Sample records for velocity suite physical

  1. Enhanced verification test suite for physics simulation codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamm, James R.; Brock, Jerry S.; Brandon, Scott T.; Cotrell, David L.; Johnson, Bryan; Knupp, Patrick; Rider, William J.; Trucano, Timothy G.; Weirs, V. Gregory

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations.

  2. Interferometric velocity analysis using physical and nonphysical energy Simon King1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interferometric velocity analysis using physical and nonphysical energy Simon King1 , Andrew Curtis as apparent energy that could not have propagated between receiver locations -- so-called nonphysical energy. We have developed a novel method of velocity analysis that uses both the physical and nonphysical

  3. Assessing the CAM5 Physics Suite in the WRF-Chem Model: Implementation, Resolution Sensitivity, and a First Evaluation for a Regional Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A suite of physical parameterizations (deep and shallow convection, turbulent boundary layer, aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud fraction) from the global climate model Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) has been implemented in the regional model Weather Research and Forecasting with chemistry (WRF-Chem). A downscaling modeling framework with consistent physics has also been established in which both global and regional simulations use the same emissions and surface fluxes. The WRF-Chem model with the CAM5 physics suite is run at multiple horizontal resolutions over a domain encompassing the northern Pacific Ocean, northeast Asia, and northwest North America for April 2008 when the ARCTAS, ARCPAC, and ISDAC field campaigns took place. These simulations are evaluated against field campaign measurements, satellite retrievals, and ground-based observations, and are compared with simulations that use a set of common WRF-Chem Parameterizations. This manuscript describes the implementation of the CAM5 physics suite in WRF-Chem provides an overview of the modeling framework and an initial evaluation of the simulated meteorology, clouds, and aerosols, and quantifies the resolution dependence of the cloud and aerosol parameterizations. We demonstrate that some of the CAM5 biases, such as high estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols and the underestimation of aerosol concentrations in the Arctic, can be reduced simply by increasing horizontal resolution. We also show that the CAM5 physics suite performs similarly to a set of parameterizations commonly used in WRF-Chem, but produces higher ice and liquid water condensate amounts and near-surface black carbon concentration. Further evaluations that use other mesoscale model parameterizations and perform other case studies are needed to infer whether one parameterization consistently produces results more consistent with observations.

  4. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave velocity of rock.

  5. On physical interpretation of two dimensional time-correlations regarding time delay velocities and eddy shaping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorczak, N. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Manz, P. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut feur Plasmaphysik, Association Euratom-IPP, 85748Garching (Germany); Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Time delay estimation (TDE) techniques are frequently used to estimate the flow velocity from fluctuating measurements. Tilted structures carried by the flow lead to misinterpretation of the time delays in terms of velocity direction and amplitude. It affects TDE measurements from probes, and is also intrinsically important for beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging measurements. Local eddy shapes estimated from 2D fluctuating field are necessary to gain a more accurate flow estimate from TDE, as illustrated by Langmuir probe array measurements. A least square regression approach is proposed to estimate both flow field and shaping parameters. The technique is applied to a test case built from numerical simulation of interchange fluctuations. The local eddy shape does not only provide corrections for the velocity field but also quantitative information about the statistical interaction mechanisms between local eddies and E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. The technique is then tested on gaz puff imaging data collected at the edge of EAST tokamak plasmas. It is shown that poloidal asymmetries of the fluctuation fields-velocity and eddy shape-are consistent at least qualitatively with a ballooning type of turbulence immersed in a radially sheared equilibrium flow.

  6. Shear velocity as the function of frequency in heavy oils De-hua Han and Jiajin Liu, Rock Physics Lab, UH;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shear velocity as the function of frequency in heavy oils De-hua Han and Jiajin Liu, Rock Physics of heavy oils is discussed based on the measured data in our lab. Havriliak and Negami (HN) model is suggested to describe the frequency dispersion of heavy oils. Introduction The velocity behavior in heavy

  7. STAYS PNNL SUITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002851IBMPC00 STAYSL PNNL Suite  http://radiochemscieng.pnnl.gov/research_areas/research_area_description.asp?id=283 

  8. Suite for Wind Ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Theodore

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    "Suite for Wind Ensemble" consists of three movements, each of which contains a main theme and several smaller themes. Each main theme is introduced within the first minute of the movement, and the main themes from the ...

  9. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  10. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  11. Effects of pore-scale velocity and pore-scale physical processes on contaminant biodegradation during transport in groundwater: modeling and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendoza Sanchez, Itza

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF PORE-SCALE VELOCITY AND PORE-SCALE PHYSICAL PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT BIODEGRADATION DURING TRANSPORT IN GROUNDWATER: MODELING AND EXPERIMENTS A Dissertation by ITZA MENDOZA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office... PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT BIODEGRADATION DURING TRANSPORT IN GROUNDWATER: MODELING AND EXPERIMENTS A Dissertation by ITZA MENDOZA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  12. Effects of pore-scale velocity and pore-scale physical processes on contaminant biodegradation during transport in groundwater: modeling and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendoza Sanchez, Itza

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF PORE-SCALE VELOCITY AND PORE-SCALE PHYSICAL PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT BIODEGRADATION DURING TRANSPORT IN GROUNDWATER: MODELING AND EXPERIMENTS A Dissertation by ITZA MENDOZA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office... PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT BIODEGRADATION DURING TRANSPORT IN GROUNDWATER: MODELING AND EXPERIMENTS A Dissertation by ITZA MENDOZA SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  13. Velocity oscillations in turbulent RayleighBenard convection Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Penger

    , Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 X.-D. Shang Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong P. Tong Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 and Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear

  14. LANL Go Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s - 6157 / ThePreliminaryLANL Go Suite

  15. METAL ABUNDANCES, RADIAL VELOCITIES, AND OTHER PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS FOR THE RR LYRAE STARS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemec, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Camosun College, Victoria, British Columbia, V8P 5J2 (Canada); Cohen, Judith G.; Sesar, Branimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States); Ripepi, Vincenzo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Derekas, Aliz [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Moskalik, Pawel [Copernicus Astronomical Centre, ul.Bartycka 18, 00-716, Warsaw (Poland); Chadid, Merieme [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Universite de Nice, Sophia-Antipolis, UMR 6525, Parc Valrose, F-06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France); Bruntt, Hans, E-mail: nemec@camosun.ca, E-mail: jmn@isr.bc.ca, E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: ripepi@na.astro.it, E-mail: derekas@konkoly.hu, E-mail: pam@camk.edu.pl, E-mail: chadid@marseille.fr, E-mail: bruntt@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude {delta} Sct star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which sixteen exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 {+-} 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 {+-} 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al. the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] {approx}-0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New P-{phi}{sub 31}{sup s}-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on {approx}970 days of quasi-continuous high-precision Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg)

  16. EVALUATION OF THREE ULTRASONIC INSTRUMENTS FOR CRITICAL VELOCITY DETERMINATION DURING HANFORD TANK WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS - 11121

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Burns, Carolyn A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three ultrasonic instruments were evaluated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine their ability to detect critical velocities for solids settling during slurry transfer operation between the Hanford Tank farms and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The evaluation was conducted in a flow loop using prototypic transfer piping and a suite of simulants that encompass a broad range of waste physical and rheological properties that are likely encountered during Hanford tank waste transfer operations. The results from the evaluation are presented in this paper.

  17. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    it is expected that the research program will evolve to take full advantage of new physics opportunities with a suitable suite of experimental equipment. Significant work has...

  18. Design of a biomechanically synergistic exotendon suit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Carmen Marten-Ellis

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this thesis is on the design, development, and evaluation of a lightweight, exotendon suit for load carriage. The suit is intended to be worn underneath the wearer's own clothes for use in a military setting, ...

  19. Effects of pore-scale velocity and pore-scale physical processes on contaminant biodegradation during transport in groundwater: modeling and experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendoza Sanchez, Itza

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ) the thickness of the diffusion layer, and 2) the biofilm structure. Therefore one hypothesis of the research project is that flow velocity is an important factor controlling the biodegradation potential of groundwater systems. The main objective... rate coefficient k can be related to microscopic rate parameters that describe mass transfer across a boundary layer, diffusion within the biofilm, and reaction within the biofilm. Under transient (non-steady-state) conditions, the two models...

  20. Effects of pore-scale velocity and pore-scale physical processes on contaminant biodegradation during transport in groundwater: modeling and experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendoza Sanchez, Itza

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) the thickness of the diffusion layer, and 2) the biofilm structure. Therefore one hypothesis of the research project is that flow velocity is an important factor controlling the biodegradation potential of groundwater systems. The main objective... rate coefficient k can be related to microscopic rate parameters that describe mass transfer across a boundary layer, diffusion within the biofilm, and reaction within the biofilm. Under transient (non-steady-state) conditions, the two models...

  1. The Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit for space habitation and exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Rebecca (Rebecca Ann)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) is a countermeasure suit for sensorimotor adaptation and musculoskeletal deconditioning in microgravity. The V2suit will consist of modules containing arrays of control ...

  2. Steam System Tool Suite Introduction Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Steam System Tool Suite Introduction Guide Alternate Text Narratives and Graphic.............................................................................................................................6 Modules Steam System Scoping Tool (SSST)........................................................................................8 Steam System Assessment Tool (SSAT

  3. The Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for space habitation and exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duda, Kevin R.

    The “Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) for Space Habitation and Exploration” is a novel system concept that provides a platform for integrating sensors and actuators with daily astronaut intravehicular activities ...

  4. Universal Benchmark Suites Jozo J. Dujmovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dujmovic, Jozo J.

    the same universal benchmark suite. This approach substantially reduces the cost of benchmarking. Keywords global increase of the cost of benchmarking. The first step in the development of a method for benchmark1 Universal Benchmark Suites Jozo J. Dujmovic Department of Computer Science San Francisco State

  5. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Modanese

    2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for beta to 1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two macroscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  6. Daily Scheduling of Nurses in Operating Suites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    (2008) proposed a stochastic model ...... operating suites, each spanning either 8 or 10 regular hours plus overtime and lunch. ... above the 700 minimum. Moreover ..... Empirically, this was seen to reduce the size of the branch-and-

  7. Black Literary Suite: Kansas Authors Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiggins, Meredith Joan

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    authors were born or lived in the Sunflower State, and their work often reflects their time in Kansas. This Black Literary Suite exhibit highlights four important black writers—Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Frank Marshall Davis, and Kevin Young...

  8. aggregate sound velocities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an acoustic loop filter Physics Websites Summary: observation of negative group velocity propagation of sound waves through an asymmetric loop filterSound beyond the speed of...

  9. anisotropic electron velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A simple model reflecting Cerveny, Vlastislav 8 Anisotropic velocity distributions in 3D dissipative optical lattices Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: We present a direct...

  10. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Our science answers questions

  11. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Our science answers

  12. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum Reserves Vision,4newsSolarrdPhysicistsPhysics

  13. Prioritisation of test suites containing precedence constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Tim

    1 Prioritisation of test suites containing precedence constraints Tim Miller Department@unimelb.edu.au Abstract--Test case prioritisation is the process of ordering the exe- cution of test cases to achieve a certain goal, such as increasing the rate of fault detection. Many existing test case prioritisation

  14. Collaboration Suite Advanced Web Client User Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepp, Larry

    ZimbraTM Collaboration Suite Advanced Web Client User Guide Version 5.0 #12;Zimbra Web Client User Guide Copyright Notice Copyright © 2008 Zimbra, Inc. All rights reserved materials, onscreen publication, or Web documentation--is expressly forbidden. Zimbra and the Zimbra logo

  15. www.earthrisktech.com Avenue, Suite 320

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Weather Analytic Software About EarthRisk Technologies EarthRisk Technologies creates a market advantage at the University of California San Diego. Energy producers and commodity investment firms currently employ TempRisk.earthrisktech.com 1 2970 5th Avenue, Suite 320 San Diego, California 92103 858.413.RISK

  16. In Outer Space without a Space Suit?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The author proposes and investigates his old idea - a living human in space without the encumbrance of a complex space suit. Only in this condition can biological humanity seriously attempt to colonize space because all planets of Solar system (except the Earth) do not have suitable atmospheres. Aside from the issue of temperature, a suitable partial pressure of oxygen is lacking. In this case the main problem is how to satiate human blood with oxygen and delete carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide). The proposed system would enable a person to function in outer space without a space suit and, for a long time, without food. That is useful also in the Earth for sustaining working men in an otherwise deadly atmosphere laden with lethal particulates (in case of nuclear, chemical or biological war), in underground confined spaces without fresh air, under water or a top high mountains above a height that can sustain respiration.

  17. User Guide for the STAYSL PNNL Suite of Software Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAYSL PNNL software suite provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of the reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations.

  18. The bioenergetics of walking and running in space suits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Christopher E. (Christopher Edward), 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space-suited activity is critical for human spaceflight, and is synonymous with human planetary exploration. Space suits impose kinematic and kinetic boundary conditions that affect movement and locomotion, and in doing ...

  19. Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Road, Suite 450

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Road, Suite 450 Walnut Creek, CA 94596 P: 925. This report was prepared by Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Blvd., Suite 450 Walnut Creek, CA

  20. Berkeley Lab's SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historianBenefits offorSPOT Suite Transforms

  1. Measurement of Poloidal Velocity on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald E. Bell and Russell Feder

    2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure impurity poloidal flow using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Toroidal and poloidal viewing systems measure all quantities required to determine the radial electric field. Two sets of up/down symmetric poloidal views are used to measure both active emission in the plane of the neutral heating beams and background emission in a radial plane away from the neutral beams. Differential velocity measurements isolate the line-integrated poloidal velocity from apparent flows due to the energy-dependent chargeexchange cross section. Six f/1.8 spectrometers measure 276 spectra to obtain 75 active and 63 background channels every 10 ms. Local measurements from a similar midplane toroidal viewing system are mapped into two dimensions to allow the inversion of poloidal line-integrated measurements to obtain local poloidal velocity profiles. Radial resolution after inversion is 0.6-1.8 cm from the plasma edge to the center.

  2. Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - 2013 BTO Peer Review Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System - 2013 BTO Peer Review Commercial Buildings...

  3. The radial-velocity revolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, R. (Cambridge Univ., Observatories (England))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instruments and techniques designed for registering the minute Doppler shifts arising from stellar radial velocity are examined. Particular attention is given to the photographic spectrographs, the high-dispersion spectrographs ('digital speedometers'), and the Palomar spectrometer. The principle of using radial-velocity masks is described, and the use of interferometers for radial-velocity measurements is discussed. Results are presented of radial velocity observations for HD 114762, HD 210647, and Epsilon Tauri, together with interpretations of these results.

  4. Automated structure solution with the PHENIX suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zwart, Peter H [LBNL; Afonine, Pavel V [LBNL; Grosse - Kunstleve, Ralf W [LBNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant time and effort are often required to solve and complete a macromolecular crystal structure. The development of automated computational methods for the analysis, solution, and completion of crystallographic structures has the potential to produce minimally biased models in a short time without the need for manual intervention. The PHENIX software suite is a highly automated system for macromolecular structure determination that can rapidly arrive at an initial partial model of a structure without significant human intervention, given moderate resolution, and good quality data. This achievement has been made possible by the development of new algorithms for structure determination, maximum-likelihood molecular replacement (PHASER), heavy-atom search (HySS), template- and pattern-based automated model-building (RESOLVE, TEXTAL), automated macromolecular refinement (phenix. refine), and iterative model-building, density modification and refinement that can operate at moderate resolution (RESOLVE, AutoBuild). These algorithms are based on a highly integrated and comprehensive set of crystallographic libraries that have been built and made available to the community. The algorithms are tightly linked and made easily accessible to users through the PHENIX Wizards and the PHENIX GUI.

  5. Automated Structure Solution with the PHENIX Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwart, Peter H.; Zwart, Peter H.; Afonine, Pavel; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Hung, Li-Wei; Ioerger, Tom R.; McCoy, A.J.; McKee, Eric; Moriarty, Nigel; Read, Randy J.; Sacchettini, James C.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Storoni, L.C.; Terwilliger, Tomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant time and effort are often required to solve and complete a macromolecular crystal structure. The development of automated computational methods for the analysis, solution and completion of crystallographic structures has the potential to produce minimally biased models in a short time without the need for manual intervention. The PHENIX software suite is a highly automated system for macromolecular structure determination that can rapidly arrive at an initial partial model of a structure without significant human intervention, given moderate resolution and good quality data. This achievement has been made possible by the development of new algorithms for structure determination, maximum-likelihood molecular replacement (PHASER), heavy-atom search (HySS), template and pattern-based automated model-building (RESOLVE, TEXTAL), automated macromolecular refinement (phenix.refine), and iterative model-building, density modification and refinement that can operate at moderate resolution (RESOLVE, AutoBuild). These algorithms are based on a highly integrated and comprehensive set of crystallographic libraries that have been built and made available to the community. The algorithms are tightly linked and made easily accessible to users through the PHENIX Wizards and the PHENIX GUI.

  6. On the velocity-strengthening behavior of dry friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yohai Bar-Sinai; Robert Spatschek; Efim A. Brener; Eran Bouchbinder

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The onset of frictional instabilities, e.g. earthquakes nucleation, is intimately related to velocity-weakening friction, in which the frictional resistance of interfaces decreases with increasing slip velocity. While this frictional response has been studied extensively, less attention has been given to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, in spite of its potential importance for various aspects of frictional phenomena such as the propagation speed of interfacial rupture fronts and the amount of stored energy released by them. In this note we suggest that a crossover from steady-state velocity-weakening friction at small slip velocities to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction at higher velocities might be a generic feature of dry friction. We further argue that while thermally activated rheology naturally gives rise to logarithmic steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, a crossover to stronger-than-logarithmic strengthening might take place at higher slip velocities, possibly accompanied by a change in the dominant dissipation mechanism. We sketch a few physical mechanisms that may account for the crossover to stronger-than-logarithmic steady-state velocity-strengthening and compile a rather extensive set of experimental data available in the literature, lending support to these ideas.

  7. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  8. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  9. SKIRT: the design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baes, Maarten

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can...

  10. Gravitation Physics at BGPL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. E. Boynton; R. M. Bonicalzi; A. M. Kalet; A. M. Kleczewski; J. K. Lingwood; K. J. McKenney; M. W. Moore; J. H. Steffen; E. C. Berg; W. D. Cross; R. D. Newman; R. E. Gephart

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report progress on a program of gravitational physics experiments using cryogenic torsion pendula undergoing large-amplitude torsion oscillation. This program includes tests of the gravitational inverse square law and of the weak equivalence principle. Here we describe our ongoing search for inverse-square-law violation at a strength down to $10^{-5}$ of standard gravity. The low-vibration environment provided by the Battelle Gravitation Physics Laboratory (BGPL) is uniquely suited to this study.

  11. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich [University Observatory of the Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) (Germany); Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) (Germany); Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv [Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) (Germany); Fisher, David [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin (United States)

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (sigma*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  12. Velocity of sound in solid methane near melting temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John Martin

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VELOCITY OF SOUND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1968 Ma)or Sub)ect: Physics VELOCITY OF SOVND IN SOLID METHANE NEAR MELTING TEMPERATURES A Thesis By JOHN MARTIN WHITEHEAD Approved as to style and content by& (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Departsmnt) (Mem er (Member) May 1968...

  13. Is there Lower Limit to Velocity or Velocity Change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. N. Sreenath; Kenath Arun; C. Sivaram

    2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we explore the possibility of a lower limit to velocity or velocity change which is 20 orders of magnitude smaller than the speed of light and explore the various observable signatures including those in cosmic rays and gamma ray bursts.

  14. Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Results From The Alum 25-29 Well, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  15. Mechanical counter-pressure space suit design using active materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holschuh, Bradley Thomas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suits have the potential to greatly improve the mobility of astronauts as they conduct planetary exploration activities; however, the underlying technologies required to provide ...

  16. Engineering a robotic exoskeleton for space suit simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyen, Forrest Edward

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel methods for assessing space suit designs and human performance capabilities are needed as NASA prepares for manned missions beyond low Earth orbit. Current human performance tests and training are conducted in space ...

  17. Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Rybkowski, Zofia; Aliber, Jennifer; Lange, Cathleen

    2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    , London W1T 3JH, UK Building Research & Information Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rbri20 Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation Mardelle Mc... published: 08 Aug 2012. To cite this article: Mardelle McCuskey Shepley , Zofia Rybkowski , Jennifer Aliber & Cathleen Lange (2012): Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation, Building Research & Information, 40:6, 700-712 To link...

  18. Materials and Textile Architecture Analyses for Mechanical Counter-Pressure Space Suits using Active Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buechley, Leah

    Mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suits have the potential to improve the mobility of astronauts as they conduct planetary exploration activities. MCP suits differ from traditional gas-pressurized space suits by ...

  19. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  20. Is the Weibull distribution really suited for wind statistics modeling and wind power evaluation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drobinski, Philippe

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind speed statistics is generally modeled using the Weibull distribution. This distribution is convenient since it fully characterizes analytically with only two parameters (the shape and scale parameters) the shape of distribution and the different moments of the wind speed (mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis). This distribution is broadly used in the wind energy sector to produce maps of wind energy potential. However, the Weibull distribution is based on empirical rather than physical justification and might display strong limitations for its applications. The philosophy of this article is based on the modeling of the wind components instead of the wind speed itself. This provides more physical insights on the validity domain of the Weibull distribution as a possible relevant model for wind statistics and the quantification of the error made by using such a distribution. We thereby propose alternative expressions of more suited wind speed distribution.

  1. Using Dependency Structures for Prioritisation of Functional Test Suites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Tim

    1 Using Dependency Structures for Prioritisation of Functional Test Suites Shifa-e-Zehra Haidry, Australia. 3 Abstract--Test case prioritisation is the process of ordering the exe- cution of test cases software delivery. Many existing test case prioritisation techniques consider that tests can be run in any

  2. A Tool Suite to Prototype Pervasive Computing Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    covering the development life- cycle of a pervasive computing system. This tool suite comprises a domain to deployment and test. Our approach We propose an approach that covers the development life- cycleSpecapplication 3 546 7 1 ArchitectureTaxonomy 2 Figure 1. Development life-cycle A. A design language for pervasive

  3. College of Communication & Information 1345 Circle Park Drive | Suite 302

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    College of Communication & Information 1345 Circle Park Drive | Suite 302 Knoxville, TN 37996 & Communication Studies (CICS) - Awarded grants total $7 million +, NSF, IMLS, Sloan Foundation and more - 2.5+ million in science information and communication contract work at Oak Ridge National Labs. · Hands

  4. Predicting the Operational Effectiveness of Aircraft Survivability Equipment Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noh, Sanguk

    , and experiment with their autonomous decision-making against threats in various electronic warfare settings. We: Autonomous Decision-Making, Electronic Warfare Settings, Aircraft Survivability Equipment Suite, Operational Effectiveness 1. Introduction In order to counter threats in electronic warfare environments, a command

  5. 2820 Napoleon Avenue, Suite 700 New Orleans, LA 70115

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2820 Napoleon Avenue, Suite 700 New Orleans, LA 70115 Tel: 504-412-1517 Park in the Jena Garage onto Napoleon Ave. Turn Right onto Clara Turn Right onto Jena (garage on left) Directions from Westbank Tchoupitoulas Stay on Tch to Napoleon Ave. Turn Right onto Napoleon Ave. Cross St. Charles, go about 12 blocks

  6. Water Optimizer Suite: Tools for Decision Support and Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    , irrigation system options, well and pump characteristics and water supply. Irrigation options include center pivot or gravity irrigation systems, well or canal delivery, and systems powered by electricity, diesel irrigation water when water supplies are limited. The Water Optimizer Suite consists of four separate

  7. 3D Velocity from 3D Doppler Radial Velocity J. L. Barron,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, John

    to compute local 3D velocity (local 3D optical flow). Radial velocity (measured by the Doppler effect3D Velocity from 3D Doppler Radial Velocity J. L. Barron,1 R. E. Mercer,1 X. Chen,1 P. Joe2 1 velocity data and qualitatively on real radial velocity data, obtained from the Doppler radar at Kurnell

  8. NIHAO project II: Halo shape, phase-space density and velocity distribution of dark matter in galaxy formation simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butsky, Iryna; Dutton, Aaron A; Wang, Liang; Stinson, Greg S; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W; Wadsley, James

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show the effect of galaxy formation on the dark matter (DM) distribution across a wide range of halo masses. We focus on how baryon physics changes the dark matter halo shape, the so called "pseudo phase-space density distribution" and the velocity distribution within the virial radius, Rvir and in the solar neighborhood. This study is based on the NIHAO galaxy formation simulations, a large suite of cosmological zoom-in simulations. The galaxies reproduce key properties of observed galaxies, and hence offer unique insight into how baryons change the dark matter morphology and kinematics. When compared to dark matter only simulations, the NIHAO haloes have similar shapes at Rvir, but are substantially rounder inside ~0.1 Rvir. In DM-only simulations the inner halo has a minor-to-major axis ratio of c/a~0.5. In hydro simulations c/a increases with halo mass and integrated star formation efficiency, reaching ~0.8 at the Milky Way mass, reconciling a long-standing conflict between observations and DM only sim...

  9. SHIP VELOCITY FIELDS , Lichuan Guib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui, Lichuan

    directions. 1. Introduction Knowledge of flow around ships is important for design, model development, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation. Historically, five-hole pitot probes have been used for measuring of multi-hole pitot and Laser-doppler systems, they both require measurement of ship velocity fields

  10. Velocity Distributions from Nonextensive Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric I. Barnes; Liliya L. R. Williams; Arif Babul; Julianne J. Dalcanton

    2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    There is no accepted mechanism that explains the equilibrium structures that form in collisionless cosmological N-body simulations. Recent work has identified nonextensive thermodynamics as an innovative approach to the problem. The distribution function that results from adopting this framework has the same form as for polytropes, but the polytropic index is now related to the degree of nonextensiveness. In particular, the nonextensive approach can mimic the equilibrium structure of dark matter density profiles found in simulations. We extend the investigation of this approach to the velocity structures expected from nonextensive thermodynamics. We find that the nonextensive and simulated N-body rms-velocity distributions do not match one another. The nonextensive rms-velocity profile is either monotonically decreasing or displays little radial variation, each of which disagrees with the rms-velocity distributions seen in simulations. We conclude that the currently discussed nonextensive models require further modifications in order to corroborate dark matter halo simulations. (adapted from TeX)

  11. Physics 321 Accelerating Reference Frames II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Physics 321 Hour 25 Accelerating Reference Frames II Consider an accelerating train car Proof 0 and S is a frame rotating with angular velocity . Examples Handout rotation.nb #12;Physics 321 Hour 26 Accelerating Reference Frames III Velocities in Rotating Frames in S0 basis in S' basis In S' basis in S0 basis

  12. BENCAP, LLC: CAPSULE VELOCITY TEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meidinger, Brian

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ben Cap, LLC, has a technology that utilizes bebtonite to plug wells. The bentonite is encapsulated in a cardboard capsule, droped down to the bottom of the well where it is allowed to hydrate, causing the bentonite to expand and plug the well. This method of plugging a well is accepted in some, but not all states. This technology can save a significant amount of money when compared to cementing methods currently used to plug and abandon wells. The test objective was to obtain the terminal velocity of the capsule delivery system as it drops through a column of water in a wellbore. Once the terminal velocity is known, the bentonite swelling action can be timed not to begin swelling until it reaches the bottom of the well bore. The results of the test showed that an average speed of 8.93 plus or minus 0.12 ft/sec was achieved by the capsule as it was falling through a column of water. Plotting the data revealed a very linear function with the capsules achieving terminal velocity shortly after being released. The interference of the capsule impacting the casing was not readily apparent in any of the runs, but a siginal sampling anomaly was present in one run. Because the anomaly was so brief and not present in any of the other runs, no solid conclusions could be drawn. Additional testing would be required to determine the effects of capsules impacting a fluid level that is not at surface.

  13. Space suit simulator for partial gravity extravehicular activity experimentation and training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilkey, Andrea L. (Andrea Lynn)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During human space exploration, mobility is extremely limited when working inside a pressurized space suit. Astronauts perform extensive training on Earth to become accustomed to space suit-imposed high joint torques and ...

  14. The Apollo Number: Space Suits, Self-Support, and the Walk-Run Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Christopher E.

    Background: How space suits affect the preferred walk-run transition is an open question with relevance to human

  15. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, 203 Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense ({omega}{sub pe} > {omega}{sub ce}). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub ce}. As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation {omega}-k{sub ||v||} = {omega}{sub ce}. The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  16. Using Hybrid Algorithm For Pareto Efficient Multi-Objective Test Suite Minimisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Jeremy

    Using Hybrid Algorithm For Pareto Efficient Multi-Objective Test Suite Minimisation Shin Yoo & Mark Harman King's College London, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS, UK Abstract Test suite minimisation techniques seek to reduce the effort required for regression testing by selecting a subset of test suites

  17. Effects of increasing tip velocity on wind turbine rotor design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resor, Brian Ray; Maniaci, David Charles; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reduction in cost of energy from wind is anticipated when maximum allowable tip velocity is allowed to increase. Rotor torque decreases as tip velocity increases and rotor size and power rating are held constant. Reduction in rotor torque yields a lighter weight gearbox, a decrease in the turbine cost, and an increase in the capacity for the turbine to deliver cost competitive electricity. The high speed rotor incurs costs attributable to rotor aero-acoustics and system loads. The increased loads of high speed rotors drive the sizing and cost of other components in the system. Rotor, drivetrain, and tower designs at 80 m/s maximum tip velocity and 100 m/s maximum tip velocity are created to quantify these effects. Component costs, annualized energy production, and cost of energy are computed for each design to quantify the change in overall cost of energy resulting from the increase in turbine tip velocity. High fidelity physics based models rather than cost and scaling models are used to perform the work. Results provide a quantitative assessment of anticipated costs and benefits for high speed rotors. Finally, important lessons regarding full system optimization of wind turbines are documented.

  18. Time, Distance, Velocity, Redshift: a personal guided tour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kiang

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt to answer the question 'Can we observe galaxies that recede faster than light ?' led to a re-examination of the notions of time, distance, velocity and redshift as they occur in newtonian physics, special relativity, general relativity and cosmology. A number of misconceptions were uncovered. It was found that, once freed of special relativity preconceptions, the above question is easily and unequivocally answered

  19. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  20. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  1. Single-mode fiber, velocity interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauter, K. G.; Jacobson, G. F.; Patterson, J. R.; Nguyen, J. H.; Ambrose, W. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore California 94551 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we describe a velocity interferometer system based entirely on single-mode fiber optics. This paper includes a description of principles used in developing the single-mode velocity interferometry system (SMV). The SMV design is based on polarization-insensitive components. Polarization adjusters are included to eliminate the effects of residual birefringence and polarization dependent losses in the interferometers. Characterization measurements and calibration methods needed for data analysis and a method of data analysis are described. Calibration is performed directly using tunable lasers. During development, we demonstrated its operation using exploding-foil bridge-wire fliers up to 200 m/s. In a final test, we demonstrated the SMV in a gas gun experiment up to 1.2 km/sec. As a basis for comparison in the gas gun experiment, we used another velocimetry technique that is also based on single-mode fiber optics: photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV). For the gas gun experiment, we split the light returned from a single target spot and performed a direct comparison of the homodyne (SMV) and heterodyne (PDV) techniques concurrently. The two techniques had a negligible mean difference and a 1.5% standard deviation in the one-dimensional shock zone. Within one interferometer delay time after a sudden Doppler shift, a SMV unencumbered by multimode-fiber dispersion exhibits two color beats. These beats have the same period as PDV beats--this interference occurs between the ''recently'' shifted and ''formerly unshifted'' paths within the interferometer. We believe that recognizing this identity between homodyne and heterodyne beats is novel in the shock-physics field. SMV includes the conveniences of optical fiber, while removing the time resolution limitations associated with the multimode delivery fiber.

