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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Field comparison of the point velocity probe with other groundwater velocity measurement methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field testing of a new tool for measuring groundwater velocities at the centimeter scale, the point velocity probe (PVP), was undertaken at Canadian Forces Base, Borden, Ontario, Canada. The measurements were performed in ...

Labaky, W.; Devlin, J. F.; Gillham, R. W.

2009-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

2

Millimeter-wave active probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza (Sunnyvale, CA); Bloom, David M. (Portola Valley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

P And S Wave Velocity Determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are three general methods that can be used to determine formation velocities from full waveform logs. The first approach is to make use of the data from the entire waveform. This type of velocity analysis is performed ...

Willis, M. E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Measurement of velocity field in parametrically excited solitary waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paramerically excited solitary waves emerge as localized structures in high-aspect-ratio free surfaces subject to vertical vibrations. Herein, we provide the first experimental characterization of the hydrodynamics of thess waves using Particle Image Velocimetry. We show that the underlying velocity field of parametrically excited solitary waves is mainly composed by an oscillatory velocity field. Our results confirm the accuracy of Hamiltonian models with added dissipation in describing this field. Remarkably, our measurements also uncover the onset of a streaming velocity field which is shown to be as important as other crucial nonlinear terms in the current theory. The observed streaming pattern is particularly interesting due to the presence of oscillatory meniscii.

Gordillo, Leonardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Matter wave optical techniques for probing many-body targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reports on our investigation of the uses of matter waves to probe many-body targets. We begin by discussing decoherence in an atom interferometer, in which a free gas acts as a refractive medium for a matter ...

Sanders, Scott Nicholas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense ({omega}{sub pe} > {omega}{sub ce}). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub ce}. As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation {omega}-k{sub ||v||} = {omega}{sub ce}. The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, 203 Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Embedded Fiber Optic Probes to Measure Detonation Velocities Using the Photonic Doppler Velocimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detonation velocities for high explosives can be in the 7 to 8 km/s range. Previous work has shown that these velocities may be measured by inserting an optical fiber probe into the explosive assembly and recording the velocity time history using a Fabry-Perot velocimeter. The measured velocity using this method, however, is the actual velocity multiplied times the refractive index of the fiber core, which is on the order of 1.5. This means that the velocimeter diagnostic must be capable of measuring velocities as high as 12 km/s. Until recently, a velocity of 12 km/s was beyond the maximum velocity limit of a homodyne-based velocimeter. The limiting component in a homodyne system is usually the digitizer. Recently, however, digitizers have come on the market with 20 GHz bandwidth and 50 GS/s sample rate. Such a digitizer coupled with high bandwidth detectors now have the total bandwidth required to make velocity measurements in the 12 km/s range. This paper describes measurements made of detonation velocities using a high bandwidth homodyne system.

Hare, D E; Holtkamp, D B; Strand, O T

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Mesoscale Waves as a Probe of Jupiter's Deep Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Search of the Voyager images of Jupiter reveals a class of mesoscale waves occurring near the extrema of the zonal velocity profile between latitudes 30°S and 30°N. The average horizontal wavelength is 300 km, compared to an atmospheric scale ...

F. M. Flasar; P. J. Gierasch

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

A study of vacuum arc ion velocities using a linear set of probes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most likely velocity of ions moving away from vacuum arc cathode spots was measured using a set of probes along the path of plasma expansion. The goal was to determine how much, if any, change of the ion drift velocity occurs in the expanded plasma. The arc discharge current was perturbed to create plasma density markers whose travel is picked up by the set of probes. It was found that the perturbation with current oscillations did not result in consistent data because ion current maxima and minima are not only determined by the plasma production but by the transients of the arc pulse and by the asymmetry of the ion velocity distribution function. Perturbation with a short current spike was more conclusive. The ion velocity was measured to be slightly reduced with increasing distance from the cathode, which can be explained by collisions of ions with the background of neutrals. The ion velocity was increased when the arc current was increased, which correlated with enhanced arc voltage and power dissipation. The ion velocity could be enhanced when the plasma was produced in a non-uniform magnetic field.

Hohenbild, Stefan; Grubel, Christoph; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Oks, Efim M.; Anders, Andre

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

An Exact Finite-Amplitude Wave on a Helmholtz Velocity Profile in an Infinite Boussinesq Fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the Helmholtz velocity profile shown in Fig. 1, it is shown that the interface can support an exact steady finite-amplitude wave which radiates internal gravity waves away from the interface.

R. Grimshaw

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet [Terahertz Systems Laboratory (TeSLa) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

12

Velocity width of the resonant domain in wave-particle interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wave-particle interaction is a ubiquitous physical mechanism exhibiting locality in velocity space. A single-wave Hamiltonian provides a rich model by which to study the self-consistent interaction between one electrostatic wave and N quasiresonant particles. For the simplest nonintegrable Hamiltonian coupling two particles to one wave, we analytically derive the particle velocity borders separating quasi-integrable motions from chaotic ones. These estimates are fully retrieved through computation of the largest Lyapunov exponent. For the large-N particle self-consistent case, we numerically investigate the localization of stochasticity in velocity space and test a qualitative estimate of the borders of chaos.

Marie-Christine Firpo and Fabrice Doveil

2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived from P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived from local earthquake travel times Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived from local earthquake travel times Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Inversion of 4036 P wave travel time residuals from 429 local earthquakes using a tomographic scheme provides information about three-dimensional upper crustal velocity variations in the Indian Wells Valley-Coso region of southeastern California. The residuals are calculated relative to a Coso-specific velocity model, corrected for station elevation, weighted, and back-projected along their ray paths through models defined with layers of blocks. Slowness variations in the surface

14

Galaxy peculiar velocities from large-scale supernova surveys as a dark energy probe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upcoming imaging surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will repeatedly scan large areas of sky and have the potential to yield million-supernova catalogs. Type Ia supernovae are excellent standard candles and will provide distance measures that suffice to detect mean pairwise velocities of their host galaxies. We show that when combining these distance measures with photometric redshifts for either the supernovae or their host galaxies, the mean pairwise velocities of the host galaxies will provide a dark energy probe which is competitive with other widely discussed methods. Adding information from this test to type Ia supernova photometric luminosity distances from the same experiment, plus the cosmic microwave background power spectrum from the Planck satellite, improves the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit by a factor of 1.8. Pairwise velocity measurements require no additional observational effort beyond that required to perform the traditional supernova luminosity distance test, but may provide complementary constraints on dark energy parameters and the nature of gravity. Incorporating additional spectroscopic redshift follow-up observations could provide important dark energy constraints from pairwise velocities alone. Mean pairwise velocities are much less sensitive to systematic redshift errors than the luminosity distance test or weak lensing techniques, and also are only mildly affected by systematic evolution of supernova luminosity.

Bhattacharya, Suman; Kosowsky, Arthur; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Zentner, Andrew R. [T-2, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Electric Field and Waves Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency ...

Wygant, J. R.

16

Argon–oxygen dc magnetron discharge plasma probed with ion acoustic waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precise determination of the relative concentration of negative ions is very important for the optimization of magnetron sputtering processes, especially for those undertaken in a multicomponent background produced by adding electronegative gases, such as oxygen, to the discharge. The temporal behavior of an ion acoustic wave excited from a stainless steel grid inside the plasma chamber is used to determine the relative negative ion concentration in the magnetron discharge plasma. The phase velocity of the ion acoustic wave in the presence of negative ions is found to be faster than in a pure argon plasma, and the phase velocity increases with the oxygen partial pressure. Optical emission spectroscopy further confirms the increase in the oxygen negative ion density, along with a decrease in the argon positive ion density under the same discharge conditions. The relative negative ion concentration values measured by ion acoustic waves are compared with those measured by a single Langmuir probe, and a similarity in the results obtained by both techniques is observed.

Saikia, Partha, E-mail: partha.008@gmail.com; Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Goswami, Kalyan Sindhu [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur, Kamrup, Assam 782 402 (India); Phukan, Arindam [Madhabdev College, Narayanpur, Lakhimpur, Assam 784164 (India)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Shear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table earthquake site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................... 6 Summary of seismic refraction/reflection methodsShear wave seismic velocity profiling and depth to water table ­ earthquake site response measurements for Valley County, Idaho Lee M. Liberty and Gabriel M. Gribler, Boise State University Center

Barrash, Warren

18

Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso geothermal P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso geothermal area, California, from microseismic travel time data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso geothermal area, California, from microseismic travel time data Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High precision P and S wave travel times for 2104 microearthquakes with focus <6 km are used in a non-linear inversion to derive high-resolution three-dimensional compressional and shear velocity structures at the Coso Geothermal Area in eastern California. Block size for the inversion is 0.2 km horizontally and 0.5 km vertically and inversions are investigated in the upper 5 km of the geothermal area.

19

UT of bimetallic welds by shear horizontal waves and electromagnetic ultrasonic (EMUS) probes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bimetallic transition welds include in most cases besides the austenitic weldment an austenitic buttering. Their inspection by ultrasound is strongly complicated by a high degree of elastic anisotropy. The elastic anisotropy results in phase and group velocities of the elastic wave-modes, which are functions of the propagation direction inside the weld metal and which cause skewing of the sound beams. The coarse grain structure leads to enhanced scattering. Furthermore, there exists a mismatch of the acoustical impedances between the weld metal and the base metal, which depends on the angle of incidence at the interface base metal/weld metal and weld metal/buttering. Due to these facts up to now using standard UT-techniques only the HAZ`s are inspected from both sides. In many cases dissimilar metal welds are only accessible from one side. Therefore, US-techniques are necessary which are capable to inspect the whole weld even if there is only access from one side. By improvement of the technology of the EMUS-probes and of the EMUS-instrumentation for the US-transduction of SH-waves a reliable technique for the ISI of dissimilar metal welds and also of austenitic welds is available. The contribution will shortly introduce into the physical basis of the SH-wave technique and present the results of test specimen measurements. The main part of the paper will report about the experiences and the results of field applications in different nuclear power plants.

Huebschen, G.; Salzburger, H.J.; Kroening, M. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren, Saarbruecken (Germany)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Excitation of solitons by an external resonant wave with a slowly varying phase velocity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel mechanism is proposed for the excitation of solitons in nonlinear dispersive media. The mechanism employs an external pumping wave with a varying phase velocity, which provides a continuous resonant excitation of a nonlinear wave in the medium. Two different schemes of a continuous resonant growth (continuous phase-locking) of the induced nonlinear wave are suggested. The first of them requires a definite time dependence of the pumping wave phase velocity and is relatively sensitive to the initial wave phase. The second employs the dynamic autoresonance effect and is insensitive to the exact time dependence of the pumping wave phase velocity. It is demonstrated analytically and numerically, for a particular example of a driven Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with periodic boundary conditions, that as the nonlinear wave grows, it transforms into a soliton, which continues growing and accelerating adiabatically. A fully nonlinear perturbation theory is developed for the driven KdV equation to follow the growing wave into the strongly nonlinear regime and describe the soliton formation.

Aranson, I.; Meerson, B. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Racah Inst. of Physics; Tajima, Toshiki [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Measurement of shear wave velocity of heavy oil De-hua Han, Jiajin Liu, University of Houston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for measurement of fluid velocity is to measure the travel time of the transmission wave and then the velocity can water, has been used and is good for P-wave measurement for a lot of fluid samples. But the transmission the principle of this method. The shear wave transducer is coupled with a buffer made of some kind of plastic

22

Shift in the longitudinal sound velocity due to sliding charge-density waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nonlinear conductivity observed for moderate electric fields in NbSe3, TaS3, (TaS4)2I, and K0.3MoO3 below the charge-density-wave-transition is believed to be due to the sliding of the charge-density waves. The sliding motion leads to a Doppler shift of the x-ray diffraction peaks, but this effect has not yet been resolved. We show here that besides the Doppler shift, a sliding incommensurate charge-density wave causes a change in the longitudinal sound velocity of the crystal that is linear in the charge-density-wave velocity. The resulting anisotropic shift is estimated in a mean-field approximation and found to be experimentally observable.

S. N. Coppersmith and C. M. Varma

1984-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

A New Global Rayleigh and Love Wave Group Velocity Dataset For Constraining Lithosphere Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A New Global Rayleigh and Love Wave Group Velocity Dataset For Constraining Lithosphere Properties features and fit our data very well. This dataset will be used to constrain lithospheric structure globally the global datasets used in Ritzwoller et al. (2002) already consist of more than 100,000 paths, the nature

Laske, Gabi

24

Effects of neutral interactions on velocity-shear-driven plasma waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a laboratory experiment, we demonstrate the substantial effects that collisions between charged and neutral particles have on low-frequency (?{sub i}????????{sub e}) shear-driven electrostatic lower hybrid waves in a plasma. We establish a strong (up to 2.5?kV/m) highly localized electric field with a length scale shorter than the ion gyroradius, so that the ions in the plasma, unlike the electrons, do not develop the full E?×?B drift velocity. The resulting shear in the particle velocities initiates the electron-ion hybrid (EIH) instability, and we observe the formation of strong waves in the vicinity of the shear with variations in plasma densities of 10% or greater. Our experimental configuration allows us to vary the neutral background density by more than a factor of two while holding the charged particle density effectively constant. Not surprisingly, increasing the neutral density decreases the growth rate/saturation amplitude of the waves and increases the threshold electric field necessary for wave formation, but the presence of neutrals affects the dominant wave frequency as well. We show that a 50% increase in the neutral density decreases the wave frequency by 20% while also suppressing the electric field dependence of the frequency that is observed when fewer neutrals are present. The majority of these effects, as well as the values of the frequencies we observe, closely match the predictions of previously developed linear EIH instability theory, for which we present the results of a numerical solution.

Enloe, C. L. [Physics Department, US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80840 (United States); Tejero, E. M.; Amatucci, W. E.; Crabtree, C.; Ganguli, G. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Sotnikov, V. [Sensors Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Standard practice for measuring the ultrasonic velocity in polyethylene tank walls using lateral longitudinal (LCR) waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This practice covers a procedure for measuring the ultrasonic velocities in the outer wall of polyethylene storage tanks. An angle beam lateral longitudinal (LCR) wave is excited with wedges along a circumferential chord of the tank wall. A digital ultrasonic flaw detector is used with sending-receiving search units in through transmission mode. The observed velocity is temperature corrected and compared to the expected velocity for a new, unexposed sample of material which is the same as the material being evaluated. The difference between the observed and temperature corrected velocities determines the degree of UV exposure of the tank. 1.2 The practice is intended for application to the outer surfaces of the wall of polyethylene tanks. Degradation typically occurs in an outer layer approximately 3.2-mm (0.125-in.) thick. Since the technique does not interrogate the inside wall of the tank, wall thickness is not a consideration other than to be aware of possible guided (Lamb) wave effects or reflection...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Generation of lower hybrid and whistler waves by an ion velocity ring distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using fully kinetic simulations in two and three spatial dimensions, we consider the generation and nonlinear evolution of lower hybrid waves produced by a cold ion ring velocity distribution in a low beta plasma. We show that the initial development of the instability is very similar in two and three dimensions and not significantly modified by electromagnetic effects, consistent with linear theory. At saturation, the level of electric field fluctuations is a small fraction of the background thermal energy; the electric field and corresponding density fluctuations consist of long, field-aligned striations. Energy extracted from the ring goes primarily into heating the background ions and the electrons at comparable rates. The initial growth and saturation of the magnetic components of the lower hybrid waves are related to the electric field components, consistent with linear theory. As the growing electric field fluctuations saturate, parallel propagating whistler waves develop by the interaction of two lower hybrid waves. At later times, these whistlers are replaced by longer wavelength, parallel propagating whistlers that grow through the decay of the lower hybrid fluctuations. Wave matching conditions demonstrate these conversion processes of lower hybrid waves to whistler waves. The conversion efficiency (=ratio of the whistler wave energy to the energy in the saturated lower hybrid waves) is computed and found to be significant ({approx}15%) for the parameters of the three-dimensional simulation (and even larger in the two-dimensional simulation), although when normalized in terms of the initial kinetic energy in the ring ions the overall efficiency is very small (<10{sup -4}). The results are compared with relevant linear and nonlinear theory.

Winske, D.; Daughton, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Performance testing of lead free primers: blast waves, velocity variations, and environmental testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results are presented for lead free primers based on diazodinitrophenol (DDNP)compared with tests on lead styphnate based primers. First, barrel friction measurements in 5.56 mm NATO are presented. Second, shot to shot variations in blast waves are presented as determined by detonating primers in a 7.62x51mm rifle chamber with a firing pin, but without any powder or bullet loaded and measuring the blast wave at the muzzle with a high speed pressure transducer. Third, variations in primer blast waves, muzzle velocities, and ignition delay are presented after environmental conditioning (150 days) for two lead based and two DDNP based primers under cold and dry (-25 deg C,0% relative humidity), ambient (20 deg C, 50% relative humidity), and hot & humid (50 deg C, 100% relative humidity) conditions in 5.56 mm NATO. Taken together, these results indicate that DDNP based primers are not sufficiently reliable for service use.

Courtney, Elya; Summer, Peter David; Courtney, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Velocity of Propagation of Longitudinal Waves in Liquids at Audio-Frequencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for measuring the velocity of propagation of longitudinal waves in liquids is described which is at the same time precise and convenient of application. A column of liquid contained in a cylindrical vertical steel tube was brought into resonance vibration at audio frequency by an electromagnetically excited diaphragm at the bottom. From the solution of the equation of propagation it is shown that when the resonance frequency of the system is the same as that of the diaphragm the reaction of the latter on the system is very small. The height of the column of liquid in the tube was adjusted until its natural frequency nearly corresponded with the predetermined resonance frequency of the diaphragm. The height was then varied slightly and the frequency adjusted until resonance occurred. From several observations of this type the appropriate height corresponding to the resonance frequency of the diaphragm was obtained by interpolation. The velocity of propagation of the longitudinal waves was then calculated from the relation V=f0, where f0 is the natural frequency of the diaphragm when clamped in the holder and ? is the wavelength.Correction for the elasticity of the walls of the tube.—The correction formulas of Korteweg, Lamb and Gronwall were tested experimentally on tubes of different dimensions. The latter was found to give the most satisfactory agreement, the two former being unsuitable for precision measurements.Measurements.—The velocity of sound was measured in air-free distilled water at 25°C. The average of 52 observations gave for this velocity 1485.4±2.3 m/sec. From this value the bulk modulus, G, and the adiabatic compressibility, ?, were calculated. Curves were plotted illustrating the variation of the velocity of sound with temperature for the range 25°-70°C and with concentration for solutions of NaCl and KCl of different normalities. Curves for the corresponding variations of G and ? are also given.

Louis Gordon Pooler

1930-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure 1 Victor C. Tsai and Sarun Atiganyanun* 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure 1 and Green's functions have been well established 14 for many decades. However, or Green's function surface displacement. We address this gap in the 19 literature

30

Upper mantle structure of South America from joint inversion of waveforms and fundamental mode group velocities of Rayleigh waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Upper mantle structure of South America from joint inversion of waveforms and fundamental mode tomographic S wave velocity model for the upper mantle beneath South America is presented. We developed three-dimensional (3-D) upper mantle S velocity model and a Moho depth model for South America, which

van der Lee, Suzan

31

Optical pin apparatus for measuring the arrival time and velocity of shock waves and particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for the detection of the arrival and for the determination of the velocity of disturbances such as shock-wave fronts and/or projectiles. Optical pins using fluid-filled microballoons as the light source and an optical fiber as a link to a photodetector have been used to investigate shock-waves and projectiles. A microballoon filled with a noble gas is affixed to one end of a fiber-optic cable, and the other end of the cable is attached to a high-speed streak camera. As the shock-front or projectile compresses the microballoon, the gas inside is heated and compressed producing a bright flash of light. The flash of light is transmitted via the optic cable to the streak camera where it is recorded. One image-converter streak camera is capable of recording information from more than 100 microballoon-cable combinations simultaneously.

Benjamin, R.F.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

32

Optical pin apparatus for measuring the arrival time and velocity of shock waves and particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for the detection of the arrival and for the determination of the velocity of disturbances such as shock-wave fronts and/or projectiles. Optical pins using fluid-filled microballoons as the light source and an optical fiber as a link to a photodetector have been used to investigate shock-waves and projectiles. A microballoon filled with a noble gas is affixed to one end of a fiber-optic cable, and the other end of the cable is attached to a high-speed streak camera. As the shock-front or projectile compresses the microballoon, the gas inside is heated and compressed producing a bright flash of light. The flash of light is transmitted via the optic cable to the streak camera where it is recorded. One image-converter streak camera is capable of recording information from more than 100 microballoon-cable combinations simultaneously.

Benjamin, Robert F. (315 Rover Blvd., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Optical pin apparatus for measuring the arrival time and velocity of shock waves and particles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is disclosed for the detection of the arrival and for the determination of the velocity of disturbances such as shock-wave fronts and/or projectiles. Optical pins using fluid-filled microballoons as the light source and an optical fiber as a link to a photodetector have been used to investigate shock-waves and projectiles. A microballoon filled with a noble gas is affixed to one end of a fiber-optic cable, and the other end of the cable is attached to a high-speed streak camera. As the shock-front or projectile compresses the microballoon, the gas inside is heated and compressed producing a bright flash of light. The flash of light is transmitted via the optic cable to the streak camera where it is recorded. One image-converter streak camera is capable of recording information from more than 100 microballoon-cable combinations simultaneously. 3 figs.

Benjamin, R.F.

1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

34

Ion Bernstein waves in a plasma with a kappa velocity distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a Vlasov-Poisson model, a numerical investigation of the dispersion relation for ion Bernstein waves in a kappa-distributed plasma has been carried out. The dispersion relation is found to depend significantly on the spectral index of the ions, ?{sub i}, the parameter whose smallness is a measure of the departure from thermal equilibrium of the distribution function. Over all cyclotron harmonics, the typical Bernstein wave curves are shifted to higher wavenumbers (k) if ?{sub i} is reduced. For waves whose frequency lies above the lower hybrid frequency, ?{sub LH}, an increasing excess of superthermal particles (decreasing ?{sub i}) reduces the frequency, ?{sub peak}, of the characteristic peak at which the group velocity vanishes, while the associated k{sub peak} is increased. As the ratio of ion plasma to cyclotron frequency (?{sub pi}/?{sub ci}) is increased, the fall-off of ? at large k is smaller for lower ?{sub i} and curves are shifted towards larger wavenumbers. In the lower hybrid frequency band and harmonic bands above it, the frequency in a low-?{sub i} plasma spans only a part of the intraharmonic space, unlike the Maxwellian case, thus exhibiting considerably less coupling between adjacent bands for low ?{sub i}. It is suggested that the presence of the ensuing stopbands may be a useful diagnostic for the velocity distribution characteristics. The model is applied to the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer in which waves propagating perpendicularly to the ambient magnetic field at frequencies between harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency are frequently observed.

Nsengiyumva, F.; Mace, R. L.; Hellberg, M. A. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa)] [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C. [CEA, LIST, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire d'Acoustique de l'Universite du Maine (LAUM), UMR CNRS 6613, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 9 (France)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

36

Approximate analytical method and its use for calculation of phase velocities of acoustic plane waves in crystals for example LiNbO3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By means of the offered analytical method the determinant relation for a phase velocities of elastic waves for an arbitrary propagation directions in a piezoelectric crystal are received. The phase velocities of three normal elastic waves for the crystal of LiNbO3 are calculated. Results of this calculation for each of waves are presented graphically in the form of the cards allowing easily to define phase velocities in any given direction in crystal.

A. A. Golubeva

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure by Victor C. Tsai and Sarun Atiganyanun*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Note Green's Functions for Surface Waves in a Generic Velocity Structure by Victor C. Tsai displacement/stress eigenfunctions and Green's functions have been well established for many decades. However on frequency, or Green's function surface displacement. We address this gap in the liter- ature and here

38

Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

Model of bubble velocity vector measurement in upward and downward bubbly two-phase flows using a four-sensor optical probe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The knowledge of bubble behaviors is of considerable significance for a proper understanding and modeling of two-phase flows. To obtain the information on the bubble motion, a novel model was developed, by which the bubble velocity vector can be directly calculated from six time intervals measured with a four-sensor probe. The measurements of local bubble velocity vector and void fraction were performed in both upward and downward bubbly flows by using a four-sensor optical probe. The area-averaged void fraction and bubble velocity obtained from the probe agree well with those measured by other cross-calibration methods, and the measurement errors are within 15% under various flow conditions. Experimental results of the bubble velocity vector reveal that the bubble lateral migration may be suppressed in upward flows, but be strengthened in downward flows as the liquid flow rate increases. Also, with an increase in gas flow rate, the bubble velocity distribution varies into the power–law profile in upward flows, but into an off-center peak profile in downward flows. In addition, the void fraction shows a core peak distribution at low void fraction for downward flows, but a wall peak distribution for upward flows. However, when the void fraction is relatively high, it displays an off-center peak distribution for downward flows but a core peak distribution for upward flows.

Daogui Tian; Changqi Yan; Licheng Sun

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Development of a generalized correlation for phase-velocity measurements obtained from impedance-probe pairs in two-phase flow systems. [PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A flag type electrical impedance probe has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) to measure liquid- and vapor-phase velocities in steam-water mixtures flowing through rod bundles. Measurements are made by utilizing the probes in pairs, installed in line, parallel to the flow direction, and extending out into the flow channel. The present study addresses performance difficulties by examining from a fundamental point of view the two-phase flow system which the impedance probes typically operate in. Specifically, the governing equations (continuity, momentum, energy) were formulated for both air-water and steam-water systems, and then subjected to a scaling analysis. The scaling analysis yielded the appropriate dimensionless parameters of significance in both kinds of systems. Additionally, with the aid of experimental data obtained at ORNL, those parameters of significant magnitude were established. As a result, a generalized correlation was developed for liquid and vapor phase velocities that makes it possible to employ the impedance probe velocity measurement technique in a wide variety of test configurations and fluid combinations.

Hsu, C.T.; Keshock, E.G.; McGill, R.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic wave velocity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

43.30.Ft, 43... short range was deemed desirable for isolating the effects of shallow water internal waves on acoustic... internal waves are not un- usual and it was ......

42

PROBING THE HALO FROM THE SOLAR VICINITY TO THE OUTER GALAXY: CONNECTING STARS IN LOCAL VELOCITY STRUCTURES TO LARGE-SCALE CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the first potential connections made between two local features in velocity space found in a survey of M giant stars and stellar spatial inhomogeneities on global scales. Comparison to cosmological, chemodynamical stellar halo models confirms that the M giant population is particularly sensitive to rare, recent and massive accretion events. These events can give rise to locally observed velocity sequences-each made from a small fraction of debris from a massive progenitor, passing at high velocity through the survey volume, near the pericenter of the eccentric orbit of the system. The majority of the debris is found in much larger structures, whose morphologies are more cloud-like than stream-like and which lie at the orbital apocenters. Adopting this interpretation, the full-space motions represented by the observed M giant velocity features are derived under the assumption that the members within each sequence share a common space velocity. Orbit integrations are then used to trace the past and future trajectories of these stars across the sky revealing plausible associations with large, previously discovered, cloud-like structures. The connections made between nearby velocity structures and these distant clouds represent preliminary steps toward developing coherent maps of such giant debris systems. These maps promise to provide new insights into the origin of debris clouds, new probes of Galactic history and structure, and new constraints on the high-velocity tails of the local dark matter distribution that are essential for interpreting direct dark matter particle detection experiments.

Johnston, Kathryn V.; Sheffield, Allyson A. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-0818 (United States); Sharma, Sanjib [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Rocha-Pinto, Helio J., E-mail: kvj@astro.columbia.edu [Observatorio do Valongo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

43

Topographically induced internal solitary waves in a pycnocline: Ultrasonic probes and stereo-correlation measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Internal solitary waves (ISWs) are large amplitude stable waves propagating in regions of high density gradients such as the ocean pycnocline. Their dynamics has often been investigated in two-dimensional approaches, however, their three-dimensional evolution is still poorly known. Experiments have been conducted in the large stratified water tank of CNRM-GAME to study the generation of ISWs in two academic configurations inspired by oceanic regimes. First, ultrasonic probes are used to measure the interfacial displacement in the two configurations. In the primary generation case for which the two layers are of constant density, the generation of ISWs is investigated in two series of experiments with varying amplitude and forcing frequency. In the secondary generation case for which the lower layer is stratified, the generation of ISWs from the impact of an internal wave beam on the pycnocline and their subsequent dynamics is studied. The dynamics of ISWs in these two regimes accords well with analytical approaches and numerical simulations performed in analogous configurations. Then, recent developments of a stereo correlation technique are used to describe the three-dimensional structure of propagating ISWs. In the primary generation configuration, small transverse effects are observed in the course of the ISW propagation. In the secondary generation configuration, larger transverse structures are observed in the interfacial waves dynamics. The interaction between interfacial troughs and internal waves propagating in the lower stratified layer are a possible cause for the generation of these structures. The magnitude of these transverse structures is quantified with a nondimensional parameter in the two configurations. They are twice as large in the secondary generation case as in the primary generation case.

Dossmann, Yvan, E-mail: yvan.dossmann@anu.edu.au [Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia) [Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); CNRM-GAME, UMR3589 METEO-FRANCE and CNRS, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Laboratoire d’Aérologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Paci, Alexandre [CNRM-GAME, UMR3589 METEO-FRANCE and CNRS, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France)] [CNRM-GAME, UMR3589 METEO-FRANCE and CNRS, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Auclair, Francis [Laboratoire d’Aérologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)] [Laboratoire d’Aérologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Lepilliez, Mathieu [CNRM-GAME, UMR3589 METEO-FRANCE and CNRS, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France) [CNRM-GAME, UMR3589 METEO-FRANCE and CNRS, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Laboratoire d’Aérologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse, 2 Allée Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Cid, Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, UMR5503 INPT, UPS, CNRS, 4, Allée Emile Monso, F-31030 Toulouse (France)] [Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, UMR5503 INPT, UPS, CNRS, 4, Allée Emile Monso, F-31030 Toulouse (France)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Dependence of the Shape of a Detonation Wave Front on the Detonation Wave Velocity upon Detonation of a Cylindrical Charge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transition of a system of partial differential equations which describe the stationary flow behind the shock–wave front of a detonation complex upon detonation of a cylindrical charge to a system...

A. R. Gushanov

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

47

Quantitative degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy: Probes for molecular species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resonant degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) is currently the subject of intensive investigation as a sensitive diagnostic tool for molecular species. DFWM has the advantage of generating a coherent (beam-like) signal which results in null-background detection and provides excellent immunity to background-light interference. Since multiple one-photon resonances are involved in the signal generation process, the DFWM technique can allow sensitive detection of molecules via electronic, vibrational or rotational transitions. These properties combine to make DFWM a widely applicable diagnostic technique for the probing of molecular species. The authors are conducting fundamental and applied investigations of DFWM for quantitative measurements of trace species in reacting gases. During the past year, efforts have been focussed in two areas: (1) understanding the effects of collisional processes on the DFWM signal generation process, and (2) exploring the applicability of infrared DFWM to detect polyatomic molecules via rovibrational transitions.

