National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for velocity suite physical

  1. Enhanced Verification Test Suite for Physics Simulation Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamm, J R; Brock, J S; Brandon, S T; Cotrell, D L; Johnson, B; Knupp, P; Rider, W; Trucano, T; Weirs, V G

    2008-10-10

    This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations. The key points of this document are: (1) Verification deals with mathematical correctness of the numerical algorithms in a code, while validation deals with physical correctness of a simulation in a regime of interest. This document is about verification. (2) The current seven-problem Tri-Laboratory Verification Test Suite, which has been used for approximately five years at the DOE WP laboratories, is limited. (3) Both the methodology for and technology used in verification analysis have evolved and been improved since the original test suite was proposed. (4) The proposed test problems are in three basic areas: (a) Hydrodynamics; (b) Transport processes; and (c) Dynamic strength-of-materials. (5) For several of the proposed problems we provide a 'strong sense verification benchmark', consisting of (i) a clear mathematical statement of the problem with sufficient information to run a computer simulation, (ii) an explanation of how the code result and benchmark solution are to be evaluated, and (iii) a description of the acceptance criterion for simulation code results. (6) It is proposed that the set of verification test problems with which any particular code be evaluated include some of the problems described in this document. Analysis of the proposed verification test problems constitutes part of a necessary--but not sufficient--step that builds confidence in physics and engineering simulation codes. More complicated test cases, including physics models of greater sophistication or other physics regimes (e.g., energetic material response, magneto-hydrodynamics), would represent a scientifically desirable complement to the fundamental test cases discussed in this report. The authors believe that this document can be used to enhance the verification analyses undertaken at the DOE WP Laboratories and, thus, to improve the quality, credibility, and usefulness of the simulation codes that are analyzed with these problems.

  2. Interferometric velocity analysis using physical and nonphysical energy Simon King1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy clutters the velocity spectra, making the picking of primary energy more dif- ficult. MultiplesInterferometric velocity analysis using physical and nonphysical energy Simon King1 , Andrew Curtis as apparent energy that could not have propagated between receiver locations -- so-called nonphysical energy

  3. Assessing the CAM5 Physics Suite in the WRF-Chem Model: Implementation, Resolution Sensitivity, and a First Evaluation for a Regional Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-05-06

    A suite of physical parameterizations (deep and shallow convection, turbulent boundary layer, aerosols, cloud microphysics, and cloud fraction) from the global climate model Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) has been implemented in the regional model Weather Research and Forecasting with chemistry (WRF-Chem). A downscaling modeling framework with consistent physics has also been established in which both global and regional simulations use the same emissions and surface fluxes. The WRF-Chem model with the CAM5 physics suite is run at multiple horizontal resolutions over a domain encompassing the northern Pacific Ocean, northeast Asia, and northwest North America for April 2008 when the ARCTAS, ARCPAC, and ISDAC field campaigns took place. These simulations are evaluated against field campaign measurements, satellite retrievals, and ground-based observations, and are compared with simulations that use a set of common WRF-Chem Parameterizations. This manuscript describes the implementation of the CAM5 physics suite in WRF-Chem provides an overview of the modeling framework and an initial evaluation of the simulated meteorology, clouds, and aerosols, and quantifies the resolution dependence of the cloud and aerosol parameterizations. We demonstrate that some of the CAM5 biases, such as high estimates of cloud susceptibility to aerosols and the underestimation of aerosol concentrations in the Arctic, can be reduced simply by increasing horizontal resolution. We also show that the CAM5 physics suite performs similarly to a set of parameterizations commonly used in WRF-Chem, but produces higher ice and liquid water condensate amounts and near-surface black carbon concentration. Further evaluations that use other mesoscale model parameterizations and perform other case studies are needed to infer whether one parameterization consistently produces results more consistent with observations.

  4. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wardaya, P. D. Noh, K. A. B. M. Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave velocity of rock.

  5. CNP_TEST_SUITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002854MLTPL00 Automated Nuclear Data Test Suite  file:///usr/gapps/CNP_src/us/RR/test_suite_cz/cnp_test_suite 

  6. On physical interpretation of two dimensional time-correlations regarding time delay velocities and eddy shaping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorczak, N. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Manz, P. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut feur Plasmaphysik, Association Euratom-IPP, 85748Garching (Germany); Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Time delay estimation (TDE) techniques are frequently used to estimate the flow velocity from fluctuating measurements. Tilted structures carried by the flow lead to misinterpretation of the time delays in terms of velocity direction and amplitude. It affects TDE measurements from probes, and is also intrinsically important for beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging measurements. Local eddy shapes estimated from 2D fluctuating field are necessary to gain a more accurate flow estimate from TDE, as illustrated by Langmuir probe array measurements. A least square regression approach is proposed to estimate both flow field and shaping parameters. The technique is applied to a test case built from numerical simulation of interchange fluctuations. The local eddy shape does not only provide corrections for the velocity field but also quantitative information about the statistical interaction mechanisms between local eddies and E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. The technique is then tested on gaz puff imaging data collected at the edge of EAST tokamak plasmas. It is shown that poloidal asymmetries of the fluctuation fields-velocity and eddy shape-are consistent at least qualitatively with a ballooning type of turbulence immersed in a radially sheared equilibrium flow.

  7. PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS Submitted 21 May 1997 Exact Result for the 3rd Order Correlations of Velocity in Turbulence with Helicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Procaccia, Itamar

    PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS Submitted 21 May 1997 Exact Result for the 3rd Order Correlations conservation. This law states that the energy flux expressed as a spatial derivative of the 3rd order velocity as a second spatial derivative of the 3rd order velocity correlator with the rate of helicity dissipation

  8. Shear velocity as the function of frequency in heavy oils De-hua Han and Jiajin Liu, Rock Physics Lab, UH;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shear velocity as the function of frequency in heavy oils De-hua Han and Jiajin Liu, Rock Physics of heavy oils is discussed based on the measured data in our lab. Havriliak and Negami (HN) model is suggested to describe the frequency dispersion of heavy oils. Introduction The velocity behavior in heavy

  9. HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS AND THE PHYSICS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUD A0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2013-04-01

    The neutral hydrogen structure of high-velocity cloud A0 (at about -180 km s{sup -1}) has been mapped with a 9.'1 resolution. Gaussian decomposition of the profiles is used to separately map families of components defined by similarities in center velocities and line widths. About 70% of the H I gas is in the form of a narrow, twisted filament whose typical line widths are of the order of 24 km s{sup -1}. Many bright features with narrow line widths of the order of 6 km s{sup -1}, clouds, are located in and near the filament. A third category with properties between those of the filament and clouds appears in the data. The clouds are not always co-located with the broader line width filament emission as seen projected on the sky. Under the assumption that magnetic fields underlie the presence of the filament, a theorem is developed for its stability in terms of a toroidal magnetic field generated by the flow of gas along field lines. It is suggested that the axial magnetic field strength may be derived from the excess line width of the H I emission over and above that due to kinetic temperature by invoking the role of Alfven waves that create what is in essence a form of magnetic turbulence. At a distance of 200 pc the axial and the derived toroidal magnetic field strengths in the filament are then about 6 {mu}G while for the clouds they are about 4 {mu}G. The dependence of the derived field strength on distance is discussed.