  2. Precision reconstruction of the dark matter-neutrino relative velocity from N-body simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Derek; Pen, Ue-Li; Farchi, Alban; Yu, Hao-Ran; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discovering the mass of neutrinos is a principle goal in high energy physics and cosmology. In addition to cosmological measurements based on two-point statistics, the neutrino mass can also be estimated by observations of neutrino wakes resulting from the relative motion between dark matter and neutrinos. Such a detection relies on an accurate reconstruction of the dark matter-neutrino relative velocity which is affected by non-linear structure growth and galaxy bias. We investigate our ability to reconstruct this relative velocity using large N-body simulations where we evolve neutrinos as distinct particles alongside the dark matter. We find that the dark matter velocity power spectrum is overpredicted by linear theory whereas the neutrino velocity power spectrum is underpredicted. The magnitude of the relative velocity observed in the simulations is found to be lower than what is predicted in linear theory. Since neither the dark matter nor the neutrino velocity fields are directly observable from galaxy ...

  3. The SECO suite of codes for site Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roache, P.J. [Ecodynamics Research Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling for Performance Assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP ) has led to development of the SECO suite of codes for groundwater flow, particle tracking, and transport. Algorithm and code developments include the following areas: facilitation of grid convergence tests in multiple domains; correct treatment of transmissivity factors for unconfined aquifers; efficient multigrid algorithms; a formulation of brine Darcy flow equations that uses freshwater head as the dependent able; boundary-fitted coordinates; temporal high order particle tracking; an efficient and accurate implicit Finite Volume TVD algorithm for radionuclide transport in (possibly) fractured porous media; accurate calculation of advection via a flux-based modified method of characteristics; and Quality Assurance procedures.

  4. MEMS BASED DOPPLER VELOCITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Robert D.

    .2 Doppler Effect...................................................................................10 2MEMS BASED DOPPLER VELOCITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM A dissertation submitted by Minchul Shin IN PARTIAL micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) based in-air Doppler velocity measurement system using a 1 cm2 planar

  5. Physics Division: Subatomic Physics Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subatomic Physics Physics home Subatomic Physics Site Home About Us Groups Applied Modern Physics, P-21 Neutron Science and Technology, P-23 Plasma Physics, P-24 Subatomic...

  6. Tangential velocity measurement using interferometric MTI radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W.; Mileshosky, Brian P.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Radar systems use time delay measurements between a transmitted signal and its echo to calculate range to a target. Ranges that change with time cause a Doppler offset in phase and frequency of the echo. Consequently, the closing velocity between target and radar can be measured by measuring the Doppler offset of the echo. The closing velocity is also known as radial velocity, or line-of-sight velocity. Doppler frequency is measured in a pulse-Doppler radar as a linear phase shift over a set of radar pulses during some Coherent Processing Interval (CPI). An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity of a target.

  7. Constraints on Neutrino Velocities Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunjie Huo; Tianjun Li; Yi Liao; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Yonghui Qi

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    With a minimally modified dispersion relation for neutrinos, we reconsider the constraints on superluminal neutrino velocities from bremsstrahlung effects in the laboratory frame. Employing both the direct calculation approach and the virtual Z-boson approach, we obtain the generic decay width and energy loss rate of a superluminal neutrino with general energy. The Cohen-Glashow's analytical results for neutrinos with a relatively low energy are confirmed in both approaches. We employ the survival probability instead of the terminal energy to assess whether a neutrino with a given energy is observable or not in the OPERA experiment. Moreover, using our general results we perform systematical analyses on the constraints arising from the Super-Kamiokande and IceCube experiments.

  8. Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A. Sethian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethian, James A.

    Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Velocities M. K. Cameron, S. B. Fomel, J. A the problem of estimating seismic velocities inside the earth which is necessary for obtaining seismic images in regular Cartesian coordinates. We derive a relation between the true seismic velocities and the routinely

  9. Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

  10. An Integrated Suite of Tools to support Human Factors Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques V Hugo

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE) work for the nuclear industry imposes special demands on the practitioner in terms of the scope, complexity and safety requirements for humans in nuclear installations. Unfortunately HFE lags behind other engineering disciplines in the development and use of modern, powerful tools for the full range of analysis and design processes. HFE does not appear to be an attractive market for software and hardware developers and as a result, HFE practitioners usually have to rely on inefficient general-purpose tools like standard office software, or they have to use expensive special-purpose tools that offer only part of the solution they require and which also do not easily integrate with other tools. There have been attempts to develop generic software tools to support the HFE analyst and also to achieve some order and consistency in format and presentation. However, in spite of many years of development, very few tools have emerged that have achieved these goals. This would suggest the need for special tools, but existing commercial products have been found inadequate and to date not a single tool has been developed that adequately supports the special requirements of HFE work for the nuclear industry. This paper describes an integrated suite of generic as well as purpose-built tools that facilitate information solicitation, issues tracking, work domain analysis, functional requirements analysis, function allocation, operational sequence analysis, task analysis and development of HSI design requirements. In combination, this suite of tools supports the analytical as well as the representational aspects of key HFE activities primarily for new NPPs, including capturing information from subject matter experts and various source documents directly into the appropriate tool and then linking, analyzing and extending that information further to represent detailed functional and task information, and ultimately HSI design requirements. The paper also describes a tool developed especially for functional requirements analysis, function allocation, and task analysis.

  11. Predicting stress-induced velocity anisotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Mukerji, T.; Godfrey, N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Rock Physics Lab.] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Rock Physics Lab.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple transformation, using measured isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S} versus hydrostatic pressure, is presented for predicting stress-induced seismic velocity anisotropy in rocks. The compliant, crack-like portions of the pore space are characterized by generalized compressional and shear compliances that are estimated form the isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S}. The physical assumption that the compliant porosity is crack-like means that the pressure dependence of the generalized compliances is governed primarily by normal tractions resolved across cracks and defects. This allows the measured pressure dependence to be mapped form the hydrostatic stress state to any applied nonhydrostatic stress. Predicted P- and S-wave velocities agree reasonably well with uniaxial stress data for Barre Granite and Massillon Sandstone. While it is mechanically similar to methods based on idealized ellipsoidal cracks, the approach is relatively independent of any assumed crack geometry and is not limited to small crack densities.

  12. From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits- Mound Science and Energy Museum Programs Cover a Wide Range of Topics From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to...

  13. New Frontiers in Solar Physics: Broadband Imaging Spectroscopy with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the solar panel of the AASC recommended an integrated suite of instrumentation designed to meetNew Frontiers in Solar Physics: Broadband Imaging Spectroscopy with the Frequency Agile Solar and other astrophysical objects and processes. Outstanding problems in solar physics include the magnetic

  14. Cyclic transgressive and regressive sequences, Paleocene Suite, Sirte basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abushagur, S.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Farrud lithofacies represent the main reservoir rock of the Ghani oil field and Western Concession Eleven of the Sirte basin, Libya. Eight microfacies are recognized in the Farrud lithofacies in the Ghani field area: (1) bryozoan-bioclastic (shallow, warm, normal marine shelf deposits); (2) micrite (suggesting quiet, low-energy conditions such as may have existed in a well-protected lagoon); (3) dasycladacean (very shallow, normal marine environment); (4) bioclastic (very shallow, normal marine environment with moderate to vigorous energy); (5) mgal (very shallow, normal marine environment in a shelf lagoon); (6) pelletal-skeletal (deposition within slightly agitated waters of a sheltered lagoon with restricted circulation); (7) dolomicrite (fenestrate structures indicating a high intertidal environment of deposition); and (8) anhydrite (supratidal environment). The Paleocene suite of the Farrud lithofacies generally shows a prograding, regressive sequence of three facies: (1) supratidal facies, characterized by nonfossiliferous anhydrite, dolomite, and dolomitic pelletal carbonate mudstone; (2) intertidal to very shallow subtidal facies, characterized by fossiliferous, pelletal, carbonate mudstone and skeletal calcarenite; and (3) subtidal facies, characterized by a skeletal, pelletal, carbonate mudstone. Source rocks were primarily organic-rich shales overlying the Farrud reservoir rock. Porosity and permeability were developed in part by such processes as dolomitization, leaching, and fracturing in the two progradational, regressive carbonate facies. Hydrocarbons were trapped by a supratidal, anhydrite cap rock.

  15. Minimum and terminal velocities in projectile motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. N. Miranda; S. Nikolskaya; R. Riba

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The motion of a projectile with horizontal initial velocity V0, moving under the action of the gravitational field and a drag force is studied analytically. As it is well known, the projectile reaches a terminal velocity Vterm. There is a curious result concerning the minimum speed Vmin; it turns out that the minimum velocity is lower than the terminal one if V0 > Vterm and is lower than the initial one if V0 < Vterm. These results show that the velocity is not a monotonous function. If the initial speed is not horizontal, there is an angle range where the velocity shows the same behavior mentioned previously. Out of that range, the volocity is a monotonous function. These results come out from numerical simulations.

  16. 7, 48894923, 2007 Physical controls on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and kinematic trajectories from a mesoscale weather model (MM5), we assess physical controls on Ci P() during, homoge- neous freezing and mesoscale variability in vertical velocities led to broad modeled P the importance of homogeneous freezing and mesoscale vertical velocity variability in controlling Ci P() shapes

  17. Excavatability Assessment of Weathered Sedimentary Rock Mass Using Seismic Velocity Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bin Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam; Noor, Muhazian Md; Isa, Mohamed Fauzi Bin Md.; Mazlan, Ain Naadia [Department of Geotechnics and Transportation, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai. Johor (Malaysia); Saad, Rosli [Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang (Malaysia)

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic refraction method is one of the most popular methods in assessing surface excavation. The main objective of the seismic data acquisition is to delineate the subsurface into velocity profiles as different velocity can be correlated to identify different materials. The physical principal used for the determination of excavatability is that seismic waves travel faster through denser material as compared to less consolidated material. In general, a lower velocity indicates material that is soft and a higher velocity indicates more difficult to be excavated. However, a few researchers have noted that seismic velocity method alone does not correlate well with the excavatability of the material. In this study, a seismic velocity method was used in Nusajaya, Johor to assess the accuracy of this seismic velocity method with excavatability of the weathered sedimentary rock mass. A direct ripping run by monitoring the actual production of ripping has been employed at later stage and compared to the ripper manufacturer's recommendation. This paper presents the findings of the seismic velocity tests in weathered sedimentary area. The reliability of using this method with the actual rippability trials is also presented.

  18. Lee-TM: A Non-Trivial Benchmark Suite for Transactional Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Jeremy

    , Ian Watson, Chris Kirkham, Mikel Luj´an, and Kim Jarvis School of Computer Science, University of Manchester {ansari, kotselidis, watson, kirkham, lujan, jarvis}@cs.manchester.ac.uk Abstract. Transactional-trivial and realistic TM bench- mark suite based on Lee's routing algorithm. The benchmark suite pro- vides sequential

  19. A Diagnostic Suite of Models for the Evaluation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy Parameterizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    A Diagnostic Suite of Models for the Evaluation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy Parameterizations by S. D of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy Parameterizations written by S. D. Bachman has been approved for the Department and Oceanic Sciences) A Diagnostic Suite of Models for the Evaluation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy

  20. Enabling Process Support for Advanced Applications with the AristaFlow BPM Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Enabling Process Support for Advanced Applications with the AristaFlow BPM Suite Andreas Lanz1. In this software demonstration we show how the AristaFlow BPM Suite ­ an adaptive process management system) as offered by AristaFlow. 1 Introduction In many domains IT support can benefit from BPM technologies

  1. Designing for the Future: The New Open Suite of Programs and Peer Review Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charette, André

    Designing for the Future: The New Open Suite of Programs and Peer Review Process Questions and Answers 1 Rationale 1. If the changes to the Open Suite of Programs and peer review process are successful processes is to develop a high quality, flexible and sustainable system capable of identifying

  2. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 20300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 20300 General Physics Designation: Required Undergraduate Catalog description: For majors in the life sciences (biology, medicine, dentistry, psychology, physical therapy) and for liberal arts students. Fundamental ideas and laws of physics from mechanics to modern

  3. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 32100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 32100 Modern Physics for Engineers Designation to one- electron atoms, atomic shell structure and periodic table; nuclear physics, relativity. Prerequisites: Prereq.: Physics 20800 or equivalent, Math 20300 or 20900 (elective for Engineering students

  4. Cosmological Constraints from Galaxy Cluster Velocity Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suman Bhattacharya; Arthur Kosowsky

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Future microwave sky surveys will have the sensitivity to detect the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal from moving galaxy clusters, thus providing a direct measurement of their line-of-sight peculiar velocity. We show that cluster peculiar velocity statistics applied to foreseeable surveys will put significant constraints on fundamental cosmological parameters. We consider three statistical quantities that can be constructed from a cluster peculiar velocity catalog: the probability density function, the mean pairwise streaming velocity, and the pairwise velocity dispersion. These quantities are applied to an envisioned data set which measures line-of-sight cluster velocities with normal errors of 100 km/s for all clusters with masses larger than $10^{14}$ solar masses over a sky area of up to 5000 square degrees. A simple Fisher matrix analysis of this survey shows that the normalization of the matter power spectrum and the dark energy equation of state can be constrained to better than 10 percent, and the Hubble constant and the primordial power spectrum index can be constrained to a few percent, independent of any other cosmological observations. We also find that the current constraint on the power spectrum normalization can be improved by more than a factor of two using data from a 400 square degree survey and WMAP third-year priors. We also show how the constraints on cosmological parameters changes if cluster velocities are measured with normal errors of 300 km/s.

  5. Modeling velocity dispersion In Gypsy site, Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsaadan, Sami Ibrahim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrepancies in interval velocities estimated from vertical well measurements made with different source central frequencies at Gypsy site could be primarily explained in terms of intrinsic attenuation. Four intervals ...

  6. Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

  7. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Syahputra, Ahmad [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  8. Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data ĺ Ð 1 ¸ Ö Ò ×¹ Ò ÝÖ¹Ê Ò 2 1 processing algo- rithms normally used to extract water velocity. We present an alternative method for velocity homogeneity precludes the extraction of fish velocities. Water velocities can sometimes still

  9. Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Sushil J.

    Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Genetic Adaptive­surface models from seismic travel­time data. Given a sub­surface model, the physics of wave propagation through refractive media can be used to compute travel times for seismic waves. How­ ever, in practice, we have

  10. Velocity dependence of friction of confined polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Sivebaek; V. N. Samoilov; B. N. J. Persson

    2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the frictional shear stress for both cases. In our simulations, the polymer films are very thin (approx. 3 nm), and the solid walls are connected to a thermostat at a short distance from the polymer slab. Under these circumstances we find that frictional heating effects are not important, and the effective temperature in the polymer film is always close to the thermostat temperature. In the first setup (a), for hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 1400 carbon atoms, the shear stresses are nearly independent of molecular length, but for the shortest hydrocarbon C20H42 the frictional shear stress is lower. In all cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer [case (b)] the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C-atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant increases (abruptly) with increasing sliding velocity (from 6 to 7 layers), leading to a decrease of the friction. Before and after the layering transition, the frictional shear stresses are nearly proportional to the logarithm of sliding velocity. For the longest hydrocarbon (1400 C-atoms) the friction shows no dependence on the sliding velocity, and for the shortest hydrocarbon (20 C-atoms) the frictional shear stress increases nearly linearly with the sliding velocity.

  11. Space exploration challenges : characterization and enhancement of space suit mobility and planetary protection policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holschuh, Bradley Thomas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses two challenges associated with advanced space and planetary exploration: characterizing and improving the mobility of current and future gas pressurized space suits; and developing effective domestic ...

  12. The Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Effect of State Policy Suites on the Development of Solar Markets D. Steward and E. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP- 7A40-62506 November...

  13. Assessment and preliminary model development of shape memory polymers mechanical counter pressure space suits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wee, Brian (Brian J.)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis seeks to assess the viability of a space qualified shape memory polymer (SMP) mechanical counter pressure (MCP) suit. A key development objective identified by the International Space Exploration Coordination ...

  14. Understanding human-space suit interaction to prevent injury during extravehicular activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Allison P. (Allison Paige)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is a critical component of human spaceflight. Working in gas-pressurized space suits, however, causes fatigue, unnecessary energy expenditure, and injury. The problem of injury is particularly ...

  15. An investigation of space suit mobility with applications to EVA operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Patricia Barrett, 1974-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary aim of this thesis is to advance the current understanding of astronauts' capabilities and limitations in space-suited extravehicular activity (EVA) by compiling a detailed database of the torques needed to ...

  16. The Apollo Number: space suits, self-support, and the walk-run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, Jeremy

    Background: How space suits affect the preferred walk-run transition is an open question with relevance to human biomechanics and planetary extravehicular activity. Walking and running energetics differ; in reduced gravity ...

  17. Development of a mechanical counter pressure Bio-Suit System for planetary exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Zhe Liang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) is critical for human spaceflight and particularly for human planetary exploration. The MIT Man Vehicle Laboratory is developing a Bio-Suit EVA System, based on mechanical counterpressure ...

  18. @Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    @Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major. From the basic laws of physics to the resulting emergent behavior, physics studies what the universe is made of and how it works. As a Physics major that surrounds us, to the structure and evolution of the entire universe. We offer three degrees in Physics

  19. The Department of Energy Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The supplied-air suits that protect DOE contractor and federal employees from exposure to harmful atmospheres and radioactive contaminants are not included in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification process for respiratory protective devices. Therefore, with the awareness and acknowledgement of NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Department established a system for acceptance testing of supplied-air suits.

  20. air velocity effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transfer velocities. A moving tropical cyclone is an intense source of surface wind stress Chu, Peter C. 4 The exit velocity of a compressed air cannon CERN Preprints...

  1. On the definition of velocity in doubly special relativity theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Kosinski; Pawel Maslanka

    2002-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the definition of particle velocity in doubly relativity theories. The general formula relating velocity and four-momentum of particle is given.

  2. High-velocity clouds: a diverse phenomenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. P. Wakker

    2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution the current state of knowledge about the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) is summarized. Recent progress has shown that the HVCs are a diverse phenomenon. The intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are likely to be part of a Galactic Fountain. The Magellanic Stream is a tidal remnant. HVC complex C (possibly complexes A and GCN) are low-metallicity clouds near the Galaxy; they could be remnants of the formation of the Galaxy or old tidal streams extracted from nearby dwarf galaxies. Having a substantial number of HI HVCs dispersed throughout the Local Group seems incompatible with the observed HI mass function of galaxies. Finally, FUSE finds high-velocity OVI, some of which is clearly associated with HI HVCs, but some which is not.

  3. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  4. Lagrangian reconstruction of cosmic velocity fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Lavaux

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a Lagrangian reconstruction method of the velocity field from galaxy redshift catalog that takes its root in the Euler equation. This results in a ``functional'' of the velocity field which must be minimized. This is helped by an algorithm solving the minimization of cost-flow problems. The results obtained by applying this method to cosmological problems are shown and boundary effects happening in real observational cases are then discussed. Finally, a statistical model of the errors made by the reconstruction method is proposed.

  5. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, D.; Gota, H.; Hayashi, R.; Kiyashko, V.; Morehouse, M.; Primavera, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Bolte, N. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Marsili, P. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Roche, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Wessel, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  6. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanton, Philip L. (Bernalillo County, NM); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Crump, Jr., O. B. (Albuquerque, NM); Bonzon, Lloyd L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  7. PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP By NATHAN ANDREW WEBER PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP Thesis Approved: _______________________________________ Thesis Advisor the air speed transducer mount and the Plexiglas model of the heat pump. Ipseng Iu and myself worked side

  8. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 42200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 42200 Biophysics Designation: Undergraduate Catalog and membranes. In depth study of the physical basis of selected systems including vision, nerve transmission. Prerequisites: Prereq.: 1 yr. of Math, 1 yr. of Physics (elective for Physics Majors and Biomedical Engineering

  9. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 32300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 32300 Quantum Mechanics for Engineers Designation: required for Physics majors in the Applied Physics Option Undergraduate Catalog description: Basic experiments, wave: Physics 20700 and 20800, Math 39100 and Math 39200 Textbook and other suggested material: Scherrer

  10. A MAGNETIC CALIBRATION OF PHOTOSPHERIC DOPPLER VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Sun, Xudong [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The zero point of measured photospheric Doppler shifts is uncertain for at least two reasons: instrumental variations (from, e.g., thermal drifts); and the convective blueshift, a known correlation between intensity and upflows. Accurate knowledge of the zero point is, however, useful for (1) improving estimates of the Poynting flux of magnetic energy across the photosphere, and (2) constraining processes underlying flux cancellation, the mutual apparent loss of magnetic flux in closely spaced, opposite-polarity magnetogram features. We present a method to absolutely calibrate line-of-sight (LOS) velocities in solar active regions (ARs) near disk center using three successive vector magnetograms and one Dopplergram coincident with the central magnetogram. It exploits the fact that Doppler shifts measured along polarity inversion lines (PILs) of the LOS magnetic field determine one component of the velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field, and optimizes consistency between changes in LOS flux near PILs and the transport of transverse magnetic flux by LOS velocities, assuming that ideal electric fields govern the magnetic evolution. Previous calibrations fitted the center-to-limb variation of Doppler velocities, but this approach cannot, by itself, account for residual convective shifts at the limb. We apply our method to vector magnetograms of AR 11158, observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and find clear evidence of offsets in the Doppler zero point in the range of 50-550 m s{sup -1}. In addition, we note that a simpler calibration can be determined from an LOS magnetogram and Dopplergram pair from the median Doppler velocity among all near-disk-center PIL pixels. We briefly discuss shortcomings in our initial implementation, and suggest ways to address these. In addition, as a step in our data reduction, we discuss the use of temporal continuity in the transverse magnetic field direction to correct apparently spurious fluctuations in resolution of the 180 Degree-Sign ambiguity.

  11. Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 757-779, December 2006 Acoustic and Shear-Wave Velocities in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    for the presence of gas hydrate are strong. In this study, we perform velocity analysis of the 6 4-component OBS of the velocities are observed. We then investigate the large scale gas hydrate content through rock physic modeling, and the acoustic veloci- ties predicted for a set of gas hydrate, quartz and clay contents are com- pared

  12. Phenomenological Explanation of Special Relativity Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. G. Yi

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper shows how we can find in the aberration of starlight a phenomenological explanation of special relativity physics. The special-relativity effect is identified as an effect due to the observation velocity being affected by the velocity of a moving particle. In contrast to the currently accepted view, it is demonstrated that the usual concepts of time and simultaneity are natural for describing relativistic phenomena.

  13. Comment on "Pulsar Velocities and Neutrino Oscillations"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. -Z. Qian

    1997-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent Letter, Kusenko and Segre proposed a new mechanism to explain the observed proper motions of pulsars. Their mechanism was based on the asymmetric neutrino emission induced by neutrino oscillations in the protoneutron star magnetic field. In this note I point out that their estimate of the asymmetry in the neutrino emission is incorrect. A proper calculation shows that their mechanism at least requires a magnetic field of 10**16 G in order to produce the observed average pulsar velocity.

  14. On Pulsar Velocities from Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Birkel; Ramon Toldra

    1997-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been recently suggested that magnetically affected neutrino oscillations inside a cooling protoneutron star, created in a supernova explosion, could explain the large proper motion of pulsars. We investigate whether this hypothesis is in agreement with the observed properties of pulsars and find that present data disfavor the suggested mechanism. The relevance of our results for other models proposed to understand the origin of pulsar velocities is also discussed.

  15. Slow group velocity and Cherenkov radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Carusotto; M. Artoni; G. C. La Rocca; F. Bassani

    2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study the effect of ultraslow group velocities on the emission of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in a coherently driven medium. We show that in this case the aperture of the group cone on which the intensity of the radiation peaks is much smaller than that of the usual wave cone associated with the Cherenkov coherence condition. We show that such a singular behaviour may be observed in a coherently driven ultracold atomic gas.

  16. Irregular wave induced velocities in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sultan, Nels John

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    probabil- ity density function. This thesis applies this expanded distribution to fluid particle velocities instead of wave elevations. Ochi (1982) presents a review of recent ad- vances in the stochastic analysis of random seas. He notes that the first..., (Longuet-Higgins 1963), that purely linear waves will have a Gaussian distribu- tion. Therefore, any deviation from a Gaussian distribution must be attributed to wave nonlinearities. Ochi (1982) discusses a series of experiments by Honda and Mitsuyasu...

  17. Radial velocities of southern visual multiple stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokovinin, Andrei [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Pribulla, Theodor [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 059 60 Tatranská Lomnica (Slovakia); Fischer, Debra, E-mail: atokovinin@ctio.noao.edu, E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk, E-mail: debra.fischer@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution spectra of visual multiple stars were taken in 2008–2009 to detect or confirm spectroscopic subsystems and to determine their orbits. Radial velocities of 93 late-type stars belonging to visual multiple systems were measured by numerical cross-correlation. We provide the individual velocities, the width, and the amplitude of the Gaussians that approximate the correlations. The new information on the multiple systems resulting from these data is discussed. We discovered double-lined binaries in HD 41742B, HD 56593C, and HD 122613AB, confirmed several other known subsystems, and constrained the existence of subsystems in some visual binaries where both components turned out to have similar velocities. The orbits of double-lined subsystems with periods of 148 and 13 days are computed for HD 104471 Aa,Ab and HD 210349 Aa,Ab, respectively. We estimate individual magnitudes and masses of the components in these triple systems and update the outer orbit of HD 104471 AB.

  18. On the velocity-strengthening behavior of dry friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Brener, Efim A; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The onset of frictional instabilities, e.g. earthquakes nucleation, is intimately related to velocity-weakening friction, in which the frictional resistance of interfaces decreases with increasing slip velocity. While this frictional response has been studied extensively, much less attention has been given to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, in spite of its importance for various aspects of frictional phenomena such as the propagation speed of interfacial rupture fronts and the amount of stored energy released by them. In this note we suggest that a crossover from steady-state velocity-weakening friction at small slip velocities to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction at higher velocities might be a generic feature of dry friction. We further argue that while thermally activated rheology naturally gives rise to logarithmic steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, a crossover to stronger-than-logarithmic strengthening might take place at higher slip velocities, possibly accompanied by...

  19. A wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedt, J.-M [SENSeOR, 32 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 25044 Besancon (France); Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S. [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST, 32 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 25044 Besancon (France)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring physical quantities using acoustic wave devices can be advantageously achieved using the wave characteristic dependence to various parametric perturbations (temperature, stress, and pressure). Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are particularly well suited to such applications as their resonance frequency is directly influenced by these perturbations, modifying both the phase velocity and resonance conditions. Moreover, the intrinsic radio frequency (rf) nature of these devices makes them ideal for wireless applications, mainly exploiting antennas reciprocity and piezoelectric reversibility. In this paper, we present a wireless SAW sensor interrogation unit operating in the 434 MHz centered ISM band--selected as a tradeoff between antenna dimensions and electromagnetic wave penetration in dielectric media--based on the principles of a frequency sweep network analyzer. We particularly focus on the compliance with the ISM standard which reveals complicated by the need for switching from emission to reception modes similarly to radar operation. In this matter, we propose a fully digital rf synthesis chain to develop various interrogation strategies to overcome the corresponding difficulties and comply with the above-mentioned standard. We finally assess the reader interrogation range, accuracy, and dynamics.

  20. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi#12;cations. The cost-e#11;ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

  1. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the CostEffectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost­Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modifications. The cost­effective­ ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris­ tics of test

  2. The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    The Impact of Test Suite Granularity on the Cost-Effectiveness of Regression Testing Gregg,pkallakug@cse.unl.edu ABSTRACT Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to validate software following modi cations. The cost-e ective- ness of regression testing techniques varies with characteris- tics of test

  3. COLUMBIA RIVER INTER-TRIBAL FISH COMMISSION 700 NE Multnomah Street, Suite 1200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLUMBIA RIVER INTER-TRIBAL FISH COMMISSION 700 NE Multnomah Street, Suite 1200 Portland, Oregon 97232 F (503) 235-4228 (503) 238-0667 F (503) 235-4228 www.critfc.org Putting fish back in the rivers and protecting the watersheds where fish live September 17, 2013 Bill Bradbury, Chairman Northwest Power

  4. AES-CCM ECC Cipher Suites for TLS CS290G Network Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AES-CCM ECC Cipher Suites for TLS CS290G Network Security Qin ZHOU #12;· Transfer Layer Security (TLS) · Handshake Protocol: ECDHE_ECDSA · Record Protocol: AEAD_AES_CCM Content #12;Transfer Layer_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_CCM ECDHE_ECDSA AES_128_CCM TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_256_CCM ECDHE_ECDSA AES_256_CCM TLS

  5. The Carmen-Suite: Maya Plisetskaya Challenging Soviet Culture and Policy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalashnikova, Anna

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    -Cold War politics in the USSR and post-Soviet Russia. The evolution of Carmen-Suite from a symbol of protest to an integral part of the established cultural system illustrates both political protest on the part of its creators and artistic repossession...