Farrow, R.; Rakestraw, D.; Paul, P.; Lucht, R.; Danehy, P.; Friedman-Hill, E.; Germann, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: Effect of moisture,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for wood-based panel products. In the forest products industry, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology, Ross and Pellerin 1994). One NDE technique, which uses stress-wave propagation characteristics, has received considerable atten- tion. Stress-wave-based NDE techniques have been investi- gated extensively

49

Probing the thermal character of analogue Hawking radiation for shallow water waves?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study and numerically compute the scattering coefficients of shallow water waves blocked by a stationary counterflow. When the flow is transcritical, the coefficients closely follow Hawking's prediction according to which black holes should emit a thermal spectrum. We study how the spectrum deviates from thermality when reducing the maximal flow velocity, with a particular attention to subcritical flows since these have been recently used to test Hawking's prediction. For such flows, we show that the emission spectrum is strongly suppressed, and that its Planckian character is completely lost. For low frequencies, we also show that the scattering coefficients are dominated by elastic hydrodynamical channels. Our numerical results reproduce rather well the observations made by S. Weinfurtner {\\it et al.} in the Vancouver experiment. Nevertheless, we propose a new interpretation of what has been observed, as well as new experimental tests.

Florent Michel; Renaud Parentani

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

P- and SV-wave transversely isotropic phase velocities analysis from VSP data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Measured anisotropy in Pierre Shale, Geophys. Prosp., 31...been applied to the Pierre Shale data (White, Martineau...elastic wave propagation in anisotropic media is the fact that the...al. (1983) in the Pierre Shale where two neighbouring wells......

J. de Parscau

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Surface wave phase velocities of the Western United States from a two-station method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the University of Colorado at Boulder (Lin et-al. 2009), which...Cascade Ranges, Columbia Plateau flood basalts, HLP and NW BR (High...colocated with the Columbia River flood basalts to the east in Washington...observed beneath the Columbia River flood basalt province. Love wave......

Anna Foster; Göran Ekström; Meredith Nettles

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Compressional and shear-wave velocities from gas hydrate bearing sediments: Examples from the India and Cascadia margins as well as Arctic permafrost regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shear wave velocity data have been acquired at several marine gas hydrate drilling expeditions, including the India National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 1 (NGHP-01), the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 (X311). In this study we use data from these marine drilling expeditions to develop an understanding of general grain-size control on the P- and S-wave properties of sediments. A clear difference in the downhole trends of P-wave (Vp) and S-wave (Vs) velocity and the Vp/Vs ratio from all three marine regions was observed: the northern Cascadia margin (IODP X311) shows the highest P-wave and S-wave velocity values overall and those from the India margin (Expedition NGHP-01) are the lowest. The southern Cascadia margin (ODP Leg 204) appears to have similar low P-wave and S-wave velocity values as seen off India. S-wave velocity values increase relative to the sites off India, but they are not as high as those seen on the northern Cascadia margin. Such regional differences can be explained by the amount of silt/sand (or lack thereof) occurring at these sites, with northern Cascadia being the region of the highest silt/sand occurrences. This grain-size control on P-wave and S-wave velocity and associated mineral composition differences is amplified when compared to the Arctic permafrost environments, where gas hydrate predominantly occurs in sand- and silt-dominated formations. Using a cross-plot of gamma ray values versus the Vp/Vs ratio, we compare the marine gas hydrate occurrences in these regions: offshore eastern India margin, offshore Cascadia margin, the Ignik-Sikumi site in Alaska, and the Mallik 5L-38 site in the Mackenzie Delta. The log-data from the Arctic permafrost regions show a strongly linear Vp–Vs relationship, similar to the previously defined empirical relationships by Greenberg and Castagna (1992). P- and S-wave velocity data from the India margin and ODP Leg 204 deviate strongly from these linear trends, whereas data from IODP X311 plot closer to the trend of the Arctic data sets and previously published relationships. Three new linear relationships for different grain size marine sediment hosts are suggested:a) mud-dominated (Mahanadi Basin, ODP Leg 204 & NGHP-01-17): Vs = 1.5854 × Vp ? 2.1649 b) silty-mud (KG Basin): Vs = 0.8105 × Vp ? 1.0223 c) silty-sand (IODP X311): Vs = 0.5316 × Vp ? 0.4916 We investigate the relationship of gas hydrate saturation determined from electrical resistivity on the Vp/Vs ratio and found that the sand-dominated Arctic hosts show a clearly decreasing trend of Vp/Vs ratio with gas hydrate saturation. Though limited due to lower overall GH saturations, a similar trend is seen for sites from IODP X311 and at the ash-dominated NGHP-01-17 sediment in the Andaman Sea. Gas hydrate that occurs predominantly in fractured clay hosts show a different trend where the Vp/Vs ratio is much higher than at sand-dominated sites and remains constant or increases slightly with increasing gas hydrate saturation. This trend may be the result of anisotropy in fracture-dominated systems, where P- and S-wave velocities appear higher and Archie-based saturations of gas hydrate are overestimated. Gas hydrate concentrations were also estimated in these three marine settings and at Arctic sites using an effective medium model, combining P- and S-wave velocities as equally weighted constraints on the calculation. The effective medium approach generally overestimates S-wave velocity in high-porosity, clay-dominated sediments, but can be accurately used in sand-rich formations.

M. Riedel; D. Goldberg; G. Guerin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Probing strong-field gravity and black holes with gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational wave observations will be excellent tools for making precise measurements of processes that occur in very strong- field regions of space time. Extreme mass

Hughes, Scott A.

54

Probing Vibrational Energy Transfer in DNA Nucleobases with Mid-UV Four-Wave Mixing Spectroscopies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heterodyne-detected four-wave mixing spectroscopies are used to investigate vibrational energy transfer in various DNA nucleobases. Unique insights into the solute-solvent couplings...

West, Brantley A; Womick, Jordan M; Moran, Andrew M

55

KRONOSEISMOLOGY: USING DENSITY WAVES IN SATURN'S C RING TO PROBE THE PLANET'S INTERIOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saturn's C ring contains multiple spiral patterns that appear to be density waves driven by periodic gravitational perturbations. In other parts of Saturn's rings, such waves are generated by Lindblad resonances with Saturn's various moons, but most of the wave-like C-ring features are not situated near any strong resonance with any known moon. Using stellar occultation data obtained by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft, we investigate the origin of six unidentified C-ring waves located between 80,900 and 87,200 km from Saturn's center. By measuring differences in the waves' phases among the different occultations, we are able to determine both the number of arms in each spiral pattern and the speeds at which these patterns rotate around the planet. We find that all six of these waves have between two and four arms and pattern speeds between 1660 Degree-Sign day{sup -1} and 1861 Degree-Sign day{sup -1}. These speeds are too large to be attributed to any satellite resonance. Instead, they are comparable to the predicted pattern speeds of waves generated by low-order normal-mode oscillations within the planet. The precise pattern speeds associated with these waves should therefore provide strong constraints on Saturn's internal structure. Furthermore, we identify multiple waves with the same number of arms and very similar pattern speeds, indicating that multiple m = 3 and m = 2 sectoral (l = m) modes may exist within the planet.

Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P. D., E-mail: mmhedman@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Anisotropy of elastic moduli, P-wave velocities, and thermal conductivities of Asan Gneiss, Boryeong Shale, and Yeoncheon Schist in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the anisotropic characteristics of the elastic moduli, P-wave velocities, and thermal conductivities of three types of anisotropic rocks, i.e., Asan gneiss, Boryeong shale, and Yeoncheon schist, occurring in Korea. The experiments were conducted on rock samples that show clear evidence of transverse isotropy. Cylindrical core samples with different anisotropy angles were prepared by coring at 15-degree intervals from the transversely isotropic plane using the laboratory directional coring system established for this study. Elastic moduli, P-wave velocities, and thermal conductivities were determined along the sample axis for different anisotropy angles. The anisotropy ratio is defined as the ratio of the properties parallel to the transversely isotropic plane to those perpendicular to the plane, and the anisotropy ratios for the thermal conductivities (K(90°)/K(0°)) of Asan gneiss, Boryeong shale, and Yeoncheon schist were 1.4, 2.1, and 2.5, respectively. The P-wave velocity anisotropy ratios (VP(90°)/VP(0°)) for Asan gneiss, Boryeong shale, and Yeoncheon schist were 1.2, 1.5, and 2.3, respectively. The elastic moduli, P-wave velocities, and thermal conductivities that were obtained were compared with theoretical predictions by mean prediction error (MPE). The correlations between the measured properties were evidently correlated with some minor scatter in the data. The degree of anisotropy measured in this study suggests that ignoring anisotropy in rock properties may mislead to erroneous results. The application of tensorial transformation evaluations revealed that the three types of rocks chosen for this study can be modeled effectively by a transversely isotropic model.

Hanna Kim; Jung-Woo Cho; Insun Song; Ki-Bok Min

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

Redpath, Bruce B.

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

58

Train of high-power femtosecond pulses: Probe wave in a gas of prepared atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new method for generating a regular train of ultrashort optical pulses in a prepared two-level medium. The train develops from incident monochromatic probe radiation travelling in a medium of atoms, which are in a quantum mechanical superposition of dressed internal states. In the frame of used linear theory for the probe radiation, the energy of individual pulses is an exponentially growing function of atom density and of interaction cross section. Pulse repetition rate is determined by the generalized Rabi frequency and can be around 1 THz and greater. We also show that the terms, extra to the dipole approximation, endow the gas by a new property: non-saturating dependence of refractive index on the dressing monochromatic field intensity. Contribution of these nonsaturating terms can be compatible with the main dipole approximation in the wavelength region of about ten micrometers (the range of CO_2 laser) or larger.

Gevorg Muradyan; A. Zh. Muradyan

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

59

Probing neutrino oscillations from supernovae shock waves via the IceCube detector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The time dependent neutrino oscillation signals due to the passage of a shock wave through the supernovae are analyzed for the case of three active neutrinos and also for the case that there are two additional sterile neutrinos. It is shown that, even without flavor identification and energy measurement, detailed information about the masses and mixing angles of the neutrinos may be obtained with a detector with excellent time resolution such as IceCube. Such a signal would also give important information about the nature of the shock wave within the supernovae.

Sandhya Choubey; N. P. Harries; G. G. Ross

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

60

Time-synchronized continuous wave laser-induced fluorescence axial velocity measurements in a diverging cusped field thruster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements are presented of time-synchronized axial ion velocities at three positions in the discharge channel and plume of a diverging cusped field thruster operating on xenon. Xenon axial ion velocities for the thruster are derived from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 5d[4]7/2–6p[3]5/2 xenon ion excited state transition centred at ? = 834.72 nm. The thruster is operated in a high-current mode, where the anode discharge current is shown to oscillate quasi-periodically. A sample-hold scheme is implemented to correlate ion velocities to phases along the current cycle. These time-synchronized measurements show that median axial ion velocities decrease as discharge current increases, and that the widths of ion velocity distributions increase with increases in discharge current for positions at the exit plane and outside the thruster channel.

N A MacDonald; M A Cappelli; W A Hargus Jr

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Upper-crustal seismic velocity heterogeneity as derived from a variety of P-wave sonic logs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......removing a large-scale...probed rocks. borehole geophysics...Continental Deep Drilling Program...range from borehole logs, Geophys...continental deep-drilling (KTB) holes...removing a large-scale...representative of larger volumes of...vicinity of the borehole wall. Hornby...introduced during drilling. Although......

K. Holliger

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

detonation velocity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

detonation velocity, detonation rate, velocity of detonation, V.O.D., detonating velocity, rate of detonation, detonating rate, detonation speed, detonating speed, speed of detonation ? Detonationsge...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Rogue waves for a long wave-short wave resonance model with multiple short waves Hiu Ning Chan (1 waves; Long-short resonance PACS Classification: 02.30.Jr; 05.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg #12;2 ABSTRACT A resonance between long and short waves will occur if the phase velocity of the long wave matches the group velocity

64

2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-multiple of the wavelength: n 2 L ,n 1,2,... . A vibrating string is an example of a transverse wave: its oscillation2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand

Glashausser, Charles

65

3-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-ft Wave Flume Facility 3-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

66

5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-ft Wave Flume Facility 5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 1.5 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

67

Calculations of Nonlinear Wave-Packet Interferometry Signals in the Pump-Probe Limit as Tests for Vibrational Control over Electronic Excitation Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The preceding paper describes a strategy for externally influencing the course of short-time electronic excitation transfer (EET) in molecular dimers and observing the process by nonlinear wave-packet interferometry (nl-WPI). Within a sample of isotropically oriented dimers having a specified internal geometry, a vibrational mode internal to the acceptor chromophore can be preferentially driven by electronically nonresonant impulsive stimulated Raman (or resonant infrared) excitation with a short polarized control pulse. A subsequent electronically resonant polarized pump then preferentially excites the donor, and EET ensues. Here we test both the control strategy and its spectroscopic investigation-with some sacrifice of amplitude-level detail-by calculating the pump-probe difference signal. That signal is the limiting case of the control-influenced nl-WPI signal in which the two pulses in the pump pulse-pair coincide, as do the two pulses in the probe pulse-pair. We present calculated pump-probe difference signals for (1) a model excitation-transfer complex in which two equal-energy monomers each support one moderately Franck-Condon active intramolecular vibration; (2) a simplified model of the covalent dimer dithia-anthracenophane, representing its EET dynamics following selective impulsive excitation of the weakly Franck-Condon active anthracene vibration at 385 cm-1; and (3) a model complex featuring moderate electronic-vibrational coupling in which the site energy of the acceptor chromophore is lower than that of the donor.

Jason D. Biggs; Jeffrey A. Cina

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

68

Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

LaCure, Mari Mae

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

70

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume I P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (I), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

71

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume III P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (III), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 390 to 1220 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 40 ft (later relocated to 27.5 ft due to visibility in borehole after rain) in Borehole C4997, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4997, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

72

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume IV S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (IV), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. S-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1300 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Shear (S) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition, a second average shear wave record was recorded by reversing the polarity of the motion of the T-Rex base plate. In this sense, all the signals recorded in the field were averaged signals. In all cases, the base plate was moving perpendicular to a radial line between the base plate and the borehole which is in and out of the plane of the figure shown in Figure 1.1. The definition of “in-line”, “cross-line”, “forward”, and “reversed” directions in items 2 and 3 of Section 2 was based on the moving direction of the base plate. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas (UT) was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. The Redpath geophone and the UT geophone were properly aligned so that one of the horizontal components in each geophone was aligned with the direction of horizontal shaking of the T-Rex base plate. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows. Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vs Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered S-wave records of lower horizontal receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, respectively, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered S-wave signals of lower horizontal receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, respectively, Section 10: Expanded and filtered S-wave signals of lower horizontal receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower horizontal receiver signals, respectively.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

Velocity determination from velocity spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Lithologic and structural information can bc inferred from the interval velocities and thicknesses. Actual seismic exploration data (which are twelvefold sub- surface coverage data taken at Niller County, Arkansas) were used to make the actual velocity...) with decreasing increment of normal incidence time and rms velocity, 2) with in- creasing interval between the initial and final values of time and TRACE NO. & SHOT-GEOPHONE DISTANCE l 2 3 4 3 6 X, X X 4 Xs X~ RMS VELOCITY V ca Jo M A tD M NNO = J o) y...

Yang, Sung Jin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 92, NO. B1, PAGES 393-405, JANUARY 10, 1987 P Wave Velocity Variations in the Coso Region, California,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GeophysicsDivision, SandiaNational Laboratories,Albuquerque,New Mexico ROBERT W. CLAYTON Seismological velocity variations in the Indian Wells Valley-Coso region of southeasternCalifornia. The residuals layer reflect local geology, including slow velocities for the sedimentary basins of Indian Wells

Clayton, Robert W.

75

High temperature probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

Swan, Raymond A. (Fremont, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Probing the plasma near high power wave launchers in fusion devices for static and dynamic electric fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An exploratory study was carried out in the long-pulse tokamak Tore Supra, to determine if electric fields in the plasma around high-power, RF wave launchers could be measured with non-intrusive, passive, optical emission spectroscopy. The focus was in particular on the use of the external electric field Stark effect. The feasibility was found to be strongly dependent on the spatial extent of the electric fields and overlap between regions of strong (> 1 kV/cm) electric fields and regions of plasma particle recycling and plasma-induced, spectral line emission. Most amenable to the measurement was the RF electric field in edge plasma, in front of a lower hybrid heating and current drive launcher. Electric field strengths and direction, derived from fitting the acquired spectra to a model including time-dependent Stark effect and the tokamak-range magnetic field Zeeman-effect, were found to be in good agreement with full-wave modeling of the observed launcher.

Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL; Martin, Elijah H [ORNL; Isler, Ralph C [ORNL; Colas, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Goniche, M. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Hillairet, J. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Panayotis, Stephanie [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Jacquot, Jonathan [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Lotte, Ph. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Colledani, G. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Caughman, J. B. O. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Ekedahl, A. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Green, David L [ORNL; Harris, Jeffrey H [ORNL; Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Shannon, Prof. Steven [North Carolina State University; Litaudon, X [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

MHD Waves in Astrophysical Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dependence of the wave velocities on the angle ? between the undisturbed field B 0 and the wave vector k is clearly demonstrated in a polar diagram—the phase velocity diagram. In Fig.?15.2, th...

Boris V. Somov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Kinematic inversion for the 2-D horizontal and vertical qP-wave velocities and depths to interfaces applied to the TACT seismic profile, southern Alaska  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the upper 5 km of the crust is anisotropic. The range of anisotropy for...the rock samples, limestone-anisotropic shale. Since the ray path is velocity-dependent...equation (1986) for limestone-anisotropic shale using the following data (Levin......

E. A. Boztepe; L. W. Braile

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Detonation velocity deficit and curvature radius of flexible detonation fuses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The detonation velocity deficit in bending flexible detonating fuses is studied, based on the detonation wave’s corner effects and delay time ... model and a theoretical mathematical equation of the detonation ve...

Y. -Q. Wen; Ya. -K. Ye; N. Yan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Wave Breaking Dissipation Observed with “SWIFT” Drifters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy dissipation rates during ocean wave breaking are estimated from high-resolution profiles of turbulent velocities collected within 1 m of the surface. The velocity profiles are obtained from a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler sonar on a wave-...

Jim Thomson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Local tunneling characteristics near a grain boundary of a d-wave superconductor as probed by a normal-metal or a low-Tc-superconductor STM tip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We studied the local single-particle tunneling characteristics [as observed with scanning tunnel microscopy (STM)] for N D and S D tunneling, where N is a normal metal, S is a s-wave superconductor, and D is a d-wave superconductor with a {100...

Zhao, Hongwei

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

Velocities of Wave-Transmission in Rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...excep- tion the fundamental requirement that...interior- wall of boiler-room. This...the buildings safe for operation and providing...amperes for normal operation. A Laon tube...0.1, the fundamental REPORTS AND PAPERS...

L. H. Adams

83

Effective traveling-wave excitation below the speed of light  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate that effective traveling-wave excitation of high-gain amplifiers requires velocities that are remarkably slower than the velocity of light. Experiments with a...

Tommasini, Riccardo; Fill, Ernst E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Studies of the velocity fields near a submerged rectangular object  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the time periodic waves past a submerged rectangular object. For sotne wave conditions, large energy dissipation occurred at the submerged object due to vortex generation. The amount of energy dissipation was examined by comparing incident wave energy... object. A two component laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA) was used to obtain detailed measurements of the instantaneous velocity field and flow visualization was conducted to study the vortex structure around the submerged object. The measured wave...

Kim, Young-Ki

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Atom Probe Tomography | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atom Probe Tomography Atom Probe Tomography The LEAP 4000 XHR local electrode atom probe tomography instrument enabled the first-ever comprehensive and accurate 3-D chemical...

86

Localized velocity anomalies in the lower mantle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......projection centred on the Argentina source region. The location...approximately 80" from the Argentina source region. S-waves...Bolivia are dominated by SV energy, and large Sp precursors...closer to the stations than Argentina. Lower mantle velocity anomalies......

Thorne Lay

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

IWA : an analysis program for isentropic wave measurements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IWA (Isentropic Wave Analysis) is a program for analyzing velocity profiles of isentropic compression experiments. IWA applies incremental impedance matching correction to measured velocity profiles to obtain in-situ particle velocity profiles for Lagrangian wave analysis. From the in-situ velocity profiles, material properties such as wave velocities, stress, strain, strain rate, and strength are calculated. The program can be run in any current version of MATLAB (2008a or later) or as a Windows XP executable.

Ao, Tommy

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

PROPAGATING WAVES ALONG SPICULES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alfvenic waves are thought to play an important role in coronal heating and acceleration of solar wind. Here we investigate the statistical properties of Alfvenic waves along spicules (jets that protrude into the corona) in a polar coronal hole using high-cadence observations of the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We developed a technique for the automated detection of spicules and high-frequency waves. We detected 89 spicules and found (1) a mix of upward propagating, downward propagating, as well as standing waves (occurrence rates of 59%, 21%, and 20%, respectively); (2) the phase speed gradually increases with height; (3) upward waves dominant at lower altitudes, standing waves at higher altitudes; (4) standing waves dominant in the early and late phases of each spicule, while upward waves were dominant in the middle phase; (5) in some spicules, we find waves propagating upward (from the bottom) and downward (from the top) to form a standing wave in the middle of the spicule; and (6) the medians of the amplitude, period, and velocity amplitude were 55 km, 45 s, and 7.4 km s{sup -1}, respectively. We speculate that upward propagating waves are produced near the solar surface (below the spicule) and downward propagating waves are caused by reflection of (initially) upward propagating waves off the transition region at the spicule top. The mix of upward and downward propagating waves implies that exploiting these waves to perform seismology of the spicular environment requires careful analysis and may be problematic.

Okamoto, Takenori J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); De Pontieu, Bart, E-mail: joten.okamoto@nao.ac.jp [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Elastic constants and velocity surfaces of indurated anisotropic shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The velocities of two Devonian-Mississippian shales have been measured to confining pressures of 200 MPa in a laboratory study of anisotropy and wave propagation. Both samples were found to be transversely iso...

Joel E. Johnston; Nikolas I. Christensen

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Extreme wave impinging and overtopping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi...

Ryu, Yong Uk

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

LAB #2 Escape Velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(6) The above calculations ignore the effect of air resistance on the object. We assume that resistance is proportional to velocity and decreases with increasing

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ethics of reproductive technologies probed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethics of reproductive technologies probed ... Creation of human reproductive technologies—such as in-vitro fertilization, cryopreservation of embryos, and surrogate motherhood— has advanced far more rapidly than development of legal, social, and ethical frameworks to deal with the wave of issues raised. ... The 11-member panel, chaired by Howard W. Jones Jr. of Eastern Virginia Medical School, includes physicians, scientists, lawyers, a theologian, and an ethicist. ...

1986-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

High frequency sound velocity in the glass former 2Ca(NO3)2?3KNO3: Molecular dynamics simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations of the fragile glass-forming liquid 2Ca(NO3)2?3KNO3 (CKN) were performed from its molten state at 800K down to its glassy state at 250K. Time correlation functions of mass current fluctuations were calculated in order to investigate sound waves of high wave vectors, 0.18velocity of CKN was obtained from the slope of the dispersion curve of excitation energy of acoustic modes, ?(k), as a function of temperature across the glass transition. The temperature dependence of the sound velocity of longitudinal acoustic modes is discontinuous in a range that is higher than the glass transition temperature Tg estimated from the T dependence of density and energy. This result demonstrates that the high frequency sound velocity probes the transition from liquidlike to solidlike regimes at a temperature higher than the Tg of the simulated material. The sound velocity of transverse acoustic (TA) modes presents discontinuity at the same value of the thermodynamic derived Tg. It is proposed that the distinct behavior of high frequency TA modes is due to fast reorientational motions of NO3? anions that are able to relieve local shear stresses.

Mauro C. C. Ribeiro

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

94

Spatiotemporal Signal Analysis via the Phase Velocity Transform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phase velocity transform (PVT) is an integral transform that divides a function of space and time into components that propagate at uniform phase velocities without distortion. This paper examines the PVT as a method to analyze spatiotemporal fluctuation data. The transform is extended to systems with discretely sampled data on a periodic domain, and applied to data from eight azimuthally distributed probes on the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX). This reveals features not shown by Fourier analysis, particularly regarding nonsinusoidal mode structure.

Nathan Mattor

2000-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

95

ARM - Measurement - Vertical velocity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsVertical velocity govMeasurementsVertical velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Vertical velocity The component of the velocity vector, along the local vertical. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System KAZR : Ka ARM Zenith Radar MMCR : Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radar SODAR : Mini Sound Detection and Ranging

96

Vertical Velocity Focus Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Velocity Focus Group Velocity Focus Group ARM 2008 Science Team Meeting Norfolk, VA March 10-14 Background Vertical velocity measurements have been at the top of the priority list of the cloud modeling community for some time. Doppler measurements from ARM profiling radars operating at 915-MHz, 35-GHz and 94-GHz have been largely unexploited. The purpose of this new focus group is to develop vertical velocity ARM products suitable for modelers. ARM response to their request has been slow. Most ARM instruments are suitable for cloud observations and have limited capabilities in precipitation Using ARM datasets for evaluating and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically drastically limits opportunities

97

Sheets Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sheets Wave Basin Sheets Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sheets Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Rhode Island Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 30.0 Beam(m) 3.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) $750(+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.0 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Pre-programmed for regular and irregular waves, but wavemaker is capable of any input motion. Wave Direction Uni-Directional

98

A One-Dimensional Propagation of Shock Wave Supported by Atmospheric Millimeter-Wave Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A shock wave supported by an atmospheric breakdown plasma caused by a high-power millimeter-wave ... was detached from the ionization front of the plasma whenever the propagation velocity of the ionization ... . ...

Yasuhisa Oda; Toshikazu Yamaguchi…

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Traveling-wave photodetector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Monitoring attosecond dynamics of coherent electron-nuclear wave packets by molecular high-order-harmonic generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pump-probe scheme for preparing and monitoring electron-nuclear motion in a dissociative coherent electron-nuclear wave packet is explored from numerical solutions of a non-Born-Oppenheimer time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A mid-ir intense few-cycle probe pulse is used to generate molecular high-order-harmonic generation (MHOHG) from a coherent superposition of two or more dissociative coherent electronic-nuclear wave packets, prepared by a femtosecond uv pump pulse. Varying the time delay between the intense ir probe pulse and the uv pump pulse by a few hundreds of attoseconds, the MHOHG signal intensity is shown to vary by orders of magnitude, thus showing the high sensitivity to electron-nuclear dynamics in coherent electron-nuclear wave packets. We relate this high sensitivity of MHOHG spectra to opposing electron velocities (fluxes) in the electron wave packets of the recombining (recolliding) ionized electron and of the bound electron in the initial coherent superposition of two electronic states.

Bredtmann, Timm [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Institut fuer Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Takustrasse 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, Andre D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Perspectives on Deposition Velocity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deposition Deposition Velocity ... Going down the rabbit hole to explain that sinking feeling Brian DiNunno, Ph.D. Project Enhancement Corporation June 6 th , 2012 Discussion Framework ï‚— Development of the HSS Deposition Velocity Safety Bulletin ï‚— Broader discussion of appropriate conservatism within dispersion modeling and DOE-STD-3009 DOE-STD-3009 Dose Comparison "General discussion is provided for source term calculation and dose estimation, as well as prescriptive guidance for the latter. The intent is that calculations be based on reasonably conservative estimates of the various input parameters." - DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A.3 DOE-STD-3009 Dispersion

102

Velocity pump reaction turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Velocity pump reaction turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Nonlinear Mixing of Electromagnetic Waves in Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...coupling (32, 33). Plasma instabilities with multiple...experiment (34) with 430-MHz incoher-ent backscatter...probing of ionospheric plasma with beat waves appears...four-wave mixing in a plasma opens up the possibility...important in future upper atmospheric research. Beat waves...

V. STEFAN; B. I. COHEN; C. JOSHI

1989-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evidence for correlation of electrical resistivity and seismic velocity in heterogeneous near-surface materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-surface materials. For both trends, the resistivity (r) and p-wave velocity (Vp) are related in the form Log10 r = m resistivity and seismic velocity in heterogeneous near-surface materials, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30(7), 1373Evidence for correlation of electrical resistivity and seismic velocity in heterogeneous near

Meju, Max

106

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

Marsh, S.P.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

107

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Marsh, S.P.

1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

108

Explosive plane-wave lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

Marsh, Stanley P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

Day, Robert A. (Livermore, CA); Conti, Armond E. (San Jose, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Seismic velocity estimation from time migration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Algorithms producing the seismic velocities from thethe Dix velocities and the true seismic velocities in 2D . .

Cameron, Maria Kourkina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Are "EIT Waves" Fast-Mode MHD Waves?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the nature of large-scale, coronal, propagating wave fronts (``EIT waves'') and find they are incongruous with solutions using fast-mode MHD plane-wave theory. Specifically, we consider the following properties: non-dispersive single pulse manifestions, observed velocities below the local Alfven speed, and different pulses which travel at any number of constant velocities, rather than at the ``predicted'' fast-mode speed. We discuss the possibility of a soliton-like explanation for these phenomena, and show how it is consistent with the above-mentioned aspects.

M. J. Wills-Davey; C. E. DeForest; J. O. Stenflo

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

Scour of simulated Gulf Coast sand beaches due to wave action in front of sea walls and dune barriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

versus the deep water wave height for the two wave lengths and for the 15' and 90' walls. For a particular wave length scour increased with increase in wave height, because of the greater energies and velocities associated with higher waves... were identical, Because the wave lengths differed, the deep water wave heights differed. For longer waves the scour increased at all points where the wall was installed. The greater weve length resulted in greater energy and particle velocities and...

Chesnutt, Charles Burgess

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 104.0 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 4.6 Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 1.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 12' by 12' concrete slabs anchored to flume walls

114

Energy Flux and Wavelet Diagnostics of Secondary Mountain Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, aircraft data from mountain waves have been primarily analyzed using velocity and temperature power spectrum and momentum flux estimation. Herein it is argued that energy flux wavelets (i.e., pressure–velocity wavelet cross-...

Bryan K. Woods; Ronald B. Smith

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Radar and sonar probing of potash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system Determination of the sylvinite and halite acoustic velocities using sonar 50 56 Samples Velocity measurements 56 57 TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED) CHAPTER Page V PROBING RESEARCH CONDUCTED IN THE IMC K-2 POTASH MINE 62 Geology... sylvinite and halite test samples 26 7 Schematic diagram of the 250 kHz sonar system used to measure the one-way travel time through sylvinite and halite test samples 26 8 Map showing the location of the Foxtrot and Bravo radar stations in the Petromisa...

Lopez Aguilar, Luis Felipe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

116

Propagation Distance Required to Reach Steady-State Detonation Velocity in Finite-Sized Charges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The decay of a detonation wave from its initial CJ velocity to its final, steady state velocity upon encountering a finite thickness or diameter charge is investigated numerically and theoretically. The numerical simulations use an ideal gas equation of state and pressure dependent reaction rate in order to ensure a stable wave structure. The confinement is also treated as an ideal gas with variable impedance. The velocity decay along the centerline is extracted from the simulations and compared to predictions base on a front evolution equation that uses the steady state detonation velocity-front curvature relation ($D_n-\\kappa$). This model fails to capture the finite signaling speed of the leading rarefaction resulting from the interaction with the yielding confinement. This signaling speed is verified to be the maximum signal velocity occurring in the ideal ZND wave structure of the initial CJ velocity. A simple heuristic model based on the rarefaction generated by a one-dimensional interaction between the...