  10. STAYS PNNL SUITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002851IBMPC00 STAYSL PNNL Suite  http://radiochemscieng.pnnl.gov/research_areas/research_area_description.asp?id=283 

  11. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  12. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  13. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VII. THE LOW-VELOCITY COLLISION BEHAVIOR OF LARGE DUST AGGLOMERATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen; Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2012-10-10

    We performed micro-gravity collision experiments in our laboratory drop tower using 5 cm sized dust agglomerates with volume filling factors of 0.3 and 0.4, respectively. This work is an extension of our previous experiments reported in Beitz et al. to aggregates of more than one order of magnitude higher masses. The dust aggregates consisted of micrometer-sized silica particles and were macroscopically homogeneous. We measured the coefficient of restitution for collision velocities ranging from 1 cm s{sup -1} to 0.5 m s{sup -1}, and determined the fragmentation velocity. For low velocities, the coefficient of restitution decreases with increasing impact velocity, in contrast to findings by Beitz et al. At higher velocities, the value of the coefficient of restitution becomes constant, before the aggregates break at the onset of fragmentation. We interpret the qualitative change in the coefficient of restitution as the transition from a solid-body-dominated to a granular-medium-dominated behavior. We complement our experiments by molecular-dynamics simulations of porous aggregates and obtain a reasonable match to the experimental data. We discuss the importance of our experiments for protoplanetary disks, debris disks, and planetary rings. This work is an extension to the previous work of our group and gives new insight into the velocity dependency of the coefficient of restitution due to improved measurements, better statistics, and a theoretical approach.

  14. Velocity oscillations in turbulent RayleighBenard convection Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Penger

    , Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 X.-D. Shang Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong P. Tong Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 and Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear

  15. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 84, 056408 (2011) Doppler measurement of implosion velocity in fast Z-pinch x-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starobinets, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    in the sun [1], waves in the solar corona [2], the wobble of stars perturbed by exoplanets [3,4], and binary of velocity is important to inferring the plasma kinetic energy, which can be the primary storage reservoir of j × B work accumulated over 100 ns during implosion and then provide plasma heating when thermalized

  16. Tsunami inundation modeling in constructed environments: A physical and numerical comparison of free-surface elevation, velocity, and momentum flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Tsunami inundation modeling in constructed environments: A physical and numerical comparison April 2013 Available online 17 May 2013 Keywords: Tsunami Inundation Macro-roughness Benchmark COULWAVE Friction factor A laboratory benchmark test for tsunami inundation through an urban waterfront including

  17. LANL Go Suite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand Cubic Feet)MultimaterialforLAESFGettingLANLLANL Go Suite

  18. METAL ABUNDANCES, RADIAL VELOCITIES, AND OTHER PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS FOR THE RR LYRAE STARS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemec, James M.; Cohen, Judith G.; Sesar, Branimir; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Derekas, Aliz; Moskalik, Pawel; Chadid, Merieme; Bruntt, Hans E-mail: jmn@isr.bc.ca E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu E-mail: derekas@konkoly.hu E-mail: chadid@marseille.fr

    2013-08-20

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude {delta} Sct star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which sixteen exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 {+-} 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 {+-} 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al. the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] {approx}-0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New P-{phi}{sub 31}{sup s}-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on {approx}970 days of quasi-continuous high-precision Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg)

  19. DC Pro Software Tool Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet describes how DOE's Data Center Energy Profiler (DC Pro) Software Tool Suite and other resources can help U.S. companies identify ways to improve the efficiency of their data centers.

  20. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group (PDG) Organizations American Institute of Physics (AIP) American Physical Society (APS) Institute of Physics (IOP) SPIE - International society for optics and photonics Top...

  1. SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The2/01/12 Page 1 ofSuper1 THISSPOT Suite

  2. Effects of pore-scale velocity and pore-scale physical processes on contaminant biodegradation during transport in groundwater: modeling and experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendoza Sanchez, Itza

    2008-10-10

    ) the thickness of the diffusion layer, and 2) the biofilm structure. Therefore one hypothesis of the research project is that flow velocity is an important factor controlling the biodegradation potential of groundwater systems. The main objective... rate coefficient k can be related to microscopic rate parameters that describe mass transfer across a boundary layer, diffusion within the biofilm, and reaction within the biofilm. Under transient (non-steady-state) conditions, the two models...

  3. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Physics Our science answers questions about the nature of the universe and delivers solutions for national security concerns. Contact Us Division Leader Doug Fulton Deputy...

  4. The Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit for space habitation and exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Rebecca (Rebecca Ann)

    2014-01-01

    The Variable Vector Countermeasure Suit (V2Suit) is a countermeasure suit for sensorimotor adaptation and musculoskeletal deconditioning in microgravity. The V2suit will consist of modules containing arrays of control ...

  5. Directed Test Suite Augmentation: Techniques and Tradeoffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Directed Test Suite Augmentation: Techniques and Tradeoffs Zhihong Xu, Yunho Kim, Moonzoo Kim and Technology kimyunho@kaist.ac.kr, moonzoo@cs.kaist.ac.kr ABSTRACT Test suite augmentation techniques are used in regression testing to identify code elements affected by changes and to generate test cases to cover those

  6. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Modanese

    2015-01-18

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for beta to 1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two macroscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  7. HYBRID COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS WITH STREAM VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Thacker, Robert J. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, B3H 3C3 (Canada)

    2013-07-10

    In the early universe, substantial relative ''stream'' velocities between the gas and dark matter arise due to radiation pressure and persist after recombination. To assess the impact of these velocities on high-redshift structure formation, we carry out a suite of high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations, which use smoothed particle hydrodynamic data sets as initial conditions, converted using a new tool developed for this work. These simulations resolve structures with masses as small as a few 100 M{sub Sun }, and we focus on the 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} ''mini-halos'' in which the first stars formed. At z Almost-Equal-To 17, the presence of stream velocities has only a minor effect on the number density of halos below 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, but it greatly suppresses gas accretion onto all halos and the dark matter structures around them. Stream velocities lead to significantly lower halo gas fractions, especially for Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} objects, an effect that is likely to depend on the orientation of a halo's accretion lanes. This reduction in gas density leads to colder, more compact radial profiles, and it substantially delays the redshift of collapse of the largest halos, leading to delayed star formation and possibly delayed reionization. These many differences suggest that future simulations of early cosmological structure formation should include stream velocities to properly predict gas evolution, star formation, and the epoch of reionization.

  8. Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation | Center for GasPhysics Physics Print Because a

  9. Introduction Machine Learning Suite XML Interface MLSuite Results Closing Remarks Machine Learning Suite Overview and Tutorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    Interface MLSuite Results Future Electrical Consumption EnergyPlus Approximation Inverse EnergyPlus Closing Learning Suite XML Interface MLSuite Results Future Electrical Consumption EnergyPlus Approximation Inverse EnergyPlus Closing Remarks Richard E. Edwards University of Tennessee Machine Learning Suite Overview

  10. BDP: BrainSuite Diffusion Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, Richard M.

    BDP: BrainSuite Diffusion Pipeline Chitresh Bhushan #12; Quantify microstructural tissue ROI Connectivity ROI Statistics MPRAGE Diffusion #12;Diffusion Pipeline Dicom to NIfTI Co ROIs Custom ROIs #12;Diffusion Pipeline Dicom to NIfTI Co-registration Diffusion Modeling Tractography

  11. Collaboration Suite Advanced Web Client User Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepp, Larry

    ZimbraTM Collaboration Suite Advanced Web Client User Guide Version 5.0 #12;Zimbra Web Client User Guide Copyright Notice Copyright © 2008 Zimbra, Inc. All rights reserved materials, onscreen publication, or Web documentation--is expressly forbidden. Zimbra and the Zimbra logo

  12. Work Project Report: Static Analysis Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartek, Filip

    2013-01-01

    This summer, I was working in PH-SFT group as a summer student. My assignment consisted of developing a software tool for static analysis of C++ code. The tool is called Static Analysis Suite. This document describes the project - the initial goal, the domain of interest, i.e. static program analysis, the work I performed and the tools I used, and the results.