  6. Multimedia Analytics Canopy is a visual analytic software suite, developed by researchers at Battelle's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multimedia Analytics Canopy is a visual analytic software suite, developed by researchers to efficiently analyze massive amounts of multimedia data. Canopy incorporates cutting-edge extraction techniques is a multimedia analytics software platform that combines cutting-edge extraction techniques, state

  7. Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office, Edinburgh EH14 4AP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    , to address diffuse pollution (particularly hydrocarbons) associated with the nearby Brucefield Industry Park1 Minutes of Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office. It was set up several years ago, particularly to support the implementation of constructed farm wetlands

  8. Two Distinctive Granite Suites in the SW Bohemian Massif and their Record of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Two Distinctive Granite Suites in the SW Bohemian Massif and their Record of Emplacement types of gneisses, migmatites and granites dominate the out- crops of the Bavarian Forest characteristics ofa crustal root zone. Fourteen granite intrusions from this area have been dated by the single

  9. Two Distinctive Granite Suites in the Southwestern Bohemian Massif: Reply to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siebel, Wolfgang

    Two Distinctive Granite Suites in the Southwestern Bohemian Massif: Reply to F. Finger and M. Rene geochemical and geochronological analyses of mainly crustal-derived late Variscan granites (328^321 Ma) from the Bavarian Forest, Moldanubian unit, Bohemian Massif. As an important observation, a high Ca^Sr^Y granite

  10. Test-Suite Reduction and Prioritization for Modified Condition/Decision Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrold, Mary Jean

    Test-Suite Reduction and Prioritization for Modified Condition/Decision Coverage James A. Jones (MC/DC) adequate. Despite its cost, there is evidence that MC/DC is an effective verification technique, and can help to uncover safety faults. As the software is modified and new test cases are added

  11. Test-Suite Reduction and Prioritization for Modified Condition/Decision Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrold, Mary Jean

    Test-Suite Reduction and Prioritization for Modified Condition/Decision Coverage James A. Jones condition/decision coverage (MC/DC) adequate. Despite its cost, there is evidence that MC/DC is an effective verification technique and can help to uncover safety faults. As the software is modified and new test cases

  12. A benchmark suite with virtualized reality models for supporting tracking evaluation and data set generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) Benchmark resources Sharing of benchmarking results A : Datasets GenerateA benchmark suite with virtualized reality models for supporting tracking evaluation and data set laurence.nigay@imag.fr Takeshi Kurata AIST, Japan t.kurata@aist.go.jp Abstract We describe a benchmark

  13. Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand Michael D. Ernst, research advisor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskov, Barbara

    Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand David Saff Michael D. Ernst, research and Subject Descriptors: D.2.5 (Testing and Debug­ ging): Testing tools General Terms: Algorithms, Design, Performance, Verification Keywords: test factoring, mock objects, unit testing 1. Problem: slow, unfocused

  14. On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing Gregg Rothermel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing Gregg Rothermel , Sebastian Elbaum}@cse.unl.edu August 31, 2004 Abstract Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost

  15. Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand Michael D. Ernst, research advisor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskov, Barbara

    Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand David Saff Michael D. Ernst, research and Subject Descriptors: D.2.5 (Testing and Debug- ging): Testing tools General Terms: Algorithms, Design, Performance, Verification Keywords: test factoring, mock objects, unit testing 1. Problem: slow, unfocused

  16. On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing. Gregg Rothermel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing. Gregg Rothermel , Sebastian Elbaum}@cse.unl.edu August 30, 2003 Abstract Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost

  17. How kelp produce blade shapes suited to different flow regimes: A new wrinkle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahadevan, L.

    How kelp produce blade shapes suited to different flow regimes: A new wrinkle M. A. R. Koehl,1,Ã? W bull kelp, Nereocystis luetkeana, to investigate how these ecomorphological differences are produced, strap-like blades of kelp from habitats with rapid flow collapse into streamlined bundles and flutter

  18. STUDIES ON THE GOES-R HYPERSPECTRAL ENVIRONMENTAL SUITE (HES) ON , Timothy, J. Schmit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    resolution infrared radiances from the Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) on Geostationary Operational with capabilities from current sensors. Corresponding author address: Jun Li, Cooperative Institute and 2 km relative humidity (RH) rms were created to evaluate the retrieval difference between LW + LMW

  19. 7900 SE 28th Street, Suite 200 Mercer, Island, WA 98040-2970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7900 SE 28th Street, Suite 200 Mercer, Island, WA 98040-2970 v 206.236.7200 f 206.236.3019 www Administration. The Joint Proposal is a comprehensive settlement that will bring to an end the long costs, when the responsibility for reaching agreements with IPPs, is dispersed directly to the load

  20. Space Suited Crew Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Array A-Z PSE Decoupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    for thermal skirt deployment was utilized. C. TEST FACILITIES Crew Engineering Laboratory, Plt 2. D. TEST: : I Pt ·::., p.~ Space Suited Crew Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Array A-Z PSE Decoupled Shroud (Crew Engineering Mockup) NO. REV. NO. ATM-973 PAGE 1 OF 8 rtems Division DATE Z/9/71 A. INTRCDUC

  1. Unexplored Aspect of Velocity of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhijit Biswas; Krishnan RS Mani

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the post-Maxwellian era, sensing that the tide of discoveries in electromagnetim indicated a decline of the mechanical view, Einstein replaced Newton's three absolutes -- space, time and mass, with a single one, the velocity of light. The magnitude of the velocity of light was first determined and proven to be finite independently by Ole Romer and Bradley in the eighteenth century. In the nineteenth century, Fizeau carried out the first successful measurement of the speed of light using an earthbound apparatus. Thereafter, many earthbound experiments were conducted for its determination till 1983, when its magnitude was frozen at a fixed value after it was determined up to an accuracy level of a fraction of a meter per second. Einstein considered the speed of light derived from terrestrial experiments, to be the limiting speed of all natural phenomena. Einstein stated in connection with his general relativity theory that light rays could curve only when the velocity of propagation of light varies with position. Experiments have been conducted to prove the phenomenon of light deflection to higher and higher accuracy levels, but none so far to determine the speed of light at locations closer to the sun. To verify some essential aspects of general relativity, NASA had commendably planned many costly experiments. Hence, NASA can now be expected to expeditiously plan and execute the low cost experiment proposed here, so as to conclusively verify the effect of the solar gravitational field on the speed of light, as regards the important predictions of Einstein's theory of gravitation and of its remodeled form -- the Remodeled Relativity Theory, which retained and incorporated only experimentally proven concepts and principles.

  2. Velocity-selected molecular pulses produced by an electric guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C.; Motsch, M.; Chervenkov, S.; Buuren, L. D. van; Zeppenfeld, M.; Pinkse, P. W. H.; Rempe, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrostatic velocity filtering is a technique for the production of continuous guided beams of slow polar molecules from a thermal gas. We extended this technique to produce pulses of slow molecules with a narrow velocity distribution around a tunable velocity. The pulses are generated by sequentially switching the voltages on adjacent segments of an electric quadrupole guide synchronously with the molecules propagating at the desired velocity. This technique is demonstrated for deuterated ammonia (ND{sub 3}), delivering pulses with a velocity in the range of 20-100 m/s and a relative velocity spread of (16{+-}2)% at full width at half maximum. At velocities around 60 m/s, the pulses contain up to 10{sup 6} molecules each. The data are well reproduced by Monte Carlo simulations, which provide useful insight into the mechanisms of velocity selection.

  3. Orthogonal-Phase-Velocity Propagation of Electromagnetic Plane Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom G. Mackay; Akhlesh Lakhtakia

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In an isotropic, homogeneous, nondissipative, dielectric-magnetic medium that is simply moving with respect to an inertial reference frame, planewave solutions of the Maxwell curl postulates can be such that the phase velocity and the time-averaged Poynting vector are mutually orthogonal. Orthogonal-phase-velocity propagation thus adds to the conventional positive-phase-velocity propagation and the recently discovered negative-phase-velocity propagation that is associated with the phenomenon of negative refraction.

  4. Experimental investigation of velocity biasing in laser Doppler anemometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiedner, Brian Gregory

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tech University; Chair of Advisory Commettee: Dr. Gerald L. Morrison The effects of several velocity bias reduction schemes were invest- igated using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer and counter type (burst) signal processors. Amongst these schemes... of Sample Size on Effects of Sample Size on Effects of Sample Size on Effects of Sample Size on Velocity and Reynolds Stresses Axial Mean Velocity Radial Mean Velocity Axial Turbulence Intensity Radial Turbulence Intensity Axial/Radial Correlation...

  5. Radial Velocity Variability of Field Brown Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prato, L; Rice, E L; McLean, I S; Kirkpatrick, J D; Burgasser, A J; Kim, S S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R~20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity precision of ~2 km/s, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1 sigma upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included 7 known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant radial velocity variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant ...

  6. Velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretation of seismic velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks has been limited, with few exceptions, to models that assume the melt to be distributed either as spheres or as thin films. However, other melt phase geometries, such as interconnected tubes along grain edges, might equally well account for seismic observations if there is a much larger fraction of melt. Seismic velocity and attenuation are estimated in rocks in which the melt phase has the tube geometry, and the results are compared with results expected for the more familiar film model under similar conditions. For a given melt fraction, tubes are found to give moduli intermediate between moduli for rigid spherical inclusions and compliant films. For example, in polycrystalline olivine at 20 kbar the model predicts a decrease in V/sub s/ of 10% and a decrease in V/sub p/ of 5% at 0.05 melt fraction, without considering inelastic relaxation. Shear attenuation appears to be dominated by viscous flow of melt between the tubes and/or films. For olivine the tube model predicts the increment of relaxation due to melt, ..delta mu../..mu.., to be 0.01 at 0.05 melt fraction. Relaxation of the bulk modulus is dominated by flow between melt pockets of different shape, heat flow, and solid-melt phase change. If melt is present, considerable bulk attenuation is expected, although the relaxation may be observable only at long periods, outside the seismic body wave band.

  7. The Systemic Velocity of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution spectra of molecular hydrogen in the Homunculus nebula allow for the first direct measurement of the systemic velocity of Eta Carinae. Near-infrared long-slit data for H2 1-0 S(1) lambda 21218 obtained with the Phoenix spectrometer on the Gemini South telescope give Vsys=-8.1pm1 km/s (heliocentric), or VLSR=-19.7pm1 km/s, from the average of the near and far sides of the Homunculus. This measurement considerably improves the precision for the value of -7pm10 km/s inferred from neighboring O-type stars in the Carina nebula. New near-infrared spectra also provide a high-resolution line profile of [Fe II] lambda 16435 emission from gas condensations known as the Weigelt objects without contamination from the central star, revealing a line shape with complex kinematic structure. Previously, uncertainty in the Weigelt knots' kinematics was dominated by the adopted systemic velocity of Eta Car.

  8. Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron

  9. Cooling history of lunar Mg-suite gabbronorite 76255, troctolite 76535 and Stillwater pyroxenite SC-936: The record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganguly, Jibamitra

    Cooling history of lunar Mg-suite gabbronorite 76255, troctolite 76535 and Stillwater pyroxenite SC determined cooling rates of orthopyroxene crystals from two Mg-suite lunar samples (gabbronorite 76255), on the basis of their Fe­Mg ordering states. In addition, a cooling rate of 76255 was determined by modeling

  10. NetSim: An Object-Oriented Architectural Simulator Suite David A. Zier, Jarrod A. Nelsen, and Ben Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ben

    NetSim: An Object-Oriented Architectural Simulator Suite David A. Zier, Jarrod A. Nelsen, and Ben {zier, nelsonja, benl}@eecs.oregonstate.edu Abstract NetSim is an object-oriented based architectural simu- lator suite written in C# and uses Microsoft's .NET Framework. NetSim consists of several

  11. Density, porosity, mineralogy, and internal structure of cosmic dust and alteration of its properties during high velocity atmospheric entry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohout, T; Suuronen, J -P; Rochette, P; Hutzler, A; Gattacceca, J; Skála, D D Badjukov R; Böhmová, V; ?uda, J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray microtomography (XMT), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetic hysteresis measurements were used to determine micrometeorite internal structure, mineralogy, crystallography, and physical properties at ~{\\mu}m resolution. The study samples include unmelted, partially melted (scoriaceous) and completely melted (cosmic spherules) micrometeorites. This variety not only allows comparison of the mineralogy and porosity of these three micrometeorite types, but also reveals changes in meteoroid properties during atmospheric entry at various velocities. At low entry velocities, meteoroids do not melt, and their physical properties do not change. The porosity of unmelted micrometeorites varies considerably (0-12%) with one friable example having porosity around 50%. At higher velocities, the range of meteoroid porosity narrows, but average porosity increases (to 16-27%) due to volatile evaporation and partial melting (scoriaceous phase). Metal distribution seems to be mostly unaffected at this stage. At even higher ...

  12. Force-velocity relations for multiple molecular motor transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ziqing

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transition rate model of cargo transportation by N effective molecular motors is proposed. Under the assumption of steady state, the force-velocity curve of multi-motor system can be derived from the force-velocity curve of single motor. Our work shows, in the case of low load, the velocity of multi-motor system can decrease or increase with increasing motor number, which is dependent on the single motor force-velocity curve. And most commonly, the velocity decreases. This gives a possible explanation to some recent experimental observations.

  13. Force-velocity relations for multiple-molecular-motor transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziqing Wang; Ming Li

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transition rate model of cargo transport by $N$ molecular motors is proposed. Under the assumption of steady state, the force-velocity curve of multi-motor system can be derived from the force-velocity curve of single motor. Our work shows, in the case of low load, the velocity of multi-motor system can decrease or increase with increasing motor number, which is dependent on the single motor force-velocity curve. And most commonly, the velocity decreases. This gives a possible explanation to some recent

  14. Introduction The Smith Cloud is a high velocity cloud with a radial velocity near

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    .8 ­ 15.1 kpc (Wakker et al. 2008). Lockman et al. (2008) presented an H I survey of the cloud using the off and on spectra of each line to a single atmospheric template, which we then subtracted from velocities, Figure 2 shows ON­OFF spectra with no atmospheric template for this line. Like Bland-Hawthorn et

  15. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  16. Scaling of convective velocity in a vertically vibrated granular bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya M. Yamada; Hiroaki Katsuragi

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study the velocity scaling of granular convection which is a possible mechanism of the regolith migration on the surface of small asteroids. In order to evaluate the contribution of granular convection to the regolith migration, the velocity of granular convection under the microgravity condition has to be revealed. Although it is hard to control the gravitational acceleration in laboratory experiments, scaling relations involving the gravitational effect can be evaluated by systematic experiments. Therefore, we perform such a systematic experiment of the vibration-induced granular convection. From the experimental data, a scaling form for the granular convective velocity is obtained. The obtained scaling form implies that the granular convective velocity can be decomposed into two characteristic velocity components: vibrational and gravitational velocities. In addition, the system size dependence is also scaled. According to the scaling form, the granular convective velocity $v$ depends on the gravitational acceleration $g$ as $v \\propto g^{0.97}$ when the normalized vibrational acceleration is fixed.

  17. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States)] [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany) [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  18. Transit Detection of Radial Velocity Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen R. Kane; Kaspar von Braun

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The orbital parameters of extra-solar planets have a significant impact on the probability that the planet will transit the host star. This was recently demonstrated by the transit detection of HD 17156b whose favourable eccentricity and argument of periastron dramatically increased its transit likelihood. We present a study which provides a quantitative analysis of how these two orbital parameters effect the geometric transit probability as a function of period. Further, we apply these results to known radial velocity planets and show that there are unexpectedly high transit probabilities for planets at relatively long periods. For a photometric monitoring campaign which aims to determine if the planet indeed transits, we calculate the significance of a null result and the subsequent constraints that may be applied to orbital parameters.

  19. Correlation of bubble rise velocity and volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burge, C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was conducted at Westinghouse`s Savannah River Laboratories (SRL). The goal of SRL is to make certain that the modifications on the reactor are safe for those working at the plant as well as the general public. One of the steps needed to insure safety is the knowledge of the occurrences that result from a plenum pipe breakage. When a plenum pipe breaks, two things occur: air is sucked into the pipe and is trapped in the cooling water; and water used to cool the fuel rods is lost. As a result of these occurrences, the water is slowed down by both the loss in water pressure and the upward force of air bubbles pushing against the downward force of the water. The project required the conducting of tests to find the bubble velocity in an annular ribbed pipe filled with stagnant water. This document discusses the methodology and results of this testing.

  20. Correlation of bubble rise velocity and volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burge, C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was conducted at Westinghouse's Savannah River Laboratories (SRL). The goal of SRL is to make certain that the modifications on the reactor are safe for those working at the plant as well as the general public. One of the steps needed to insure safety is the knowledge of the occurrences that result from a plenum pipe breakage. When a plenum pipe breaks, two things occur: air is sucked into the pipe and is trapped in the cooling water; and water used to cool the fuel rods is lost. As a result of these occurrences, the water is slowed down by both the loss in water pressure and the upward force of air bubbles pushing against the downward force of the water. The project required the conducting of tests to find the bubble velocity in an annular ribbed pipe filled with stagnant water. This document discusses the methodology and results of this testing.

  1. Towards the Integration of APECS and VE-Suite for Virtual Power Plant Co-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.E.; McCorkle, D. (Iowa State University, Ames, IA); Yang, C. (Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT); Jordan, T.; Swensen, D. (Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT); Bryden, M. (Iowa State University, Ames, IA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process modeling and simulation tools are widely used for the design and operation of advanced power generation systems. These tools enable engineers to solve the critical process systems engineering problems that arise throughout the lifecycle of a power plant, such as designing a new process, troubleshooting a process unit or optimizing operations of the full process. To analyze the impact of complex thermal and fluid flow phenomena on overall power plant performance, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has developed the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The APECS system is an integrated software suite that combines process simulation (e.g., Aspen Plus) and high-fidelity equipment simulations such as those based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD), together with advanced analysis capabilities including case studies, sensitivity analysis, stochastic simulation for risk/uncertainty analysis, and multi-objective optimization. In this paper we discuss the initial phases of the integration of the APECS system with the immersive and interactive virtual engineering software, VE-Suite, developed at Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory. VE-Suite uses the ActiveX (OLE Automation) controls in the Aspen Plus process simulator wrapped by the CASI library developed by Reaction Engineering International to run process/CFD co-simulations and query for results. This integration represents a necessary step in the development of virtual power plant co-simulations that will ultimately reduce the time, cost, and technical risk of developing advanced power generation systems.

  2. Molecular extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gases and wave velocities for increasing number of moments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arima, Takashi, E-mail: tks@stat.nitech.ac.jp [Center for Social Contribution and Collaboration, Nagoya Institute of Technology (Japan); Mentrelli, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.mentrelli@unibo.it [Department of Mathematics and Research Center of Applied Mathematics (CIRAM), University of Bologna (Italy); Ruggeri, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.ruggeri@unibo.it [Department of Mathematics and Research Center of Applied Mathematics (CIRAM), University of Bologna (Italy)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gases is characterized by two hierarchies of equations for moments of a suitable distribution function in which the internal degrees of freedom of a molecule is taken into account. On the basis of physical relevance the truncation orders of the two hierarchies are proven to be not independent on each other, and the closure procedures based on the maximum entropy principle (MEP) and on the entropy principle (EP) are proven to be equivalent. The characteristic velocities of the emerging hyperbolic system of differential equations are compared to those obtained for monatomic gases and the lower bound estimate for the maximum equilibrium characteristic velocity established for monatomic gases (characterized by only one hierarchy for moments with truncation order of moments N) by Boillat and Ruggeri (1997) (?{sub (N)}{sup E,max})/(c{sub 0}) ??(6/5 (N?1/2 )),(c{sub 0}=?(5/3 k/m T)) is proven to hold also for rarefied polyatomic gases independently from the degrees of freedom of a molecule. -- Highlights: •Molecular extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gases is studied. •The relation between two hierarchies of equations for moments is derived. •The equivalence of maximum entropy principle and entropy principle is proven. •The characteristic velocities are compared to those of monatomic gases. •The lower bound of the maximum characteristic velocity is estimated.

  3. LANL | Physics | High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the intensity frontier On the trail of one of the greatest mysteries in physics, researchers on the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) seek to discover why...

  4. Time-resolved particle velocity measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypervelocity launch capabilities (9--16 km/s) with macroscopic plates have become available in recent years. It is now feasible to conduct instrumented plane-wave tests using this capability. Successfully conducting such tests requires a planar launch and impact at hypervelocities, appropriate triggering for recording systems, and time-resolved measurements of motion or stress at a particular point or set of points within the target or projectile during impact. The authors have conducted the first time-resolved wave-profile experiments using velocity interferometric techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that aluminum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa shock pressure, with complete loss of strength of the shocked state. These experiments have allowed a determination of shock-wave window transparency in conditions produced by a hypervelocity impact. In particular, lithium fluoride appears to lose transparency at a shock stress of 200 GPa; this appears to be the upper limit for conventional wave profile measurements using velocity interferometric techniques.

  5. Terminal Velocity Infall in QSO Absorption Line Halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert A. Benjamin

    1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the hypothesis that clouds detected in quasar absorption line systems are falling at a terminal velocity toward the center of high redshift gaseous galactic halos. Since both the ionization level and terminal velocity of halo clouds increase with increasing distance from the central galaxy, velocity resolved profiles of highly ionized gas are predicted to have a greater width than low ionization gas. A line of sight passing through the center of gaseous halo (an idealized damped Ly alpha system), yields low ionization absorption at the velocity of the galaxy, flanked by high ionization on either side. Reasonable halo parameters yield total velocity extents for C IV of v_{C IV}=100-200 km/s, in agreement with several observed systems. The remaining systems may better described by the rotating disk model of Prochaska & Wolfe (1998). Finally, observational tests are suggested for verifying or falsifying the terminal velocity hypothesis for these systems.

  6. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

  7. True Masses of Radial-Velocity Exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Robert A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the science power of space telescopes used to estimate the true masses of known radial-velocity exoplanets by means of astrometry on direct images. We translate a desired mass accuracy (+/10% in our example) into a minimum goal for the signal-to-noise ratio, which implies a minimum exposure time. When the planet is near a node, the mass measurement becomes difficult if not impossible, because the apparent separation becomes decoupled from the inclination angle of the orbit. The combination of this nodal effect with considerations of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, and image blurring due to orbital motion, severely limits the observing opportunities, often to only brief intervals in a five-year mission. We compare the science power of four missions, two with external star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, and two with internal coronagraphs, EXO-C and WFIRST-C. The star shades out-perform the coronagraph in this science program by about a factor of th...

  8. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA); Brodeur, Pierre H. (Smyrna, GA); Jackson, Theodore G. (Atlanta, GA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

  9. High strain rate metalworking with vaporizing foil actuator: Control of flyer velocity by varying input energy and foil thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek, A., E-mail: vivek.4@osu.edu; Hansen, S. R.; Daehn, Glenn S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041, College Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically driven rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils can generate a high pressure which can be used to launch flyers at high velocities. Recently, vaporizing foil actuators have been applied toward a variety of impulse-based metal working operations. In order to exercise control over this useful tool, it is imperative that an understanding of the effect of characteristics of the foil actuator on its ability for mechanical impulse generation is developed. Here, foil actuators made out of 0.0508 mm, 0.0762 mm, and 0.127 mm thick AA1145 were used for launching AA2024-T3 sheets of thickness 0.508 mm toward a photonic Doppler velocimeter probe. Launch velocities ranging between 300 m/s and 1100 m/s were observed. In situ measurement of velocity, current, and voltage assisted in understanding the effect of burst current density and deposited electrical energy on average pressure and velocity with foil actuators of various thicknesses. For the pulse generator, geometry, and flyer used here, the 0.0762 mm thick foil was found to be optimal for launching flyers to high velocities over short distances. Experimenting with annealed foil actuators resulted in no change in the temporal evolution of flyer velocity as compared to foil actuators of full hard temper. A physics-based analytical model was developed and found to have reasonable agreement with experiment.

  10. The Euler Legacy to Modern Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Dattoli; M. Del Franco

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Particular families of special functions, conceived as purely mathematical devices between the end of XVIII and the beginning of XIX centuries, have played a crucial role in the development of many aspects of modern Physics. This is indeed the case of the Euler gamma function, which has been one of the key elements paving the way to string theories, furthermore the Euler-Riemann Zeta function has played a decisive role in the development of renormalization theories. The ideas of Euler and later those of Riemann, Ramanujan and of other, less popular, mathematicians have therefore provided the mathematical apparatus ideally suited to explore, and eventually solve, problems of fundamental importance in modern Physics. The mathematical foundations of the theory of renormalization trace back to the work on divergent series by Euler and by mathematicians of two centuries ago. Feynman, Dyson, Schwinger... rediscovered most of these mathematical "curiosities" and were able to develop a new and powerful way of looking at physical phenomena.

  11. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion University; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion University; Park, HyeKyoung [JLAB

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, ?0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, ?0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  12. Limiting velocities as running parameters and superluminal neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed M. Anber; John F. Donoghue

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of theories where particles can have different limiting velocities, we review the running of particle speeds towards a common limiting velocity at low energy. Motivated by the recent OPERA experimental results, we describe a model where the neutrinos would deviate from the common velocity by more than do other particles in the theory, because their running is slower due to weaker interactions.

  13. Lie-admissible approach to ''extended relativity. '' I. Nonlinear velocity, mass, and charge transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Animalu, A.O.E.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to the ''extended relativity'' principle proposed by Recami, Mignani, and others, in which the speed of light (c) is invariant with respect to both subluminal (vc) linear generalized Lorentz transformations in vacuum, is presented, in order to take into account some novel nonlinear velocity transformations (v, V) ..-->.. (v', V'), associated with changes in motion at the interface between vacuum and a deformable hadronic medium, envisaged in Santilli's notion of quarks as mutations of physical leptons (''eletons'') inside hadrons. The new approach demands a generalization of the usual ralation (vV = c/sup 2/) between subluminal and superluminal inertial frames or objects to the (Lie-admissible) form (vV = c/sup 2/ = V'/sup 2/-v'/sup 2/), which is tantamount to a principle of relativistic invariance in velocity space.

  14. Space-time attributes of physical objects and the laws of space-time physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Field

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical time intervals are attributes of single physical object whereas physical space intervals are a relational attribute of two physical objects. Some consequences of the breaking of the space-time exchange symmetry inherent in the Lorentz transformation following from the above distinction are investigated. In particular, it is shown that the relativity of simultaneity and length contraction effects which naively follow from space-time symmetry of the Lorentz transformation do not occur. Seven laws describing the relation between observations of space intervals, time intervals and velocities in different reference frames are given. Only two of these laws are respected by conventional special relativity theory.

  15. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 35400

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    , electromagnetic waves in vacuum and in matter, guided waves ­ transmission lines and waveguides, electromagnetic-varying sources 7. calculate the electromagnetic radiation fields and power emitted for electric dipole sources 8DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 35400 Electricity and Magnetism II Designation

  16. acoustic wave velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the offered analytical method the determinant relation for a phase velocities of elastic waves for an arbitrary propagation directions in a piezoelectric crystal are received. The...

  17. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  18. adiabatic burning velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: burning velocities under conditions for which the net heat loss of the flame is zero. Very similar values, France 2 IFP Energies nouvelles, 1 et...

  19. Modified definition of group velocity and electromagnetic energy conservation equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical definition of group velocity has two flaws: (a) the group velocity can be greater than the phase velocity in a non-dispersive, lossless, non-conducting, anisotropic uniform medium; (b) the definition is not consistent with the principle of relativity for a plane wave in a moving isotropic uniform medium. To remove the flaws, a modified definition is proposed. A criterion is set up to identify the justification of group velocity definition. A "superluminal power flow" is constructed to show that the electromagnetic energy conservation equation cannot uniquely define the power flow if the principle of Fermat is not taken into account.

  20. USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP...

  1. Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Field California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

  2. A novel photonic Doppler velocimetry for transverse velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Guanghua; Wang Detian; Liu Jun; Meng Jianhua; Liu Shouxian; Yang Qingguo [Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-109, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber interferometry for transverse velocity measurement has been developed. This diagnostic is similar to photonic Doppler velocimetry in the way in which laser propagates and couples. The interferometer mainly consists of a fiber coupler, an emitting probe, and two receiving probes. A pair of scattered laser beams mix in the coupler and generates fringes with frequency proportional to transverse velocity. Measurement of transverse velocity is independent of longitudinal velocity. The feasibility of the technique has been verified by rotating wheel experiment and shock loading experiment.

  3. Determination of Surface Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved Atomic Desorption. Abstract: We have developed a new method for determining surface exciton band energies in alkali halides based on...

  4. Line bisectors and radial velocity jitter from SARG spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Martinez Fiorenzano; R. G. Gratton; S. Desidera; R. Cosentino; M. Endl

    2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of spectral line bisector variations for a few stars observed in the SARG high precision radial velocity planet survey, and discuss their relationship with differential radial velocities. The spectra we consider are the same used for determining radial velocities. The iodine cell lines employed in the measurement of radial velocities were removed before bisector analysis. The line bisectors were then computed from average absorption profiles obtained by cross correlation of the stellar spectra with a mask made from suitable lines of a solar catalog. Bisector velocity spans were then determined: errors in these quantities compare well with theoretical expectations based on resolution, S/N and line shape. The plot of bisector velocity span against radial velocity was studied to search for correlations between line asymmetries and radial velocity variations. A correlation was seen for HD 166435 due to stellar activity, and for HD 8071B due to spectral contamination by the companion. No correlation was seen for 51 Peg and rho CrB, stars hosting planets. We conclude that this technique may be useful to separate radial velocity variations due to barycenter motion from spurious signals in spectra acquired with the iodine cell.

  5. air stream velocities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the early universe, substantial relative "stream" velocities between the gas and dark matter arise due to radiation pressure and persist after recombination. To asses the impact...

  6. Note: A helical velocity selector for continuous molecular beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szewc, Carola; Collier, James D.; Ulbricht, Hendrik [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a modern realization of the classic helical velocity selector for gas phase particle beams. The device operates stably under high vacuum conditions at rotational frequencies limited only by commercial dc motor capabilities. Tuning the rotational frequency allows selective scanning over a broad velocity band. The width of the selected velocity distributions at full-width-half-maximum is as narrow as a few percent of the selected mean velocity and independent of the rotational speed of the selector. The selector generates low vibrational noise amplitudes comparable to mechanically damped state-of-the-art turbo-molecular pumps and is therefore compatible with vibration sensitive experiments like molecule interferometry.

  7. Name Phone Location Email Aebel, Barbara 362-3700 CSRB-NTA Suite 200, Room 223 barbara@wustl.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Kristen L.

    @path.wustl.edu Anderson, Mary Ann 935-7009 Danforth Campus - North Brookings maryann_anderson@wustl.edu Felton, Michele@wustl.edu Anderson, Margie 454-8101 Cytogenetics - Cortex Building, 4320 Forest Park, Suite 209 manderson

  8. Compact, Isolated High-Velocity Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Burton; R. Braun; V. de Heij

    2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider here the class of compact, isolated, high-velocity HI clouds, CHVCs, which are sharply bounded in angular extent down to a limiting column density of 1.5x10^18 cm^-2. We describe our automated search algorithm and it's application to the LDS north of dec= -28 deg. and the HIPASS data south of dec=0, resulting in an all--sky catalog numbering 246 CHVCs. We argue that these objects are more likely to represent a single phenomenon in a similar evolutionary state than would a sample which included any of the major HVC complexes. Five principal observables are defined for the CHVC population: (1) the spatial deployment of the objects on the sky, (2) the kinematic distribution, (3) the number distribution of observed HI column densities, (4) the number distribution of angular sizes, and (5) the number distribution of line widths. We show that the spatial and kinematic deployments of the ensemble of CHVCs contain various clues regarding their characteristic distance. These clues are not compatible with a location of the ensemble within the Galaxy proper. The deployments resemble in several regards those of the Local Group galaxies. We describe a model testing the hypothesis that the CHVCs are a Local Group population. The agreement of the model with the data is judged by extracting the observables from simulations, in a manner consistent with the sensitivities of the observations and explicitly taking account of Galactic obscuration. We show that models in which the CHVCs are the HI counterparts of dark-matter halos evolving in the Local Group potential provide a good match to the observables, if account is taken of tidal and ram--pressure disruption, the consequences of obscuration due to Galactic HI and of differing sensitivities and selection effects pertaining to the surveys.

