic wave, and elastic release wave can be clearly identified. The velocities of stress waves, Hugoniot elastic limit, and the amplitude of shock pressure induced by laser can be obtained from the measurement. In the Kolsky-bar based tests, both methods show validity of processing the longitudinal velocity signal of incident bar, whereas CWT improperly interprets the radial velocity of the shocked sample at the beginning period, indicating the sensitiveness of the CWT to the background noise. STFT is relatively robust in extracting waveforms of low signal-to-noise ratio. Data processing method greatly affects the temporal resolution and velocity resolution of a given fringe signal, usually CWT demonstrates a better local temporal resolution and velocity resolution, due to its adaptability to the local frequency, also due to the finer time-frequency product according to the uncertainty principle.

  10. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of ion velocity and temperature of drift turbulence driven sheared plasma flow in a linear helicon plasma device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Fedorczak, N.; Manz, P.; Tynan, G. R.; Xu, M. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Lee, T. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using laser induced fluorescence (LIF), radial profiles of azimuthal ion fluid velocity and ion temperature are measured in the controlled shear de-correlation experiment (CSDX) linear helicon plasma device. Ion velocities and temperatures are derived from the measured Doppler broadened velocity distribution functions of argon ions. The LIF system employs a portable, high power (>300 mW), narrowband ({approx}1 MHz) tunable diode laser-based system operating at 668.614 nm. Previous studies in CSDX have shown the existence of a radially sheared azimuthal flow as measured with time delay estimation methods and Mach probes. Here, we report the first LIF measurements of sheared plasma fluid flow in CSDX. Above a critical magnetic field, the ion fluid flow profile evolves from radially uniform to peaked on axis with a distinct reversed flow region at the boundary, indicating the development of a sheared azimuthal flow. Simultaneously, the ion temperature also evolves from a radially uniform profile to a profile with a gradient. Measurements in turbulent and coherent drift wave mode dominated plasmas are compared.

  11. Is there Lower Limit to Velocity or Velocity Change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. N. Sreenath; Kenath Arun; C. Sivaram

    2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we explore the possibility of a lower limit to velocity or velocity change which is 20 orders of magnitude smaller than the speed of light and explore the various observable signatures including those in cosmic rays and gamma ray bursts.

  12. Electrochemical Waves on Patterned Surfaces: Propagation through Narrow Gaps and Konstantin Agladze, Stephanie Thouvenel-Romans, and Oliver Steinbock*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbock, Oliver

    Electrochemical Waves on Patterned Surfaces: Propagation through Narrow Gaps and Channels propagation through narrow gaps and long channels. In channels, the wave velocity decreases with decreasing dynamically similar phenomena such as propagating fronts, target patterns, and rotating spiral waves. Pattern

  13. Small ASM probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, J.N.; Olinger, B.; Vorthman, J.E.; Wilder, L.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A part of the ongoing effort to miniaturize the adjoint sensitivity method (ASM) probe, six small probes in different configurations were tested on a single experiment. The results of the different configurations are presented. The ASM probe is quite accurate and its performance is well understood in those situations where we have a relatively large area that has 1-D flow. Area is expensive and it is desirable to make measurements using a minimum of this resource. When we confine ourselves to a small area we get electromagnetic effects and perturbations in the hydrodynamic flows that were absent in experiments whose lateral extent was large enough to effectively eliminate these problems. We are forced toward magnet and coil configurations that are not ideal for best accuracy. In the experiment described in this report, we describe and report the results of six ASM probes that approach the goal of using less area. 2 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Converted wave imaging in anisotropic media using sea-floor seismic data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, Fabio

    velocity ratio is derived conventionally by event matching in the P-wave and converted wave stacks. I present an attempt to use well-log derived velocity ratios to avoid this interpretative step. The velocity ratio derived from 4C seismic data is about 30...

  15. Wave propagation in a seven-story reinforced concrete building I. Theoretical modelsq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Wave propagation in a seven-story reinforced concrete building I. Theoretical modelsq M natural to use wave propagation methods. In this paper (Part I), we review several two-dimensional wave/s and bx/bz 1 for EW vibrations. The velocity of shear waves propagating through the slabs is estimated

  16. Kinematics measurements of regular, irregular, and rogue waves by PIV/LDV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hae-Jin

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    waves. A series of experiments were conducted in a 2-D wave tank at Texas A&M University to measure wave velocities and accelerations using LDV and PIV systems. The wave crests of regular and rogue waves are the focus of this study. With the measured...

  17. APPLICATION OF THE EMBEDDED FIBER OPTIC PROBE IN HIGH EXPLOSIVE DETONATION STUDIES: PBX-9502 AND LX-17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hare, D; Goosman, D; Lorenz, K; Lee, E

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Embedded Fiber Optic probe directly measures detonation speed continuously in time, without the need to numerically differentiate data, and is a new tool for measuring time-dependent as well as steady detonation speed to high accuracy. It consists of a custom-design optical fiber probe embedded in high explosive. The explosive is detonated and a refractive index discontinuity is produced in the probe at the location of the detonation front by the compression of the detonation. Because this index-jump tracks the detonation front a measurement of the Doppler shift of laser light reflected from the jump makes it possible to continuously measure detonation velocity with high spatial and temporal resolution. We have employed this probe with a Fabry-Perot-type laser Doppler velocimetry system additionally equipped with a special filter for reducing the level of non-Doppler shifted light relative to the signal. This is necessary because the index-jump signal is relatively weak compared to the return expected from a well-prepared surface in the more traditional and familiar example of material interface velocimetry. Our observations were carried out on a number of explosives but this work is focused on our results on PBX-9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F) at varying initial charge density. Our measurements reveal a density dependence significantly lower than previous quoted values and lower than theoretical calculations. Our limited data on detonation speed dependence on wave curvature is in reasonable agreement with previous work using more standard methods and confirms deviation from the Wood-Kirkwood theoretical formula.

  18. Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Sushil J.

    Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Genetic Adaptive­surface models from seismic travel­time data. Given a sub­surface model, the physics of wave propagation through refractive media can be used to compute travel times for seismic waves. How­ ever, in practice, we have

  19. Propagation of a solitary fission wave A. G. Osborne, G. D. Recktenwald, and M. R. Deinerta)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deinert, Mark

    Propagation of a solitary fission wave A. G. Osborne, G. D. Recktenwald, and M. R. Deinerta waves can arise that will propagate at constant velocity. Numerical studies have shown that fission the conditions required for a solitary fission wave to propagate at constant velocity. The results place strict

  20. Fermi velocity renormalization and dynamical gap generation in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Popovici; C. S. Fischer; L. von Smekal

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the renormalization of the Fermi velocity by the long-range Coulomb interactions between the charge carriers in the Dirac-cone approximation for the effective low-energy description of the electronic excitations in graphene at half filling. Solving the coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the dressing functions in the corresponding fermion propagator with various approximations for the particle-hole polarization we observe that Fermi velocity renormalization effects generally lead to a considerable increase of the critical coupling for dynamical gap generation and charge-density wave formation at the semimetal-insulator transition.

  1. Velocity determination of the very shallow lunar crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Tzuhua Edward

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1972 and 1974 ) for the Apollo 16 and 17 landing sites, respectively. A deep layer of dust on the moon may provide a very good seismic-wave transmission channel. In order to investigate the seismic properties of such a medium, Gold and Soter (1970...) at the Apollo 14 and 16 landing sites has been determined to be a self-compacting powder layer overlying a homogeneous layer. The velocity function of the powder layer is given by V(z)=V (z/z ) , where V =340+20 m/sec is a reference 1/6 0 0 0 velocity at a...

  2. New insights on boundary plasma turbulence and the quasi-coherent mode in Alcator C-Mod using a Mirror Langmuir Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBombard, B.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Terry, J. L.; Brunner, D.; Davis, E.; Greenwald, M.; Hughes, J. W. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new “Mirror Langmuir Probe” diagnostic, combined with a double-coil scanning magnetic probe, is used to interrogate Alcator C-Mod's quasi-coherent mode (QCM) with unprecedented detail. In ohmic EDA H-modes, the QCM is found to reside in a region of positive radial electric field, with a radial width (?3?mm) that spans open and closed field line regions. Large amplitude, in-phase sinusoidal bursts (?100?kHz) in density, electron temperature, and plasma potential are observed, with potential lagging density by ?16°, producing an outward radial transport velocity of ?10?m/s. Mode propagation corresponds to the sum of local E × B and electron diamagnetic drift velocities. Poloidal magnetic field fluctuations project to current filaments carrying peak current densities of ?25 A/cm{sup 2}. An evaluation of parallel electron force balance (Ohm's law) over a fluctuation cycle indicates a significant electromotive component. Interchange drive is also a contributor in the current continuity (vorticity) equation. Thus, the QCM is primarily a separatrix-spanning electron drift-wave with interchange and electromagnetic contributions.

  3. The various manifestations of collisionless dissipation in wave propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benisti, Didier; Morice, Olivier; Gremillet, Laurent [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of an electrostatic wave packet inside a collisionless and initially Maxwellian plasma is always dissipative because of the irreversible acceleration of the electrons by the wave. Then, in the linear regime, the wave packet is Landau damped, so that in the reference frame moving at the group velocity, the wave amplitude decays exponentially with time. In the nonlinear regime, once phase mixing has occurred and when the electron motion is nearly adiabatic, the damping rate is strongly reduced compared to the Landau one, so that the wave amplitude remains nearly constant along the characteristics. Yet, we show here that the electrons are still globally accelerated by the wave packet, and in one dimension, this leads to a non local amplitude dependence of the group velocity. As a result, a freely propagating wave packet would shrink, and therefore, so would its total energy. In more than one dimension, not only does the magnitude of the group velocity nonlinearly vary, but also its direction. In the weakly nonlinear regime, when the collisionless damping rate is still significant compared to its linear value, the group velocity is directed towards the outside of the wave packet and tends to increase its transverse extent, while the opposite is true once the wave is essentially undamped. The impact of the nonlinear variation of the group velocity on the transverse size of the wave packet is quantified, and compared to that induced by the self-focussing due to wave front bowing.

  4. Velocity-Space Diffusion in a Perpendicularly Propagating Electrostatic Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    -@ax(k_~y-wt) in con- midered. When o)Qi and ul 2w/kL, the e q u a t hofmotion may be reduced to r net of dillerence in Fig. 1. Expanding the trajectory about the raumance point, we find that the magnitude of the impulses

  5. Longshore sediment transport rate calculated incorporating wave orbital velocity fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ernest Ray

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study and improve longshore sediment transport rate predictions. Measured total longshore transport in the laboratory was approximately three times greater for plunging breakers than spilling breakers. Three...

  6. Convective heat flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  7. Variables and units in Ocean 420 u zonal velocity (east-west) m/s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    speed m/s Cg group velocity m/s k wave number 1/m frequency 1/s wavelength m T period s kinematic mixed-layer and water below C E Energy density in surface gravity wave J/m 2 #12;Some constants k Von surface height m g gravitational constant m/s 2 a amplitude of wave in sea surface height m f Coriolis

  8. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  9. Velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretation of seismic velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks has been limited, with few exceptions, to models that assume the melt to be distributed either as spheres or as thin films. However, other melt phase geometries, such as interconnected tubes along grain edges, might equally well account for seismic observations if there is a much larger fraction of melt. Seismic velocity and attenuation are estimated in rocks in which the melt phase has the tube geometry, and the results are compared with results expected for the more familiar film model under similar conditions. For a given melt fraction, tubes are found to give moduli intermediate between moduli for rigid spherical inclusions and compliant films. For example, in polycrystalline olivine at 20 kbar the model predicts a decrease in V/sub s/ of 10% and a decrease in V/sub p/ of 5% at 0.05 melt fraction, without considering inelastic relaxation. Shear attenuation appears to be dominated by viscous flow of melt between the tubes and/or films. For olivine the tube model predicts the increment of relaxation due to melt, ..delta mu../..mu.., to be 0.01 at 0.05 melt fraction. Relaxation of the bulk modulus is dominated by flow between melt pockets of different shape, heat flow, and solid-melt phase change. If melt is present, considerable bulk attenuation is expected, although the relaxation may be observable only at long periods, outside the seismic body wave band.

  10. Probing Mercury's Partnering Preferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriority Firm Exchange . .ProbingProbing

  11. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  12. Techniques for improving the readout sensitivity of gravitational wave antennae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolás de Mateo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from astrophysical sources shows promise as a new method to probe extremely energetic phenomena and test the strong field limit of the general theory of relativity. The era of the ...

  13. An upper bound from helioseismology on the stochastic background of gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Siegel; Markus Roth

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The universe is expected to be permeated by a stochastic background of gravitational radiation of astrophysical and cosmological origin. This background is capable of exciting oscillations in solar-like stars. Here we show that solar-like oscillators can be employed as giant hydrodynamical detectors for such a background in the muHz to mHz frequency range, which has remained essentially unexplored until today. We demonstrate this approach by using high-precision radial velocity data for the Sun to constrain the normalized energy density of the stochastic gravitational-wave background around 0.11 mHz. These results open up the possibility for asteroseismic missions like CoRoT and Kepler to probe fundamental physics.

  14. Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  15. Quantitative imaging of the air-water flow fields formed by unsteady breaking waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belden, Jesse (Jesse Levi)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental method for simultaneously measuring the velocity fields on the air and water side of unsteady breaking waves is presented. The method is applied to breaking waves to investigate the physics of the air and ...

  16. Dynamics of excitation pulses with attractive interaction: Kinematic analysis and chemical wave experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbock, Oliver

    Dynamics of excitation pulses with attractive interaction: Kinematic analysis and chemical wave present a theoretical analysis of stacking and destacking wave trains in excitable reaction-diffusion systems with anomalous velocity-wavelength dependence. For linearized dispersion relations, kinematic

  17. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Modanese

    2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for beta to 1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two macroscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  18. 3D Velocity from 3D Doppler Radial Velocity J. L. Barron,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, John

    to compute local 3D velocity (local 3D optical flow). Radial velocity (measured by the Doppler effect3D Velocity from 3D Doppler Radial Velocity J. L. Barron,1 R. E. Mercer,1 X. Chen,1 P. Joe2 1 velocity data and qualitatively on real radial velocity data, obtained from the Doppler radar at Kurnell

  19. Torsional waves propagation in an initially stressed dissipative cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Selim

    2009-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper has been framed to show the effect of damping on the propagation of torsional waves in an initially stressed, dissipative, incompressible cylinder of infinite length. A governing equation has been formulated on Biot's incremental deformation theory. The velocities of torsional waves are obtained as complex ones, in which real part gives the phase velocity of propagation and corresponding imaginary part gives the damping. The study reveals that the damping of the medium has strong effect in the propagation of torsional wave. Since every medium has damping so it is more realistic to use the damped wave equation instead of the undamped wave equation. The study also shows that the velocity of propagation of such waves depend on the presence of initial stress. The influences of damping and initial stresses are shown separately.

  20. Propagation of transverse zero sound in He3and of spin waves in He3-He II solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyerovich, Alex

    Propagation of transverse zero sound in He3and of spin waves in He3-He II solutions E. P. Bashkin absorption may dominate if the wave propagation velocity is close to the Fermi value. It is shown that the propagation of transverse zero sound in He3 is possible even if the wave velocity is somewhat smaller than

  1. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cabaret; P. Béquin; G. Theocharis; V. Andreev; V. E. Gusev; V. Tournat

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  2. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabaret, J; Theocharis, G; Andreev, V; Gusev, V E; Tournat, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control de...

  3. The Nature of Running Penumbral Waves Revealed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Shaun Bloomfield; Andreas Lagg; Sami K. Solanki

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We seek to clarify the nature of running penumbral (RP) waves: are they chromospheric trans-sunspot waves or a visual pattern of upward-propagating waves? Full Stokes spectropolarimetric time series of the photospheric Si I 10827 \\AA line and the chromospheric He I 10830 \\AA multiplet were inverted using a Milne-Eddington atmosphere. Spatial pixels were paired between the outer umbral/inner penumbral photosphere and the penumbral chromosphere using inclinations retrieved by the inversion and the dual-height pairings of line-of-sight velocity time series were studied for signatures of wave propagation using a Fourier phase difference analysis. The dispersion relation for radiatively cooling acoustic waves, modified to incorporate an inclined propagation direction, fits well the observed phase differences between the pairs of photospheric and chromospheric pixels. We have thus demonstrated that RP waves are in effect low-beta slow-mode waves propagating along the magnetic field.

  4. Scour around a circular pile due to oscillatory wave motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Donald Raymond

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ( COLEMAN ) 10 authors. In general the committee on sedimentation has found many inconsistencies in critical velocities necessary for incipient motion and have concluded that when studying incipient motion critical shear stresses should be the governing...- city of the paddle arm on the flywheel. The period is varied through a variable rheostat that controls the speed of the flywheel. The rocker arms can be varied so as to vary the wave from a deep water wave to a shallow water wave. Wave heights...

  5. Tracing ultrafast dynamics of strong fields at plasma-vacuum interfaces with longitudinal proton probing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abicht, F.; Braenzel, J.; Koschitzki, Ch.; Schnürer, M., E-mail: schnuerer@mbi-berlin.de [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Priebe, G. [XFEL GmbH, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Andreev, A. A. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Vavilov State Optical Institut, Birzhevaya line 12, 199064 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg University, 199064 St. Petersburg, University emb.6 (Russian Federation); Nickles, P. V. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Center of Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Sandner, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Technical University Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); ELI-DC International Association AISBL, c/o DESY – StandortZeuthen, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    If regions of localized strong fields at plasma-vacuum interfaces are probed longitudinally with laser accelerated proton beams their velocity distribution changes sensitively and very fast. Its measured variations provide indirectly a higher temporal resolution as deduced from deflection geometries which rely on the explicit temporal resolution of the proton beam at the position of the object to probe. With help of reasonable models and comparative measurements changes of proton velocity can trace the field dynamics even at femtosecond time scale. In longitudinal probing, the very low longitudinal emittance together with a broad band kinetic energy distribution of laser accelerated protons is the essential prerequisite of the method. With a combination of energy and one-dimensional spatial resolution, we resolve fast field changes down to 100 fs. The used pump probe setup extends previous schemes and allows discriminating simultaneously between electric and magnetic fields in their temporal evolution.

  6. Velocity Distributions from Nonextensive Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric I. Barnes; Liliya L. R. Williams; Arif Babul; Julianne J. Dalcanton

    2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    There is no accepted mechanism that explains the equilibrium structures that form in collisionless cosmological N-body simulations. Recent work has identified nonextensive thermodynamics as an innovative approach to the problem. The distribution function that results from adopting this framework has the same form as for polytropes, but the polytropic index is now related to the degree of nonextensiveness. In particular, the nonextensive approach can mimic the equilibrium structure of dark matter density profiles found in simulations. We extend the investigation of this approach to the velocity structures expected from nonextensive thermodynamics. We find that the nonextensive and simulated N-body rms-velocity distributions do not match one another. The nonextensive rms-velocity profile is either monotonically decreasing or displays little radial variation, each of which disagrees with the rms-velocity distributions seen in simulations. We conclude that the currently discussed nonextensive models require further modifications in order to corroborate dark matter halo simulations. (adapted from TeX)

  7. System and method for determining coolant level and flow velocity in a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brisson, Bruce William; Morris, William Guy; Zheng, Danian; Monk, David James; Fang, Biao; Surman, Cheryl Margaret; Anderson, David Deloyd

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiling water reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel having a feedwater inlet for the introduction of recycled steam condensate and/or makeup coolant into the vessel, and a steam outlet for the discharge of produced steam for appropriate work. A fuel core is located within a lower area of the pressure vessel. The fuel core is surrounded by a core shroud spaced inward from the wall of the pressure vessel to provide an annular downcomer forming a coolant flow path between the vessel wall and the core shroud. A probe system that includes a combination of conductivity/resistivity probes and/or one or more time-domain reflectometer (TDR) probes is at least partially located within the downcomer. The probe system measures the coolant level and flow velocity within the downcomer.

  8. Ring diagram analysis of velocity fields within the solar convection zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia; S. C. Tripathy

    1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Ring diagram analysis of solar oscillation power spectra obtained from MDI data is performed to study the velocity fields within the solar convection zone. The three dimensional power spectra are fitted to a model with a Lorentzian profile in frequency and includes the advection of the wave front by horizontal flows to obtain the two horizontal components of flows as a function of the horizontal wave number and radial order of the oscillation modes. This information is then inverted using the OLA and RLS techniques to infer the variation in flow velocity with depth. The resulting velocity fields yield the mean rotation velocity at different latitudes which agrees reasonably with helioseismic estimates. The zonal flow inferred in the outermost layers also appears to be in agreement with other measurements. A meridional flow from equator polewards is found to have an amplitude of about 25 m/s near the surface and the amplitude appears to increase with depth.

  9. Low-frequency fluid waves in fractures and pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korneev, Valeri

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-frequency analytical solutions have been obtained for phase velocities of symmetrical fluid waves within both an infinite fracture and a pipe filled with a viscous fluid. Three different fluid wave regimes can exist in such objects, depending on the various combinations of parameters, such as fluid density, fluid viscosity, walls shear modulus, channel thickness, and frequency. Equations for velocities of all these regimes have explicit forms and are verified by comparisons with the exact solutions. The dominant role of fractures in rock permeability at field scales and the strong amplitude and frequency effects of Stoneley guided waves suggest the importance of including these wave effects into poroelastic theories.

  10. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 65, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2000); P. 232246, 11 FIGS., 2 TABLES. Inversion of azimuthally dependent NMO velocity in transversely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    ) or crack systems. P-wave kinematic signatures in TTI media are controlled by the velocity VP0 kinematic signatures, can be found only from the moveout of shear waves. Using the exact NMO equation, we ) of the symmetry axis. Here, we show that all five parameters can be obtained from az- imuthally varying P-wave NMO

  11. Nonlinear effects resulting from the interaction of a large-scale Alfven wave with a density filament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angles, University of

    through the plasma-sheet boundary layer in the earth's magnetosphere at altitudes of 4­6 Earth radii-scale wave are large enough to produce oscillatory velocities comparable to the electron thermal velocity

  12. Experimental probes of axions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  13. Probing metal solidification nondestructively

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriority Firm ExchangeSynchrotronProbing

  14. Journal of Computational Acoustics, FREQUENCY DOMAIN WAVE PROPAGATION MODELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheen, Dongwoo

    #11;ect de gas, brine or oil and gas-brine or gas-oil pore uids on seismic velocities. NumericalJournal of Computational Acoustics, f c IMACS FREQUENCY DOMAIN WAVE PROPAGATION MODELLING

  15. BENCAP, LLC: CAPSULE VELOCITY TEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meidinger, Brian

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ben Cap, LLC, has a technology that utilizes bebtonite to plug wells. The bentonite is encapsulated in a cardboard capsule, droped down to the bottom of the well where it is allowed to hydrate, causing the bentonite to expand and plug the well. This method of plugging a well is accepted in some, but not all states. This technology can save a significant amount of money when compared to cementing methods currently used to plug and abandon wells. The test objective was to obtain the terminal velocity of the capsule delivery system as it drops through a column of water in a wellbore. Once the terminal velocity is known, the bentonite swelling action can be timed not to begin swelling until it reaches the bottom of the well bore. The results of the test showed that an average speed of 8.93 plus or minus 0.12 ft/sec was achieved by the capsule as it was falling through a column of water. Plotting the data revealed a very linear function with the capsules achieving terminal velocity shortly after being released. The interference of the capsule impacting the casing was not readily apparent in any of the runs, but a siginal sampling anomaly was present in one run. Because the anomaly was so brief and not present in any of the other runs, no solid conclusions could be drawn. Additional testing would be required to determine the effects of capsules impacting a fluid level that is not at surface.

  16. Bose-Einstein Condensates as a Probe for Lorentz Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Don Colladay; Patrick McDonald

    2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of small Lorentz-violating terms on Bose-Einstein condensates are analyzed. We find that there are changes to the phase and shape of the ground-state wave function that vary with the orientation of the trap. In addition, spin-couplings can act as a source for spontaneous symmetry breaking in ferromagnetic condensates making them sensitive probes for fundamental symmetry violation.