  13. Average Angular Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Essen

    2004-01-28

    This paper addresses the problem of the separation of rotational and internal motion. It introduces the concept of average angular velocity as the moment of inertia weighted average of particle angular velocities. It extends and elucidates the concept of Jellinek and Li (1989) of separation of the energy of overall rotation in an arbitrary (non-linear) $N$-particle system. It generalizes the so called Koenig's theorem on the two parts of the kinetic energy (center of mass plus internal) to three parts: center of mass, rotational, plus the remaining internal energy relative to an optimally translating and rotating frame.

  14. Elementary analysis of the special relativistic combination of velocities, Wigner rotation, and Thomas precession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Kane

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an elementary introduction to the qualitative and quantitative results of velocity combination in special relativity, including the Wigner rotation and Thomas precession. We utilize only the most familiar tools of special relativity, in arguments presented at three differing levels: (1) utterly elementary, which will suit a first course in relativity; (2) intermediate, to suit a second course; and (3) advanced, to suit higher level students. We then give a summary of useful results, and suggest further reading in this often obscure field.

  15. User Guide for the STAYSL PNNL Suite of Software Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2013-02-27

    The STAYSL PNNL software suite provides a set of tools for working with neutron activation rates measured in a nuclear fission reactor, an accelerator-based neutron source, or any neutron field to determine the neutron flux spectrum through a generalized least-squares approach. This process is referred to as neutron spectral adjustment since the preferred approach is to use measured data to adjust neutron spectra provided by neutron physics calculations. The input data consist of the reaction rates based on measured activities, an initial estimate of the neutron flux spectrum, neutron activation cross sections and their associated uncertainties (covariances), and relevant correction factors. The output consists of the adjusted neutron flux spectrum and associated covariance matrix, which is useful for neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations.

  16. The bioenergetics of walking and running in space suits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Christopher E. (Christopher Edward), 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Space-suited activity is critical for human spaceflight, and is synonymous with human planetary exploration. Space suits impose kinematic and kinetic boundary conditions that affect movement and locomotion, and in doing ...

  17. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    2007-01-01

    Seismic images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Algorithms producing the seismic velocities from thethe Dix velocities and the true seismic velocities in 2D . .

  18. Irena : tool suite for modeling and analysis of small-angle scattering.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilavsky, J.; Jemian, P.

    2009-04-01

    Irena, a tool suite for analysis of both X-ray and neutron small-angle scattering (SAS) data within the commercial Igor Pro application, brings together a comprehensive suite of tools useful for investigations in materials science, physics, chemistry, polymer science and other fields. In addition to Guinier and Porod fits, the suite combines a variety of advanced SAS data evaluation tools for the modeling of size distribution in the dilute limit using maximum entropy and other methods, dilute limit small-angle scattering from multiple non-interacting populations of scatterers, the pair-distance distribution function, a unified fit, the Debye-Bueche model, the reflectivity (X-ray and neutron) using Parratt's formalism, and small-angle diffraction. There are also a number of support tools, such as a data import/export tool supporting a broad sampling of common data formats, a data modification tool, a presentation-quality graphics tool optimized for small-angle scattering data, and a neutron and X-ray scattering contrast calculator. These tools are brought together into one suite with consistent interfaces and functionality. The suite allows robust automated note recording and saving of parameters during export.

  19. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric G. Speckhard; Kenny C. Y. Ng; John F. Beacom; Ranjan Laha

    2015-07-31

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce line-like spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will reach the required 0.1% level. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  20. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  1. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  2. Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic System - 2013 BTO Peer Review Rooftop Unit Suite: RTU Challenge, RTU Advanced Controls and RTU Smart Monitoring and Diagnostic...

  3. The coyote universe III: simulation suite and precision emulator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    suite and precision emulator for the nonlinear matter power spectrum Ongoing and future large scale structure surveys targeted at the investigation of dark energy will enter...

  4. Suite of Cellulase Enzyme Technologies for Biomass Conversion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Suite of Cellulase Enzyme Technologies for Biomass Conversion National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  5. Automated structure solution with the PHENIX suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zwart, Peter H [LBNL; Afonine, Pavel V [LBNL; Grosse - Kunstleve, Ralf W [LBNL

    2008-01-01

    Significant time and effort are often required to solve and complete a macromolecular crystal structure. The development of automated computational methods for the analysis, solution, and completion of crystallographic structures has the potential to produce minimally biased models in a short time without the need for manual intervention. The PHENIX software suite is a highly automated system for macromolecular structure determination that can rapidly arrive at an initial partial model of a structure without significant human intervention, given moderate resolution, and good quality data. This achievement has been made possible by the development of new algorithms for structure determination, maximum-likelihood molecular replacement (PHASER), heavy-atom search (HySS), template- and pattern-based automated model-building (RESOLVE, TEXTAL), automated macromolecular refinement (phenix. refine), and iterative model-building, density modification and refinement that can operate at moderate resolution (RESOLVE, AutoBuild). These algorithms are based on a highly integrated and comprehensive set of crystallographic libraries that have been built and made available to the community. The algorithms are tightly linked and made easily accessible to users through the PHENIX Wizards and the PHENIX GUI.

  6. Automated Structure Solution with the PHENIX Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwart, Peter H.; Zwart, Peter H.; Afonine, Pavel; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Hung, Li-Wei; Ioerger, Tom R.; McCoy, A.J.; McKee, Eric; Moriarty, Nigel; Read, Randy J.; Sacchettini, James C.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Storoni, L.C.; Terwilliger, Tomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2008-06-09

    Significant time and effort are often required to solve and complete a macromolecular crystal structure. The development of automated computational methods for the analysis, solution and completion of crystallographic structures has the potential to produce minimally biased models in a short time without the need for manual intervention. The PHENIX software suite is a highly automated system for macromolecular structure determination that can rapidly arrive at an initial partial model of a structure without significant human intervention, given moderate resolution and good quality data. This achievement has been made possible by the development of new algorithms for structure determination, maximum-likelihood molecular replacement (PHASER), heavy-atom search (HySS), template and pattern-based automated model-building (RESOLVE, TEXTAL), automated macromolecular refinement (phenix.refine), and iterative model-building, density modification and refinement that can operate at moderate resolution (RESOLVE, AutoBuild). These algorithms are based on a highly integrated and comprehensive set of crystallographic libraries that have been built and made available to the community. The algorithms are tightly linked and made easily accessible to users through the PHENIX Wizards and the PHENIX GUI.

  7. Cummings Engineering's Secure Mobility Suite B Crypto Module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings Engineering's Secure Mobility Suite B Crypto Module FIPS 140-2 Level 1 Security Policy Version: 1.1 Last Updated: April 15, 2013 Cummings Engineering Consultants, Inc. 145 S. 79th St., Suite 26 Chandler, Arizona 85226 Office: 480-809-6024 Fax: 866-884-9570 #12;Cummings Engineering's Secure Mobility

  8. Measuring Test Case Similarity to Support Test Suite Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaidman, Andy

    Measuring Test Case Similarity to Support Test Suite Understanding Michaela Greiler, Arie van.e.zaidman}@tudelft.nl Abstract. In order to support test suite understanding, we investigate whether we can automatically derive relations between test cases. In par- ticular, we search for trace-based similarities between (high

  9. Inversion Of Travel Time For Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Common source velocities and borehole compensated (BC) estimates have been used to obtain formation velocity estimates from full waveform acoustic

  10. Mechanical counter-pressure space suit design using active materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holschuh, Bradley Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suits have the potential to greatly improve the mobility of astronauts as they conduct planetary exploration activities; however, the underlying technologies required to provide ...

  11. Engineering a robotic exoskeleton for space suit simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyen, Forrest Edward

    2013-01-01

    Novel methods for assessing space suit designs and human performance capabilities are needed as NASA prepares for manned missions beyond low Earth orbit. Current human performance tests and training are conducted in space ...