  9. Nonlinear peculiar-velocity analysis and PCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dekel, A. [and others

    2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We allow for nonlinear effects in the likelihood analysis of peculiar velocities, and obtain {approximately}35%-lower values for the cosmological density parameter and for the amplitude of mass-density fluctuations. The power spectrum in the linear regime is assumed to be of the flat {Lambda}CDM model (h = 0:65, n = 1) with only {Omega}{sub m} free. Since the likelihood is driven by the nonlinear regime, we break the power spectrum at k{sub b} {approximately} 0.2 (h{sup {minus}1} Mpc){sup {minus}1} and fit a two-parameter power-law at k > k{sub b} . This allows for an unbiased fit in the linear regime. Tests using improved mock catalogs demonstrate a reduced bias and a better fit. We find for the Mark III and SFI data {Omega}{sub m} = 0.35 {+-} 0.09 with {sigma}{sub 8}{Omega}P{sub m}{sup 0.6} = 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (90% errors). When allowing deviations from {Lambda}CDM, we find an indication for a wiggle in the power spectrum in the form of an excess near k {approximately} 0.05 and a deficiency at k {approximately} 0.1 (h{sup {minus}1} Mpc){sup {minus}1}--a cold flow which may be related to a feature indicated from redshift surveys and the second peak in the CMB anisotropy. A {chi}{sup 2} test applied to principal modes demonstrates that the nonlinear procedure improves the goodness of fit. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) helps identifying spatial features of the data and fine-tuning the theoretical and error models. We address the potential for optimal data compression using PCA.

  10. Theoretical Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a hierarchy problem? Are there new physical principles at the TeV scale? Is the Higgs boson a fundamental particle or composite, like a pion? What is the final state of...

  11. Physical Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of...

  12. Towards Understanding Stellar Radial Velocity Jitter as a Function of Wavelength: The Sun as a Proxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchwinski, Robert C; Robertson, Paul; Ramsey, Lawrence; Harder, Jerald

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using solar spectral irradiance measurements from the SORCE spacecraft and the F/F' technique, we have estimated the radial velocity (RV) scatter induced on the Sun by stellar activity as a function of wavelength. Our goal was to evaluate the potential advantages of using new near-infrared (NIR) spectrographs to search for low-mass planets around bright F, G, and K stars by beating down activity effects. Unlike M dwarfs, which have higher fluxes and therefore greater RV information content in the NIR, solar-type stars are brightest at visible wavelengths, and, based solely on information content, are better suited to traditional optical RV surveys. However, we find that the F/F' estimated RV noise induced by stellar activity is diminished by up to a factor of 4 in the NIR versus the visible. Observations with the upcoming future generation of NIR instruments can be a valuable addition to the search for low-mass planets around bright FGK stars in reducing the amount of stellar noise affecting RV measurements.

  13. The Carmen-Suite: Maya Plisetskaya Challenging Soviet Culture and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalashnikova, Anna

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    or the character, and affect or express the performer’s identity. To examine the legacy of the Carmen-Suite today, I will use Victor Turner’s work “Social Dramas and Stories About Them” and Mikhail Bakhtin’s essay “Art and Answerability.” Theorizing Carmen... detachment and choreographic indifference and will argue that intimacy is the factor that influences the ballerina’s placement of the continuum of choreographic empathy – choreographic detachment/indifference. Finally, I will apply Mikhail Bakhtin’s concept...

  14. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moos, Daniel (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  15. Measurements of Laminar Flame Velocity for Components of Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    flame velocity of components of natural gas, methane, ethane, propane, and nbutane as well as of binary% by volume (1). The laminar flame velocities of methane/air, ethane/air, and propane/air mixtures have on a plenum chamber with the radial temperature distribution measurement made by a series of thermocouples

  16. A laser Doppler method for noninvasive measurement of flow velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, G.L.

    1986-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Doppler velocimetry is a powerful optical technique for noninvasively obtaining experimental flow-velocity data. This paper describes the principle of operation and various optical configurations of the laser Doppler velocimeter. As a sample application, we describe an experimental apparatus for measuring the velocity flow field around a cylinder, and give our experimental results.

  17. A comparison of light and velocity variations in Semiregular variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Lebzelter; L. L. Kiss; K. H. Hinkle

    2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    NIR velocity variations are compared with simultaneous visual light curves for a sample of late-type semiregular variables (SRV). Precise radial velocity measurements are also presented for the SRV V450 Aql. Our aim is to investigate the nature of the irregular light changes found in these variables. Light and velocity variations are correlated in all stars of our sample. Based on these results we discuss several possibilities to explain the observed behavior. We find that pulsation is responsible for large amplitude variations. In a recent paper Lebzelter (1999) invoked large convective cells to understand observed velocity variations. This possibility is discussed with respect to the observed correlation between light and velocity changes. In the light of these results we investigate the origin of the semiregular variations.

  18. Precision Measuring of Velocities via the Relativistic Doppler Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonid M. Ozernoy

    1997-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Just as the ordinary Doppler effect serves as a tool to measure radial velocities of celestial objects, so can the relativistic Doppler effect be implemented to measure a combination of radial and transverse velocities by using recent improvements in observing techniques. A key element that makes a further use of this combination feasible is the periodicity in changes of the orbital velocity direction for the source. Two cases are considered: (i) a binary star; and (ii) a solitary star with the planetary companion. It is shown that, in case (i), several precision Doppler measurements employing the gas absorption cell technique would determine both the total orbital velocity and the inclination angle of the binary orbit disentangled from the peculiar velocity of the system. The necessary condition for that is the measured, at least with a modest precision, proper motion and distance to the system.

  19. Precision Measuring of Velocities via the Relativistic Doppler Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozernoy, L M

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Just as the ordinary Doppler effect serves as a tool to measure radial velocities of celestial objects, so can the relativistic Doppler effect be implemented to measure a combination of radial and transverse velocities by using recent improvements in observing techniques. A key element that makes a further use of this combination feasible is the periodicity in changes of the orbital velocity direction for the source. Two cases are considered: (i) a binary star; and (ii) a solitary star with the planetary companion. It is shown that, in case (i), several precision Doppler measurements employing the gas absorption cell technique would determine both the total orbital velocity and the inclination angle of the binary orbit disentangled from the peculiar velocity of the system. The necessary condition for that is the measured, at least with a modest precision, proper motion and distance to the system.

  20. Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

  1. REVIEW OF PARTICLE PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beringer, Juerg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    387 Colliders, accelerator physics of Coverage Color octet50, 974 Accelerator physics offor non-accelerator physics . . . . . . . . . 368 Number

  2. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symposium on Accelerator Physics (1994). "The Development ofcolliders", Accelerator Physics at the Superconducting Superaccelerators, accelerator physics, linear colliders, heavy

  3. Planetary Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear AstrophysicsPayroll,Physics Physics An error

  4. Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear AstrophysicsPayroll,Physics Physics An

  5. Westerbork HI observations of high-velocity clouds near M31 and M33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Westmeier; R. Braun; D. Thilker

    2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have undertaken high-resolution follow-up of a sample of high velocity HI clouds apparently associated with M31. Our sample was chosen from the population of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) detected out to 50 kpc projected radius of the Andromeda Galaxy by Thilker et al. (2004) with the Green Bank Telescope. Nine pointings were observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope to determine the physical parameters of these objects and to find clues to their origin. One additional pointing was directed at a similar object near M33. At 2' resolution we detect 16 individual HVCs around M31 and 1 HVC near M33 with typical HI masses of a few times 10^5 solar masses and sizes of the order of 1 kpc. Estimates of the dynamical and virial masses of some of the HVCs indicate that they are likely gravitationally dominated by additional mass components such as dark matter or ionised gas. Twelve of the clouds are concentrated in an area of only 1 by 1 degree at a projected separation of less than 15 kpc from the disk of M31. This HVC complex has a rather complicated morphological and kinematical structure and partly overlaps with the giant stellar stream of M31, suggesting a tidal origin. Another detected feature is in close proximity, in both position and velocity, with NGC 205, perhaps also indicative of tidal processes. Other HVCs in our survey are isolated and might represent primordial, dark-matter dominated clouds.

  6. Physics 15030401 Special Topics in Modern Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Randy

    Physics 15­030­401 Special Topics in Modern Physics Probability and Statistics for Physics Randy Johnson Summer, '96 Text Bevington and Robinson, Data Reduction and Error Analysis for the Physical Physics. Eardie, Drijard, James, Roos, and Sadoulet, Statistical Methods in Experimental Physics. Roe

  7. Continued Evaluation of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 12518

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will be governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. In 2010 Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory began evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to accurately identify critical velocities in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of >50 micrometers. In 2011 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated to identify critical velocities for slurries containing fast-settling, high-density particles with a mean particle diameter of <15 micrometers. This two-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  8. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of interests under the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) purview ranging from facilities, buildings, Government property, and employees to national security interests such as classified information, special nuclear material (SNM), and nuclear weapons. Cancels Section A of DOE M 470.4-2 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

  9. Stellar Velocity Dispersion of the Leo A Dwarf Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren R. Brown; Margaret J. Geller; Scott J. Kenyon; Michael J. Kurtz

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the first stellar velocity dispersion of the Leo A dwarf galaxy, \\sigma = 9.3 +- 1.3 km/s. We derive the velocity dispersion from the radial velocities of ten young B supergiants and two HII regions in the central region of Leo A. We estimate a projected mass of 8 +- 2.7 x10^7 solar masses within a radius of 2 arcmin, and a mass to light ratio of at least 20 +- 6 M_sun/L_sun. These results imply Leo A is at least ~80% dark matter by mass.

  10. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qin, Hong [PPPL; Davidson, Ronald C. [PPPL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  11. Measuring Oscillatory Velocity Fields Due to Swimming Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guasto, Jeffrey S; Gollub, J P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this fluid dynamics video, we present the first time-resolved measurements of the oscillatory velocity field induced by swimming unicellular microorganisms. Confinement of the green alga C. reinhardtii in stabilized thin liquid films allows simultaneous tracking of cells and tracer particles. The measured velocity field reveals complex time-dependent flow structures, and scales inversely with distance. The instantaneous mechanical power generated by the cells is measured from the velocity fields and peaks at 15 fW. The dissipation per cycle is more than four times what steady swimming would require.

  12. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  13. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  14. Report of IAU Commission 30 on Radial Velocities (2009-2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, G; Lovis, C; Marcy, G W; Mathieu, R D; Mazeh, T; Meibom, S; Minniti, D; Moutou, C; Pepe, F; Pourbaix, D; Turon, C; Udry, S; Zwitter, T

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief summaries are given of the following subjects of interest to IAU Commission 30: Large-scale radial-velocity surveys; The role of radial-velocity measurements in studies of stellar angular momentum evolution and stellar age; Radial velocities in open clusters; Toward higher radial-velocity precision; High-precision radial velocities applied to studies of binary stars; Doppler boosting effect; Working groups (Stellar radial velocity bibliography; Radial velocity standards; Catalogue of orbital elements of spectroscopic binaries [SB9]).

  15. The Kinematic and Spatial Deployment of Compact, Isolated High-Velocity Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Braun; W. B. Burton

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We have identified a class of high-velocity clouds which are compact and apparently isolated. The clouds are compact in that they have angular sizes less than 2 degrees FWHM. They are isolated in that they are separated from neighboring emission by expanses where no emission is seen to the detection limit of the available data. Candidates for inclusion in this class were extracted from the Leiden/Dwingeloo HI survey of Hartmann & Burton and from the Wakker & van Woerden catalogue of high-velocity clouds. The candidates were subject to independent confirmation using either the 25-meter telescope in Dwingeloo or the 140-foot telescope in Green Bank. We argue that the resulting list, even if incomplete, is sufficiently representative of the ensemble of compact, isolated HVCs - CHVCs - that the characteristics of their disposition on the sky, and of their kinematics, are revealing of some physical aspects of the class. The CHVCs are in fact distributed quite uniformly across the sky. A global search for the reference frame which minimizes the velocity dispersion of the ensemble returns the Local Group Standard of Rest with high confidence. The CHVCs are not stationary with respect to this reference frame but have a mean infall velocity of 100 km/s. These properties are strongly suggestive of a population which has as yet had little interaction with the more massive Local Group members. At a typical distance of about 1 Mpc these objects would have sizes of about 15 kpc and gas masses, M_HI, of a few times 10^7 M_Sun, corresponding to those of (sub-)dwarf galaxies. (abridged)

  16. Verification and Validation of Carbon-Fiber Laminate Low Velocity Impact Simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    English, Shawn Allen; Nelson, Stacy Michelle; Briggs, Timothy; Brown, Arthur

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented is a model verification and validation effort using low - velocity impact (LVI) of carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminate experiments. A flat cylindrical indenter impacts the laminate with enough energy to produce delamination, matrix cracks and fiber breaks. Included in the experimental efforts are ultrasonic scans of the damage for qualitative validation of the models. However, the primary quantitative metrics of validation are the force time history measured through the instrumented indenter and initial and final velocities. The simulations, whi ch are run on Sandia's Sierra finite element codes , consist of all physics and material parameters of importance as determined by a sensitivity analysis conducted on the LVI simulation. A novel orthotropic damage and failure constitutive model that is cap able of predicting progressive composite damage and failure is described in detail and material properties are measured, estimated from micromechanics or optimized through calibration. A thorough verification and calibration to the accompanying experiment s are presented. Specia l emphasis is given to the four - point bend experiment. For all simulations of interest, the mesh and material behavior is verified through extensive convergence studies. An ensemble of simulations incorporating model parameter unc ertainties is used to predict a response distribution which is then compared to experimental output. The result is a quantifiable confidence in material characterization and model physics when simulating this phenomenon in structures of interest.

  17. Multipole seismoelectric logging while drilling (LWD) for acoustic velocity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhenya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In seismoelectric well logging, an acoustic wave propagates along a borehole and induces electrical signals along the borehole wall. The apparent velocities of these seismoelectric signals are equal to the formation ...

  18. CO and IRAS detection of an intermediate-velocity cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desert, F.X.; Bazell, D.; Blitz, L. (Paris Observatoire, Meudon (France) Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (USA) Maryland Univ., College Park (USA))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the course of a radio survey of high-Galactic-latitude clouds, CO emission was detected at the position l = 210.8 deg and b = 63.1 deg with an LSR velocity of -39 km/sec. This molecular cloud constitutes the third one with an unusually large absolute velocity at these latitudes, as compared with the 5.4-km/sec cloud-to-cloud velocity dispersion of the high-latitude molecular clouds. The position is coincident with an H I intermediate-velocity cloud (GHL 11, Verschuur H, OLM 268) and the IR-excess cloud 306 in the list by Desert et al. (1988). This cloud is clearly detected at all four IRAS wavelengths and has warmer colors than the local ISM. 27 refs.

  19. P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    times Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: P wave velocity variations in the Coso region, California, derived from local earthquake...

  20. LOW VELOCITY SHPERE IMPACT OF SODA LIME SILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity ( 30 m/s or 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations.

  1. air velocity distribution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Carbon isotope evidence for the latitudinal distribution and wind speed dependence of the air-sea gas transfer velocity University of California eScholarship...

  2. Superluminal Velocity of Photons in a Gravitational Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich

    1994-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of radiative corrections on the photon propagation in a gravitational background is investigated without the low-frequency approximation $\\omega \\ll m$. The conclusion is made in this way that the velocity of light can exceed unity.

  3. artery peak velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The time series analysis of Doppler velocity maps show enhanced power in the sunspot umbra at higher frequencies and in the penumbra at lower frequencies. We find that the peak...

  4. Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    issue at this field is the distribution of fluid in the matrix of the reservoir rock. In this paper, we interpret seismic compressional-wave velocity and quality quotient...

  5. Effective velocities in fractured media: a numerical study using the ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    theories that predict the effective P- and S-wave velocities in fractured materials in ... can be treated only by numerical techniques because analyt- ... apply the rotated staggered grid (Saenger, Gold and Shapiro ..... (r ? 0:2) and for SH-

  6. Waste Authority wins 8th law suit against resource recovery project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cornerstone of a series of legal challenges launched against the plan to build a waste-to-energy resource recovery plant in the Port Washington sandpits has been dismissed by the New York State Supreme Court in favor of the North Hempstead Solid Waste Management Authority. The dismissal marks the fourth unsuccessful attempt by Residents for A More Beautiful Port Washington to have the environmental review performed by the Town's Solid Waste Management Authority overturned on the contention that it should have been performed by the State. The Residents law suit sought to have the entire two and one half year environmental review performed by the Solid Waste Management Authority discarded and redone by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

  7. LP-VIcode: a program to compute a suite of variational chaos indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. D. Carpintero; N. P. Maffione; L. A. Darriba

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An important point in analysing the dynamics of a given stellar or planetary system is the reliable identification of the chaotic or regular behaviour of its orbits. We introduce here the program LP-VIcode, a fully operational code which efficiently computes a suite of ten variational chaos indicators for dynamical systems in any number of dimensions. The user may choose to simultaneously compute any number of chaos indicators among the following: the Lyapunov Exponents, the Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits, the Slope Estimation of the largest Lyapunov Characteristic Exponent, the Smaller ALignment Index, the Generalized ALignment Index, the Fast Lyapunov Indicator, the Othogonal Fast Lyapunov Indicator, the dynamical Spectra of Stretching Numbers, the Spectral Distance, and the Relative Lyapunov Indicator. They are combined in an efficient way, allowing the sharing of differential equations whenever this is possible, and the individual stopping of their computation when any of them saturates.

  8. Pore fluid effects on seismic velocity in anisotropic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple new technique predicts the high- and low-frequency saturated velocities in anisotropic rocks entirely in terms of measurable dry rock properties without the need for idealized crack geometries. Measurements of dry velocity versus pressure and porosity versus pressure contain all of the necessary information for predicting the frequency-dependent effects of fluid saturation. Furthermore, these measurements automatically incorporate all pore interaction, so there is no limitation to low crack density. The velocities are found to depend on five key interrelated variables: frequency, the distribution of compliant crack-like porosity, the intrinsic or noncrack anisotropy, fluid viscosity and compressibility, and effective pressure. The sensitivity of velocities to saturation is generally greater at high frequencies than low frequencies. The magnitude of the differences from dry to saturated and from low frequency to high frequency is determined by the compliant or crack-like porosity. Predictions of saturated velocities based on dry data for sandstone and granite show that compressional velocities generally increase with saturation and with frequency. However, the degree of compressional wave anisotropy may either increase or decrease upon saturation depending on the crack distribution, the effective pressure, and the frequency at which the measurements are made. Shear-wave velocities can either increase or decrease with saturation, and the degree of anisotropy depends on the microstructure, pressure, and frequency. Consequently great care must be taken when interpreting observed velocity anisotropy for measurements at low frequencies, typical of in situ observations, will generally be different from those at high frequencies, typical of the laboratory.

  9. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  10. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Chg 1, dated 3/7/06. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B

  11. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B.

  12. Noise pair velocity and range echo location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution is disclosed. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna. 46 figs.

  13. Supersonic relative velocity effect on the baryonic acoustic oscillation measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Seljak, Uroš [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zürich, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Dalal, Neal, E-mail: jyoo@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: neal@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: seljak@physik.uzh.ch [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Ontario, M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of supersonic relative velocities between baryons and dark matter, recently shown to arise generically at high redshift, on baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at low redshift. The amplitude of the relative velocity effect at low redshift is model-dependent, but can be parameterized by using an unknown bias. We find that if unaccounted, the relative velocity effect can shift the BAO peak position and bias estimates of the dark energy equation-of-state due to its non-smooth, out-of-phase oscillation structure around the BAO scale. Fortunately, the relative velocity effect can be easily modeled in constraining cosmological parameters without substantially inflating the error budget. We also demonstrate that the presence of the relative velocity effect gives rise to a unique signature in the galaxy bispectrum, which can be utilized to isolate this effect. Future dark energy surveys can accurately measure the relative velocity effect and subtract it from the power spectrum analysis to constrain dark energy models with high precision.

  14. Noise pair velocity and range echo location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna.

  15. The concentration-velocity dispersion relation in galaxy groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Faltenbacher; William G. Mathews

    2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on results from cold dark matter N-body simulations we develop a dynamical model for the evolution of subhaloes within host haloes of galaxy groups. Only subhaloes more massive than 5 times 10^8 M_{sol} at the time of accretion are examined because they are massive enough to possibly host luminous galaxies. As they orbit within a growing host potential the subhaloes are subject to tidal stripping and dynamical friction. We consider groups of equal mass (M_{vir} = 3.9 times 10^{13} M_{sol}) at redshift z=0 but with different concentrations associated with different formation times. We investigate the variation of subhaloe (or satellite galaxy) velocity dispersion with host concentration and/or formation time. In agreement with the Jeans equation the velocity dispersion of subhaloes increases with the host concentration. Between concentrations ~5 and ~20 the subhaloe velocity dispersions increase by ~25 per cent. By applying a simplified tidal disruption criterion, i.e. rejection of all subhaloes with a tidal truncation radius below 3 kpc at z=0, the central velocity dispersion of 'surviving' subhaloes increases substantially for all concentrations. The enhanced central velocity dispersion among surviving subhaloes is caused by a lack of slow tangential motions. Additionally, we present a fitting formula for the velocity anisotropy parameter \\beta(r) which does not depend on concentration if the group-centric distances are scaled by r_s, the characteristic radius of the NFW-profile.

  16. Physics and Astronomy Radiation Safety Physics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Radiation Safety Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Environucleonics Lab 1 PHY 3211 Modern Physics II 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4330 Digital Electronics 3 PHY 4820 Medical Physics 3 CHE 1101 Intro. Chemistry I 3 CHE 1110 Intro. Chemistry I Lab 1 CHE 1102 Intro

  17. Physics and Astronomy Engineering/Physics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Engineering/Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Electromagnetic Fields & Waves 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4020 Computational Methods in Physics.) taken Grade PHY 4620 Optics 4 PHY 3211 Modern Physics II 3 PHY 4730 Analog Circuits 3 PHY 4640 Quantum

  18. 314 Department of Physics Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    314 Department of Physics Department of Physics Physics, one of the basic sciences, has its origin led to the detailed understanding of a remarkable variety of physical phenomena. Our knowledge now comprehension of the physical world forms an impressive part of the intellectual and cultural heritage of our

  19. Propagation velocities of gas rings in collisional ring galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Vorobyov; D. Bizyaev

    2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation velocity of the first gas ring in collisional ring galaxies, i.e. the velocity at which the maximum in the radial gas density profile propagates radially in the galactic disk, is usually inferred from the radial expansion velocity of gas in the first ring. Our numerical hydrodynamics modeling of ring galaxy formation however shows that the maximum radial expansion velocity of gas in the first ring ($v_{gas}$) is invariably below the propagation velocity of the first gas ring itself ($v_{ring}$). Modeling of the Cartwheel galaxy indicates that the outer ring is currently propagating at $v_{ring} \\approx$ 100 km/s, while the maximum radial expansion velocity of gas in the outer ring is currently $v_{gas} \\approx$ 65 km/s. Modeling of the radial B-V/V-K color gradients of the Cartwheel ring galaxy also indicates that the outer ring is propagating at $v_{ring} \\ge $ 90 km/s. We show that a combined effect of inclination, finite thickness, and warping of the Cartwheel's disk might be responsible for the lack of angular difference in the peak positions found for the azimuthally averaged $H\\alpha$, K and B surface brightness profiles of the Cartwheel's outer ring. Indeed, the radial $H\\alpha$ surface brightness profiles obtained along the Cartwheel's major axis, where effects of inclination and finite thickness are minimized, do peak exterior to those at K- and B-bands. The angular difference in peak positions implies $v_{ring}$ = 110 km/s, which is in agreement with the model predictions. We briefly discuss the utility of radio continuum emission and spectral line equivalent widths for determining the propagation velocity of gas rings in collisional ring galaxies.

  20. January 2010 Physics 3300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    1 January 2010 Physics 3300 Introduction to Physical Oceanography Instructor: Brad de Young Physics and Physical Oceanography Memorial University, bdeyoung@mun.ca Room C-3000 737-8738 Physics 3300 Introduction to Physical Oceanography deals with the physics of the processes in the ocean, providing an integrating view

  1. Hadron physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunce, G.

    1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Is all hadronic physics ultimately describable by QCD. Certainly, many disparate phenomena can be understood within the QCD framework. Also certainly, there are important questions which are open, both theoretically (little guidance, as yet) and experimentally, regarding confinement. Are there dibaryons, baryonium, glueballs. In addition, there are experimental results which at present do not have an explanation. This talk, after a short section on QCD successes and difficulties, will emphasize two experimental topics which have recent results - glueball spectroscopy and exclusive reactions at large momentum transfer. Both are experimentally accessible in the AGS/LAMPF II/AGS II/TRIUMF II/SIN II energy domain.

  2. Physical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoid NanosheetsStudyingFebruary PhotonsPhysical Sciences

  3. Review of Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics - “Neutrino’Kim, Fundamentals of Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (Fermi”, CLII Course “Neutrino Physics”, 23 July-2 August

  4. REVIEW OF PARTICLE PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beringer, Juerg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics - “Neutrino’Kim, Fundamentals of Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (Fermi”, CLII Course “Neutrino Physics”, 23 July-2 August

  5. Review of Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for non-accelerator physics . . . . . . . . . 328 ParticleColliders, accelerator physics of Coupling between matterdetectors for non-accelerator physics (Figure 29.5) . . .

  6. Optic-microwave mixing velocimeter for superhigh velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng Jidong; Wang Xiang; Tao Tianjiong; Liu Cangli; Tan Hua [Laboratory for Shock Waves and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, P.O. Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon that a light beam reflected off a moving object experiences a Doppler shift in its frequency underlies practical interferometric techniques for remote velocity measurements, such as velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR), displacement interferometer system for any reflector (DISAR), and photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV). While VISAR velocimeters are often bewildered by the fringe loss upon high-acceleration dynamic process diagnosis, the optic-fiber velocimeters such as DISAR and PDV, on the other hand, are puzzled by high velocity measurement over 10 km/s, due to the demand for the high bandwidth digitizer. Here, we describe a new optic-microwave mixing velocimeter (OMV) for super-high velocity measurements. By using currently available commercial microwave products, we have constructed a simple, compact, and reliable OMV device, and have successfully obtained, with a digitizer of bandwidth 6 GH only, the precise velocity history of an aluminum flyer plate being accelerated up to 11.2 km/s in a three stage gas-gun experiment.

  7. Exceptional Ground Accelerations and Velocities Caused by Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, John

    2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aims to understand the characteristics of the free-field strong-motion records that have yielded the 100 largest peak accelerations and the 100 largest peak velocities recorded to date. The peak is defined as the maximum magnitude of the acceleration or velocity vector during the strong shaking. This compilation includes 35 records with peak acceleration greater than gravity, and 41 records with peak velocities greater than 100 cm/s. The results represent an estimated 150,000 instrument-years of strong-motion recordings. The mean horizontal acceleration or velocity, as used for the NGA ground motion models, is typically 0.76 times the magnitude of this vector peak. Accelerations in the top 100 come from earthquakes as small as magnitude 5, while velocities in the top 100 all come from earthquakes with magnitude 6 or larger. Records are dominated by crustal earthquakes with thrust, oblique-thrust, or strike-slip mechanisms. Normal faulting mechanisms in crustal earthquakes constitute under 5% of the records in the databases searched, and an even smaller percentage of the exceptional records. All NEHRP site categories have contributed exceptional records, in proportions similar to the extent that they are represented in the larger database.

  8. Control of group velocity by phase-changing collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M. [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Wilson-Gordon, A.D.; Friedmann, H. [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the influence of phase-changing collisions on the group velocities in Doppler-broadened, cycling, degenerate two-level systems where F{sub e}=F{sub g}+1 and F{sub g}>0, interacting with pump and probe lasers, that exhibit electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA). Two model systems are considered: the N system where the pump and probe are polarized perpendicularly, and EIA is due to transfer of coherence (TOC), and the double two-level system (TLS) where both lasers have the same polarization, and EIA is due to transfer of population (TOP). For the case of Doppler-broadened EIA TOC, which occurs at low pump intensity, there is a switch from positive to negative dispersion and group velocity, as the rate of phase-changing collisions is increased. For the case of EIA TOP at low pump intensity, the dispersion and group velocity remain negative even when the collision rate is increased. Pressure-induced narrowing, accompanied by an increase in the magnitude of the negative dispersion and a decrease in the magnitude of the negative group velocity, occurs in both EIA TOC and EIA TOP, at low pump intensity. When the pump intensity is increased, a switch from negative to positive dispersion and group velocity, with increasing collision rate, also occurs in the double TLS system. However, the effect is far smaller than in the case of the N system at low pump intensity.

  9. Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators are severely hampered in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stentz, Tony

    Abstract Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators approach meets the requirements for cutting straight entries and mining the proper amount of coal per cycle. Introduction The mining of soft materials, such as coal, is a large industry. Worldwide, a total of 435 million

  10. A Comparison of FEBio, ABAQUS, and NIKE3D Results for a Suite of Verification Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    involves the consideration of overall energy minimization and/or other fundamental physical balance laws and Imaging Institute University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA December 1, 2009 Abstract: Computational

  11. Modeling and Control of High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray: A Tutorial Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mingheng; Christofides, Panagiotis D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid Dynamics Analysis of a Wire- Feed, High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Gas Flow Charac- teristics in a High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel

  12. SUBSTRUCTURE IN BULK VELOCITIES OF MILKY WAY DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; DeLaunay, James; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Gole, Daniel; Grabowski, Kathleen [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Deng, Licai; Liu, Chao; Luo, A-Li; Zhang, Haotong; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Yongheng [Key Lab for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)] [Key Lab for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Jin, Ge [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)] [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Liu, Xiaowei; Yuan, Haibo, E-mail: carlij@rpi.edu [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We find that Galactic disk stars near the anticenter exhibit velocity asymmetries in both the Galactocentric radial and vertical components across the midplane as well as azimuthally. These findings are based on Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectroscopic velocities for a sample of ?400, 000 F-type stars, combined with proper motions from the PPMXL catalog for which we have derived corrections to the zero points based in part on spectroscopically discovered galaxies and QSOs from LAMOST. In the region within 2 kpc outside the Sun's radius and ±2 kpc from the Galactic midplane, we show that stars above the plane exhibit net outward radial motions with downward vertical velocities, while stars below the plane have roughly the opposite behavior. We discuss this in the context of other recent findings, and conclude that we are likely seeing the signature of vertical disturbances to the disk due to an external perturbation.

  13. The Velocity Field of Quasar Broad Emission Line Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Punsly

    2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, the broad emission line (BEL) profiles of superluminal quasars with apparent jet velocities, $\\beta_{a}>10$, (ultraluminal QSOs, or ULQSOs hereafter) are studied as a diagnostic of the velocity field of the BEL emitting gas in quasars. The ULQSOs are useful because they satisfy a very strict kinematical constraint, their parsec scale jets must be propagating within $12^{\\circ}$ of the line of sight. We know the orientation of these objects with great certainty. The large BEL FWHM, $\\sim 3,000 \\mathrm{km/s} - 6,000 \\mathrm{km/s}$, in ULQSOs tend to indicate that the BEL gas has a larger component of axial velocity (either random or in a wind) along the jet direction than previously thought.