  17. Vacuum Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

  18. Probing Multiparton Correlations at CEBAF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianwei Qiu

    1998-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, I explore the possibilities of probing the multiparton correlation functions at CEBAF at its current energy and the energies with its future upgrades.

  19. 1. INTRODUCTION The investigation of whistler waves excitation and propagation in Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    disturbance near antenna was about Bmax/B0~5%. #12;High frequency probe whistler waves (f0=80-200 MHz) were magnetic field disturbance the whistler wave (frequency f0=160 MHz is close to local electron cyclotron and parametric whistler wave interaction with plasma density and magnetic field variations. Amplitude-frequency

  20. Estimating seismic velocities at ultrasonic frequencies in partially saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic velocities in rocks at ultrasonic frequencies depend not only on the degree of saturation but also on the distribution of the fluid phase at various scales within the pore space. Two scales of saturation heterogeneity are important: (1) saturation differences between thin compliant pores and larger stiffer pores, and (2) differences between saturated patches and undersaturated patches at a scale much larger than any pore. The authors propose a formalism for predicting the range of velocities in partially saturated rocks that avoids assuming idealized pore shapes by using measured dry rock velocity versus pressure and dry rock porosity versus pressure. The pressure dependence contains all of the necessary information about the distribution of pore compliance for estimating effects of saturation at the finest scales where small amounts of fluid in the thinnest, most compliant parts of the pore space stiffen the rock in both compression and shear (increasing both P- and S-wave velocities) in approximately the same way that confining pressure stiffens the rock by closing the compliant pores. Large-scale saturation patches tend to increase only the high-frequency bulk modulus by amounts roughly proportional to the saturation. The pore-scale effects will be most important at laboratory and logging frequencies when pore-scale pore pressure gradients are unrelaxed. The patchy-saturation effects can persist even at seismic field frequencies if the patch sizes are sufficiently large and the diffusivities are sufficiently low for the larger-scale pressure gradients to be unrelaxed.

  1. A photoelectron velocity map imaging spectrometer for experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keeffe, P.; Bolognesi, P.; Coreno, M.; Avaldi, L. [CNR-IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo (Italy); Moise, A.; Richter, R.; Cautero, G.; Stebel, L.; Sergo, R. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Pravica, L. [The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia); Ovcharenko, Y. [Institute of Electron Physics, 88017 Uzhgorod (Ukraine)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A velocity map imaging/ion time-of-flight spectrometer designed specifically for pump-probe experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations is described. The in-house built delay line detector can be used in two modes: the high spatial resolution mode and the coincidence mode. In the high spatial resolution mode a kinetic energy resolution of 6% has been achieved. The coincidence mode can be used to improve signal-to-noise ratio for the pump-probe experiments either by using a gate to count electrons only when the laser is present or by recording coincidences with the ion formed in the ionization process.

  2. The critical velocity in the BEC-BCS crossover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf Weimer; Kai Morgener; Vijay Pal Singh; Jonas Siegl; Klaus Hueck; Niclas Luick; Ludwig Mathey; Henning Moritz

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We map out the critical velocity in the crossover from Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superfluidity with ultracold $^{6}$Li gases. A small attractive potential is dragged along lines of constant column density. The rate of the induced heating increases steeply above a critical velocity $v_c$. In the same samples, we measure the speed of sound $v_s$ by exciting density waves and compare the results to the measured values of $v_c$. We perform numerical simulations in the BEC regime and find very good agreement, validating the approach. In the strongly correlated regime, where theoretical predictions only exist for the speed of sound, our measurements of $v_c$ provide a testing ground for theoretical approaches.

  3. Predicting stress-induced velocity anisotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Mukerji, T.; Godfrey, N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Rock Physics Lab.] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Rock Physics Lab.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple transformation, using measured isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S} versus hydrostatic pressure, is presented for predicting stress-induced seismic velocity anisotropy in rocks. The compliant, crack-like portions of the pore space are characterized by generalized compressional and shear compliances that are estimated form the isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S}. The physical assumption that the compliant porosity is crack-like means that the pressure dependence of the generalized compliances is governed primarily by normal tractions resolved across cracks and defects. This allows the measured pressure dependence to be mapped form the hydrostatic stress state to any applied nonhydrostatic stress. Predicted P- and S-wave velocities agree reasonably well with uniaxial stress data for Barre Granite and Massillon Sandstone. While it is mechanically similar to methods based on idealized ellipsoidal cracks, the approach is relatively independent of any assumed crack geometry and is not limited to small crack densities.

  4. The stellar wind velocity field of HD 77581

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manousakis, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The early acceleration of stellar winds in massive stars is poorly constrained. The scattering of hard X-ray photons emitted by the pulsar in the high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 can be used to probe the stellar wind velocity and density profile close to the surface of its supergiant companion HD 77581. We built a high signal-to-noise and high resolution hard X-ray lightcurve of Vela X-1 measured by Swift/BAT over 300 orbital periods of the system and compared it with the predictions of a grid of hydrodynamic simulations. We obtain a very good agreement between observations and simulations for a narrow set of parameters, implying that the wind velocity close to the stellar surface is twice larger than usually assumed with the standard beta law. Locally a velocity gradient of $\\beta\\sim0.5$ is favoured. Even if still incomplete, hydrodynamic simulations are successfully reproducing several observational properties of Vela X-1.

  5. Lagrangian kinematics of steep waves up to the inception of a spilling breaker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shemer, Lev

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal Lagrangian velocities and accelerations at the surface of steep water-waves are studied by Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) for gradually increasing crest heights up to the inception of a spilling breaker. Localized steep waves are excited using wavemaker-generated Peregrine breather-type wave trains. Actual crest and phase velocities are estimated from video recorded sequences of the instantaneous wave shape as well as from surface elevation measurements by wave gauges. Effects of nonlinearity and spectral width on phase velocity, as well as relation between the phase velocity and crest propagation speed are discussed. The inception of a spilling breaker is associated with the horizontal velocity of water particles at the crest attaining that of the crest, thus confirming the kinematic criterion for inception of breaking.

  6. Heat transfer probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

  7. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khlopov, Maxim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs) are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY) models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  8. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  9. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  10. MEMS BASED DOPPLER VELOCITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Robert D.

    .2 Doppler Effect...................................................................................10 2MEMS BASED DOPPLER VELOCITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM A dissertation submitted by Minchul Shin IN PARTIAL micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) based in-air Doppler velocity measurement system using a 1 cm2 planar

  11. Rotating concave eddy current probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis P. (Albuquerque, NM); Walkington, Phil (Albuquerque, NM); Rackow, Kirk A. (Albuquerque, NM); Hohman, Ed (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

  12. Note: Simultaneous measurement of transverse speed and axial velocity from a single optical beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, Erik A.; Briggs, Matthew E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is introduced for simultaneously measuring transverse speed and axial velocity using a single optical beam and a standard photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) sensing architecture. This result is of particular interest given the recent, widespread use of PDV and the fact that optical velocimetry has thus far been limited to measuring motion in one dimension per probe. Further, this result demonstrates that both axial velocity data and transverse speed data (at least qualitative) may be obtained entirely through signal analysis; not requiring hardware modification. This result is immediately relevant to analyses of existing PDV data and to future efforts in high-speed optical velocimetry.

  13. Sonar probing of concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mims, John Hornsby

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) The original signal set. (b) Signal set after changing the salt surface properties by pouring castor oil onto the floor around the transducer. Amplitudes of suspected surface waves between 2 ms and 4 ms are reduced. (sweep = 2 ms/div) . . . . 45 . . . 47... metal mount to the floor or to the wall of the salt. The mount is then filled with either glycerine or castor oil for coupling the acoustic beam from the transducer to the salt, The castor oil or glycerine is used for the coupling fluid since...

  14. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  15. Bubbly Flow Experiment in Channel Using an Optical Probe and Tracking Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Abdul

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    was inserted through a porous media at three superficial gas velocities: 4.6 mm/s, 2.5 mm/s, and 1.4 mm/s. Two techniques were applied in the experiment to measure the bubbly flow: an optical probe and an in-house developed tracking algorithm. Measurements...

  16. Cavitation controlled acoustic probe for fabric spot cleaning and moisture monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for monitoring a fabric. An acoustic probe generates acoustic waves relative to the fabric. An acoustic sensor, such as an accelerometer is coupled to the acoustic probe for generating a signal representative of cavitation activity in the fabric. The generated cavitation activity representative signal is processed to indicate moisture content of the fabric. A feature of the invention is a feedback control signal is generated responsive to the generated cavitation activity representative signal. The feedback control signal can be used to control the energy level of the generated acoustic waves and to control the application of a cleaning solution to the fabric.

  17. Slow Waves in Fractures Filled with Viscous Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korneev, Valeri

    2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Stoneley guided waves in a fluid-filled fracture generally have larger amplitudes than other waves, and therefore, their properties need to be incorporated in more realistic models. In this study, a fracture is modeled as an infinite layer of viscous fluid bounded by two elastic half-spaces with identical parameters. For small fracture thickness, I obtain a simple dispersion equation for wave-propagation velocity. This velocity is much smaller than the velocity of a fluid wave in a Biot-type solution, in which fracture walls are assumed to be rigid. At seismic prospecting frequencies and realistic fracture thicknesses, the Stoneley guided wave has wavelengths on the order of several meters and an attenuation Q factor exceeding 10, which indicates the possibility of resonance excitation in fluid-bearing rocks. The velocity and attenuation of Stoneley guided waves are distinctly different at low frequencies for water and oil. The predominant role of fractures in fluid flow at field scales is supported by permeability data showing an increase of several orders of magnitude when compared to values obtained at laboratory scales. These data suggest that Stoneley guided waves should be taken into account in theories describing seismic wave propagation in fluid-saturated rocks.

  18. Few-cycle optical probe-pulse for investigation of relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwab, M. B.; Sävert, A.; Polz, J.; Schnell, M.; Rinck, T.; Möller, M.; Hansinger, P. [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)] [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Jäckel, O.; Paulus, G. G.; Kaluza, M. C. [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany) [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Veisz, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a few-cycle optical probe-pulse for the investigation of laser-plasma interactions driven by a Ti:sapphire, 30 Terawatt (TW) laser system is described. The probe is seeded by a fraction of the driving laser's energy and is spectrally broadened via self-phase modulation in a hollow core fiber filled with a rare gas, then temporally compressed to a few optical cycles via chirped mirrors. Shadowgrams of the laser-driven plasma wave created in relativistic electron acceleration experiments are presented with few-fs temporal resolution, which is shown to be independent of post-interaction spectral filtering of the probe-beam.

  19. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, S.; Young, J.P.

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0{degree}, an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head. 12 figs.

  20. Shock Initiation of New and Aged PBX 9501 Measured with Embedded Electromagnetic Particle Velocity Gauges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. G. Hill; R. L. Gustavsen; R. R. Alcon; S. A. Sheffield

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used an embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauge technique to measure the shock initiation behavior in PBX 9501 explosive. Up to twelve separate particle velocity wave profile measurements have been made at different depths in a single experiment. These detail the growth from an input shock to a detonation. In addition, another gauge element called a ''shock tracker'' has been used to monitor the progress of the shock front as a function of time and position as it moves through the explosive sample. This provides data similar to that obtained in a traditional explosively driven wedge test and is used to determine the position and time that the wave attains detonation. Run distance-to-detonation vs. input pressure (Pop-plot) data and particle velocity wave profile data have been obtained on new PBX 9501 pressed to densities of 1.826, 1.830, and 1.837 g/cm{sup 3}. In addition, the same measurements were performed on aged material recovered from dismantled W76 and W78 weapons. The input pressure range covered was 3.0 to 5.2 GPa. All results to date show shock sensitivity to be a function only of the initial density and not of age. PBX 9501 shock initiates the same after 17 years in stockpile as it does on the day it is pressed. Particle velocity wave profiles show mixed heterogeneous initiation (growth in the front) and homogeneous initiation (growth behind the front).

  1. Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Satish Pullammanappallil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Sushil J.

    Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Satish to compute travel times for seismic waves. However, in practice, we have to solve the inverse problem: travel synthetic seismic models shows that large population sizes are crit- ical to generating good seismic

  2. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

  3. Acoustic waves in a Biot-type porous snow model: The fast slow wave in light snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidler, Rolf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave velocities, attenuation and reflection coefficients in snow can not be explained by the widely used elastic or viscoelastic models for wave propagation. Instead, Biot's model of wave propagation in porous materials should be used. However, the application of Biot's model is difficult due to the large property space of the underlying porous material. Here we use the properties of ice and air as well as empirical relationships to define the properties of snow as a function of porosity. This reduction allows to predict phase velocities and attenuation of the shear- and compressional-waves as functions of porosity or density. For light snow the peculiarity was found that the velocity of the compressional wave of the first kind is lower than the compressional wave of the second kind that is commonly referred to as the "slow" wave. The reversal of the velocities comes with an increase of attenuation for the first compressional wave. This is in line with the common observation that sound is strongly absorbed af...

  4. Measurements of elastic modulus using laser-induced surface waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, D.J.; Amimoto, S.T.; Gross, R.W.F. [Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Glenn, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, the mechanical testing methods that are utilized for alloys and polymers, e.g., dogbone, rheovibron, etc., are not applicable to thin film structures. We wish to report noncontacting measurements of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity and the elastic modulus applicable to thin films of moderate thickness. An accompanying paper extends this technique to smaller film dimensions. A 15 ns pulsed YAG laser was used as the energy source to thermoelastically excite surface waves. The propagation of the waves was then observed by a second, independent He-Ne laser at a distance from the excitation spot. using the knife edge/beam deflection technique. A cylindrical lens was used to reduce the energy loading of the YAG laser on the sample to avoid damaging the surface of the specimen. The Rayleigh wave velocity is calculated from measurements of the arrival time of the surface wave as a function of distance from the ND:YAG laser spot. The shear modulus, G, can be determined from the measured speed of the surface waves, V, the specimen density, p, and Poisson`s ratio, v, according to the following relationship: V = R(v){sm_bullet}(G/p){sup {1/2}} where R(v), expressed as (0.862 + 1.14v)/(l + v), is the ratio of the Rayleigh wave velocity to the shear wave velocity and ranges from 0.86 to 0.95 Table below lists the measured surface wave velocities and the calculated shear modulus for our experimental results and the published values. Excellent agreement is observed. The depth of the SAW is approximately equal to the SAW wavelength which is approximately the laser spot size. Typically 30 {mu}m spot sizes can be readily achieved. In conclusion, SAW velocities and the modulus of elasticity of various materials have been measured. We have demonstrated that this non-contacting method can be used to characterize moderately thin films.

  5. Nonlinear acoustic wave generation in a three-phase seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kukarkin, A B; Zhileikin, Ya M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of an acoustic wave by two pump sound waves is studied in a three-phase marine sediment that consists of a solid frame and the pore water with air bubbles in it. To avoid shock-wave formation the interaction is considered in the frequency range where there is a significant amount of sound velocity dispersion. Nonlinear equations are obtained to describe the interaction of acoustic waves in the presence of air bubbles. An expression for the amplitude of the generated wave is obtained and numerical analysis of its dependence on distance and on the resonance frequency of bubbles is performed.

  6. Nonlinear acoustic wave generation in a three-phase seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Kukarkin; N. I. Pushkina; Ya. M. Zhileikin

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of an acoustic wave by two pump sound waves is studied in a three-phase marine sediment that consists of a solid frame and the pore water with air bubbles in it. To avoid shock-wave formation the interaction is considered in the frequency range where there is a significant amount of sound velocity dispersion. Nonlinear equations are obtained to describe the interaction of acoustic waves in the presence of air bubbles. An expression for the amplitude of the generated wave is obtained and numerical analysis of its dependence on distance and on the resonance frequency of bubbles is performed.

  7. Scanning Probe AFM Compound Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probe AFM Compound Microscope Scanning Probe AFM Compound Microscope The atomic force microscope (AFM) compound microscope is designed primarily for fluorescence imaging in the...

  8. Electron dynamics in surface acoustic wave devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorn, Adam Leslie

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    -dimensional nanostructures one can create a series of dynamic quantum dots corresponding to the minima of the travelling electric wave, and each dot carries a single electron at the SAW velocity (? 2800 m/s). These devices may be of use in developing future quantum...

  9. Long duration ash probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurley, J.P.; McCollor, D.P.; Selle, S.J.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during soot blowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon. 8 figs.

  10. Long duration ash probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurley, John P. (Grand Forks, ND); McCollor, Don P. (Grand Forks, ND); Selle, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, MN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

  11. Tangential velocity measurement using interferometric MTI radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W.; Mileshosky, Brian P.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Radar systems use time delay measurements between a transmitted signal and its echo to calculate range to a target. Ranges that change with time cause a Doppler offset in phase and frequency of the echo. Consequently, the closing velocity between target and radar can be measured by measuring the Doppler offset of the echo. The closing velocity is also known as radial velocity, or line-of-sight velocity. Doppler frequency is measured in a pulse-Doppler radar as a linear phase shift over a set of radar pulses during some Coherent Processing Interval (CPI). An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity of a target.

  12. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Hambarian, Artak (Yerevan, AM)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  13. Constraints on Neutrino Velocities Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunjie Huo; Tianjun Li; Yi Liao; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Yonghui Qi

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    With a minimally modified dispersion relation for neutrinos, we reconsider the constraints on superluminal neutrino velocities from bremsstrahlung effects in the laboratory frame. Employing both the direct calculation approach and the virtual Z-boson approach, we obtain the generic decay width and energy loss rate of a superluminal neutrino with general energy. The Cohen-Glashow's analytical results for neutrinos with a relatively low energy are confirmed in both approaches. We employ the survival probability instead of the terminal energy to assess whether a neutrino with a given energy is observable or not in the OPERA experiment. Moreover, using our general results we perform systematical analyses on the constraints arising from the Super-Kamiokande and IceCube experiments.

  14. Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia [Department of Geotechnics and Transportation, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai. Johor (Malaysia); Saad, Rosli [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

  15. Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A. Sethian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethian, James A.

    Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A the problem of estimating seismic velocities inside the earth which is necessary for obtaining seismic images in regular Cartesian coordinates. We derive a relation between the true seismic velocities and the routinely

  16. Excitation of fast waves near the mean gyrofrequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, R.C.; McWilliams, R.

    1986-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast waves with frequencies near the mean gyrofrequency (..omega..--(..omega../sub c//sub i/..omega../sub ce/)/sup 1/2/) were excited in a toroidal, magnetized plasma. Experimental measurements were made of wavelengths and phase velocities perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field, and wave energy trajectories in the plasma, varying wave frequency, plasma density, and magnetic field values. Experimental results agree with predictions from the cold-plasma dispersion relation.

  17. Cold Plasma Wave Analysis in Magneto-Rotational Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Umber Sheikh

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to investigate the cold plasma wave properties. The analysis has been restricted to the neighborhood of the pair production region of the Kerr magnetosphere. The Fourier analyzed general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations are dealt under special circumstances and dispersion relations are obtained. We find the $x$-component of the complex wave vector numerically. The corresponding components of the propagation vector, attenuation vector, phase and group velocities are shown in graphs. The direction and dispersion of waves are investigated.

  18. Nonlinear Landau damping of transverse electromagnetic waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsintsadze, N. L. [E. Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, Tbilisi 0171 (Georgia); Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Chaudhary, Rozina [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salam Chair in Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-frequency transverse electromagnetic waves in a collisionless isotropic dusty plasma damp via nonlinear Landau damping. Taking into account the latter we have obtained a generalized set of Zakharov equations with local and nonlocal terms. Then from this coupled set of Zakharov equations a kinetic nonlinear Schroedinger equation with local and nonlocal nonlinearities is derived for special cases. It is shown that the modulation of the amplitude of the electromagnetic waves leads to the modulation instability through the nonlinear Landau damping term. The maximum growth rate is obtained for the special case when the group velocity of electromagnetic waves is close to the dust acoustic velocity.

  19. Assessment of the 296-S-21 Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed to assess the suitability of the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack according to the criteria of ANSI N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted most tests on a 3.67:1 scale model of the stack. CH2MHill also performed some limited confirmatory tests on the actual stack. The tests assessed the capability of the air-monitoring probe to extract a sample representative of the effluent stream. The tests were conducted for the practical combinations of operating fans and addressed: (1) Angular Flow--The purpose is to determine whether the velocity vector is aligned with the sampling nozzle. The average yaw angle relative to the nozzle axis should not be more than 20. The measured values ranged from 5 to 11 degrees on the scale model and 10 to 12 degrees on the actual stack. (2) Uniform Air Velocity--The gas momentum across the stack cross section where the sample is extracted should be well mixed or uniform. The uniformity is expressed as the variability of the measurements about the mean, the coefficient of variance (COV). The lower the COV value, the more uniform the velocity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ?20% across the center two-thirds of the area of the stack. At the location simulating the sampling probe, the measured values ranged form 4 to 11%, which are within the criterion. To confirm the validity of the scale model results, air velocity uniformity measurements were made both on the actual stack and on the scale model at the test ports 1.5 stack diameters upstream of the sampling probe. The results ranged from 6 to 8% COV on the actual stack and 10 to 13% COV on the scale model. The average difference for the eight runs was 4.8% COV, which is within the validation criterion. The fact that the scale model results were slightly higher than the actual stack suggests that the other test results on the scale model are conservative relative to the actual stack. (3) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases--A uniform contaminant concentration in the sampling plane enables the extraction of samples that represent the true concentration. This was first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The fan is a good mixer, so injecting the tracer downstream of the fans provides worst-case results. The acceptance criteria are that (1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and (2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. The results on the scale model at the point simulating the sampling probe ranged from 0.3 to 6 %COV, and the maximum single point deviation from the mean was -10%. (4) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles--Uniformity in contaminant concentration at the sampling probe was further demonstrated using tracer particles large enough to exhibit inertial effects. Particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter were used. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane. The scale model results ranged form 2 to 9%. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack meets the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard.

  20. Dissipative electromagnetic solitary waves in collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borhanian, Jafar [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O.Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of linearly polarized electromagnetic (EM) waves in a collisional plasma is studied using multiple scale perturbation technique in a weakly nonlinear regime. A complex linear dispersion relation and a complex group velocity are obtained for EM waves propagating in a plasma and their dependence on system parameters is investigated. It is shown that the amplitude of EM pulse is governed by an envelope equation similar to a cubic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. A traveling bright solitary wave solution for envelope equation is found, its existence condition in parameter space is explored and variation of its profile with system parameters is manipulated. Monitoring temporal evolution of traveling solitary wave solution provides more insight into the nature of this solution and ensures that depending on the parameters of the system, solitary wave solution may behave like a stationary soliton or may exhibit the behavior of a breathing soliton.

  1. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  2. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Ballard, Sanford (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

  3. Backward wave propagation in left-handed media with isotropic and anisotropic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojahedi, Mohammad

    Backward wave propagation in left-handed media with isotropic and anisotropic permittivity tensors medium is investigated from a purely wave propagation point of view. The functional form for the index-velocity vectors are antiparallel. It is shown that, in the case considered, the backward-wave propagation can

  4. Numerical simulation of inviscid wave-current interaction with an FPSO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Sang-Yun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) responses under wave and current interactions. A higher order boundary element method (HOBEM) was adopted to probe the behavior of an FPSO. Forces and moment of an FPSO were...

  5. Probe Spin-Velocity Dependent New Interactions by Spin Relaxation Times of Polarized $^{3}He$ Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Zhang; G. A. Sun; S. M. Peng; C. B. Fu; Hao Guo; B. Q. Liu; H. Yan

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied how to constrain the $\\alpha\\vec{\\sigma}\\cdot\\vec{v}$ type interactions with the relaxation time of spin polarized noble gases in magnetic fields. Using the longest $T_{2}$ measured in the laboratory and the earth as the source, we obtained constraints on three new interactions. We present a new experimental upper bound to the vector-axial-vector($V_{VA}$) type interaction for ranges between $1\\sim10^{8}$m. In combination with the previous result, we set the most stringent experiment limits on $g_{V}g_{A}$ ranging from $\\sim\\mu m$ to $\\sim10^{8}$m. We improve the laboratory limit to the axial-axial-vector($V_{AA}$) type interaction by $\\sim2$ orders or more for distances below $\\sim1$cm. To our best knowledge, we report the first experiment upper limit on torsion induced by the earth on its surface.