  12. PARENTE SUITE USER'S GUIDE (c) 1994-97

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    are granted a limited license to use this working version of Parente Suite which includes PGraph, Ego2Cpl, Par, funding from the A. von Humboldt Foundation and Leibnitz Award to Thomas Schweizer

  13. MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy’s Chief of Nuclear Safety hosted a MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop on June 5-6, 2012, in Germantown, Maryland. Approximately 70 participants attended. The purpose of...

  14. Materials and Textile Architecture Analyses for Mechanical Counter-Pressure Space Suits using Active Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buechley, Leah

    Mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suits have the potential to improve the mobility of astronauts as they conduct planetary exploration activities. MCP suits differ from traditional gas-pressurized space suits by ...

  15. Angular Velocity Operator and Barnett-Pegg Formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramandeep S. Johal

    1997-07-14

    We define a new operator within Barnett-Pegg formalism for phase angle. The physical predictions for this operator correspond to those expected of an angular velocity operator. Examples studied are particle on a circle with and without magnetic field and quantum harmonic oscillator.

  16. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Belen Martinez Carmona; Jose L. Muñoz Martinez

    2015-11-19

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramer-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  17. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J; Martinez, Jose L Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramer-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  18. Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Rybkowski, Zofia; Aliber, Jennifer; Lange, Cathleen

    2015-02-08

    dans ce contexte. Mots cle´s: e´tablissement de lutte contre le cancer, e´valuation d’e´tablissement, soins de sante´, centre de perfusion, occupation, vie prive´e, interaction sociale Introduction This study focuses on an evaluation of infusion suites... facility, facility evaluation, healthcare, infusion suite, post-occupancy, privacy, social interaction Il est pre´sente´ une e´valuation de l’expe´rience ve´cue par les patients, les familles et les employe´s dans deux centres de perfusion. L’un des centres...

  19. DYNA3D/ParaDyn Regression Test Suite Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J I

    2011-01-25

    The following table constitutes an initial assessment of feature coverage across the regression test suite used for DYNA3D and ParaDyn. It documents the regression test suite at the time of production release 10.1 in September 2010. The columns of the table represent groupings of functionalities, e.g., material models. Each problem in the test suite is represented by a row in the table. All features exercised by the problem are denoted by a check mark in the corresponding column. The definition of ''feature'' has not been subdivided to its smallest unit of user input, e.g., algorithmic parameters specific to a particular type of contact surface. This represents a judgment to provide code developers and users a reasonable impression of feature coverage without expanding the width of the table by several multiples. All regression testing is run in parallel, typically with eight processors. Many are strictly regression tests acting as a check that the codes continue to produce adequately repeatable results as development unfolds, compilers change and platforms are replaced. A subset of the tests represents true verification problems that have been checked against analytical or other benchmark solutions. Users are welcomed to submit documented problems for inclusion in the test suite, especially if they are heavily exercising, and dependent upon, features that are currently underrepresented.

  20. A Test Suite for GCMs: An Intercomparison of 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    A Test Suite for GCMs: An Intercomparison of 11 Dynamical Cores Christiane Jablonowski1, PeterSandia National Laboratories PDEs on the Sphere Workshop, Santa Fe Apr/28/2009 #12;Motivation · Test standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques · Idea: Establish a collection of test cases that finds broad

  1. Soft Wearable Motion Sensing Suit for Lower Limb Biomechanics Measurements*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Soft Wearable Motion Sensing Suit for Lower Limb Biomechanics Measurements* Yigit Meng¨uc¸1,2, Yong of human biomechanics as well as the entertainment industry. Although existing technologies motion data in order to understand the underlying biomechanics. Simulation tools such as Open- Sim [2

  2. CBR Fermenter Suite Frequently asked questions: Updated Jun 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strynadka, Natalie

    , and air), motor, pH sensor, dO2 sensor, temperature sensor, heating jacket, and 3 pumps (acid, base Floor Plan from the Equipment page to see floor plan of our suite. I'm the first time user. How do I

  3. Anti-cancer Technology Summary 121 Research Drive, Suite 501

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    Anti-cancer Technology Summary 121 Research Drive, Suite 501 Saskatoon, SK, S7N 1K2 Tel: (306) 966 cancers are ranked 2ed , 3ed and 11th of the most diagnosed cancers (National Cancer Institute, USA cancer cells but also healthy ones. A great opportunity exists for targeted therapies for the use solely

  4. The UNIVERSITY of WESTERN ONTARIO Subcommittee on Information Technology (SUIT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    The UNIVERSITY of WESTERN ONTARIO SENATE Subcommittee on Information Technology (SUIT) Terms of Reference: To report to SCUP on security issues relating to Information Technology, including: mechanisms, review, update and/or develop policies in the area of Information Technology. To report annually to SCUP

  5. Diffraction-focusing migration velocity analysis with application to seismic and GPR data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biondi, Biondo

    from migrated diffracted events by analyzing their residual focus- ing in physical space (depth. By comparing the results of full prestack depth migration before and after the velocity updating, we confirm the migration velocity function for a 2-D, zero-offset, Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) data set. Depth migra

  6. Three axis velocity probe system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Smith, Jr., Nelson S. (Morgantown, WV); Utt, Carroll E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01

    A three-axis velocity probe system for determining three-axis positional velocities of small particles in fluidized bed systems and similar applications. This system has a sensor head containing four closely-spaced sensing electrodes of small wires that have flat ends to establish a two axis plane, e.g. a X-Y plane. Two of the sensing electrodes are positioned along one of the axes and the other two are along the second axis. These four sensing electrodes are surrounded by a guard electrode, and the outer surface is a ground electrode and support member for the sensing head. The electrodes are excited by, for example, sinusoidal voltage having a peak-to-peak voltage of up to 500 volts at a frequency of 2 MHz. Capacitive currents flowing between the four sensing electrodes and the ground electrode are influenced by the presence and position of a particle passing the sensing head. Any changes in these currents due to the particle are amplified and synchronously detected to produce positional signal values that are converted to digital form. Using these digital forms and two values of time permit generation of values of the three components of the particle vector and thus the total velocity vector.

  7. Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Measurements in Unlithified Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rickards, Benjamin Thomas

    2011-05-31

    Shear-wave (S-wave) velocity can be directly correlated to material stiff¬ness making it a valuable physical property that has found uses in construction, engineering, and envi-ronmental projects. This study compares three ...

  8. Scurit Informatique / Numro 11 ////// Mars 2011 >>>> suite page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provence Aix-Marseille I, Université de

    sphères privée et professionnelle se retrouve aussi dans une simple clef UsB. Isabelle Benoist de la... _8 par Isabelle Benoist >>>> suite page 2 �ditorial Clefs USB : pratiques mais risquées Luc Vallée ANSSI Par leurs formats et la généralisation rapide de l'interface USB, les clefs sont rapidement

  9. Velocity condensation for magnetotactic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupprecht, Jean-Francois; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic swimmers tend to align along magnetic field lines against stochastic reorientations. We show that the swimming strategy, e.g. active Brownian motion versus run-and-tumble dynamics, strongly affects the orientation statistics. The latter can exhibit a velocity condensation whereby the alignment probability density diverges. As a consequence, we find that the swimming strategy affects the nature of the phase transition to collective motion, indicating that L\\'evy run-and-tumble walks can outperform active Brownian processes as strategies to trigger collective behavior.