Li, Jianling; Higgins, Andrew J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Grading of lumber using stress waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this research was to develop stress wave grading technology suitable for small lumber mills. Specific goals include: 1) develop an ultrasonic probe configuration to facilitate real-time grain angle and edge knot measurement, 2) determine...

Bethi, Rajeshwar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

118

Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Stress anisotropy and velocity anisotropy in low porosity shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shales are known for often marked intrinsic anisotropy of many of their properties, including strength, permeability and velocity for example. In addition, it is well known that anisotropic stress fields can also have a significant impact on anisotropy of velocity, even in an isotropic medium. This paper sets out to investigate the ultrasonic velocity response of well-characterised low porosity shales from the Officer Basin in Western Australia to both isotropic and anisotropic stress fields and to evaluate the velocity response to the changing stress field. During consolidated undrained multi-stage triaxial tests on core plugs cut normal to bedding, Vpv increases monotonically with increasing effective stress and Vs1 behaves similarly although with some scatter. Vph and Vsh remain constant initially but then decrease within each stage of the multi-stage test, although velocity from stage to stage at any given differential stress increases. This has the impact of decreasing both P-wave (?) and S-wave anisotropy (?) through application of differential stress within each loading stage. However, increasing the magnitude of an isotropic stress field has little effect on the velocity anisotropies. The intrinsic anisotropy of the shale remains reasonably high at the highest confining pressures. The results indicate the magnitude and orientation of the stress anisotropy with respect to the shale microfabric has a significant impact on the velocity response to changing stress fields.

U. Kuila; D.N. Dewhurst; A.F. Siggins; M.D. Raven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Slow waves in fractures filled with viscous fluid Valeri Korneev1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow waves in fractures filled with viscous fluid Valeri Korneev1 ABSTRACT Stoneley guided waves in a fluid-filled fracture generally have larger amplitudes than other waves; therefore, their properties, a simple dispersion equa- tion for wave-propagation velocity is obtained. This velocity is much smaller

Korneev, Valeri A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

MagLab Audio Dictionary: Probe  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probe? Now Playing: What's a Probe? Enable Javascript and Flash to stream the Magnet Minute Greg Boebinger Associated Links Meet the Probes What's a Probe? Probe Development for...

122

SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Arregui, I.; Terradas, J., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin 2 Wave Basin 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Length(m) 48.8 Beam(m) 26.5 Depth(m) 2.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Built to client specifications, currently rigid concrete over gravel fill

124

Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 22.9 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $150/hour (excluding labor) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.3 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10.7 Wave Period Range(s) 3.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.2 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Directional, irregular, any spectrum, cnoidal or solitary wave Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Stone Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None

125

White light velocity interferometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

White light velocity interferometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

Erskine, D.J.

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

White light velocity interferometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s.

Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

White light velocity interferometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a technique that allows the use of broadband and incoherent illumination. Although denoted white light velocimetry, this principle can be applied to any wave phenomenon. For the first time, powerful, compact or inexpensive sources can be used for remote target velocimetry. These include flash and arc lamps, light from detonations, pulsed lasers, chirped frequency lasers, and lasers operating simultaneously in several wavelengths. The technique is demonstrated with white light from an incandescent source to measure a target moving at 16 m/s. 41 figs.

Erskine, D.J.

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

McIntyre, T.J.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

130

Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microseismic imaging can be an important tool for characterizing geothermal reservoirs. Since microseismic sources occur more or less continuously both due to the operations of a geothermal field and the naturally occurring background seismicity, passive seismic monitoring is well suited to quantify the temporal variations in the vicinity of a

131

The Standing Wave on a String as an Oscillator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the usual treatment of waves in introductory courses one begins with traveling waves and the frequency/wavelength relationship f??=?v where v is the wave velocity. One then makes the point about superposition and shows that two waves traveling in opposite directions can add up to a standing wave; Eq. (1) still applies. This approach is problematic in two ways: (1) The motion being described standing waves has no apparent “velocity ” and so it seems unnecessarily complex—perhaps unreasonably complex—to construct it out of moving waves; (2) It is not easy to derive the formula for the velocity of waves especially for an audience without calculus or without multi-variate calculus (the wave equation).

Michael Sobel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Reconsideration of Matter Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matter waves were discovered in the early 20th century from their wavelength, predicted by DeBroglie, Planck's constant divided by the particle's momentum, that is, lmw = h/mv. But, the failure to obtain a reasonable theory for the matter wave frequency resulted somewhat in loss of further interest. It was expected that the frequency of the matter wave should correspond to the particle kinetic energy, that is, fmw = 1/2mv^2/h but the resulting velocity of the matter of the particle, v = fmw x lmw, is that the matter wave moves at one half the speed of the particle, obviously absurd as the particle and its wave must move together. If relativistic mass is used (as it should in any case) the problem remains, the same mass appearing in numerator and denominator and canceling. It is no help to hypothesize that the total energy, not just the kinetic energy, yields the matter wave. That attributes a matter wave to a particle at rest. It also gives the resulting velocity as c^2/v, the wave racing ahead of its particle. A reinterpretation of Einstein's derivation of relativistic kinetic energy (which produced his famous E = mc^2) leads to a valid matter wave frequency and a new understanding of particle kinetics and of the atom's stable orbits.

Roger Ellman

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

133

Alden Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 33.5 Beam(m) 21.3 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Depends on study Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 1.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 1.8 Wave Period Range(s) 1.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Period adjustable electronically, height adjustable mechanically Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Designed as needed using commercially available sand/sediment

134

Energy Dispersion in African Easterly Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The existence of an upstream (eastward) group velocity for African easterly waves (AEWs) is shown based on single-point lag regressions using gridded reanalysis data from 1990 to 2010. The eastward energy dispersion is consistent with the ...

Michael Diaz; Anantha Aiyyer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Probing Mercury's Partnering Preferences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Preferences Probing Mercury's Partnering Preferences Merc.gif Why it Matters: Mercury (Hg) is a major global pollutant arising from both natural and anthropogenic sources....

136

Probing metal solidification nondestructively  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing metal solidification nondestructively This is the first time that high-energy protons have been used to nondestructively image a large metal sample during melting and...

137

Probing metal solidification nondestructively  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing metal solidification nondestructively This is the first time that high-energy protons have been used to nondestructively image a large metal sample during melting...

138

Wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waves receive their energy from the wind by means of a ... whose yield is not yet clearly understood. Energy in the wave is more concentrated than in the wind ... density. For this reason a motor utilizing wave p...

Ferruccio Mosetti

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is one of the world's largest producers of electricity from geothermal energy. A key resource management issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient (Q) data at The Geysers in terms of the geologic structure and fluid saturation in the reservoir. Our data consist of waveforms from approximately 300

140

Local tunneling characteristics near a grain boundary of a d-wave superconductor as probed by a normal-metal or a low-T-c-superconductor STM tip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the local single-particle tunneling characteristics [as observed with scanning tunnel microscopy (STM)] for N-D and S-D tunneling, where D is a d-wave superconductor with a {100}{110} grain boundary. The tunneling Hamiltonian method is used...

Zhao, HW; Hu, Chia-Ren.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ponderomotive Forces On Waves In Modulated Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear interactions of waves via instantaneous cross-phase modulation can be cast in the same way as ponderomotive wave-particle interactions in high-frequency electromagnetic fi eld. The ponderomotive effect arises when rays of a probe wave scatter off perturbations of the underlying medium produced by a second, modulation wave, much like charged particles scatter off a quasiperiodic field. Parallels with the point-particle dynamics, which itself is generalized by this theory, lead to new methods of wave manipulation, including asymmetric barriers for light.

Dodin, I.Y; Fisch, Nathaniel

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

142

Alfv'en Wave Solitons and Solar Intermediate Drift Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

propagate at velocities of the order of the Alfv'en veloc­ ity in a direction inclined to the magnetic field, the solar wind, and possibly accretion disks, and extra­ galactic jets. In such magnetized plasmas Alfv'en waves are easily excited by various processes. Linear waves propagate at the Alfv'en speed v

Guedel, Manuel

143

Effect of Doppler broadening on quantitative concentration measurements with degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of Doppler broadening on degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) signal intensities in the regime of high pump and probe laser intensities is investigated theoretically. DFWM...

Reichardt, Thomas A; Lucht, Robert P

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Seismic waves in stratified anisotropic media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......structure response as a function of frequency and radial...group, and energy velocities...structure response as a function of frequency and radial...group, and energy velocities...plane-wave response. This method...for each frequency, data for...amounts of storage required......

Gerard J. Fryer; L. Neil Frazer

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch15. Mechanical Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch15. Mechanical Waves #12;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 2 15-1. Introduction Source: disturbance + cohesive force between adjacent pieces A wave is a disturbance that propagates through space Mechanical wave: needs a medium to propagate Wave pulse #12;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 3 Distinctions Wave velocity vs

Yoo, S. J. Ben

146

Kinematics measurements of regular, irregular, and rogue waves by PIV/LDV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waves. A series of experiments were conducted in a 2-D wave tank at Texas A&M University to measure wave velocities and accelerations using LDV and PIV systems. The wave crests of regular and rogue waves are the focus of this study. With the measured...

Choi, Hae-Jin

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

147

Velocity of Elastic Waves in Granite and Norite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...excep- tion the fundamental requirement that...interior- wall of boiler-room. This...the buildings safe for operation and providing...amperes for normal operation. A Laon tube...0.1, the fundamental REPORTS AND PAPERS...

L. Don Leet

148

Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

149

Van Allen probes pinpoint driver of speeding electrons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Van Allen probes pinpoint driver of speeding electrons Van Allen probes pinpoint driver of speeding electrons Van Allen probes pinpoint driver of speeding electrons Los Alamos researchers believe they have solved a lingering mystery about how electrons within Earth's radiation belt can suddenly become energetic enough to kill orbiting satellites. July 25, 2013 Artist's rendering of mechanism within Van Allen radiation belts An artist's rendering of a mechanism within the Van Allen radiation belts that can accelerate electrons to satellite-killing energies. The mechanism was discovered by a group of scientists using data from NASA's Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes). Researchers, led by Los Alamos National laboratory space physicist Geoffrey Reeves, believe that electromagnetic waves within the Van Allen belts themselves

150

DeFrees Large Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Large Wave Basin Large Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Large Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 32.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 64 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Computer controlled 4m hydraulic wave paddle stroke allows a series of solitary waves to be generated; arbitrary wave shape possible Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes

151

Fermi velocity renormalization and dynamical gap generation in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the renormalization of the Fermi velocity by the long-range Coulomb interactions between the charge carriers in the Dirac-cone approximation for the effective low-energy description of the electronic excitations in graphene at half filling. Solving the coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the dressing functions in the corresponding fermion propagator with various approximations for the particle-hole polarization we observe that Fermi velocity renormalization effects generally lead to a considerable increase of the critical coupling for dynamical gap generation and charge-density wave formation at the semimetal-insulator transition.

C. Popovici; C. S. Fischer; L. von Smekal

2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

Comparison of P-wave and S-wave data in a fractured reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-wave and S-wave stations . Table 2 The depths, times, and RMS velocities of the seismic reflectors (Tertiary and Cretaceous systems) at locations 45, 0 and 65. 0 on the P-wave section . 32 Table 3 The RMS velocities, depths of the seismic reflectors...-wave seismic lines were shot, parallel to each other, in Burleson County, Texas. The circles indicate ~ oil-producing wells. The two lines trend northwest-southeast and are appmximately thee and a half miles long (Fig. 2) The contours represent cumulative...

Al-Mustafa, Husam Mustafa

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

Chemical sensing flow probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

Laguna, George R. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The various manifestations of collisionless dissipation in wave propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of an electrostatic wave packet inside a collisionless and initially Maxwellian plasma is always dissipative because of the irreversible acceleration of the electrons by the wave. Then, in the linear regime, the wave packet is Landau damped, so that in the reference frame moving at the group velocity, the wave amplitude decays exponentially with time. In the nonlinear regime, once phase mixing has occurred and when the electron motion is nearly adiabatic, the damping rate is strongly reduced compared to the Landau one, so that the wave amplitude remains nearly constant along the characteristics. Yet, we show here that the electrons are still globally accelerated by the wave packet, and in one dimension, this leads to a non local amplitude dependence of the group velocity. As a result, a freely propagating wave packet would shrink, and therefore, so would its total energy. In more than one dimension, not only does the magnitude of the group velocity nonlinearly vary, but also its direction. In the weakly nonlinear regime, when the collisionless damping rate is still significant compared to its linear value, the group velocity is directed towards the outside of the wave packet and tends to increase its transverse extent, while the opposite is true once the wave is essentially undamped. The impact of the nonlinear variation of the group velocity on the transverse size of the wave packet is quantified, and compared to that induced by the self-focussing due to wave front bowing.

Benisti, Didier; Morice, Olivier; Gremillet, Laurent [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor fall velocity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fall velocity fall velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Hydrometeor fall velocity Fall velocity of hydrometeors (e.g. rain, snow, graupel, hail). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer LDIS : Laser Disdrometer WSACR : Scanning ARM Cloud Radar, tuned to W-Band (95GHz) Field Campaign Instruments DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

156

The gridded electromagnet probe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We attempted to measure the anisotropy in the electron distribution function in magnetized plasma by exploiting the adiabatic invariance of the electron's magnetic moment with a probe comprising a grid, a collector, and ...

Shadman, K. (Khashayar), 1972-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Property:Current Velocity Range(m/s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity Range(m/s) Velocity Range(m/s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Current Velocity Range(m/s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Current Velocity Range(m/s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 0.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 3.2 + Alden Small Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 0.0 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.0 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.0 + Chase Tow Tank + 0.0 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 0.0 +

158

Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves C.F. Driscoll, F. Anderegg, D 92093 USA Abstract. Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma Langmuir waves, and at large excitations resonance is observed over a broad range. Laser Induced

California at San Diego, University of

159

Particle Velocity Distributions and Ionization Processes in a Gas-Puff Z Pinch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured the time-dependent radial velocity distributions of singly to five times ionized ions in an imploding plasma shell by observing the spectral shapes and intensities of emission lines in various directions. An ionization wave propagating much faster than the local radial ion velocities is observed. The ionization front velocity is found to be consistent with estimates of electron heat conduction into the plasma-neutral layer. The ionization and velocity histories of the particles are experimentally determined. The mechanisms of momentum transfer to the particles are also determined and compared with existing models.

M. E. Foord; Y. Maron; G. Davara; L. Gregorian; A. Fisher

1994-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

160

OTRC Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OTRC Wave Basin OTRC Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name OTRC Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (OTRC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 45.7 Beam(m) 30.5 Depth(m) 5.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $300/hour (excluding labor) Special Physical Features 4.6m wide x 9.1m long x 16.8m deep pit with adjustable depth floor in test area Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.6 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 25 Wave Period Range(s) 4.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.6 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description GEDAP 3D wave generation software, 48 hinged flap wave generator

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Techniques for improving the readout sensitivity of gravitational wave antennae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from astrophysical sources shows promise as a new method to probe extremely energetic phenomena and test the strong field limit of the general theory of relativity. The era of the ...

Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolás de Mateo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Convective heat flow probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

163

Direct numerical investigation of detonation waves using a Monte Carlo method.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A detonation wave describes a shock that propagates at supersonic velocity through a chemically unstable gas medium and is driven by the energy released by… (more)

O'Connor, Patrick

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ultrasonic Rayleigh wave inspection of unit train rotary couplers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of using ultrasonic Rayleigh waves I' or the inspection of rotary couplers 'O'. Experiments rvere conducted on three couplers, one that was cracked, one that was nerv, and one new coupler with simulated cracks. IJsing a commercial probe. indications... of using ultrasonic Rayleigh waves I' or the inspection of rotary couplers 'O'. Experiments rvere conducted on three couplers, one that was cracked, one that was nerv, and one new coupler with simulated cracks. IJsing a commercial probe. indications...

Salkowski, Charles Leo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

Ultrasonic guided waves in eccentric annular pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper studies the feasibility of using ultrasonic guided waves to rapidly inspect tubes and pipes for possible eccentricity. While guided waves are well established in the long range inspection of structures such as pipes and plates, studies for more complex cross sections are limited and analytical solutions are often difficult to obtain. Recent developments have made the Semi Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method widely accessible for researchers to study guided wave properties in complex structures. Here the SAFE method is used to study the effect of eccentricity on the modal structures and velocities of lower order guided wave modes in thin pipes of diameters typically of interest to the industry. Results are validated using experiments. The paper demonstrates that even a small eccentricity in the pipe can strongly affect guided wave mode structures and velocities and hence shows potential for pipe eccentricity inspection.

Pattanayak, Roson Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu [Centre for NDE, Indian Institute of Technology - Madras Chennai 600036, T. N. (India)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

166

Seismic Shear Waves in Deep Seismic Reflection Surveys: Some Notes on Problems and Profits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

—Shear (S) waves differ from compressional (P) waves because of their lower propagation velocities, their lower frequencies and due to the different character of their particle motion. The move-out of travel-time...

E. Lüschen

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Response of an Open Stratospheric Balloon to the Presence of Inertio-Gravity Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analytic solutions for the vertical response of an open stratospheric balloon to the presence of inertio-gravity waves during its descent are obtained. Monochromatic waves with simultaneous variations in density, velocity, and temperature are ...

P. Alexander; J. Cornejo; A. De la Torre

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Quantitative imaging of the air-water flow fields formed by unsteady breaking waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental method for simultaneously measuring the velocity fields on the air and water side of unsteady breaking waves is presented. The method is applied to breaking waves to investigate the physics of the air and ...

Belden, Jesse (Jesse Levi)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Guided Wave Propagation in Tubular Section with Multi-Layered Viscoelastic Coating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The dispersion of phase velocity and wave attenuation for coated pipes are evaluated against a baseline model which is the bare, uncoated tubing to establish the propagation characteristics of the guided shear and longitudinal waves in the presence of multiple...

Kuo, Chi-Wei 1982-

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

170

An upper bound from helioseismology on the stochastic background of gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The universe is expected to be permeated by a stochastic background of gravitational radiation of astrophysical and cosmological origin. This background is capable of exciting oscillations in solar-like stars. Here we show that solar-like oscillators can be employed as giant hydrodynamical detectors for such a background in the muHz to mHz frequency range, which has remained essentially unexplored until today. We demonstrate this approach by using high-precision radial velocity data for the Sun to constrain the normalized energy density of the stochastic gravitational-wave background around 0.11 mHz. These results open up the possibility for asteroseismic missions like CoRoT and Kepler to probe fundamental physics.

Daniel M. Siegel; Markus Roth

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

171

Multispectral imaging probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

172

Multispectral imaging probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

Sandison, David R. (Moriarty, NM); Platzbecker, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Descour, Michael R. (Tucson, AZ); Armour, David L. (Albuquerque, NM); Craig, Marcus J. (Albuquerque, NM); Richards-Kortum, Rebecca (Austin, TX)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Inversion of azimuthally dependent NMO velocity in transversely isotropic media with a tilted axis of symmetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Just as the transversely isotropic model with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI media) is typical for describing horizontally layered sediments, transverse isotropy with a tilted symmetry axis (TTI) describes dipping TI layers (such as tilted shale beds near salt domes) or crack systems. P-wave kinematic signatures in TTI media are controlled by the velocity V{sub PO} in the symmetry direction, Thomsen's anisotropic coefficients {xi} and {delta}, and the orientation (tilt {nu} and azimuth {beta}) of the symmetry axis. Here, the authors show that all five parameters can be obtained from azimuthally varying P-wave NMO velocities measured for two reflectors with different dips and/or azimuths (one of the reflectors can be horizontal). The shear-wave velocity V{sub SO} in the symmetry direction, which has negligible influence on P-wave kinematic signatures, can be found only from the moveout of shear waves. Using the exact NMO equation, the authors examine the propagation of errors in observed moveout velocities into estimated values of the anisotropic parameters and establish the necessary conditions for a stable inversion procedure. Since the azimuthal variation of the NMO velocity is elliptical, each reflection event provides them with up to three constraints on the model parameters. Generally, the five parameters responsible for P-wave velocity can be obtained from two P-wave ellipses, but the feasibility of the moveout inversion strongly depends on the tilt {nu}. While most of the analysis is carried out for a single layer, the authors also extend the inversion algorithm to vertically heterogeneous TTI media above a dipping reflector using the generalized Dix equation. A synthetic example for a strongly anisotropic, stratified TTI medium demonstrates a high accuracy of the inversion.

Grechka, V.; Tsvankin, I.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

DeFrees Small Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Small Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 15.0 Beam(m) 0.8 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 30 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Computer controlled hydraulic paddle, arbitrary wave shape possible Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 1:10 sloping glass with dissipative horsehair covering if needed

175

Lithospheric Velocity Structure of the Anatolain plateau-Caucasus-Caspian Regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anatolian Plateau-Caucasus-Caspian region is an area of complex structure accompanied by large variations in seismic wave velocities. Despite the complexity of the region little is known about the detailed lithospheric structure. Using data from 29 new broadband seismic stations in the region, a unified velocity structure is developed using teleseismic receiver functions and surface waves. Love and Rayleigh surface waves dispersion curves have been derived from event-based analysis and ambient-noise correlation. We jointly inverted the receiver functions with the surface wave dispersion curves to determine absolute shear wave velocity and important discontinuities such as sedimentary layer, Moho, lithospheric-asthenospheric boundary. We combined these new station results with Eastern Turkey Seismic Experiment results (29 stations). Caspian Sea and Kura basin underlained by one of the thickest sediments in the world. Therefore, short-period surface waves are observed to be very slow. The strong crustal multiples in receiver functions and the slow velocities in upper crust indicate the presence of thick sedimentary unit (up to 20 km). Crustal thickness varies from 34 to 52 km in the region. The thickest crust is in Lesser Caucasus and the thinnest is in the Arabian Plate. The lithospheric mantle in the Greater Caucasus and the Kura depression is faster than the Anatolian Plateau and Lesser Caucasus. This possibly indicates the presence of cold lithosphere. The lower crust is slowest in the northeastern part of the Anatolian Plateau where Holocene volcanoes are located.

Gok, R; Mellors, R J; Sandvol, E; Pasyanos, M; Hauk, T; Yetirmishli, G; Teoman, U; Turkelli, N; Godoladze, T; Javakishvirli, Z

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Teleseismic evidence for a low-velocity body under the Coso geothermal area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic evidence for a low-velocity body under the Coso geothermal area Teleseismic evidence for a low-velocity body under the Coso geothermal area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Teleseismic evidence for a low-velocity body under the Coso geothermal area Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Teleseismic P wave arrivals were recorded by a dense array of seismograph stations located in the Coso geothermal area, California. The resulting pattern of relative residuals an area showing approximately 0.2-s excess travel time that migrates with changing source azimuth, suggesting that the area is the 'delay shadow' produced by a deep, low-velocity body. Inversion of the relative residual data for three-dimensional velocity structure determines the lateral variations in velocity to a depth of 22.5

177

Original articles: Intelligent multichannel sensors for pulse wave analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aortic pulse wave velocity is an independent predictive indicator for all cause mortality and cardiovascular morbidity. Unfortunately it is only invasively accessible and thus the A. carotis-A. femoralis pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is recommended as ... Keywords: Arterial stiffness, BP, Cardiovascular risk, ECG, Electrocardiography, FIR, ICA, INA, Idxao, Idxo, Idxs, LED, PTT, PW, PWV, Pulse transit time, Pulse wave velocity, SD, cfPWV, dBP, p'(Idxo), p'(Idxs), p(Idxo), p(Idxs), sBP

S. Rosenkranz; C. Mayer; J. Kropf; S. Wassertheurer

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Velocity Distributions from Nonextensive Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is no accepted mechanism that explains the equilibrium structures that form in collisionless cosmological N-body simulations. Recent work has identified nonextensive thermodynamics as an innovative approach to the problem. The distribution function that results from adopting this framework has the same form as for polytropes, but the polytropic index is now related to the degree of nonextensiveness. In particular, the nonextensive approach can mimic the equilibrium structure of dark matter density profiles found in simulations. We extend the investigation of this approach to the velocity structures expected from nonextensive thermodynamics. We find that the nonextensive and simulated N-body rms-velocity distributions do not match one another. The nonextensive rms-velocity profile is either monotonically decreasing or displays little radial variation, each of which disagrees with the rms-velocity distributions seen in simulations. We conclude that the currently discussed nonextensive models require further modifications in order to corroborate dark matter halo simulations. (adapted from TeX)

Eric I. Barnes; Liliya L. R. Williams; Arif Babul; Julianne J. Dalcanton

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

179

APRIL 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APRIL 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM1 , J. M. KLYMAK2. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear internal waves. Unlike linear internal waves, the pressure-velocity energy flux up includes important

180

SEPTEMBER 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEPTEMBER 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM1 , J. M of coastline. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear internal waves. Unlike linear internal waves, the pressure-velocity energy flux up includes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

wave energy ? Wellenenergie f [Die einer Schwerewelle innewohnende potentielle und kinetische Energie. Sie ist etwa proportional dem Quadrat der Wellenhöhe. Zeichen: E we ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Site-Specific Velocity and Density Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the work conducted under the SBP to develop a shear wave and compressional wave velocity and density model specific to the WTP site. Section 2 provides detailed background information on the WTP site and its underlying geology as well as on the Seismic Boreholes Project activities leading up to the Vs and Vp measurements. In Section 3, methods employed and results obtained are documented for measurements of Vs and Vp velocities in basalts and interbeds. Section 4 provides details on velocity measurements in the sediments underlying the WTP. Borehole gravity measurements of density of the subsurface basalt and sediments are described in Section 5. Section 6 describes the analysis of data presented in section 3-5, and presents the overall velocity and density model for the WTP site.

Rohay, Alan C.; Brouns, Thomas M.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

183

System and method for determining coolant level and flow velocity in a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A boiling water reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel having a feedwater inlet for the introduction of recycled steam condensate and/or makeup coolant into the vessel, and a steam outlet for the discharge of produced steam for appropriate work. A fuel core is located within a lower area of the pressure vessel. The fuel core is surrounded by a core shroud spaced inward from the wall of the pressure vessel to provide an annular downcomer forming a coolant flow path between the vessel wall and the core shroud. A probe system that includes a combination of conductivity/resistivity probes and/or one or more time-domain reflectometer (TDR) probes is at least partially located within the downcomer. The probe system measures the coolant level and flow velocity within the downcomer.

Brisson, Bruce William; Morris, William Guy; Zheng, Danian; Monk, David James; Fang, Biao; Surman, Cheryl Margaret; Anderson, David Deloyd

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

BENCAP, LLC: CAPSULE VELOCITY TEST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ben Cap, LLC, has a technology that utilizes bebtonite to plug wells. The bentonite is encapsulated in a cardboard capsule, droped down to the bottom of the well where it is allowed to hydrate, causing the bentonite to expand and plug the well. This method of plugging a well is accepted in some, but not all states. This technology can save a significant amount of money when compared to cementing methods currently used to plug and abandon wells. The test objective was to obtain the terminal velocity of the capsule delivery system as it drops through a column of water in a wellbore. Once the terminal velocity is known, the bentonite swelling action can be timed not to begin swelling until it reaches the bottom of the well bore. The results of the test showed that an average speed of 8.93 plus or minus 0.12 ft/sec was achieved by the capsule as it was falling through a column of water. Plotting the data revealed a very linear function with the capsules achieving terminal velocity shortly after being released. The interference of the capsule impacting the casing was not readily apparent in any of the runs, but a siginal sampling anomaly was present in one run. Because the anomaly was so brief and not present in any of the other runs, no solid conclusions could be drawn. Additional testing would be required to determine the effects of capsules impacting a fluid level that is not at surface.

Meidinger, Brian

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

Vacuum Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

Paul S. Wesson

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Dark Energy Probes of Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

19/12/2013 1 Dark Energy Probes of Dark Energy Probes Dark Energy Supernovae Ia probing luminosity (Betti numbers) #12;19/12/2013 2 Dark Energy Probes: Comparison Method Strengths Weaknesses Systematics

Weijgaert, Rien van de

187

High-Frequency Internal Waves on the Oregon Continental Shelf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of vertical velocity by isopycnal-following, neutrally buoyant floats deployed on the Oregon shelf during the summers of 2000 and 2001 were used to characterize internal gravity waves on the shelf using measurements of vertical ...

Eric A. D’Asaro; Ren-Chieh Lien; Frank Henyey

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Voyager 2 Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...on the basis of plasma probe data) and infer...the weak 3.25-kHz waves represent electro-magnetic...pitch-angle dif-fusion and atmospheric precipitation, but for this low plasma density and high magnetic...f = 0.8 to 1.3 kHz) and a structured...

F. L. SCARF; D. A. GURNETT; W. S. KURTH; R. L. POYNTER

1982-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

MHL 2D Wind/Wave | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHL 2D Wind/Wave MHL 2D Wind/Wave Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL 2D Wind/Wave Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 35.1 Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Regular and irregular wave spectrum Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Removable beach Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Wind Velocity Range(m/s) 20.4

190

University of Iowa Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University of Iowa Wave Basin University of Iowa Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 40.0 Beam(m) 20.0 Depth(m) 3.0 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Towed 3DPIV; contactless motion tracking; free surface measurement mappingv Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.5 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Fully programmable for regular or irregular waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Trusses overlaid with lattice and matting Channel/Tunnel/Flume

191

Wave-particle interaction and Hamiltonian dynamics investigated in a traveling wave tube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For wave-particle interaction studies, the one-dimensional (1-D) beam-plasma system can be advantageously replaced by a Traveling Wave Tube (TWT). This led us to a detailed experimental analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and a small either cold or warm beam. More recently, a test electron beam has been used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s). The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is investigated with a trochoidal energy analyzer that records the beam energy distribution at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave responsible for Landau damping is observed. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is also observed, as well as the transition to large-scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap leading to a typical 'devil's staircase' behavior. A new strategy for the control of chaos is tested.

Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro [Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moleculaires, Unite 6633 CNRS-Universite de Provence, Equipe Turbulence Plasma, Case 321, Centre de Saint-Jerome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Bending waves due to a moving harmonic force.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many structurally induced and flow?induced vibration problems the harmonic forcing function is not stationary but moves with a velocity V 0. The effect of the forcing function velocity V 0 upon the free vibrational wave?number characteristics of a membrane and a plate is analyzed. The Mach numberM is defined to be the ratio of the velocity V 0 to the wave speed of the bending waves. For the membrane the effect of the Mach number is to increase the wave number (shorter wavelength) ahead of the forcing function and to decrease the wave number (longer wavelength) behind it. At supersonic speeds no disturbances travel ahead of the forcing function and both wave numbers lead to trailing waves. These results are equivalent to the classical Doppler?shifted results. The results of the plate are more complex. The right and left traveling waves retain their basic properties with the magnitude of the wave number changing monotomically as a function of the Mach numberM. The near?field decaying disturbances also retain their basic properties but immediately obtain components that induce the decaying disturbances to become left traveling waves with decaying components. At Mach numbers greater than 2 these disturbances become pure waves trailing without any decaying factor. The importance of each of these components as a function of the Mach number is discussed.