  6. Mapping the nano-Hertz gravitational wave sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil J. Cornish; Rutger van Haasteren

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new method for extracting gravitational wave signals from pulsar timing data. We show that any gravitational wave signal can be decomposed into an orthogonal set of sky maps, with the number of maps equal to the number of pulsars in the timing array. These maps may be used as a basis to construct gravitational wave templates for any type of source, including collections of point sources. A variant of the standard Hellings-Downs correlation analysis is recovered for statistically isotropic signals. The template based approach allows us to probe potential anisotropies in the signal and produce maps of the gravitational wave sky.

  7. On physical interpretation of two dimensional time-correlations regarding time delay velocities and eddy shaping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorczak, N. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Manz, P. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut feur Plasmaphysik, Association Euratom-IPP, 85748Garching (Germany); Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Time delay estimation (TDE) techniques are frequently used to estimate the flow velocity from fluctuating measurements. Tilted structures carried by the flow lead to misinterpretation of the time delays in terms of velocity direction and amplitude. It affects TDE measurements from probes, and is also intrinsically important for beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging measurements. Local eddy shapes estimated from 2D fluctuating field are necessary to gain a more accurate flow estimate from TDE, as illustrated by Langmuir probe array measurements. A least square regression approach is proposed to estimate both flow field and shaping parameters. The technique is applied to a test case built from numerical simulation of interchange fluctuations. The local eddy shape does not only provide corrections for the velocity field but also quantitative information about the statistical interaction mechanisms between local eddies and E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. The technique is then tested on gaz puff imaging data collected at the edge of EAST tokamak plasmas. It is shown that poloidal asymmetries of the fluctuation fields-velocity and eddy shape-are consistent at least qualitatively with a ballooning type of turbulence immersed in a radially sheared equilibrium flow.

  8. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Syahputra, Ahmad [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  9. Moreton Waves and EIT Waves Related to the Flare Events of June 3, 2012 and July 6, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Admiranto, A G; Yus'an, U; Puspitaningrum, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present geometrical and kinematical analysis of Moreton waves and EIT waves observed on June 3, 2012 and Moreton waves observed on July 6, 2012. The Moreton waves were recorded in H$\\alpha$ images of Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) archive and EIT waves obtained from SDO/AIA observations, especially in 193 nm channel. The observed wave of June 3 has angular span of about $70^{\\circ}$ with a broad wave front associated to NOAA active region 11496. It was found that the speed of the wave that started propagating at 17.53 UT is between 950 to 1500 km/s. Related to this wave occurrence, there was solar type II and III radio bursts. The speed of the EIT in this respect about 247 km/sec. On the other hand, the wave of July 6 may be associated to X1.1 class flare that occurred at 23.01 UT around the 11514 active region. From the kinematical analysis, the wave propagated with the initial velocity of about 1180 km/s which is in agreement with coronal shock velocity derived from type II radio burst observati...

  10. Gravitational Waves in G4v

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mead, Carver

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational coupling of the propagation four-vectors of matter wave functions is formulated in flat space-time. Coupling at the momentum level rather than at the "force-law" level greatly simplifies many calculations. This locally Lorentz-invariant approach (G4v) treats electromagnetic and gravitational coupling on an equal footing. Classical mechanics emerges from the incoherent aggregation of matter wave functions. The theory reproduces, to first order beyond Newton, the standard GR results for Gravity-Probe B, deflection of light by massive bodies, precession of orbits, gravitational red shift, and total gravitational-wave energy radiated by a circular binary system. Its predictions of total radiated energy from highly eccentric Kepler systems are slightly larger than those of similar GR treatments. G4v predictions differ markedly from those of GR for the gravitational-wave radiation patterns from rotating massive systems, and for the LIGO antenna pattern. The predicted antenna patterns have been shown t...

  11. Volume203,number2,3 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 19February1993 Transient grating spectroscopy of exciton sound waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    of exciton sound waves in dense exciton fluids Jan A. Leegwater and Shaul Mukamel Department of Chemistry to that of sound waves in an ordinary gas. A method to probe these motions using transient grating with strong pump density may disappear and reap- pear later. The physical mechanism is analogous to that of sound waves

  12. High-pressure sound velocities and elasticity of aluminous MgSiO3 perovskite to 45 GPa: Implications for lateral heterogeneity in Earth's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Jennifer M.

    High-pressure sound velocities and elasticity of aluminous MgSiO3 perovskite to 45 GPa lateral variations of seismic wave speeds in Earth's lower mantle are due at least in part to a chemical, J. M., J. Zhang, J. Shu, S. V. Sinogeikin, and J. D. Bass (2005), High-pressure sound velocities

  13. Quantum probes of timelike naked singularities in $2+1-$ dimensional power - law spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Gurtug; M. Halilsoy; S. Habib Mazharimousavi

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of naked singularities in $2+1-$ dimensional power - law spacetimes in linear Einstein-Maxwell and Einstein-scalar theories sourced by azimuthally symmetric electric field and a self-interacting real scalar field respectively, are considered in view of quantum mechanics. Quantum test fields obeying the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations are used to probe the classical timelike naked singularities developed at $r=0$. We show that when the classically singular spacetimes probed with scalar waves, the considered spacetimes remains singular. However, the spinorial wave probe of the singularity in the metric of a self-interacting real scalar field remains quantum regular. The notable outcome in this study is that the quantum regularity/singularity can not be associated with the energy conditions.

  14. An analysis of salt and moisture deposition on the air sampling probes in the exhaust shaft of the waste isolation pilot plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Gregg Shelton

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at the top of the exhaust shaft. The salt encrustations could potentially interfere with the operation of the air sampling probes. The formation of the salt was not uniform with time or location on the probe surface. Previous studies (Westinghouse Electric... becomes entrained once the gas velocities increase above about 15 m/s. Westinghouse Electric Corporation (1994) detailed a study of the probes conducted from April, 1993 to May, 1994. The probes suspended from Stations A-l, A-2, and A-3 were removed...

  15. Co-existence of whistler waves with kinetic Alfven wave turbulence for the high-beta solar wind plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mithaiwala, Manish; Crabtree, Chris; Ganguli, Gurudas [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5346 (United States); Rudakov, Leonid [Icarus Research Inc., P.O. Box 30780, Bethesda, Maryland 20824-0780 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the dispersion relation for whistler waves is identical for a high or low beta plasma. Furthermore, in the high-beta solar wind plasma, whistler waves meet the Landau resonance with electrons for velocities less than the thermal speed, and consequently, the electric force is small compared to the mirror force. As whistlers propagate through the inhomogeneous solar wind, the perpendicular wave number increases through refraction, increasing the Landau damping rate. However, the whistlers can survive because the background kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence creates a plateau by quasilinear (QL) diffusion in the solar wind electron distribution at small velocities. It is found that for whistler energy density of only {approx}10{sup -3} that of the kinetic Alfven waves, the quasilinear diffusion rate due to whistlers is comparable to KAW. Thus, very small amplitude whistler turbulence can have a significant consequence on the evolution of the solar wind electron distribution function.

  16. Effect of gas velocity on the weakly nonlinear instability of a planar viscous sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Li-Jun, E-mail: yanglijun@buaa.edu.cn; Chen, Pi-Min; Wang, Chen [School of Astronautics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A weakly nonlinear spatial instability of a two-dimensional planar viscous sheet for sinuous disturbances in a co-flowing inviscid gas stream is investigated theoretically, with an emphasis on the effect of the surrounding gas velocity. The solutions of the second-order interface disturbances are derived and the wave deformation has been computed. The results indicate that the second-order surface disturbance of the fundamental sinuous mode is varicose, which causes the thinning and the subsequent breakup of the liquid sheet. The nonlinear behaviors of the planar sheet are quite sensitive to variations in gas-to-liquid velocity ratio. The deviation of the velocity ratio from the value of unity leads to a larger growth rate, a larger second-order initial amplitude, and a shorter breakup length, and therefore enhances the instability. The growth rates predicted by the present nonlinear analysis according to the shortest breakup length are generally smaller than the linear predictions and can better conform to the experimental measures of Barreras et al. [“Linear instability analysis of the viscous longitudinal perturbation on an air-blasted liquid sheets,” Atomization Sprays 11, 139 (2001)]. Furthermore, the wave deformations of the most unstable disturbances are presented. The nonlinear instability of the planar sheet for a fixed velocity difference is performed. An equal increase of the gas and liquid velocity reduces the spatial growth rate and increases the breakup length, but generally has no influences on the second-order initial amplitude and the wavelength of the disturbance.

  17. Hand-held survey probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Hungate, Kevin E. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include an optical sensor to generate data corresponding to a position of the detection probe with respect to a surface; a microprocessor to receive the data; a software medium having code to process the data with the microprocessor and pre-programmed parameters, and making a comparison of the data to the parameters; and an indicator device to indicate results of the comparison. A method of providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include generating output data with an optical sensor corresponding to the relative position with respect to a surface; processing the output data, including comparing the output data to pre-programmed parameters; and indicating results of the comparison.

  18. Minimum and terminal velocities in projectile motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. N. Miranda; S. Nikolskaya; R. Riba

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The motion of a projectile with horizontal initial velocity V0, moving under the action of the gravitational field and a drag force is studied analytically. As it is well known, the projectile reaches a terminal velocity Vterm. There is a curious result concerning the minimum speed Vmin; it turns out that the minimum velocity is lower than the terminal one if V0 > Vterm and is lower than the initial one if V0 < Vterm. These results show that the velocity is not a monotonous function. If the initial speed is not horizontal, there is an angle range where the velocity shows the same behavior mentioned previously. Out of that range, the volocity is a monotonous function. These results come out from numerical simulations.

  19. An investigation of the relationships between mountain waves and clear air turbulence encountered by the XB-70 airplane in the stratosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incrocci, Thomas Paul

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . , . . . ~ . ~ INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND TO THE PROBLEM Theory of Mountain Waves Mountain Waves and Clear Air Turbulence (CAT). Page iv v vi viii The Vertical Propagation and Transfer of Energy of Mountain Waves into the Stratosphere The Influence of Wind... and wave energy under the influence of wind shear (Booker and Bretherton, 1967). A critical level, if it exists, is the level at which the horizontal phase velocity of the wave equals the mean wind speed. If a wave passes through a criti- cal level...

  20. Numerical Analysis of the Internal Kinematics and Dynamics of Three-dimensional Breaking Waves on B. Biausser, S.T. Grilli, P. Frauni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Numerical Analysis of the Internal Kinematics and Dynamics of Three-dimensional Breaking Waves/Navier-Stokes solver. Analysis of wave profiles and kinematics (velocity, vorticity, pressure) are carried out. Keyword the breaking and post-breaking in a three- dimensional numerical wave tank of a solitary wave over a sloping

  1. Free energy in plasmas under wave-induced diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Rax, J.M. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When waves propagate through a bounded plasma, the wave may be amplified or damped at the expense of the plasma kinetic energy. In many cases of interest, the primary effect of the wave is to cause plasma diffusion in velocity and configuration space. In the absence of collisions, the rearrangement of the plasma conserves entropy, as large-grain structures are mixed and fine-grain structures emerge. The maximum extractable energy by waves so diffusing the plasma is a quantity of fundamental interest; it can be defined, but it is difficult to calculate. Through the consideration of specific examples, certain strategies for maximizing energy extraction are identified.

  2. Wave Properties of Isothermal Magneto-Rotational Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Umber Sheikh

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the isothermal plasma wave properties in the neighborhood of the pair production region for the Kerr black hole magnetosphere are discussed. We have considered the Fourier analyzed form of the perturbed general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations whose determinant leads to a dispersion relation. For the special scenario, the $x$-component of the complex wave vectors are numerically calculated. Respective components of the propagation vector, attenuation vector, phase and group velocities are shown in graphs. We have particularly investigated the existence of a Veselago medium and wave behavior (modes of waves dispersion

  3. Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry An interferometer is an instrument that is sensitive to the interference of two or more waves (optical or acoustic). For example, an optical interferometer uses two interfering light beams to measure small length changes. Coda wave interferometry

  4. Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

  5. Nonlinear extraordinary wave in dense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasovitskiy, V. B., E-mail: krasovit@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Turikov, V. A. [Russian University of Peoples’ Friendship (Russian Federation)] [Russian University of Peoples’ Friendship (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Conditions for the propagation of a slow extraordinary wave in dense magnetized plasma are found. A solution to the set of relativistic hydrodynamic equations and Maxwell’s equations under the plasma resonance conditions, when the phase velocity of the nonlinear wave is equal to the speed of light, is obtained. The deviation of the wave frequency from the resonance frequency is accompanied by nonlinear longitudinal-transverse oscillations. It is shown that, in this case, the solution to the set of self-consistent equations obtained by averaging the initial equations over the period of high-frequency oscillations has the form of an envelope soliton. The possibility of excitation of a nonlinear wave in plasma by an external electromagnetic pulse is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  6. Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Cluster Velocity Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suman Bhattacharya; Arthur Kosowsky

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Future microwave sky surveys will have the sensitivity to detect the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal from moving galaxy clusters, thus providing a direct measurement of their line-of-sight peculiar velocity. We show that cluster peculiar velocity statistics applied to foreseeable surveys will put significant constraints on fundamental cosmological parameters. We consider three statistical quantities that can be constructed from a cluster peculiar velocity catalog: the probability density function, the mean pairwise streaming velocity, and the pairwise velocity dispersion. These quantities are applied to an envisioned data set which measures line-of-sight cluster velocities with normal errors of 100 km/s for all clusters with masses larger than $10^{14}$ solar masses over a sky area of up to 5000 square degrees. A simple Fisher matrix analysis of this survey shows that the normalization of the matter power spectrum and the dark energy equation of state can be constrained to better than 10 percent, and the Hubble constant and the primordial power spectrum index can be constrained to a few percent, independent of any other cosmological observations. We also find that the current constraint on the power spectrum normalization can be improved by more than a factor of two using data from a 400 square degree survey and WMAP third-year priors. We also show how the constraints on cosmological parameters changes if cluster velocities are measured with normal errors of 300 km/s.

  7. The jump-off velocity of an impulsively loaded spherical shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chabaud, Brandon M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Jerry S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a constant temperature spherical shell of isotropic, homogeneous, linearly elastic material with density {rho} and Lame coefficients {lambda} and {mu}. The inner and outer radii of the shell are r{sub i} and r{sub o}, respectively. We assume that the inside of the shell is a void. On the outside of the shell, we apply a uniform, time-varying pressure p(t). We also assume that the shell is initially at rest. We want to compute the jump-off time and velocity of the pressure wave, which are the first time after t = 0 at which the pressure wave from the outer surface reaches the inner surface. This analysis computes the jump-off velocity and time for both compressible and incompressible materials. This differs substantially from [3], where only incompressible materials are considered. We will consider the behavior of an impulsively loaded, exponentially decaying pressure wave p(t) = P{sub 0{sup e}}{sup -{alpha}t}, where {alpha} {ge} 0. We notice that a constant pressure wave P(t) = P{sub 0} is a special case ({alpha} = 0) of a decaying pressure wave. Both of these boundary conditions are considered in [3].

  8. Nuclear Physics with Electroweak Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omar Benhar

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the italian theoretical Nuclear Physics community has played a leading role in the development of a unified approach, allowing for a consistent and fully quantitative description of the nuclear response to electromagnetic and weak probes. In this paper I review the main achievements in both fields, point out some of the open problems, and outline the most promising prospects.

  9. Thirteen pump-probe resonances of the sodium D1 line Vincent Wong,* Robert W. Boyd, C. R. Stroud, Jr., Ryan S. Bennink, and Alberto M. Marino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroud, Carlos R.

    four-wave mixing in a three-level V system, electromagnetically induced transparency and optical. A Burleigh WA4500 wavemeter monitors the wavelengths of the fields. The pump and probe fi-degenerate four-wave mixing and saturation in a two-level system, difference-frequency crossing and nondegenerate

  10. *Smith, J. A., 1999: Observations of wind, waves, and the mixed layer: the scaling of surface motion. In The Wind-Driven Air-Sea Interface, edited by M. L. Banner, pp. 231-238. Published

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    velocity scale measured by Doppler sonar to wind friction velocity and the surface Stokes' drift, velocity profiles, and surface fields of radial velocity and acoustic backscatter intensity have been made effects of improved understanding and measurement techniques. The fluxes are linked to both wave dynamics

  11. LISA as a dark energy probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K G Arun; Chandra Kant Mishra; Chris Van Den Broeck; B R Iyer; B S Sathyaprakash; Siddhartha Sinha

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently it was shown that the inclusion of higher signal harmonics in the inspiral signals of binary supermassive black holes (SMBH) leads to dramatic improvements in parameter estimation with the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). In particular, the angular resolution becomes good enough to identify the host galaxy or galaxy cluster, in which case the redshift can be determined by electromagnetic means. The gravitational wave signal also provides the luminosity distance with high accuracy, and the relationship between this and the redshift depends sensitively on the cosmological parameters, such as the equation-of-state parameter $w=p_{\\rm DE}/\\rho_{\\rm DE}$ of dark energy. With a single binary SMBH event at $z < 1$ having appropriate masses and orientation, one would be able to constrain $w$ to within a few percent. We show that, if the measured sky location is folded into the error analysis, the uncertainty on $w$ goes down by an additional factor of 2-3, leaving weak lensing as the only limiting factor in using LISA as a dark energy probe.

  12. Explicit dispersion relations for elastic waves in extremely deformed soft matter with application to nearly incompressible and auxetic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavel Galich; Stephan Rudykh

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the propagation of elastic waves in soft materials subjected to finite deformations. We derive explicit dispersion relations, and apply these results to study elastic wave propagation in (i) nearly incompressible materials such as biological tissues and polymers, and (ii) negative Poisson's ratio or auxetic materials. We find that for nearly incompressible materials transverse wave velocities exhibit strong dependence on direction of propagation and initial strain state, whereas the longitudinal component is not affected significantly until extreme levels of deformations are attained. For highly compressible materials, we show that both pressure and shear wave velocities depend strongly on initial deformation and direction of propagation. When compression is applied, longitudinal wave velocity decreases in positive bulk modulus materials, and increases for negative bulk modulus materials; this is regardless the direction of wave prorogation. We demonstrate that finite deformations influence elastic wave propagation through combinations of induced effective compressibility and stiffness.

  13. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  14. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  15. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D. (Reno, NV); Sulchek, Todd A. (Oakland, CA); Feigin, Stuart C. (Reno, NV)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  16. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  17. Handheld force-controlled ultrasound probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbertson, Matthew Wright

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An hand-held force controlled ultrasound probe has been developed. The controller maintains a prescribed contact force between the probe and a patient's body. The device will enhance the diagnostic capability of free-hand ...

  18. Velocity dispersion and upscaling in a laboratory-simulated VSP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rio, P.; Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Marion, D. [Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France)] [Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory and numerical study was conducted to investigate the impact of scale-dependent seismic wave propagation in randomly layered media, as applied to sonic logs, surface seismic, and vertical seismic profiles (VSPs). Analysis of the laboratory results (1) confirmed the wavelength dependence of velocities inferred from traveltimes, (2) indicated that scale effects can introduce traveltime errors when upscaling from logs to surface seismic and VSPs, and (3) illustrated that erroneous VSP interval velocities can result when layer thicknesses are smaller than about one-tenth of the wavelength. A simple approximate recipe is presented for estimating these traveltimes by successively filtering the medium using a running Backus average and ray theory. The scale-dependent dispersion was also predicted well using a more rigorous invariant imbedding formulation. The predicted traveltimes, using the approximate recipe, compare well with the times observed in the laboratory stack of steel and plastic layers and in numerical studies of stratified media. The dispersion curves predicted by the approximate method also show the overall behavior computed with the more rigorous invariant imbedding formulation.

  19. Electron probe microanalysis in geoscience: a tutorial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gooley, R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tutorial on the history, theory and use of electron probe microanalysis in the geosciences is presented. (ACR)

  20. Probing Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation Dynamics using Correalted AFM and Confocal Ultramicroscopy. Probing Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation...

  1. Robust Autoresonant Excitation in the Plasma Beat-Wave Accelerator R. R. Lindberg,* A. E. Charman, and J. S. Wurtele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedland, Lazar

    scheme is proposed, based on autoresonant phase locking of the Langmuir wave to the slowly chirped beat ponderomotively on the plasma to resonantly excite a large-amplitude, high-phase-velocity plasma wave suitableRobust Autoresonant Excitation in the Plasma Beat-Wave Accelerator R. R. Lindberg,* A. E. Charman

  2. Geophys. J. Znt. (1991) 107, 531-543 Effects of point singularities on shear-wave propagation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Geophys. J. Znt. (1991) 107, 531-543 Effects of point singularities on shear-wave propagation In most directions of propagation in anisotropic solids, seismic shear waves split in regular small to cause conventional cusps on the group-velocity wave surfaces. The effects of propagation near

  3. Wave Propagation in Lipid Monolayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Griesbauer; A. Wixforth; M. F. Schneider

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Sound waves are excited on lipid monolayers using a set of planar electrodes aligned in parallel with the excitable medium. By measuring the frequency dependent change in the lateral pressure we are able to extract the sound velocity for the entire monolayer phase diagram. We demonstrate that this velocity can also be directly derived from the lipid monolayer compressibility and consequently displays a minimum in the phase transition regime. This minimum decreases from v0=170m/s for one component lipid monolayers down to vm=50m/s for lipid mixtures. No significant attenuation can be detected confirming an adiabatic phenomenon. Finally our data propose a relative lateral density oscillation of \\Delta\\rho/\\rho ~ 2% implying a change in all area dependent physical properties. Order of magnitude estimates from static couplings therefore predict propagating changes in surface potential of 1-50mV, 1 unit in pH (electrochemical potential) and 0.01{\\deg}K in temperature and fall within the same order of magnitude as physical changes measured during nerve pulse propagation. These results therefore strongly support the idea of propagating adiabatic sound waves along nerves as first thoroughly described by Kaufmann in 1989 and recently by Heimburg and Jackson, but claimed by Wilke already in 1912.

  4. Modeling velocity dispersion In Gypsy site, Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsaadan, Sami Ibrahim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrepancies in interval velocities estimated from vertical well measurements made with different source central frequencies at Gypsy site could be primarily explained in terms of intrinsic attenuation. Four intervals ...

  5. Heterogeneity and anisotropy of the lithosphere of SE Tibet from surface wave array tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Huajian

    Understanding the geotectonic evolution of the southeastern Tibetan plateau requires knowledge about the structure of the lithosphere. Using data from 77 broadband stations in SW China, we invert Rayleigh wave phase velocity ...

  6. EVALUATION OF EMPIRICAL RELATIONS FOR THE SEA SURFACE ROUGHNESS OF FETCH-LIMITED WIND WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    with an improved description of the wave field. The aim is to find a power law between non-dimensional scaling either the Charnock parameter z0g/u* 2 (with friction velocity u* and gravitational acceleration g

  7. Distances and Metallicities of High- and Intermediate-Velocity Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. P. Wakker

    2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A table is presented that summarizes published absorption line measurements for the high- and intermediate velocity clouds (HVCs and IVCs). New values are derived for N(HI) in the direction of observed probes, in order to arrive at reliable abundances and abundance limits (the HI data are described in Paper II). Distances to stellar probes are revisited and calculated consistently, in order to derive distance brackets or limits for many of the clouds, taking care to properly interpret non-detections. The main conclusions are the following. 1) Absolute abundances have been measured using lines of SII, NI and OI, with the following resulting values: ~0.1 solar for one HVC (complex C), ~0.3 solar for the Magellanic Stream, ~0.5 solar for a southern IVC, and ~ solar for two northern IVCs (the IV Arch and LLIV Arch). Finally, approximate values in the range 0.5-2 solar are found for three more IVCs. 2) Depletion patterns in IVCs are like those in warm disk or halo gas. 3) Most distance limits are based on strong UV lines of CII, SiII and MgII, a few on CaII. Distance limits for major HVCs are >5 kpc, while distance brackets for several IVCs are in the range 0.5-2 kpc. 4) Mass limits for major IVCs are 0.5-8x10^5 M_sun, but for major HVCs they are >10^6 M_sun. 5) The CaII/HI ratio varies by up to a factor 2-5 within a single cloud, somewhat more between clouds. 6) The NaIHI ratio varies by a factor >10 within a cloud, and even more between clouds. Thus, CaII can be useful for determining both lower and upper distance limits, but NaI only yields upper limits.