  10. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  11. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  12. Effects of increasing tip velocity on wind turbine rotor design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resor, Brian Ray; Maniaci, David Charles; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-05-01

    A reduction in cost of energy from wind is anticipated when maximum allowable tip velocity is allowed to increase. Rotor torque decreases as tip velocity increases and rotor size and power rating are held constant. Reduction in rotor torque yields a lighter weight gearbox, a decrease in the turbine cost, and an increase in the capacity for the turbine to deliver cost competitive electricity. The high speed rotor incurs costs attributable to rotor aero-acoustics and system loads. The increased loads of high speed rotors drive the sizing and cost of other components in the system. Rotor, drivetrain, and tower designs at 80 m/s maximum tip velocity and 100 m/s maximum tip velocity are created to quantify these effects. Component costs, annualized energy production, and cost of energy are computed for each design to quantify the change in overall cost of energy resulting from the increase in turbine tip velocity. High fidelity physics based models rather than cost and scaling models are used to perform the work. Results provide a quantitative assessment of anticipated costs and benefits for high speed rotors. Finally, important lessons regarding full system optimization of wind turbines are documented.

  13. Petrovay: Solar physics Helioseismology SOLAR OSCILLATIONS: INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrovay, Kristóf

    where = T(P0/P) ad (potential temperature) #12;Petrovay: Solar physics Helioseismology Group velocity Helioseismology Global helioseismology: Determine set of nlm's infer global mean solar structure. LocalPetrovay: Solar physics Helioseismology SOLAR OSCILLATIONS: INTRODUCTION Small departures from

  14. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore »the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  15. Pyrotechnic deflagration velocity and permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begeal, D R; Stanton, P L

    1982-01-01

    Particle size, porosity, and permeability of the reactive material have long been considered to be important factors in propellant burning rates and the deflagration-to-detonation transition in explosives. It is reasonable to assume that these same parameters will also affect the deflagration velocity of pyrotechnics. This report describes an experimental program that addresses the permeability of porous solids (particulate beds), in terms of particle size and porosity, and the relationship between permeability and the behavior of pyrotechnics and explosives. The experimental techniques used to acquire permeability data and to characterize the pyrotechnic burning are discussed. Preliminary data have been obtained on the burning characteristics of titanium hydride/potassium perchlorate (THKP) and boron/calcium chromate (BCCR). With THKP, the velocity of a pressure wave (from hot product gases) in the unburned region shows unsteady behavior which is related to the initial porosity or permeability. Simultaneous measurements with pressure gauges and ion gauges reveal that the pressure wave precedes the burn front. Steady burning of BCCR was observed with pressure gauge diagnostics and with a microwave interferometry technique.

  16. Time, Distance, Velocity, Redshift: a personal guided tour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Kiang

    2003-08-01

    An attempt to answer the question 'Can we observe galaxies that recede faster than light ?' led to a re-examination of the notions of time, distance, velocity and redshift as they occur in newtonian physics, special relativity, general relativity and cosmology. A number of misconceptions were uncovered. It was found that, once freed of special relativity preconceptions, the above question is easily and unequivocally answered

  17. Space suit simulator for partial gravity extravehicular activity experimentation and training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilkey, Andrea L. (Andrea Lynn)

    2012-01-01

    During human space exploration, mobility is extremely limited when working inside a pressurized space suit. Astronauts perform extensive training on Earth to become accustomed to space suit-imposed high joint torques and ...

  18. On the deformation of human skin for mechanical counter pressure space suit development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obropta, Edward William, Jr

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of planetary bodies requires space suits that do not inhibit astronaut mobility. Gas pressurized suits are typically bulky and stiff to operate or require unnatural human motion. Development of mechanical counter ...

  19. Robotic Joint Torque Testing: A Critical Tool in the Development of Pressure Suit Mobility Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyen, Forrest Edward

    Pressure suits allow pilots and astronauts to survive in extreme environments at the edge of Earth’s atmosphere and in the vacuum of space. One obstacle that pilots and astronauts face is that gas-pressurized suits stiffen ...

  20. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director www progress report on various activities that are underway. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503

  1. STING Millennium: a web-based suite of programs for comprehensive and simultaneous analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neshich, Goran

    STING Millennium: a web-based suite of programs for comprehensive and simultaneous analysis ABSTRACT STING Millennium Suite (SMS) is a new web-based suite of programs and databases providing visuali it provides a variety of algorithms and validated data, wrapped-up in a user friendly web interface. Using SMS

  2. Augmenting Test Suites Effectiveness by Increasing Output Diversity Nadia Alshahwan and Mark Harman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Mark

    that output uniqueness shall be used to augment a traditional test generation adequacy criterion not replace for relatively high coverage test suites. In this paper we use output uniqueness to augment a test suiteAugmenting Test Suites Effectiveness by Increasing Output Diversity Nadia Alshahwan and Mark Harman

  3. SHIP VELOCITY FIELDS , Lichuan Guib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui, Lichuan

    and with free surface, bow flow, wave hydrodynamics, propulsor hydrodynamics, appendages, and cavitation extensive use of PIV for measurement of ship-hydrodynamic flows. In fact, PIV is fast replacing techniques of micro-scale flow structures so that new physics can be studied such as cavitation. Refinement

  4. TD M41 Series Serie 3 Suites de fonctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berglund, Nils

    1 + (x + n)2 ; 2. fn(x) = 1 - xn 1 + xn , x 0; 7. fn(x) = 1 nx2 + 1 ; 3. fn(x) = x n(1 + xn) ; 8. fn(x) = sin(nx) nx , x > 0; 4. fn(x) = nx 1 + n2x ; 9. fn(x) = (log x)2n - 2 (log x)2n + 2 , x > 0; 5. fn(x) = nx3 1 + nx2 ; 10. fn(x) = x2 e-x/n ; Exercice 2 D´eterminer pour lesquelles des suites de fonctions

  5. Controlling Velocity In Bipedal Walking: A Dynamic Programming Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkeson, Christopher G.

    velocity and swing leg angle and angular velocity) to 1 (stance leg angular velocity). RepercussionsControlling Velocity In Bipedal Walking: A Dynamic Programming Approach Thijs Mandersloot their velocity. We control velocity by using dynamic programming to design control laws for each desired velocity

  6. Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

  7. Oxidation of H on Rh(111): H2O product velocity and angular distributions K. D. Gibson, J. I. Colonell, and S. J. Sibener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    Oxidation of H on Rh(111): H2O product velocity and angular distributions K. D. Gibson, J. I measured the angular dependence of the energy and intensity of the product H2O at Ts 650 K. The velocity distributed. © 1995 American Institute of Physics. INTRODUCTION The angular and velocity distributions

  8. Local Energy Velocity of Classical Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Drozdov; A. A. Stahlhofen

    2007-04-19

    It is proposed to apply a recently developed concept of local wave velocities to the dynamical field characteristics, especially for the canonical field energy density. It is shown that local energy velocities can be derived from the lagrangian directly. The local velocities of zero- and first- order for energy propagation has been obtained for special cases of scalar and vector fields. Some important special cases of these results are discussed.

  9. Predicting stress-induced velocity anisotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Mukerji, T.; Godfrey, N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Rock Physics Lab.] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Rock Physics Lab.

    1995-07-01

    A simple transformation, using measured isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S} versus hydrostatic pressure, is presented for predicting stress-induced seismic velocity anisotropy in rocks. The compliant, crack-like portions of the pore space are characterized by generalized compressional and shear compliances that are estimated form the isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S}. The physical assumption that the compliant porosity is crack-like means that the pressure dependence of the generalized compliances is governed primarily by normal tractions resolved across cracks and defects. This allows the measured pressure dependence to be mapped form the hydrostatic stress state to any applied nonhydrostatic stress. Predicted P- and S-wave velocities agree reasonably well with uniaxial stress data for Barre Granite and Massillon Sandstone. While it is mechanically similar to methods based on idealized ellipsoidal cracks, the approach is relatively independent of any assumed crack geometry and is not limited to small crack densities.