Mauro Pierucci

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Compressional-wave and shear-wave velocities from long-spaced sonic waveforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-SPACED SONIC TOOL UT LTF R L TNR 3' Lr TN R LrTFR LT 10' C FR NR 8' D I FRI (( 'I ll NrR ) ( rt I ll ))8. I ) 8 I I I I ) I I I l I I I-I Ii& I ? ? +) ? +l ?? I I~ I lk ) I LT I ? I I 10' A LT Figure 2. Configuration... REFERENCES 56 VITA 58 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page I Input parameters for synthetic sonic waveforms. 23 2 Synthetic waveform computed slowness error ? 9"-diameter borehole. . . . 25 3 Synthetic waveform computed slowness error ? 4"-diameter borehole...

Lake, Leonard Cornelius

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

194

Measuring In-Situ Mdf Velocity Of Detonation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for determining the velocity of detonation of a mild detonation fuse mounted on the surface of a device includes placing the device in a predetermined position with respect to an apparatus that carries a couple of sensors that sense the passage of a detonation wave at first and second spaced locations along the fuse. The sensors operate a timer and the time and distance between the locations is used to determine the velocity of detonation. The sensors are preferably electrical contacts that are held spaced from but close to the fuse such that expansion of the fuse caused by detonation causes the fuse to touch the contact, causing an electrical signal to actuate the timer.

Horine, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); James, Jr., Forrest B. (Albuquerque, NM)

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Body and surface wave tomography are two of the primary methods for estimation of regional scale seismic velocity variations. Seismic velocity is affected by temperature and rock composition in complex ways, but when combined with geologic and structural maps, relative temperature can in some cases be estimated. We present preliminary tomographic models for compressional and shear-wave velocity using local and regional earthquakes recorded by Earthscope Transportable Array stations, network

196

DOE Workshop - Deposition Velocity Status  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delivering DOE's Vision for the Delivering DOE's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission Safely Delivering the Department of Energy's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission DOE Workshop Deposition Velocity Status Mike Hitchler, Manager Nuclear Facility Safety June 5, 2012 Safely Delivering DOE's Vision for the East Tennessee Technology Park Mission Existing UCOR Analyses * UCOR facilities at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) use various plume models depending on when they were developed and by whom. - Some use MACCS or MACCS2 for dispersion evaluation. (~5 locations) - LLLW uses ingestion modeling (multiple locations)

197

Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

Dennise Templeton

198

Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

Dennise Templeton

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Estimating wave energy from a wave record  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This note is concerned with the calculation of wave energy from a time series record of wave heights. Various methods are used to estimate the wave energy. For wave records that contain a number of different ... ...

Sasithorn Aranuvachapun; John A. Johnson

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Airflow Simulations around OA Intake Louver with Electronic Velocity Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is important to control outdoor airflow rates into HVAC systems in terms of energy conservation and healthy indoor environment. Technologies are being developed to measure outdoor air (OA) flow rates through OA intake louvers on a real time basis. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the airflow characteristics through an OA intake louver numerically in order to provide suggestions for sensor installations. Airflow patterns are simulated with and without electronic air velocity sensors within cylindrical probes installed between louver blades or at the downstream face of the louver. Numerical results show quite good agreements with experimental data, and provide insights regarding measurement system design. The simulations indicate that velocity profiles are more spatially uniform at the louver outlet relative to between louver blades, that pressure drops imposed by the sensor bars are smaller with sensor bars at the louver outlet, and that placement of the sensor bars between louver blades substantially increases air velocities inside the louver. These findings suggest there is an advantage to placing the sensor bars at the louver outlet face.

Han, Hwataik; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Coherence waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1955 Wolf noticed that the mutual coherence function ? obeys two wave equations [Proc. R. Soc. London230, 246 (1955)]. The physical optics of this finding is thoroughly presented in...

Lohmann, Adolf W; Mendlovic, David; Shabtay, Gal

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Method of accelerating photons by a relativistic plasma wave  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photons of a laser pulse have their group velocity accelerated in a plasma as they are placed on a downward density gradient of a plasma wave of which the phase velocity nearly matches the group velocity of the photons. This acceleration results in a frequency upshift. If the unperturbed plasma has a slight density gradient in the direction of propagation, the photon frequencies can be continuously upshifted to significantly greater values.

Dawson, John M. (Pacific Palisades, CA); Wilks, Scott C. (Santa Monica, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 76.2 Beam(m) 15.2 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Special Physical Features Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control sys

204

Electromagnetic Probes in PHENIX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic probes are arguably the most universal tools to study the different physics processes in high energy hadron and heavy ion collisions. In this paper we summarize recent measurements of real and virtual direct photons at central rapidity by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions. We also discuss the impact of the results and the constraints they put on theoretical models. At the end we report on the immediate as well as on the mid-term future of photon measurements at RHIC.

Gabor David

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

205

Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

TIGER: A data analysis pipeline for testing the strong-field dynamics of general relativity with gravitational wave signals from coalescing compact binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The direct detection of gravitational waves with upcoming second-generation gravitational wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo will allow us to probe the genuinely strong-field dynamics of general ...

Agathos, M.

207

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

Colorado at Boulder, University of

208

Geophysical Prospecting, 2006, 54, 565573 Influence of pore pressure on velocity in low-porosity sandstone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

than unity for low-porosity rocks and that it varies with porosity, rock texture and wave type. We Pressure strongly influences the mechanical and transport properties of rocks, such as porosity, velocity, permeability and resistivity. In a fluid-saturated rock, both pore pressure and confining pressure control

209

Group-velocity tomography of South America and the surrounding oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Group-velocity tomography of South America and the surrounding oceans Oleg Vdovin,1 Jose¨ A. Rial,2 propagating across South America and the surrounding oceans. Broad-band waveform data from about 765 events and show that the average resolution across South America is about 60^80 for Rayleigh waves and 70

Ritzwolle, Mike

210

Numerical modelling of MHD waves in the solar chromosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waves and oscillations in the solar plasma organized by Robert Erdelyi...exploration of the properties of the solar chromosphere will have to rely...waves and oscillations in the solar plasma. Figure 1 (a) Magnetic...horizontal). The other three panels show the velocity times the...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Kinematics of Turbulence Convected by a Random Wave Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Turbulent velocity spectra measured beneath wind waves show a large enhancement about the central wave frequency. A “5/3" frequency dependence can be seen both above and below the central peak, but with an apparent increase in spectral density at ...

J. L. Lumley; E. A. Terray

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Variable path length spectrophotometric probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact, variable pathlength, fiber optic probe for spectrophotometric measurements of fluids in situ. The probe comprises a probe body with a shaft having a polished end penetrating one side of the probe, a pair of optic fibers, parallel and coterminous, entering the probe opposite the reflecting shaft, and a collimating lens to direct light from one of the fibers to the reflecting surface of the shaft and to direct the reflected light to the second optic fiber. The probe body has an inlet and an outlet port to allow the liquid to enter the probe body and pass between the lens and the reflecting surface of the shaft. A linear stepper motor is connected to the shaft to cause the shaft to advance toward or away from the lens in increments so that absorption measurements can be made at each of the incremental steps. The shaft is sealed to the probe body by a bellows seal to allow freedom of movement of the shaft and yet avoid leakage from the interior of the probe.

O'Rourke, Patrick E. (157 Greenwood Dr., Martiney, GA 30907); McCarty, Jerry E. (104 Recreation Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Haggard, Ricky A. (1144 Thornwood Drive, North Augusta, SC 29891)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The black hole symphony: probing new physics using gravitational waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from the system, carrying energy. These propagating curvature...direction along each arm of the constellation. To date, no confirmed detections...g. dark matter and dark energy) that makes up the Universe...structure and the rate at which energy is lost to GW emission. In...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Multipole-specific, model-independent, velocity-change spectra of collisionally perturbed P13-state Yb174 atoms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coherent transient (echo) techniques have been employed in a high-precision study of collisional velocity thermalization in a sample of (6s6p)P13, excited-state, Yb174 atoms perturbed by He or Ar. This work probes the comparative response of aligned and oriented atoms to both depolarizing and to weak, nondepolarizing and/or velocity-changing collisions. By direct inversion of our time-domain echo relaxation data, we also provide a model-independent determination of velocity-change spectra (collision kernels) for nondepolarizing collisions.

A. G. Yodh; T. W. Mossberg; J. E. Thomas

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Augmented geophysical data interpretation through automated velocity picking in semblance velocity images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Velocity picking is the problem of picking velocity-time pairs based on a coherence metric between multiple seismic signals. Coherence as a function of velocity and time can be expressed as a 2D color semblance velocity image. Currently, humans pick ...

J. Ross Beveridge; Charlie Ross; Darrell Whitley; Barry Fish

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Dispersion of Rayleigh Waves across Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......deformation ; there are considerable sedimentary basins of Paleozoic and Upper Proterozoic age...the wave fronts near the Great Australian Bight. A number of theoretical group velocity...A., 1962. The crust of the Pacific Basin, Geophys. Monograph No. 6, Brune......

B. A. Bolt; M. Niazi

1964-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Long Wave/Short Wave Resonance in Equatorial Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that resonant coupling between ultra long equatorial Rossby waves and packets of either short Rossby or short westward-traveling gravity waves is possible. Simple analytic formulas give the discrete value of the packet wave number k, ...

John P. Boyd

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

Wurtele, Jonathan [UC Berkeley and LBNL

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

219

Electromagnetic waves with nonlinear dispersion law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Last year physicists in Europe have measured the velocity of the neutrinos particles. They found the neutrinos moving faster than the speed of light in vacuum. This result means that Einstein's relativity principle and its consequences in modern physics need a global additional renovation. In present paper the part of this problem is considered in terms of basic Maxwell's method only. By means of introduction a diffusion like displacement current the new super wave equation was derived, which permits of its solution be described the electromagnetic waves moving some faster than the conventional speed of light in vacuum especially in a gamma ray of a very short wave length region. The unique properties of these waves are that they undergo nonlinear dispersion law, uppermost limit of which is restricted. Discussion of further experimental problems and a number of estimations are given for the macro physic super wave equations also.

Pavel Mednis

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

220

Wave–wave interactions and deep ocean acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deep ocean acoustics in the absence of shipping and wildlife is driven by surface processes. Best understood is the signal generated by non-linear surface wave interactions the Longuet-Higgins mechanism which dominates from 0.1 to 10?Hz and may be significant for another octave. For this source the spectral matrix of pressure and vector velocity is derived for points near the bottom of a deep ocean resting on an elastic half-space. In the absence of a bottom the ratios of matrix elements are universal constants. Bottom effects vitiate the usual “standing wave approximation ” but a weaker form of the approximation is shown to hold and this is used for numerical calculations. In the weak standing wave approximation the ratios of matrix elements are independent of the surface wave spectrum but depend on frequency and the propagation environment. Data from the Hawaii-2 Observatory are in excellent accord with the theory for frequencies between 0.1 and 1?Hz less so at higher frequencies. Insensitivity of the spectral ratios to wind and presumably waves is indeed observed in the data.

Z. Guralnik; J. Bourdelais; X. Zabalgogeazcoa; W. E. Farrell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Reverse Doppler effect of magnons with negative group velocity scattered from a moving Bragg grating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the reverse Doppler effect when magnons with negative group velocity are reflected off a moving Bragg grating. This grating, which represents a moving magnonic crystal, is created in an yttrium-iron-garnet film by the periodic strain induced by a traveling surface acoustic wave. As reflection occurs from a crystal rather than from a single reflecting surface, the wave number of the scattered wave is strictly determined by a momentum conservation law. Magnons scattered from the approaching (receding) magnonic crystal are found to be shifted down (up) in frequency. This result, together with an earlier report of reverse Doppler shift from moving sources [D. D. Stancil et al., Phys. Rev. B, 74, 060404(R) (2006)], establishes that the reverse Doppler effect is a universal phenomenon in systems with negative group velocity and not restricted to left-handed materials.

A. V. Chumak; P. Dhagat; A. Jander; A. A. Serga; B. Hillebrands

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

222

The Velocity of Sound in an Absorptive Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The theory of velocity propagation in a gas as conditioned by internal energy exchanges is considered in detail for the simplest case in which the "lags" may be different—namely, the model with three sets of states. This "second order" theory is required for the interpretation of experimental results where the wave period is of the order of the lag for some states. Assuming the first vibration state of CO2 to have the largest lag in accordance with Kneser's interpretation of his recent experiments, the necessary approximations are given explicitly and the results are directly applicable to CO2. The apparent lag as measured in sound velocity experiments is not the simple stationary state mean "collision life" nor the mean life of the energy quantum except under special conditions and then for only one of the states. The velocity increment in the "resonance" region is given more accurately in terms of transition probabilities and is not described completely by the specific heats as might be expected from the "first order" theory. Contrary to the indications of the simple theory with an empirical constant the external energy is always merely the translation term. The status of the assumed lag assignment in CO2 is discussed in the light of the results and underlying theory of this paper.

D. G. Bourgin

1932-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

KB Widener; K Johnson

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Vortices in Brain waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003). Vortices in Brain Waves 62. M. E. Raichle, ScienceVORTICES IN BRAIN WAVES WALTER J. FREEMAN Department ofthat is recorded in brain waves (electroencephalogram, EEG).

Freeman, Walter J III; Vitiello, Giuseppe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Rotating concave eddy current probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

Roach, Dennis P. (Albuquerque, NM); Walkington, Phil (Albuquerque, NM); Rackow, Kirk A. (Albuquerque, NM); Hohman, Ed (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Large-amplitude circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider large-amplitude circularly polarized (LACP) waves propagating in a magnetized plasma. It is well-known that the dispersion relation for such waves coincides with the dispersion relation given by the linear theory. We develop the model of LACP wave containing a finite population of Cerenkov resonant particles. We find that the current of resonant particles modifies the linear dispersion relation. Dispersion curves of low-frequency (i.e., whistler and magnetosonic) waves are shifted toward larger values of the wave vector, i.e., waves with arbitrarily large wavelengths do not exist in this case. Dispersion curves of high-frequency waves are modified so that the wave phase velocity becomes smaller than the speed of light.

Vasko, I. Y., E-mail: vaskoiy@gmail.com; Artemyev, A. V.; Zelenyi, L. M. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cavitation controlled acoustic probe for fabric spot cleaning and moisture monitoring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are provided for monitoring a fabric. An acoustic probe generates acoustic waves relative to the fabric. An acoustic sensor, such as an accelerometer is coupled to the acoustic probe for generating a signal representative of cavitation activity in the fabric. The generated cavitation activity representative signal is processed to indicate moisture content of the fabric. A feature of the invention is a feedback control signal is generated responsive to the generated cavitation activity representative signal. The feedback control signal can be used to control the energy level of the generated acoustic waves and to control the application of a cleaning solution to the fabric.

Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Few-cycle optical probe-pulse for investigation of relativistic laser-plasma interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a few-cycle optical probe-pulse for the investigation of laser-plasma interactions driven by a Ti:sapphire, 30 Terawatt (TW) laser system is described. The probe is seeded by a fraction of the driving laser's energy and is spectrally broadened via self-phase modulation in a hollow core fiber filled with a rare gas, then temporally compressed to a few optical cycles via chirped mirrors. Shadowgrams of the laser-driven plasma wave created in relativistic electron acceleration experiments are presented with few-fs temporal resolution, which is shown to be independent of post-interaction spectral filtering of the probe-beam.

Schwab, M. B.; Sävert, A.; Polz, J.; Schnell, M.; Rinck, T.; Möller, M.; Hansinger, P. [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)] [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Jäckel, O.; Paulus, G. G.; Kaluza, M. C. [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany) [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Veisz, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

229

Theoretical study of four-probe resistance in nanoscale measurements: Monatomic carbon chains and (5,5)-carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulations of four-probe resistance measurements of monatomic carbon chains and (5,5)-carbon nanotubes were carried out using the self-consistent charge density-functional tight-binding method and the Green’s function method. The four-probe resistance spectra show oscillations depending on the probe geometries and become negative at specific electron energies. These features coincide qualitatively with those experimentally observed by Gao et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 196802 (2005)]. It is shown that the resistance oscillations can be attributed to the interference of electron waves between the two voltage probes.

Asako Terasawa; Tomofumi Tada; Satoshi Watanabe

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

231

3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Syahputra, Ahmad [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

232

Electromagnetic Energy Velocity in Slow Light  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Group and electromagnetic energy velocities in structural and material slow light are compared. They are equal for structural slow light; the enhancement of linear and nonlinear...

Santagiustina, Marco

233

Mapping the nano-Hertz gravitational wave sky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a new method for extracting gravitational wave signals from pulsar timing data. We show that any gravitational wave signal can be decomposed into an orthogonal set of sky maps, with the number of maps equal to the number of pulsars in the timing array. These maps may be used as a basis to construct gravitational wave templates for any type of source, including collections of point sources. A variant of the standard Hellings-Downs correlation analysis is recovered for statistically isotropic signals. The template based approach allows us to probe potential anisotropies in the signal and produce maps of the gravitational wave sky.

Neil J. Cornish; Rutger van Haasteren

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

234

Probe Spin-Velocity Dependent New Interactions by Spin Relaxation Times of Polarized $^{3}He$ Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied how to constrain the $\\alpha\\vec{\\sigma}\\cdot\\vec{v}$ type interactions with the relaxation time of spin polarized noble gases in magnetic fields. Using the longest $T_{2}$ measured in the laboratory and the earth as the source, we obtained constraints on three new interactions. We present a new experimental upper bound to the vector-axial-vector($V_{VA}$) type interaction for ranges between $1\\sim10^{8}$m. In combination with the previous result, we set the most stringent experiment limits on $g_{V}g_{A}$ ranging from $\\sim\\mu m$ to $\\sim10^{8}$m. We improve the laboratory limit to the axial-axial-vector($V_{AA}$) type interaction by $\\sim2$ orders or more for distances below $\\sim1$cm. To our best knowledge, we report the first experiment upper limit on torsion induced by the earth on its surface.

Y. Zhang; G. A. Sun; S. M. Peng; C. B. Fu; Hao Guo; B. Q. Liu; H. Yan

2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

Experimental and numerical studies of high-velocity impact fragmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developments are reported in both experimental and numerical capabilities for characterizing the debris spray produced in penetration events. We have performed a series of high-velocity experiments specifically designed to examine the fragmentation of the projectile during impact. High-strength, well-characterized steel spheres (6.35 mm diameter) were launched with a two-stage light-gas gun to velocities in the range of 3 to 5 km/s. Normal impact with PMMA plates, thicknesses of 0.6 to 11 mm, applied impulsive loads of various amplitudes and durations to the steel sphere. Multiple flash radiography diagnostics and recovery techniques were used to assess size, velocity, trajectory and statistics of the impact-induced fragment debris. Damage modes to the primary target plate (plastic) and to a secondary target plate (aluminum) were also evaluated. Dynamic fragmentation theories, based on energy-balance principles, were used to evaluate local material deformation and fracture state information from CTH, a three-dimensional Eulerian solid dynamics shock wave propagation code. The local fragment characterization of the material defines a weighted fragment size distribution, and the sum of these distributions provides a composite particle size distribution for the steel sphere. The calculated axial and radial velocity changes agree well with experimental data, and the calculated fragment sizes are in qualitative agreement with the radiographic data. A secondary effort involved the experimental and computational analyses of normal and oblique copper ball impacts on steel target plates. High-resolution radiography and witness plate diagnostics provided impact motion and statistical fragment size data. CTH simulations were performed to test computational models and numerical methods.

Kipp, M.E.; Grady, D.E.; Swegle, J.W.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Conducted Electrical Weapon Deployed Probe Wounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deployment of probes is a common method of use for some handheld conducted electrical weapons (CEWs). Probe deployment allows for greater...

Donald M. Dawes M.D.; Jeffrey D. Ho M.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Wednesday, 26 July 2006 00:00 Silicon-based transistors are well-understood,...

238

Solar probe technology challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mission close to the sun is only possible if new spacecraft technologies can be developed and incorporated into a state?of?the?art spacecraft concept. The perihelion goal of 4 solar radii requires a shielded spacecraft that can tolerate the almost 3000 suns solar flux while maintaining the electronics components at room temperature. In addition the shield surface should sublimate at a rate of less than 3mg/s at perihelion. Many shield configuration designs have been studied and the most promising is a parabolic shape that functions as both a shield and a large high gain antenna. The shield material chosen for this design is a carbon?carbon material with highly emissive surface properties. A mission requirement for a high telecommunications power stems from the expected interference when attempting to transmit data through the solar corona. It is expected that the large carbon?carbon shield/antenna will have a high power gain even at high temperatures and will return adequate telemetry at the X?band radio frequency chosen for the Solar Probe mission. Other key technology needs include a non?nuclear power subsystem that can function in the extreme environments of the mission from Earth to Jupiter and onward to a 4 solar radii perihelion.

James E. Randolph; Robert N. Miyake; Bill J. Nesmith; Ray B. Dirling Jr.; Richard J. Howard

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Long duration ash probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

Hurley, John P. (Grand Forks, ND); McCollor, Don P. (Grand Forks, ND); Selle, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, MN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Long duration ash probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during soot blowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon. 8 figs.

Hurley, J.P.; McCollor, D.P.; Selle, S.J.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Exact probes of orientifolds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the exact vacuum expectation value of circular Wilson loops for Euclidean ${\\cal N}=4$ super Yang-Mills with $G=SO(N),Sp(N)$, in the fundamental and spinor representations. These field theories are dual to type IIB string theory compactified on $AdS_5\\times {\\mathbb R} {\\mathbb P}^5$ plus certain choices of discrete torsion, and we use our results to probe this holographic duality. We first revisit the LLM-type geometries having $AdS_5\\times {\\mathbb R} {\\mathbb P}^5$ as ground state. Our results clarify and refine the identification of these LLM-type geometries as bubbling geometries arising from fermions on a half harmonic oscillator. We furthermore identify the presence of discrete torsion with the one-fermion Wigner distribution becoming negative at the origin of phase space. We then turn to the string world-sheet interpretation of our results and argue that for the quantities considered they imply two features: first, the contribution coming from world-sheets with a single crosscap is closely ...

Fiol, Bartomeu; Torrents, Genis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Differential probes aid flow measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonconstricting differential pressure flow probes which help solve the problems of clogging, wear, and pressure loss at the Seawater Filtration Facility in Saudi Arabia are described. Treated seawater is pumped into oil-bearing formations for secondary recovery. Figures showing principle of operation for probes, installation schematic and long-term accuracy results (flow probes vs. orifice meters) are presented. The new diamond-shaped design flow sensor offers accurate flow measurement with low permanent pressure loss, which translates into cost savings for the operator.

Mesnard, D.R.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Optic probe for semiconductor characterization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Hambarian, Artak (Yerevan, AM)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

244

Assessment of the 296-S-21 Stack Sampling Probe Location  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were performed to assess the suitability of the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack according to the criteria of ANSI N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted most tests on a 3.67:1 scale model of the stack. CH2MHill also performed some limited confirmatory tests on the actual stack. The tests assessed the capability of the air-monitoring probe to extract a sample representative of the effluent stream. The tests were conducted for the practical combinations of operating fans and addressed: (1) Angular Flow--The purpose is to determine whether the velocity vector is aligned with the sampling nozzle. The average yaw angle relative to the nozzle axis should not be more than 20. The measured values ranged from 5 to 11 degrees on the scale model and 10 to 12 degrees on the actual stack. (2) Uniform Air Velocity--The gas momentum across the stack cross section where the sample is extracted should be well mixed or uniform. The uniformity is expressed as the variability of the measurements about the mean, the coefficient of variance (COV). The lower the COV value, the more uniform the velocity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ?20% across the center two-thirds of the area of the stack. At the location simulating the sampling probe, the measured values ranged form 4 to 11%, which are within the criterion. To confirm the validity of the scale model results, air velocity uniformity measurements were made both on the actual stack and on the scale model at the test ports 1.5 stack diameters upstream of the sampling probe. The results ranged from 6 to 8% COV on the actual stack and 10 to 13% COV on the scale model. The average difference for the eight runs was 4.8% COV, which is within the validation criterion. The fact that the scale model results were slightly higher than the actual stack suggests that the other test results on the scale model are conservative relative to the actual stack. (3) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases--A uniform contaminant concentration in the sampling plane enables the extraction of samples that represent the true concentration. This was first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The fan is a good mixer, so injecting the tracer downstream of the fans provides worst-case results. The acceptance criteria are that (1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and (2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. The results on the scale model at the point simulating the sampling probe ranged from 0.3 to 6 %COV, and the maximum single point deviation from the mean was -10%. (4) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles--Uniformity in contaminant concentration at the sampling probe was further demonstrated using tracer particles large enough to exhibit inertial effects. Particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter were used. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane. The scale model results ranged form 2 to 9%. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack meets the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

245

Velocity distributions in clusters of galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ a high-resolution dissipationless N-body simulation of a galaxy cluster to investigate the impact of subhalo selection on the resulting velocity distributions. Applying a lower limit on the present bound mass of subhalos leads to high subhalo velocity dispersions compared to the diffuse dark matter (positive velocity bias) and to a considerable deviation from a Gaussian velocity distribution (kurtosis -0.6). However, if subhalos are required to exceed a minimal mass before accretion onto the host, the velocity bias becomes negligible and the velocity distribution is close to Gaussian (kurtosis -0.15). Recently it has been shown that the latter criterion results in subhalo samples that agree well with the observed number-density profiles of galaxies in clusters. Therefore we argue that the velocity distributions of galaxies in clusters are essentially un-biased. The comparison of the galaxy velocity distribution and the sound speed, derived from scaling relations of X-ray observations, results in an average Mach number of 1.24. Altogether 65% of the galaxies move supersonically and 8% have Mach numbers larger than 2 with respect to the intra cluster gas.

A. Faltenbacher; J. Diemand

2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

Impact Velocity (2011) | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Impact Velocity (2011) | National Nuclear Security Administration Impact Velocity (2011) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > Impact Velocity (2011) Impact Velocity (2011) Impact Velocity (2011) From: NNSANews Views: 388 2 ratings Time: 02:26 More in Science & Technology See video Facebook Twitter

247

The velocity campaign for ignition on NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Achieving inertial confinement fusion ignition requires a symmetric, high velocity implosion. Experiments show that we can reach 95 {+-} 5% of the required velocity by using a 420 TW, 1.6 MJ laser pulse. In addition, experiments with a depleted uranium hohlraum show an increase in capsule performance which suggests an additional 18 {+-} 5 {mu}m/ns of velocity with uranium hohlraums over gold hohlraums. Combining these two would give 99 {+-} 5% of the ignition velocity. Experiments show that we have the ability to tune symmetry using crossbeam transfer. We can control the second Legendre mode (P2) by changing the wavelength separation between the inner and outer cones of laser beams. We can control the azimuthal m = 4 asymmetry by changing the wavelength separation between the 23.5 and 30 degree beams on NIF. This paper describes our 'first pass' tuning the implosion velocity and shape on the National Ignition Facility laser [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas, 16, 041006 (2009)].

Callahan, D. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celeste, J. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Glenn, S.; Haan, S. W.; Haynam, C. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Landen, O. L.; London, R. A.; MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

PDF Rotating Probe VW Dwg  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7.350 PDF Rotating Probe Drawing 45 T 32 mm bore Top Loading into mixture dilution refrigerator 30 mK< T < 900 mK Heater & Thermometer location 24 pin SIP connector BeCu Spring...

249

Switchable stiffness scanning microscope probe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has rapidly gained widespread utilization as an imaging device and micro/nano-manipulator during recent years. This thesis investigates the new concept of a dual stiffness scanning probe with ...

Mueller-Falcke, Clemens T. (Clemens Tobias)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

President's panel probes sustainable development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

President's panel probes sustainable development ... The President's Council on Sustainable Development, a blue-ribbon advisory panel established by President Bill Clinton last June, held its first meeting outside the nation's capital earlier this month in the Seattle. ...

DEBORAH ILLMAN

1994-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

THEMIS Observations of the Magnetopause Electron Diffusion Region: Large Amplitude Waves and Heated Electrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first observations of large amplitude waves in a well-defined electron diffusion region at the sub-solar magnetopause using data from one THEMIS satellite. These waves identified as whistler mode waves, electrostatic solitary waves, lower hybrid waves and electrostatic electron cyclotron waves, are observed in the same 12-sec waveform capture and in association with signatures of active magnetic reconnection. The large amplitude waves in the electron diffusion region are coincident with abrupt increases in electron parallel temperature suggesting strong wave heating. The whistler mode waves which are at the electron scale and enable us to probe electron dynamics in the diffusion region were analyzed in detail. The energetic electrons (~30 keV) within the electron diffusion region have anisotropic distributions with T_{e\\perp}/T_{e\\parallel}>1 that may provide the free energy for the whistler mode waves. The energetic anisotropic electrons may be produced during the reconnection process. The whi...

Tang, Xiangwei; Dombeck, John; Dai, Lei; Wilson, Lynn B; Breneman, Aaron; Hupach, Adam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Modeling fault-zone guided waves of microearthquakes in a geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fault-zone guided waves of microearthquakes in a geothermal fault-zone guided waves of microearthquakes in a geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Modeling fault-zone guided waves of microearthquakes in a geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fault-zone guided waves have been identified in microearthquake seismograms recorded at the Coso Geothermal Field, California. The observed guided waves have particle motions and propagation group velocities similar to Rayleigh wave modes. A numerical method has been employed to simulate the guided-wave propagation through the fault zone. By comparing observed and synthetic waveforms the fault-zone width and its P- and S-wave velocity structure have been estimated. It is suggested here that the identification

253

1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-ft Wave Flume Facility -ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.5 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

254

11-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 77.4 Beam(m) 3.4 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

255

10-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 10-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

256

6-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Flume Facility Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 6-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 105.2 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

257

Kink waves in solar spicules: observation and modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Height series of Doppler observation at the solar limb (covering 3800 - 8700 km distance above the photosphere) in $H_{\\alpha}$ spectral line obtained by big coronagraph of Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory \\citep{khu} show the periodic spatial distribution of Doppler velocities in spicules. We suggest that the periodic spatial distribution is caused by propagating kink waves in spicule. The wave length is found to be $\\sim$ 3500 km. Numerical modelling of kink wave propagation from the photosphere to observed heights gives the wave length of kink waves at the photosphere to be $\\sim$ 1000 km, which indicates to the granular origin of the waves. The period of waves is estimated to be in the range of 35-70 s.

V. Kukhianidze; T. V. Zaqarashvili; E. Khutsishvili

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nonlinear extraordinary wave in dense plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conditions for the propagation of a slow extraordinary wave in dense magnetized plasma are found. A solution to the set of relativistic hydrodynamic equations and Maxwell’s equations under the plasma resonance conditions, when the phase velocity of the nonlinear wave is equal to the speed of light, is obtained. The deviation of the wave frequency from the resonance frequency is accompanied by nonlinear longitudinal-transverse oscillations. It is shown that, in this case, the solution to the set of self-consistent equations obtained by averaging the initial equations over the period of high-frequency oscillations has the form of an envelope soliton. The possibility of excitation of a nonlinear wave in plasma by an external electromagnetic pulse is confirmed by numerical simulations.

Krasovitskiy, V. B., E-mail: krasovit@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Turikov, V. A. [Russian University of Peoples’ Friendship (Russian Federation)] [Russian University of Peoples’ Friendship (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

An investigation of the relationships between mountain waves and clear air turbulence encountered by the XB-70 airplane in the stratosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . , . . . ~ . ~ INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND TO THE PROBLEM Theory of Mountain Waves Mountain Waves and Clear Air Turbulence (CAT). Page iv v vi viii The Vertical Propagation and Transfer of Energy of Mountain Waves into the Stratosphere The Influence of Wind... and wave energy under the influence of wind shear (Booker and Bretherton, 1967). A critical level, if it exists, is the level at which the horizontal phase velocity of the wave equals the mean wind speed. If a wave passes through a criti- cal level...