  8. Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

  9. Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

  10. Interferometry with correlated matter-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oksana I. Streltsova; Alexej I. Streltsov

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Matter-wave interferometry of ultra-cold atoms with attractive interactions is studied at the full many-body level. First, we study how a coherent light-pulse applied to an initially-condensed solitonic system splits it into two matter-waves. The split system looses its coherence and develops correlations with time, and inevitably becomes fragmented due to inter-particle attractions. Next, we show that by re-colliding the sub-clouds constituting the split density together, along with a simultaneous application of the same laser-pulse, one creates three matter-waves propagating with different momenta. We demonstrate that the number of atoms in the sub-cloud with zero-momentum is directly proportional to the degree of fragmentation in the system. This interferometric-based protocol to discriminate, probe, and measure the fragmentation is general and can be applied to ultra-cold systems with attractive, repulsive, short- and long-range interactions.

  11. An Experimental Method for Determining the Time Constants of Capacitive Thin-Film Polymer Humidity sensors at Various Duct Air Velocities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, B.; O'Neal, D.

    outputs in response to step changes in RH and temperature over a range of air velocities. Duct air velocities ofO (stili air). 200. 500. 800, and UOOft/min (0. 1.0, 2.5. 4.1, and 5.6 m/s) were considered along with .step changes in RH of 20%-40% and step.... The duct air velocity was measured with two identical thermal anemometer probes, one in each duct. The anemometers were calibrated with a pitot-static pressure measurement in a low-speed wind tunnel. A secondary cheek was performed by measuring the air...

  12. Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data ĺ Ð 1 ¸ Ö Ò ×¹ Ò ÝÖ¹Ê Ò 2 1 processing algo- rithms normally used to extract water velocity. We present an alternative method for velocity homogeneity precludes the extraction of fish velocities. Water velocities can sometimes still

  13. On the role of spectral resolution in velocity shear layer measurements by Doppler reflectometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Happel, T.; Blanco, E.; Estrada, T. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Association Euratom-Ciemat, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The signal quality of a Doppler reflectometer depends strongly on its spectral resolution, which is influenced by the microwave beam properties and the radius of curvature of the cutoff layer in the plasma. If measured close to a strong perpendicular velocity shear layer, the spectrum of the backscattered signal is influenced by different velocities. This can give rise to two Doppler shifted peaks in the spectrum as observed in TJ-II H-mode plasmas. It is shown by two-dimensional full wave simulations that the two peaks are separable provided the spectral resolution of the system is sufficient. However, if the spectral resolution is poor, the two peaks blend into one and yield an intermediate and incorrect velocity.

  14. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas with non-thermal ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S. [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most studies on dusty plasmas have assumed that electrons and ions follow Maxwellian distributions. However, in the presence of energetic ions, the distribution of ions tends to be non-Maxwellian. It is shown here that the existence of non-thermal ions would increase the phase velocity of a dust-acoustic wave. It is also found that the change in the phase velocity profoundly affects the characteristics of a dust-acoustic solitary wave.

  15. Optical probe with reference fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Chase, Charles L. (Dublin, CA)

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for characterizing tissue includes the steps of generating an emission signal, generating a reference signal, directing the emission signal to and from the tissue, directing the reference signal in a predetermined manner relative to the emission signal, and using the reference signal to compensate the emission signal. In one embodiment compensation is provided for fluctuations in light delivery to the tip of the probe due to cable motion.

  16. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  17. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  18. Studies of laser-driven radiative blast waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, M J; Hansen, J; Edens, A; Ditmire, T; Adams, R; Rambo, P; Ruggles, L; Smith, I; Porter, J

    2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed two sets of experiments looking at laser-driven radiating blast waves. In one set of experiments the effect of a drive laser's passage through a background gas on the hydrodynamical evolution of blast waves was examined. It was found that the laser's passage heats a channel in the gas, creating a region where a portion of the blast wave front had an increased velocity, leading to the formation of a bump-like protrusion on the blast wave. The second set of experiments involved the use of regularly spaced wire arrays to induce perturbations on a blast wave surface. The decay of these perturbations as a function of time was measured for various wave number perturbations and found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  19. Coherent cooling of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave: Wave function and stochastic trajectory approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argonov, V. Yu., E-mail: argonov@poi.dvo.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Pacific Oceanological Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field can suppress packet splitting for some atoms whose specific velocities are in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We demonstrate and explain this effect numerically and analytically. We also demonstrate that the modulated field can not only trap but also cool the atoms. We perform a numerical experiment with a large atomic ensemble having wide initial velocity and energy distributions. During the experiment, most of atoms leave the wave while the trapped atoms have a narrow energy distribution.

  20. Velocity dependence of friction of confined polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Sivebaek; V. N. Samoilov; B. N. J. Persson

    2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the frictional shear stress for both cases. In our simulations, the polymer films are very thin (approx. 3 nm), and the solid walls are connected to a thermostat at a short distance from the polymer slab. Under these circumstances we find that frictional heating effects are not important, and the effective temperature in the polymer film is always close to the thermostat temperature. In the first setup (a), for hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 1400 carbon atoms, the shear stresses are nearly independent of molecular length, but for the shortest hydrocarbon C20H42 the frictional shear stress is lower. In all cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer [case (b)] the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C-atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant increases (abruptly) with increasing sliding velocity (from 6 to 7 layers), leading to a decrease of the friction. Before and after the layering transition, the frictional shear stresses are nearly proportional to the logarithm of sliding velocity. For the longest hydrocarbon (1400 C-atoms) the friction shows no dependence on the sliding velocity, and for the shortest hydrocarbon (20 C-atoms) the frictional shear stress increases nearly linearly with the sliding velocity.

  1. Sheet flow dynamics under monochromatic nonbreaking waves C. Marjolein Dohmen-Janssen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    % of the velocity outside the wave boundary layer. The observations are compared to previous experimental work model for oscillatory flow with enhanced boundary roughness and a two-phase collisional grain flow model measurements of sediment concentrations and grain velocities inside the sheet flow layer under prototype

  2. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

  3. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond Angélil; Prasenjit Saha

    2015-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics - rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches - we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  4. Topological Aspects of Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Valero

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of wave propagation on a manifold X, the characteristic functions are real valued functions on cotangent bundle of X that specify the allowable phase velocities of the waves. For certain classes of differential operators (e.g Maxwell's Equations) the associated characteristic functions have singularities. These singularities account for phenomena like conical refraction and the transformation of longitudinal waves into transversal ones (or viceversa). For a specific class of differential operators on surface, we prove that the singularities of the characteristic functions can be accounted from purely topological considerations. We also prove that there is a natural way to desingularsize the characteristic functions, and observe that this fact and Morse Theory establishes a specific connection between singularities and critical points of these functions. The relation between characteristic functions and differential operators is obtained through what is known as the symbol of the operator. We establish a connection between these symbols and holomorphic vector fields, which will provide us with symbols whose characteristic functions have interesting singularity sets.

  5. VELOCITY-SHEAR-INDUCED MODE COUPLING IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE AND SOLAR WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLASMA HEATING AND MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center, Morse Hall, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh., E-mail: joe.hollweg@unh.edu, E-mail: ekaghash@aer.com, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, A Verisk Analytics Company, 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analytically consider how velocity shear in the corona and solar wind can cause an initial Alfven wave to drive up other propagating signals. The process is similar to the familiar coupling into other modes induced by non-WKB refraction in an inhomogeneous plasma, except here the refraction is a consequence of velocity shear. We limit our discussion to a low-beta plasma, and ignore couplings into signals resembling the slow mode. If the initial Alfven wave is propagating nearly parallel to the background magnetic field, then the induced signals are mainly a forward-going (i.e., propagating in the same sense as the original Alfven wave) fast mode, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; both signals are compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. For an initial Alfven wave propagating obliquely with respect to the magnetic field, the induced signals are mainly forward- and backward-going fast modes, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; these signals are all compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. A backward-going Alfven wave, thought to be important in the development of MHD turbulence, is also produced, but it is very weak. However, we suggest that for oblique propagation of the initial Alfven wave the induced fast-polarized signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave may interact coherently with the initial Alfven wave and distort it at a strong-turbulence-like rate.

  6. air velocity effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transfer velocities. A moving tropical cyclone is an intense source of surface wind stress Chu, Peter C. 4 The exit velocity of a compressed air cannon CERN Preprints...

  7. On the definition of velocity in doubly special relativity theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Kosinski; Pawel Maslanka

    2002-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the definition of particle velocity in doubly relativity theories. The general formula relating velocity and four-momentum of particle is given.

  8. Probes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPoints ofJanoschek

  9. High-velocity clouds: a diverse phenomenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. P. Wakker

    2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution the current state of knowledge about the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) is summarized. Recent progress has shown that the HVCs are a diverse phenomenon. The intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are likely to be part of a Galactic Fountain. The Magellanic Stream is a tidal remnant. HVC complex C (possibly complexes A and GCN) are low-metallicity clouds near the Galaxy; they could be remnants of the formation of the Galaxy or old tidal streams extracted from nearby dwarf galaxies. Having a substantial number of HI HVCs dispersed throughout the Local Group seems incompatible with the observed HI mass function of galaxies. Finally, FUSE finds high-velocity OVI, some of which is clearly associated with HI HVCs, but some which is not.

  10. Wave turbulence served up on a plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Cobelli; Philippe Petitjeans; Agnes Maurel; Vincent Pagneux; Nicolas Mordant

    2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave turbulence in a thin elastic plate is experimentally investigated. By using a Fourier transform profilometry technique, the deformation field of the plate surface is measured simultaneously in time and space. This enables us to compute the wavevector-frequency Fourier ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) spectrum of the full space-time deformation velocity. In the 3D ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) space, we show that the energy of the motion is concentrated on a 2D surface that represents a nonlinear dispersion relation. This nonlinear dispersion relation is close to the linear dispersion relation. This validates the usual wavenumber-frequency change of variables used in many experimental studies of wave turbulence. The deviation from the linear dispersion, which increases with the input power of the forcing, is attributed to weak non linear effects. Our technique opens the way for many new extensive quantitative comparisons between theory and experiments of wave turbulence.

  11. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  12. Lagrangian reconstruction of cosmic velocity fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Lavaux

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a Lagrangian reconstruction method of the velocity field from galaxy redshift catalog that takes its root in the Euler equation. This results in a ``functional'' of the velocity field which must be minimized. This is helped by an algorithm solving the minimization of cost-flow problems. The results obtained by applying this method to cosmological problems are shown and boundary effects happening in real observational cases are then discussed. Finally, a statistical model of the errors made by the reconstruction method is proposed.

  13. Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column Daniel H. E. Dubin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    plasma column with near-Maxwellian velocity distributions. We focus on the z-independent component#12;Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column Daniel H. E. Dubin Department of Physics April 2013; published online 25 April 2013) A kinetic theory of linear electrostatic plasma waves

  14. Shell-instability generated waves by low energy electrons on converging magnetic field lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Shell-instability generated waves by low energy electrons on converging magnetic field lines D of observations of such shell type distributions having positive slope in velocity space at low energies, about 10´cre´au (2006), Shell-instability generated waves by low energy electrons on converging magnetic field lines

  15. Edge ion heating by launched high harmonic fast waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biewer, Theodore

    Edge ion heating by launched high harmonic fast waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment T al., Fusion Technology 30, 1337 (1996)] measures the velocity distribution of ions in the plasma edge power High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) rf heating in helium plasmas, with the poloidal ion temperature

  16. Seismic Ground Motions from a Bolide Shock Wave Charles A. Langston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langston, Charles A.

    -surface layer with low P wave (~0.25 km/s) and S wave (~0.125 km/s) velocities consistent with previously published profiling results in unconsolidated Mississippi embayment sediments. Ground motions are generally/04/2003 ~3:50 UT). Some observers also reported that the bolide was accompanied by a sonic boom and residents

  17. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,2) provide a kinematic description of water waves, which to this point means that the conditionsWater Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves

  18. Using Chandra/LETG spectra to probe stellar coronae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaitee A. J. Hussain; Nancy Brickhouse; Andrea K. Dupree; Adriaan A. van Ballegooijen; Andrew Collier Cameron; Moira Jardine; Jean-Francois Donati

    2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We probe the relationship between surface magnetic fields and the X-ray emitting corona in the rapidly rotating star AB Dor. Circularly polarised spectra have been inverted to produce a surface (photospheric) magnetic field map. This surface map has been extrapolated to model AB Dor's coronal field topology and X-ray light curve. Chandra/LETG light curves of AB Dor from the same epoch show intrinsic variability at the 30% level. Period analysis indicates a fraction of this is due to rotational modulation. We measure velocity shifts in emission line centroids as a function of rotation period and find evidence of rotational modulation (max. vel. ~40+/- 13km/s). This modulation may indicate the presence of a localised X-ray emitting region at mid-to-high latitudes.

  19. Two-dimensional elastic wave propagation in a duraluminum sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cefola, David Paul

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MENTAL PROCEDURE Experimental Design Data Acquisition Data Correction III. DATA PROCESSING 12 12 12 15 16 Wiener Filter Theory Construction of Desired. Wavelet 23 25 Wiener Filter Results 27 Bandpass Filter IV. TRAVELTIME ANALYSIS Wave... perpendicular to strike 2, Duraluminum model used in experiments 1 and 2 Relations between the Rayleigh-, P-, and S-wave velocities in an infinite medium for Poisson's ratio, o-, ranging from 0. 0 to 0. 5 Square root of energy ratios for reflected P- and S-waves...

  20. Gravitational Wave Sources from New Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig J. Hogan

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Forthcoming advances in direct gravitational wave detection from kilohertz to nanohertz frequencies have unique capabilities to detect signatures from or set meaningful constraints on a wide range of new cosmological phenomena and new fundamental physics. A brief survey is presented of the post-inflationary gravitational radiation backgrounds predicted in cosmologies that include intense new classical sources such as first-order phase transitions, late-ending inflation, and dynamically active mesoscopic extra dimensions. LISA will provide the most sensitive direct probes of such phenomena near TeV energies or Terascale. LISA will also deeply probe the broadband background, and possibly bursts, from loops of cosmic superstrings predicted to form in current models of brane inflation.

  1. High strain rate metalworking with vaporizing foil actuator: Control of flyer velocity by varying input energy and foil thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek, A., E-mail: vivek.4@osu.edu; Hansen, S. R.; Daehn, Glenn S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041, College Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically driven rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils can generate a high pressure which can be used to launch flyers at high velocities. Recently, vaporizing foil actuators have been applied toward a variety of impulse-based metal working operations. In order to exercise control over this useful tool, it is imperative that an understanding of the effect of characteristics of the foil actuator on its ability for mechanical impulse generation is developed. Here, foil actuators made out of 0.0508 mm, 0.0762 mm, and 0.127 mm thick AA1145 were used for launching AA2024-T3 sheets of thickness 0.508 mm toward a photonic Doppler velocimeter probe. Launch velocities ranging between 300 m/s and 1100 m/s were observed. In situ measurement of velocity, current, and voltage assisted in understanding the effect of burst current density and deposited electrical energy on average pressure and velocity with foil actuators of various thicknesses. For the pulse generator, geometry, and flyer used here, the 0.0762 mm thick foil was found to be optimal for launching flyers to high velocities over short distances. Experimenting with annealed foil actuators resulted in no change in the temporal evolution of flyer velocity as compared to foil actuators of full hard temper. A physics-based analytical model was developed and found to have reasonable agreement with experiment.

  2. Gravitational Waves in G4v

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver Mead

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational coupling of the propagation four-vectors of matter wave functions is formulated in flat space-time. Coupling at the momentum level rather than at the "force-law" level greatly simplifies many calculations. This locally Lorentz-invariant approach (G4v) treats electromagnetic and gravitational coupling on an equal footing. Classical mechanics emerges from the incoherent aggregation of matter wave functions. The theory reproduces, to first order beyond Newton, the standard GR results for Gravity-Probe B, deflection of light by massive bodies, precession of orbits, gravitational red shift, and total gravitational-wave energy radiated by a circular binary system. Its predictions of total radiated energy from highly eccentric Kepler systems are slightly larger than those of similar GR treatments. G4v predictions differ markedly from those of GR for the gravitational-wave radiation patterns from rotating massive systems, and for the LIGO antenna pattern. The predicted antenna patterns have been shown to be highly distinguishable in the case of continuous gravitational-wave sources, and should therefore be testable as data from Advanced LIGO becomes available over the next few years.

  3. Mechanisms and relationships governing the propagation of pyrolysis and combustion waves along a laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, G I [Institute for Problems in Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationships governing the propagation of pyrolysis and combustion waves along an electric-discharge CO{sub 2}-laser beam in propane and propane - air mixtures were investigated. It was shown that, after the preliminary conversion of propane in the pyrolysis waves, the average velocity of the combustion wave along the laser beam increases by a factor of 6 - 7. It was established that the velocity of the combustion wave along the beam is proportional to the chain-branching rate constant and that the wave appears as a result of consecutive ignition of the mixture along the beam (analogous to an electric breakdown wave). (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Entangled quantum probes for dynamical environmental noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo A. C. Rossi; Matteo G. A. Paris

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the use of entangled qubits as quantum probes to characterize the dynamical noise induced by complex environments. In particular, we show that entangled probes improve estimation of the correlation time for a broad class of environmental noises compared to any sequential strategy involving single qubit preparation. The effect is present when the noise is faster than a threshold value, a regime which may always be achieved by tuning the coupling between the quantum probe and the environment inducing the noise. Our scheme exploits time-dependent sensitivity of quantum systems to decoherence and does not require dynamical control on the probes. We derive the optimal interaction time and the optimal probe preparation, showing that it corresponds to multiqubit GHZ states when entanglement is useful. We also show robustness of the scheme against depolarization or dephasing of the probe, and discuss simple measurements approaching optimal precision.

  5. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanton, Philip L. (Bernalillo County, NM); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Crump, Jr., O. B. (Albuquerque, NM); Bonzon, Lloyd L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  6. PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP By NATHAN ANDREW WEBER PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP Thesis Approved: _______________________________________ Thesis Advisor the air speed transducer mount and the Plexiglas model of the heat pump. Ipseng Iu and myself worked side

  7. INNOVATIVE EDDY CURRENT PROBE FOR MICRO DEFECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Telmo G.; Vilaca, Pedro; Quintino, Luisa [IDMEC, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos, Jorge dos [GKSS, Max-Planck-Street 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Rosado, Luis [IST, UTL, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the development of an innovative eddy current (EC) probe, and its application to micro-defects on the root of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The new EC probe presents innovative concept issues, allowing 3D induced current in the material, and a lift-off independence. Validation experiments were performed on aluminium alloys processed by FSW. The results clearly show that the new EC probe is able to detect and sizing surface defects about 60 microns depth.

  8. A MAGNETIC CALIBRATION OF PHOTOSPHERIC DOPPLER VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Sun, Xudong [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The zero point of measured photospheric Doppler shifts is uncertain for at least two reasons: instrumental variations (from, e.g., thermal drifts); and the convective blueshift, a known correlation between intensity and upflows. Accurate knowledge of the zero point is, however, useful for (1) improving estimates of the Poynting flux of magnetic energy across the photosphere, and (2) constraining processes underlying flux cancellation, the mutual apparent loss of magnetic flux in closely spaced, opposite-polarity magnetogram features. We present a method to absolutely calibrate line-of-sight (LOS) velocities in solar active regions (ARs) near disk center using three successive vector magnetograms and one Dopplergram coincident with the central magnetogram. It exploits the fact that Doppler shifts measured along polarity inversion lines (PILs) of the LOS magnetic field determine one component of the velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field, and optimizes consistency between changes in LOS flux near PILs and the transport of transverse magnetic flux by LOS velocities, assuming that ideal electric fields govern the magnetic evolution. Previous calibrations fitted the center-to-limb variation of Doppler velocities, but this approach cannot, by itself, account for residual convective shifts at the limb. We apply our method to vector magnetograms of AR 11158, observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and find clear evidence of offsets in the Doppler zero point in the range of 50-550 m s{sup -1}. In addition, we note that a simpler calibration can be determined from an LOS magnetogram and Dopplergram pair from the median Doppler velocity among all near-disk-center PIL pixels. We briefly discuss shortcomings in our initial implementation, and suggest ways to address these. In addition, as a step in our data reduction, we discuss the use of temporal continuity in the transverse magnetic field direction to correct apparently spurious fluctuations in resolution of the 180 Degree-Sign ambiguity.

  9. PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: scanning probe microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focus on stainless steels. Dr. An is an internationally recognized expert on scanning probe microscopy, such as atomic force microscopy and scanning ... Last Updated:...

  11. Solids Fraction Measurement with a Reflective Fiber Optic Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seachman, S.M.; Yue, P.C.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method has been developed to extract solids fraction information from a reflective fiber optic probe. The commercially available reflective fiber optic probe was designed to measure axial particle velocity (both up and down directions). However, the reflected light intensity measured is related to particle size and particle concentration. A light reflection model is used to relate the reflected light intensity to solids fraction. In this model we assume that the reflected light intensity is a fixed fraction, K1, of the total light intensity lost in penetration of a solid layer. Also, the solids fraction is related to particle concentration, N, in the light path, by N = K2 (1- ?), where (1-?) is the solids fraction. The parameters K1 and K2 are determined through a calibration and curve fitting procedure. This paper describes this procedure and the steps taken to derive the values of K1 and K2. It is proposed that the reflective fiber optic can be used for real time measurement of solids fraction in a circulating fluid bed.

  12. Design, Assembly, and Testing of a Photon Doppler Velocimetry Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Robert M; Cox, Brian C; Daykin, Edward P; DeVore, Douglas O; Esquibel, David L; Frayer, Daniel K; Frogget, Brent C; Gallegos, Cenobio H; Kaufman, Morris I; McGillivray, Kevin D; Romero, Vincent T; Briggs, Matthew E; Furlanetto, Michael R; Holtkamp, David B; Pazuchanics, Peter; Primas, Lori E; Shinas, Michael A

    2011-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel fiber-optic probe measures the velocity distribution of an imploding surface along many lines of sight. Reflected light from each spot on the moving surface is Doppler shifted with a small portion of this light propagating backwards through the launching fiber. The reflected light is mixed with a reference laser in a technique called photon Doppler velocimetry, providing continuous time records. Within the probe, a matrix array of 56 single-mode fibers sends light through an optical relay consisting of three types of lenses. Seven sets of these relay lenses are grouped into a close-packed array allowing the interrogation of seven regions of interest. A six-faceted prism with a hole drilled into its center directs the light beams to the different regions. Several types of relay lens systems have been evaluated, including doublets and molded aspheric singlets. The optical design minimizes beam diameters and also provides excellent imaging capabilities. One of the fiber matrix arrays can be replaced by an imaging coherent bundle. This close-packed array of seven relay systems provides up to 476 beam trajectories. The pyramid prism has its six facets polished at two different angles that will vary the density of surface point coverage. Fibers in the matrix arrays are angle polished at 8{sup o} to minimize back reflections. This causes the minimum beam waist to vary along different trajectories. Precision metrology on the direction cosine trajectories is measured to satisfy environmental requirements for vibration and temperature.

  13. A Fisheye Lens as a Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frogget, B C; Cox, B C; DeVore, D O; Esquibel, D L; Frayer, D K; Furlanetto, M R; Holtkamp, D B; Kaufman, M I; Malone, R M

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fisheye lens design is used as a miniature probe to measure the velocity distribution of an imploding surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed and scattered back along each beam on the surface, is Doppler shifted by the moving surface and collected into the launching fiber. The received light is mixed with reference laser light in each optical fiber in a technique called photonic Doppler velocimetry, providing a continuous time record. An array of single-mode optical fibers sends laser light through the fisheye lens. The lens consists of an index-matching positive element, two positive doublet groups, and two negative singlet elements. The optical design minimizes beam diameters, physical size, and back reflections for excellent signal collection. The fiber array projected through the fisheye lens provides many measurement points of surface coverage over a hemisphere with very little crosstalk. The probe measures surface movement with only a small encroachment into the center of the cavity. The fiber array is coupled to the index-matching element using index-matching gel. The array is bonded and sealed into a blast tube for ease of assembly and focusing. This configuration also allows the fiber array to be flat polished at a common object plane. In areas where increased measurement point density is desired, the fibers can be close packed. To further increase surface density coverage, smaller-diameter cladding optical fibers may be used.