  10. eXtended CASA Line Analysis Software Suite (XCLASS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Möller, T; Schilke, P

    2015-01-01

    The eXtended CASA Line Analysis Software Suite (XCLASS) is a toolbox for the Common Astronomy Software Applications package (CASA) containing new functions for modeling interferometric and single dish data. Among the tools is the myXCLASS program which calculates synthetic spectra by solving the radiative transfer equation for an isothermal object in one dimension, whereas the finite source size and dust attenuation are considered as well. Molecular data required by the myXCLASS program are taken from an embedded SQLite3 database containing entries from the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy CDMS) and JPL using the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center (VAMDC) portal. Additionally, the toolbox provides an interface for the model optimizer package Modeling and Analysis Generic Interface for eXternal numerical codes (MAGIX), which helps to find the best description of observational data using myXCLASS (or another external model program), i.e., finding the parameter set that most closely reproduces t...

  11. An Integrated Suite of Tools to support Human Factors Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques V Hugo

    2001-08-01

    Human Factors Engineering (HFE) work for the nuclear industry imposes special demands on the practitioner in terms of the scope, complexity and safety requirements for humans in nuclear installations. Unfortunately HFE lags behind other engineering disciplines in the development and use of modern, powerful tools for the full range of analysis and design processes. HFE does not appear to be an attractive market for software and hardware developers and as a result, HFE practitioners usually have to rely on inefficient general-purpose tools like standard office software, or they have to use expensive special-purpose tools that offer only part of the solution they require and which also do not easily integrate with other tools. There have been attempts to develop generic software tools to support the HFE analyst and also to achieve some order and consistency in format and presentation. However, in spite of many years of development, very few tools have emerged that have achieved these goals. This would suggest the need for special tools, but existing commercial products have been found inadequate and to date not a single tool has been developed that adequately supports the special requirements of HFE work for the nuclear industry. This paper describes an integrated suite of generic as well as purpose-built tools that facilitate information solicitation, issues tracking, work domain analysis, functional requirements analysis, function allocation, operational sequence analysis, task analysis and development of HSI design requirements. In combination, this suite of tools supports the analytical as well as the representational aspects of key HFE activities primarily for new NPPs, including capturing information from subject matter experts and various source documents directly into the appropriate tool and then linking, analyzing and extending that information further to represent detailed functional and task information, and ultimately HSI design requirements. The paper also describes a tool developed especially for functional requirements analysis, function allocation, and task analysis.

  12. Analysis of Ultrasonic Velocities in Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of measurements on ultrasonic velocities of liquid hydrocarbons and mixtures. They found that their dataAnalysis of Ultrasonic Velocities in Hydrocarbon Mixtures James G. Berryman Lawrence Livermore on hydrocarbon mixtures was shown by Wang and Nur [JASA 89, 2725 (1991)] to agree quite well with the predictions

  13. Field comparison of the point velocity probe with other groundwater velocity measurement methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labaky, W.; Devlin, John F.; Gillham, R. W.

    2009-03-14

    Field testing of a new tool for measuring groundwater velocities at the centimeter scale, the point velocity probe (PVP), was undertaken at Canadian Forces Base, Borden, Ontario, Canada. The measurements were performed in a sheet pile...

  14. Observations of Velocity Conditions near a Hydroelectric Turbine Draft Tube Exit using ADCP Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2007-10-01

    Measurement of flow characteristics near hydraulic structures is an ongoing challenge because of the need to obtain rapid measurements of time-varying velocity over a relatively large spatial domain. This paper discusses use of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to measure the rapidly diverging flow exiting from an operating hydroelectric turbine draft tube exit. The resolved three-dimensional velocity vectors show a highly complex and helical flow pattern developed near to and downstream of the exit. Velocity vectors were integrated across the exit and we computed an uneven percentage of flow (67%/33%) passing through the two draft tube barrels at a mid-range turbine discharge, consistent with physical model results. In addition to the three-dimensional velocity vectors, the individual one-dimensional velocities measured by each of the four ADCP beams can be separately used as calibration and validation datasets for numerical and physical models. This technique is demonstrated by comparing along-beam ADCP velocity measurements to data collected in a scaled physical model.

  15. Tenure Track Positions in Applied Physics The Physics Department of the Naval Postgraduate School invites applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenure Track Positions in Applied Physics The Physics Department of the Naval Postgraduate School invites applications for two positions at the Assistant/Associate Professor level in Applied Physics in the areas of: Shock Physics and Energetic Material; High-Velocity Impact Phenomena; Acoustic sensor

  16. From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits- Mound Science and Energy Museum Programs Cover a Wide Range of Topics From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to...

  17. New Physics of Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Y. Wang

    2014-04-15

    Einstein utilized Lorentz invariance from Maxwell's equations to modify mechanical laws and establish the special theory of relativity. Similarly, we may have a different theory if there exists another covariance of Maxwell's equations. In this paper, we find such a new transformation where Maxwell's equations are still unchanged. Consequently, Veselago's metamaterial and other systems have negative phase velocities without double negative permittivity and permeability can be described by a unified theory. People are interested in the application of metamaterials and negative phase velocities but do not appreciate the magnitude and significance to the spacetime conception of modern physics and philosophy.

  18. Quench propagation velocity for highly stabilized conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mints, R.G. |; Ogitsu, T. |; Devred, A.

    1995-05-01

    Quench propagation velocity in conductors having a large amount of stabilizer outside the multifilamentary area is considered. It is shown that the current redistribution process between the multifilamentary area and the stabilizer can strongly effect the quench propagation. A criterion is derived determining the conditions under which the current redistribution process becomes significant, and a model of effective stabilizer area is suggested to describe its influence on the quench propagation velocity. As an illustration, the model is applied to calculate the adiabatic quench propagation velocity for a conductor geometry with a multifilamentary area embedded inside the stabilizer.

  19. Collisional Velocities and Rates in Resonant Planetesimal Belts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martina Queck; Alexander V. Krivov; Miodrag Sremcevic; Philippe Thebault

    2007-07-23

    We consider a belt of small bodies around a star, captured in one of the external or 1:1 mean-motion resonances with a massive perturber. The objects in the belt collide with each other. Combining methods of celestial mechanics and statistical physics, we calculate mean collisional velocities and collisional rates, averaged over the belt. The results are compared to collisional velocities and rates in a similar, but non-resonant belt, as predicted by the particle-in-a-box method. It is found that the effect of the resonant lock on the velocities is rather small, while on the rates more substantial. The collisional rates between objects in an external resonance are by about a factor of two higher than those in a similar belt of objects not locked in a resonance. For Trojans under the same conditions, the collisional rates may be enhanced by up to an order of magnitude. Our results imply, in particular, shorter collisional lifetimes of resonant Kuiper belt objects in the solar system and higher efficiency of dust production by resonant planetesimals in debris disks around other stars.

  20. Modeling velocity dispersion In Gypsy site, Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsaadan, Sami Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Discrepancies in interval velocities estimated from vertical well measurements made with different source central frequencies at Gypsy site could be primarily explained in terms of intrinsic attenuation. Four intervals ...

  1. Recovering Velocity Distributions via Penalized Likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    1996-05-14

    Line-of-sight velocity distributions are crucial for unravelling the dynamics of hot stellar systems. We present a new formalism based on penalized likelihood for deriving such distributions from kinematical data, and evaluate the performance of two algorithms that extract N(V) from absorption-line spectra and from sets of individual velocities. Both algorithms are superior to existing ones in that the solutions are nearly unbiased even when the data are so poor that a great deal of smoothing is required. In addition, the discrete-velocity algorithm is able to remove a known distribution of measurement errors from the estimate of N(V). The formalism is used to recover the velocity distribution of stars in five fields near the center of the globular cluster Omega Centauri.