  14. Planar velocity analysis of diesel spray shadow images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sedarsky, David; Blaisot, J-B; Rozé, C

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this work is to demonstrate how spatially resolved image information from diesel fuel injection events can be obtained using a forward-scatter imaging geometry, and used to calculate the velocities of liquid structures on the periphery of the spray. In order to obtain accurate velocities directly from individual diesel spray structures, those features need to be spatially resolved in the measurement. The distributed structures measured in a direct shadowgraphy arrangement cannot be reliably analyzed for this kind of velocity information. However, by utilizing an intense collimated light source and adding imaging optics which modify the signal collection, spatially resolved optical information can be retrieved from spray edge regions within a chosen object plane. This work discusses a set of measurements where a diesel spray is illuminated in rapid succession by two ultrafast laser pulses generated by a mode-locked Ti-Sapphire oscillator seeding a matched pair of regenerative amplifiers. Light fro...

  15. St. Stephen powerhouse tailrace velocity measurement. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fagerburg, T.L.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were conducted to provide a prototype evaluation of the operating conditions of the project and to evaluate the adequacy of the repairs and remedial work performed in the channel downstream of the tailrace. Prototype measurements were made to define the relative magnitudes of velocities and the surface flow patterns in the channel downstream of the tailrace and the displacement, if any, of the stone protection material resulting from various turbine operations and tailwater conditions. Results of the data collection included determination of (a) velocity distribution at various ranges across the channel; (b) velocity profiles at the toe of the slope and at the observed location of highest velocity; and (c) unusual surface flow patterns that are produced by different combinations of turbine operations. Recommendations for start-up and shut-down procedures for the turbine operations that would produce the most acceptable. The depth soundings revealed that the stone protection material was quite stable (District surveys reveal that no appreciable displacement has occurred during the subsequent months of operation of the powerhouse.) The flow velocities were found to concentrate along the right side of the channel as a result of uneven flow distribution from the draft tube bays and the asymmetrical geometry along the left side of the tailrace. Return flows were observed and found to concentrate along the left side of the channel except when all three turbines were operating. Operating recommendations for the turbines are made based on tailwater conditions, length of time of nonoperation of the powerhouse, and the velocity data obtained from the tests.

  16. Physics 6321 Coastal oceanography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Physics 6321 Coastal oceanography · Instructor: Dr. Iakov Afanassiev · Office: Physics C-4065 · email: yakov@physics.mun.ca · Course Times: TBD Room TBD · Office Hours: unlimited · Web Page: http://www.physics

  17. SOAR: An extensible suite of codes for weld analysis and optimal weld schedules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisler, G.R.; Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A suite of MATLAB-based code modules has been developed to provide optimal weld schedules, regulating weld process parameters for CO2 and pulse Nd:YAG laser welding methods, and arc welding in support of the Smartweld manufacturing initiative at Sandia National Laboratories. The optimization methodology consists of mixed genetic and gradient-based algorithms to query semi-empirical, nonlinear algebraic models. The optimization output provides heat-input-efficient welds for user-specified weld dimensions. User querying of all weld models is available to examine sub-optimal schedules. In addition, a heat conduction equation solver for 2-D heat flow is available to provide the user with an additional check of weld thermal effects. The inclusion of thermodynamic properties allows the extension of the empirical models to include materials other than those tested. All solution methods are provided with graphical user interfaces and display pertinent results in two and three-dimensional form. The code architecture provides an extensible framework to add an arbitrary number of modules.

  18. Fermi velocity renormalization and dynamical gap generation in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Popovici; C. S. Fischer; L. von Smekal

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the renormalization of the Fermi velocity by the long-range Coulomb interactions between the charge carriers in the Dirac-cone approximation for the effective low-energy description of the electronic excitations in graphene at half filling. Solving the coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the dressing functions in the corresponding fermion propagator with various approximations for the particle-hole polarization we observe that Fermi velocity renormalization effects generally lead to a considerable increase of the critical coupling for dynamical gap generation and charge-density wave formation at the semimetal-insulator transition.

  19. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kalesse, Heike

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  20. Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, A.; Zweben, S. J.; Stotler, D. P.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

  1. ELECTROSTATIC MODE ASSOCIATED WITH PINCH VELOCITY IN RFPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DELZANNO, GIAN LUCA [Los Alamos National Laboratory; FINN, JOHN M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; CHACON, LUIS [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of a new electrostatic instability is shown for RFP (reversed field pinch) equilibria. This mode arises due to the non-zero equilibrium radial flow (pinch flow). In RFP simulations with no-stress boundary conditions on the tangential velocity at the radial wall, this electrostatic mode is unstable and dominates the nonlinear dynamics, even in the presence of the MHD modes typically responsible for the reversal of the axial magnetic field at edge. Nonlinearly, this mode leads to two beams moving azimuthally towards each other, which eventually collide. The electrostatic mode can be controlled by using Dirichlet (no-slip) boundary conditions on the azimuthal velocity at the radial wall.

  2. Extreme Value Analysis of Tidal Stream Velocity Perturbations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harding, Samuel; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Bryden, Ian

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a statistical extreme value analysis of maximum velocity perturbations from the mean flow speed in a tidal stream. This study was performed using tidal velocity data measured using both an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) at the same location which allows for direct comparison of predictions. The extreme value analysis implements of a Peak-Over-Threshold method to explore the effect of perturbation length and time scale on the magnitude of a 50-year perturbation.

  3. Velocity determination of the very shallow lunar crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Tzuhua Edward

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1972 and 1974 ) for the Apollo 16 and 17 landing sites, respectively. A deep layer of dust on the moon may provide a very good seismic-wave transmission channel. In order to investigate the seismic properties of such a medium, Gold and Soter (1970...) at the Apollo 14 and 16 landing sites has been determined to be a self-compacting powder layer overlying a homogeneous layer. The velocity function of the powder layer is given by V(z)=V (z/z ) , where V =340+20 m/sec is a reference 1/6 0 0 0 velocity at a...

  4. Source shape determination with directional fragment-fragment velocity correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, A; Auger, G; Begemann-Blaich, M L; Bellaize, N; Bittiger, R; Bocage, F; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Bouriquet, B; Charvet, J L; Chbihi, A; Dayras, R; Durand, D; Frankland, J D; Galíchet, E; Gourio, D; Guinet, D; Hudan, S; Lautesse, P; Lavaud, F; Legrain, R; López, O; Lukasik, J; Lynen, U; Müller, W F J; Nalpas, L; Orth, H; Plagnol, E; Rosato, E; Saija, A; Sfienti, C; Tamain, B; Trautmann, W; Trzcinski, A; Turzó, K; Vient, E; Vigilante, M; Volant, C; Zwieglinski, B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation functions, constructed from directional projections of the relative velocities of fragments, are used to determine the shape of the breakup volume in coordinate space. For central collisions of 129Xe + natSn at 50 MeV per nucleon incident energy, measured with the 4pi multi-detector INDRA at GSI, a prolate shape aligned along the beam direction with an axis ratio of 1:0.7 is deduced. The sensitivity of the method is discussed in comparison with conventional fragment-fragment velocity correlations.

  5. Impact of Phase Transitions on P Wave Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Weidner; L Li

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In regions where a high pressure phase is in equilibrium with a low pressure phase, the bulk modulus defined by the P-V relationship is greatly reduced. Here we evaluate the effect of such transitions on the P wave velocity. A model, where cation diffusion is the rate limiting factor, is used to project laboratory data to the conditions of a seismic wave propagating in the two-phase region. We demonstrate that for the minimum expected effect there is a significant reduction of the seismic velocity, as large as 10% over a narrow depth range.

  6. Color Imaging Arithmetic: Physics Math > Physics + Math

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Gaurav

    Color Imaging Arithmetic: Physics Math > Physics + Math Gaurav Sharma University of Rochester inter- action commonly form the physical interface by which we connect to the digital cyber-world. Because these devices bridge the physical and the electronic worlds, elegant and effective solutions

  7. Physics and Astronomy Chemical Physics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Chemical Physics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Dept Fields & Waves 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 PHY 4640 Quantum Mechanics 3 PHY 4020 Computational Methods in Physics & Engineering 3 PHY 4330 Digital Electronics 3 CHE 1101 Intro. Chemistry I 3 CHE 1110 Intro

  8. People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book Authors James H. Dann, Ph.D. James J. Dann. All rights reserved. Textbook Website http://scipp.ucsc.edu/outreach/index2.html #12;People's Physics, and many of the problems. We also thank our fellow physics teachers at both schools for their immense help

  9. People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    #12;People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book Authors James H. Dann, Ph.D. James J. Dann. All rights reserved. Textbook Website http://scipp.ucsc.edu/outreach/index2.html #12;People's Physics, and many of the problems. We also thank our fellow physics teachers at both schools for their immense help

  10. THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W. [Astronomy Department, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Meyer, B. S. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

  11. Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, James D.

    of students (from physics, engineering physics, elec- trical engineering, nuclear engineering and other un;PREFACE Plasma physics is a relatively new branch of physics that became a mature science over the last). Thus, plasma physics has developed in large part as a branch of applied or engineering physics

  12. The Light Velocity Casimir Effect Does the Velocity of Light Increase when Propagating Between the Casimir Plates?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoma, T; Ostoma, Tom; Trushyk, Mike

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose experiments that might be set up to detect the increase in the velocity of light in a vacuum in the laboratory frame for photons travelling between (and perpendicular to) the Casimir plates in a vacuum. The Casimir plates are two closely spaced, conductive plates, where an attractive force is observed to exist between the plates called the 'Casimir Force'. We propose that the velocity of light in a vacuum increases when propagating between two transparent Casimir Plates. We call this effect the 'Light Velocity Casimir Effect' or LVC effect. The LVC effect happens because the vacuum energy density in between the plates is lower than that outside the Casimir plates. The conductive plates disallow certain frequencies of electrically charged virtual particles to exist inside the plates, thus lowering the inside vacuum particle density, compared to the density outside the plates. The reduced (electrically charged) virtual particle density results in fewer photon scattering events inside the plates, whic...

  13. UPb dating of the Madeira Suite and structural control of the albite-enriched granite at Pitinga (Amazonia, Brazil): Evolution of the A-type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    U­Pb dating of the Madeira Suite and structural control of the albite- enriched granite at Pitinga of A-type magmatism and basin formation occurred. The albite-enriched granite emplacement occurred-enriched facies of Madeira granite (Madeira Suite) that is part of a NE­SW alignment of three granitic bodies

  14. Astronomy & Physics Resources for Middle & High School Teachers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Gillian

    , refraction, Doppler effect, and polarization. Physics 4: Waves #12;http://www.faculty.ucr.edu/~gillianw State;Galaxy Distances and Radial Velocities Hubble measured the distances to 24 nearby galaxies. For each was static. His fix - Add a constant term, the "cosmological constant" to cancel the effects of gravity

  15. Holographic and time-resolving ability of pulse-pair two-dimensional velocity interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erskine, David J., E-mail: erskine1@llnl.gov; Smith, R. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Bolme, C. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ali, S. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous velocity interferometers used at research laboratories for shock physics experiments measured target motion at a point or many points on a line on the target. Recently, a two-dimensional (2d) version (2d-velocity interferometer system for any reflector) has been demonstrated using a pair of ultrashort (3 ps) pulses for illumination, separated by 268 ps. We have discovered new abilities for this instrument, by treating the complex output image as a hologram. For data taken in an out of focus configuration, we can Fourier process to bring narrow features such as cracks into sharp focus, which are otherwise completely blurred. This solves a practical problem when using high numerical aperture optics having narrow depth of field to observe moving surface features such as cracks. Furthermore, theory predicts that the target appearance (position and reflectivity) at two separate moments in time are recorded by the main and conjugate images of the same hologram, and are partially separable during analysis for narrow features. Hence, for the cracks we bring into refocus, we can make a two-frame movie with a subnanosecond frame period. Longer and shorter frame periods are possible with different interferometer delays. Since the megapixel optical detectors we use have superior spatial resolution over electronic beam based framing cameras, this technology could be of great use in studying microscopic three-dimensional-behavior of targets at ultrafast times scales. Demonstrations on shocked silicon are shown.

  16. Revisit of the relationship between the elastic properties and sound velocities at high pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chenju; Yan, Xiaozhen [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Xiang, Shikai, E-mail: skxiang@caep.ac.cn; Chen, Haiyan [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Gu, Jianbing; Yu, Yin [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, PO Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Kuang, Xiaoyu [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); International Centre for Materials Physics, Academia Sinica, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are defined, respectively, as the second derivatives of the total energy and the first derivative of the stress with respect to strain. Since the Lagrangian and infinitesimal strain are commonly used in the two definitions above, the second-order elastic constants and stress-strain coefficients are separated into two categories, respectively. In general, any of the four physical quantities is employed to characterize the elastic properties of materials without differentiation. Nevertheless, differences may exist among them at non-zero pressures, especially high pressures. Having explored the confusing issue systemically in the present work, we find that the four quantities are indeed different from each other at high pressures and these differences depend on the initial stress applied on materials. Moreover, the various relations between the four quantities depicting elastic properties of materials and high-pressure sound velocities are also derived from the elastic wave equations. As examples, we calculated the high-pressure sound velocities of cubic tantalum and hexagonal rhenium using these nexus. The excellent agreement of our results with available experimental data suggests the general applicability of the relations.

  17. Investigation of plasma velocity field solar flare footpoints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrozek, Tomasz

    of Wroclaw NCN Grant 2011/01/M/ST9/06096 #12;The Solar Flare - observations #12;chromosphere corona photosphere The Solar Flare - cartoon - conversion of magnetic energy into other forms - transport of energyInvestigation of plasma velocity field in solar flare footpoints from RHESSI observations T. Mrozek

  18. Estimating seismic velocities at ultrasonic frequencies in partially saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic velocities in rocks at ultrasonic frequencies depend not only on the degree of saturation but also on the distribution of the fluid phase at various scales within the pore space. Two scales of saturation heterogeneity are important: (1) saturation differences between thin compliant pores and larger stiffer pores, and (2) differences between saturated patches and undersaturated patches at a scale much larger than any pore. The authors propose a formalism for predicting the range of velocities in partially saturated rocks that avoids assuming idealized pore shapes by using measured dry rock velocity versus pressure and dry rock porosity versus pressure. The pressure dependence contains all of the necessary information about the distribution of pore compliance for estimating effects of saturation at the finest scales where small amounts of fluid in the thinnest, most compliant parts of the pore space stiffen the rock in both compression and shear (increasing both P- and S-wave velocities) in approximately the same way that confining pressure stiffens the rock by closing the compliant pores. Large-scale saturation patches tend to increase only the high-frequency bulk modulus by amounts roughly proportional to the saturation. The pore-scale effects will be most important at laboratory and logging frequencies when pore-scale pore pressure gradients are unrelaxed. The patchy-saturation effects can persist even at seismic field frequencies if the patch sizes are sufficiently large and the diffusivities are sufficiently low for the larger-scale pressure gradients to be unrelaxed.

  19. Scale-dependent seismic velocity in heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G.; Mujica, D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Lucet, N. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)] [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurable traveltime of seismic events propagating in heterogeneous media depend on the geologic scale, the seismic wavelength, and the propagation distance. In general, the velocity inferred from arrival times is slower when the wavelength is longer than the scale of heterogeneity and faster when the wavelength is shorter. For normal incidence propagation in stratified media, this is the difference between averaging elastic compliance sin the long wavelength limit. In two and three dimensions there is also the path effect. Shorter wavelengths tend to find faster paths, thus biasing the traveltimes to lower values. In the shorter wavelength limit, the slowness inferred from the average traveltime is smaller than the mean slowness of the medium. When the propagation distance is much larger than the scale of the heterogeneity, the path effect causes the velocity increase from long to short wavelengths to be much larger in two dimensions than in one dimension, and even larger in three dimensions. The amount of velocity dispersion can be understood theoretically, but there is some discrepancy between theory and experiment as to what ratio of wavelength to heterogeneity scale separates the long and short wavelength limits. The scale-dependent traveltime implies that a measured velocity depends not just on rock properties, but also on the scale of the measurement relative to he scale of the geology.

  20. Velocity Autocorrelation Functions and Diffusion of Dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Daniyarov, T. T.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N. [IETP, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a, Tole bi St., Almaty, 050012 (Kazakhstan)

    2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The velocity autocorrelation functions and square displacements were calculated on the basis of experimental data obtained on experimental setup with dc discharge. Computer simulation of the system of dust particles by the method of the Langevin dynamics was performed. The comparisons of experimental and theoretical results are given.

  1. Relativistic addition of parallel velocities from time dilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Rothenstein; Stefan Popescu

    2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic addition of parallel velocities is derived involving relativity only via the time dilation formula, avoiding the length contraction used by many authors in conjunction with time dilation. The followed scenario involves a machine gun that fires successive bullets, considered from its rest frame and from the rest frame of the target, the bullets hit.

  2. VELOCITY FIELD OF A ROUND TURBULENT TRANSVERSE JET Suman Muppidi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    - bulent jet in a laminar crossflow. The velocity ratio is 5.7 and the Reynolds number is 5000. Mean Jets in crossflow, also called `transverse jets' are defined as the flow field where a jet of fluid enters and interacts with a crossflowing fluid. Examples of jets in crossflow are fuel injectors

  3. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mellors, Robert J.

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  4. Harmonic analysis of the Ha velocity field of NGC 4254

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Chemin; Olivier Hernandez; Chantal Balkowski; Claude Carignan; Philippe Amram

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionized gas kinematics of the Virgo Cluster galaxy NGC 4254 (Messier 99) is analyzed by an harmonic decomposition of the velocity field into Fourier coefficients. The aims of this study are to measure the kinematical asymmetries of Virgo cluster galaxies and to connect them to the environment. The analysis reveals significant $m=1,2,4$ terms which origins are discussed.

  5. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  6. TOWARDS VERTICAL VELOCITY AND HYDROMETEOR CLASSIFICATION FROM ARM WIND PROFILERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscriptTOWARDS VERTICAL VELOCITY AND HYDROMETEOR CLASSIFICATION FROM ARM WIND PROFILERS Scott Giangrande Department/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Office

  7. LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 , R. Bounaceur1 , H. Le Gall1 , A. Pires da Cruz2 , A. The influence of ethanol as an oxygenated additive has been investigated for these two fuels and has been found

  8. Morphological Characteristics of Compact High-Velocity Clouds Revealed by High-Resolution WSRT Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Burton; Robert Braun

    1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of compact, isolated high-velocity clouds which plausibly represents a homogeneous subsample of the HVC phenomenon in a single physical state was objectively identified by Braun and Burton (1999). Six examples of the CHVCs, unresolved in single-dish data, have been imaged with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The high-resolution imaging reveals the morphology of these objects, including a core/halo distribution of fluxes, signatures of rotation indicating dark matter, and narrow linewidths constraining the kinetic temperature of several opaque cores. In these regards, as well as in their kinematic and spatial deployment on the sky, the CHVC objects are evidently a dynamically cold ensemble of dark-matter-dominated HI clouds accreting onto the Local Group in a continuing process of galactic evolution.

  9. Graduate Studies Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabry, Frederic

    Graduate Studies in Physics Department of Physics Ernest Rutherford Physics Building Mc - 8434 Email: secretariat@physics.mcgill.ca Web: http://www.physics.mcgill.ca McGill Physics 2011 ­ 2012 mot de bienvenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The Challenge of Physics

  10. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  11. is an open-source software suite for Partial Differential Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Juan J.

    -physics simulations · Adaptive, goal-oriented mesh refinement and sliding meshes Documentation and a full description.stanford.edu Analyze. Optimize. Design! DLR-F6 static pressure contours Sample Unstructured High-Fidelity Analysis and Optimization Baseline and Final N+2 surface pressure The New Open-Source CFD code

  12. NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 8 | JANUARY 2012 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 3 It's a (stylized) fact!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    to the Maxwellian distribution of velocities in a gas -- a general law holding for all markets, although we donNATURE PHYSICS | VOL 8 | JANUARY 2012 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 3 thesis It's a (stylized of methods of physics to problems in economics and finance -- where this peculiar label does, in effect, mean

  13. VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS FOR A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION FAN LOOP FROM HINODE/EIS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); O'Dwyer, B.; Mason, H. E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The velocity pattern of a fan loop structure within a solar active region over the temperature range 0.15-1.5 MK is derived using data from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode satellite. The loop is aligned toward the observer's line of sight and shows downflows (redshifts) of around 15 km s{sup -1} up to a temperature of 0.8 MK, but for temperatures of 1.0 MK and above the measured velocity shifts are consistent with no net flow. This velocity result applies over a projected spatial distance of 9 Mm and demonstrates that the cooler, redshifted plasma is physically disconnected from the hotter, stationary plasma. A scenario in which the fan loops consist of at least two groups of 'strands'-one cooler and downflowing, the other hotter and stationary-is suggested. The cooler strands may represent a later evolutionary stage of the hotter strands. A density diagnostic of Mg VII was used to show that the electron density at around 0.8 MK falls from 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3} at the loop base, to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} at a projected height of 15 Mm. A filling factor of 0.2 is found at temperatures close to the formation temperature of Mg VII (0.8 MK), confirming that the cooler, downflowing plasma occupies only a fraction of the apparent loop volume. The fan loop is rooted within a so-called outflow region that displays low intensity and blueshifts of up to 25 km s{sup -1} in Fe XII {lambda}195.12 (formed at 1.5 MK), in contrast to the loop's redshifts of 15 km s{sup -1} at 0.8 MK. A new technique for obtaining an absolute wavelength calibration for the EIS instrument is presented and an instrumental effect, possibly related to a distorted point-spread function, that affects velocity measurements is identified.

  14. Velocity distribution of high-energy particles and the solar neutrino problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Miin Liu

    2001-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy infers high velocity and high velocity is a concept of special relativity. The Maxwellian velocity distribution is corrected to be consistent with special relativity. The corrected distribution reduces to the Maxwellian distribution for small velocities, contains a relatively depleted high-energy tail and vanishes at the velocity of light. This corrected distribution will lower solar neutrino fluxes and change solar neutrino energy spectra but keep solar sound speeds.

  15. Suggestions for dealership development to suit needs of a new kind of John Deere customer: a study of 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pospeshnova, Maria Alexandrovna

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    SUGGESTIONS FOR DEALERSHIP DEVELOPMENT TO SUIT NEEDS OF A NEW KIND OF JOHN DEERE CUSTOMER: A STUDY OF ?LARGE PROPERTY OWNERS? AND THEIR PREFERENCES A Thesis by MARIA ALEXANDROVNA POSPESHNOVA Submitted to the Office of Graduate... DEERE CUSTOMER: A STUDY OF ?LARGE PROPERTY OWNERS? AND THEIR PREFERENCES A Thesis by MARIA ALEXANDROVNA POSPESHNOVA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  16. Suggestions for dealership development to suit needs of a new kind of John Deere customer: a study of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pospeshnova, Maria Alexandrovna

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    SUGGESTIONS FOR DEALERSHIP DEVELOPMENT TO SUIT NEEDS OF A NEW KIND OF JOHN DEERE CUSTOMER: A STUDY OF ?LARGE PROPERTY OWNERS? AND THEIR PREFERENCES A Thesis by MARIA ALEXANDROVNA POSPESHNOVA Submitted to the Office of Graduate... DEERE CUSTOMER: A STUDY OF ?LARGE PROPERTY OWNERS? AND THEIR PREFERENCES A Thesis by MARIA ALEXANDROVNA POSPESHNOVA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  17. Pseudostress-velocity formulation for incompressible Navier-Stokes ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Computational Physics 1982; 48:387–411. 24. Bramble J. Multigrid Methods. Pitman Research Notes in Mathematics Series. Pitman: London, 1993.

  18. High velocity compact clouds in the sagittarius C region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Oka, Tomoharu; Matsumura, Shinji [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan); Nagai, Makoto [Division of Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Ten-noudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kamegai, Kazuhisa, E-mail: ktanaka@phys.keio.ac.jp [Department of Industrial Administration, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of extremely broad emission toward two molecular clumps in the Galactic central molecular zone. We have mapped the Sagittarius C complex (–0.°61 < l < –0.°27, –0.°29 < b < 0.°04) in the HCN J = 4-3, {sup 13}CO J = 3-2, and H{sup 13}CN J = 1-0 lines with the ASTE 10 m and NRO 45 m telescopes, detecting bright emission with 80-120 km s{sup –1} velocity width (in full-width at zero intensity) toward CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22, which are high velocity compact clouds (HVCCs) identified with our previous CO J = 3-2 survey. Our data reveal an interesting internal structure of CO–0.30–0.07 comprising a pair of high velocity lobes. The spatial-velocity structure of CO–0.40–0.22 can be also understood as a multiple velocity component, or a velocity gradient across the cloud. They are both located on the rims of two molecular shells of about 10 pc in radius. Kinetic energies of CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22 are (0.8-2) × 10{sup 49} erg and (1-4) × 10{sup 49} erg, respectively. We propose several interpretations of their broad emission: collision between clouds associated with the shells, bipolar outflow, expansion driven by supernovae (SNe), and rotation around a dark massive object. These scenarios cannot be discriminated because of the insufficient angular resolution of our data, though the absence of a visible energy source associated with the HVCCs seems to favor the cloud-cloud collision scenario. Kinetic energies of the two molecular shells are 1 × 10{sup 51} erg and 0.7 × 10{sup 51} erg, which can be furnished by multiple SN or hypernova explosions in 2 × 10{sup 5} yr. These shells are candidates of molecular superbubbles created after past active star formation.

  19. General Syllabus Physics 45100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    General Syllabus Physics 45100 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Designation: Undergraduate Catalog description: 45100: Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Temperature; equation of state; work and statistical mechanics; low-temperature physics; the Third Law. 3 HR./Wk.; 3 CR. Prerequisites: Physics 35100

  20. The critical velocity in the BEC-BCS crossover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf Weimer; Kai Morgener; Vijay Pal Singh; Jonas Siegl; Klaus Hueck; Niclas Luick; Ludwig Mathey; Henning Moritz

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We map out the critical velocity in the crossover from Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superfluidity with ultracold $^{6}$Li gases. A small attractive potential is dragged along lines of constant column density. The rate of the induced heating increases steeply above a critical velocity $v_c$. In the same samples, we measure the speed of sound $v_s$ by exciting density waves and compare the results to the measured values of $v_c$. We perform numerical simulations in the BEC regime and find very good agreement, validating the approach. In the strongly correlated regime, where theoretical predictions only exist for the speed of sound, our measurements of $v_c$ provide a testing ground for theoretical approaches.

  1. Velocity tuning of friction with two trapped atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Jhe, Wonho; Vuleti?, Vladan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Friction is the basic, ubiquitous mechanical interaction between two surfaces that results in resistance to motion and energy dissipation. In spite of its technological and economic significance, our ability to control friction remains modest, and our understanding of the microscopic processes incomplete. At the atomic scale, mismatch between the two contacting crystal lattices can lead to a reduction of stick-slip friction (structural lubricity), while thermally activated atomic motion can give rise to a complex velocity dependence, and nearly vanishing friction at sufficiently low velocities (thermal lubricity). Atomic force microscopy has provided a wealth of experimental results, but limitations in the dynamic range, time resolution, and control at the single-atom level have hampered a full quantitative description from first principles. Here, using an ion-crystal friction emulator with single-atom, single substrate-site spatial resolution and single-slip temporal resolution, we measure the friction force...

  2. The AMS-RICH velocity and charge reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Barao; M. Aguilar-Benitez; L. Arruda; B. Baret; A. Barrau; G. Barreira; E. Belmont; J. Berdugo; J. Borges; M. Buenerd; D. Casadei; J. Casaus; E. Cortina; M. Costado; D. Crespo; C. Delgado; C. Diaz; L. Derome; P. Goncalves; R. Garcia-Lopez; C. de la Guia; A. Herrero; E. Lanciotti; G. Laurenti; A. Malinin; C. Mana; J. Marin; M. Mangin-Brinet; G. Martinez; A. Menchaca-Rocha; C. Palomares; R. Pereira; M. Pimenta; A. Putze; Y. Sallaz-Damaz; E. S. Seo; I. Sevilla; A. Torrento; M. Vargas-Trevino; O. Veziant

    2007-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The AMS detector, to be installed on the International Space Station, includes a Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector with two different radiators, silica aerogel (n=1.05) and sodium fluoride (n=1.334). This detector is designed to provide very precise measurements of velocity and electric charge in a wide range of cosmic nuclei energies and atomic numbers. The detector geometry, in particular the presence of a reflector for acceptance purposes, leads to complex Cerenkov patterns detected in a pixelized photomultiplier matrix. The results of different reconstruction methods applied to test beam data as well as to simulated samples are presented. To ensure nominal performances throughout the flight, several detector parameters have to be carefully monitored. The algorithms developed to fulfill these requirements are presented. The velocity and charge measurements provided by the RICH detector endow the AMS spectrometer with precise particle identification capabilities in a wide energy range. The expected performances on light isotope separation are discussed.

  3. Velocity renormalization in graphene from lattice Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joaquín E. Drut; Timo A. Lähde

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the Fermi velocity of the Dirac quasiparticles in clean graphene at the charge neutrality point for strong Coulomb coupling alpha_g. We perform a Lattice Monte Carlo calculation within the low-energy Dirac theory, which includes an instantaneous, long-range Coulomb interaction. We find a renormalized Fermi velocity v_FR > v_F, where v_F = c/300. Our results are consistent with a momentum-independent v_FR which increases approximately linearly with alpha_g, although a logarithmic running with momentum cannot be excluded at present. At the predicted critical coupling alpha_gc for the semimetal-insulator transition due to excitonic pair formation, we find v_FR/v_F = 3.3, which we discuss in light of experimental findings for v_FR/v_F at the charge neutrality point in ultra-clean suspended graphene.

  4. Low velocity ion stopping in binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tashev, Bekbolat; Baimbetov, Fazylkhan [Department of Physics, Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96, Almaty 480012 (Kazakhstan); Deutsch, Claude [LPGP (UMR-CNRS 8578), Universite Paris XI, 91405 Orsay (France); Fromy, Patrice [Direction de l'Informatique, Universite Paris XI, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Attention is focused on the low ion velocity stopping mechanisms in multicomponent and dense target plasmas built of quasiclassical electron fluids neutralizing binary ionic mixtures, such as, deuterium-tritium of current fusion interest, proton-heliumlike iron in the solar interior or proton-helium ions considered in planetology, as well as other mixtures of fiducial concern in the heavy ion beam production of warm dense matter at Bragg peak conditions. The target plasma is taken in a multicomponent dielectric formulation a la Fried-Conte. The occurrence of projectile ion velocities (so-called critical) for which target electron slowing down equals that of given target ion components is also considered. The corresponding multiquadrature computations, albeit rather heavy, can be monitored analytical through a very compact code operating a PC cluster. Slowing down results are systematically scanned with respect to target temperature and electron density, as well as ion composition.