  14. the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of optical pulses in fibres with a travelling refractive-index-change wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamova, M S; Zolotovskii, Igor' O; Sementsov, Dmitrii I [Ul'yanovsk State University, Ul'yanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamics of soliton-like wave packets in fibres with a travelling refractive-index-change wave is studied. It is shown that both a soliton-like propagation regime of a pulse and a self-compression regime in the region of normal group velocity dispersion are possible. It is also shown that in the case of a copropagating or counterpropagating pulse and optically inhomogeneous wave nonreciprocal effects appear. (solitons)

  16. The propagation of waves in Einstein's unified field theory as shown by two exact solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Antoci

    2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of waves in two space dimensions exhibited by two exact solutions to the field equations of Einstein's unified field theory is investigated under the assumption that the metric s_{ik} is the one already chosen by Kursunoglu and by H\\'ely in the years 1952-1954. It is shown that, for both exact solutions, with this choice of the metric the propagation of the waves occurs in the wave zone with the fundamental velocity (ds^2=0).

  17. Global well-posedness of the 3-D full water wave problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sijue Wu

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of global in time existence and uniqueness of solutions of the 3-D infinite depth full water wave problem. We show that the nature of the nonlinearity of the water wave equation is essentially of cubic and higher orders. For any initial interface that is sufficiently small in its steepness and velocity, we show that there exists a unique smooth solution of the full water wave problem for all time, and the solution decays at the rate $1/t$.

  18. Imaging the lithosphere beneath NE Tibet: teleseismic P and S body wave tomography incorporating surface wave starting models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunn, Ceri; Roecker, Steven W.; Tilmann, Frederik J.; Priestley, Keith F.; Heyburn, Ross; Sandvol, Eric A.; Ni, James F.; Chen, Yongshun John; Zhao, Wenjin; INDEPTH IV Team

    2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    ; Priestley&Tilmann 2009). In the absence of any prior information about the distribution of wave velocities in the crust, investigators generally use either station corrections de- rived from average residuals (e.g. Frederiksen et al. 1998; Graeber et al...

  19. Enhancing the efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with the tapered refractive index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong Lingbao; Hou Zhiling; Jing Jian [School of Science and Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Assessment, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Jin Haibo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Du Chaohai [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear analysis of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) based on anomalous Doppler effect in a slab waveguide is presented. A method of tapered refractive index (TRI) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the TRI method can significantly enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM with the frequency ranging from the microwave to terahertz band. The effect of beam velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread suppresses the efficiency significantly, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be introduced by the TRI method.

  20. Surface electromagnetic wave equations in a warm magnetized quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chunhua; Yang, Weihong [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China); Wu, Zhengwei, E-mail: wuzw@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Center of Low Temperature Plasma Application, Yunnan Aerospace Industry Company, Kunming, 650229 Yunnan (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the single-fluid plasma model, a theoretical investigation of surface electromagnetic waves in a warm quantum magnetized inhomogeneous plasma is presented. The surface electromagnetic waves are assumed to propagate on the plane between a vacuum and a warm quantum magnetized plasma. The quantum magnetohydrodynamic model includes quantum diffraction effect (Bohm potential), and quantum statistical pressure is used to derive the new dispersion relation of surface electromagnetic waves. And the general dispersion relation is analyzed in some special cases of interest. It is shown that surface plasma oscillations can be propagated due to quantum effects, and the propagation velocity is enhanced. Furthermore, the external magnetic field has a significant effect on surface wave's dispersion equation. Our work should be of a useful tool for investigating the physical characteristic of surface waves and physical properties of the bounded quantum plasmas.

  1. Nonlinear Hydromagnetic Wave Support of a Stratified Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kudoh; S. Basu

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform numerical simulations of nonlinear MHD waves in a gravitationally stratified molecular cloud that is bounded by a hot and tenuous external medium. We study the relation between the strength of the turbulence and various global properties of a molecular cloud, within a 1.5-dimensional approximation. Under the influence of a driving source of Alfvenic disturbances, the cloud is lifted up by the pressure of MHD waves and reaches a steady-state characterized by oscillations about a new time-averaged equilibrium state. The nonlinear effect results in the generation of longitudinal motions and many shock waves; however, the wave kinetic energy remains predominantly in transverse, rather than longitudinal, motions. There is an approximate equipartition of energy between the transverse velocity and fluctuating magnetic field (aspredicted by small-amplitude theory) in the region of the stratified cloud which contains most of the mass; however, this relation breaks down in the outer regions, particularly near the cloud surface, where the motions have a standing-wave character. This means that the Chandrasekhar-Fermi formula applied to molecular clouds must be significantly modified in such regions. Models of an ensemble of clouds show that, for various strengths of the input energy, the velocity dispersion in the cloud $\\sigma \\propto Z^{0.5}$, where $Z$ is a characteristic size of the cloud.Furthermore, $\\sigma$ is always comparable to the mean Alfven velocity of the cloud, consistent with observational results.

  2. Decay of helical Kelvin waves on a quantum vortex filament

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A., E-mail: rav@knights.ucf.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816-1364 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of helical Kelvin waves moving along a quantum vortex filament driven by a normal fluid flow. We employ the vector form of the quantum local induction approximation (LIA) due to Schwarz. For an isolated filament, this is an adequate approximation to the full Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov dynamics. The motion of such Kelvin waves is both translational (along the quantum vortex filament) and rotational (in the plane orthogonal to the reference axis). We first present an exact closed form solution for the motion of these Kelvin waves in the case of a constant amplitude helix. Such solutions exist for a critical wave number and correspond exactly to the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, so perturbations of such solutions either decay to line filaments or blow-up. This leads us to consider helical Kelvin waves which decay to line filaments. Unlike in the case of constant amplitude helical solutions, the dynamics are much more complicated for the decaying helical waves, owing to the fact that the rate of decay of the helical perturbations along the vortex filament is not constant in time. We give an analytical and numerical description of the motion of decaying helical Kelvin waves, from which we are able to ascertain the influence of the physical parameters on the decay, translational motion along the filament, and rotational motion, of these waves (all of which depend nonlinearly on time). One interesting finding is that the helical Kelvin waves do not decay uniformly. Rather, such waves decay slowly for small time scales, and more rapidly for large time scales. The rotational and translational velocity of the Kelvin waves depend strongly on this rate of decay, and we find that the speed of propagation of a helical Kelvin wave along a quantum filament is large for small time while the wave asymptotically slows as it decays. The rotational velocity of such Kelvin waves along the filament will increase over time, asymptotically reaching a finite value. These decaying Kelvin waves correspond to wave number below the critical value for the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, and hence our results on the Schwarz quantum LIA correspond exactly to what one would expect from prior work on the Donnelly-Glaberson instability.

  3. Analytical modeling of elastic-plastic wave behavior near grain boundaries in crystalline materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loomis, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greenfield, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swift, Damian [LLNL; Peralta, Pedro [ASU

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that changes in material properties across an interface will produce differences in the behavior of reflected and transmitted waves. This is seen frequently in planar impact experiments, and to a lesser extent, oblique impacts. In anisotropic elastic materials, wave behavior as a function of direction is usually accomplished with the aid of velocity surfaces, a graphical method for predicting wave scattering configurations. They have expanded this method to account for inelastic deformation due to crystal plasticity. The set of derived equations could not be put into a characteristic form, but instead led to an implicit problem. to overcome this difficulty an algorithm was developed to search the parameters space defined by a wave normal vector, particle velocity vector, and a wave speed. A solution was said to exist when a set from this parameter space satisfied the governing vector equation. Using this technique they can predict the anisotropic elastic-plastic velocity surfaces and grain boundary scattering configuration for crystalline materials undergoing deformation by slip. Specifically, they have calculated the configuration of scattered elastic-plastic waves in anisotropic NiAl for an incident compressional wave propagating along a <111> direction and contacting a 45 degree inclined grain boundary and found that large amplitude transmitted waves exist owing to the fact that the wave surface geometry forces it to propagate near the zero Schmid factor direction <100>.

  4. P- and S-body wave tomography of the state of Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Leiph

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P- and S-body wave travel times collected from stations in and near the state of Nevada were inverted for P-wave velocity and the Vp/Vs ratio. These waves consist of Pn, Pg, Sn and Sg, but only the first arriving P and S waves were used in the inversion. Travel times were picked by University of Nevada Reno colleagues and were culled for inclusion in the tomographic inversion. The resulting tomographic model covers the entire state of Nevada to a depth of {approx}90 km; however, only the upper 40 km indicate relatively good resolution. Several features of interest are imaged including the Sierra Nevada, basin structures, and low velocities at depth below Yucca Mountain. These velocity structure images provide valuable information to aide in the interpretation of geothermal resource areas throughout the state on Nevada.

  5. Wave-induced chaos in a continuously fed unstirred reactor John H. Merkin,"Valery Petrov,bStephen K. Scottc*and Kenneth Showalterb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Showalter, Kenneth

    Wave-induced chaos in a continuously fed unstirred reactor John H. Merkin,"Valery Petrov,bStephen K of a constant-velocity constant-form reaction wave that traverses the reaction domain, leaving behind, allowing further wave events to be initiated, which then propagate into the `recovered' region. The chaotic

  6. Laboratory measurements of the temporal and cross-shore variation of the wave-induced bed stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukumaran, Ashok

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed laboratory measurements of horizontal velocity above a rough, fixed, impermeable slope were made to determine the effect of varying wave conditions on the shear stress in the swash zone. The research involved the design, construction...

  7. MERIT Pump/Probe Data OutlineOutline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    MERIT Pump/Probe Data Analysis OutlineOutline The pump/probe program Particle detector response correction Pump/probe analysis results NFMCC Collaboration Meeting , LBNL, January 26, 2009 Ilias Efthymiopoulos - CERN #12;The pump/probe program #12;The pump/probe program Use of the CERN PS flexibility

  8. In-situ spectrophotometric probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, W.S.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrophotometric probe is described for in situ absorption spectra measurements comprising a first optical fiber carrying light from a remote light source, a second optical fiber carrying light to a remote spectrophotometer, the proximal ends of the first and second optical fibers parallel and co-terminal, a planoconvex lens to collimate light from the first optical fiber, a reflecting grid positioned a short distance from the lens to reflect the collimated light back to the lens for focusing on the second optical fiber. The lens is positioned with the convex side toward the optical fibers. A substrate for absorbing analyte or an analyte and reagent mixture may be positioned between the lens and the reflecting grid. 5 figs.

  9. Photon wave function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwo Bialynicki-Birula

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, the photon wave function exists as long as it can be precisely defined and made useful.

  10. Covariant nucleon wave function with S, D, and P-state components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franz Gross, G. Ramalho, M. T. Pena

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Expressions for the nucleon wave functions in the covariant spectator theory (CST) are derived. The nucleon is described as a system with a off-mass-shell constituent quark, free to interact with an external probe, and two spectator constituent quarks on their mass shell. Integrating over the internal momentum of the on-mass-shell quark pair allows us to derive an effective nucleon wave function that can be written only in terms of the quark and diquark (quark-pair) variables. The derived nucleon wave function includes contributions from S, P and D-waves.

  11. Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang, E-mail: liuqf@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

  12. The transverse and rotational motions of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, bus 2400, B-3001 Herverlee (Belgium); Soler, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Verth, G., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves have now been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere. With modern instruments, they have now been detected in the chromosphere, interface region, and corona. The key purpose of this paper is to show that kink waves do not only involve purely transverse motions of solar magnetic flux tubes, but the velocity field is a spatially and temporally varying sum of both transverse and rotational motion. Taking this fact into account is particularly important for the accurate interpretation of varying Doppler velocity profiles across oscillating structures such as spicules. It has now been shown that, as well as bulk transverse motions, spicules have omnipresent rotational motions. Here we emphasize that caution should be used before interpreting the particular MHD wave mode/s responsible for these rotational motions. The rotational motions are not necessarily signatures of the classic axisymmetric torsional Alfvén wave alone, because kink motion itself can also contribute substantially to varying Doppler velocity profiles observed across these structures. In this paper, the displacement field of the kink wave is demonstrated to be a sum of its transverse and rotational components, both for a flux tube with a discontinuous density profile at its boundary, and one with a more realistic density continuum between the internal and external plasma. Furthermore, the Doppler velocity profile of the kink wave is forward modeled to demonstrate that, depending on the line of sight, it can either be quite distinct or very similar to that expected from a torsional Alfvén wave.

  13. Comment on "Pulsar Velocities and Neutrino Oscillations"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. -Z. Qian

    1997-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent Letter, Kusenko and Segre proposed a new mechanism to explain the observed proper motions of pulsars. Their mechanism was based on the asymmetric neutrino emission induced by neutrino oscillations in the protoneutron star magnetic field. In this note I point out that their estimate of the asymmetry in the neutrino emission is incorrect. A proper calculation shows that their mechanism at least requires a magnetic field of 10**16 G in order to produce the observed average pulsar velocity.

  14. On Pulsar Velocities from Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Birkel; Ramon Toldra

    1997-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been recently suggested that magnetically affected neutrino oscillations inside a cooling protoneutron star, created in a supernova explosion, could explain the large proper motion of pulsars. We investigate whether this hypothesis is in agreement with the observed properties of pulsars and find that present data disfavor the suggested mechanism. The relevance of our results for other models proposed to understand the origin of pulsar velocities is also discussed.

  15. AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A SURGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)] [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a surge on 2010 November 13. Due to the magnetic flux cancelation, some surges formed in the source active region (AR). The strongest surge produced our studied event. The surge was deflected by the nearby loops that connected to another AR, and disrupted the overlying loops that slowly expanded and eventually evolved into a weak coronal mass ejection (CME). The surge was likely associated with the core of the CME. The EUV wave happened after the surge deflected. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the deflected surge. The wave propagated in a narrow angular extent, mainly in the ejection direction of the surge. The close timing and location relations between the EUV wave and the surge indicate that the wave was closely associated with the CME. The wave had a velocity of 310-350 km s{sup -1}, while the speeds of the surge and the expanding loops were about 130 and 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. All of the results suggest that the EUV wave was a fast-mode wave and was most likely triggered by the weak CME.

  16. Horizon effects with surface waves on moving water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Germain Rousseaux; Philippe Maissa; Christian Mathis; Pierre Coullet; Thomas G. Philbin; Ulf Leonhardt

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface waves on a stationary flow of water are considered, in a linear model that includes the surface tension of the fluid. The resulting gravity-capillary waves experience a rich array of horizon effects when propagating against the flow. In some cases three horizons (points where the group velocity of the wave reverses) exist for waves with a single laboratory frequency. Some of these effects are familiar in fluid mechanics under the name of wave blocking, but other aspects, in particular waves with negative co-moving frequency and the Hawking effect, were overlooked until surface waves were investigated as examples of analogue gravity [Sch\\"utzhold R and Unruh W G 2002 Phys. Rev. D 66 044019]. A comprehensive presentation of the various horizon effects for gravity-capillary waves is given, with emphasis on the deep water/short wavelength case kh>>1 where many analytical results can be derived. A similarity of the state space of the waves to that of a thermodynamic system is pointed out.

  17. Radial velocities of southern visual multiple stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokovinin, Andrei [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Pribulla, Theodor [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 059 60 Tatranská Lomnica (Slovakia); Fischer, Debra, E-mail: atokovinin@ctio.noao.edu, E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk, E-mail: debra.fischer@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution spectra of visual multiple stars were taken in 2008–2009 to detect or confirm spectroscopic subsystems and to determine their orbits. Radial velocities of 93 late-type stars belonging to visual multiple systems were measured by numerical cross-correlation. We provide the individual velocities, the width, and the amplitude of the Gaussians that approximate the correlations. The new information on the multiple systems resulting from these data is discussed. We discovered double-lined binaries in HD 41742B, HD 56593C, and HD 122613AB, confirmed several other known subsystems, and constrained the existence of subsystems in some visual binaries where both components turned out to have similar velocities. The orbits of double-lined subsystems with periods of 148 and 13 days are computed for HD 104471 Aa,Ab and HD 210349 Aa,Ab, respectively. We estimate individual magnitudes and masses of the components in these triple systems and update the outer orbit of HD 104471 AB.

  18. Thermodynamics of D-brane Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kiritsis; T. R. Taylor

    1999-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the dynamics and thermodynamics of particle and D-brane probes moving in non-extremal black hole/brane backgrounds. When a probe falls from asymptotic infinity to the horizon, it transforms its potential energy into heat, $TdS$, which is absorbed by the black hole in a way consistent with the first law of thermodynamics. We show that the same remains true in the near-horizon limit, for BPS probes only, with the BPS probe moving from AdS infinity to the horizon. This is a quantitative indication that the brane-probe reaching the horizon corresponds to thermalization in gauge theory. It is shown that this relation provides a way to reliably compute the entropy away from the extremal limit (towards the Schwarzschild limit).

  19. Rugged fiber optic probe for raman measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA); Toole, Jr., William R. (Aiken, SC); Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical probe for conducting light scattering analysis is disclosed. The probe comprises a hollow housing and a probe tip. A fiber assembly made up of a transmitting fiber and a receiving bundle is inserted in the tip. A filter assembly is inserted in the housing and connected to the fiber assembly. A signal line from the light source and to the spectrometer also is connected to the filter assembly and communicates with the fiber assembly. By using a spring-loaded assembly to hold the fiber connectors together with the in-line filters, complex and sensitive alignment procedures are avoided. The close proximity of the filter assembly to the probe tip eliminates or minimizes self-scattering generated by the optical fiber. Also, because the probe can contact the sample directly, sensitive optics can be eliminated.

  20. Scale effects on velocity dispersion: From ray to effective medium theories in stratified media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, D. (Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France)); Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Rockphysics Lab.)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave propagation in stratified media may be explained by ray theory, effective medium theory, or scattering theory depending on the scales of wavelength and layer spacing. To effectively integrate and use seismic data ate different frequencies and widely varying scales, it is essential to understand the domain of applicability of long and short wavelength behavior and the transition between them. A joint experimental and theoretical study was conducted to investigate velocity behavior at the transition from ray theory to effective medium theory in stratified media. Velocity measurements were performed at 50 and 500 kHz on periodic media composed of steel and plastic discs. The ratio of wavelength to layer spacing, [lambda]/d, spanned more than two orders of magnitude between 0.1 and 50, and the volume fraction of steel ranged from 9 to 89 percent by volume. The results confirm that velocities in stratified media depend on composition and are controlled by the ratio of wavelength to layer spacing. Velocities in the short wavelength limit are generally faster than velocities in the long wavelength limit. The authors find that transition from ray to effective medium approximations occurs over a narrow range of [lambda]/d at a value of approximately 10. The amount of velocity change increases with impedance contrast, but the value of [lambda]/d at the transition is generally independent of the composition of the stratified medium. The numerically simulated waveforms are in close agreement with the experimentally observed delayed first arrival in the long wavelength limit and with the reduced amplitudes at the transition from short to long wavelength regime.

  1. On the velocity-strengthening behavior of dry friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Brener, Efim A; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The onset of frictional instabilities, e.g. earthquakes nucleation, is intimately related to velocity-weakening friction, in which the frictional resistance of interfaces decreases with increasing slip velocity. While this frictional response has been studied extensively, much less attention has been given to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, in spite of its importance for various aspects of frictional phenomena such as the propagation speed of interfacial rupture fronts and the amount of stored energy released by them. In this note we suggest that a crossover from steady-state velocity-weakening friction at small slip velocities to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction at higher velocities might be a generic feature of dry friction. We further argue that while thermally activated rheology naturally gives rise to logarithmic steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, a crossover to stronger-than-logarithmic strengthening might take place at higher slip velocities, possibly accompanied by...

  2. Hard probes of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Arrington; D. W. Higinbotham; G. Rosner; M. Sargsian

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is providing a complete description of the structure of atomic nuclei. While mean-field calculations provide detailed information on the nuclear shell structure for a wide range of nuclei, they do not capture the complete structure of nuclei, in particular the impact of small, dense structures in nuclei. The strong, short-range component of the nucleon-nucleon potential yields hard interactions between nucleons which are close together, generating a high-momentum tail to the nucleon momentum distribution, with momenta well in excess of the Fermi momentum. This high-momentum component of the nuclear wave-function is one of the most poorly understood parts of nuclear structure. Utilizing high-energy probes, we can isolate scattering from high-momentum nucleons, and use these measurements to examine the structure and impact of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations. Over the last decade we have moved from looking for evidence of such short-range structures to mapping out their strength in nuclei and examining their isospin structure. This has been made possible by high-luminosity and high-energy accelerators, coupled with an improved understanding of the reaction mechanism issues involved in studying these structures. We review the general issues related to short-range correlations, survey recent experiments aimed at probing these short-range structures, and lay out future possibilities to further these studies.

  3. Effects of quintessence on holographic p-wave superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Songbai Chen; Qiyuan Pan; Jiliang Jing

    2012-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a holographic p-wave superconductor model in the background of quintessence AdS black hole with an SU(2) Yang-Mills gauge field and then probe the effects of quintessence on the holographic p-wave superconductor. We investigate the relation between the critical temperature and the state parameter of quintessence, and present the numerical results for electric conductivity. It is shown that the condensation of the vector field becomes harder as the absolute value of the state parameter increases. Unlike the scalar condensate in the s-wave model, the condensation of the vector field in p-wave model can occur in the total value range of the state parameter $w_q$ of quintessence. These results could help us know more about holographic superconductor and dark energy.

  4. "Nonrelativistic" kinematics: Particles or waves?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Madsen Houlrik; Germain Rousseaux

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinematics of particles refer to events and tangent vectors, while that of waves refer to dual gradient planes. Special relativity [1-3] applies to both objects alike. Here we show that spacetime exchange symmetry [7] implicit in the SIdefinition of length based on the universal constant c has profound consequences at low velocities. Galilean physics, exact in the limit c \\to \\infty, is mirrored by a dual so-called Carrollian superluminal kinematics [4-6] exact in the limit c \\to 0. Several new results follow. The Galilean limit explains mass conservation in Newtonian mechanics, while the dual limit is a kinematical prerequisite for wavelike tachyonic motion [8, 9]. As an example, the Land\\'e paradox [19, 20] of waveparticle duality has a natural resolution within special relativity in terms of superluminal, particlelike waves. It is emphasized that internal particle energy mc^2 can not be ignored, while kinetic energy leads to an extended Galilei group. We also demonstrate that Maxwell's equations have magnetic and electric limits covariant under Galilean and Carrollian symmetry.

  5. Wave fronts, pulses and wave trains in photoexcited superlattices behaving as excitable or oscillatory media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arana, J I; Grahn, H T

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Undoped and strongly photoexcited semiconductor superlattices with field-dependent recombination behave as excitable or oscillatory media with spatially discrete nonlinear convection and diffusion. Infinitely long, dc-current-biased superlattices behaving as excitable media exhibit wave fronts with increasing or decreasing profiles, whose velocities can be calculated by means of asymptotic methods. These superlattices can also support pulses of the electric field. Pulses moving downstream with the flux of electrons can be constructed from their component wave fronts, whereas pulses advancing upstream do so slowly and experience saltatory motion: they change slowly in long intervals of time separated by fast transitions during which the pulses jump to the previous superlattice period. Photoexcited superlattices can also behave as oscillatory media and exhibit wave trains.

  6. Wave fronts, pulses and wave trains in photoexcited superlattices behaving as excitable or oscillatory media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Arana; L. L. Bonilla; H. T. Grahn

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Undoped and strongly photoexcited semiconductor superlattices with field-dependent recombination behave as excitable or oscillatory media with spatially discrete nonlinear convection and diffusion. Infinitely long, dc-current-biased superlattices behaving as excitable media exhibit wave fronts with increasing or decreasing profiles, whose velocities can be calculated by means of asymptotic methods. These superlattices can also support pulses of the electric field. Pulses moving downstream with the flux of electrons can be constructed from their component wave fronts, whereas pulses advancing upstream do so slowly and experience saltatory motion: they change slowly in long intervals of time separated by fast transitions during which the pulses jump to the previous superlattice period. Photoexcited superlattices can also behave as oscillatory media and exhibit wave trains.