  2. Physics 630 Statistical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    strongly the issue of problem solving and understanding of the main concepts in Statistical PhysicsPhysics 630 Statistical Physics Spring 2005 Logistics Lecture Room: 1100 (Science I, 1st floor (Supplement) Introduction to Modern Statistical Mechanics, by David Chandler, Oxford Objectives This course

  3. Supernova 2010as: the lowest-velocity member of a family of flat-velocity type IIb supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folatelli, Gastón; Bersten, Melina C.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Hamuy, Mario [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Olivares Estay, Felipe; Pignata, Giuliano [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, Joseph P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Holmbo, Simon; Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Morrell, Nidia; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, Mark M. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Förster, Francisco [Center for Mathematical Modelling, Universidad de Chile, Avenida Blanco Encalada 2120 Piso 7, Santiago (Chile); Prieto, José Luis [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Valenti, Stefano [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Afonso, Paulo; Altenmüller, Konrad; Elliott, Jonny, E-mail: gaston.folatelli@ipmu.jp [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße 1, D-85740 Garching (Germany); and others

    2014-09-01

    We present extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the stripped-envelope supernova SN 2010as. Spectroscopic peculiarities such as initially weak helium features and low expansion velocities with a nearly flat evolution place this object in the small family of events previously identified as transitional Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe). There is ubiquitous evidence of hydrogen, albeit weak, in this family of SNe, indicating that they are in fact a peculiar kind of Type IIb SNe that we name 'flat-velocity' Type IIb. The flat-velocity evolution—which occurs at different levels between 6000 and 8000 km s{sup –1} for different SNe—suggests the presence of a dense shell in the ejecta. Despite the spectroscopic similarities, these objects show surprisingly diverse luminosities. We discuss the possible physical or geometrical unification picture for such diversity. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope images, we associate SN 2010as with a massive cluster and derive a progenitor age of ?6 Myr, assuming a single star-formation burst, which is compatible with a Wolf-Rayet progenitor. Our hydrodynamical modeling, on the contrary, indicates that the pre-explosion mass was relatively low, ?4 M {sub ?}. The seeming contradiction between a young age and low pre-SN mass may be solved by a massive interacting binary progenitor.

  4. Test Suite Reduction for Fault Detection and Localization: A Combined Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beszedes, Árpád

    detection capability of a test suite in general is hard, and the mostly accepted method is to use different from fault localization viewpoint. Based on this observation, we defined a test reduction methodTest Suite Reduction for Fault Detection and Localization: A Combined Approach László Vidács

  5. Conformance Test Architecture and Test Suite for ANSI/NIST-ITL 1-2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conformance Test Architecture and Test Suite for ANSI/NIST-ITL 1-2007 Fernando L. Podio Dylan Yaga Christofer J. McGinnis NISTIR 7791 #12;NISTIR 7791 Conformance Test Architecture and Test Suite for ANSI develops tests, test methods, reference data, proof of concept implementations, and technical analysis

  6. Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ã?lveczky, Peter Csaba

    Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite to the specification and analy- sis of the AER/NCA suite of active network multicast protocol compo- nents, AER/NCA poses challenging new problems for its formal specification and analysis. Real-Time Maude

  7. Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ã?lveczky, Peter Csaba

    Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite in Real­Time Maude Peter and the Maude formal methodology to the specification and analy­ sis of the AER/NCA suite of active network and the composability of its components, AER/NCA poses challenging new problems for its formal specification

  8. Space Suited Crew Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Array A-Z PSE Decoupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    : : I Pt ·::., p.~ Space Suited Crew Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Array A-Z PSE Decoupled Shroud (Crew Engineering Mockup) NO. REV. NO. ATM-973 PAGE 1 OF 8 rtems Division DATE Z/9/71 A. INTRCDUC TICN On January ZZ, 1971, the BxA Crew Engineering group performed a lG, space- suited handling

  9. A Diagnostic Suite of Models for the Evaluation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy Parameterizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    A Diagnostic Suite of Models for the Evaluation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy Parameterizations by S. D of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy Parameterizations written by S. D. Bachman has been approved for the Department and Oceanic Sciences) A Diagnostic Suite of Models for the Evaluation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddy

  10. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    2007-01-01

    Mathematics Research Interests Scienti?c Computing, PDE, Computational Physics, Geophysics, Numerical

  11. Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data ĺ Ð 1 ¸ Ö Ò ×¹ Ò ÝÖ¹Ê Ò 2 1 processing algo- rithms normally used to extract water velocity. We present an alternative method for velocity homogeneity precludes the extraction of fish velocities. Water velocities can sometimes still

  12. 7, 48894923, 2007 Physical controls on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and kinematic trajectories from a mesoscale weather model (MM5), we assess physical controls on Ci P() during, homoge- neous freezing and mesoscale variability in vertical velocities led to broad modeled P the importance of homogeneous freezing and mesoscale vertical velocity variability in controlling Ci P() shapes

  13. Velocity dependence of friction of confined polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Sivebaek; V. N. Samoilov; B. N. J. Persson

    2009-11-18

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the frictional shear stress for both cases. In our simulations, the polymer films are very thin (approx. 3 nm), and the solid walls are connected to a thermostat at a short distance from the polymer slab. Under these circumstances we find that frictional heating effects are not important, and the effective temperature in the polymer film is always close to the thermostat temperature. In the first setup (a), for hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 1400 carbon atoms, the shear stresses are nearly independent of molecular length, but for the shortest hydrocarbon C20H42 the frictional shear stress is lower. In all cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer [case (b)] the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C-atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant increases (abruptly) with increasing sliding velocity (from 6 to 7 layers), leading to a decrease of the friction. Before and after the layering transition, the frictional shear stresses are nearly proportional to the logarithm of sliding velocity. For the longest hydrocarbon (1400 C-atoms) the friction shows no dependence on the sliding velocity, and for the shortest hydrocarbon (20 C-atoms) the frictional shear stress increases nearly linearly with the sliding velocity.

  14. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Syahputra, Ahmad [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)] [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  15. New Frontiers in Solar Physics: Broadband Imaging Spectroscopy with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the solar panel of the AASC recommended an integrated suite of instrumentation designed to meetNew Frontiers in Solar Physics: Broadband Imaging Spectroscopy with the Frequency Agile Solar and other astrophysical objects and processes. Outstanding problems in solar physics include the magnetic

  16. Characterization of a Dipole Flow System Using Point Velocity Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ian Reed

    2010-11-23

    A direct groundwater velocity measurement tool, the Point Velocity Probe, was developed to measure velocities in the vertical and horizontal directions. The tool was designed and tested in a low-cost laboratory flow-through tank. Following testing...

  17. Passive scalar in a large-scale velocity field I. Kolokolov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebedev, Vladimir

    Passive scalar in a large-scale velocity field I. Kolokolov Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics advection of a passive scalar (t,r) by an incompressible large-scale turbulent flow. In the framework of and for the passive scalar difference (r1) (r2) for separations r1 r2 lying in the convective interval are found

  18. Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Sushil J.

    Seismic Velocity Inversion with Genetic Algorithms Sushil J. Louis Qinxue Chen Genetic Adaptive­surface models from seismic travel­time data. Given a sub­surface model, the physics of wave propagation through refractive media can be used to compute travel times for seismic waves. How­ ever, in practice, we have

  19. Physics with electroweak penguins at LHCb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel De Cian

    2012-12-30

    Flavour changing neutral currents are only allowed via loop diagrams in the Standard Model (SM). Electroweak penguin processes are therefore sensitive probes for new physics, as physics beyond the Standard Model can enter via virtual particles at the same level as SM physics. The LHCb detector at the LHC with its forward geometry is ideally suited for the analysis of electroweak penguin processes in $B$ meson decays. All analyses are performed with 1 fb$^{-1}$ of collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV in 2011 and constrain new physics models.

  20. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS A protostellar jet and outflow...