  5. GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOWS AND COLLISION VELOCITIES IN QUMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, Harley; McGaugh, Stacy; Teuben, Peter [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Angus, G. W., E-mail: hkatz@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: teuben@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: angus.gz@gmail.com [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet Cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for ''pink elephants'' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  6. Maximum velocity of self-propulsion for an active segment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recho, Pierre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motor part of a crawling eukaryotic cell can be represented schematically as an active continuum layer. The main active processes in this layer are protrusion, originating from non-equilibrium polymerization of actin fibers, contraction, induced by myosin molecular motors and attachment due to active bonding of trans-membrane proteins to a substrate. All three active mechanisms are regulated by complex signaling pathways involving chemical and mechanical feedback loops whose microscopic functioning is still poorly understood. In this situation, it is instructive to take a reverse engineering approach and study a problem of finding the spatial organization of standard active elements inside a crawling layer ensuring an optimal cost-performance trade-off. In this paper we assume that (in the range of interest) the energetic cost of self-propulsion is velocity independent and adopt, as an optimality criterion, the maximization of the overall velocity. We then choose a prototypical setting, formulate the corr...

  7. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): FOURTH DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Carrillo, I. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Boeche, C.; Roeser, S. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Seabroke, G. M. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Siebert, A. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l'Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Zwitter, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Binney, J. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); De Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bijaoui, A. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR 7293, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, BP4229, F-06304 Nice (France); Wyse, R. F. G. [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Freeman, K. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Munari, U. [INAF National Institute of Astrophysics, Astronomical Institute of Padova, I-36012 Asiago (VI) (Italy); Anguiano, B., E-mail: gkordo@ast.cam.ac.uk [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); and others

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atmospheric parameters are computed using a new pipeline, based on the algorithms of MATISSE and DEGAS. The spectral degeneracies and the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometric information are now better taken into consideration, improving the parameter determination compared to the previous RAVE data releases. The individual abundances for six elements (magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, iron, and nickel) are also given, based on a special-purpose pipeline that is also improved compared to that available for the RAVE DR3 and Chemical DR1 data releases. Together with photometric information and proper motions, these data can be retrieved from the RAVE collaboration Web site and the Vizier database.

  8. Astrometric determination of white dwarf radial velocities with Gaia?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Stefan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Usually, the determination of radial velocities of stars relies on the shift of spectral lines by the Doppler effect. Russel & Atkinson (1931) and Oort (1932) already noted that due to the large proper motion and parallax of the white dwarf (WD) van Maanen 2, a determination of the perspective acceleration of the proper motion would provide a direct astrometric determination of the radial velocity which is independent of the gravitational redshift. If spectroscopic redshift measurements of Halpha and Hbeta NLTE cores exist, a purely astrometric determination would allow disentangling the gravitational redshift from the Doppler shift. The best instrument for measuring the tiny perspective acceleration is the Gaia satellite of the European Space Agency, aiming at absolute astrometric measurements of one billion stars down to 20th magnitude with unprecedented accuracy. At 15th magnitude, the predicted angular accuracy of Gaia is about 20 micro-arcseconds. In this article, we estimate whether it is possible t...

  9. Dynamic slip velocity correlation using non-spherical particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pecore, Douglas Wilkin

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRAMS FIGURE 39: FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION, STATIC, MUD WEIGHT RANGE: 0. 5 - 0. 6 GRAMS FIGURE 40: FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION, STATIC, MUD WEIGHT RANGE: 0. 6 - 0. 7 GRAMS FIGURE 41: FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION, STATIC, MUD WEIGHT RANGE: 0. 7 - 0, 8 GRAMS... of Advisory Committee: Dr. Hans C. Juvkam-Wold This research proposes a method for calculating the slip velocity of irregularly shaped particles falling in non-Newtonian fluids in a vertical flow conduit under static and dynamic flow conditions. A...

  10. Obtaining anisotropic velocity data for proper depth seismic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egerev, Sergey; Yushin, Victor; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Dubinsky, Vladimir; Patterson, Doug [Andreyev Acoustics Institute, Moscow, 117036 (Russian Federation); Baker Hughes, Inc, 2001 Rankin Road, Houston, TX, 77073 (United States)

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with the problem of obtaining anisotropic velocity data due to continuous acoustic impedance-based measurements while scanning in the axial direction along the walls of the borehole. Diagrams of full conductivity of the piezoceramic transducer were used to derive anisotropy parameters of the rock sample. The measurements are aimed to support accurate depth imaging of seismic data. Understanding these common anisotropy effects is important when interpreting data where it is present.

  11. Radial Velocity Studies of Close Binary Stars. XI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodor Pribulla; Slavek M. Rucinski; Wenxian Lu; Stefan W. Mochnacki; George Conidis; R. M. Blake; Heide DeBond; J. R. Thomson; Wojtek Pych; Waldemar Ogloza; Michal Siwak

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radial-velocity measurements and sine-curve fits to the orbital radial velocity variations are presented for ten close binary systems: DU Boo, ET Boo, TX Cnc, V1073 Cyg, HL Dra, AK Her, VW LMi, V566 Oph, TV UMi and AG Vir. By this contribution, the DDO program has reached the point of 100 published radial velocity orbits. The radial velocities have been determined using an improved fitting technique which uses rotational profiles to approximate individual peaks in broadening functions. Three systems, ET Boo, VW LMi and TV UMi, were found to be quadruple while AG Vir appears to be a spectroscopic triple. ET Boo, a member of a close visual binary with $P_{vis} = 113$ years, was previously known to be a multiple system, but we show that the second component is actually a close, non-eclipsing binary. The new observations enabled us to determine the spectroscopic orbits of the companion, non-eclipsing pairs in ET Boo and VW LMi. The particularly interesting case is VW LMi, where the period of the mutual revolution of the two spectroscopic binaries is only 355 days. While most of the studied eclipsing pairs are contact binaries, ET Boo is composed of two double-lined detached binaries and HL Dra is single-lined detached or semi-detached system. Five systems of this group were observed spectroscopically before: TX Cnc, V1073 Cyg, AK Her (as a single-lined binary), V566 Oph, AG Vir, but our new data are of much higher quality than the previous studies.

  12. The stellar wind velocity field of HD 77581

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manousakis, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The early acceleration of stellar winds in massive stars is poorly constrained. The scattering of hard X-ray photons emitted by the pulsar in the high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 can be used to probe the stellar wind velocity and density profile close to the surface of its supergiant companion HD 77581. We built a high signal-to-noise and high resolution hard X-ray lightcurve of Vela X-1 measured by Swift/BAT over 300 orbital periods of the system and compared it with the predictions of a grid of hydrodynamic simulations. We obtain a very good agreement between observations and simulations for a narrow set of parameters, implying that the wind velocity close to the stellar surface is twice larger than usually assumed with the standard beta law. Locally a velocity gradient of $\\beta\\sim0.5$ is favoured. Even if still incomplete, hydrodynamic simulations are successfully reproducing several observational properties of Vela X-1.

  13. RVSAO 2.0: Digital Redshifts and Radial Velocities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael J. Kurtz; Douglas J. Mink

    1998-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    RVSAO is a set of programs to obtain redshifts and radial velocities from digital spectra. RVSAO operates in the IRAF(Tody 1986, 1993) environment. The heart of the system is xcsao, which implements the cross-correlation method, and is a direct descendant of the system built by Tonry and Davis (1979). emsao uses intelligent heuristics to search for emission lines in spectra, then fits them to obtain a redshift. sumspec shifts and sums spectra to build templates for cross-correlation. linespec builds synthetic spectra given a list of spectral lines. bcvcorr corrects velocities for the motion of the earth. We discuss in detail the parameters necessary to run xcsao and emsao properly. We discuss the reliability and error associated with xcsao derived redshifts. We develop an internal error estimator, and we show how large, stable surveys can be used to develop more accurate error estimators. We develop a new methodology for building spectral templates for galaxy redshifts. We show how to obtain correlation velocities using emission line templates. Emission line correlations are substantially more efficient than the previous standard technique, automated emission line fitting. We compare the use of RVSAO with new methods, which use Singular Value Decomposition and $\\chi^2$ fitting techniques.

  14. VELOCITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD DISTRIBUTION IN A FORMING PENUMBRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, P.; Guglielmino, S. L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Frasca, D.; Zuccarello, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia-Sezione Astrofisica, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Ermolli, I. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Tritschler, A.; Reardon, K. P., E-mail: prom@oact.inaf.it [National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak, P.O. Box 62, Sunspot, NM 88349-0062 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the analysis of high-resolution spectropolarimetric and spectroscopic observations of the solar photosphere and chromosphere, obtained shortly before the formation of a penumbra in one of the leading polarity sunspots of NOAA active region 11490. The observations were performed at the Dunn Solar Telescope of the National Solar Observatory on 2012 May 28, using the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer. The data set is comprised of a 1 hr time sequence of measurements in the Fe I 617.3 nm and Fe I 630.25 nm lines (full Stokes polarimetry) and in the Ca II 854.2 nm line (Stokes I only). We perform an inversion of the Fe I 630.25 nm Stokes profiles to derive magnetic field parameters and the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity at the photospheric level. We characterize chromospheric LOS velocities by the Doppler shift of the centroid of the Ca II 854.2 nm line. We find that, before the formation of the penumbra, an annular zone of 3''-5'' width is visible around the sunspot. In the photosphere, we find that this zone is characterized by an uncombed structure of the magnetic field although no visible penumbra has formed yet. We also find that the chromospheric LOS velocity field shows several elongated structures characterized by downflow and upflow motions in the inner and outer parts of the annular zone, respectively.

  15. Terminal velocities of luminous, early-type SMC stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Evans; D. J. Lennon; C. Trundle; S. R. Heap; D. J. Lindler

    2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet spectra from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) are used to determine terminal velocities for 11 O and B-type giants and supergiants in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) from the Si IV and C IV resonance lines. Using archival data from observations with the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph and the International Ultraviolet Explorer telescope, terminal velocities are obtained for a further five B-type supergiants. We discuss the metallicity dependence of stellar terminal velocities, finding no evidence for a significant scaling between Galactic and SMC metallicities for Teff < 30,000 K, consistent with the predictions of radiation driven wind theory for supergiant stars. A comparison of the $v_\\infty / v_{esc}$ ratio between the SMC and Galactic samples, while consistent with the above statement, emphasizes that the uncertainties in the distances to galactic O-stars are a serious obstacle to a detailed comparison with theory. For the SMC sample there is considerable scatter in this ratio at a given effective temperature, perhaps indicative of uncertainties in stellar masses.

  16. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (or 630-252-1911 on cell phones) Safety Aspects of radiation safety at ATLAS: Health Physics Coverage at ATLAS is provided by Argonne National Laboratory. Health Physics...

  17. LANL | Physics | LDRD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    directed research and development funding at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Physics Division, as the major source of innovation in experimental physical science at Los...

  18. ORISE: Health Physics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Training Student performs an analysis during an ORAU health physics training course Training and educating a highly skilled workforce that can meet operational...

  19. Nuclear Physics: Recent Talks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns Meetings Recent Talks Archived Talks Additional Information Computing at JLab Operations Logbook Physics Topics:...

  20. Nuclear Physics: Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns The Structure of the Nuclear Building Blocks The Structure of Nuclei Symmetry Tests in Nuclear Physics Meetings...

  1. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UserResearcher Information print version Research Highlights Public Interest Nuclear Physics Accelerator Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns...

  2. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing...

  3. Office of Physical Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Physical Protection is comprised of a team of security specialists engaged in providing Headquarters-wide physical protection.

  4. Velocity distribution function of sputtered gallium atoms during inductively coupled argon plasma treatment of a GaAs surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Chabert, Pascal; Ramos, Raphaeel; Cunge, Gilles; Sadeghi, Nader [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique, CNRS, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A GaN laser diode at 403.3 nm is used to measure the velocity distribution function (vdf) of Ga atoms sputtered from a radio-frequency biased GaAs substrate in a low pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) argon discharge. To investigate both perpendicular (V{sub z} normal to wafer) and longitudinal (V{sub x} parallel to wafer) velocity components, laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements are performed in the z direction and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in the x direction. The longitudinal vdf of Ga sputtered atoms is very close to a Lorentzian function with V{sub x} comprised between 0 and 7500 m s{sup -1}, while the perpendicular velocities V{sub z} can reach 10 000 m s{sup -1}. Experimental results are compared to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Ar{sup +} ion sputtering of GaAs under 200 eV bombardment. MD predictions and experiments are in fairly good agreement, which confirms the existence of products sputtered from the surface with kinetic energies larger than 10 eV. In etching processes dominated by physical bombardment, these energetic atoms could alter passivation layers on sidewalls and be responsible for defects observed in nanodevices. The best fit of the Doppler-broadened LIF and AAS profiles with the vdfs predicted by sputtering theory allows one to estimate the surface binding energy of Ga atoms in GaAs, E{sub b}, to be around 3 eV.

  5. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  6. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of ?14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS’ System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  7. 2007-01-0808 Nonlinear Observer for Vehicle Velocity with Friction and Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    . The sensor suite assumed provides us with the fairly standard measurements men- tioned above, but in addition both the nonlinear observer and the EKF use longitudinal and vertical acceleration sensors. Earlier

  8. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Borofloat borosilicate glass, and is a follow-up to a similar study completed by the authors on Starphire soda-lime silicate glass last year. The response of the borosilicate glass to impact testing at different angles was also studied. The Borofloat glass was supplied by the US Army Research Laboratory and its tin-side was impacted or indented. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Borofloat. Seven sphere materials were used whose densities bracket that of rock: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, carbon steel, and a chrome steel. A gas gun or a ball-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against the glass tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Borofloat were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the seven sphere-Borofloat-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) BS glass responded similarly to soda-lime silicate glass when spherically indented but quite differently under sphere impact conditions; (2) Frictional effects contributed to fracture initiation in BS glass when it spherically indented. This effect was also observed with soda-lime silicate glass; (3) The force necessary to initiate fracture in BS glass under spherical impact decreases with increasing elastic modulus of the sphere material. This trend is opposite to what was observed with soda-lime silicate glass. Friction cannot explain this trend and the authors do not have a legitimate explanation for it yet; (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than under quasi-static conditions. That difference decreases with increasing elastic modulus mismatch between the sphere material and borosilicate This trend was opposite in soda-lime silicate glass; (5) Fracture in borosilicate glass occurs at lower velocities (i.e., easier) at 24{sup o} than at 0{sup o} (orthogonal) and 46{sup o} of impact for the same probability of failure. Though not analyzed yet, this suggests that a convolution of kinetic energy and friction is contributing to that trend; (6) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation RCIF. This likely is not a material property nor exclusive to borosilicate glass, rather, it is a statistical response of a combination of local, surface-located flaw and imposed tensile stress. Understanding of the surface flaw population and flaw positioning can likely enable prediction of spherical indentation RCIF; and (7) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Borofloat BS for impact kinetic energies up to {approx} 20 mJ. For kinetic energies between {approx} 20-150 mJ, fracture sometimes initiated. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 150 mJ. The energy values, and their boundaries, were much lower for BS glass than they were for soda-lime silicate glass.

  9. A rock physics strategy for quantifying uncertainty in common hydrocarbon indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.; Mukerji, T.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a strategy for hydrocarbon detection and for quantifying the uncertainty in hydrocarbon indicators, by combining statistical techniques with deterministic rock physics relations derived from the laboratory and theory. A simple example combines Gassmann`s deterministic equation for fluid substitution with statistics inferred from log and core data, to detect hydrocarbons from observed seismic velocities. The formulation gives the most likely estimate of the pore fluid modulus, corresponding to each observed velocity, and also the uncertainty of that interpretation. The variances of seismic velocity and porosity in the calibration data determine the uncertainty of the pore fluid interpretation. As expected, adding information about shear wave velocity, from AVO for example, narrows the uncertainty of the hydrocarbon indicator. The formulation offers a convenient way to implement deterministic fluid substitution equations in the realistic case when the reference porosity and velocity span a range of values.

  10. PHYSICS 106 Summer 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    PHYSICS 106 Summer 2011 Instructor: Stephanie Magleby (sam25@physics.byu.edu) Office Hours: MWF 2 -3 pm, N311 ESC Office Phone (physics): 422-7056 Office Phone (engineering): 422-8319 TA: Corbin Jacobs [corbinjacobs@gmail.com] Email Corbin with any reading quiz questions or Mastering Physics issues

  11. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  12. High-resolution imaging of compact high-velocity clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Braun; Butler Burton

    1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Six examples of the compact, isolated high-velocity HI clouds (CHVCs) identified by Braun and Burton (1999) have been imaged with the WSRT. The 65 confirmed objects in this class define a dynamically cold system, with a global minimum for the velocity dispersion of only 70 km/s, found in the Local Group Standard of Rest, while in-falling at 100 km/s toward the LG barycenter. These objects have a characteristic morphology, in which several compact cores are embedded in a diffuse halo. The compact cores typically account for 40% of the HI line flux while covering some 15% of the source area. The cores are the cool condensed phase of HI, the CNM, with temp. near 100 K, while the halos appear to be a shielding column of warm diffuse HI, the WNM, with temp. near 8000 K. We detect a core with one of the narrowest HI emission lines ever observed, with intrinsic FWHM of 2 km/s and 75 K brightness. From a comparison of column and volume densities we derive a distance in the range 0.5 to 1 Mpc. We determine a metallicity for this same object of 0.04 to 0.07 solar. Comparably high distances are implied by demanding the stability of objects with multiple cores, which show relative velocities as large as 70 km/s on 30 arcmin scales. Many compact cores show systematic velocity gradients along the major axis of their elliptical extent which are consistent with circular rotation. Several of the derived rotation curves are well-fit by Navarro, Frenk, and White (1997) cold dark matter profiles. These kinematic signatures imply a high dark-to-visible mass ratio of 10-50, for D=0.7Mpc, which scales as 1/D. The implied dark matter halos dominate the mass volume density within the central 2 kpc (10 arcmin) of each source, providing a sufficent hydrostatic pressure to allow local CNM condensation. (abridged)

  13. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  14. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raptis, A.C.

    1983-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions. 8 figs.

  15. Velocity bunching in travelling wave accelerator with low acceleration gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Rui-Xuan; Li, Wei-Wei; Jia, Qi-Ka

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analytical and simulated results concerning the influences of the acceleration gradient in the velocity bunching process, which is a bunch compression scheme that uses a traveling wave accelerating structure as a compressor. Our study shows that the bunch compression application with low acceleration gradient is more tolerant to phase jitter and more successful to obtain compressed electron beam with symmetrical longitudinal distribution and low energy spread. We also present a transverse emittance compensation scheme to compensate the emittance growth caused by the increasing of the space charge force in the compressing process that is easy to be adjusted for different compressing factors.

  16. Accounting for velocity jitter in planet search surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman V. Baluev

    2008-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of radial velocity (RV) jitter in extrasolar planet search surveys is discussed. Based on the maximum likelihood principle, improved statistical algorithms for RV fitting and period search are developed. These algorithms incorporate a built-in jitter determination, so that resulting estimations of planetary parameters account for this jitter automatically. This approach is applied to RV data for several extrasolar planetary systems. It is shown that many RV planet search surveys suffer from periodic systematic errors which increase effective RV jitter and can lead to erroneous conclusions. For instance, the planet candidate HD74156 d may be a false detection made due to annual systematic errors.

  17. A method of measuring velocity of sound in soil samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matzen, Walter T

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 0% feet per second. In the brass bar: (Figure 11) g ? $. 71 feet h = 2?300 cycles v = 10, 8% feet per second . 20 ?l6 0 ' ISO Q I8o q ISO 0 ISO 0 ISO PHASE SHIFT L8 DEGREE Figure 10. Helation of, Frequejncy to Phase Shift iri steel . 'Tuhe.... '28 26 20 18 16 0 leO P IBo 0 . ' l80: 0, ' ']80, 0 iS'o pigure' ll. Relation of Frequee'cg, to Pha'ss Shift; iri Brass 'Bar. 1 Again, the velocity in brass, given by Carlin as 14. , 500 feet per second, is a reasonable check. In the aluminum...

  18. High-resolution imaging of compact high-velocity clouds (II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. de Heij; R. Braun; W. B. Burton

    2002-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have imaged five compact high-velocity clouds in HI with arcmin angular- and km/s spectral-resolution using the WSRT. Supplementary total-power data, which is fully sensitive to both the cool and warm components of HI, is available for comparison for all the sources, albeit with angular resolutions that vary from 3' to 36'. The fractional HI flux in compact CNM components varies from 4% to 16% in our sample. All objects have at least one local peak in the CNM column which exceeds about 10^19 cm^-2 when observed with arcmin resolution. It is plausible that a peak column density of 1-2x10^19 cm^-2 is a prerequisite for the long-term survival of these sources. One object in our sample, CHVC120-20-443 (Davies' cloud), lies in close projected proximity to the disk of M31. This object is characterized by exceptionally broad linewidths in its CNM concentrations (more than 5 times greater than the median value). These CNM concentrations lie in an arc on the edge of the source facing the M31 disk, while the diffuse HI component of this source has a position offset in the direction of the disk. All of these attributes suggest that CHVC120-20-443 is in a different evolutionary state than most of the other CHVCs which have been studied. Similarly broad CNM linewidths have only been detected in one other object, CHVC111-07-466, which also lies in the Local Group barycenter direction and has the most extreme radial velocity known. A distinct possibility for Davies' cloud seems to be physical interaction of some type with M31. The most likely form of this interaction might be the ram-pressure or tidal- stripping by either one of M31's visible dwarf companions, M32 or NGC205, or else by a dark companion with an associated HI condensation.

  19. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bersier, David [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Fransson, Claes [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason [Spitzer Science Center, MS 314-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Quimby, Robert [Kavli IPMU (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ?10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  20. Using the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Maguire, J.; Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important as a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes models that isolate the impacts of specific building components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models; these discrepancies are caused by differences in the models used by the engines or coding errors.

  1. The oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity and attenuation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asthenosphere Seismic attenuation Seismic velocity Anelasticity Partial melt Combined interpretation of seismicThe oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity anelastic dispersion (Karato and Jung, 1998; Karato, 2003). A unique interpretation of seismological models

  2. Brady Geothermal 1D seismic velocity model - Datasets - OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1025. Number is 262. Title is "Brady 1D seismic velocity http:geothermaldata.orgdatasetbrady-1d-seismic-velocity-model-ambient-noise-prelim-prelim-brady-median-vpvsqs-model...

  3. Evidence for a critical velocity in a Bose-Einstein condensed gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Raman; M. Kohl; R. Onofrio; D. S. Durfee; C. E. Kuklewicz; Z. Hadzibabic; W. Ketterle

    1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied dissipation in a Bose--Einstein condensed gas by moving a blue detuned laser beam through the condensate at different velocities. Strong heating was observed only above a critical velocity.

  4. Physics 151 Lecture 1 Physics 207: Lecture 1, Pg 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    and Engineers with Modern PhysicsScientists and Engineers with Modern Physics Read: Chapters 1 & 2 (sections 2Page 1 Physics 151 ­ Lecture 1 Physics 207: Lecture 1, Pg 1 Physics 207, Sections: 301/601Physics 207, Sections: 301/601 ­­ 314/614314/614 General Physics IGeneral Physics I MichaelMichael Winokur

  5. Deployment of a Suite of High-Performance Computational Tools for Multi-scale Multi-physics Simulation of Generation IV Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podowski, Michael Z

    2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project has been to deploy advanced simulation capabilities for next generation reactor systems utilizing newly available, high-performance computing facilities. The approach includes the following major components: The development of new simulation capabilities using state-of-the-art computer codes of different scales: molecular dynamics (MD) level, DNS (FronTier and PHASTA) and CFD (NPHASE-CMFD); The development of advanced numerical solvers for large-size computational problems; The deployment of a multiple-code computational platform for multiscale simulations of gas/liquid two-phase flow during reactor transients and accidents; and Application of the new computational methodology to study the progression of loss-of-flow accident in sodium fast reactor (SFR).

  6. Velocity dispersion and upscaling in a laboratory-simulated VSP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rio, P.; Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Marion, D. [Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France)] [Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory and numerical study was conducted to investigate the impact of scale-dependent seismic wave propagation in randomly layered media, as applied to sonic logs, surface seismic, and vertical seismic profiles (VSPs). Analysis of the laboratory results (1) confirmed the wavelength dependence of velocities inferred from traveltimes, (2) indicated that scale effects can introduce traveltime errors when upscaling from logs to surface seismic and VSPs, and (3) illustrated that erroneous VSP interval velocities can result when layer thicknesses are smaller than about one-tenth of the wavelength. A simple approximate recipe is presented for estimating these traveltimes by successively filtering the medium using a running Backus average and ray theory. The scale-dependent dispersion was also predicted well using a more rigorous invariant imbedding formulation. The predicted traveltimes, using the approximate recipe, compare well with the times observed in the laboratory stack of steel and plastic layers and in numerical studies of stratified media. The dispersion curves predicted by the approximate method also show the overall behavior computed with the more rigorous invariant imbedding formulation.

  7. Cosmic density and velocity fields in Lagrangian perturbation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikel Susperregi; Thomas Buchert

    1997-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A first- and second-order relation between cosmic density and peculiar-velocity fields is presented. The calculation is purely Lagrangian and it is derived using the second-order solutions of the Lagrange-Newton system obtained by Buchert & Ehlers. The procedure is applied to two particular solutions given generic initial conditions. In this approach, the continuity equation yields a relation between the over-density and peculiar-velocity fields that automatically satisfies Euler's equation because the orbits are derived from the Lagrange-Newton system. This scheme generalizes some results obtained by Nusser et al. (1991) in the context of the Zel'dovich approximation. As opposed to several other reconstruction schemes, in this approach it is not necessary to truncate the expansion of the Jacobian given by the continuity equation in order to calculate a first- or second-order expression for the density field. In these previous schemes, the density contrast given by (a) the continuity equation and (b) Euler's equation are mutually incompatible. This inconsistency arises as a consequence of an improper handling of Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates in the analysis. Here, we take into account the fact that an exact calculation of the density is feasible in the Lagrangian picture and therefore an accurate and consistent description is obtained.

  8. Low Velocity Boron Micro-Pellet Injector For Edge And Core Impurity Transport Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Low Velocity Boron Micro-Pellet Injector For Edge And Core Impurity Transport Measurements H. W, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 Abstract A simple Low Velocity Boron Micro-Pellet Injector has been under High velocity, pneumatic, pellet injection systems are applied routinely for injecting frozen pellets

  9. Tracking deep mantle reservoirs with ultra-low velocity zones Allen K. McNamara a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Tracking deep mantle reservoirs with ultra-low velocity zones Allen K. McNamara a, , Edward J, that directly overlies the core-mantle boundary (CMB). These regions have been dubbed Ultra-Low Velocity Zones. Introduction For over 15 yrs seismologists have mapped regions of ultra-low P- and S-wave velocities

  10. Ultra-low velocities and Superplumes Garnero, Thorne, McNamara, Rost [2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnero, Ed

    Ultra-low velocities and Superplumes Garnero, Thorne, McNamara, Rost [2005] - 1- Fine-scale ultra-low, Arizona 85287-1404 USA Abstract. Ultra-low velocity layering at Earth's core-mantle boundary has now been in the overlying few hundred km of the mantle. Ultra-low velocity zones contain properties consistent with partial

  11. Investigation of the Moessbauer Spectrum Quality as a Dependence on the Frequency of the Velocity Signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pechousek, J. [Centre for Nanomaterial Research, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17, listopadu 1192/12, 771 46, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Prochazka, R.; Cuda, J.; Frydrych, J.; Jancik, D. [Centre for Nanomaterial Research, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71, Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is focused on a quality characterizing the Moessbauer spectra measured for various frequencies of the velocity signal. Standard electromechanical double-loudspeaker drive and digital PID velocity controller were used for calibration spectra measurement in the frequency interval from 4 up to 100 Hz. Several parameters were evaluated for recommendation of the suitable velocity signal frequency.

  12. Experimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , steam, burning velocity, chemiluminescence, OH Introduction In ultra-wet gas turbines, the heatExperimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures Eric Abstract Global burning velocities of methane-air-steam mixtures are measured on prismatic laminar Bunsen

  13. Microbial Activity during Biodegradation and its Effects on Groundwater Velocity in a Contaminated Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schillig, Peter Curtis

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    of Contents??????????????????????????vi List of Tables???????????????????????????...ix List of Figures???????????????????????????...x Chapter 1: Introduction...??????????????????????...1 1.1: The Importance of Groundwater Velocity.............................................??1 1.2: Impact of Biological Activity on Groundwater Velocity...??????2 1.3: Current Techniques for Determining Groundwater Velocity...????..2 1.3.1: Indirect Techniques???...?????????????...3 1.3.2: Direct Techniques...

  14. Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) sphere impact testing of two materials from the lithium aluminosilicate family reinforced with different amounts of ceramic particulate, i.e., glass-ceramic materials, SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-G1 and SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-L. Both materials are provided by SCHOTT Glass (Duryea, PA). This work is a follow-up to similar sphere impact studies completed by the authors on PPG's Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass and SCHOTT BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. A gas gun or a sphere-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) spheres against the glass ceramic tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the glass-ceramics were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between sphere and target material. Quasistatic spherical indentation was also performed on both glass ceramics and their contact damage responses were compared to those of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses. Lastly, variability of contact damage response was assessed by performing spherical indentation testing across the area of an entire glass ceramic tile. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Resistan{trademark}-L glass ceramic required the highest velocity of sphere impact for damage to initiate. Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass was second best, then Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and then BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (2) Glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-L also required the largest force to initiate ring crack from quasi-static indentation. That ranking was followed, in descending order, by Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass, Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (3) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in Resistan{trademark}-G1 from quasi-static spherical indentation. This indicates that friction is affecting ring crack initiation in Resistan{trademark}-G1. Friction also affected ring crack initiation in Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glasses. Among these three materials, friction was the most pronounced (largest slope in the RCIF-elastic modulus graph) in the Starphire{reg_sign} and least pronounced in the BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. The reason for this is not understood, but differences in deformation behavior under high contact stresses could be a cause or contributor to this. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than it is under quasi-static conditions in Resistan{trademark}-L and Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramics. This is a trend observed too in Starphire{reg_sign} and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. (5) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation-induced ring crack initiation forces. This is not a material property nor is it exclusive to glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, rather, it is a statistical mechanical response to an accumulated history of processing and handling of that specific tile.