Incrocci, Thomas Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Did last-minute change cause loss of $l-billion Mars probe?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , Mars Observer project manager. It was NASA's concern about shock-waves from these pyrotechnic valves - equivalent to "tapping the probe with a ham-mer", according to ... fuel just before the final boost into the Mars orbit, by releas-ing the four pyrotechnic valves (two on each helium pipe). The team took this action because they ...

Colin Macilwain

1993-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

262

The jump-off velocity of an impulsively loaded spherical shell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider a constant temperature spherical shell of isotropic, homogeneous, linearly elastic material with density {rho} and Lame coefficients {lambda} and {mu}. The inner and outer radii of the shell are r{sub i} and r{sub o}, respectively. We assume that the inside of the shell is a void. On the outside of the shell, we apply a uniform, time-varying pressure p(t). We also assume that the shell is initially at rest. We want to compute the jump-off time and velocity of the pressure wave, which are the first time after t = 0 at which the pressure wave from the outer surface reaches the inner surface. This analysis computes the jump-off velocity and time for both compressible and incompressible materials. This differs substantially from [3], where only incompressible materials are considered. We will consider the behavior of an impulsively loaded, exponentially decaying pressure wave p(t) = P{sub 0{sup e}}{sup -{alpha}t}, where {alpha} {ge} 0. We notice that a constant pressure wave P(t) = P{sub 0} is a special case ({alpha} = 0) of a decaying pressure wave. Both of these boundary conditions are considered in [3].

Chabaud, Brandon M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Jerry S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

263

Dependence of synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave and electron cyclotron wave on the frequency and parallel refractive index of electron cyclotron wave for Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical mechanism of the synergy current driven by lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW) in tokamaks is investigated using theoretical analysis and simulation methods in the present paper. Research shows that the synergy relationship between the two waves in velocity space strongly depends on the frequency ? and parallel refractive index N{sub //} of ECW. For a given spectrum of LHW, the parameter range of ECW, in which the synergy current exists, can be predicted by theoretical analysis, and these results are consistent with the simulation results. It is shown that the synergy effect is mainly caused by the electrons accelerated by both ECW and LHW, and the acceleration of these electrons requires that there is overlap of the resonance regions of the two waves in velocity space.

Huang, J.; Chen, S. Y., E-mail: sychen531@163.com; Tang, C. J. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China) [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Preparation and probing of the ground state coherence in Rubidium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate the preparation and probing of the coherence between the hyperfine ground states |5S_{1/2}, F=1> and |5S_{1/2}, F=2> of the Rubidium 87 isotope. The effect of various coherence control techniques, i.e. fractional Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage and Coherent Population Return on the coherence are investigated. These techniques are implemented using nearly degenerate pump and Stokes lasers at 795nm (Rubidium D1 transition) which couple the two hyperfine ground states via the excited state |5P_{1/2}, F=1> through a resonant two-photon process, in which a coherent superposition of the two hyperfine ground states is established. The medium is probed by an additional weak laser, which generates a four-wave mixing signal proportional to the ground state coherence, and allows us to monitor its evolution in time. The experimental data are compared with numerical simulations.

Martin Oberst; Frank Vewinger; A. I. Lvovsky

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Modeling velocity dispersion In Gypsy site, Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrepancies in interval velocities estimated from vertical well measurements made with different source central frequencies at Gypsy site could be primarily explained in terms of intrinsic attenuation. Four intervals ...

Alsaadan, Sami Ibrahim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Steady magnetic-field generation via surface-plasma-wave excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of inducing a magnetic field via surface plasma-wave excitation is investigated with a simple nonrelativistic hydrodynamic model. A static magnetic field is predicted at the plasma surface, scaling with the square of the surface-wave field amplitude, and the influence of the electron plasma density is studied. In the case of resonant surface-wave excitation by laser this result can be applied to low intensities such that the electron quiver velocity in the field of the surface wave is less than its thermal velocity.

Bigongiari, A.; Raynaud, M.; Riconda, C. [CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France and TIPS/LULI, Universite Paris 6, CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, 3, rue Galilee, F-94200, Ivry-sur-Seine (France); CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); TIPS/LULI, Universite Paris 6, CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, 3, rue Galilee, F-94200, Ivry-sur-Seine (France)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Modeling of current characteristics of segmented Langmuir probe on DEMETER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We model the current characteristics of the DEMETER Segmented Langmuir probe (SLP). The probe is used to measure electron density and temperature in the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 700 km. It is also used to measure the plasma flow velocity in the satellite frame of reference. The probe is partitioned into seven collectors: six electrically insulated spherical segments and a guard electrode (the rest of the sphere and the small post). Comparisons are made between the predictions of the model and DEMETER measurements for actual ionospheric plasma conditions encountered along the satellite orbit. Segment characteristics are computed numerically with PTetra, a three-dimensional particle in cell simulation code. In PTetra, space is discretized with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, thus, enabling a good representation of the probe geometry. The model also accounts for several physical effects of importance in the interaction of spacecraft with the space environment. These include satellite charging, photoelectron, and secondary electron emissions. The model is electrostatic, but it accounts for the presence of a uniform background magnetic field. PTetra simulation results show different characteristics for the different probe segments. The current collected by each segment depends on its orientation with respect to the ram direction, the plasma composition, the magnitude, and the orientation of the magnetic field. It is observed that the presence of light H{sup +} ions leads to a significant increase in the ion current branch of the I-V curves of the negatively polarized SLP. The effect of the magnetic field is demonstrated by varying its magnitude and direction with respect to the reference magnetic field. It is found that the magnetic field appreciably affects the electron current branch of the I-V curves of certain segments on the SLP, whereas the ion current branch remains almost unaffected. PTetra simulations are validated by comparing the computed characteristics and their angular anisotropy with the DEMETER measurements, as simulation results are found to be in good agreement with the measurements.

Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Lebreton, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement et de l'Espace (LPC2E), CNRS-Université d'Orléans, Orléans Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement et de l'Espace (LPC2E), CNRS-Université d'Orléans, Orléans Cedex (France)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Wave-Driven Rotation In Centrifugal Mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Centrifugal mirrors use supersonic rotation to provide axial confinement and enhanced stability. Usually the rotation is produced using electrodes, but these electrodes have limited the rotation to the Alfven critical ionization velocity, which is too slow to be useful for fusion. Instead, the rotation could be produced using radio frequency waves. A fixed azimuthal ripple is a simple and efficient wave that could produce rotation by harnessing alpha particle energy. This is an extension of the alpha channeling effect. The alpha particle power and efficiency in a simulated devices is sufficient to produce rotation without external energy input. By eliminating the need for electrodes, this opens new opportunities for centrifugal traps.

Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

Modulation of whistler waves in nonthermal plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modulation of whistler waves in nonthermal plasmas is investigated. The dynamics of the magnetized plasma is described by the fluid equations and the electron velocity distribution function is modeled via a nonthermal {kappa} distribution. A multiscale perturbation analysis based on the Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky method is carried out and the nonlinear Schroedinger equation governing the modulation of the high-frequency whistler is obtained. The effect of the superthermal electrons on the stability of the wave envelope and soliton formation is discussed and a comparison with previous results is presented.

Rios, L. A.; Galvao, R. M. O. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas and Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Sistemas Complexos, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Plane waves Lumped systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems S x y z Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · open tube #12;2 Impedance · Plane waves ­ Lumped systems · closed tube Impedance · Cylindrical waves z x y r #12;3 Impedance · Cylindrical waves ­ Circumferential part n=0 n=1 n=2 n=3 Impedance · Cylindrical

Berlin,Technische Universität

272

Explicit dispersion relations for elastic waves in extremely deformed soft matter with application to nearly incompressible and auxetic materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the propagation of elastic waves in soft materials subjected to finite deformations. We derive explicit dispersion relations, and apply these results to study elastic wave propagation in (i) nearly incompressible materials such as biological tissues and polymers, and (ii) negative Poisson's ratio or auxetic materials. We find that for nearly incompressible materials transverse wave velocities exhibit strong dependence on direction of propagation and initial strain state, whereas the longitudinal component is not affected significantly until extreme levels of deformations are attained. For highly compressible materials, we show that both pressure and shear wave velocities depend strongly on initial deformation and direction of propagation. When compression is applied, longitudinal wave velocity decreases in positive bulk modulus materials, and increases for negative bulk modulus materials; this is regardless the direction of wave prorogation. We demonstrate that finite deformations influence elastic wave propagation through combinations of induced effective compressibility and stiffness.

Pavel Galich; Stephan Rudykh

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Argonne CNM: Proximal Probes Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proximal Probes Proximal Probes Capabilities Omicron VT-AFM XA microscope scanning tunneling microscope VIew high-resolution image. Variable-temperature, ultra-high-vacuum, atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope: Omicron VT-AFM XA (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Measurement modes include: Contact and non-contact AFM Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) Scanning tunneling spectroscopy Preparation tools include: Resistive sample heating Direct current heating E-beam heating Sputter ion etching Gas dosing E-beam evaporation An analysis chamber contains combined four-grid LEED/Auger optics Omicron nanoprobe View high-resolution image Scanning probe/scanning electron microscopy: Omicron UHV Nanoprobe (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group)

274

Hand-held survey probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include an optical sensor to generate data corresponding to a position of the detection probe with respect to a surface; a microprocessor to receive the data; a software medium having code to process the data with the microprocessor and pre-programmed parameters, and making a comparison of the data to the parameters; and an indicator device to indicate results of the comparison. A method of providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include generating output data with an optical sensor corresponding to the relative position with respect to a surface; processing the output data, including comparing the output data to pre-programmed parameters; and indicating results of the comparison.

Young, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Hungate, Kevin E. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

275

Numerical experiments of fracture-induced velocity and attenuation anisotropy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Plata, La Plata, Argentina 4 Department of...phase velocities, energy velocities (wavefronts...112-200801-00952 (CONICET, Argentina). Appendix Appendix...qSV or v SH. The energy-velocity vector...phase velocities, energy velocities (wavefronts...de Buenos Aires Argentina 1179 1191 Geophysical......

J. M. Carcione; S. Picotti; J. E. Santos

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Nonlinear hydromagnetic waves in a thermally stratified spherical shell: Exact toroidal field solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of nonlinear hydromagnetic waves in a highly conducting, self-gravitating fluid in a spherical geometry, subject to the convective forces produced by a radial temperature gradient, is treated in a Boussinesq approximation. Exact wave solutions of the nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic equations (in the Boussinesq approximation) in the presence of convective forces are obtained for the toroidal velocity and magnetic fields. The solution represents waves propagating along the mean magnetic field with the velocity depending on the mean magnetic (or velocity) field strength and the strength of stratification, under the influence of the azimuthal magnetic and velocity fields and convective forces. The solutions may be applicable to the hydromagnetic waves in the Earth's core and the solar convection zone.

Hamabata, H. (Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558 (Japan))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Observations and modeling of wave-acceleration-induced sediment transport in the surfzone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Onshore sediment transport and sandbar migration are important to the morphological evolution of beaches, but are not understood well. Here, a new model that accounts for accelerations of wave-orbital velocities predicts ...

Hoefel, Fernanda Gemael, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Modeling fault-zone guided waves of microearthquakes in a geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the identification and modeling of such guided waves is an effective tool to locate fracture-induced, low-velocity fault-zone structures in geothermal fields. Authors Lou, M.;...

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - averaged teleseismic p-wave Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Zone: A joint teleseismic and local P tomographic study Summary: because the unconsolidated sediment layer has a very low P wave velocity (1.8 kmsec) Chiu et al., 1992......

280

Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

On the role of spectral resolution in velocity shear layer measurements by Doppler reflectometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The signal quality of a Doppler reflectometer depends strongly on its spectral resolution, which is influenced by the microwave beam properties and the radius of curvature of the cutoff layer in the plasma. If measured close to a strong perpendicular velocity shear layer, the spectrum of the backscattered signal is influenced by different velocities. This can give rise to two Doppler shifted peaks in the spectrum as observed in TJ-II H-mode plasmas. It is shown by two-dimensional full wave simulations that the two peaks are separable provided the spectral resolution of the system is sufficient. However, if the spectral resolution is poor, the two peaks blend into one and yield an intermediate and incorrect velocity.

Happel, T.; Blanco, E.; Estrada, T. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Association Euratom-Ciemat, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Instabilities of a circularly polarized wave with trapped particles in an isotropic plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure and stability of a transverse electromagnetic wave propagating with a velocity lower than the speed of light in an unmagnetized plasma are considered. The stationary finite-amplitude wave is described by exact solutions to the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. However, unlike the well-known electrostatic analog, the Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal wave, the wave structure is determined to a large extent by the presence of trapped particles with a shear of transverse velocities, without which the existence of waves with a refraction index larger than unity is impossible. It is shown that the main origin of the wave instability is the longitudinal motion of trapped particles relative to the background plasma. Expressions for the growth rates in the main instability regimes are found under definite restrictions on the wave parameters.

Krasovsky, V. L., E-mail: vkrasov@iki.rssi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Tidal waves as yrast states in transitional nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The yrast states of transitional nuclei are described as quadrupole waves running over the nuclear surface, which we call tidal waves. In contrast to a rotor, which generates angular momentum by increasing the angular velocity at approximately constant deformation, a tidal wave generates angular momentum by increasing the deformation at approximately constant angular velocity. The properties of the tidal waves are calculated by means of the cranking model in a microscopic way. The calculated energies and E2 transition probabilities of the yrast states in the transitional nuclides with $Z$= 44, 46, 48 and $N=56, 58, ..., 66$ reproduce the experiment in detail. The nonlinear response of the nucleonic orbitals results in a strong coupling between shape and single particle degrees of freedom.

S. Frauendorf; Y. Gu; J. Sun

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

Sensor Based on Extending the Concept of Fidelity to Classical Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose and demonstrate a remote sensor scheme by applying the quantum mechanical concept of fidelity loss to classical waves. The sensor makes explicit use of time-reversal invariance and spatial reciprocity in a wave chaotic system to sensitively and remotely measure the presence of small perturbations. The loss of fidelity is measured through a classical wave-analog of the Loschmidt echo by employing a single-channel time-reversal mirror to rebroadcast a probe signal into the perturbed system. We also introduce the use of exponential amplification of the probe signal to partially overcome the effects of propagation losses and to vary the sensitivity.

Biniyam Tesfaye Taddese; James Hart; Thomas M. Antonsen; Edward Ott; Steven M. Anlage

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

285

Relativistic solitary waves with phase modulation embedded in long laser pulses in plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the existence of nonlinear phase-modulated relativistic solitary waves embedded in an infinitely long circularly polarized electromagnetic wave propagating through a plasma. These states are exact nonlinear solutions of the 1-dimensional Maxwell-fluid model for a cold plasma composed of electrons and ions. The solitary wave, which consists of an electromagnetic wave trapped in a self-generated Langmuir wave, presents a phase modulation when the group velocity V and the phase velocity V{sub ph} of the long circularly polarized electromagnetic wave do not match the condition VV{sub ph} = c{sup 2}. The main properties of the waves as a function of their group velocities, wavevectors, and frequencies are studied, as well as bifurcations of the dynamical system that describes the waves when the parameter controlling the phase modulation changes from zero to a finite value. Such a transition is illustrated in the limit of small amplitude waves where an analytical solution for a grey solitary wave exists. The solutions are interpreted as the stationary state after the collision of a long laser pulse with an isolated solitary wave.

Sanchez-Arriaga, G.; Siminos, E.; Lefebvre, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Determination of Non-thermal Velocity Distributions from SERTS Linewidth Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 Å and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s–1 in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfvén wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

Aaron J. Coyner; Joseph M. Davila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

Louge, M.Y.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

289

Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

Louge, Michel Y. (Ithaca, NY)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

Louge, Michel Y. (Ithaca, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Faster-Than-Light Group Velocities and Causality Violation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Faster-Than-Light Group Velocities and Causality...group velocities in excess of the speed of light does not imply causality violation...phase velocity shall exceed the speed of light. Application of the theorem leads...

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Nuclear Physics with Electroweak Probes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, the italian theoretical Nuclear Physics community has played a leading role in the development of a unified approach, allowing for a consistent and fully quantitative description of the nuclear response to electromagnetic and weak probes. In this paper I review the main achievements in both fields, point out some of the open problems, and outline the most promising prospects.

Omar Benhar

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

293

Scanning Probe Alloying Nanolithography (SPAN)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or silicon nitride. Probes shapes can be pyramidal or conical and may be sharpened. Figure 1.8. Two kinds of cantilevers; triangle and rectangle shapes. (Courtesy of PNI) 1.2.7. Mode The AFM become much more versatile and capable than before...

Lee, Hyungoo

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

ARM - Evaluation Product - Convective Vertical Velocity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsConvective Vertical Velocity ProductsConvective Vertical Velocity Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Convective Vertical Velocity 2011.04.25 - 2011.05.23 Site(s) SGP General Description Convective processes play an important role in Earth's energy balance by distributing heat and moisture throughout the atmosphere. In particular, vertical air motions associated with these processes are inherently linked to the life cycle of these convective systems and are therefore directly tied to their energy budget. However, direct measurements of vertical air motions (e.g., in situ aircraft observations) are sparse, making it difficult to compare them with numerical model output, which relies on convective parameterization schemes that have yet to be extensively

296

Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Sound velocity bound and neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been conjectured that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by $\\sqrt{3}$. Simple arguments support this bound in non-relativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. The bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. We point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at "low" densities is in strong tension with this bound.

Paulo F. Bedaque; Andrew W. Steiner

2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

298

VELOCITY-SHEAR-INDUCED MODE COUPLING IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE AND SOLAR WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLASMA HEATING AND MHD TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analytically consider how velocity shear in the corona and solar wind can cause an initial Alfven wave to drive up other propagating signals. The process is similar to the familiar coupling into other modes induced by non-WKB refraction in an inhomogeneous plasma, except here the refraction is a consequence of velocity shear. We limit our discussion to a low-beta plasma, and ignore couplings into signals resembling the slow mode. If the initial Alfven wave is propagating nearly parallel to the background magnetic field, then the induced signals are mainly a forward-going (i.e., propagating in the same sense as the original Alfven wave) fast mode, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; both signals are compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. For an initial Alfven wave propagating obliquely with respect to the magnetic field, the induced signals are mainly forward- and backward-going fast modes, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; these signals are all compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. A backward-going Alfven wave, thought to be important in the development of MHD turbulence, is also produced, but it is very weak. However, we suggest that for oblique propagation of the initial Alfven wave the induced fast-polarized signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave may interact coherently with the initial Alfven wave and distort it at a strong-turbulence-like rate.

Hollweg, Joseph V.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center, Morse Hall, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh., E-mail: joe.hollweg@unh.edu, E-mail: ekaghash@aer.com, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, A Verisk Analytics Company, 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Augmented Geophysical Data Interpretation Through Automated Velocity Picking in Semblance Velocity Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Fort Collins, CO 80523 ross@cs.colostate.edu Barry Fish Sun Microsystems (Previously at Landmark Graphics) Denver, CO Barry.Fish@central.sun.com Abstract Velocity Picking is the problem of picking velocity-time pairs based on a coherence metric between multiple seismic signals. Coherence as a function

Whitley, Darrell

300

Electromagnetic waves destabilized by runaway electrons in near-critical electric fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Runaway electron distributions are strongly anisotropic in velocity space. This anisotropy is a source of free energy that may destabilize electromagnetic waves through a resonant interaction between the waves and the energetic electrons. In this work, we investigate the high-frequency electromagnetic waves that are destabilized by runaway electron beams when the electric field is close to the critical field for runaway acceleration. Using a runaway electron distribution appropriate for the near-critical case, we calculate the linear instability growth rate of these waves and conclude that the obliquely propagating whistler waves are most unstable. We show that the frequencies, wave numbers, and propagation angles of the most unstable waves depend strongly on the magnetic field. Taking into account collisional and convective damping of the waves, we determine the number density of runaways that is required to destabilize the waves and show its parametric dependences.

Komar, A.; Pokol, G. I. [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Association EURATOM, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Fueloep, T. [Department of Applied Physics, Nuclear Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology and Euratom-VR Association, Goeteborg (Sweden)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ion Heating with Beating Electrostatic Waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear interaction of a magnetized ion with two beating electrostatic waves (BEW) whose frequencies differ by a cyclotron harmonic can lead, under some conditions [Phys. Rev. E 69, 046402 (2004)], to vigorous acceleration for an ion with arbitrarily low initial velocity. When applied to an ensemble of ions, this mechanism promises enhanced heating over single electrostatic wave (SEW) heating for comparable wave energy densities. The extension of single ion acceleration to heating (SEWH and BEWH) of an ensemble of initially thermalized ions was carried out to compare the processes. Using a numerical solution of the Vlasov equation as a guideline, an analytical expression for the heating level was derived with Lie transforms and was used to show BEWH's superiority over all parameter space.

Jorns, B.; Choueiri, E. Y. [Electric Propulsion and Plasma Dynamics Laboratory (EPPDyL), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

302

Spring Semester, Course Title: Scanned Probe Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: a fundamental understanding of the theoretical underpinnings behind each scanned probe technique Probe Microscopy: Atomic Scale Engineering by Forces and Currents - Adam Foster and Werner Hofer Applied Scanning Probe Methods (Vol. 1-13) ­ Bharat Bhushan, ed. Springer Handbook of Nanotechnology - Bharat

Sherrill, David

303

Pump probe spectroscopy of quasiparticle dynamics in cuprate superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pump probe spectroscopy is used to examine the picosecond response of a BSCCO thin film, and two YBCO crystals in the near infrared. The role of pump fluence and temperature have been closely examined in an effort to clarify the mechanism by which the quasiparticles rejoin the condensate. BSCCO results suggest that the recombination behavior is consistent with the d-wave density of states in that quasiparticles appear to relax to the nodes immediately before they rejoin the condensate. The first substantial investigation of polarized pump probe response in detwinned YBCO crystals is also reported. Dramatic doping dependent anisotropies along the a and b axes are observed in time and temperature resolved studies. Among many results, we highlight the discovery of an anomalous temperature and time dependence of a- axis response in optimally doped YBCO. We also report on the first observation of the photoinduced response in a magnetic field. We find the amplitude of the response, and in some cases, the dynamics considerably changed with the application of a 6T field. Finally, we speculate on two of the many theoretical directions stimulated by our results. We find that the two-fluid model suggests a mechanism to explain how changes at very low energies are visible to a high-energy probe. Also discussed are basic recombination processes which may play a role in the observed decay.

Segre, Gino P.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Velocity Shear Stabilization of Centrifugally Confined Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A magnetized, centrifugally confined plasma is subjected to a 3D MHD stability test. Ordinarily, the system is expected to be grossly unstable to “flute” interchanges of field lines. Numerical simulation shows though that the system is stable on account of velocity shear. This allows consideration of a magnetically confined plasma for thermonuclear fusion that has a particularly simple coil configuration.

Yi-Min Huang and A. B. Hassam

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

LATTICE BOLTZMANN SCHEMES WITH RELATIVE VELOCITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LATTICE BOLTZMANN SCHEMES WITH RELATIVE VELOCITIES FRANÃ?OIS DUBOIS, TONY FEVRIER, AND BENJAMIN GRAILLE Abstract. In this contribution, a new class of lattice Boltzmann schem- es is introduced is then performed to derive the equivalent equations up to third order accuracy. Introduction The lattice Boltzmann

Boyer, Edmond

306

Bulk flow velocities in the solar corona  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......bin. In a small but significant number of images the data are defective, largely owing to telemetry drop outs. These images are easily...velocity-height curves. We perform a five-point running-box-car straight-line fit with appropriate weighting and this rate......

D. J. Lewis; G. M. Simnett

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A MAGNETIC CALIBRATION OF PHOTOSPHERIC DOPPLER VELOCITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The zero point of measured photospheric Doppler shifts is uncertain for at least two reasons: instrumental variations (from, e.g., thermal drifts); and the convective blueshift, a known correlation between intensity and upflows. Accurate knowledge of the zero point is, however, useful for (1) improving estimates of the Poynting flux of magnetic energy across the photosphere, and (2) constraining processes underlying flux cancellation, the mutual apparent loss of magnetic flux in closely spaced, opposite-polarity magnetogram features. We present a method to absolutely calibrate line-of-sight (LOS) velocities in solar active regions (ARs) near disk center using three successive vector magnetograms and one Dopplergram coincident with the central magnetogram. It exploits the fact that Doppler shifts measured along polarity inversion lines (PILs) of the LOS magnetic field determine one component of the velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field, and optimizes consistency between changes in LOS flux near PILs and the transport of transverse magnetic flux by LOS velocities, assuming that ideal electric fields govern the magnetic evolution. Previous calibrations fitted the center-to-limb variation of Doppler velocities, but this approach cannot, by itself, account for residual convective shifts at the limb. We apply our method to vector magnetograms of AR 11158, observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and find clear evidence of offsets in the Doppler zero point in the range of 50-550 m s{sup -1}. In addition, we note that a simpler calibration can be determined from an LOS magnetogram and Dopplergram pair from the median Doppler velocity among all near-disk-center PIL pixels. We briefly discuss shortcomings in our initial implementation, and suggest ways to address these. In addition, as a step in our data reduction, we discuss the use of temporal continuity in the transverse magnetic field direction to correct apparently spurious fluctuations in resolution of the 180 Degree-Sign ambiguity.

Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Sun, Xudong [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

308

Downhole probes evaluate cavern integrity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Obtaining natural-gas storage caverns` pressures and temperatures with downhole probes has allowed TransGas Ltd., Regina, to monitor and evaluate cavern integrity. TransGas has more than 5 years` experience with the devices. The acquired data have also helped determine gas-in-place inventory and confirm and assess changes in spatial volumes. These changes may have resulted from cavern creep (shrinkage or closure) or downhole abnormality such as fluid infill or collapse of the side walls or roof. This first of two articles presents background and many of the details and lessons to date of TransGas` cavern gas-storage probe program; the conclusion describes a specific storage site with some results.

Crossley, N.G. [TransGas Ltd., Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1997-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field Frank M. Lee,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in global ocean mixing, it is important to understand the power present in the internal wave fieldExperimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data Frank M. Lee to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux J and total radiated power P

Morrison, Philip J.,

310

Waves and the equilibrium range at Ocean Weather Station P J. Thomson,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy spectra. Observations are consistent with a local balance between wind input and breaking is extended to a wider range of conditions using observations of wave energy spectra and wind speed during a 2 friction velocity u� (and thus wind stress) directly controls wave energy spectra levels at high fre

311

Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column Daniel H. E. Dubin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma column with near-Maxwellian velocity distributions. We focus on the z-independent component#12;Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column Daniel H. E. Dubin Department of Physics April 2013; published online 25 April 2013) A kinetic theory of linear electrostatic plasma waves

California at San Diego, University of

312

Shock-Wave Attenuation and Energy-Dissipation Potential of Granular Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shock-Wave Attenuation and Energy-Dissipation Potential of Granular Materials Mica Grujicic, B this approach, both compression shocks and decompression waves are treated as (stress, specific volume, particle velocity, mass-based internal energy density, temperature, and mass-based entropy density) propagating

Grujicic, Mica

313

Electron Climbing a 'Devil's Staircase' in Wave-Particle Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous nonlinear driven systems display spectacular responses to forcing, including chaos and complex phase-locking plateaus characterized by 'devil's staircase', Arnold tongues, and Farey trees. In the universality class of Hamiltonian systems, a paradigm is the motion of a charged particle in two waves, which inspired a renormalization group method for its description. Here we report the observation of the underlying 'devil's staircase' by recording the beam velocity distribution function at the outlet of a traveling wave tube versus the amplitude of two externally induced waves.

Macor, Alessandro; Doveil, Fabrice; Elskens, Yves [Physique des interactions ioniques et moleculaires, Unite 6633 CNRS-Universite de Provence, Equipe turbulence plasma, case 321, Centre de Saint-Jerome, F-13397 Marseille cedex 20 (France)

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

pH Meter probe assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

Hale, Charles J. (San Jose, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

An active wave generating–absorbing boundary condition for VOF type numerical model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of the present work is to discuss the implementation of an active wave generating–absorbing boundary condition for a numerical model based on the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) method for tracking free surfaces. First an overview of the development of VOF type models with special emphasis in the field of coastal engineering is given. A new type of numerical boundary condition for combined wave generation and absorption in the numerical model \\{VOFbreak2\\} is presented. The numerical boundary condition is based on an active wave absorption system that was first developed in the context of physical wave flume experiments, using a wave paddle. The method applies to regular and irregular waves. Velocities are measured at one location inside the computational domain. The reflected wave train is separated from the incident wave field in front of a structure by means of digital filtering and subsequent superposition of the measured velocity signals. The incident wave signal is corrected, so that the reflected wave is effectively absorbed at the boundary. The digital filters are derived theoretically and their practical design is discussed. The practical use of this numerical boundary condition is compared to the use of the absorption system in a physical wave flume. The effectiveness of the active wave generating–absorbing boundary condition finally is proved using analytical tests and numerical simulations with VOFbreak2.

Peter Troch; Julien De Rouck

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Lorentz violation and red shift of gravitational waves in brane-worlds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the speed of gravitational waves in a brane world scenario and show that if the extra dimension is space-like, the speed of the propagation of such waves is greater in the bulk than that on the brane. Therefore, the 4D Lorentz invariance is broken in the gravitational sector. A comparison is also made between the red shift of such waves and those of the electromagnetic waves on the brane. Such a comparison is essential for extracting the signature of the extra dimension and thus clarifying the question of maximal velocity of gravitational waves in the bulk.

Fatemeh Ahmadi; Jafar Khodagholizadeh; H. R. Sepangi

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

317

Lecture 11, Corona Waves, Oscillations and Mass Motions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Coronal Waves: Seismological Tools Wei Liu @Stanford-Lockheed 15 Three types of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD fronts) to correct for the sphericity of the Sun; 2. Space-time diagram; 3. Base difference-Lockheed 20 #12;11 Steep stripes at ~2000 km/s Velocity fits on space-time diagrams Wei Liu @Stanford

318

Reflection and transmission of surface waves in laterally varying media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......regional phases Pg and Lg at the Nevada Test Site, J. geophys. Res., 1981...velocity heterogeneity under the Nevada Test Site on short-period P wave amplitudes...Key 1967). In studies of the Nevada Test Site, Barker, Der & Mrazek (1981......

M. G. Bostock

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Radial velocities of population II binary stars. II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we publish the second list of radial velocities for 91 Hipparcos stars, mostly high transverse velocity binaries without previous radial velocity measurements. The measurements of radial velocities are done with a CORAVEL-type radial velocity spectrometer with an accuracy better than 1 km/s. We also present the information on eight new radial velocity variables - HD 29696, HD 117466AB, BD +28 4035AB, BD +30 2129A, BD +39 1828AB, BD +69 230A, BD +82 565A and TYC 2267-1300-1 - found from our measurements. Two stars (HD 27961AB and HD 75632AB) are suspected as possible radial velocity variables.