  7. Internal Wave Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Manikandan S.

    Internal waves are a ubiquitous and significant means of momentum and energy transport in the oceans, atmosphere, and astrophysical bodies. Here, we show that internal wave propagation in nonuniform density stratifications, ...

  8. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J.

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123–130). This ...

  9. A Langmuir Probe Diagnostic for Use in Inhomogeneous, Time-Varying Plasmas Produced by High-Energy Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, J R; Emig, J A; Fournier, K B; Jenkins, P P; Trautz, K M; Seiler, S W; Davis, J F

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Langmuir probes (LP) are used extensively to characterize plasma environments produced by radio frequency, pulsed plasma thrusters, and laser ablation. We discuss here the development of a LP diagnostic to examine high-density, high-temperature inhomogeneous plasmas such as those that can be created at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility. We have configured our diagnostic to examine the velocity of the plasma expanding from the target. We observe velocities of approximately 16-17 cm/{micro}s, with individual LP currents displaying complex structures, perhaps due to the multiple atomic species and ionization states that exist.

  10. Shock initiation studies of low density HMX using electromagnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress gauges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Alcon, R.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Graham, R.A.; Anderson, M.U. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress rate gauges have been used to measure the shock response of low density octotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) (1.24 &/cm{sup 3}). In experiments done at LANL, magnetic particle velocity gauges were located on both sides of the explosive. In nearly identical experiments done at SNL, PVDF stress rate gauges were located at the same positions so both particle velocity and stress histories were obtained for a particular experimental condition. Unreacted Hugoniot data were obtained and an EOS was developed by combining methods used by Hayes, Sheffield and Mitchell (for describing the Hugoniot of HNS at various densities) with Hermann`s P-{alpha} model. Using this technique, it is only necessary to know some thermodynamic constants or the Hugoniot of the initially solid material and the porous material sound speed to obtain accurate unreacted Hugoniots for the porous explosive. Loading and reaction paths were established in the stress-particle velocity plane for some experimental conditions. This information was used to determine a global reaction rate of {approx} 0.13 {mu}s{sup {minus}1} for porous HMX shocked to 0.8 GPa. At low input stresses the transmitted wave profiles had long rise times (up to 1 {mu}s) due to the compaction processes.

  11. Ultraslow propagation of matched pulses by four-wave mixing in an atomic vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Boyer; C. F. McCormick; E. Arimondo; P. D. Lett

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed the ultraslow propagation of matched pulses in nondegenerate four-wave mixing in a hot atomic vapor. Probe pulses as short as 70 ns can be delayed by a tunable time of up to 40 ns with little broadening or distortion. During the propagation, a probe pulse is amplified and generates a conjugate pulse which is faster and separates from the probe pulse before getting locked to it at a fixed delay. The precise timing of this process allows us to determine the key coefficients of the susceptibility tensor. The presence of gain in this system makes this system very interesting in the context of all-optical information processing.

  12. Bragg grating rogue wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degasperis, Antonio; Aceves, Alejandro B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the rogue wave solution of the classical massive Thirring model, that describes nonlinear optical pulse propagation in Bragg gratings. Combining electromagnetically induced transparency with Bragg scattering four-wave mixing, may lead to extreme waves at extremely low powers.

  13. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    , known as parametric sub- harmonic instability, results generally when a disturbance of one frequency imparts energy to disturbances of half that frequency.13,14 Generally, a plane periodic internal wave, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  14. Nonlinear theory of ionic sound waves in a hot quantum-degenerate electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinov, A. E., E-mail: dubinov-ae@yandex.ru; Sazonkin, M. A., E-mail: figma@mail.r [Sarov State Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A collisionless nonmagnetized e-p-i plasma consisting of quantum-degenerate gases of ions, electrons, and positrons at nonzero temperatures is considered. The dispersion equation for isothermal ionic sound waves is derived and analyzed, and an exact expression is obtained for the linear velocity of ionic sound. Analysis of the dispersion equation has made it possible to determine the ranges of parameters in which nonlinear solutions in the form of solitons should be sought. A nonlinear theory of isothermal ionic sound waves is developed and used for obtaining and analyzing the exact solution to the system of initial equations. Analysis has been carried out by the method of the Bernoulli pseudopotential. The ranges of phase velocities of periodic ionic sound waves and soliton velocities are determined. It is shown that in the plasma under investigation, these ranges do not overlap and that the soliton velocity cannot be lower than the linear velocity of ionic sound. The profiles of physical quantities in a periodic wave and in a soliton are constructed, as well as the dependences of the velocity of sound and the critical velocity on the ionic concentration in the plasma. It is shown that these velocities increase with the ion concentration.

  15. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

  16. Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

  17. Application of a fiber optic probe to the hydrodynamic study of an industrial fluidized bed furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saberi, B.; Shakourzadeh, K. [Technical Univ. of Compiegne (France); Militzer, J. [Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic probe technique is used to establish the hydrodynamic characteristics of an industrial scale (0.9 m internal diameter and 2.5 m tall) bubbling fluidized bed. This measurement technique allows for the bubbling phenomenon to be studied locally. Bubble parameters such as size, velocity and frequency can be measured with an adequate accuracy. This, however, is not a straight forward procedure, since among other things the shape of the bubble and the position at which fiber intercepts the bubble are unknown. This requires a statistical treatment of the data and the use of a correction factor. A geometrical and statistical analysis of the bubble/probe interactions shows that the correction factor is approximately unitary and thus the bubble size distribution can be obtained directly from the statistical treatment of the results of relatively large number of series of measurements. In addition, sampling rate and sample duration have to be determined as a function of the bubble size and velocity. Several combinations of sampling time and sampling rate have been tested allowing for the best combination of these parameters to be determined. After treatment of the acquired signals, the mean bubble size and velocity were calculated. The results obtained were compared to the measured expansion of the bed and the overall gas flow rate. This confirmed the accuracy of the measurements and the usefulness of this technique to establish the hydrodynamics of bubbling fluidized beds.

  18. WAVE MIXING SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert William

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is that due to the Doppler effect in gaseous media.velocity due to the Doppler shift effect. In solid state

  19. Simple Scalings for Various Regimes of Electron Acceleration in Surface Plasma Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riconda, C; Vialis, T; Grech, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Different electron acceleration regimes in the evanescent field of a surface plasma wave are studied by considering the interaction of a test electron with the high-frequency electromagnetic field of a surface wave. The non-relativistic and relativistic limits are investigated. Simple scalings are found demonstrating the possibility to achieve an efficient conversion of the surface wave field energy into electron kinetic energy. This mechanism of electron acceleration can provide a high-frequency pulsed source of relativistic electrons with a well defined energy. In the relativistic limit, the most energetic electrons are obtained in the so-called electromagnetic regime for surface waves. In this regime the particles are accelerated to velocities larger than the wave phase velocity, mainly in the direction parallel to the plasma-vacuum interface.

  20. Probing Signal Design for Power System Identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierre, John W.; Zhou, Ning; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hauer, John F.; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mittelstadt, William

    2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the design of effective input signals for low-level probing of power systems. In 2005, 2006, and 2008 the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) conducted four large-scale system wide tests of the western interconnected power system where probing signals were injected by modulating the control signal at the Celilo end of the Pacific DC intertie. A major objective of these tests is the accurate estimation of the inter-area electromechanical modes. A key aspect of any such test is the design of an effective probing signal that leads to measured outputs rich in information about the modes. This paper specifically studies low-level probing signal design for power-system identification. The paper describes the design methodology and the advantages of this new probing signal which was successfully applied during these tests. This probing input is a multi-sine signal with its frequency content focused in the range of the inter-area modes. The period of the signal is over two minutes providing high-frequency resolution. Up to 15 cycles of the signal are injected resulting in a processing gain of 15. The resulting system response is studied in the time and frequency domains. Because of the new probing signal characteristics, these results show significant improvement in the output SNR compared to previous tests.

  1. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial...

  2. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Abstract: The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the...

  3. Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Mass Spectrometry: A New Approach...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Mass Spectrometry: A New Approach for Airborne Particle Analysis. Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Mass Spectrometry: A New Approach for Airborne...

  4. Scanning Probe Direct-Write of Germanium Nanostructures. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probe Direct-Write of Germanium Nanostructures. Scanning Probe Direct-Write of Germanium Nanostructures. Abstract: Bottom-up nanostructure synthesis has played a pivotal role in...

  5. Unexplored Aspect of Velocity of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhijit Biswas; Krishnan RS Mani

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the post-Maxwellian era, sensing that the tide of discoveries in electromagnetim indicated a decline of the mechanical view, Einstein replaced Newton's three absolutes -- space, time and mass, with a single one, the velocity of light. The magnitude of the velocity of light was first determined and proven to be finite independently by Ole Romer and Bradley in the eighteenth century. In the nineteenth century, Fizeau carried out the first successful measurement of the speed of light using an earthbound apparatus. Thereafter, many earthbound experiments were conducted for its determination till 1983, when its magnitude was frozen at a fixed value after it was determined up to an accuracy level of a fraction of a meter per second. Einstein considered the speed of light derived from terrestrial experiments, to be the limiting speed of all natural phenomena. Einstein stated in connection with his general relativity theory that light rays could curve only when the velocity of propagation of light varies with position. Experiments have been conducted to prove the phenomenon of light deflection to higher and higher accuracy levels, but none so far to determine the speed of light at locations closer to the sun. To verify some essential aspects of general relativity, NASA had commendably planned many costly experiments. Hence, NASA can now be expected to expeditiously plan and execute the low cost experiment proposed here, so as to conclusively verify the effect of the solar gravitational field on the speed of light, as regards the important predictions of Einstein's theory of gravitation and of its remodeled form -- the Remodeled Relativity Theory, which retained and incorporated only experimentally proven concepts and principles.

  6. An overview of branes in the plane wave background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostas Skenderis; Marika Taylor

    2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an overview of D-branes in the maximally supersymmetric plane wave background of IIB supergravity. We start by reviewing the results of the probe analysis. We then present the open string analysis and show how certain spacetime symmetries are restored using worldsheet symmetries. We discuss the construction of these branes as boundary states and summarize what is known about the dual gauge theory description.

  7. Interference effects in tunnelling of "cat" wave packet states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Sokolovski

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse tunnelling of a single particle, whose initial state is given by a superposition of spatially separated wave packet modes. It is shown that "pile up" of different components the scatterer may change the tunnelling probabilities, making such states a convenient tool for probing the barrier's scattering times. Interference effects arising in resonance tunnelling in are studied in detail. The analysis allows us to gain further insight into the origin of interference effects in scattering of several identical particles.

  8. Characterization of Fiber Optic CMM Probe System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.W.Swallow

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a study completed on the fiber optic probe system that is a part of the Werth optical CMM. This study was necessary due to a lack of documentation from the vendor for the proper use and calibration of the fiber probe, and was performed in support of the Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung (LIGA) development program at the FM&T. As a result of this study, a better understanding of the fiber optic probe has been developed, including guidelines for its proper use and calibration.

  9. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  10. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  11. Velocity-selected molecular pulses produced by an electric guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C.; Motsch, M.; Chervenkov, S.; Buuren, L. D. van; Zeppenfeld, M.; Pinkse, P. W. H.; Rempe, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrostatic velocity filtering is a technique for the production of continuous guided beams of slow polar molecules from a thermal gas. We extended this technique to produce pulses of slow molecules with a narrow velocity distribution around a tunable velocity. The pulses are generated by sequentially switching the voltages on adjacent segments of an electric quadrupole guide synchronously with the molecules propagating at the desired velocity. This technique is demonstrated for deuterated ammonia (ND{sub 3}), delivering pulses with a velocity in the range of 20-100 m/s and a relative velocity spread of (16{+-}2)% at full width at half maximum. At velocities around 60 m/s, the pulses contain up to 10{sup 6} molecules each. The data are well reproduced by Monte Carlo simulations, which provide useful insight into the mechanisms of velocity selection.

  12. Anisotropic wave propagation in nematic liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Biscari; Antonio DiCarlo; Stefano S. Turzi

    2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the fact that quantitative experimental data have been available for more than forty years now, nematoacoustics still poses intriguing theoretical and experimental problems. In this paper, we prove that the main observed features of acoustic wave propagation through a nematic liquid crystal cell -- namely, the anisotropy of sound velocity and its frequency dependence -- may be plausibly explained by a first-gradient continuum theory characterized by a hyperelastic anisotropic response from an evolving relaxed configuration. We compare and contrast our proposal with a competing theory where the liquid crystal is modeled as an isotropically compressible, anisotropic second-gradient fluid.

  13. Seismic Technology Adapted to Analyzing and Developing Geothermal Systems Below Surface-Exposed High-Velocity Rocks Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardage, Bob A; DeAngelo, Michael V; Ermolaeva, Elena; Hardage, Bob A; Remington, Randy; Sava, Diana; Wagner, Donald; Wei, Shuijion

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of our research was to develop and demonstrate seismic data-acquisition and data-processing technologies that allow geothermal prospects below high-velocity rock outcrops to be evaluated. To do this, we acquired a 3-component seismic test line across an area of exposed high-velocity rocks in Brewster County, Texas, where there is high heat flow and surface conditions mimic those found at numerous geothermal prospects. Seismic contractors have not succeeded in creating good-quality seismic data in this area for companies who have acquired data for oil and gas exploitation purposes. Our test profile traversed an area where high-velocity rocks and low-velocity sediment were exposed on the surface in alternating patterns that repeated along the test line. We verified that these surface conditions cause non-ending reverberations of Love waves, Rayleigh waves, and shallow critical refractions to travel across the earth surface between the boundaries of the fast-velocity and slow-velocity material exposed on the surface. These reverberating surface waves form the high level of noise in this area that does not allow reflections from deep interfaces to be seen and utilized. Our data-acquisition method of deploying a box array of closely spaced geophones allowed us to recognize and evaluate these surface-wave noise modes regardless of the azimuth direction to the surface anomaly that backscattered the waves and caused them to return to the test-line profile. With this knowledge of the surface-wave noise, we were able to process these test-line data to create P-P and SH-SH images that were superior to those produced by a skilled seismic data-processing contractor. Compared to the P-P data acquired along the test line, the SH-SH data provided a better detection of faults and could be used to trace these faults upward to the boundaries of exposed surface rocks. We expanded our comparison of the relative value of S-wave and P-wave seismic data for geothermal applications by inserting into this report a small part of the interpretation we have done with 3C3D data across Wister geothermal field in the Imperial Valley of California. This interpretation shows that P-SV data reveal faults (and by inference, also fractures) that cannot be easily, or confidently, seen with P-P data, and that the combination of P-P and P-SV data allows VP/VS velocity ratios to be estimated across a targeted reservoir interval to show where an interval has more sandstone (the preferred reservoir facies). The conclusion reached from this investigation is that S-wave seismic technology can be invaluable to geothermal operators. Thus we developed a strong interest in understanding the direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources, particularly vertical vibrators, because if it can be demonstrated that direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources can be used as effectively as the direct-S modes produced by horizontal-force sources, geothermal operators can acquire direct-S data across many more prospect areas than can be done with horizontal-force sources, which presently are limited to horizontal vibrators. We include some of our preliminary work in evaluating direct-S modes produced by vertical-force sources.

  14. Experimental investigation of velocity biasing in laser Doppler anemometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiedner, Brian Gregory

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tech University; Chair of Advisory Commettee: Dr. Gerald L. Morrison The effects of several velocity bias reduction schemes were invest- igated using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer and counter type (burst) signal processors. Amongst these schemes... of Sample Size on Effects of Sample Size on Effects of Sample Size on Effects of Sample Size on Velocity and Reynolds Stresses Axial Mean Velocity Radial Mean Velocity Axial Turbulence Intensity Radial Turbulence Intensity Axial/Radial Correlation...

  15. Sound Wave in Vortex with Sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soumen Basak

    2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Komar's definition, we give expressions for the mass and angular momentum of a rotating acoustic black hole. We show that the mass and angular momentum so defined, obey the equilibrium version of the first law of Black Hole thermodynamics. We also show that when a phonon passes by a vortex with a sink, its trajectory is bent. The angle of bending of the sound wave to leading order is quadratic in $A/cb$ and $B/cb$, where $b$ is the impact parameter and $A$ and $B$ are the parameters in the velocity of the fluid flow. The time delay in the propagation of sound wave which to first order depends only on $B/c^2$ and is independent of $A$.

  16. Characteristics of transverse waves in chromospheric mottles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Jess, D. B.; Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Center, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Center (SP2RC), University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Morton, R. J. [Mathematics and Information Science, Northumbria University, Camden Street, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Christian, D. J., E-mail: dkuridze01@qub.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data obtained by the high temporal and spatial resolution Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope, we investigate at an unprecedented level of detail transverse oscillations in chromospheric fine structures near the solar disk center. The oscillations are interpreted in terms of propagating and standing magnetohydrodynamic kink waves. Wave characteristics including the maximum transverse velocity amplitude and the phase speed are measured as a function of distance along the structure's length. Solar magnetoseismology is applied to these measured parameters to obtain diagnostic information on key plasma parameters (e.g., magnetic field, density, temperature, flow speed) of these localized waveguides. The magnetic field strength of the mottle along the ?2 Mm length is found to decrease by a factor of 12, while the local plasma density scale height is ?280 ± 80 km.

  17. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHALLOW WATER WAVES: LINEAR ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin [Institute for Advanced Study, School of Natural Sciences, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Spitkovsky, Anatoly, E-mail: heng@ias.ed, E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.ed [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a linear analysis of inviscid, incompressible, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shallow water systems. In spherical geometry, a generic property of such systems is the existence of five wave modes. Three of them (two magneto-Poincare modes and one magneto-Rossby mode) are previously known. The other two wave modes are strongly influenced by the magnetic field and rotation, and have substantially lower angular frequencies; as such, we term them 'magnetostrophic modes'. We obtain analytical functions for the velocity, height, and magnetic field perturbations in the limit that the magnitude of the MHD analogue of Lamb's parameter is large. On a sphere, the magnetostrophic modes reside near the poles, while the other modes are equatorially confined. Magnetostrophic modes may be an ingredient in explaining the frequency drifts observed in Type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars.

  18. Mother templates for gravitational wave chirps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Sathyaprakash

    2000-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Templates used in a search for binary black holes and neutron stars in gravitational wave interferometer data will have to be computed on-line since the computational storage and retrieval costs for the template bank are too expensive. The conventional dimensionless variable $T=(c^3/Gm)t,$ where $m$ is the total mass of a binary, in the time-domain and a not-so-conventional velocity-like variable $v=(\\pi Gm f)^{1/3}$ in the Fourier-domain, render the phasing of the waves independent of the total mass of the system enabling the construction of {\\it mother templates} that depend only on the mass ratio of a black hole binary. Use of such mother templates in a template bank will bring about a reduction in computational costs up to a factor of 10 and a saving on storage by a factor of 100.

  19. WAVE PROPAGATION AND JET FORMATION IN THE CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heggland, L.; Hansteen, V. H.; Carlsson, M. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); De Pontieu, B., E-mail: lars.heggland@astro.uio.no [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Organization ADBS, Building 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of numerical simulations of wave propagation and jet formation in solar atmosphere models with different magnetic field configurations. The presence in the chromosphere of waves with periods longer than the acoustic cutoff period has been ascribed to either strong inclined magnetic fields, or changes in the radiative relaxation time. Our simulations include a sophisticated treatment of radiative losses, as well as fields with different strengths and inclinations. Using Fourier and wavelet analysis techniques, we investigate the periodicity of the waves that travel through the chromosphere. We find that the velocity signal is dominated by waves with periods around 5 minutes in regions of strong, inclined field, including at the edges of strong flux tubes where the field expands, whereas 3 minute waves dominate in regions of weak or vertically oriented fields. Our results show that the field inclination is very important for long-period wave propagation, whereas variations in the radiative relaxation time have little effect. Furthermore, we find that atmospheric conditions can vary significantly on timescales of a few minutes, meaning that a Fourier analysis of wave propagation can be misleading. Wavelet techniques take variations with time into account and are more suitable analysis tools. Finally, we investigate the properties of jets formed by the propagating waves once they reach the transition region, and find systematic differences between the jets in inclined-field regions and those in vertical field regions, in agreement with observations of dynamic fibrils.

  20. The scientific potential of space-based gravitational wave detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan R. Gair

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The millihertz gravitational wave band can only be accessed with a space-based interferometer, but it is one of the richest in potential sources. Observations in this band have amazing scientific potential. The mergers between massive black holes with mass in the range 10 thousand to 10 million solar masses, which are expected to occur following the mergers of their host galaxies, produce strong millihertz gravitational radiation. Observations of these systems will trace the hierarchical assembly of structure in the Universe in a mass range that is very difficult to probe electromagnetically. Stellar mass compact objects falling into such black holes in the centres of galaxies generate detectable gravitational radiation for several years prior to the final plunge and merger with the central black hole. Measurements of these systems offer an unprecedented opportunity to probe the predictions of general relativity in the strong-field and dynamical regime. Millihertz gravitational waves are also generated by millions of ultra-compact binaries in the Milky Way, providing a new way to probe galactic stellar populations. ESA has recognised this great scientific potential by selecting The Gravitational Universe as its theme for the L3 large satellite mission, scheduled for launch in ~2034. In this article we will review the likely sources for millihertz gravitational wave detectors and describe the wide applications that observations of these sources could have for astrophysics, cosmology and fundamental physics.

  1. Radial Velocity Variability of Field Brown Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prato, L; Rice, E L; McLean, I S; Kirkpatrick, J D; Burgasser, A J; Kim, S S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R~20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity precision of ~2 km/s, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1 sigma upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included 7 known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant radial velocity variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant ...

  2. The Systemic Velocity of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution spectra of molecular hydrogen in the Homunculus nebula allow for the first direct measurement of the systemic velocity of Eta Carinae. Near-infrared long-slit data for H2 1-0 S(1) lambda 21218 obtained with the Phoenix spectrometer on the Gemini South telescope give Vsys=-8.1pm1 km/s (heliocentric), or VLSR=-19.7pm1 km/s, from the average of the near and far sides of the Homunculus. This measurement considerably improves the precision for the value of -7pm10 km/s inferred from neighboring O-type stars in the Carina nebula. New near-infrared spectra also provide a high-resolution line profile of [Fe II] lambda 16435 emission from gas condensations known as the Weigelt objects without contamination from the central star, revealing a line shape with complex kinematic structure. Previously, uncertainty in the Weigelt knots' kinematics was dominated by the adopted systemic velocity of Eta Car.

  3. Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron

  4. A comparison between matter wave and light wave interferometers for the detection of gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacôme Delva; Marie-Christine Angonin; Philippe Tourrenc

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate and compare the response of light wave interferometers and matter wave interferometers to gravitational waves. We find that metric matter wave interferometers will not challenge kilometric light wave interferometers such as Virgo or LIGO, but could be a good candidate for the detection of very low frequency gravitational waves.

  5. THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W. [Astronomy Department, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Meyer, B. S. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

  6. Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

  7. Self-referencing remote optical probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, P.E.; Prather, W.S.; Livingston, R.R.

    1991-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A probe is described for remote spectrometric measurements of fluid samples having a hollow probe body with a sliding reflective plug therein and a lens at one end, ports for admitting and expelling the fluid sample and a means for moving the reflector so that reference measurement can be made with the reflector in a first position near the lens and a sample measurement can be made with the reflector away from the lens and the fluid sample between the reflector and the lens. Comparison of the two measurements will yield the composition of the fluid sample. The probe is preferably used for remote measurements and light is carried to and from the probe via fiber optic cables. 3 figures.

  8. Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

  9. Catheter based magnetic resonance compatible perfusion probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toretta, Cara Lynne

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neurosurgeons are using a thermal based technique to quantify brain perfusion. The thermal diffusion probe (TDP) technology measures perfusion in a relatively small volume of brain tissue. The neurosurgeon chooses the ...