  15. 3D Least Squares Velocity from 3D Doppler Radial X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, John

    neighbourhoods to compute local 3D velocity. Radial velocity (measured by the Doppler effect) is the component3D Least Squares Velocity from 3D Doppler Radial Velocity X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer Dept. Radial velocity can be used to predict the motion of storms in sequences of Doppler radar datasets

  16. Photometric Redshift with Bayesian Priors on Physical Properties of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Masayuki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a proof-of-concept analysis of photometric redshifts with Bayesian priors on physical properties of galaxies. This concept is particularly suited for upcoming/on-going large imaging surveys, in which only several broad-band filters are available and it is hard to break some of the degeneracies in the multi-color space. We construct model templates of galaxies using a stellar population synthesis code and apply Bayesian priors on physical properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate. These priors are a function of redshift and they effectively evolve the templates with time in an observationally motivated way. We demonstrate that the priors help reduce the degeneracy and deliver significantly improved photometric redshifts. Furthermore, we show that a template error function, which corrects for systematic flux errors in the model templates as a function of rest-frame wavelength, delivers further improvements. One great advantage of our technique is that we simultaneously measure redshifts...

  17. The Application of the PEBBED Code Suite to the PBMR-400 Coupled Code Benchmark - FY 2006 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the recent developments of the PEBBED code suite and its application to the PBMR-400 Coupled Code Benchmark. This report addresses an FY2006 Level 2 milestone under the NGNP Design and Evaluation Methods Work Package. The milestone states "Complete a report describing the results of the application of the integrated PEBBED code package to the PBMR-400 coupled code benchmark". The report describes the current state of the PEBBED code suite, provides an overview of the Benchmark problems to which it was applied, discusses the code developments achieved in the past year, and states some of the results attained. Results of the steady state problems generated by the PEBBED fuel management code compare favorably to the preliminary results generated by codes from other participating institutions and to similar non-Benchmark analyses. Partial transient analysis capability has been achieved through the acquisition of the NEM-THERMIX code from Penn State University. Phase I of the task has been achieved through the development of a self-consistent set of tools for generating cross sections for design and transient analysis and in the successful execution of the steady state benchmark exercises.

  18. PHYSICS OF BURNING PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    facilities 1. Effects of energetic -particles 2. Self-heating 3. Physics of reactor-scale plasmas · Examples towards instability. · Interacts with (m,n) = (1,1) modes - sawteeth & fishbones 2. Self-Heating Workshop 4 May 2000 #12;PHYSICS INACCESSABLE TO PRESENT FACILITIES: PARTICLES AND SELF-HEATING / THERMAL

  19. DOCTORAL PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS, Subprogramme PHYSICS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Slovenia is producing a significant share of its electricity in nuclear power plant. The doctoral programme of nuclear engineering stems from the requirements of the Nuclear power plant Krsko, Slovenian Nuclear SafetyDOCTORAL PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS, Subprogramme PHYSICS, Module NUCLEAR ENGINEERING

  20. What physics and astronomy courses Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Essentials What physics and astronomy courses are there? MPhys Astrophysics Physics Physics (research placement) Physics with Astrophysics Theoretical Physics BSc Physics Physics with Astrophysics Theoretical Physics Foundation year for UK and EU students Physics and Astronomy degrees (with a foundation

  1. Research in: Experimental Photonuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    & Phenomenology Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology Accelerator Physics Health Physics #12;Experimental Photonuclear cryptography #12;Accelerator Physics Dallin, CLS Staff Particle Accelerator Design · Beam Optics · RF systemsResearch in: Experimental Photonuclear Physics Quantum Entanglement Particle Physics Theory

  2. The effect of rainfall on the velocity distribution in shallow channel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Larry Joe

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , gave the following equation for uniform two-dimensional open channel f low v v max ~2. Iog y Ve~~ in which v is the velocity at any distance, y, above the channel bed, v Is the maximum velocity, g is the acceleration of gravity, d is the Illa X... piezometer located at the same longi- tudinal position along the flume at the tip of the ve'locity probe. The velocity coefficient of the total head probe was obtained by two methods. 29 One method was determining the velocity by observing the time...

  3. Compact High-Velocity Clouds at High Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Burton; Robert Braun

    1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Six examples of the compact, isolated high-velocity clouds catalogued by Braun & Burton (1999) and identified with a dynamically cold ensemble of primitive objects falling towards the barycenter of the Local Group have been imaged with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope; an additional ten have been imaged with the Arecibo telescope. The imaging reveals a characteristic core/halo morphology: one or several cores of cool, relatively high-column-density material, are embedded in an extended halo of warmer, lower-density material. Several of the cores show kinematic gradients consistent with rotation; these CHVCs are evidently rotationally supported and dark-matter dominated. The imaging data allows several independent estimates of the distances to these objects, which lie in the range 0.3 to 1.0 Mpc. The CHVC properties resemble what might be expected from very dark dwarf irregular galaxies.

  4. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, Edwin F. (Alamo, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  5. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  6. Space Weather Application Using Projected Velocity Asymmetry of Halo CMEs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Michalek; N. Gopalswamy; S. Yashiro

    2008-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) originating from regions close to the center of the Sun are likely to be responsible for severe geomagnetic storms. It is important to predict geo-effectiveness of HCMEs using observations when they are still near the Sun. Unfortunately, coronagraphic observations do not provide true speeds of CMEs due to the projection effects. In the present paper, we present a new technique allowing estimate the space speed and approximate source location using projected speeds measured at different position angles for a given HCME (velocity asymmetry). We apply this technique to HCMEs observed during 2001-2002 and find that the improved speeds are better correlated with the travel times of HCMEs to Earth and with the magnitudes ensuing geomagnetic storms.

  7. A summary report on the search for current technologies and developers to develop depth profiling/physical parameter end effectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Q.H.

    1994-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the search strategies and results for available technologies and developers to develop tank waste depth profiling/physical parameter sensors. Sources searched include worldwide research reports, technical papers, journals, private industries, and work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) at Richland site. Tank waste physical parameters of interest are: abrasiveness, compressive strength, corrosiveness, density, pH, particle size/shape, porosity, radiation, settling velocity, shear strength, shear wave velocity, tensile strength, temperature, viscosity, and viscoelasticity. A list of related articles or sources for each physical parameters is provided.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horváth, Ákos

    , environmental radiation, noise, acustics, infra sound, natural radioactivity, solar energy, polarized lightENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS METHODS LABORATORY PRACTICES #12;Foundations of Environmental Science Lecture Enviromental Physics Methods Laboratory Practices #12;Eötvös Loránd University Faculty of Science ENVIRONMENTAL

  9. Evaluation of Physics Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    1 Evaluation of Physics Research Eindhoven University of Technology 1996-2003 April 2006 #12;2 3........................................................................................................................................................... 11 Individual Programme Evaluation Eindhoven University of Technology (RU) in September 2004 ­ and Technische Universiteit Eindhoven (TUE) decided to have their physics

  10. THE IMPACT OF THE SUPERSONIC BARYON-DARK MATTER VELOCITY DIFFERENCE ON THE z {approx} 20 21 cm BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McQuinn, Matthew; O'Leary, Ryan M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, Tseliakhovich and Hirata showed that during the cosmic Dark Ages the baryons were typically moving supersonically with respect to the dark matter with a spatially variable Mach number. Such supersonic motion may source shocks that inhomogeneously heat the universe. This motion may also suppress star formation in the first halos. Even a small amount of coupling of the 21 cm signal to this motion has the potential to vastly enhance the 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations at 15 {approx}< z {approx}< 40, as well as to imprint distinctive acoustic oscillations in this signal. We present estimates for the size of this coupling, which we calibrate with a suite of cosmological simulations of the high-redshift universe using the GADGET and Enzo codes. Our simulations, discussed in detail in a companion paper, are initialized to self-consistently account for gas pressure and the dark matter-baryon relative velocity, v {sub bc} (in contrast to prior simulations). We find that the supersonic velocity difference dramatically suppresses structure formation on 10-100 comoving kpc scales, it sources shocks throughout the universe, and it impacts the accretion of gas onto the first star-forming minihalos (even for halo masses as large as 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }). However, prior to reheating by astrophysical sources, we find that the v {sub bc}-sourced temperature fluctuations can contribute only as much as Almost-Equal-To 10% of the fluctuations in the 21 cm signal. We do find that v {sub bc} in certain scenarios could source an O(1) component in the power spectrum of the 21 cm background on observable scales via the X-ray (but not ultraviolet) backgrounds produced once the first stars formed. In a scenario in which {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub Sun} minihalos reheated the universe via their X-ray backgrounds, we find that the pre-reionization 21 cm signal would be larger than previously anticipated and exhibit more significant acoustic features. Such features would be a direct probe of the first stars and black holes. In addition, we show that structure formation shocks are unable to heat the universe sufficiently to erase a strong 21 cm absorption trough at z {approx} 20 that is found in most models of the sky-averaged 21 cm intensity.

  11. THEORY OF DISPERSED FIXED-DELAY INTERFEROMETRY FOR RADIAL VELOCITY EXOPLANET SEARCHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Eyken, Julian C.; Ge Jian; Mahadevan, Suvrath, E-mail: vaneyken@ipac.caltech.ed, E-mail: jge@astro.ufl.ed, E-mail: suvrath@astro.psu.ed [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dispersed fixed-delay interferometer (DFDI) represents a new instrument concept for high-precision radial velocity (RV) surveys for extrasolar planets. A combination of a Michelson interferometer and a medium-resolution spectrograph, it has the potential for performing multi-object surveys, where most previous RV techniques have been limited to observing only one target at a time. Because of the large sample of extrasolar planets needed to better understand planetary formation, evolution, and prevalence, this new technique represents a logical next step in instrumentation for RV extrasolar planet searches, and has been proven with the single-object Exoplanet Tracker (ET) at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and the multi-object W. M. Keck/MARVELS Exoplanet Tracker at Apache Point Observatory. The development of the ET instruments has necessitated fleshing out a detailed understanding of the physical principles of the DFDI technique. Here we summarize the fundamental theoretical material needed to understand the technique and provide an overview of the physics underlying the instrument's working. We also derive some useful analytical formulae that can be used to estimate the level of various sources of error generic to the technique, such as photon shot noise when using a fiducial reference spectrum, contamination by secondary spectra (e.g., crowded sources, spectroscopic binaries, or moonlight contamination), residual interferometer comb, and reference cross-talk error. Following this, we show that the use of a traditional gas absorption fiducial reference with a DFDI can incur significant systematic errors that must be taken into account at the precision levels required to detect extrasolar planets.

  12. Particle Physics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward W. Kolb

    1994-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Lectures presented at the 42nd Scottish Universities Summer School in Physics, St. Andrews, Scotland, August 1993.

  13. Introduction to Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linares, Edgar Casimiro [Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias Campus Leon, Loma del Bosque 103 Col. Lomas del Campestre, C.P. 37150 Leon (Mexico) and Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Av. Complutense, 22, C.P. 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I present a basic introduction to the physics of the neutrino, with emphasis on experimental results and developments.

  14. PHYSICS, QUALITATIVE BIBLIOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Kleer, Johan

    PHYSICS, QUALITATIVE C BIBLIOGRAPHY D. G. Bobrow and R J. Hayes, eds., Artif. Intell. 24," in Gentner and Stevens, 1983, pp. 155--190. J. de Kleer and J. S. Brown "A Qualitative Physics Based.J., 1983. P. Hayes, "The Naive Physics Manifesto," in Hobbs and Moore, 1985, pp 1--36 J R Hobbs and R C

  15. in Condensed Matter Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Master in Condensed Matter Physics ­ Master académique #12;2 #12;3 Students at the University. Condensed matter physics is about explaining and predicting the relationship between the atomic, and broad education in the field of condensed matter physics · introduce you to current research topics

  16. Sharply tunable group velocity in alkali vapors using a single low-power control field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardeep Kumar; Shubhrangshu Dasgupta

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how a single linearly polarized control field can produce a sharply tunable group velocity of a weak probe field at resonance in a four-level atomic configuration of alkali vapors. The dispersion can be switched from normal to anomalous along with vanishing absorption, just by changing intensity of the resonant control field. In addition, by allowing different intensities of the different polarization components of the control field, the anomalous dispersion can be switched back to the normal. This thereby creates a "valley of anomaly" in group index variation and offers two sets of control field intensities, for which the system behaves like a vacuum. The explicit analytical expressions for the probe coherence are provided along with all physical explanations. We demonstrate our results in $J = 1/2 \\leftrightarrow J = 1/2$ transition for D_1 lines in alkali atoms, in which one can obtain a group index as large as $3.2\\times10^{8}$ and as negative as $-1.5\\times10^{5}$ using a control field with power as low as 0.017 mW/cm$^2$ and 9.56 mW/cm$^2$ .

  17. Computational Methods for Collisional Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasinski, B F; Larson, D J; Hewett, D W; Langdon, A B; Still, C H

    2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the high density, high temperature plasmas produced by intense laser or particle beams requires accurate simulation of a large range of plasma collisionality. Current simulation algorithms accurately and efficiently model collisionless and collision-dominated plasmas. The important parameter regime between these extremes, semi-collisional plasmas, has been inadequately addressed to date. LLNL efforts to understand and harness high energy-density physics phenomena for stockpile stewardship require accurate simulation of such plasmas. We have made significant progress towards our goal: building a new modeling capability to accurately simulate the full range of collisional plasma physics phenomena. Our project has developed a computer model using a two-pronged approach that involves a new adaptive-resolution, ''smart'' particle-in-cell algorithm: complex particle kinetics (CPK); and developing a robust 3D massively parallel plasma production code Z3 with collisional extensions. Our new CPK algorithms expand the function of point particles in traditional plasma PIC models by including finite size and internal dynamics. This project has enhanced LLNL's competency in computational plasma physics and contributed to LLNL's expertise and forefront position in plasma modeling. The computational models developed will be applied to plasma problems of interest to LLNL's stockpile stewardship mission. Such problems include semi-collisional behavior in hohlraums, high-energy-density physics experiments, and the physics of high altitude nuclear explosions (HANE). Over the course of this LDRD project, the world's largest fully electromagnetic PIC calculation was run, enabled by the adaptation of Z3 to the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) White system. This milestone calculation simulated an entire laser illumination speckle, brought new realism to laser-plasma interaction simulations, and was directly applicable to laser target physics. For the first time, magnetic fields driven by Raman scatter have been observed. Also, Raman rescatter was observed in 2D. This code and its increased suite of dedicated diagnostics are now playing a key role in studies of short-pulse, high-intensity laser matter interactions. In addition, a momentum-conserving electron collision algorithm was incorporated into Z3. Finally, Z3's portability across diverse MPP platforms enabled it to serve the LLNL computing community as a tool for effectively utilizing new machines.

  18. Programs of Study Physics Undergraduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    ) and Modern Physics (PY 354) OR General Physics (PY 211, 212) and Elementary Modern Physics (PY 313); MethodsBU Physics Programs of Study Physics Undergraduate The undergraduate physics program at BU gives for the concentration in physics, as well as joint concentrations with astronomy, philosophy, and other College of Arts

  19. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  20. Simulation of BPM and DC-monitor assembly for the NESTOR storage ring by CST Studio Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Androsov, V P; Telegin, Yu N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The piece of NESTOR vacuum chamber with the ceramic insertion for DC-monitor and RF-shields was simulated by using both transient and wake field solvers of CST Studio Suite. For a 6 mm gap between two RF-shields the contributions of the assembly considered to the longitudinal broadband (BB) impedance Z/n and the loss factor kloss are 0.71 Ohm and 0.21 V/pC, correspondingly. These estimates are the second largest after those of the RF-cavity that were obtained till now for the NESTOR ring components. Contributions from a beam position monitor (BPM) are also obtained by simulation and compared with analytical estimates obtained earlier. We also present in the paper the frequency content of longitudinal impedance in the frequency range from 0 to 16 GHz for all ring components considered.

  1. The statistics of velocity fluctuations arising from a random distribution of point vortices: the speed of fluctuations and the diffusion coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Henri Chavanis; Clément Sire

    2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to a statistical analysis of the fluctuations of velocity and acceleration produced by a random distribution of point vortices in two-dimensional turbulence. We show that the velocity probability density function (p.d.f.) behaves in a manner which is intermediate between Gaussian and L\\'evy laws while the distribution of accelerations is governed by a Cauchy law. Our study accounts properly for a spectrum of circulations among the vortices. In the case of real vortices (with a finite core) we show analytically that the distribution of accelerations makes a smooth transition from Cauchy (for small fluctuations) to Gaussian (for large fluctuations) passing probably through an exponential tail. We introduce a function $T(V)$ which gives the typical duration of a velocity fluctuation $V$; we show that $T(V)$ behaves like $V$ and $V^{-1}$ for weak and large velocities respectively. These results have a simple physical interpretation in the nearest neighbor approximation and in Smoluchowski theory concerning the persistence of fluctuations. We discuss the analogies with respect to the fluctuations of the gravitational field in stellar systems. As an application of these results, we determine an approximate expression for the diffusion coefficient of point vortices. When applied to the context of freely decaying two-dimensional turbulence, the diffusion becomes anomalous and we establish a relationship $\

  2. Primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Christel Johanna

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Brief History of and Introduction to Neutrino Physics . 13Nucleosynthesis and Neutrino Physics A dissertationdensity depend on new neutrino physics in di?erent ways. In

  3. Working group report: Neutrino physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working group report: Neutrino physics Acknowledgements TheWorking group report: Neutrino physics Coordinators: SANDHYAthe report of the neutrino physics working group at WHEPP-X.

  4. Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics A.M. Sessler OctoberSOME FRONTIERS OF ACCELERATOR PHYSICS* Andrew M. Sessleris Some Frontiers of Accelerator Physics and it is most

  5. BSMBench: a flexible and scalable supercomputer benchmark from computational particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Ed; Jordan, Kirk; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Benchmarking plays a central role in the evaluation of High Performance Computing architectures. Several benchmarks have been designed that allow users to stress various components of supercomputers. In order for the figures they provide to be useful, benchmarks need to be representative of the most common real-world scenarios. In this work, we introduce BSMBench, a benchmarking suite derived from Monte Carlo code used in computational particle physics. The advantage of this suite (which can be freely downloaded from http://www.bsmbench.org/) over others is the capacity to vary the relative importance of computation and communication. This enables the tests to simulate various practical situations. To showcase BSMBench, we perform a wide range of tests on various architectures, from desktop computers to state-of-the-art supercomputers, and discuss the corresponding results. Possible future directions of development of the benchmark are also outlined.

  6. BSMBench: a flexible and scalable supercomputer benchmark from computational particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ed Bennett; Luigi Del Debbio; Kirk Jordan; Biagio Lucini; Agostino Patella; Claudio Pica; Antonio Rago

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Benchmarking plays a central role in the evaluation of High Performance Computing architectures. Several benchmarks have been designed that allow users to stress various components of supercomputers. In order for the figures they provide to be useful, benchmarks need to be representative of the most common real-world scenarios. In this work, we introduce BSMBench, a benchmarking suite derived from Monte Carlo code used in computational particle physics. The advantage of this suite (which can be freely downloaded from http://www.bsmbench.org/) over others is the capacity to vary the relative importance of computation and communication. This enables the tests to simulate various practical situations. To showcase BSMBench, we perform a wide range of tests on various architectures, from desktop computers to state-of-the-art supercomputers, and discuss the corresponding results. Possible future directions of development of the benchmark are also outlined.

  7. The physical Church-Turing thesis and the principles of quantum theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Arrighi; Gilles Dowek

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Notoriously, quantum computation shatters complexity theory, but is innocuous to computability theory. Yet several works have shown how quantum theory as it stands could breach the physical Church-Turing thesis. We draw a clear line as to when this is the case, in a way that is inspired by Gandy. Gandy formulates postulates about physics, such as homogeneity of space and time, bounded density and velocity of information --- and proves that the physical Church-Turing thesis is a consequence of these postulates. We provide a quantum version of the theorem. Thus this approach exhibits a formal non-trivial interplay between theoretical physics symmetries and computability assumptions.

  8. Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2012 Prof. Collins Modern Physics II (Physics 304)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2012 Prof. Collins 1/2 Modern Physics II (Physics 304) Syllabus, Fall 2012 Physics 304 is the second semester of a course in modern or quantum physics for students of physics, math, sciences and engineering. Principles learned in Physics 303 are applied here to understand

  9. Ion and electron microprobe study of troctolites, norite, and anorthosites from Apollo 14: Evidence for urKREEP assimilation during petrogenesis of Apollo 14 Mg-suite rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shervais, J.W.; McGee, J.J. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences] [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the Moon`s highland crust comprises Fe-rich anorthosites with calcic plagioclase compositions. Subsequent evolution of the highland crust was dominated by troctolites, anorthosites, and norites of the Mg-suite. This plutonic series is characterized by calcic plagioclase, and mafic minerals with high mg{number_sign} (=100{sup *}Mg/[Mg + Fe]). In an effort to distinguish the origin of this important lunar rock series, the authors have analyzed the REE content of primary cumulus phases in ten Mg-suite cumulates using SIMS, along with their major and minor element compositions by electron microprobe analysis. Nine of these samples have high mg{number_sign}s, consistent with their formation from the most primitive parent melts of the Mg-suite. The data presented here show that Mg-suite troctolites and anorthosites preserve major and trace element characteristics acquired during their formation as igneous cumulate rocks and that these characteristics can be used to reconstruct related aspects of the parent magma composition. Data show that primitive cumulates of the Mg-suite crystallized from magmas with REE contents similar to high-K KREEP in both concentration and relative abundance. The highly enriched nature of this parent magma contrasts with its primitive major element characteristics, as pointed out by previous workers. This enigma is best explained by the mixing of residual magma ocean urKREEP melts with ultramagnesian komatiitic partial melts from the deep lunar interior. The data do not support earlier models that invoke crustal metasomatism to enrich the Mg-suite cumulates after formation, or models which call for a superKREEP parent for the troctolites and anorthosites.

  10. Imaging Arithmetic: Physics Math > Physics + Math Gaurav Sharma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Gaurav

    Imaging Arithmetic: Physics Math > Physics + Math Gaurav Sharma Electrical and Computer, NY 14627-0126 ABSTRACT Imaging devices operate at the physical interfaces corresponding to image capture and reproduction. The combi- nation of physical insight and mathematical signal processing tools

  11. Physics high-ranking Journals (category 2) Advances in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics high-ranking Journals (category 2) Advances in Physics Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science Applied Physics Letters Astronomy & Astrophysics Astronomy and Astrophysics Review Astrophysical Journal European Physical Journal D. Atomic, Molecular

  12. Arecibo imaging of compact high-velocity clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, W B; Chengalur, J N

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten isolated compact high-velocity clouds (CHVCs) of the type cataloged by Braun & Burton (1999) have been imaged with the Arecibo telescope and were found to have a nested core/halo morphology. We argue that a combination of high-resolution filled-aperture and synthesis data is crucial to determining the intrinsic properties of the CHVCs. We identify the halos as Warm Neutral Medium surrounding one or more cores in the Cool Neutral Medium phase. These halos are clearly detected and resolved by the Arecibo filled-aperture imaging, which reaches a limiting sensitivity (1 sigma) of N_H about 2x10^17 cm^-2 over the typical 70 km/s linewidth at zero intensity. The FWHM linewidth of the halo gas is found to be 25 km/s, consistent with a WNM thermal broadening within 10^4 K gas. Substantial asymmetries are found at high N_H (>10^18.5 cm^-2) levels in 60% of our sample. A high degree of reflection-symmetry is found at low N_H (<10^18.5 cm^-2) in all sources studied at these levels. The column-density profiles...

  13. Impact of boundaries on velocity profiles in bubble rafts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuhong Wang; Kapilanjan Krishan; Michael Dennin

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under conditions of sufficiently slow flow, foams, colloids, granular matter, and various pastes have been observed to exhibit shear localization, i.e. regions of flow coexisting with regions of solid-like behavior. The details of such shear localization can vary depending on the system being studied. A number of the systems of interest are confined so as to be quasi-two dimensional, and an important issue in these systems is the role of the confining boundaries. For foams, three basic systems have been studied with very different boundary conditions: Hele-Shaw cells (bubbles confined between two solid plates); bubble rafts (a single layer of bubbles freely floating on a surface of water); and confined bubble rafts (bubbles confined between the surface of water below and a glass plate on top). Often, it is assumed that the impact of the boundaries is not significant in the ``quasi-static limit'', i.e. when externally imposed rates of strain are sufficiently smaller than internal kinematic relaxation times. In this paper, we directly test this assumption for rates of strain ranging from $10^{-3}$ to $10^{-2} {\\rm s^{-1}}$. This corresponds to the quoted quasi-static limit in a number of previous experiments. It is found that the top plate dramatically alters both the velocity profile and the distribution of nonlinear rearrangements, even at these slow rates of strain.

  14. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 89, 032907 (2014) Vectorial velocity filter for ultracold neutrons based on a surface-disordered mirror system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotter, Stefan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    neutrons. Considerable progress has been made [3­7] over the last decade to produce superthermal sources

  15. Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know, but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. Our study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. In Chap. 2 we will study kinetic theory — the simplest of all formalisms for analyzing systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the frame-independent laws it

  16. Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know, but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. Our study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. In Chap. 2 we will study kinetic theory — the simplest of all formalisms for analyzing systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the frame-independent laws it

  17. Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. This study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Chapter 2 will deal with kinetic theory, which is the simplest of all formalisms for studying systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the laws it obeys provide

  18. UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP 18th September 2012 STFC 2012 #12;UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP 18th September 2012 STFC · Conclusion #12;UCL DEPARTMENT OF SPACE & CLIMATE PHYSICS SPACE PLASMA PHYSICS GROUP 18th September 2012 STFC

  19. Ph.D. Physics Program Ph.D. in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Ph.D. Physics Program Ph.D. in Physics Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College Sciences Program Assessment Coordinator Michael Pravica pravica@physics.unlv.edu 895-1723 Five-Year Implementation Dates (2010 for physics at the graduate level 4. understand statistical physics at the graduate level 5. perform

  20. Velocity distribution measurements in atomic beams generated using laser induced back-ablation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denning, A; Lee, S; Ammonson, M; Bergeson, S D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a sub-thermal atomic beam.

  1. One-loop fluctuation-dissipation formula for bubble-wall velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1993-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The limiting bubble-wall velocity during a first-order electroweak phase transition is of interest in scenarios for electroweak baryogenesis. Khlebnikov has recently proposed an interesting method for computing this velocity based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. I demonstrate that at one-loop order this method is identical to simple, earlier techniques for computing the wall velocity based on computing the friction from particles reflecting off or transmitting through the wall in the ideal gas ( thin-wall'') limit.

  2. 3.September.2014 Physics 3340

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    ) Atmospheric structure and climate Solar input, radiation balance, environmental spectroscopy, ozone layers, CO3.September.2014 Physics 3340 Principles of Environmental Physics Instructor: Brad de Young Physics % Final examination 40 % #12;Course outline people (1) Environmental physics Introduction and background

  3. 4.September.2013 Physics 3340

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    (2) Atmospheric structure and climate Solar input, radiation balance, environmental spectroscopy4.September.2013 Physics 3340 Principles of Environmental Physics Instructor: Brad de Young Physics environmental physics will mean exploring the terrestrial environment through the understanding provided

  4. Recovery of uranium from seawater; 15: Development of amidoxime resins with high sedimentation velocity for passively driver fluidized bed adsorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egawa, Hiroaki; Kabay, N.; Jyo, A.; Hirono, Masaki; Shuto, Taketomi (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to design the amidoxime resins (RNH) suitable for circulating fluidized bed adsorbers, RNH were prepared from precursory acrylonitrile-divinylbenzene copolymer beads of different particle sizes, and chemical and physical properties of the resulting RNH were evaluated. Specific surface areas, pore structures, swelling ratios, and anion and cation-exchange capacities of RNH are little affected by the particle size, while their sedimentation velocities in water increase with an increase in particle size as expected from fluid dynamics. Although the uptake of uncomplexed uranyl ion from a uranyl nitrate solution (0.01 M) was not influenced by the particle size, the uranium uptake from seawater decreases with an increase in the particle size, indicating that the particle diffusion of the bulky complexed species UO[sub 2](CO[sub 3])[sub 3][sup 4[minus

  5. Effect of turbulent velocity on the \\HI intensity fluctuation power spectrum from spiral galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prasun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use numerical simulations to investigate effect of turbulent velocity on the power spectrum of \\HI intensity from external galaxies when (a) all emission is considered, (b) emission with velocity range smaller than the turbulent velocity dispersion is considered. We found that for case (a) the intensity fluctuation depends directly only on the power spectrum of the column density, whereas for case (b) it depends only on the turbulent velocity fluctuation. We discuss the implications of this result in real observations of \\HI fluctuations.

  6. Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso geothermal area, California, from...

  7. Test Loop Demonstration and Evaluation of Slurry Transfer Line Critical Velocity Measurement Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Morgen, Gerald P.; Peters, Timothy J.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Baer, Ellen BK

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the evaluation of three ultrasonic sensors for detecting critical velocity during slurry transfer between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  8. Measuring Stellar Radial Velocities with a Dispersed Fixed-Delay Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suvrath Mahadevan; Julian van Eyken; Jian Ge; Curtis DeWitt; Scott W. Fleming; Roger Cohen; Justin Crepp; Andrew Vanden Heuvel

    2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the ability to measure precise stellar barycentric radial velocities with the dispersed fixed-delay interferometer technique using the Exoplanet Tracker (ET), an instrument primarily designed for precision differential Doppler velocity measurements using this technique. Our barycentric radial velocities, derived from observations taken at the KPNO 2.1 meter telescope, differ from those of Nidever et al. by 0.047 km/s (rms) when simultaneous iodine calibration is used, and by 0.120 km/s (rms) without simultaneous iodine calibration. Our results effectively show that a Michelson interferometer coupled to a spectrograph allows precise measurements of barycentric radial velocities even at a modest spectral resolution of R ~ 5100. A multi-object version of the ET instrument capable of observing ~500 stars per night is being used at the Sloan 2.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory for the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS), a wide-field radial velocity survey for extrasolar planets around TYCHO-2 stars in the magnitude range 7.6velocities, this survey will also yield precise barycentric radial velocities for many thousands of stars using the data analysis techniques reported here. Such a large kinematic survey at high velocity precision will be useful in identifying the signature of accretion events in the Milky Way and understanding local stellar kinematics in addition to discovering exoplanets, brown dwarfs and spectroscopic binaries.

  9. asymmetric m-b velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consistent with Asymmetric M-B Velocity Distributions-Implications on Direct Dark Matter Searches General Relativity & Quantum Cosmology (arXiv) Summary: In the present paper...

  10. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and...

  11. Physics of Cancer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Our science

  12. Plasma physics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics OursourcesEdgephysics Subscribe

  13. A new P-velocity model for the Tethyan margin from a scaled S-velocity model and the inversion of P-and PKP-delay times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Lee, Suzan

    A new P-velocity model for the Tethyan margin from a scaled S-velocity model and the inversion of P- and PKP-delay times Sung-Joon Chang a, , Suzan Van der Lee a , Megan P. Flanagan b a Dept. of Earth Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-205, Livermore, CA 94551, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article

  14. > MSU Catalog Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    > MSU Catalog Physics Department of Physics http://www.physics.montana.edu/ The physics curriculum and concepts related to the physical world surrounding us. Using this broad base, which stresses fundamentals into jobs in education, industry, government, or business. The Department of Physics offers graduate work

  15. LANL | Physics | Active Interrogation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Division activities in standoff active-interrogation for detecting terrorist nuclear devices, 2011 Detonation of a terrorist nuclear device in a major city would have...