A. Bartkevicius; J. Sperauskas

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Neutron Star Crustal Interface Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The eigenfrequencies of nonradial oscillations are a powerful probe of a star's interior structure. This is especially true when there exist discontinuities such as at the neutron star (NS) ocean/crust boundary, as first noted by McDermott, Van Horn, & Hansen. The interface mode associated with this boundary has subsequently been neglected in studies of stellar nonradial oscillations. We revisit this mode, investigating its properties both analytically and numerically for a simple NS envelope model. We find that it acts like a shallow surface ocean wave, but with a large radial displacement at the ocean/crust boundary due to flexing of the crust with shear modulus ? P, the pressure. This displacement lowers the mode's frequency by a factor of ~(?/P)1/2 ~ 0.1 in comparison to a shallow surface wave frequency on a hard surface. The interface mode may be excited on accreting or bursting NSs, and future work on nonradial oscillations should consider this mode. Our work also implies an additional mode on massive and/or cold white dwarfs with crystalline cores, which may have a frequency between the f-mode and g-modes, an otherwise empty part of the frequency domain.

Anthony L. Piro; Lars Bildsten

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

3D REGULARIZED VELOCITY FROM 3D DOPPLER RADIAL VELOCITY X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D REGULARIZED VELOCITY FROM 3D DOPPLER RADIAL VELOCITY X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer Dept, Ontario, M3H 5T4 Paul.Joe@ec.gc.ca ABSTRACT The recent availability of sequences of 3D Doppler radial velocity datasets provides sufficient information to estimate the 3D velocity of Doppler storms. We present

Barron, John

322

Enhancing the efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with the tapered refractive index  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear analysis of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) based on anomalous Doppler effect in a slab waveguide is presented. A method of tapered refractive index (TRI) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the TRI method can significantly enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM with the frequency ranging from the microwave to terahertz band. The effect of beam velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread suppresses the efficiency significantly, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be introduced by the TRI method.

Kong Lingbao; Hou Zhiling; Jing Jian [School of Science and Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Assessment, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Jin Haibo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Du Chaohai [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Accessibility for lower hybrid waves in PBX-M  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the wave damping mechanism in the presence of a `spectral gap` is an important issue for the current profile control using Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The authors examine a traditional explanation based upon upshifting of the wave parallel refractive index (n{sub {parallel}}) and find that there can be an upper bound in the n{sub {parallel}} upshift. The amount of upshift is not sufficient to bridge the spectral gap completely under some PBX-M LHCD conditions. There is experimental evidence, however, that current was driven even under such conditions. Another mechanism is also considered, based upon the 2-D velocity space dynamics coupled with a compound wave spectrum, here consisting of forward- and backward-running waves. The runaway critical speed relative to the phase speeds of these waves plays an important role in this model.

Takahashi, H.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Chance, M.; Chu, T.K.; Gettelfinger, G.; Greenough, N.; Hatcher, R.; Ignat, D.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paul, S.; Perkins, F.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Sun, Y.; Tighe, W.; Valeo, E.; von Goeler, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (US). Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S.; Levinton, F. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (US); Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Harris, J.; Hirshman, S.; Isler, R.; Post-Zwicker, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Jones, S.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (US); Schmitz, L.; Tynan, G. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Wave power absorption: Experiments in open sea and simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A full scale prototype of a wave power plant based on a direct drive linear generator driven by a point absorber has been installed at the west coast of Sweden. In this paper experimentally collected data of energy absorption for different electrical loads are used to verify a model of the wave power plant including the interactions of wave buoy generator and external load circuit. The wave-buoy interaction is modeled with linear potential wavetheory. The generator is modeled as a nonlinear mechanical damping function that is dependent on piston velocity and electric load. The results show good agreement between experiments and simulations. Potential wavetheory is well suited for the modeling of a point absorber in normal operation and for the design of future converters. Moreover the simulations are fast which opens up for simulations of wave farms.

M. Eriksson; R. Waters; O. Svensson; J. Isberg; M. Leijon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Surface electromagnetic wave equations in a warm magnetized quantum plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the single-fluid plasma model, a theoretical investigation of surface electromagnetic waves in a warm quantum magnetized inhomogeneous plasma is presented. The surface electromagnetic waves are assumed to propagate on the plane between a vacuum and a warm quantum magnetized plasma. The quantum magnetohydrodynamic model includes quantum diffraction effect (Bohm potential), and quantum statistical pressure is used to derive the new dispersion relation of surface electromagnetic waves. And the general dispersion relation is analyzed in some special cases of interest. It is shown that surface plasma oscillations can be propagated due to quantum effects, and the propagation velocity is enhanced. Furthermore, the external magnetic field has a significant effect on surface wave's dispersion equation. Our work should be of a useful tool for investigating the physical characteristic of surface waves and physical properties of the bounded quantum plasmas.

Li, Chunhua; Yang, Weihong [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China); Wu, Zhengwei, E-mail: wuzw@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Center of Low Temperature Plasma Application, Yunnan Aerospace Industry Company, Kunming, 650229 Yunnan (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Interaction of two walkers: Wave-mediated energy and force  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A bouncing droplet, self-propelled by its interaction with the waves it generates, forms a classical wave-particle association called a "walker." Previous works have demonstrated that the dynamics of a single walker is driven by its global surface wave field that retains information on its past trajectory. Here, we investigate the energy stored in this wave field for two coupled walkers and how it conveys an interaction between them. For this purpose, we characterize experimentally the "promenade modes" where two walkers are bound, and propagate together. Their possible binding distances take discrete values, and the velocity of the pair depends on their mutual binding. The mean parallel motion can be either rectilinear or oscillating. The experimental results are recovered analytically with a simple theoretical framework. A relation between the kinetic energy of the droplets and the total energy of the standing waves is established.

Borghesi, Christian; Labousse, Matthieu; Eddi, Antonin; Fort, Emmanuel; Couder, Yves

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

High velocity spectroscopic binary orbits from photoelectric radial velocities: BD +30 2129 A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectroscopic orbit of a high proper motion visual binary system BD +30 2129 component A is determined from 22 CORAVEL-type radial velocity measurements. A period of P = 32.79 days and a moderate eccentricity e = 0.29 are obtained. The visual system AB has a projected spatial separation ~580 AU. The system's barycenter velocity V0 = -35.95 km/s and the transverse velocity Vt = 132.2 km/s. The Galactic spatial velocity components U = +76.7 km/s, V = 110.4 km/s, W = -26.6 km/s, and a large ultraviolet excess give evidence that the star belongs to thick disk population of the Galaxy.

A. Bartkevicius; J. Sperauskas

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

High Velocity Spectroscopic Binary Orbits from Photoelectric Radial Velocities: BD +82 565A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectroscopic orbit of a circumpolar high-proper-motion visual binary BD +82 565 A component is determined from 57 CORAVEL radial velocity measurements. A short period P = 12.69 d and a moderate eccentricity e = 0.30 are obtained. The visual system AB has a projected spatial separation ~830 AU. The system's barycenter velocity V_0 = -86.7 km/s, the transverse velocity V_t = 118.7 km/s and the Galactic spatial velocity components U = -62.6 km/s, V = -84.1 km/s and W = -84.2 km/s give evidence that it belongs to the thick disk of the Galaxy.

A. Bartkevicius; J. Sperauskas

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

Probing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the understanding of this family of compounds is YMnO 3 , which has a ferrielectric transition at T C 900 K. 3-5 This gives rise to a small distortion of the two-dimensional...

330

Dynamics of positive probes in underdense, strongly magnetized, E×B drifting plasma: Particle-in-cell simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron trapping, electron heating, space-charge wings, wake eddies, and current collection by a positive probe in E×B drifting plasma were studied in three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations. In these simulations, electrons and ions were magnetized with respect to the probe and the plasma was underdense (?{sub pe}velocity (Mach 4.5 with respect to the ion acoustic speed) between the plasma and probe was created with background electric and magnetic fields. Four distinct regions developed in the presences of the positive probe: a quasi-trapped electron region, an electron-depletion wing, an ion-rich wing, and a wake region. We report on the observations of strong electron heating mechanisms, space-charge wings, ion cyclotron charge-density eddies in the wake, electron acceleration due to a magnetic presheath, and the current-voltage relationship.

Heinrich, Jonathon R.; Cooke, David L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Observation of negative-frequency waves in a water tank: A classical analogue to the Hawking effect?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conversion of positive-frequency waves into negative-frequency waves at the event horizon is the mechanism at the heart of the Hawking radiation of black holes. In black-hole analogues, horizons are formed for waves propagating in a medium against the current when and where the flow exceeds the wave velocity. We report on the first direct observation of negative-frequency waves converted from positive-frequency waves in a moving medium. The measured degree of mode conversion is significantly higher than expected from theory.

Germain Rousseaux; Christian Mathis; Philippe Maissa; Thomas G. Philbin; Ulf Leonhardt

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Stochastic background of gravitational waves from cosmological sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves (GW) can constitute a unique probe of the primordial universe. In many cases, the characteristic frequency of the emitted GW is directly related to the energy scale at which the GW source is operating in the early universe. Consequently, different GW detectors can probe different energy scales in the evolution of the universe. After a general introduction on the properties of a GW stochastic background of primordial origin, some examples of cosmological sources are presented, which may lead to observable GW signals.

Caprini, Chiara

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Analytical modeling of elastic-plastic wave behavior near grain boundaries in crystalline materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that changes in material properties across an interface will produce differences in the behavior of reflected and transmitted waves. This is seen frequently in planar impact experiments, and to a lesser extent, oblique impacts. In anisotropic elastic materials, wave behavior as a function of direction is usually accomplished with the aid of velocity surfaces, a graphical method for predicting wave scattering configurations. They have expanded this method to account for inelastic deformation due to crystal plasticity. The set of derived equations could not be put into a characteristic form, but instead led to an implicit problem. to overcome this difficulty an algorithm was developed to search the parameters space defined by a wave normal vector, particle velocity vector, and a wave speed. A solution was said to exist when a set from this parameter space satisfied the governing vector equation. Using this technique they can predict the anisotropic elastic-plastic velocity surfaces and grain boundary scattering configuration for crystalline materials undergoing deformation by slip. Specifically, they have calculated the configuration of scattered elastic-plastic waves in anisotropic NiAl for an incident compressional wave propagating along a <111> direction and contacting a 45 degree inclined grain boundary and found that large amplitude transmitted waves exist owing to the fact that the wave surface geometry forces it to propagate near the zero Schmid factor direction <100>.

Loomis, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Greenfield, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swift, Damian [LLNL; Peralta, Pedro [ASU

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

High-frequency probing diagnostic for Hall current plasma thrusters A. A. Litvak, Y. Raitses, and N. J. Fisch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-frequency probing diagnostic for Hall current plasma thrusters A. A. Litvak, Y. Raitses, and N Received 6 November 2001; accepted for publication 21 May 20002 High-frequency oscillations 1­100 MHz-thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been successfully identified

335

Interpreting Velocities from Heat-Based Flow Sensors by NumericalSimulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have carried out numerical simulations of three-dimensional non-isothermal flow around an in situ heat-based flow sensor to investigate how formation heterogeneities can affect the interpretation of ground water flow velocities from this instrument. The flow sensor operates by constant heating of a 0.75 m long, 5 cm diameter cylindrical probe, which contains 30 thermistors in contact with the formation. The temperature evolution at each thermistor can be inverted to obtain an estimate of the ground water flow velocity vector using the standard interpretive method, which assumes that the formation is homogeneous. Analysis of data from heat-based flow sensors installed in a sand aquifer at the Former Fort Ord Army Base near Monterey, California suggested an unexpected component of downward flow. The magnitudes of the vertical velocities were expected to be much less than the horizontal velocities at this site because the sensors were installed just above a clay aquitard. Numerical simulations were conducted to examine how differences in thermal conductivities may lead to spurious indications of vertical flow velocities. We found that a decrease in the thermal conductivity near the bottom of the sensor can perturb the temperature profiles along the instrument in such a manner that analyses assuming homogeneous thermal conductivity could indicate a vertical flow component even though flow is actually horizontal. This work demonstrates how modeling can be used to simulate instrument response to formation heterogeneity, and shows that caution must be used in interpreting data from such devices using overly simplistic assumptions.

Su, Grace W.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Jordan,Preston D.; Daley, Paul F.

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

336

AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A SURGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a surge on 2010 November 13. Due to the magnetic flux cancelation, some surges formed in the source active region (AR). The strongest surge produced our studied event. The surge was deflected by the nearby loops that connected to another AR, and disrupted the overlying loops that slowly expanded and eventually evolved into a weak coronal mass ejection (CME). The surge was likely associated with the core of the CME. The EUV wave happened after the surge deflected. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the deflected surge. The wave propagated in a narrow angular extent, mainly in the ejection direction of the surge. The close timing and location relations between the EUV wave and the surge indicate that the wave was closely associated with the CME. The wave had a velocity of 310-350 km s{sup -1}, while the speeds of the surge and the expanding loops were about 130 and 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. All of the results suggest that the EUV wave was a fast-mode wave and was most likely triggered by the weak CME.

Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)] [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

337

Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang, E-mail: liuqf@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

Kelvin Waves around Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Southern Ocean allows circumpolar structure and the Antarctic coastline plays a role as a waveguide for oceanic Kelvin waves. Under the cyclic conditions, the horizontal wavenumbers and frequencies for circumpolarly propagating waves are ...

Kazuya Kusahara; Kay I. Ohshima

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Surface wave tomography of the western United States from ambient seismic noise: Rayleigh wave group velocity maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Department of Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, Campus Box 390, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA River flood basalts, the Snake River Plain and Yellowstone, and mantle wedge features associated

Ritzwolle, Mike

340

Terahertz imaging of sub-wavelength particles with Zenneck surface waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Impact of sub-wavelength-size dielectric particles on Zenneck surface waves on planar metallic antennas is investigated at terahertz (THz) frequencies with THz near-field probe microscopy. Perturbations of the surface waves show the particle presence, despite its sub-wavelength size. The experimental configuration, which utilizes excitation of surface waves at metallic edges, is suitable for THz imaging of dielectric sub-wavelength size objects. As a proof of concept, the effects of a small strontium titanate rectangular particle and a titanium dioxide sphere on the surface field of a bow-tie antenna are experimentally detected and verified using full-wave simulations.

Navarro-Cía, M., E-mail: m.navarro@imperial.ac.uk [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BT (United Kingdom); Centre for Plasmonics and Metamaterials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Centre for Terahertz Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Natrella, M.; Graham, C.; Renaud, C. C.; Seeds, A. J.; Mitrofanov, O., E-mail: o.mitrofanov@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Dominec, F.; Kužel, P., E-mail: kuzelp@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Delagnes, J. C.; Mounaix, P., E-mail: p.mounaix@loma.u-bordeaux1.fr [LOMA, Bordeaux 1 University, CNRS UMR 4798, 351 cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence (France)

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Wave fronts, pulses and wave trains in photoexcited superlattices behaving as excitable or oscillatory media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Undoped and strongly photoexcited semiconductor superlattices with field-dependent recombination behave as excitable or oscillatory media with spatially discrete nonlinear convection and diffusion. Infinitely long, dc-current-biased superlattices behaving as excitable media exhibit wave fronts with increasing or decreasing profiles, whose velocities can be calculated by means of asymptotic methods. These superlattices can also support pulses of the electric field. Pulses moving downstream with the flux of electrons can be constructed from their component wave fronts, whereas pulses advancing upstream do so slowly and experience saltatory motion: they change slowly in long intervals of time separated by fast transitions during which the pulses jump to the previous superlattice period. Photoexcited superlattices can also behave as oscillatory media and exhibit wave trains.

J. I. Arana; L. L. Bonilla; H. T. Grahn

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Gravity perturbed Crapper waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waves are known to have multi-valued height. Using...gravity-capillary waves with multi-valued height. The...of single-valued and multi-valued travelling waves...absence of gravity, a family of exact solutions is...elliptic functions. Building upon the work by Tanveer...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

INNOVATIVE EDDY CURRENT PROBE FOR MICRO DEFECTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the development of an innovative eddy current (EC) probe, and its application to micro-defects on the root of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The new EC probe presents innovative concept issues, allowing 3D induced current in the material, and a lift-off independence. Validation experiments were performed on aluminium alloys processed by FSW. The results clearly show that the new EC probe is able to detect and sizing surface defects about 60 microns depth.

Santos, Telmo G.; Vilaca, Pedro; Quintino, Luisa [IDMEC, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos, Jorge dos [GKSS, Max-Planck-Street 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Rosado, Luis [IST, UTL, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

344

Microsoft Word - PumpProbe  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pump/Probe Pump/Probe Resources Available - BE Current Mid 2014 Mid 2016 Beamline X-ray Source Total Total Total NSLS-I 0.25 0.15 0 U4B Bend 0.05 0 0 U4IR Bend 0.2 0.15 0 APS 4.75 4.75 4.75 4-ID-C CPU 0 0 0 7-ID-C&D Undulator 1 1 1 7-BM-B Bend 1 1 1 10-ID-B Undulator 0.5 0.5 0.5 11-ID-D Undulator 1 1 1 14-ID-B Undulator 1 1 1 20-ID Undulator 0.25 0.25 0.25 ALS 3 3 3 4.0.2 EPU 0 0 0 6.0.1 Undulator 1 1 1 6.0.2 Undulator 1 1 1 6.1.2 Bend 0 0 0 9.0.2 Undulator 1 1 1 11.0.1 EPU 0 0 0 11.0.2 EPU 0 0 0 SSRL 0.15 0.45 0.45

345

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

Hansen, René Rydhof

346

The Effect of Wave Breaking on the Wave Energy Spectrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of wave breaking on the wave energy spectral shape is examined. The Stokes wave-breaking criterion is first extended to random waves and a breaking wave model is established in which the elevation of breaking waves is expressed in ...

C. C. Tung; N. E. Huang

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Technical Challenges in Low-velocity SRF Development ATLAS 25th Anniversary Celebration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Challenges in Low-velocity SRF Development Challenges in Low-velocity SRF Development ATLAS 25th Anniversary Celebration October 22-23, 2010 Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory Building 203, Auditorium Speaker: Mike Kelly ATLAS Energy Upgrade: Commissioned June 2009 14.5 MV in 5 meters using 7 SC Quarter-wave Cavities Superconductivity 1911 - superconductivity discovered by Kamerlingh Onnes in a sample of Hg at 4 Kelvin 1950's: - Ginsburg-Landau theory developed - 1957 - Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer theory First applications such as SC magnets 1964 - SC resonators developed for accelerator applications at Stanford Leiden, ca. 1910 4 Outline Materials from: Ken Shepard, Joel Fuerst I. Some superconductivity background II. Progress in RF superconductivity

348

Synthetic investigation of small-molecule probes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A series of small molecules was synthesized to probe three protein targets in order to elucidate the key small molecule-protein interactions required for potency. Triclosan… (more)

Bromba, Caleb

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams Print Silicon-based transistors are well-understood, basic components of contemporary electronic technology. In contrast, there is...

350

Potential Distribution in Functionalized Graphene Devices Probed by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graphene sheet (FGS) [1] can be utilized in sensor technology, batteries and supercapacitors becausePotential Distribution in Functionalized Graphene Devices Probed by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy Institute of Physics. Related Articles Ferromagnetic fluctuation in doped armchair graphene nanoribbons J

Aksay, Ilhan A.

351

WAVE MIXING SPECTROSCOPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is that due to the Doppler effect in gaseous media.velocity due to the Doppler shift effect. In solid state

Smith, Robert William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Resonant Interactions Between Protons and Oblique Alfven/Ion-Cyclotron Waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resonant interactions between ions and Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) waves may play an important role in the heating and acceleration of the fast solar wind. Although such interactions have been studied extensively for 'parallel' waves, whose wave vectors k are aligned with the background magnetic field B{sub 0}, much less is known about interactions between ions and oblique A/IC waves, for which the angle theta between k and B{sub 0} is nonzero. In this paper, we present new numerical results on resonant cyclotron interactions between protons and oblique A/IC waves in collisionless low-beta plasmas such as the solar corona. We find that if some mechanism generates oblique high-frequency A/IC waves, then these waves initially modify the proton distribution function in such a way that it becomes unstable to parallel waves. Parallel waves are then amplified to the point that they dominate the wave energy at the large parallel wave numbers at which the waves resonate with the particles. Pitch-angle scattering by these waves then causes the plasma to evolve towards a state in which the proton distribution is constant along a particular set of nested 'scattering surfaces' in velocity space, whose shapes have been calculated previously. As the distribution function approaches this state, the imaginary part of the frequency of parallel A/IC waves drops continuously towards zero, but oblique waves continue to undergo cyclotron damping while simultaneously causing protons to diffuse across these kinetic shells to higher energies. We conclude that oblique A/IC waves can be more effective at heating protons than parallel A/IC waves, because for oblique waves the plasma does not relax towards a state in which proton damping of oblique A/IC waves ceases.

Pongkitiwanichakul, Peera; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham NH, 03824 (United States)

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

353

The Effects of Magnetizer Velocity on Magnetic Flux Leakage Signals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many magnetic flux leakage applications, the nondestructive inspection constraints suggest the use of high inspection velocities. However, high inspection velocities can compromise the ability to detect and ch...

J. Bruce Nestleroth; Richard J. Davis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Velocity of the electric arc in a plasmatron discharge chamber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental investigation of the velocity of a high-current arc with air injection in the discharge chamber of a coaxial sectioned plasmatron is described. The experiments showed that the velocity of the c...

A. S. Shaboltas

1969-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

MERIT Pump/Probe Data OutlineOutline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MERIT Pump/Probe Data Analysis OutlineOutline The pump/probe program Particle detector response correction Pump/probe analysis results NFMCC Collaboration Meeting , LBNL, January 26, 2009 Ilias Efthymiopoulos - CERN #12;The pump/probe program #12;The pump/probe program Use of the CERN PS flexibility

McDonald, Kirk

356

A Variable-resolution Surface Wave Dispersion Study of Eurasia, North Africa, and Surrounding Regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a large-scale study of surface wave dispersion performed across Eurasia and North Africa. Improvements were made to previous surface wave work by enlarging the study region, increasing path density, improving spatial resolution, and expanding the period range. This study expands the coverage area northwards and eastwards relative to a previous dispersion analysis, which covered only North Africa and the Middle East. We have significantly increased the number of seismograms examined and group velocity measurements made. We have now made good quality dispersion measurements for about 30,000 Rayleigh wave and 20,000 Love wave paths, and have incorporated measurements from several other researchers into the study. A conjugate gradient method was employed for the group velocity tomography, which improved the inversion from the previous study by adopting a variable smoothness. This technique allows us to go to higher resolution where the data allow without producing artifacts. The current results include both Love and Rayleigh wave inversions across the region for periods from 7 to 100 seconds at 1{sup o} resolution. Short period group velocities are sensitive to slow velocities associated with large sedimentary features such as the Caspian Sea, West Siberian Platform, Mediterranean Sea, Bay of Bengal, Tarim Basin, and Persian Gulf. Intermediate periods are sensitive to differences in crustal thickness, such as those between oceanic and continental crust or along orogenic zones and continental plateaus. At longer periods, fast velocities are consistently found beneath cratons while slow upper mantle velocities occur along rift systems, subduction zones, and collision zones such as the Tethys Belt. We have compared the group velocities at various periods with features such as sediment thickness, topographic height, crustal thickness, proximity to plate boundaries, lithospheric age and lithospheric thickness, and find significant correlations. We don't find any similar correlation between the longest period surface waves and hot spots.

Pasyanos, M E

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

357

On Approximating the Translational Velocity of Vortex Rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from this configuration and the system scaling. Here, the accuracy of this approximation is presented orifice in a flat plate contain a converging radial component of velocity. For both configurations. By this definition, the piston velocity is the average jet velocity passing through the orifice independent

Mohseni, Kamran

358

LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 (2014) 162-169" DOI : 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.07.015 #12;2 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES, Sweden Abstract The adiabatic laminar burning velocities of a commercial gasoline and of a model fuel (n

Boyer, Edmond

359

Compressional and Shear-Wave Velocity versus Depth Relations for Common Rock Types in Northern California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1 1.638 4 0.31 4 5.28 Merritt sand (Qm) 0.024 0.986 1 0.43 1 2.30 Merritt sand (Qm) 0.030 1.610 1 0.31 1 5.21 Merritt sand (Qm) 0.037 1.610...Pilot Hole Vp and Vs logs. Nick Christensen provided unpublished...

Thomas M. Brocher

360

Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

structures of the Coso geothermal area, California, from microseismic travel time data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

P- and SV-wave transversely isotropic phase velocities analysis from VSP data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......et al. have been used for the inversion process. Therefore, inverted parameters can be...Expanded obstructs, .5&h Ann. Int. SEG Mtg, Houston, pp. 464-468. Keith, C...Expanded ubstracts, 59th Ann. Int. SEG Mtg, Dallas, pp. Lines, L. R. & Treitel......

J. de Parscau

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......partially during the subsequent tectonism of flat Farallon subduction (Humphreys et al...Thick-structured Proterozoic lithosphere of the Rocky Mountain region, GSA Today, 11, 4-9...azimuthal anisotropy beneath the Colorado Rocky Mountains, in The Rocky Mountain Region-An......

Huaiyu Yuan; Barbara Romanowicz; Karen M. Fischer; David Abt

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation, and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......where E* is the activation energy, R is the gas constant, tau...This is achieved by use of a cost function based on the norm...Petrologic and non-steady-state geothermal constraints available for these...1965. Attenuation of seismic energy in upper mantle, J. geophys......

Irina M. Artemieva; Magali Billien; Jean-Jacques Lévêque; Walter D. Mooney

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Prediction of rocks thermal conductivity from elastic wave velocities, mineralogy and microstructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......exploitation of geothermal energy rely on the proper...predict TC in a cost-effective way...geometry of the cost-function and...crustal rocks and geothermal applications...Clauser C. Geothermal energy. Landolt Bornstein......

Lucas Pimienta; Joel Sarout; Lionel Esteban; Claudio Delle Piane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Surface wave phase velocities of the Western United States from a two-station method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Columbia Plateau flood basalts, HLP and...Rio Grande Rift), Colorado Plateau, WF (Wasatch...Rocky Mountains in Colorado, possibly reflecting...the Columbia River flood basalts to the east...the Columbia River flood basalts and the northeastern...colocated with the Colorado Plateau, possibly......

Anna Foster; Göran Ekström; Meredith Nettles

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

E-Print Network 3.0 - aortic pulse-wave velocity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CDF 2006 Summary: . Priaux (Eds) TU Delft, Delft The Netherland, 2006 THE INFLUENCE OF ASYMMETRIC INFLOW IN ABDOMINAL AORTIC... the hemodynamics in...

367

A new method to determine phase velocities of Rayleigh waves from microseisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...special situations where there are significant contributions from subway lines, pipelines, geothermal processes, and the like. Note...overlapped Fast Fourier Transform processing: IEEE Transactions on Audio Electroacoustics, AU-21 , 337-344. Henstridge, J. D...

Ikuo Cho; Taku Tada; Yuzo Shinozaki

368

Scanning Probe Microscopy Studies of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scanning Probe Microscopy Studies of Carbon Nanotubes Teri Wang Odom1 , Jason H. Hafner1 relationship between Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWNT) atomic structure and electronic properties, (2, properties and application of carbon nanotube probe microscopy tips to ultrahigh resolution and chemically

Odom, Teri W.

369

Nuclear Imaging Probes: from Bench to Bedside  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...specific imaging probes is the nuclear fuel for molecular imaging by positron emission...cancer. Cancer Res 2001;61:110-7. 24 Price DT, Coleman RE, Liao RP, Robertson CN...specific imaging probes is the nuclear fuel for molecular imaging by positron emission...

Hans-Jürgen Wester

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Proximal Probes | Center for Functional Nanomaterials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proximal Probes Facility Proximal Probes Facility proximal probes The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the core of the facility is a suite of instruments for in-situ microscopy of surfaces and nanostructures under extreme conditions, e.g., in reactive gases, and at high or low temperatures. Unique instruments enable in-situ and in-operando studies of surface chemistry and catalysis at pressures from ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) to 5 bar via complementary scanning tunneling microscopy imaging and photoelectron spectroscopy, coupled with real-time gas analysis. Several UHV systems are available for scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy, as well as low-energy electron microscopy and synchrotron photoelectron microscopy. A

371

Rugged fiber optic probe for raman measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical probe for conducting light scattering analysis is disclosed. The probe comprises a hollow housing and a probe tip. A fiber assembly made up of a transmitting fiber and a receiving bundle is inserted in the tip. A filter assembly is inserted in the housing and connected to the fiber assembly. A signal line from the light source and to the spectrometer also is connected to the filter assembly and communicates with the fiber assembly. By using a spring-loaded assembly to hold the fiber connectors together with the in-line filters, complex and sensitive alignment procedures are avoided. The close proximity of the filter assembly to the probe tip eliminates or minimizes self-scattering generated by the optical fiber. Also, because the probe can contact the sample directly, sensitive optics can be eliminated.

O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA); Toole, Jr., William R. (Aiken, SC); Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Individual quantum probes for optimal thermometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unknown temperature of a sample may be estimated with minimal disturbance by putting it in thermal contact with an individual quantum probe. If the interaction time is sufficiently long so that the probe thermalizes, the temperature can be read out directly from its steady state. Here we prove that the optimal quantum probe, acting as a thermometer with maximal thermal sensitivity, is an effective two-level atom with a maximally degenerate excited state. When the total interaction time is insufficient to produce full thermalization, we optimize the estimation protocol by breaking it down into sequential stages of probe preparation, thermal contact and measurement. We observe that frequently interrogated probes initialized in the ground state achieve the best performance. For both fully and partly thermalized thermometers, the sensitivity grows significantly with the number of levels, though optimization over their energy spectrum remains always crucial.

Luis A. Correa; Mohammad Mehboudi; Gerardo Adesso; Anna Sanpera

2014-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

373

THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W. [Astronomy Department, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Meyer, B. S. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Generation of electromagnetic structures via modulational instability of drift waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generation mechanism for large scale electromagnetic structures (blobs) is considered by employing the technique of four-wave interactions (modulational instability). It is shown that primary electrostatic turbulence may generate elongated electromagnetic structures with poloidal modulations. Such structures are principally related to drift-Alfven waves. The analysis fully takes into account finite ion temperature effects and associated diamagnetic contributions to Reynolds stress. The turbulent generation of blobs has instability growth rates which scale similar to the zonal flow instabilities, {gamma}{approx}, where q is a characteristic wave vector of large scale modes, and V-tilde is a characteristic amplitude of the velocity of turbulent fluctuations. This analysis is shown to be fully consistent with results of an earlier analysis by using the wave kinetic equation.

Smolyakov, A. I. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Nuclear Fusion Institute, Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', 1 Kurchatov Square, 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krasheninnikov, S. I. [University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Whistler Modes with Wave Magnetic Fields Exceeding the Ambient Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Whistler-mode wave packets with fields exceeding the ambient dc magnetic field have been excited in a large, high electron-beta plasma. The waves are induced with a loop antenna with dipole moment either along or opposite to the dc field. In the latter case the excited wave packets have the topology of a spheromak but are propagating in the whistler mode along and opposite to the dc magnetic field. Field-reversed configurations with net zero helicity have also been produced. The electron magnetohydrodynamics fields are force free, have wave energy density exceeding the particle energy density, and propagate stably at subelectron thermal velocities through a nearly uniform stationary ion density background.