  10. Scanning Probe AFM Compound Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a dye-sensitization system,... Tip-Enhanced Near-Field Raman Spectroscopy Probing Single Dye-Sensitized TiO2 Nanoparticles. The correlated metallic tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy...

  11. Single Molecule Probes of Lipid Membrane Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livanec, Philip W.

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological membranes are highly heterogeneous structures that are thought to use this heterogeneity to organize and modify the function of membrane constituents. Probing membrane organization, structure, and changes therein ...

  12. On the fully nonlinear acoustic waves in a plasma with positrons beam impact and superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali Shan, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan) [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions, superthermal electrons, and positrons beam are reported. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to an energy-balance like equation. The latter is numerically analyzed to examine the existence regions for solitary and shock waves. It is found that only solitary waves can propagate, however, the model cannot support shocks. The effects of superthermality and beam parameters (via, positrons concentration and streaming velocity) on the existence region, as well as solitary wave profile have been discussed.

  13. Electron heating using lower hybrid waves in the PLT tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Cavallo, A.; Chu, T.K.; Luce, T.; Motley, R.; Ono, M.; Stevens, J.; von Goeler, S.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lower hybrid waves with a narrow high velocity wave spectrum have been used to achieve high central electron temperatures in a tokamak plasma. Waves with a frequency of 2.45 GHz launched by a 16-waveguide grill at a power level less than 600 kW were used to increase the central electron temperature of the PLT plasma from 2.2 keV to 5 keV. The magnitude of the temperature increase depends strongly on the phase difference between the waveguides and on the direction of the launched wave. A reduction in the central electron thermal diffusivity is associated with the peaked electron temperature profiles of lower hybrid current-driven plasmas. 16 refs.

  14. The Force of a Tsunami on a Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Laura; Renzi, Emiliano; Dutykh, Denys; Dias, Frédéric

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With an increasing emphasis on renewable energy resources, wave power technology is fast becoming a realistic solution. However, the recent tsunami in Japan was a harsh reminder of the ferocity of the ocean. It is known that tsunamis are nearly undetectable in the open ocean but as the wave approaches the shore its energy is compressed creating large destructive waves. The question posed here is whether a nearshore wave energy converter (WEC) could withstand the force of an incoming tsunami. The analytical 3D model of Renzi & Dias (2012) developed within the framework of a linear theory and applied to an array of fixed plates is used. The time derivative of the velocity potential allows the hydrodynamic force to be calculated.

  15. An integrable evolution equation for surface waves in deep water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Kraenkel; H. Leblond; M. A. Manna

    2011-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to describe the dynamics of monochromatic surface waves in deep water, we derive a nonlinear and dispersive system of equations for the free surface elevation and the free surface velocity from the Euler equations in infinite depth. From it, and using a multiscale perturbative methods, an asymptotic model for small-aspect-ratio waves is derived. The model is shown to be completely integrable. The Lax pair, the first conserved quantities as well as the symmetries are exhibited. Theoretical and numerical studies reveal that it supports periodic progressive Stokes waves which peak and break in finite time. Comparison between the limiting wave solution of the asymptotic model and classical irrotational results is performed.

  16. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

  17. Nonlinear pulse propagation and phase velocity of laser-driven plasma waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a relativistically-intense short-pulse laser in un- derdensevelocity driven by a short-pulse laser is intrinsicallya 0 ? 1) short-pulse (k p L ? 1) laser in an underdense (k

  18. Earth Planets Space, 52, 573577, 2000 Average shear-wave velocity structure of the Kamchatka peninsula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    . Dominguez1 1Instituto de Geof´isica, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan 04510, Mexico D.F., Mexico 2 by the IRIS station PET in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatski. The Moho interface was found at a depth of 35±5 km

  19. aortic pulse-wave velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    well imaged with MR angiography. The approach is similar to the thoracic aorta, although ECG-gating is not required. We usually perform a combination of axial T1 weighted GRE and...

  20. Real-time microseismic monitoring: Automatic wave processing and multilayered velocity model for accurate event location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for the prevention of dynamic phenomena is an integral part of a strategy for exploring zones where there are risks, and the mine layout, all playing a significant contribution to the rate of seismic energy released. In order, powerfui Software has been installed in order to provide for high quality, real time microseismic

  1. P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived from

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York:Ozark, Alabama: Energy Resources Jumplocal

  2. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|CoreCpWing County, Minnesota: EnergyCrowsNew Mexico-

  3. Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyoThornwood, New

  4. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  5. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  6. Force-velocity relations for multiple molecular motor transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ziqing

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transition rate model of cargo transportation by N effective molecular motors is proposed. Under the assumption of steady state, the force-velocity curve of multi-motor system can be derived from the force-velocity curve of single motor. Our work shows, in the case of low load, the velocity of multi-motor system can decrease or increase with increasing motor number, which is dependent on the single motor force-velocity curve. And most commonly, the velocity decreases. This gives a possible explanation to some recent experimental observations.

  7. Force-velocity relations for multiple-molecular-motor transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziqing Wang; Ming Li

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transition rate model of cargo transport by $N$ molecular motors is proposed. Under the assumption of steady state, the force-velocity curve of multi-motor system can be derived from the force-velocity curve of single motor. Our work shows, in the case of low load, the velocity of multi-motor system can decrease or increase with increasing motor number, which is dependent on the single motor force-velocity curve. And most commonly, the velocity decreases. This gives a possible explanation to some recent

  8. Introduction The Smith Cloud is a high velocity cloud with a radial velocity near

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    .8 ­ 15.1 kpc (Wakker et al. 2008). Lockman et al. (2008) presented an H I survey of the cloud using the off and on spectra of each line to a single atmospheric template, which we then subtracted from velocities, Figure 2 shows ON­OFF spectra with no atmospheric template for this line. Like Bland-Hawthorn et

  9. Evaluation of probes used to detect alpha radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sackett, Gregory Duane

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such probes were evaluated in this study, the 350A Alpha Probe of Dosimeter Corporation and the AB100 Scintillator Probe produced by Harshaw Bicron. As an additional comparison, a Ludlum Model 44-9 (Pancake) GM Probe was also evaluated, since it has served...

  10. Evaluation of probes used to detect alpha radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sackett, Gregory Duane

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such probes were evaluated in this study, the 350A Alpha Probe of Dosimeter Corporation and the AB100 Scintillator Probe produced by Harshaw Bicron. As an additional comparison, a Ludlum Model 44-9 (Pancake) GM Probe was also evaluated, since it has served...

  11. Scaling of convective velocity in a vertically vibrated granular bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya M. Yamada; Hiroaki Katsuragi

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study the velocity scaling of granular convection which is a possible mechanism of the regolith migration on the surface of small asteroids. In order to evaluate the contribution of granular convection to the regolith migration, the velocity of granular convection under the microgravity condition has to be revealed. Although it is hard to control the gravitational acceleration in laboratory experiments, scaling relations involving the gravitational effect can be evaluated by systematic experiments. Therefore, we perform such a systematic experiment of the vibration-induced granular convection. From the experimental data, a scaling form for the granular convective velocity is obtained. The obtained scaling form implies that the granular convective velocity can be decomposed into two characteristic velocity components: vibrational and gravitational velocities. In addition, the system size dependence is also scaled. According to the scaling form, the granular convective velocity $v$ depends on the gravitational acceleration $g$ as $v \\propto g^{0.97}$ when the normalized vibrational acceleration is fixed.

  12. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States)] [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  13. Transit Detection of Radial Velocity Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen R. Kane; Kaspar von Braun

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The orbital parameters of extra-solar planets have a significant impact on the probability that the planet will transit the host star. This was recently demonstrated by the transit detection of HD 17156b whose favourable eccentricity and argument of periastron dramatically increased its transit likelihood. We present a study which provides a quantitative analysis of how these two orbital parameters effect the geometric transit probability as a function of period. Further, we apply these results to known radial velocity planets and show that there are unexpectedly high transit probabilities for planets at relatively long periods. For a photometric monitoring campaign which aims to determine if the planet indeed transits, we calculate the significance of a null result and the subsequent constraints that may be applied to orbital parameters.

  14. Correlation of bubble rise velocity and volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burge, C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was conducted at Westinghouse`s Savannah River Laboratories (SRL). The goal of SRL is to make certain that the modifications on the reactor are safe for those working at the plant as well as the general public. One of the steps needed to insure safety is the knowledge of the occurrences that result from a plenum pipe breakage. When a plenum pipe breaks, two things occur: air is sucked into the pipe and is trapped in the cooling water; and water used to cool the fuel rods is lost. As a result of these occurrences, the water is slowed down by both the loss in water pressure and the upward force of air bubbles pushing against the downward force of the water. The project required the conducting of tests to find the bubble velocity in an annular ribbed pipe filled with stagnant water. This document discusses the methodology and results of this testing.

  15. Correlation of bubble rise velocity and volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burge, C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was conducted at Westinghouse's Savannah River Laboratories (SRL). The goal of SRL is to make certain that the modifications on the reactor are safe for those working at the plant as well as the general public. One of the steps needed to insure safety is the knowledge of the occurrences that result from a plenum pipe breakage. When a plenum pipe breaks, two things occur: air is sucked into the pipe and is trapped in the cooling water; and water used to cool the fuel rods is lost. As a result of these occurrences, the water is slowed down by both the loss in water pressure and the upward force of air bubbles pushing against the downward force of the water. The project required the conducting of tests to find the bubble velocity in an annular ribbed pipe filled with stagnant water. This document discusses the methodology and results of this testing.

  16. Nonlinear spherical Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf Torkelsson; G. Christopher Boynton

    1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an one-dimensional numerical study of Alfven waves propagating along a radial magnetic field. Neglecting losses, any spherical Alfven wave, no matter how small its initial amplitude is, becomes nonlinear at sufficiently large radii. From previous simulations of Alfven waves in plane parallel atmospheres we did expect the waves to steepen and produce current sheets in the nonlinear regime, which was confirmed by our new calculations. On the other hand we did find that even the least nonlinear waves were damped out almost completely before 10 solar radii. A damping of that kind is required by models of Alfven wave-driven winds from old low-mass stars as these winds are mainly accelerated within a few stellar radii.

  17. Limited spatial region for synchronous beam-wave interactions in rotating mode resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velazco, J.E. (Microwave Research Laboratory, Department of Electric and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)); Mako, F.M. (FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, Virginia 22032 (United States))

    1993-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam passing along an axisymmetric static magnetic field under the presence of circularly polarized electromagnetic fields, launched in a suitable rotating mode resonator, can propagate as a growing helix. This helix rotates temporally with an angular velocity equal to that of the cavity's rotating mode. When the axial magnetic field is adjusted to obtain matching between the electrons gyrofrequency and fields rotating frequency, the electrons maintain phase coherence with the wave during the interaction. Synchronous beam-wave interactions will be shown to be limited to a spatial region near the resonator axis. This limited synchronous region results from the rotating-wave phase velocity exceeding the velocity of the particle beam.

  18. Single-mode fiber, velocity interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauter, K. G.; Jacobson, G. F.; Patterson, J. R.; Nguyen, J. H.; Ambrose, W. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore California 94551 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we describe a velocity interferometer system based entirely on single-mode fiber optics. This paper includes a description of principles used in developing the single-mode velocity interferometry system (SMV). The SMV design is based on polarization-insensitive components. Polarization adjusters are included to eliminate the effects of residual birefringence and polarization dependent losses in the interferometers. Characterization measurements and calibration methods needed for data analysis and a method of data analysis are described. Calibration is performed directly using tunable lasers. During development, we demonstrated its operation using exploding-foil bridge-wire fliers up to 200 m/s. In a final test, we demonstrated the SMV in a gas gun experiment up to 1.2 km/sec. As a basis for comparison in the gas gun experiment, we used another velocimetry technique that is also based on single-mode fiber optics: photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV). For the gas gun experiment, we split the light returned from a single target spot and performed a direct comparison of the homodyne (SMV) and heterodyne (PDV) techniques concurrently. The two techniques had a negligible mean difference and a 1.5% standard deviation in the one-dimensional shock zone. Within one interferometer delay time after a sudden Doppler shift, a SMV unencumbered by multimode-fiber dispersion exhibits two color beats. These beats have the same period as PDV beats--this interference occurs between the ''recently'' shifted and ''formerly unshifted'' paths within the interferometer. We believe that recognizing this identity between homodyne and heterodyne beats is novel in the shock-physics field. SMV includes the conveniences of optical fiber, while removing the time resolution limitations associated with the multimode delivery fiber.

  19. Hohlraum Designs for High Velocity Implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meezan, N B; Hicks, D G; Callahan, D A; Olson, R E; Schneider, M S; Thomas, C A; Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J K; Dixit, S N; Michel, P A; Jones, O S; Clark, D S; Ralph, J E; Doeppner, T; MacKinnon, A J; Haan, S W; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Edwards, M J; Macgowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Atherton, L J

    2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we compare experimental shock and capsule trajectories to design calculations using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA. The measured trajectories from surrogate ignition targets are consistent with reducing the x-ray flux on the capsule by about 85%. A new method of extracting the radiation temperature as seen by the capsule from x-ray intensity and image data shows that about half of the apparent 15% flux deficit in the data with respect to the simulations can be explained by HYDRA overestimating the x-ray flux on the capsule. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) point-design target is designed to reach a peak fuel-layer velocity of 370 km/s by ablating 90% of its plastic (CH) ablator. The 192-beam National Ignition Facility laser drives a gold hohlraum to a radiation temperature (T{sub RAD}) of 300 eV with a 20 ns-long, 420 TW, 1.3 MJ laser pulse. The hohlraum x-rays couple to the CH ablator in order to apply the required pressure to the outside of the capsule. In this paper, we compare experimental measurements of the hohlraum T{sub RAD} and the implosion trajectory with design calculations using the code hydra. The measured radial positions of the leading shock wave and the unablated shell are consistent with simulations in which the x-ray flux on the capsule is artificially reduced by 85%. We describe a new method of inferring the T{sub RAD} seen by the capsule from time-dependent x-ray intensity data and static x-ray images. This analysis shows that hydra overestimates the x-ray flux incident on the capsule by {approx}8%.

  20. Peculiarity of convergence of shock wave generated by underwater electrical explosion of ring-shaped wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, D.; Toker, G. R.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Gleizer, S.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)] [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanosecond timescale underwater electrical wire explosions of ring-shaped Cu wires were investigated using a pulsed generator with a current amplitude up to 50 kA. It was shown that this type of wire explosion results in the generation of a toroidal shock wave (SW). Time- and space-resolved optical diagnostics were used to determine azimuthal uniformity of the shock wave front and its velocity. It was found that the shock wave preserves its circular front shape in the range of radii 50?mwave propagates with a constant velocity of v{sub sw}=1.2M, where M is the Mach number. The dynamics of the leading part of the shock wave, based on the oblique shock wave theory, is presented, explaining the constant velocity of the shock wave.

  1. PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS OF AN EIT WAVE OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS AND SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veronig, A. M.; Kienreich, I. W.; Muhr, N.; Temmer, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Goemoery, P. [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Kaciceva 26, 1000 Zagreb (Croatia); Warren, H. P., E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present plasma diagnostics of an Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) wave observed with high cadence in Hinode/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) sit-and-stare spectroscopy and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imagery obtained during the HOP-180 observing campaign on 2011 February 16. At the propagating EIT wave front, we observe downward plasma flows in the EIS Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XVI spectral lines (log T Almost-Equal-To 6.1-6.4) with line-of-sight (LOS) velocities up to 20 km s{sup -1}. These redshifts are followed by blueshifts with upward velocities up to -5 km s{sup -1} indicating relaxation of the plasma behind the wave front. During the wave evolution, the downward velocity pulse steepens from a few km s{sup -1} up to 20 km s{sup -1} and subsequently decays, correlated with the relative changes of the line intensities. The expected increase of the plasma densities at the EIT wave front estimated from the observed intensity increase lies within the noise level of our density diagnostics from EIS Fe XIII 202/203 A line ratios. No significant LOS plasma motions are observed in the He II line, suggesting that the wave pulse was not strong enough to perturb the underlying chromosphere. This is consistent with the finding that no H{alpha} Moreton wave was associated with the event. The EIT wave propagating along the EIS slit reveals a strong deceleration of a Almost-Equal-To -540 m s{sup -2} and a start velocity of v{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 590 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the passage of a coronal fast-mode MHD wave, pushing the plasma downward and compressing it at the coronal base.

  2. Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

  3. Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation The wave equation in an ideal fluid can be derived #12;66 2. Wave Propagation Theory quantities of the quiescent (time independent) medium are identified perturbations is much smaller than the speed of sound. 2.1.1 The Nonlinear Wave Equation Retaining higher

  4. Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

  5. System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  6. Wave induced forces on a partially exposed circular cylinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Michael Edward

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analyzed to give a dimensionless force which was related to the wave parameters H/L and d/L. Other methods of analysis were also used for the derivation of drag, inertia, and lift coefficients for use with various forms of the Norison Equation. RCKHOI... = Fluid Density A = Area of Hodel u = Horizontal Hater Particle Velocity x In a study conducted by Chakrabarti (9), the data presented by Shank and Herbich were analyzed by a different method, namely a closed form expression for the wave forces. Only...

  7. Holographic backgrounds from D-brane probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micha Moskovic

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the derivation of holographic backgrounds from the field theory side, without using any supergravity equations of motion. Instead, we rely on the addition of probe D-branes to the stack of D-branes generating the background. From the field theory description of the probe branes, one can compute an effective action for the probes (in a suitable low-energy/near-horizon limit) by integrating out the background branes. Comparing this action with the generic probe D-brane action then allows to determine the holographic background dual to the considered field theory vacuum. In the first part, the required pre-requisites of field and string theory are recalled and this strategy to derive holographic backgrounds is explained in more detail on the basic case of D3-branes in flat space probed by a small number of D-instantons. The second part contains our original results, which have already appeared in arXiv:1301.3738, arXiv:1301.7062 and arXiv:1312.0621. We first derive the duals to three continuous deformations (Coulomb branch, $\\beta$ and non-commutative deformations) of N=4 super-Yang-Mills. We then derive the enhan\\c{c}on mechanism in a simple N=2 quiver gauge theory setup by using a fractional D-instanton as a probe and exploiting recent exact results on the Coulomb branch of N=2 quivers. Finally, we obtain the near-horizon D4-brane geometry by probing the D4-branes with a small number of D0-branes.

  8. Quantum probes for fractional Gaussian processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo G. A. Paris

    2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the characterization of classical fractional random noise via quantum probes. In particular, we focus on estimation and discrimination problems involving the fractal dimension of the trajectories of a system subject to fractional Brownian noise. We assume that the classical degree of freedom exposed to the environmental noise is coupled to a quantum degree of freedom of the same system, e.g. its spin, and exploit quantum limited measurements on the spin part to characterize the classical fractional noise. More generally, our approach may be applied to any two-level system subject to dephasing perturbations described by fractional Brownian noise, in order to assess the precision of quantum limited measurements in the characterization of the external noise. In order to assess the performances of quantum probes we evaluate the Bures metric, as well as the Helstrom and the Chernoff bound, and optimize their values over the interaction time. We find that quantum probes may be successfully employed to obtain a reliable characterization of fractional Gaussian process when the coupling with the environment is weak or strong. In the first case decoherence is not much detrimental and for long interaction times the probe acquires information about the environmental parameters without being too much mixed. Conversely, for strong coupling, information is quickly impinged on the quantum probe and can effectively retrieved by measurements performed in the early stage of the evolution. In the intermediate situation, none of the two above effects take place: information is flowing from the environment to the probe too slowly compared to decoherence, and no measurements can be effectively employed to extract it from the quantum probe. The two regimes of weak- and strong-coupling are defined in terms of a threshold value of the coupling, which itself increases with the fractional dimension.

  9. Corrosion monitoring with hydrogen probes in the oilfield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomason, W.H.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the application of hydrogen probes for corrosion monitoring in the oilfield is presented. The three basic types of hydrogen probes are described and their relative merits discussed. The construction and installation of a simple and inexpensive electrochemical hydrogen probe is described. Experiences with hydrogen probes in oilfield operations are discussed, and it is concluded from these experiences that production systems where hydrogen probes can provide useful corrosion data are limited.

  10. Focused acoustic beam imaging of grain structure and local Young's modulus with Rayleigh and surface skimming longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R. W.; Sathish, S. [University of Dayton Research Institute, Structural Integrity Division 300 College Park Drive, Dayton, OH, 45469 (United States); Blodgett, M. P. [Air Force Research Lab, RXCA, Wright Patterson AFB, OH, 45433 (United States)

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of a focused acoustic beam with materials generates Rayleigh surface waves (RSW) and surface skimming longitudinal waves (SSLW). Acoustic microscopic investigations have used the RSW amplitude and the velocity measurements, extensively for grain structure analysis. Although, the presence of SSLW has been recognized, it is rarely used in acoustic imaging. This paper presents an approach to perform microstructure imaging and local elastic modulus measurements by combining both RSW and SSLW. The acoustic imaging of grain structure was performed by measuring the amplitude of RSW and SSLW signal. The microstructure images obtained on the same region of the samples with RSW and SSLW are compared and the difference in the contrast observed is discussed based on the propagation characteristics of the individual surface waves. The velocity measurements are determined by two point defocus method. The surface wave velocities of RSW and SSLW of the same regions of the sample are combined and presented as average Young's modulus image.

  11. IJOPE Paper No JC-343AB-final 9/26/04 Biausser Page number 1 Numerical Analysis of the Internal Kinematics and Dynamics of 3D Breaking Waves on Slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Kinematics and Dynamics of 3D Breaking Waves on Slopes Benjamin Biausser1 , Stéphan T. Grilli2 , Philippe and internal kinematics (velocity, vorticity, pressure) are presented. KEY WORDS: breaking ocean waves years, our understanding of wave breaking dynamics and kinematics is still quite incomplete. Due

  12. Search for long-lived gravitational-wave transients coincident with long gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Nancy

    Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been linked to extreme core-collapse supernovae from massive stars. Gravitational waves (GW) offer a probe of the physics behind long GRBs. We investigate models of long-lived (?10–1000??s) ...

  13. An alpha particle diagnostic based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, K.L.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the one-dimensional alpha particle velocity distribution function can be determined from the fluctuation- dissipation theorem based on measurements of lower hybrid wave fluctuations in an equilibrium plasma. This method uses collective Thomson scattering data with large signal-to-noise ratio, but it is applicable only when the alpha particles have an isotropic velocity distribution. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Wave Energy challenges and possibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Wave Energy ­ challenges and possibilities By: Per Resen Steenstrup www.WaveStarEnergy.com Risø-R-1608(EN) 161 #12;© Wave energy is an old story.... The first wave energy patent is 200 years old. Over the last 100 years more than 200 new wave energy devices have been developped and more than 1.000 patents

  15. Probing electron acceleration and x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Corde, S.; Brijesh, P.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech—CNRS UMR7639—École Polytechnique ParisTech, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech—CNRS UMR7639—École Polytechnique ParisTech, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M. S.; Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam, is focused on the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion, which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  16. Initial Results in Power System Identification from Injected Probing Signals Using a Subspace Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; Pierre, John W.; Hauer, John F.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors use the Numerical algorithm for Subspace State Space System IDentification (N4SID) to extract dynamic parameters from phasor measurements collected on the western North American Power Grid. The data were obtained during tests on June 7, 2000, and they represent wide area response to several kinds of probing signals including Low-Level Pseudo-Random Noise (LLPRN) and Single-Mode Square Wave (SMSW) injected at the Celilo terminal of the Pacific HVDC In-tertie (PDCI). An identified model is validated using a cross vali-dation method. Also, the obtained electromechanical modes are compared with the results from Prony analysis of a ringdown and with signal analysis of ambient data measured under similar op-erating conditions. The consistent results show that methods in this class can be highly effective even when the probing signal is small.