  16. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Operations personnel, and to various experimental instrument specialists in the Physics Division. The PAC members will review each proposal for scientific merit and...

  17. Nuclear Physics from QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. van Kolck

    2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective field theories provide a bridge between QCD and nuclear physics. I discuss light nuclei from this perspective, emphasizing the role of fine-tuning.

  18. Nuclear Physics: Meetings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Talks Archived Talks Additional Information Computing at JLab Operations Logbook Physics Topics: Meetings Talks given at the Science & Technology Review 2004 Larry Cardman:...

  19. Courses on Beam Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is an incomplete listing of course available for beam physics. United States Particle Accelerator School The US Particle Accelerator School provides educational programs in the...

  20. Physical Protection Program Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Supplements DOE O 473.1, by establishing requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Cancels: DOE M 5632.1C-1

  1. Physics of viral shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruinsma, RF; Bruinsma, RF; Klug, WS

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constitute minimum free energy states but they typically areshells must have different energies so T = 7 shells shouldof thermodynamics, the Gibbs free energy of Physics of Viral

  2. FAILED-DETONATION SUPERNOVAE: SUBLUMINOUS LOW-VELOCITY Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR KICKED REMNANT WHITE DWARFS WITH IRON-RICH CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, George C. IV; Van Rossum, Daniel R. [Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Perets, Hagai B. [Physics Department, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Fisher, Robert T. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA 02740 (United States)

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) originate from the thermonuclear explosions of carbon-oxygen (C-O) white dwarfs (WDs). The single-degenerate scenario is a well-explored model of SNe Ia where unstable thermonuclear burning initiates in an accreting, Chandrasekhar-mass WD and forms an advancing flame. By several proposed physical processes, the rising, burning material triggers a detonation, which subsequently consumes and unbinds the WD. However, if a detonation is not triggered and the deflagration is too weak to unbind the star, a completely different scenario unfolds. We explore the failure of the gravitationally confined detonation mechanism of SNe Ia, and demonstrate through two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations the properties of failed-detonation SNe. We show that failed-detonation SNe expel a few 0.1 M{sub Sun} of burned and partially burned material and that a fraction of the material falls back onto the WD, polluting the remnant WD with intermediate-mass and iron-group elements that likely segregate to the core forming a WD whose core is iron rich. The remaining material is asymmetrically ejected at velocities comparable to the escape velocity from the WD, and in response, the WD is kicked to velocities of a few hundred km s{sup -1}. These kicks may unbind the binary and eject a runaway/hypervelocity WD. Although the energy and ejected mass of the failed-detonation SN are a fraction of typical thermonuclear SNe, they are likely to appear as subluminous low-velocity SNe Ia. Such failed detonations might therefore explain or are related to the observed branch of peculiar SNe Ia, such as the family of low-velocity subluminous SNe (SN 2002cx/SN 2008ha-like SNe).

  3. Hohlraum Designs for High Velocity Implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meezan, N B; Hicks, D G; Callahan, D A; Olson, R E; Schneider, M S; Thomas, C A; Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J K; Dixit, S N; Michel, P A; Jones, O S; Clark, D S; Ralph, J E; Doeppner, T; MacKinnon, A J; Haan, S W; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Edwards, M J; Macgowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Atherton, L J

    2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we compare experimental shock and capsule trajectories to design calculations using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA. The measured trajectories from surrogate ignition targets are consistent with reducing the x-ray flux on the capsule by about 85%. A new method of extracting the radiation temperature as seen by the capsule from x-ray intensity and image data shows that about half of the apparent 15% flux deficit in the data with respect to the simulations can be explained by HYDRA overestimating the x-ray flux on the capsule. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) point-design target is designed to reach a peak fuel-layer velocity of 370 km/s by ablating 90% of its plastic (CH) ablator. The 192-beam National Ignition Facility laser drives a gold hohlraum to a radiation temperature (T{sub RAD}) of 300 eV with a 20 ns-long, 420 TW, 1.3 MJ laser pulse. The hohlraum x-rays couple to the CH ablator in order to apply the required pressure to the outside of the capsule. In this paper, we compare experimental measurements of the hohlraum T{sub RAD} and the implosion trajectory with design calculations using the code hydra. The measured radial positions of the leading shock wave and the unablated shell are consistent with simulations in which the x-ray flux on the capsule is artificially reduced by 85%. We describe a new method of inferring the T{sub RAD} seen by the capsule from time-dependent x-ray intensity data and static x-ray images. This analysis shows that hydra overestimates the x-ray flux incident on the capsule by {approx}8%.

  4. Arecibo imaging of compact high-velocity clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Burton; R. Braun; J. N. Chengalur

    2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten isolated compact high-velocity clouds (CHVCs) of the type cataloged by Braun & Burton (1999) have been imaged with the Arecibo telescope and were found to have a nested core/halo morphology. We argue that a combination of high-resolution filled-aperture and synthesis data is crucial to determining the intrinsic properties of the CHVCs. We identify the halos as Warm Neutral Medium surrounding one or more cores in the Cool Neutral Medium phase. These halos are clearly detected and resolved by the Arecibo filled-aperture imaging, which reaches a limiting sensitivity (1 sigma) of N_H about 2x10^17 cm^-2 over the typical 70 km/s linewidth at zero intensity. The FWHM linewidth of the halo gas is found to be 25 km/s, consistent with a WNM thermal broadening within 10^4 K gas. Substantial asymmetries are found at high N_H (>10^18.5 cm^-2) levels in 60% of our sample. A high degree of reflection-symmetry is found at low N_H (<10^18.5 cm^-2) in all sources studied at these levels. The column-density profiles of the envelopes are described well by the sky-plane projection of a spherical exponential in atomic volume density, which allows estimating the characteristic central halo column density, N_H(0) = 4.1+/-3.2x10^19 cm^-2, and characteristic exponential scale-length, h_B=420+/-90 arcsec. For plausible values of the thermal pressure at the CNM/WNM interface, these edge profiles allow distance estimates to be made for the individual CHVCs studied here which range between 150 and 850 kpc. (abridged)

  5. Distances and Metallicities of High- and Intermediate-Velocity Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. P. Wakker

    2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A table is presented that summarizes published absorption line measurements for the high- and intermediate velocity clouds (HVCs and IVCs). New values are derived for N(HI) in the direction of observed probes, in order to arrive at reliable abundances and abundance limits (the HI data are described in Paper II). Distances to stellar probes are revisited and calculated consistently, in order to derive distance brackets or limits for many of the clouds, taking care to properly interpret non-detections. The main conclusions are the following. 1) Absolute abundances have been measured using lines of SII, NI and OI, with the following resulting values: ~0.1 solar for one HVC (complex C), ~0.3 solar for the Magellanic Stream, ~0.5 solar for a southern IVC, and ~ solar for two northern IVCs (the IV Arch and LLIV Arch). Finally, approximate values in the range 0.5-2 solar are found for three more IVCs. 2) Depletion patterns in IVCs are like those in warm disk or halo gas. 3) Most distance limits are based on strong UV lines of CII, SiII and MgII, a few on CaII. Distance limits for major HVCs are >5 kpc, while distance brackets for several IVCs are in the range 0.5-2 kpc. 4) Mass limits for major IVCs are 0.5-8x10^5 M_sun, but for major HVCs they are >10^6 M_sun. 5) The CaII/HI ratio varies by up to a factor 2-5 within a single cloud, somewhat more between clouds. 6) The NaIHI ratio varies by a factor >10 within a cloud, and even more between clouds. Thus, CaII can be useful for determining both lower and upper distance limits, but NaI only yields upper limits.

  6. DEPOSITION VELOCITY ESTIMATION WITH THE GENII V2 SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchins, H.

    2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010, the Department of Energy (DOE) Chief of Nuclear Safety and Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), with the support of industry experts in atmospheric sciences and accident dose consequences analysis, performed detailed analyses of the basis for the dry deposition velocity (DV) values used in the MACCS2 computer code. As a result of these analyses, DOE concluded that the historically used default DV values of 1 centimeter/second (cm/s) for unfiltered/unmitigated releases and 0.1 cm/s for filtered/mitigated releases may not be reasonably conservative for all DOE sites and accident scenarios. HSS recently issued Safety Bulletin 2011-02, Accident Analysis Parameter Update, recommending the use of the newly developed default DV, 0.1 cm/s for an unmitigated/unfiltered release. Alternatively site specific DV values can be developed using GENII version 2 (GENII v2) computer code. Key input parameters for calculating DV values include surface roughness, maximum wind speed for calm, particle size, particle density and meteorological data (wind speed and stability class). This paper will include reasonably conservative inputs, and a truncated parametric study. In lieu of the highly-conservative recommended DV value (0.1cm/s) for unmitigated/unfiltered release, GENII v2 has been used to justify estimated 95th percentile DV values. Also presented here are atmospheric dilution factors ({chi}/Q values) calculated with the MACCS2 code using the DV values form GENII v2, {chi}/Q values calculated directly with GENII v2, and a discussion of these results compare with one another. This paper will give an overview of the process of calculating DV with GENII v2 including a discussion of the sensitivity of input parameters.

  7. Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers Douglas] #12;Velocity autocorrelation: Controlled by inertia 0.1 1 Dispersion: inertial at short time particles spend much more time at rest than in motion. Stochastic modeling approach: Direct solution of f

  8. On the possibility of variation of the fundamental constants of physics in the static universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Jonauskas

    1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A variation of fundamental constants of physics is proposed in a frame of static universe. It is shown when the velocity of light increases (decreases) the Planck's constant increases (decreases) and mass of bodies decreases (increases). This variation of constants leads to the variation of dimensions of bodies and the energy levels of atoms, but a fine structure constant remains unaltered.

  9. Differences between Physical Water Models and Steel Continuous Casters: A Theoretical Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    lower surface velocities and surface waves in the water model, especially for thinner cross sections to the similar kinematic viscosity of water and steel, and the ease of constructing and visualizing flow in waterDifferences between Physical Water Models and Steel Continuous Casters: A Theoretical Evaluation R

  10. Physics 129 Nuclear and Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , homework solutions, handouts and announcements will be posted at my course web site: http://scipp.ucsc.edu/daw/phys129/enrolled This web site is password protected. The username and password will be announced materials will be distributed on the web site above. Nine texts on nuclear and particle physics, all

  11. Twin Cities Campus The Aurora Center for Advocacy & Education 128 Pleasant St. SE Office for Student Affairs Suite 117 Appleby Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    Campus The Aurora Center for Advocacy & Education 128 Pleasant St. SE Office for Student Affairs Suite Prospective Volunteer, Thank you for your interest in being a volunteer with The Aurora Center for Advocacy and challenging work! The Aurora Center (TAC) provides free and confidential crisis intervention to victims

  12. Abington Abington Pediatrics* 360 Brockton Avenue, Suite 102, MA 02351 Yara Fernandez, MD 781-792-1999 781-792-1990 Laurie Massey, MD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    Andrea Reilly, MD Milton Pediatric Associates - MGH 10 Hawthorne Place, Suite 110, MA 02114 JonathanCullough, MD Rebecca Niloff, MD Cara O'Reilly, MD Scott Paul, MD Jonathon Brenner, MD John Robinson, MD Heidi-643-8120 Elizabeth Turnock, MD Pediatric Group Practice 55 Fruit Street, YAW 6D, MA 02114 Ronald Benz, MD 617

  13. Office of Technology Transfer and Innovation Partnerships, Innovative Technologies Complex, Suite 2100 Mailing Address: PO Box 6000, Binghamton, New York 13902-6000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Office of Technology Transfer and Innovation Partnerships, Innovative Technologies Complex, Suite 2100 Mailing Address: PO Box 6000, Binghamton, New York 13902-6000 Courier Address: Innovative Technologies Complex, 85 Murray Hill Rd., Binghamton, New York 13902 Telephone (607) 777-5870 Fax (607) 777

  14. Dye-Sentitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are an emerging low-cost third generation photovoltaic technology particularly suited for efficient light-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dye-Sentitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are an emerging low-cost third generation photovoltaic technology particularly suited for efficient light- to-electricity conversion in indoors low light-to -electricity conversion efficiency in early implementations under AM1.5 solar light. Easy

  15. FROM PHYSICS TO PHYSICALISM a version of this paper is published in Physicalism and its Discontents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loewer, Barry

    FROM PHYSICS TO PHYSICALISM a version of this paper is published in Physicalism and its Discontents be informed by science advocate physicalism in place of materialism. Physicalism claims that all facts obtain- of completed fundamental physics. Later I will discuss a more precise formulation. But not all contemporary

  16. About the Applied Physics Career Applied physics is a general term for physics which is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    About the Applied Physics Career Applied physics is a general term for physics which is intended" physics and engineering. "Applied" is distinguished from "pure" by a subtle combination of factors not be designing something in particular, but rather is using physics or conducting physics research with the aim

  17. Physics 141 & Physics 153 Laboratory Schedule -Physics 141 & 153 -Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Physics 141 & Physics 153 i Laboratory Schedule - Physics 141 & 153 - Spring 2008 Monday Tuesday ­ No Labs! #12;Physics 141 & Physics 153 ii Lab Instructor Information Name: Office: Phone: Email: Mailbox: · Write your lab instructor's name on it · Give it to Theresa Sis, Main Physics Office, 116 Brace Lab

  18. Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2011 Prof. Collins Modern Physics II (Physics 304)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2011 Prof. Collins 1/2 Modern Physics II (Physics 304) Syllabus, Fall 2011 Physics 304 is the second semester of a course in modern or quantum physics for students.com Classes: MWF, 12:10-13:00 pm, Webster B11. Required text: Modern Physics, Randy Harris (Pearson, 2nd

  19. Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2010 Prof. Collins Modern Physics II (Physics 304)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Physics 304 Syllabus Fall 2010 Prof. Collins 1/2 Modern Physics II (Physics 304) Syllabus, Fall 2010 Physics 304 is the second semester of a course in modern or quantum physics for students, 12:10-13:00 pm, Webster B11. Required text: Modern Physics, Randy Harris (Pearson, 2nd edition, 2008

  20. The Hall D Physics Program at JLab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leckey, John P. [Indiana U.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GlueX is one of the flagship experiments of the 12 GeV era at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The energy of the electron accelerator at JLab is presently undergoing an upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV and a 4th experimental hall (Hall D) is being added. The GlueX experimental apparatus consists of a tagged coherent bremsstrahlung photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The photoproduced mesons, which are created inside of a 2.2 T solenoid, will then pass through a pair of drift chambers and eventually deposit their energy into either of two calorimeters, depending on their respective angles. GlueX will attempt to map out the light meson spectrum and search for meson-gluon hybrids to better understand the confinement of quarks and gluons in quantum chromodynamics (QCD). There is little data on the photoproduction of light mesons and the GlueX experiment will exceed the current photoproduction data by several orders of magnitude in the first year alone. Photoproduction is specifically well suited to search for meson-gluon hybrids because in the flux tube model the production cross-sections are higher for meson-gluon hybrids from photons, with the spins of the virtual quark-antiquark pair aligned, than from other sources such as pions, with the spins of the quark-antiquark pair anti-aligned. There are also other Hall D experiments proposed to look for physics beyond the Standard Model by studying Eta rare or forbidden decay channels such as eta to two neutral pions. The 12 GeV upgrade of the JLab accelerator and the complete physics program of Hall D will be presented.

  1. Noncommutative Two Time Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Chagas-Filho

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a classical formalism describing two-time physics with Abelian canonical gauge field backgrounds. The formalism can be used as a starting point for the construction of an interacting quantized two-time physics theory in a noncommutative soace-time.

  2. Physics at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grahame A. Blair

    2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The physics at a 500-800 GeV electron positron linear collider, TESLA, is reviewed. The machine parameters that impact directly on the physics are discussed and a few key performance goals for a detector at TESLA are given. Emphasis is placed on precision measurements in the Higgs and top sectors and on extrapolation to high energy scales in the supersymmetric scenario.

  3. PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE TITLE PHYSICAL PLANT HIGH VOLTAGE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE To establish a consistent policy of performing Preventive Maintenance on high voltage by the G.S.A. Preventive Maintenance sections E- 29 (high voltage oil circuit breaker), E-32 (high voltage

  4. Top physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julia Thom

    2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision studies of top quark properties are a primary goal of the Run II physics program at the Fermilab Tevatron. Marking the first stages of this program, the CDF collaboration presents recent results on top pair production cross section, single top physics and top mass, using between 109 and 200 pb{sup -1} of Run II data.

  5. Nuclear physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Bâtiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There are important aspects of Cosmology, the scientific study of the large scale properties of the universe as a whole, for which nuclear physics can provide insights. Here, we will focus on Standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and we refer to the previous edition of the School [1] for the aspects concerning the variations of constants in nuclear cosmo-physics.

  6. Physics 554 Astronomy 510

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Physics 554 Astronomy 510 Nuclear Astrophysics Winter 2004 Chapter 1 Big Bang Nucleosynthesis 1 universe comes from nuclear physics, the elemental abundances we can measure on the sun's surface by mass are 1 H 0.75 4 He 0.25 We will see that these elements owe their abundances primarily to nuclear

  7. Electromagnetic plane waves with negative phase velocity in charged black strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Manzoor, R., E-mail: rubabmanzoor9@yahoo.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the propagation regions of electromagnetic plane waves with negative phase velocity in the ergosphere of static charged black strings. For such a propagation, some conditions for negative phase velocity are established that depend on the metric components and the choice of the octant. We conclude that these conditions remain unaffected by the negative values of the cosmological constant.

  8. The Effect of Slip Velocity on Saturation for Multiphase Condensing Mixtures in a PEM Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockie, John

    The Effect of Slip Velocity on Saturation for Multiphase Condensing Mixtures in a PEM Fuel Cell in computed results reported in the fuel cell literature, but which has not yet received a satisfactory to treat the slip velocity between phases. Keywords: Condensation ­ Two Phase Flow ­ PEM Fuel Cell ­ Slip

  9. The equivalence principle and the relative velocity of local inertial frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Shojai; A. Shojai

    2015-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we explicitly show that in general relativity, the relative velocity of two local inertial frames is always less than the velocity of light. This fact is a by-product of the equivalence principle. The general result is then illustrated within two examples, the FLRW cosmological model and the Schwarzschild metric.

  10. Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpkins, Alex

    Coulomb Friction Viscous Friction Stribeck Friction Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity. Static Friction Model: Friction force opposes the direction of motion when the sliding velocity is zero. Coulomb Friction Model: Friction force

  11. High Velocity Interparticle Collisions Driven by Ultrasound Tanya Prozorov, Ruslan Prozorov, and Kenneth S. Suslick*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    the liquid at velocities above the speed of sound.1-4 Unusual sonochemical effects are induced by these shock velocity of colliding particles approaches half the speed of sound in the liquid.4 The low melting point@uiuc.edu Ultrasonic irradiation of liquids produces transient cavitation: the formation, growth, and implosive

  12. ccsd00000648 Damping rates of the atomic velocity in Sisyphus cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decades have witnessed an impressive progress in laser cooling techniques, and nowdays it is possibleccsd­00000648 (version 1) : 29 Sep 2003 Damping rates of the atomic velocity in Sisyphus cooling and experimental study of the damping process of the atomic velocity in Sisyphus cooling. The relaxation rates

  13. Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Arctic sea ice velocity field: General circulation and turbulent-like fluctuations P. Rampal,1,2 J the Arctic sea ice velocity field as the superposition of a mean field and fluctuations. We study how subtracting the mean field, are analyzed in terms of diffusion properties. Although the Arctic sea ice cover

  14. Sound velocities of ferropericlase in the Earth's lower mantle Jung-Fu Lin,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jung-Fu "Afu"

    . Introduction [2] The speed of seismic waves in the Earth's lower mantle is governed by the elastic properties a dramatic increase in the isothermal bulk modulus (KT) and bulk sound velocity (VF) at the electronic spinSound velocities of ferropericlase in the Earth's lower mantle Jung-Fu Lin,1 Steven D. Jacobsen,2

  15. Measurement of fast-changing low velocities by photonic Doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song Hongwei; Wu Xianqian; Huang Chenguang; Wei Yangpeng; Wang Xi [Key Laboratory for Hydrodynamics and Ocean Engineering, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the increasing popularity of photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) in shock wave experiments, its capability of capturing low particle velocities while changing rapidly is still questionable. The paper discusses the performance of short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) in processing fringe signals of fast-changing low velocities measured by PDV. Two typical experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance. In the laser shock peening test, the CWT gives a better interpretation to the free surface velocity history, where the elastic precursor, main plastic wave, and elastic release wave can be clearly identified. The velocities of stress waves, Hugoniot elastic limit, and the amplitude of shock pressure induced by laser can be obtained from the measurement. In the Kolsky-bar based tests, both methods show validity of processing the longitudinal velocity signal of incident bar, whereas CWT improperly interprets the radial velocity of the shocked sample at the beginning period, indicating the sensitiveness of the CWT to the background noise. STFT is relatively robust in extracting waveforms of low signal-to-noise ratio. Data processing method greatly affects the temporal resolution and velocity resolution of a given fringe signal, usually CWT demonstrates a better local temporal resolution and velocity resolution, due to its adaptability to the local frequency, also due to the finer time-frequency product according to the uncertainty principle.

  16. Instructions for use Short-term Glacier Velocity Changes at West Kunlun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunogai, Urumu

    to global warming could further accelerate glacier15 flow and potentially lead to significant lossInstructions for use #12;Short-term Glacier Velocity Changes at West Kunlun Shan, Northwest Tibet. Abstract Seasonal glacier velocity changes across the High Arctic, including the Green- land Ice Sheet

  17. Radial velocities of three poorly studied clusters and the kinematics of open clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Christian R.; Friel, Eileen D., E-mail: hayescr@indiana.edu, E-mail: efriel@indiana.edu [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present radial velocities for stars in the field of the open star clusters Berkeley 44, Berkeley 81, and NGC 6802 from spectra obtained using the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO (WIYN) 3.5 m telescope. These clusters are of intermediate age (1-3 Gyr), located within the solar Galactocentric radius, and have no previous radial velocity measurements. We find mean radial velocities of –9.6 ± 3.0 km s{sup –1}, 48.1 ± 2.0 km s{sup –1}, and 12.4 ± 2.8 km s{sup –1} for Be 44, Be 81, and NGC 6802, respectively. We present an analysis of radial velocities of 134 open clusters of a wide range of ages using data obtained in this study and the literature. Assuming the system of clusters rotates about the Galactic center with a constant velocity, we find older clusters exhibit a slower rotation and larger line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion than younger clusters. The gradual decrease in rotational velocity of the cluster system with age is accompanied by a smooth increase in LOS velocity dispersion, which we interpret as the effect of heating on the open cluster system over time.

  18. Particle Temperature and Velocity Effects on the Porosity and Oxidation of an HVOF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settles, Gary S.

    Particle Temperature and Velocity Effects on the Porosity and Oxidation of an HVOF Corrosion) Independent control of particle velocity and temperature in the HVOF process has been achieved on porosity and no effect on oxidation. Particle temperature, on the other hand, correlates strongly

  19. HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE NEARBY SPIRAL GALAXY M 83

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Eric D.

    We present deep H I 21 cm and optical observations of the face-on spiral galaxy M 83 obtained as part of a project to search for high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in nearby galaxies. Anomalous-velocity neutral gas is detected ...

  20. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SN 2012fr: A LUMINOUS, NORMAL TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA WITH EARLY HIGH-VELOCITY FEATURES AND A LATE VELOCITY PLATEAU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childress, M. J.; Scalzo, R. A.; Sim, S. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B. P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Silverman, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Contreras, C.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Jha, S. W.; McCully, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Anderson, J. P.; De Jaeger, T.; Forster, F. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Benetti, S. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bufano, F., E-mail: mjc@mso.anu.edu.au [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia SN 2012fr, 33 of which were obtained before maximum light. At early times, SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II {lambda}6355 line that can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity ''photospheric'' component. This Si II {lambda}6355 HVF fades by phase -5; subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of {approx}12,000 km s{sup -1} until at least five weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v Almost-Equal-To 12,000 km s{sup -1} with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as an HVF beginning at v Almost-Equal-To 31,000 km s{sup -1} two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the ''shallow silicon'' and ''core-normal'' subclasses in the Branch et al. classification scheme, and on the border between normal and high-velocity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Wang et al. system. Though it is a clear member of the ''low velocity gradient'' group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.

  1. Effects of Velocity Correlation on Early Stage of Free Cooling Process of Inelastic Hard Sphere System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryo Kawahara; Hiizu Nakanishi

    2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The free cooling process in the inelastic hard sphere system is studied by analysing the data from large scale molecular dynamics simulations on a three dimensional system. The initial energy decay, the velocity distribution function, and the velocity correlation functions are calculated to be compared with theoretical predictions. The energy decay rate in the homogeneous cooling state is slightly but distinctively smaller than that expected from the independent collision assumption. The form of the one particle velocity distribution is found not to be stationary. These contradict to the predictions of the kinetic theory based on the Enskog-Boltzmann equation and suggest that the velocity correlation is already important in the early stage of homogeneous cooling state. The energy decay rate is analysed in terms of the velocity correlation.

  2. Derivation of Relativistic law of Addition of Velocities from Superposition of Eigenfunctions and Discreteness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mushfiq Ahmad

    2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have defined a slowness, s, as the reciprocal conjugate of velocity, v. s = -ih/v. We have shown that Einstein's postulate (v has an upper limit) implies that s is discrete. A velocity operator is defined as the derivative with respect to s. Superposition of corresponding Eigenfunctions give Galilean law of addition of velocities. We have replaced the differential operator by the corresponding finite difference symmetric operator. We have shown that superposition of corresponding discrete Eigenfunctions give relativistic law of addition of velocities. A reciprocal symmetric number system is developed and with the help of this number system we have shown the relation between superposition and relativistic law of addition of velocities.

  3. Line formation in AGB atmospheres including velocity effects. Molecular line profile variations of long period variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowotny, W; Aringer, B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmospheres of evolved red giants are considerably influenced by pulsations of the stellar interiors and developing stellar winds. The resulting complex velocity fields severely affect molecular line profiles observable in NIR spectra. With the help of model calculations the complex line formation process in AGB atmospheres was explored with the focus on velocity effects. Furthermore, we aimed for atmospheric models which are able to quantitatively reproduce line profile variations found in observed spectra of pulsating late-type giants. Models describing pulsation-enhanced dust-driven winds were used to compute synthetic spectra under the assumptions of chemical equilibrium and LTE and by solving the radiative transfer in spherical geometry including velocity effects. Radial velocities derived from Doppler-shifted synthetic line profiles provide information on the gas velocities in the line-forming region of the spectral features. On the basis of dynamic models we investigated in detail the finding that ...

  4. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ? log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

  5. High School Physics Teachers Summer Physics Education Research Position

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    High School Physics Teachers Summer Physics Education Research Position The Department of Physics's Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. This effort is intended to enhance high school physics and lecture demonstrations, or other pedagogical components, or to allow participation in current physics

  6. M.S. Physics Program M.S. in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    M.S. Physics Program M.S. in Physics Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College Sciences 1 for later reference. 1. understanding of a variety of fields of physics at the graduate level 2. performance of a physics research project suitable for a masters thesis 3. ability to communicate scientific research

  7. SCS Student N Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    ate examination dates cannot be eighting of the m nation of your co nt must be inclu ND CONTAC Number

  8. Top Physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Chang-Seong

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV analyzed by the CDF collaboration. Thanks to this large data sample, precision top quark measurements are now a reality at the Tevatron. Further, several new physics signals could appear in this large dataset. We will present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  9. Top Physics at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang-Seong Moon

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the recent results of top-quark physics using up to 6 fb$^{-1}$ of $p \\bar p$ collisions at a center of mass energy of $\\sqrt s$ = 1.96 TeV analyzed by the CDF collaboration. Thanks to this large data sample, precision top quark measurements are now a reality at the Tevatron. Further, several new physics signals could appear in this large dataset. We will present the latest measurements of top quark intrinsic properties as well as direct searches for new physics in the top sector.

  10. Top Physics at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcello Barisonzi

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider LHC is a top quark factory: due to its high design luminosity, LHC will produce about 200 millions of top quarks per year of operation. The large amount of data will allow to study with great precision the properties of the top quark, most notably cross-section, mass and spin. The Top Physics Working Group has been set up at the ATLAS experiment, to evaluate the precision reach of physics measurements in the top sector, and to study the systematic effects of the ATLAS detector on such measurements. This reports give an overview of the main activities of the ATLAS Top Physics Working Group in 2004.

  11. Fidelity of Physical Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Bahder

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The fidelity (Shannon mutual information between measurements and physical quantities) is proposed as a quantitative measure of the quality of physical measurements. The fidelity does not depend on the true value of unknown physical quantities (as does the Fisher information) and it allows for the role of prior information in the measurement process. The fidelity is general enough to allow a natural comparison of the quality of classical and quantum measurements. As an example, the fidelity is used to compare the quality of measurements made by a classical and a quantum Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  12. Physics | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Our sciencePhysics of Intrinsic

  13. MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    MILLERSVILLE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Student Handbook Visit us on the Web at http://www.millersville.edu/~physics the Millersville University Physics Department and its programs. It complements, but does not replace, the catalog of Department Programs 8 Description of Individual Programs: 8 -- B.S. in Physics 8 -- B.A. in Physics 8 -- B

  14. Physics and College of Arts and Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    and Professional Writing Physics 188: First-Year Seminar Physics 303: Modern Physics I Physics 320: Mechanics 202/206: Physics for Scientists and Engineers II Physics 303: Modern Physics I Physics 304: ModernPhysics and Astronomy College of Arts and Sciences Degree Options Bachelor of Science in Physics

  15. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    call 911 on the internal phones (or 252-1911 on cell phones) Safety Tom Mullen, Physics Division Safety Engineer. Please Note: If you have any comments or concerns regarding...

  16. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and as such hosts 200 - 300 Users each year. It is supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the Department of Energy. The Users come from U.S. universities and national...

  17. Physical Protection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes Department of Energy management objectives, requirements and responsibilities for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Cancels DOE 5632.1C. Canceled by DOE O 470.4.

  18. Physical process Mechanical mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Physical process Generation · Mechanical mechanisms F = m·a · Electric/Magnetic mechanisms F = B·i·l · Fluid dynamic/Hydraulic mechanisms q, p, ij · Thermal/Optical #12;2 Source unit

  19. PHYSICAL THERAPIST STUDENT EVALUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    planning worksheets, Clinical Site Information Form (CSIF), program outcomes, and other sourcesPHYSICAL THERAPIST STUDENT EVALUATION: CLINICAL EXPERIENCE AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION June 10, 2003 and clinical educators' requests to provide a voluntary, consistent and uniform approach for students

  20. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1997, San Jose, CBP Note-205, LBNL-39944, February 1997.71-259 wurtele@lbl.gov Joined LBNL in 1995 Ph. D. , Physics,collider collaboration) Chap. 8, LBNL- "Free Electron Laser