R. L. Stenzel; J. M. Urrutia; K. D. Strohmaier

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

376

On plane waves in diluted relativistic cold plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We briefly report on some exact results [G. Fiore, arXiv:1312.4665 preprint, to appear in J. Phys. A] regarding plane waves in a relativistic cold plasma. If the plasma, initially at rest, is reached by a transverse plane electromagnetic travelling-wave, then its motion has a very simple dependence on this wave in the limit of zero density, otherwise can be determined by an iterative procedure whose accuracy decreases with time or the plasma density. Thus one can describe in particular the impact of a very intense and short laser pulse onto a plasma and determine conditions for the "slingshot effect" [G. Fiore, R. Fedele, U. De Angelis, arXiv:1309.1400 preprint] to occur. The motion in vacuum of a charged test particle subject to a wave of the same kind is also determined, for any initial velocity.

Gaetano Fiore

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

About measurements of stopping power behind intense shock waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Method of generation of plasma targets with electron densities n e ?10 21 ? cm ?3 behind strong shock wave for study of energy losses of protons and heavy ions is discussed. The problems of matching of large scale accelerator facility and explosive technique are considered. It is suggested to use small (<150 g TNT) vacuum pumped explosive metallic chambers with fast valves in such experiments. Construction of small-sized explosively driven generators of strong shock waves is described. Estimations of stopping power in strong shock waves in hydrogen xenon and argon were carried out. It is shown that to get main contribution of free electrons it is necessary to have velocities of shock wave in xenon and argon more than 20 km/s and in hydrogen more than 60 km/s.

V. Gryaznov; M. Kulish; V. Mintsev; V. Fortov; B. Sharkov; A. Golubev; A. Fertman; N. Mescheryakov; D. H. H. Hoffmann; M. Stetter; C. Stöckl; D. Gardes

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Relative velocity of dark matter and baryons in clusters of galaxies and measurements of their peculiar velocities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Salpeter initial mass function...fixed to get a wind velocity of 1. More...Synthetic maps of observables...call peculiar velocity the mean (and mass-weighted...maximum circular velocity (e.g. mass) of galaxies...kinetic SZ map directly produced......

K. Dolag; R. Sunyaev

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

On the fully nonlinear acoustic waves in a plasma with positrons beam impact and superthermal electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions, superthermal electrons, and positrons beam are reported. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to an energy-balance like equation. The latter is numerically analyzed to examine the existence regions for solitary and shock waves. It is found that only solitary waves can propagate, however, the model cannot support shocks. The effects of superthermality and beam parameters (via, positrons concentration and streaming velocity) on the existence region, as well as solitary wave profile have been discussed.

Ali Shan, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan) [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Experimental Study of Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Solitary Waves in a Dusty Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The excitation and propagation of finite-amplitude low-frequency solitary waves are investigated in an argon plasma impregnated with kaolin dust particles. A nonlinear longitudinal dust acoustic solitary wave is excited by pulse modulating the discharge voltage with a negative potential. It is found that the velocity of the solitary wave increases and the width decreases with the increase of the modulating voltage, but the product of the solitary wave amplitude and the square of the width remains nearly constant. The experimental findings are compared with analytic soliton solutions of a model Korteveg–de Vries equation.

P. Bandyopadhyay; G. Prasad; A. Sen; P. K. Kaw

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Coupling SPH with a 1-D Boussinesq-type wave Christophe Kassiotis, Martin Ferrand, Damien Violeau, Benedict D. Rogers,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coupling SPH with a 1-D Boussinesq-type wave model Christophe Kassiotis, Martin Ferrand, Damien-D Finite Difference Boussinesq-type model. The latter deals with wave propagations for most. These velocity and water height values are then driven by the Boussinesq-type model. As an illustration

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

382

Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States)] [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Hypersonic wave propagation in the triton X-100 2014 water gelation system as studied by Brillouin spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1211 Hypersonic wave propagation in the triton X-100 2014 water gelation system as studied, quelle que soit la concentration de triton X-100. Abstract 2014 The hypersonic velocity and absorption refractometer. Analysis of the results show that in the gel phase hypersonic waves propagate effectively through

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

384

Single-mode fiber, velocity interferometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe a velocity interferometer system based entirely on single-mode fiber optics. This paper includes a description of principles used in developing the single-mode velocity interferometry system (SMV). The SMV design is based on polarization-insensitive components. Polarization adjusters are included to eliminate the effects of residual birefringence and polarization dependent losses in the interferometers. Characterization measurements and calibration methods needed for data analysis and a method of data analysis are described. Calibration is performed directly using tunable lasers. During development, we demonstrated its operation using exploding-foil bridge-wire fliers up to 200 m/s. In a final test, we demonstrated the SMV in a gas gun experiment up to 1.2 km/sec. As a basis for comparison in the gas gun experiment, we used another velocimetry technique that is also based on single-mode fiber optics: photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV). For the gas gun experiment, we split the light returned from a single target spot and performed a direct comparison of the homodyne (SMV) and heterodyne (PDV) techniques concurrently. The two techniques had a negligible mean difference and a 1.5% standard deviation in the one-dimensional shock zone. Within one interferometer delay time after a sudden Doppler shift, a SMV unencumbered by multimode-fiber dispersion exhibits two color beats. These beats have the same period as PDV beats--this interference occurs between the ''recently'' shifted and ''formerly unshifted'' paths within the interferometer. We believe that recognizing this identity between homodyne and heterodyne beats is novel in the shock-physics field. SMV includes the conveniences of optical fiber, while removing the time resolution limitations associated with the multimode delivery fiber.

Krauter, K. G.; Jacobson, G. F.; Patterson, J. R.; Nguyen, J. H.; Ambrose, W. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore California 94551 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 3 (MAY-JUNE 2001); P. 904910, 7 FIGS., 3 TABLES. Velocity analysis for tilted transversely isotropic media: A physical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in conventional imaging, it is important to be able to recon- struct the velocity model suitable for anisotropic depth migration. Here, we discuss the results of anisotropic pa- rameter estimation on a physical and the anisotropic parameters and . The coefficient is obtained using the travel- times of a wave that crosses

Tsvankin, Ilya

386

MagLab - MagLab Dictionary: Probe (Transcript)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

means, "stick on which you put the sample," but probe sounds more scientific Listen Audio version Related Links Meet the Probes A magnet without a probe is like a drill without...

387

Hohlraum Designs for High Velocity Implosions on NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we compare experimental shock and capsule trajectories to design calculations using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA. The measured trajectories from surrogate ignition targets are consistent with reducing the x-ray flux on the capsule by about 85%. A new method of extracting the radiation temperature as seen by the capsule from x-ray intensity and image data shows that about half of the apparent 15% flux deficit in the data with respect to the simulations can be explained by HYDRA overestimating the x-ray flux on the capsule. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) point-design target is designed to reach a peak fuel-layer velocity of 370 km/s by ablating 90% of its plastic (CH) ablator. The 192-beam National Ignition Facility laser drives a gold hohlraum to a radiation temperature (T{sub RAD}) of 300 eV with a 20 ns-long, 420 TW, 1.3 MJ laser pulse. The hohlraum x-rays couple to the CH ablator in order to apply the required pressure to the outside of the capsule. In this paper, we compare experimental measurements of the hohlraum T{sub RAD} and the implosion trajectory with design calculations using the code hydra. The measured radial positions of the leading shock wave and the unablated shell are consistent with simulations in which the x-ray flux on the capsule is artificially reduced by 85%. We describe a new method of inferring the T{sub RAD} seen by the capsule from time-dependent x-ray intensity data and static x-ray images. This analysis shows that hydra overestimates the x-ray flux incident on the capsule by {approx}8%.

Meezan, N B; Hicks, D G; Callahan, D A; Olson, R E; Schneider, M S; Thomas, C A; Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J K; Dixit, S N; Michel, P A; Jones, O S; Clark, D S; Ralph, J E; Doeppner, T; MacKinnon, A J; Haan, S W; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Edwards, M J; Macgowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Atherton, L J

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hysteresis of ionization waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

Dinklage, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H. [Institut fuer Physik, E.-M.-Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Wilke, C. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Plasmaforschung und Technologie, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

US Army Corps of Engineers

390

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer of the Subject II. Introduction­Historical Perspective III. Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations IV. Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics V. Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions VI

Hereman, Willy A.M.

391

Matter Waves and Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classical four-dimensional relativity gives a most natural and harmonious interpretation of the three basic phenomena of nature: gravity, electricity, and the wave structure of matter, provided that the basic assumptions of the Einsteinian theory are modified in two respects: (1) the fundamental invariant of the action principle is chosen as a quadratic instead of a linear function of the curvature components; (2) the static equilibrium of the world is replaced by a dynamic equilibrium. Electricity comes out as a second-order resonance effect of the matter waves. The matter waves are gravitational waves but superposed not on an empty Euclidean space but on a space of high average curvature.

Cornelius Lanczos

1942-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

kinetic wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

kinetic wave energy ? kinetische Wellenenergie f [Teil der Wellenlänge, die im Feld der Orbitalgeschwindigkeiten unter der Welle enthalten ist und als Orbitalbewegung am Ort verbleibt

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

potential wave energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

potential wave energy ? potentielle Wellenenergie f [Der für die Auslenkung des Wasserspiegels zum Ruhewasserspiegel erforderliche Teil der Wellenenergie, die mit der Wellengeschwindigkeit fortbewegt...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

System and method to estimate compressional to shear velocity (VP/VS) ratio in a region remote from a borehole  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T; Schmitt, Denis P; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should help speed cleanup...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should help speed cleanup of damaged plant The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the...

396

Using Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the Glass Transition Temperature. Using Rare Gas Permeation to Probe Methanol Diffusion near the Glass Transition Temperature....

397

Contribution of atom-probe tomography to a better understanding...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

atom-probe tomography to a better understanding of glass alteration mechanisms: application to a nuclear glass Contribution of atom-probe tomography to a better understanding of...

398

Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic Resolution Electron Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal...

399

PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS OF AN EIT WAVE OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS AND SDO/AIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present plasma diagnostics of an Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) wave observed with high cadence in Hinode/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) sit-and-stare spectroscopy and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imagery obtained during the HOP-180 observing campaign on 2011 February 16. At the propagating EIT wave front, we observe downward plasma flows in the EIS Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XVI spectral lines (log T Almost-Equal-To 6.1-6.4) with line-of-sight (LOS) velocities up to 20 km s{sup -1}. These redshifts are followed by blueshifts with upward velocities up to -5 km s{sup -1} indicating relaxation of the plasma behind the wave front. During the wave evolution, the downward velocity pulse steepens from a few km s{sup -1} up to 20 km s{sup -1} and subsequently decays, correlated with the relative changes of the line intensities. The expected increase of the plasma densities at the EIT wave front estimated from the observed intensity increase lies within the noise level of our density diagnostics from EIS Fe XIII 202/203 A line ratios. No significant LOS plasma motions are observed in the He II line, suggesting that the wave pulse was not strong enough to perturb the underlying chromosphere. This is consistent with the finding that no H{alpha} Moreton wave was associated with the event. The EIT wave propagating along the EIS slit reveals a strong deceleration of a Almost-Equal-To -540 m s{sup -2} and a start velocity of v{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 590 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the passage of a coronal fast-mode MHD wave, pushing the plasma downward and compressing it at the coronal base.

Veronig, A. M.; Kienreich, I. W.; Muhr, N.; Temmer, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Goemoery, P. [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Kaciceva 26, 1000 Zagreb (Croatia); Warren, H. P., E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

Evaluation of layer thickness in human teeth using higher-order-mode leaky Lamb wave interdigital transducers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation technique of the layer thickness in human teeth is proposed using a leaky Lamb wave device with two arch-shaped interdigital transducers, operating at a plate/water interface. The use of a higher-order-mode leaky Lamb wave with a phase velocity higher than the longitudinal wave velocity in the human tooth is essential to detect reflected ultrasound beams from the tooth section The layer thickness of dentin, estimated from the measured time interval between two reflected echoes, is in good agreement with the optically measured data.

Toda, Shinji; Fujita, Takeshi; Arakawa, Hirohisa; Toda, Kohji [Department of Dental and Public Health, Kanagawa Dental College, 82 Inaoka, Yokosuka 238-8580 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, National Defense Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka 239-8686 (Japan); Department of Dental and Public Health, Kanagawa Dental College, 82 Inaoka, Yokosuka 238-8580 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, National Defense Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka 239-8686 (Japan)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Theory of steady-state plane tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of band-to-band and trap-assisted tunneling on the properties of steady-state plane ionization waves in p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} structures is theoretically analyzed. It is shown that such tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves do not differ in a qualitative sense from ordinary impact ionization waves propagating due to the avalanche multiplication of uniformly distributed seed electrons and holes. The quantitative differences of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves from impact ionization waves are reduced to a slightly different relation between the wave velocity u and the maximum field strength E{sub M} at the front. It is shown that disregarding impact ionization does not exclude the possibility of the existence of tunneling-assisted ionization waves; however, their structure radically changes, and their velocity strongly decreases for the same E{sub M}. A comparison of the dependences u(E{sub M}) for various ionization-wave types makes it possible to determine the conditions under which one of them is dominant. In conclusion, unresolved problems concerning the theory of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves are discussed and the directions of further studies are outlined.

Kyuregyan, A. S., E-mail: ask@vei.ru [Lenin All-Russian Electrical-Engineering Institute (Russian Federation)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

ION HEATING BY A SPECTRUM OF OBLIQUELY PROPAGATING LOW-FREQUENCY ALFVEN WAVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion stochastic heating by a monochromatic Alfven wave, which propagates obliquely to the background magnetic field, has been studied by Chen et al. It is shown that ions can be resonantly heated at frequencies a fraction of the ion cyclotron frequency when the wave amplitude is sufficiently large. In this paper, the monochromatic wave is extended to a spectrum of left-hand polarized Alfven waves. When the amplitude of the waves is small, the components of the ion velocity have several distinct frequencies, and their motions are quasi-periodic. However, when the amplitude of the waves is sufficiently large, the components of the ion velocity have a spectrum of continuous frequencies near the ion cyclotron frequency due to the nonlinear coupling between the Alfven waves and the ion gyromotion, and the ion motions are stochastic. Compared with the case of a monochromatic Alfven wave, the threshold of the ion stochastic heating by a spectrum of Alfven waves is much lower. Even when their frequencies are only several percent of the ion cyclotron frequency, the ions can also be stochastically heated. The relevance of this heating mechanism to solar corona is also discussed.

Lu Quanming [CAS Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Chen Liu [Institute for Fusion and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

2009-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

403

Instrument Series: Microscopy Atom Probe The LEAP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atom Probe Atom Probe The LEAP ® 4000 XHR local electrode atom probe tomography instrument enabled the first- ever comprehensive and accurate 3-D chemical imaging studies of low electrical conductivity materials, such as ceramics, semiconductors and oxides. The LEAP capability is assisting EMSL's efforts to further scientific advancements in interface analysis and microstructural characterization, providing a new tool for understanding the relationship between the nanoscale structure of materials and their macroscopic properties. Research Applications Geochemistry - Studying chemical processes that compose rocks and soils has long been used to determine matter cycles and transport in the environment, which supports critical EMSL research in areas including bioremediation.

404

Characterization of Fiber Optic CMM Probe System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a study completed on the fiber optic probe system that is a part of the Werth optical CMM. This study was necessary due to a lack of documentation from the vendor for the proper use and calibration of the fiber probe, and was performed in support of the Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung (LIGA) development program at the FM&T. As a result of this study, a better understanding of the fiber optic probe has been developed, including guidelines for its proper use and calibration.

K.W.Swallow

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Acoustic probing of salt using sonar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACOUSTIC PROBING OF SALT USING SONAR A Thesis by KENNETH BRYAN BUTLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Oecember 1977 Major Subject...: Geophysics ACOUSTIC PROBING OF SALT USING SONAR A Thesis by KENNETH BRYAN BUTLER Approved as to style and content by: C airman of Com ttee ea of e r nt em er ember December 1977 ABSTRACT Acoustic Probing of Salt Using Sonar. (December 1977...

Butler, Kenneth Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Surface-wave and refraction tomography at the FACT Site, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a technique that allows for the simultaneous acquisition and interpretation of both shear-wave and compressive-wave 3-D velocities. The technique requires no special seismic sources or array geometries, and is suited to studies with small source-receiver offsets. The method also effectively deals with unwanted seismic arrivals by using the statistical properties of the data itself to discriminate against spurious picks. We demonstrate the technique with a field experiment at the Facility for Analysis, Calibration, and Testing at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The resulting 3-D shear-velocity and compressive-velocity distributions are consistent with surface geologic mapping. The averaged velocities and V{sub p}/V{sub s} ratio in the upper 30 meters are also consistent with examples found in the scientific literature.

Abbott, Robert E.; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Pullammanappallil, Satish (Optim, Inc., Reno, NV); Engler, Bruce Phillip

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was measured close to the test cylinders are analyzed. These data on wave runup in deepwater random waves were generated at similar water depths with significant wave heights and spectral peak periods. Statistical parameters, zero crossing analysis...

Indrebo, Ann Kristin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

408

Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Free-Wave Energy Dissipation in Experimental Breaking Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several transient wave trains containing an isolated plunging or spilling breaker at a prescribed location were generated in a two-dimensional wave flume using an energy focusing technique. Surface elevation measurements of each transient wave ...

Eustorgio Meza; Jun Zhang; Richard J. Seymour

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli - MIT E .J for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions L.A. Berry, D.B. Batchelor, E.F. Jaeger, E. D`Azevedo D. Green C. Milanesio #12;3 Outline · Introduction to Lower Hybrid waves · Modeling LH waves ­ Ray tracing ­ Full Wave

Wright, John C.

412

Radial velocity measurements of white dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present 594 radial velocity measurements for 71 white dwarfs obtained during our search for binary white dwarfs and not reported elsewhere. We identify three excellent candidate binaries, which require further observations to confirm our preliminary estimates for their orbital periods, and one other good candidate. We investigate whether our data support the existence of a population of single, low mass (<~0.5 solar masses) white dwarfs (LMWDs). These stars are difficult to explain in standard models of stellar evolution. We find that a model with a mixed single/binary population is at least ~20 times more likely to explain our data than a pure binary population. This result depends on assumed period distributions for binary LMWDs, assumed companion masses and several other factors. Therefore, the evidence in favour of the existence of a population of single LMWDs is not sufficient, in our opinion, to firmly establish the existence of such a population, but does suggest that extended observations of LMWDs to obtain a more convincing result would be worthwhile .

P. F. L. Maxted; T. R. Marsh; C. K. J. Moran

2000-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

True Masses of Radial-Velocity Exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the science power of space telescopes used to estimate the true masses of known radial-velocity exoplanets by means of astrometry on direct images. We translate a desired mass accuracy (+/10% in our example) into a minimum goal for the signal-to-noise ratio, which implies a minimum exposure time. When the planet is near a node, the mass measurement becomes difficult if not impossible, because the apparent separation becomes decoupled from the inclination angle of the orbit. The combination of this nodal effect with considerations of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, and image blurring due to orbital motion, severely limits the observing opportunities, often to only brief intervals in a five-year mission. We compare the science power of four missions, two with external star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, and two with internal coronagraphs, EXO-C and WFIRST-C. The star shades out-perform the coronagraph in this science program by about a factor of th...

Brown, Robert A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Shake Table for Calibration of Velocity Pickups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Shake Table was developed and built by the Engineering Research Institute to calibrate low?frequency (0 to 200 cps) velocity pickups. The platform that supports the pickup to be tested is 6 in. in diameter and will support a load of approximately 30 lb. This makes the use of a table limited by force it can deliver except at very low frequencies. The table will operate with a 10 lb load to a frequency of 150 cps. The platform displacement is 0.125 in. peak?to?peak. The platform and its load are supported by air bellows. This is an improvement over a spring support due to the fact that it has greater damping and it is more easily adjusted to different loads. The adjustment consists of just putting more air in the bellows. The table is driven by a dc push?pull power amplifier. This delivers a current to a tapped coil on the Shake Table that is located in a magnetic field. The field is set up by a coil energized by 24 volts. The power amplifier can be driven by any convenient source delivering about 1 volt. (Parts of this research were supported by Tri?service Contract No. DA?36?039?sc?52654.)

J. W. Wescott; J. H. Prout; W. H. Follett

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Integrated campaign to study the stationary inertial Alfvn wave in the laboratory and space This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are in colour only in the electronic version) 1. Introduction The stationary inertial Alfv´en (StIA) wave [1 of StIA waves is magnetic-field-aligned (s-direction in figure 1) electron drift energy that overcomes of the effective phase velocity vector, as shown, and is approximately zero. The StIA wave vector is approximately

California at Berkeley, University of

416

An insitu borescopic quantitative imaging profiler for the measurement of high concentration sediment velocity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of high concentration sediment velocity Edwin A. Cowen •instantaneous velocity in high sediment concentration ?ows,point reveals the sheet ?ow sediment velocities to be highly

Cowen, Edwin A.; Dudley, Russell D.; Liao, Qian; Variano, Evan A.; Liu, Philip L.-F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Wave Energy Conversion Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wave Energy Conversion Technology Wave Energy Conversion Technology Speaker(s): Mirko Previsic Date: August 2, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Scientists have been working on wave power conversion for the past twenty years, but recent advances in offshore and IT technologies have made it economically competitive. Sea Power & Associates is a Berkeley-based renewable energy technology company. We have developed patented technology to generate electricity from ocean wave energy using a system of concrete buoys and highly efficient hydraulic pumps. Our mission is to provide competitively priced, non-polluting, renewable energy for coastal regions worldwide. Mirko Previsic, founder and CEO, of Sea Power & Associates will discuss ocean wave power, existing technologies for its conversion into

418

2-M Probe Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-M Probe Survey 2-M Probe Survey (Redirected from 2-M Probe) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: 2-M Probe Survey Details Activities (27) Areas (21) Regions (0) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Collection and Mapping Parent Exploration Technique: Data Collection and Mapping Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Identify and delineate shallow thermal anomalies Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 200.0020,000 centUSD 0.2 kUSD 2.0e-4 MUSD 2.0e-7 TUSD / station Median Estimate (USD): 300.0030,000 centUSD 0.3 kUSD 3.0e-4 MUSD 3.0e-7 TUSD / station High-End Estimate (USD): 500.0050,000 centUSD 0.5 kUSD 5.0e-4 MUSD

419

Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

420

Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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421

Variable Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EMSL's ultra-high vacuum, variable-temperature scanning probe microscope system, or UHV VT SPM, is a state-of-the-art surface science tool comprising multiple complementary...

422

Interferometric Probes of Many-Body Localization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a method for detecting many-body localization (MBL) in disordered spin systems. The method involves pulsed coherent spin manipulations that probe the dephasing of a given spin due to its entanglement with a set ...

Knap, M.

423

Catheter based magnetic resonance compatible perfusion probe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neurosurgeons are using a thermal based technique to quantify brain perfusion. The thermal diffusion probe (TDP) technology measures perfusion in a relatively small volume of brain tissue. The neurosurgeon chooses the ...

Toretta, Cara Lynne

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Guided Wave Inspection for Bottom Edge of Rails  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Defects in a railhead and web can be detected with rail inspection cars and rail inspection tools equipped with special transducers such as wheel probes. However bottom edges of rails easily damaged regions due to contact to soil and fastening are blind zones for the conventional ultrasonic inspection technique in which signals are input from a railhead. In this paper inspection technique for defects in bottom edges of rails using guided waves were described. Dispersion curves for a rail obtained by a semi analytical finite element calculation show that a lot of propagating modes exist in a frequency region used for guided wave inspection eg. 10kHz – 200kHz. Guided wave modes mainly vibrating a bottom edge of a rail were selected among the many modes in dispersion curves and then defect detection tests were done using the selected modes. Good reflections from an artificial defect and a rail end were obtained with a vertically vibrating mode.

T. Hayashi; Y. Miyazaki; M. Murase; T. Abe

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

LIGO: the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The goal of the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is to detect and study gravitational waves (GWs) of astrophysical origin. Direct detection of GWs holds the promise of testing general relativity in the strong-field regime, of providing a new probe of exotic objects such as black holes and neutron stars and of uncovering unanticipated new astrophysics. LIGO, a joint Caltech–MIT project supported by the National Science Foundation, operates three multi-kilometer interferometers at two widely separated sites in the United States. These detectors are the result of decades of worldwide technology development, design, construction and commissioning. They are now operating at their design sensitivity, and are sensitive to gravitational wave strains smaller than one part in 1021. With this unprecedented sensitivity, the data are being analyzed to detect or place limits on GWs from a variety of potential astrophysical sources.

B P Abbott; R Abbott; R Adhikari; P Ajith; B Allen; G Allen; R S Amin; S B Anderson; W G Anderson; M A Arain; M Araya; H Armandula; P Armor; Y Aso; S Aston; P Aufmuth; C Aulbert; S Babak; P Baker; S Ballmer; C Barker; D Barker; B Barr; P Barriga; L Barsotti; M A Barton; I Bartos; R Bassiri; M Bastarrika; B Behnke; M Benacquista; J Betzwieser; P T Beyersdorf; I A Bilenko; G Billingsley; R Biswas; E Black; J K Blackburn; L Blackburn; D Blair; B Bland; T P Bodiya; L Bogue; R Bork; V Boschi; S Bose; P R Brady; V B Braginsky; J E Brau; D O Bridges; M Brinkmann; A F Brooks; D A Brown; A Brummit; G Brunet; A Bullington; A Buonanno; O Burmeister; R L Byer; L Cadonati; J B Camp; J Cannizzo; K C Cannon; J Cao; L Cardenas; S Caride; G Castaldi; S Caudill; M Cavaglià; C Cepeda; T Chalermsongsak; E Chalkley; P Charlton; S Chatterji; S Chelkowski; Y Chen; N Christensen; C T Y Chung; D Clark; J Clark; J H Clayton; T Cokelaer; C N Colacino; R Conte; D Cook; T R C Corbitt; N Cornish; D Coward; D C Coyne; J D E Creighton; T D Creighton; A M Cruise; R M Culter; A Cumming; L Cunningham; S L Danilishin; K Danzmann; B Daudert; G Davies; E J Daw; D DeBra; J Degallaix; V Dergachev; S Desai; R DeSalvo; S Dhurandhar; M Díaz; A Dietz; F Donovan; K L Dooley; E E Doomes; R W P Drever; J Dueck; I Duke; J-C Dumas; J G Dwyer; C Echols; M Edgar; A Effler; P Ehrens; E Espinoza; T Etzel; M Evans; T Evans; S Fairhurst; Y Faltas; Y Fan; D Fazi; H Fehrmenn; L S Finn; K Flasch; S Foley; C Forrest; N Fotopoulos; A Franzen; M Frede; M Frei; Z Frei; A Freise; R Frey; T Fricke; P Fritschel; V V Frolov; M Fyffe; V Galdi; J A Garofoli; I Gholami; J A Giaime; S Giampanis; K D Giardina; K Goda; E Goetz; L M Goggin; G González; M L Gorodetsky; S Goßler; R Gouaty; A Grant; S Gras; C Gray; M Gray; R J S Greenhalgh; A M Gretarsson; F Grimaldi; R Grosso; H Grote; S Grunewald; M Guenther; E K Gustafson; R Gustafson; B Hage; J M Hallam; D Hammer; G D Hammond; C Hanna; J Hanson; J Harms; G M Harry; I W Harry; E D Harstad; K Haughian; K Hayama; J Heefner; I S Heng; A Heptonstall; M Hewitson; S Hild; E Hirose; D Hoak; K A Hodge; K Holt; D J Hosken; J Hough; D Hoyland; B Hughey; S H Huttner; D R Ingram; T Isogai; M Ito; A Ivanov; B Johnson; W W Johnson; D I Jones; G Jones; R Jones; L Ju; P Kalmus; V Kalogera; S Kandhasamy; J Kanner; D Kasprzyk; E Katsavounidis; K Kawabe; S Kawamura; F Kawazoe; W Kells; D G Keppel; A Khalaidovski; F Y Khalili; R Khan; E Khazanov; P King; J S Kissel; S Klimenko; K Kokeyama; V Kondrashov; R Kopparapu; S Koranda; D Kozak; B Krishnan; R Kumar; P Kwee; P K Lam; M Landry; B Lantz; A Lazzarini; H Lei; M Lei; N Leindecker; I Leonor; C Li; H Lin; P E Lindquist; T B Littenberg; N A Lockerbie; D Lodhia; M Longo; M Lormand; P Lu; M Lubinski; A Lucianetti; H Lück; B Machenschalk; M MacInnis; M Mageswaran; K Mailand; I Mandel; V Mandic; S Márka; Z Márka; A Markosyan; J Markowitz; E Maros; I W Martin; R M Martin; J N Marx; K Mason; F Matichard; L Matone; R A Matzner; N Mavalvala; R McCarthy; D E McClelland; S C McGuire; M McHugh; G McIntyre; D J A McKechan; K McKenzie; M Mehmet; A Melatos; A C Melissinos; D F Menéndez; G Mendell; R A Mercer; S Meshkov; C Messenger; M S Meyer; J Miller; J Minelli; Y Mino; V P Mitrofanov; G Mitselmakher; R Mittleman; O Miyakawa; B Moe; S D Mohanty; S R P Mohapatra; G Moreno; T Morioka; K Mors; K Mossavi; C MowLowry; G Mueller; H Müller-Ebhardt; D Muhammad; S Mukherjee; H Mukhopadhyay; A Mullavey; J Munch; P G Murray; E Myers; J Myers; T Nash; J Nelson; G Newton; A Nishizawa; K Numata; J O'Dell; B O'Reilly; R O'Shaughnessy; E Ochsner; G H Ogin; D J Ottaway; R S Ottens; H Overmier; B J Owen; Y Pan; C Pankow; M A Papa; V Parameshwaraiah; P Patel; M Pedraza; S Penn; A Perraca; V Pierro; I M Pinto; M Pitkin; H J Pletsch; M V Plissi; F Postiglione; M Principe; R Prix; L Prokhorov; O Punken; V Quetschke; F J Raab; D S Rabeling; H Radkins; P Raffai; Z Raics; N Rainer; M Rakhmanov; V Raymond; C M Reed; T Reed; H Rehbein; S Reid; D H Reitze; R Riesen; K Riles; B Rivera; P Roberts; N A Robertson; C Robinson; E L Robinson; S Roddy; C Röver; J Rollins; J D Romano; J H Romie; S Rowan; A Rüdiger; P Russell; K Ryan; S Sakata; L Sancho de la Jordana; V Sandberg; V Sannibale; L Santamaría; S Saraf; P Sarin; B S Sathyaprakash; S Sato; M Satterthwaite; P R Saulson; R Savage; P Savov; M Scanlan; R Schilling; R Schnabel; R Schofield; B Schulz; B F Schutz; P Schwinberg; J Scott; S M Scott; A C Searle; B Sears; F Seifert; D Sellers; A S Sengupta; A Sergeev; B Shapiro; P Shawhan; D H Shoemaker; A Sibley; X Siemens; D Sigg; S Sinha; A M Sintes; B J J Slagmolen; J Slutsky; J R Smith; M R Smith; N D Smith; K Somiya; B Sorazu; A Stein; L C Stein; S Steplewski; A Stochino; R Stone; K A Strain; S Strigin; A Stroeer; A L Stuver; T Z Summerscales; K-X Sun; M Sung; P J Sutton; G P Szokoly; D Talukder; L Tang; D B Tanner; S P Tarabrin; J R Taylor; R Taylor; J Thacker; K A Thorne; A Thüring; K V Tokmakov; C Torres

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Search for long-lived gravitational-wave transients coincident with long gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been linked to extreme core-collapse supernovae from massive stars. Gravitational waves (GW) offer a probe of the physics behind long GRBs. We investigate models of long-lived (?10–1000??s) ...