  17. A Terminal Velocity on the Landscape: Particle Production near Extra Species Loci in Higher Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diana Battefeld; Thorsten Battefeld

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate particle production near extra species loci (ESL) in a higher dimensional field space and derive a speed limit in moduli space at weak coupling. This terminal velocity is set by the characteristic ESL-separation and the coupling of the extra degrees of freedom to the moduli, but it is independent of the moduli's potential if the dimensionality of the field space is considerably larger than the dimensionality of the loci, D >> d. Once the terminal velocity is approached, particles are produced at a plethora of nearby ESLs, preventing a further increase in speed via their backreaction. It is possible to drive inflation at the terminal velocity, providing a generalization of trapped inflation with attractive features: we find that more than sixty e-folds of inflation for sub-Planckian excursions in field space are possible if ESLs are ubiquitous, without fine tuning of initial conditions and less tuned potentials. We construct a simple, observationally viable model with a slightly red scalar power-spectrum and suppressed gravitational waves; we comment on the presence of additional observational signatures originating from IR-cascading and individual massive particles. We also show that moduli-trapping at an ESL is suppressed for D >> d, hindering dynamical selection of high-symmetry vacua on the landscape based on this mechanism.

  18. On the velocity-strengthening behavior of dry friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yohai Bar-Sinai; Robert Spatschek; Efim A. Brener; Eran Bouchbinder

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The onset of frictional instabilities, e.g. earthquakes nucleation, is intimately related to velocity-weakening friction, in which the frictional resistance of interfaces decreases with increasing slip velocity. While this frictional response has been studied extensively, less attention has been given to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, in spite of its potential importance for various aspects of frictional phenomena such as the propagation speed of interfacial rupture fronts and the amount of stored energy released by them. In this note we suggest that a crossover from steady-state velocity-weakening friction at small slip velocities to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction at higher velocities might be a generic feature of dry friction. We further argue that while thermally activated rheology naturally gives rise to logarithmic steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, a crossover to stronger-than-logarithmic strengthening might take place at higher slip velocities, possibly accompanied by a change in the dominant dissipation mechanism. We sketch a few physical mechanisms that may account for the crossover to stronger-than-logarithmic steady-state velocity-strengthening and compile a rather extensive set of experimental data available in the literature, lending support to these ideas.

  19. Phase-controlled pulse propagation in media with cross coupling of electric and magnetic probe field component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleischhaker, Robert; Evers, Joerg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Light propagation is discussed in media with a cross coupling of the electric and magnetic component of an applied probe field. We derive the wave equations for a probe pulse propagating through such a medium and solve them analytically in Fourier space using the slowly varying envelope approximation. Our analysis reveals the influence of the different medium response coefficients on the propagation dynamics. We apply these results to a specific example system in which cross couplings are induced in an atomic medium by additional control fields. We show that the cross couplings render the propagation dynamics sensitive to the relative phase of the additional fields, and this phase dependence enables one to control the pulse during its propagation through the medium. Our results demonstrate that the magnetic field component of a probe beam can crucially influence the system dynamics already at experimentally accessible parameter ranges in dilute vapors.

  20. Wave-Corpuscle Mechanics for Electric Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Anatoli; Figotin, Alexander

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    superposition in nonlinear wave dynamics. Rev. Math. Phys.6. Babin, A. , Figotin, A. : Wave-corpuscle mechanics forV. , Fortunato, D. : Solitary waves in the nonlinear wave

  1. Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

  2. Sharply tunable group velocity in alkali vapors using a single low-power control field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardeep Kumar; Shubhrangshu Dasgupta

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how a single linearly polarized control field can produce a sharply tunable group velocity of a weak probe field at resonance in a four-level atomic configuration of alkali vapors. The dispersion can be switched from normal to anomalous along with vanishing absorption, just by changing intensity of the resonant control field. In addition, by allowing different intensities of the different polarization components of the control field, the anomalous dispersion can be switched back to the normal. This thereby creates a "valley of anomaly" in group index variation and offers two sets of control field intensities, for which the system behaves like a vacuum. The explicit analytical expressions for the probe coherence are provided along with all physical explanations. We demonstrate our results in $J = 1/2 \\leftrightarrow J = 1/2$ transition for D_1 lines in alkali atoms, in which one can obtain a group index as large as $3.2\\times10^{8}$ and as negative as $-1.5\\times10^{5}$ using a control field with power as low as 0.017 mW/cm$^2$ and 9.56 mW/cm$^2$ .

  3. Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

  4. Linear and nonlinear coupled drift and ion acoustic waves in collisional pair ion-electron magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mushtaq, A. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Nilore, Islamabad 45660 (Pakistan); School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Saeed, R.; Haque, Q. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Nilore, Islamabad 45660 (Pakistan)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear and nonlinear coupled electrostatic drift and ion acoustic waves are studied in inhomogeneous, collisional pair ion-electron plasma. The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) equation for a medium where both dispersion and dissipation are present is derived. An attempt is made to obtain exact solution of KdVB equation by using modified tanh-coth method for arbitrary velocity of nonlinear drift wave. Another exact solution for KdVB is obtained, which gives a structure of shock wave. Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Burgers equations are derived in limiting cases with solitary and monotonic shock solutions, respectively. Effects of species density, magnetic field, obliqueness, and the acoustic to drift velocity ratio on the solitary and shock solutions are investigated. The results discussed are useful in understanding of low frequency electrostatic waves at laboratory pair ion plasmas.

  5. A Monte Carlo simulation for kinetic chemotaxis models: an application to the traveling population wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuda, Shugo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Monte Carlo simulation for the chemotactic bacteria is developed on the basis of the kinetic modeling, i.e., the Boltzmann transport equation, and applied to the one-dimensional traveling population wave in a micro channel.In this method, the Monte Carlo method, which calculates the run-and-tumble motions of bacteria, is coupled with a finite volume method to solve the macroscopic transport of the chemical cues in the field. The simulation method can successfully reproduce the traveling population wave of bacteria which was observed experimentally. The microscopic dynamics of bacteria, e.g., the velocity autocorrelation function and velocity distribution function of bacteria, are also investigated. It is found that the bacteria which form the traveling population wave create quasi-periodic motions as well as a migratory movement along with the traveling population wave. Simulations are also performed with changing the sensitivity and modulation parameters in the response function of bacteria. It is found th...

  6. Secondary dust density waves excited by nonlinear dust acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinrich, J. R.; Kim, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K.; Merlino, R. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Rosenberg, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary dust density waves were observed in conjunction with high amplitude (n{sub d}/n{sub d0}>2) dust acoustic waves (DAW) that were spontaneously excited in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma in the moderately coupled, {Gamma}{approx}1, state. The high amplitude dust acoustic waves produced large dust particle oscillations, displacements, and trapping. Secondary dust density waves were excited in the wave troughs of the high amplitude DAWs. The waveforms, amplitudes, wavelengths, and wave speeds of the primary DAWs and the secondary waves were measured. A dust-dust streaming instability is discussed as a possible mechanism for the production of the secondary waves.

  7. Seismic velocity and Q anisotropy in fractured poroelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction. Seismic wave propagation through fractures is an important subject in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization ...

  8. QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-MODE WAVE TRAINS WITHIN A GLOBAL EUV WAVE AND SEQUENTIAL TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS DETECTED BY SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Nitta, Nariaki V.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Ofman, Leon, E-mail: weiliu@lmsal.com [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washingtom, DC 20064 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first unambiguous detection of quasi-periodic wave trains within the broad pulse of a global EUV wave (so-called EIT wave) occurring on the limb. These wave trains, running ahead of the lateral coronal mass ejection (CME) front of 2-4 times slower, coherently travel to distances {approx}> R{sub Sun }/2 along the solar surface, with initial velocities up to 1400 km s{sup -1} decelerating to {approx}650 km s{sup -1}. The rapid expansion of the CME initiated at an elevated height of 110 Mm produces a strong downward and lateral compression, which may play an important role in driving the primary EUV wave and shaping its front forwardly inclined toward the solar surface. The wave trains have a dominant 2 minute periodicity that matches the X-ray flare pulsations, suggesting a causal connection. The arrival of the leading EUV wave front at increasing distances produces an uninterrupted chain sequence of deflections and/or transverse (likely fast kink mode) oscillations of local structures, including a flux-rope coronal cavity and its embedded filament with delayed onsets consistent with the wave travel time at an elevated (by {approx}50%) velocity within it. This suggests that the EUV wave penetrates through a topological separatrix surface into the cavity, unexpected from CME-caused magnetic reconfiguration. These observations, when taken together, provide compelling evidence of the fast-mode MHD wave nature of the primary (outer) fast component of a global EUV wave, running ahead of the secondary (inner) slow component of CME-caused restructuring.

  9. Terminal Velocity Infall in QSO Absorption Line Halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert A. Benjamin

    1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the hypothesis that clouds detected in quasar absorption line systems are falling at a terminal velocity toward the center of high redshift gaseous galactic halos. Since both the ionization level and terminal velocity of halo clouds increase with increasing distance from the central galaxy, velocity resolved profiles of highly ionized gas are predicted to have a greater width than low ionization gas. A line of sight passing through the center of gaseous halo (an idealized damped Ly alpha system), yields low ionization absorption at the velocity of the galaxy, flanked by high ionization on either side. Reasonable halo parameters yield total velocity extents for C IV of v_{C IV}=100-200 km/s, in agreement with several observed systems. The remaining systems may better described by the rotating disk model of Prochaska & Wolfe (1998). Finally, observational tests are suggested for verifying or falsifying the terminal velocity hypothesis for these systems.

  10. Gamma-ray blind beta particle probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Grafton, VA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intra-operative beta particle probe is provided by placing a suitable photomultiplier tube (PMT), micro channel plate (MCP) or other electron multiplier device within a vacuum housing equipped with: 1) an appropriate beta particle permeable window; and 2) electron detection circuitry. Beta particles emitted in the immediate vicinity of the probe window will be received by the electron multiplier device and amplified to produce a detectable signal. Such a device is useful as a gamma insensitive, intra-operative, beta particle probe in surgeries where the patient has been injected with a beta emitting radiopharmaceutical. The method of use of such a device is also described, as is a position sensitive such device.

  11. Remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmucker, John E. (Hurt, VA); Blasi, Raymond J. (Harrison City, PA); Archer, William B. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe allows for analyzing Raman scattered light from a point of interest external probe. An environmental barrier including at least one window separates the probe from the point of interest. An optical tube is disposed adjacent to the environmental barrier and includes a long working length compound lens objective next to the window. A beam splitter and a mirror are at the other end. A mechanical means is used to translated the prove body in the X, Y, and Z directions resulting in a variable focus optical apparatus. Laser light is reflected by the beam splitter and directed toward the compound lens objective, then through the window and focused on the point of interest. Raman scattered light is then collected by the compound lens objective and directed through the beam splitter to a mirror. A device for analyzing the light, such as a monochrometer, is coupled to the mirror.

  12. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

  13. True Masses of Radial-Velocity Exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Robert A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the science power of space telescopes used to estimate the true masses of known radial-velocity exoplanets by means of astrometry on direct images. We translate a desired mass accuracy (+/10% in our example) into a minimum goal for the signal-to-noise ratio, which implies a minimum exposure time. When the planet is near a node, the mass measurement becomes difficult if not impossible, because the apparent separation becomes decoupled from the inclination angle of the orbit. The combination of this nodal effect with considerations of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, and image blurring due to orbital motion, severely limits the observing opportunities, often to only brief intervals in a five-year mission. We compare the science power of four missions, two with external star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, and two with internal coronagraphs, EXO-C and WFIRST-C. The star shades out-perform the coronagraph in this science program by about a factor of th...

  14. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA); Brodeur, Pierre H. (Smyrna, GA); Jackson, Theodore G. (Atlanta, GA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

  15. Propagation of sound waves through a spatially homogeneous but smoothly time-dependent medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayrapetyan, A.G., E-mail: armen@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Grigoryan, K.K.; Petrosyan, R.G. [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Fritzsche, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany) [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of sound through a spatially homogeneous but non-stationary medium is investigated within the framework of fluid dynamics. For a non-vortical fluid, especially, a generalized wave equation is derived for the (scalar) potential of the fluid velocity distribution in dependence of the equilibrium mass density of the fluid and the sound wave velocity. A solution of this equation for a finite transition period ? is determined in terms of the hypergeometric function for a phenomenologically realistic, sigmoidal change of the mass density and sound wave velocity. Using this solution, it is shown that the energy flux of the sound wave is not conserved but increases always for the propagation through a non-stationary medium, independent of whether the equilibrium mass density is increased or decreased. It is found, moreover, that this amplification of the transmitted wave arises from an energy exchange with the medium and that its flux is equal to the (total) flux of the incident and the reflected wave. An interpretation of the reflected wave as a propagation of sound backward in time is given in close analogy to Feynman and Stueckelberg for the propagation of anti-particles. The reflection and transmission coefficients of sound propagating through a non-stationary medium is analyzed in more detail for hypersonic waves with transition periods ? between 15 and 200 ps as well as the transformation of infrasound waves in non-stationary oceans. -- Highlights: •Analytically exact study of sound propagation through a non-stationary medium. •Energy exchange between the non-stationary medium and the sound wave. •Transformation of hypersonic and ultrasound frequencies in non-stationary media. •Propagation of sound backward in time in close analogy to anti-particles. •Prediction of tsunamis both in spatially and temporally inhomogeneous oceans.

  16. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brizard, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model lies with the simple wave energy conservation law itthe recirculation of wave energy introduces interference e?particles, the tertiary-wave energy may be negative and thus

  17. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

  18. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion University; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion University; Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, ?0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, ?0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  19. Limiting velocities as running parameters and superluminal neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed M. Anber; John F. Donoghue

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of theories where particles can have different limiting velocities, we review the running of particle speeds towards a common limiting velocity at low energy. Motivated by the recent OPERA experimental results, we describe a model where the neutrinos would deviate from the common velocity by more than do other particles in the theory, because their running is slower due to weaker interactions.

  20. Residual stress measurement on ductile cast iron using critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chundu, Srinivasulu Naidu

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Temperature is an important factor that has significant effect on the velocity of L wave in ductile cast iron. Fully annealed and as-cast test bars were investigated to study the effect of temperature in the absence and presence of residual stresses.... Effect of Anisotropy in the Present Investigation l. Introduction . . 2. Examining the Test Bars for Anisotropy VIII. DETECTION OF STRESSES IN SHOT PEENED AND SHOT BLASTED DUCTILE IRON SAMPLES APPLYING LcR WAVE TECHNIQUE. . . . . . . . . . . . . A...

  1. Possible Zero-Flux Transport induced by Density Waves in a Tube filled with Solid Helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwang-Hua W. Chu

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Macroscopic derivation of the entrainment in a supersolid cylinder induced by a surface elastic wave (of small amplitude) propagating along the flexible interface is conducted by considering the nonlinear coupling between the interface and the rarefaction effect. We obtain the critical bounds for zero-volume-flow-rate states corresponding to specific rarefaction measure and wave number which is relevant to the rather small critical velocity or disappearance of supersolid flows reported by Rittner and Reppy.

  2. The generalized solutions of the Lama's equations in the case of running loads. The shock waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyudmila A. Alexeyeva

    2012-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The system of Lama's equations is investigated, describing the motion of the elastic media under subsonic, transonic and supersonic velocities of the moving source of distributions, and its decisions in space of generalized vector-functions. The questions are considered connected with arising shock waves, which appear in ambience under supersonic source of distributions. On base of the generalized functions theories the method of the determination of the conditions on gaps of the decisions and their derivatives on shock waves fronts is offered.

  3. Quantum mechanics of a charged particle in a background magnetic field interacting with linearized gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunandan Gangopadhyay; Anirban Saha

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the dynamics of a charged particle interacting with background electromagnetic field under the influence of linearized gravitational waves in the long wave-length and low-velocity limit. Following the prescription in \\cite{speli}, the system is quantized and the Hamiltonian is then solved by using standard algebraic iterative methods. The solution is in conformity with the classical analysis and shows the possibility of tuning the frequency by changing the magnetic field to set up resonance.

  4. Scintillation probe with photomultiplier tube saturation indicator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruch, Jeffrey F. (Bethel Park, PA); Urban, David J. (Glassport, PA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photomultiplier tube saturation indicator is formed by supplying a supplemental light source, typically an light emitting diode (LED), adjacent to the photomultiplier tube. A switch allows the light source to be activated. The light is forwarded to the photomultiplier tube by an optical fiber. If the probe is properly light tight, then a meter attached to the indicator will register the light from the LED. If the probe is no longer light tight, and the saturation indicator is saturated, no signal will be registered when the LED is activated.

  5. Hydrodynamic forces due to waves and a current induced on a pipeline placed in an open trench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jaeyoung

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For the first test, calibration was carried out in a small wave flume with an electric carnage. This carriage is designed to move at a steady speed in the range of 0. 5 ? 8. 0 fps (15 ? 24 cm/sec). The probe support, which has a hot ? wire anemometer at its.... This proves that the calibration has to be done at the same water temperature as the temperature in which the probe will be employed. Since the test wave flume is not equipped with a carriage, a small plastic ball (OD = 0. 197 in. (0. 5 cm)) was placed...

  6. adiabatic burning velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: burning velocities under conditions for which the net heat loss of the flame is zero. Very similar values, France 2 IFP Energies nouvelles, 1 et...

  7. USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP...

  8. Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Field California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

  9. Determination of Surface Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved Atomic Desorption. Abstract: We have developed a new method for determining surface exciton band energies in alkali halides based on...

  10. Line bisectors and radial velocity jitter from SARG spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Martinez Fiorenzano; R. G. Gratton; S. Desidera; R. Cosentino; M. Endl

    2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of spectral line bisector variations for a few stars observed in the SARG high precision radial velocity planet survey, and discuss their relationship with differential radial velocities. The spectra we consider are the same used for determining radial velocities. The iodine cell lines employed in the measurement of radial velocities were removed before bisector analysis. The line bisectors were then computed from average absorption profiles obtained by cross correlation of the stellar spectra with a mask made from suitable lines of a solar catalog. Bisector velocity spans were then determined: errors in these quantities compare well with theoretical expectations based on resolution, S/N and line shape. The plot of bisector velocity span against radial velocity was studied to search for correlations between line asymmetries and radial velocity variations. A correlation was seen for HD 166435 due to stellar activity, and for HD 8071B due to spectral contamination by the companion. No correlation was seen for 51 Peg and rho CrB, stars hosting planets. We conclude that this technique may be useful to separate radial velocity variations due to barycenter motion from spurious signals in spectra acquired with the iodine cell.

  11. anisotropic electron velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A simple model reflecting Cerveny, Vlastislav 8 Anisotropic velocity distributions in 3D dissipative optical lattices Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: We present a direct...

  12. air stream velocities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the early universe, substantial relative "stream" velocities between the gas and dark matter arise due to radiation pressure and persist after recombination. To asses the impact...

  13. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  14. Detection of azimuthal anisotropy from 3-D p-wave seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildizel, Ali

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the equation; (II ? 1) for u(z) = V t(z) is wave slowness. Velocity estimation using reflections and the tau-p approach was first suggested by Schultz and Claerbout (1978), They showed that velocity analysis can be done in a ' similar manner... to conventional analysis by looking for maximum coherency over each ' trajectory of ellipses in r-p domain instead of a hyperbola in conventional analysis. Schultz (1982) also suggested a method of layer-stripping for velocity estimation in the r-p domain...

  15. Diagonalization of pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A coordinate transformation is found which diagonalizes the axisymmetric pp-waves. Its effect upon concrete solutions, including impulsive and shock waves, is discussed.

  16. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  17. Compact, Isolated High-Velocity Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Burton; R. Braun; V. de Heij

    2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider here the class of compact, isolated, high-velocity HI clouds, CHVCs, which are sharply bounded in angular extent down to a limiting column density of 1.5x10^18 cm^-2. We describe our automated search algorithm and it's application to the LDS north of dec= -28 deg. and the HIPASS data south of dec=0, resulting in an all--sky catalog numbering 246 CHVCs. We argue that these objects are more likely to represent a single phenomenon in a similar evolutionary state than would a sample which included any of the major HVC complexes. Five principal observables are defined for the CHVC population: (1) the spatial deployment of the objects on the sky, (2) the kinematic distribution, (3) the number distribution of observed HI column densities, (4) the number distribution of angular sizes, and (5) the number distribution of line widths. We show that the spatial and kinematic deployments of the ensemble of CHVCs contain various clues regarding their characteristic distance. These clues are not compatible with a location of the ensemble within the Galaxy proper. The deployments resemble in several regards those of the Local Group galaxies. We describe a model testing the hypothesis that the CHVCs are a Local Group population. The agreement of the model with the data is judged by extracting the observables from simulations, in a manner consistent with the sensitivities of the observations and explicitly taking account of Galactic obscuration. We show that models in which the CHVCs are the HI counterparts of dark-matter halos evolving in the Local Group potential provide a good match to the observables, if account is taken of tidal and ram--pressure disruption, the consequences of obscuration due to Galactic HI and of differing sensitivities and selection effects pertaining to the surveys.

  18. Nonlinear peculiar-velocity analysis and PCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dekel, A. [and others

    2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We allow for nonlinear effects in the likelihood analysis of peculiar velocities, and obtain {approximately}35%-lower values for the cosmological density parameter and for the amplitude of mass-density fluctuations. The power spectrum in the linear regime is assumed to be of the flat {Lambda}CDM model (h = 0:65, n = 1) with only {Omega}{sub m} free. Since the likelihood is driven by the nonlinear regime, we break the power spectrum at k{sub b} {approximately} 0.2 (h{sup {minus}1} Mpc){sup {minus}1} and fit a two-parameter power-law at k > k{sub b} . This allows for an unbiased fit in the linear regime. Tests using improved mock catalogs demonstrate a reduced bias and a better fit. We find for the Mark III and SFI data {Omega}{sub m} = 0.35 {+-} 0.09 with {sigma}{sub 8}{Omega}P{sub m}{sup 0.6} = 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (90% errors). When allowing deviations from {Lambda}CDM, we find an indication for a wiggle in the power spectrum in the form of an excess near k {approximately} 0.05 and a deficiency at k {approximately} 0.1 (h{sup {minus}1} Mpc){sup {minus}1}--a cold flow which may be related to a feature indicated from redshift surveys and the second peak in the CMB anisotropy. A {chi}{sup 2} test applied to principal modes demonstrates that the nonlinear procedure improves the goodness of fit. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) helps identifying spatial features of the data and fine-tuning the theoretical and error models. We address the potential for optimal data compression using PCA.

  19. Dipole gravity waves from unbound quadrupoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felber, Franklin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dipole gravitational disturbances from gravitationally unbound mass quadrupoles propagate to the radiation zone with signal strength at least of quadrupole order if the quadrupoles are nonrelativistic, and of dipole order if relativistic. Angular distributions of parallel-polarized and transverse-polarized dipole power in the radiation zone are calculated for simple unbound quadrupoles, like a linear-oscillator/stress-wave pair and a particle storage ring. Laboratory tests of general relativity through measurements of dipole gravity waves in the source region are proposed. A NASA G2 flywheel module with a modified rotor can produce a post-Newtonian dc bias signal at a gradiometer up to 1 mE. At peak luminosity, the repulsive dipole impulses of proton bunches at the LHC can produce an rms velocity of a high-Q detector surface up to 4 micron/s. Far outside the source region, Newtonian lunar dipole gravity waves can produce a 1-cm displacement signal at LISA. Dipole signal strengths of astrophysical events invol...

  20. Dipole gravity waves from unbound quadrupoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin Felber

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Dipole gravitational disturbances from gravitationally unbound mass quadrupoles propagate to the radiation zone with signal strength at least of quadrupole order if the quadrupoles are nonrelativistic, and of dipole order if relativistic. Angular distributions of parallel-polarized and transverse-polarized dipole power in the radiation zone are calculated for simple unbound quadrupoles, like a linear-oscillator/stress-wave pair and a particle storage ring. Laboratory tests of general relativity through measurements of dipole gravity waves in the source region are proposed. A NASA G2 flywheel module with a modified rotor can produce a post-Newtonian dc bias signal at a gradiometer up to 1 mE. At peak luminosity, the repulsive dipole impulses of proton bunches at the LHC can produce an rms velocity of a high-Q detector surface up to 4 micron/s. Far outside the source region, Newtonian lunar dipole gravity waves can produce a 1-cm displacement signal at LISA. Dipole signal strengths of astrophysical events involving unbound quadrupoles, like near collisions and neutron star kicks in core-collapse supernovae, are estimated.