Aggarwal, Nancy

427

Wave energy: a Pacific perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...study by Cornett used wind/wave hindcasting to assess Canada's offshore wave energy resource...will probably attract offshore birds, possibly leading...related projects, such as offshore wind farms. If wave energy development...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Rainbow trapping of guided waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rainbow trapping of guided waves Javier Polanco and Rosa M.the propagation of a wave packet that is a superpositionof three s-polarized guided waves with different frequencies

Polanco, Javier; Fitzgerald, Rosa M; Leskova, Tamara A; Maradudin, Alexei A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus and efficiency of seismic processing algorithms, especially for application to regions of structural complexity

430

AdHoc Probe: End-to-end Capacity Probing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AdHoc Probe: End-to-end Capacity Probing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Ling-Jyh Chen1 , Tony Sun2 and systematic study in ad hoc, multihop wireless networks is still lacking. Yet the rate of a wireless link can deployment. In this paper, we present AdHoc Probe, a packet-pair based technique, to estimate end-to-end path

Chen, Ling-Jyh

431

Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Graphene-coated tapered nanowire infrared probe: a comparison with metal-coated probes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose in this paper a graphene-coated tapered nanowire probe providing strong field enhancement in the infrared regimes. The analytical field distributions and characteristic...

Zhu, Bofeng; Ren, Guobin; Gao, Yixiao; Yang, Yang; Lian, Yudong; Jian, Shuisheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Waveinduced velocities inside a model seagrass bed Mitul Luhar,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. By damping nearbed water velocities, seagrasses reduce local resuspension and promote the retention the seabed. Reduced resuspension improves water clarity, leading to greater light penetration and increased

Nepf, Heidi M.

435

Pseudostress-velocity formulation for incompressible Navier-Stokes ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Velocity profiles and streamline portraits for Re=100 with h = 1. 128 and different . Circles in ... of meshes generated by a refining process. The error between ...

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

436

Crusius, John, and Rik Wanninkhof, Gas transfer velocities ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jun 29, 2000 ... 2003, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc. Gas transfer velocities measured at low wind speed over a lake.

2003-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

437

Propagation of sound waves through a spatially homogeneous but smoothly time-dependent medium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The propagation of sound through a spatially homogeneous but non-stationary medium is investigated within the framework of fluid dynamics. For a non-vortical fluid, especially, a generalized wave equation is derived for the (scalar) potential of the fluid velocity distribution in dependence of the equilibrium mass density of the fluid and the sound wave velocity. A solution of this equation for a finite transition period ? is determined in terms of the hypergeometric function for a phenomenologically realistic, sigmoidal change of the mass density and sound wave velocity. Using this solution, it is shown that the energy flux of the sound wave is not conserved but increases always for the propagation through a non-stationary medium, independent of whether the equilibrium mass density is increased or decreased. It is found, moreover, that this amplification of the transmitted wave arises from an energy exchange with the medium and that its flux is equal to the (total) flux of the incident and the reflected wave. An interpretation of the reflected wave as a propagation of sound backward in time is given in close analogy to Feynman and Stueckelberg for the propagation of anti-particles. The reflection and transmission coefficients of sound propagating through a non-stationary medium is analyzed in more detail for hypersonic waves with transition periods ? between 15 and 200 ps as well as the transformation of infrasound waves in non-stationary oceans. -- Highlights: •Analytically exact study of sound propagation through a non-stationary medium. •Energy exchange between the non-stationary medium and the sound wave. •Transformation of hypersonic and ultrasound frequencies in non-stationary media. •Propagation of sound backward in time in close analogy to anti-particles. •Prediction of tsunamis both in spatially and temporally inhomogeneous oceans.

Hayrapetyan, A.G., E-mail: armen@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Grigoryan, K.K.; Petrosyan, R.G. [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Fritzsche, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany) [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

List of Wave Energy Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveEnergy&oldid267203" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

439

ALFVÉN WAVES IN SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR PHOTOSPHERIC VORTICES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using advanced numerical magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the magnetized solar photosphere, including non-gray radiative transport and a non-ideal equation of state, we analyze plasma motions in photospheric magnetic vortices. We demonstrate that apparent vortex-like motions in photospheric magnetic field concentrations do not exhibit 'tornado'-like behavior or a 'bath-tub' effect. While at each time instance the velocity field lines in the upper layers of the solar photosphere show swirls, the test particles moving with the time-dependent velocity field do not demonstrate such structures. Instead, they move in a wave-like fashion with rapidly changing and oscillating velocity field, determined mainly by magnetic tension in the magnetized intergranular downflows. Using time-distance diagrams, we identify horizontal motions in the magnetic flux tubes as torsional Alfvén perturbations propagating along the nearly vertical magnetic field lines with local Alfvén speed.

Shelyag, S.; Cally, P. S. [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)] [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Reid, A.; Mathioudakis, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)] [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

440

Characterization of mechanical properties of a hollow cylinder with zero group velocity Lamb modes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hollow cylinders used in the industry must be regularly inspected. Elasticguided waves similar to Lamb modes in a plate can propagate in the axial direction or around the circumference. They are sensitive to geometrical and mechanical parameters of the cylindrical shell. The objective of this paper is to show that zero group velocity (ZGV) Lamb modes can be used to bring out anisotropy and to measureelastic constants of the material. This study provides experimental and numerical investigations on a Zirconium alloy tube extensively used by the nuclear industry in reactor core components. A non-contact method based on laser ultrasound techniques and ZGV Lamb modes demonstrates that the difference observed between axial and circumferential guided waves cannot be explained by an isotropic model. Then a transverse isotropic model is used for the Zircaloy tube. Four of the five elastic constants are directly extracted from ZGV resonance frequencies. The last one is deduced from the measureddispersion spectra. With this complete set of constants a good agreement is obtained between theoretical and experimental dispersion curves for both axially and circumferentially propagating guided waves.

M. Cès; D. Royer; C. Prada

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

442

Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

Pasyanos, M E

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Analyzing intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution via the overlap intensity-level velocity correlator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerous experimental and theoretical studies have established that intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) in isolated molecules has a heirarchical tier structure. The tier structure implies strong correlations between the energy level motions of a quantum system and its intensity-weighted spectrum. A measure, which explicitly accounts for this correaltion, was first introduced by one of us as a sensitive probe of phase space localization. It correlates eigenlevel velocities with the overlap intensities between the eigenstates and some localized state of interest. A semiclassical theory for the correlation is developed for systems that are classically integrable and complements earlier work focusing exclusively on the chaotic case. Application to a model two dimensional effective spectroscopic Hamiltonian shows that the correlation measure can provide information about the terms in the molecular Hamiltonian which play an important role in an energy range of interest and the character of the dynamics. Moreover, the correlation function is capable of highlighting relevant phase space structures including the local resonance features associated with a specific bright state. In addition to being ideally suited for multidimensional systems with a large density of states, the measure can also be used to gain insights into the phase space transport and localization. It is argued that the overlap intensity-level velocity correlation function provides a novel way of studying vibrational energy redistribution in isolated molecules. The correlation function is ideally suited to analyzing the parametric spectra of molecules in external fields.

Srihari Keshavamurthy; Nicholas R. Cerruti; Steven Tomsovic

2002-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

444

Mach flow angularity probes for scramjet engine flow path diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mach-flow angularity (MFA) probes were developed for use in scramjet flow path probe rakes. Prototype probes were fabricated to demonstrate the assembly processes (numerical control machining, furnace brazing, and electron beam welding). Tests of prototype probes confirmed the thermal durability margins and life cycle. Selected probes were calibrated in air at Mach numbers from 1.75 to 6.0. Acceptance criteria for the production probes stressed thermal durability and pressure (and, consequently, Mach number) measurement quality. This new water-cooled MFA probe has 0.397-cm shaft diameter and is capable of withstanding heat fluxes of 2.724 kW/sq cm.

Jalbert, P.A.; Hiers, R.S. Jr. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Arnold AFS, TN (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

wave | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281559 Varnish cache server wave Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. Source Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Date Released December 05th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords

446

J. Phys. I IYance 7 (1997) 977-1001 AUGUST 1997, PAGE 977 Phase Pinning by EPR Probe in Biphenyl Doped with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Phys. I IYance 7 (1997) 977-1001 AUGUST 1997, PAGE 977 Phase Pinning by EPR Probe in Biphenyl not account for the plane wave modulation of the incommen- surate phase II. Its EPR spectra yields a phase is not symmetrical, in contra- diction with a linear one. This behaviour is not exhibited by the phenanthrene EPR

Boyer, Edmond

447

Free–energy landscape and the critical velocity of superfluid films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...P. Boon and P. V. Coveney Free-energy landscape and the critical velocity...superfluids shedding light on the free-energy landscape, the critical velocity...critical velocity|vortex| Free-energy landscape and the critical velocity...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Linear wave propagation in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The properties of linear Alfvén slow and fast magnetoacoustic waves for uniform plasmas in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics(MHD) are discussed augmenting the well-known expressions for their phase speeds with knowledge on the group speed. A 3 + 1 formalism is purposely adopted to make direct comparison with the Newtonian MHD limits easier and to stress the graphical representation of their anisotropic linear wave properties using the phase and group speed diagrams. By drawing these for both the fluid rest frame and for a laboratory Lorentzian frame which sees the plasma move with a three-velocity having an arbitrary orientation with respect to the magnetic field a graphical view of the relativistic aberrationeffects is obtained for all three MHD wave families. Moreover it is confirmed that the classical Huygens construction relates the phase and group speed diagram in the usual way even for the lab frame viewpoint. Since the group speed diagrams correspond to exact solutions for initial conditions corresponding to a localized point perturbation their formulae and geometrical construction can serve to benchmark current high-resolution algorithms for numerical relativistic MHD.

R. Keppens; Z. Meliani

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Linear wave propagation in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The properties of linear Alfv\\'en, slow, and fast magnetoacoustic waves for uniform plasmas in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed, augmenting the well-known expressions for their phase speeds with knowledge on the group speed. A 3+1 formalism is purposely adopted to make direct comparison with the Newtonian MHD limits easier and to stress the graphical representation of their anisotropic linear wave properties using the phase and group speed diagrams. By drawing these for both the fluid rest frame and for a laboratory Lorentzian frame which sees the plasma move with a three-velocity having an arbitrary orientation with respect to the magnetic field, a graphical view of the relativistic aberration effects is obtained for all three MHD wave families. Moreover, it is confirmed that the classical Huygens construction relates the phase and group speed diagram in the usual way, even for the lab frame viewpoint. Since the group speed diagrams correspond to exact solutions for initial conditions co...

Keppens, R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Linear wave propagation in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of linear Alfven, slow, and fast magnetoacoustic waves for uniform plasmas in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed, augmenting the well-known expressions for their phase speeds with knowledge on the group speed. A 3+1 formalism is purposely adopted to make direct comparison with the Newtonian MHD limits easier and to stress the graphical representation of their anisotropic linear wave properties using the phase and group speed diagrams. By drawing these for both the fluid rest frame and for a laboratory Lorentzian frame which sees the plasma move with a three-velocity having an arbitrary orientation with respect to the magnetic field, a graphical view of the relativistic aberration effects is obtained for all three MHD wave families. Moreover, it is confirmed that the classical Huygens construction relates the phase and group speed diagram in the usual way, even for the lab frame viewpoint. Since the group speed diagrams correspond to exact solutions for initial conditions corresponding to a localized point perturbation, their formulae and geometrical construction can serve to benchmark current high-resolution algorithms for numerical relativistic MHD.

Keppens, R. [Centre for Plasma-Astrophysics, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Leuven Mathematical Modeling and Computational Science Centre, K.U. Leuven (Belgium); FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands) and Astronomical Institute, Utrecht University (Netherlands); Meliani, Z. [Centre for Plasma-Astrophysics, K.U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Linear wave propagation in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The properties of linear Alfv\\'en, slow, and fast magnetoacoustic waves for uniform plasmas in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed, augmenting the well-known expressions for their phase speeds with knowledge on the group speed. A 3+1 formalism is purposely adopted to make direct comparison with the Newtonian MHD limits easier and to stress the graphical representation of their anisotropic linear wave properties using the phase and group speed diagrams. By drawing these for both the fluid rest frame and for a laboratory Lorentzian frame which sees the plasma move with a three-velocity having an arbitrary orientation with respect to the magnetic field, a graphical view of the relativistic aberration effects is obtained for all three MHD wave families. Moreover, it is confirmed that the classical Huygens construction relates the phase and group speed diagram in the usual way, even for the lab frame viewpoint. Since the group speed diagrams correspond to exact solutions for initial conditions corresponding to a localized point perturbation, their formulae and geometrical construction can serve to benchmark current high-resolution algorithms for numerical relativistic MHD.

R. Keppens; Z. Meliani

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

452

Solar off-limb line widths: Alfven waves, ion-cyclotron waves, and preferential heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alfven waves and ion-cyclotron absorption of high-frequency waves are frequently brought into models devoted to coronal heating and fast solar-wind acceleration. Signatures of ion-cyclotron resonance have already been observed in situ in the solar wind (HELIOS spacecrafts) and, recently, in the upper corona (UVCS/SOHO remote-sensing results). We propose a method to constrain both the Alfven wave amplitude and the preferential heating induced by ion-cyclotron resonance, above a partially developed polar coronal hole observed with the SUMER/SOHO spectrometer. The instrumental stray light contribution is first substracted from the spectra. By supposing that the non-thermal velocity is related to the Alfven wave amplitude, it is constrained through a density diagnostic and the gradient of the width of the Mg X 625 A line. The temperatures of several coronal ions, as functions of the distance above the limb, are then determined by substracting the non-thermal component to the observed line widths. The effect of st...

Dolla, L

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Spectroscopy of triplet states of Rb{sub 2} by femtosecond pump-probe photoionization of doped helium nanodroplets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of vibrational wave packets in triplet states of rubidium dimers (Rb{sub 2}) formed on helium nanodroplets are studied using femtosecond pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy. Due to fast desorption of the excited Rb{sub 2} molecules off the droplets and due to their low internal temperature, wave-packet oscillations can be followed up to very long pump-probe delay times > or approx. 1.5 ns. In the first-excited triplet state (1){sup 3}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}, full and fractional revivals are observed with high contrast. Fourier analysis provides high-resolution vibrational spectra which are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations.

Mudrich, M.; Heister, Ph.; Hippler, T.; Giese, Ch.; Stienkemeier, F. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Dulieu, O. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, Batiment 505, 91405 Orsay (France)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS Stefano Maranò Christoph, Dept. Information Technology & Electr. Eng., 8092 Zürich ABSTRACT Physical wave fields are often from sensors of different kinds. In this paper we propose a technique for the analysis of vector wave

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

455

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves Few things in nature are as dramatic, and potentially dangerous, as ocean waves. The impact they have on our daily lives extends from shipping to the role they play in driving the global climate. From a theoretical viewpoint water waves pose rich

456

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selfconsistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli MIT E .J. Porkolab Sherwood/Spring APS Denver May 2009 #12; 2 Participants in the Center for Simulation of Wave hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance

Wright, John C.

457

On Generating Gravity Waves with Matter and Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If a homogeneous plane light-like shell collides head-on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

458

Initial Results in Power System Identification from Injected Probing Signals Using a Subspace Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors use the Numerical algorithm for Subspace State Space System IDentification (N4SID) to extract dynamic parameters from phasor measurements collected on the western North American Power Grid. The data were obtained during tests on June 7, 2000, and they represent wide area response to several kinds of probing signals including Low-Level Pseudo-Random Noise (LLPRN) and Single-Mode Square Wave (SMSW) injected at the Celilo terminal of the Pacific HVDC In-tertie (PDCI). An identified model is validated using a cross vali-dation method. Also, the obtained electromechanical modes are compared with the results from Prony analysis of a ringdown and with signal analysis of ambient data measured under similar op-erating conditions. The consistent results show that methods in this class can be highly effective even when the probing signal is small.

Zhou, Ning; Pierre, John W.; Hauer, John F.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Ultrafast ignition with relativistic shock waves induced by high power lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider laser intensities larger than $10^{16} W/cm^2$ where the ablation pressure is negligible in comparison with the radiation pressure. The radiation pressure is caused by the ponderomotive force acting mainly on the electrons that are separated from the ions to create a double layer (DL). This DL is accelerated into the target, like a piston that pushes the matter in such a way that a shock wave is created. Here we discuss two novel ideas. First is the transition domain between the relativistic and non-relativistic laser induced shock waves. Our solution is based on relativistic hydrodynamics also for the above transition domain. The relativistic shock wave parameters, such as compression, pressure, shock wave and particle flow velocities, sound velocity and rarefaction wave velocity in the compressed target, and the temperature are calculated. Secondly, we would like to use this transition domain for shock wave induced ultrafast ignition of a pre-compressed target. The laser parameters...

Eliezer, Shalom; Pinhasi, Shirly Vinikman; Raicher, Erez; Val, José Maria Martinez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Determination of hydrogen cluster velocities and comparison with numerical calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of powerful hydrogen cluster jet targets in storage ring experiments led to the need of precise data on the mean cluster velocity as function of the stagnation temperature and pressure for the determination of the volume density of the target beams. For this purpose a large data set of hydrogen cluster velocity distributions and mean velocities was measured at a high density hydrogen cluster jet target using a trumpet shaped nozzle. The measurements have been performed at pressures above and below the critical pressure and for a broad range of temperatures relevant for target operation, e.g., at storage ring experiments. The used experimental method is described which allows for the velocity measurement of single clusters using a time-of-flight technique. Since this method is rather time-consuming and these measurements are typically interfering negatively with storage ring experiments, a method for a precise calculation of these mean velocities was needed. For this, the determined mean cluster velocities are compared with model calculations based on an isentropic one-dimensional van der Waals gas. Based on the obtained data and the presented numerical calculations, a new method has been developed which allows to predict the mean cluster velocities with an accuracy of about 5%. For this two cut-off parameters defining positions inside the nozzle are introduced, which can be determined for a given nozzle by only two velocity measurements.

Täschner, A.; Köhler, E.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Khoukaz, A. [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, D-48149 Münster (Germany)] [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "velocity wave probe" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Velocity of Second Sound in NaF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The velocity of drifting second sound and the heat capacity per unit volume are calculated for NaF for temperatures from 0 to 40 °K. The velocity of second sound decreases by 24% as the temperature is increased from 10 to 30 °K, because of the dispersion of the phonon frequency spectrum.

Robert J. Hardy and S. S. Jaswal

1971-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

Moos, Daniel (Houston, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

463

Comparing Glider Observed Velocities and Geostrophic Currents Regina Yopak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

offshore and brings cold, deep water to fill it's place. The upwelling regime creates a unique coastal. This project endeavors to compare calculated geostrophic velocities to the water velocities measured which the net vertical volume of water is transferred 90° to the right which forces warm, surface waters

Kurapov, Alexander

464

On the Structure of the Low Velocity Zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......large nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site have been used to model the P-velocity...1961. Crustal structure from Nevada Test Site to Kingman, Arizona from seismic...large nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site have been used to model the P-velocity......

Donald V. Helmberger

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Tsallis Entropy Based Velocity Distribution in Open Channel Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................. 94 32 Dimensionless velocity distribution and parameter M ............................... 96 33 um/ umax versus various M ........................................................................... 99 34 Upper Tiber River basin with location... velocity distribution with different m ... 68 9 Computation of M, ?1 and ?V based on um and umax measured on the Po river (Italy) for different verticals at Pontelagoscuro gauged section during flood event that occurred on February 2, 1985...

Luo, Hao

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

466

Neoclassical generation of toroidal zonal flow by drift wave turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zonal-flow instabilities due to drift-wave turbulence in the presence of toroidicity-induced parallel (neoclassical) viscosity and allowing for the toroidal flow are studied. It is shown that, as a result of the neoclassical viscosity a new type of zonal-flow instability is possible, leading to the generation of the considerable toroidal zonal flow. The toroidal instability is complementary to the previously studied instability resulting in the poloidal flow generation and occurs as a second branch of the general dispersion relation describing the evolution of the poloidal and toroidal flow. Nonlinear saturation of the new instability is studied. It is shown that saturated zonal toroidal velocity, generated in this instability, is large compared to the mean cross-field drift velocity as the ratio q/{epsilon}, where q is the safety factor and {epsilon} is the inverse aspect ratio. In addition to the broad turbulent spectrum of drift waves, a monochromatic wave packet is considered. It is revealed that for the case of sufficiently strong neoclassical viscosity such a wave packet is subjected to generation of the toroidal zonal flow due to instability of hydrodynamic type.

Mikhailovskii, A.B.; Smolyakov, A.I.; Tsypin, V.S.; Kovalishen, E.A.; Shirokov, M.S.; Galvao, R.M.O. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq., 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation) and Nonlinear Physics Laboratory, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskii per. 9, Dolgoprudnyi 141700, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science place, Saskatoon S7N 5E2 (Canada) and Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq., 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nonlinear Physics Laboratory, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskii per. 9, Dolgoprudnyi 141700, Moscow Region (Russian Federation) and Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq., 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq., 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation) and Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Kashirskoe Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Physics Institute, University of Sao Paulo, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil) and Brazilian Center for Research in Physics, Rua Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

MEASUREMENTS OF ANISOTROPIC ION TEMPERATURES, NON-THERMAL VELOCITIES, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS IN A CORONAL HOLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new diagnostic allowing one to measure the anisotropy of ion temperatures and non-thermal velocities, as well as Doppler shifts with respect to the ambient magnetic field. This method provides new results, as well as an independent test for previous measurements obtained with other techniques. Our spectral data come from observations of a low-latitude, on-disk coronal hole. A potential field source surface model was used to calculate the angle between the magnetic field lines and the line of sight for each spatial bin of the observation. A fit was performed to determine the line widths and Doppler shifts parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For each line width component we derived ion temperatures T {sub i,} and T {sub i, Parallel-To} and non-thermal velocities v {sub nt,} and v {sub nt, Parallel-To }. T {sub i,} was cooler than off-limb polar coronal hole measurements, suggesting increasing collisional cooling with decreasing height. T {sub i, Parallel-To} is consistent with a uniform temperature of (1.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K for each ion. Since parallel ion heating is expected to be weak, this ion temperature should reflect the proton temperature. A comparison between our results and others implies a large proton temperature gradient around 1.02 R {sub Sun }. The non-thermal velocities are thought to be proportional to the amplitudes of various waves. Our results for v {sub nt,} agree with Alfven wave amplitudes inferred from off-limb polar coronal hole line width measurements. Our v {sub nt, Parallel-To} results are consistent with slow magnetosonic wave amplitudes inferred from Fourier analysis of time-varying intensity fluctuations. Doppler shift measurements yield outflows of Almost-Equal-To 5 km s{sup -1} for ions formed over a broad temperature range. This differs from other studies that found a strong Doppler shift dependence on formation temperature.

Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, MC 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)] [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, MC 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Tracking moving radar targets with parallel, velocity-tuned filters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radar data associated with radar illumination of a movable target is processed to monitor motion of the target. A plurality of filter operations are performed in parallel on the radar data so that each filter operation produces target image information. The filter operations are defined to have respectively corresponding velocity ranges that differ from one another. The target image information produced by one of the filter operations represents the target more accurately than the target image information produced by the remainder of the filter operations when a current velocity of the target is within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation. In response to the current velocity of the target being within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation, motion of the target is tracked based on the target image information produced by the one filter operation.

Bickel, Douglas L.; Harmony, David W.; Bielek, Timothy P.; Hollowell, Jeff A.; Murray, Margaret S.; Martinez, Ana

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

Detection of electron velocity in graphene by Doppler effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Electron velocity in a two-dimensional electron gas can be measured by Doppler shift. Thus, we construct the Doppler shift of light and apply it to the motion of electrons in a graphene sheet to estimate the electron velocity. Here, a laser beam with initial frequency is incident on the graphene sheet in a parallel direction, and then the frequency of the emitted light can be measured by spectroscopy after detecting the electron velocity. Then, the ratio of frequency shift from the Doppler effect is described in terms of the electron velocity, as well as the incident and the detection angle of laser beam. The thermal broadening of detected frequency as a function of velocity is also shown for different temperatures.

Heetae Kim; Chang-Soo Park; Hak Dong Cho

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Precision Measuring of Velocities via the Relativistic Doppler Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Just as the ordinary Doppler effect serves as a tool to measure radial velocities of celestial objects, so can the relativistic Doppler effect be implemented to measure a combination of radial and transverse velocities by using recent improvements in observing techniques. A key element that makes a further use of this combination feasible is the periodicity in changes of the orbital velocity direction for the source. Two cases are considered: (i) a binary star; and (ii) a solitary star with the planetary companion. It is shown that, in case (i), several precision Doppler measurements employing the gas absorption cell technique would determine both the total orbital velocity and the inclination angle of the binary orbit disentangled from the peculiar velocity of the system. The necessary condition for that is the measured, at least with a modest precision, proper motion and distance to the system.

Leonid M. Ozernoy

1997-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

471

Characteristics of ion-acoustic solitary wave in a laboratory dusty plasma under the influence of ion-beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the influence of ion beam and charged dust impurity on the propagation of dust ion-acoustic solitary wave in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of Boltzmann distributed electrons, positive ions, positive ion beam, and negatively charged immobile dusts in a double plasma device. On interacting with an ion beam, the solitary wave is bifurcated into a compressive fast and a rarefactive slow beam mode, and appears along with the primary wave. However, there exists a critical velocity of the beam beyond which the amplitude of the fast solitary wave starts diminishing and rarefactive slow beam mode propagates with growing amplitude. Whereas, the presence of charged dust impurity in the plasma reduces this critical beam velocity and a substantial modification in the phase velocity of the slow beam mode is observed with increasing dust density. Furthermore, the nonlinear wave velocity (Mach number) as well as the width of the compressive solitons are measured for different beam velocity and dust density, and are compared with those obtained from the K-dV equation. The experimental results are found in a well agreement with the theoretical predictions.

Deka, M. K.; Adhikary, N. C.; Bailung, H. [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Vigyan Path, Paschim Boragaon, Garchuk, Guwahati 781035, Assam (India); Misra, A. P. [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731 235 (India); Nakamura, Y. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave Energy Conversion Project WaveBob (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Wave...

473

MHK Technologies/GyroWaveGen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GyroWaveGen GyroWaveGen < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage GyroWaveGen.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Paradyme Systems Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description A gyro wave energy transducer is mounted on the buoyant body for translating the pendulum like motions of the buoyant body into rotational motion The gyro wave energy transducer includes a gimbal comprised of first and second frames with the first frame being pivotally mounted to the second frame and the second frame being pivotally mounted to the buoyant body A gyroscope is mounted to the first frame for rotation about an axis perpendicular to the axes of rotation of the first and second frames A motor generator is coupled to the gyroscope for maintaining a controlled rotational velocity for the gyroscope Transferring members are associated with one of the first and second frames for transferring torque of one of the first and second frames to the gyroscope about an axis that is perpendicular to that of the gyroscope which results in rotation of the other of the first and second frames An electrical generator is responsive to the relative rotational movement of the first and se

474

Sound Waves in the Atmosphere at Infrasonic Frequencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various geophysical processes generate sound waves in the atmosphere. Some typical sources are auroral discharges in the upper atmosphere tornadoes and severe storms surface waves on the oceans volcanic explosions earthquakes and atmospheric oscillations arising from unstable wind flow at the tropopause. Man?made sources include powerful explosions and the shock waves from vehicles moving at supersonic speeds at altitudes below about 125 km. The components of sound?wave energy at infrasonic frequencies (oscillation periods >1.0 sec) are propagated for large distances (thousands of kilometers) over the earth's surface with very little loss of energy from absorption by viscosity and heat conduction. But the propagation depends strongly on (a) the horizontally stratified temperature structure of the atmosphere (b) the influence of gravity at oscillation periods greater than the atmospheric resonance period ?300 sec and (c) the nonuniform distribution of atmospheric winds. The microphones and electroacoustical apparatus at an infrasonics observation station e.g. the one at Washington D. C. measure (1) the amplitude and waveform of incident sound pressure (2) the direction of local propagation of the wave (3) the horizontal trace velocity and (4) the distribution of sound wave energy at various oscillation frequencies. Researches on propagation require observational data from a network of stations separated geographically by large distances coupled with theoretical analysis of sound propagation to arrive at useful results on the acoustics of the atmosphere.

Richard K. Cook

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Detonation wave driven by condensation of supersaturated carbon vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental observation of a detonation wave driven by the energy of condensation of supersaturated carbon vapor is reported. The carbon vapor was formed by the thermal decay of unstable carbon suboxide C3O2 behind shock waves in mixtures containing 10–30% C3O2 in Ar. In the mixture 10% C3O2+Ar the insufficient heat release resulted in a regime of overdriven detonation. In the mixture 20% C3O2+Ar measured values of the pressure and wave velocity coincident with calculated Chapman-Jouguet parameters were attained. In the richest mixture 30% C3O2+Ar an excess heat release caused the slowing down of the condensation rate and the regime of underdriven detonation was observed.

A. Emelianov; A. Eremin; V. Fortov; H. Jander; A. Makeich; H. Gg. Wagner

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

476

Surface wave dynamics in orbital shaken cylindrical containers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Be it to aerate a glass of wine before tasting, to accelerate a chemical reaction or to cultivate cells in suspension, the "swirling" (or orbital shaking) of a container ensures good mixing and gas exchange in an efficient and simple way. Despite being used in a large range of applications this intuitive motion is far from being understood and presents a richness of patterns and behaviors which has not yet been reported. The present research charts the evolution of the waves with the operating parameters identifying a large variety of patterns, ranging from single and multiple crested waves to breaking waves. Free surface and velocity fields measurements are compared to a potential sloshing model, highlighting the existence of various flow regimes. Our research assesses the importance of the modal response of the shaken liquids, laying the foundations for a rigorous mixing optimization of the orbital agitation in its applications. Copyright (2014) American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded ...

Reclari, Martino; Tissot, Stéphanie; Obreschkow, Danail; Wurm, Florian Maria; Farhat, Mohamed

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

Fisher, E.S.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

478

Mathematical Caricature of Large Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Kadomtsev-Petviiashvili equation is considered as a mathematical caricature of large and rogue waves.

Mikhail Kovalyov

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

479

Clustering of floaters by waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study experimentally how waves affect distribution of particles that float on a water surface. We show that clustering of small particles in a standing wave is a nonlinear effect with the clustering time decreasing as the square of the wave amplitude. In a set of random waves, we show that small floaters concentrate on a multi-fractal set.

P. Denissenko; G. Falkovich; S. Lukaschuk

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

480

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 2010 | 23 GUIDED WAVES Tuning Wave Dispersion in Resonant Networks Eyal Feigenbaum with meta-atoms. Resonant guided wave networks (RGWNs) are a new class of artificial photonic material,5 distinct from photonic crystals and metamateri- als, in which localized waves resonate in closed paths

Atwater, Harry