  1. RESEARCH ARTICLE Minimization of divergence error in volumetric velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Minimization of divergence error in volumetric velocity measurements Volumetric velocity measurements taken in incompressible fluids are typically hindered by a nonzero

  2. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 32100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 32100 Modern Physics for Engineers Designation to one- electron atoms, atomic shell structure and periodic table; nuclear physics, relativity. Prerequisites: Prereq.: Physics 20800 or equivalent, Math 20300 or 20900 (elective for Engineering students

  3. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 21900

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 21900 Physics for Architecture Students Designation suggested material: Giancoli, Physics, Principles with Applications (6th ed.) (required), Prentice Hall Giancoli, Physics, Principles with Applications, Student Guide (6th ed.) (optional), Prentice Hall Course

  4. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 20300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 20300 General Physics Designation: Required Undergraduate Catalog description: For majors in the life sciences (biology, medicine, dentistry, psychology, physical therapy) and for liberal arts students. Fundamental ideas and laws of physics from mechanics to modern

  5. Sound velocity bound and neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo F. Bedaque; Andrew W. Steiner

    2015-01-25

    It has been conjectured that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by $\\sqrt{3}$. Simple arguments support this bound in non-relativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. The bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. We point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at "low" densities is in strong tension with this bound.

  6. Migration velocity analysis for TI media in the presence of quadratic lateral velocity variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    of lateral heteroge- neity on image gathers obtained after prestack depth migration and found that quadratic that application of prestack depth migration (PSDM) with anisotropic MVA yields sig- nificantly improved imagesMigration velocity analysis for TI media in the presence of quadratic lateral velocity variation

  7. Augmented Geophysical Data Interpretation Through Automated Velocity Picking in Semblance Velocity Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitley, Darrell

    Augmented Geophysical Data Interpretation Through Automated Velocity Picking in Semblance Velocity on the surface. Currently, geophysicists spend hours, days or weeks in front of monitors tracing curves on images of these cor- respond to the bright spots selected by the geophysicist. Next, a combinatorial optimization

  8. University of California Davis Medical Center, Employee Health Services 2221 Stockton Boulevard, Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817 916-734-3572 Fax 916-734-7510 FLU CONSENT - INACTIVATED

  9. University of California Davis Medical Center, Employee Health Services 2221 Stockton Boulevard, Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817 916-734-3572 Fax 916-734-7510 Influenza Vaccine Declination

  10. PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP By NATHAN ANDREW WEBER PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP Thesis Approved: _______________________________________ Thesis Advisor the air speed transducer mount and the Plexiglas model of the heat pump. Ipseng Iu and myself worked side

  11. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanton, Philip L. (Bernalillo County, NM); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Crump, Jr., O. B. (Albuquerque, NM); Bonzon, Lloyd L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-09-14

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  12. An investigation of space suit mobility with applications to EVA operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Patricia Barrett, 1974-

    2001-01-01

    The primary aim of this thesis is to advance the current understanding of astronauts' capabilities and limitations in space-suited extravehicular activity (EVA) by compiling a detailed database of the torques needed to ...

  13. DC Pro Software Tool Suite, Data Center Fact Sheet, Industrial Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet describes how DOE's Data Center Energy Profiler (DC Pro) Software Tool Suite and other resources can help U.S. companies identify ways to improve the efficiency of their data centers.

  14. Space exploration challenges : characterization and enhancement of space suit mobility and planetary protection policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holschuh, Bradley Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This thesis addresses two challenges associated with advanced space and planetary exploration: characterizing and improving the mobility of current and future gas pressurized space suits; and developing effective domestic ...

  15. Unsupervised Learning of Contextual Role Knowledge for Coreference Attensity Corporation, Suite 600

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corporation, Suite 600 Gateway One 90 South 400 West Salt Lake City, UT 84101 dbean@attensity.com Ellen Riloff. Section 4 presents experimen- #12;tal results on two corpora: the MUC-4 terrorism cor- pus, and Reuters

  16. Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education 2535 Capitol Oaks Drive, Suite 400, Sacramento, CA 95833~t.. r

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollin, George

    Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education 2535 Capitol Oaks Drive, Suite 400, Sacramento, CA 95833~t.. r::n:::aP.O. Box 980818, West Sacramento, CA 95798-0818 BPPE P (916) 431-6959 F (916) 263

  17. ADVANCED DIGITAL CINEMA CAMERA CAGE 14 E. Jackson St. Suite LL103

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Marcus

    ADVANCED DIGITAL CINEMA CAMERA CAGE 14 E. Jackson St. Suite LL103 dcstage, 75mm, 100mm Zeiss CP.2 Cinema Prime Package (EF / Canon Mount) 21mm, 25mm, 35mm

  18. Development of a mechanical counter pressure Bio-Suit System for planetary exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, Zhe Liang

    2006-01-01

    Extra-vehicular activity (EVA) is critical for human spaceflight and particularly for human planetary exploration. The MIT Man Vehicle Laboratory is developing a Bio-Suit EVA System, based on mechanical counterpressure ...

  19. Assessment and preliminary model development of shape memory polymers mechanical counter pressure space suits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wee, Brian (Brian J.)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis seeks to assess the viability of a space qualified shape memory polymer (SMP) mechanical counter pressure (MCP) suit. A key development objective identified by the International Space Exploration Coordination ...

  20. Understanding human-space suit interaction to prevent injury during extravehicular activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Allison P. (Allison Paige)

    2014-01-01

    Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is a critical component of human spaceflight. Working in gas-pressurized space suits, however, causes fatigue, unnecessary energy expenditure, and injury. The problem of injury is particularly ...

  1. Turbulent Convection in Stellar Interiors. II. The Velocity Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Arnett; Casey Meakin; P. A. Young

    2008-11-25

    We analyze stellar convection with the aid of 3D hydrodynamic simulations, introducing the turbulent cascade into our theoretical analysis. We devise closures of the Reynolds-decomposed mean field equations by simple physical modeling of the simulations (we relate temperature and density fluctuations via coefficients); the procedure (CABS, Convection Algorithms Based on Simulations) is terrestrially testable and is amenable to systematic improvement. We develop a turbulent kinetic energy equation which contains both nonlocal and time dependent terms, and is appropriate if the convective transit time is shorter than the evolutionary time scale. The interpretation of mixing-length theory (MLT) as generally used in astrophysics is incorrect; MLT forces the mixing length to be an imposed constant. Direct tests show that the damping associated with the flow is that suggested by Kolmogorov. The eddy size is approximately the depth of the convection zone, and this dissipation length corresponds to the "mixing length". New terms involving local heating by turbulent dissipation should appear in the stellar evolution equations. The enthalpy flux ("convective luminosity") is directly connected to the buoyant acceleration, and hence the velocity scale. MLT tends to systematically underestimate this velocity scale. Quantitative comparison with a variety of 3D simulations reveals a previously recognized consistency. Examples of application to stellar evolution will be presented in subsequent papers in this series.

  2. Characterizing the convective velocity fields in massive stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M., E-mail: manolis@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We apply the mathematical formalism of vector spherical harmonics decomposition to convective stellar velocity fields from multidimensional hydrodynamics simulations and show that the resulting power spectra furnish a robust and stable statistical description of stellar convective turbulence. Analysis of the power spectra helps identify key physical parameters of the convective process such as the dominant scale of the turbulent motions that influence the structure of massive evolved pre-supernova stars. We introduce the numerical method that can be used to calculate vector spherical harmonics power spectra from two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) convective shell simulation data. Using this method we study the properties of oxygen shell burning and convection for a 15 M {sub ?} star simulated by the hydrodynamics code FLASH in 2D and 3D. We discuss the importance of realistic initial conditions to achieving successful core-collapse supernova explosions in multidimensional simulations. We show that the calculated power spectra can be used to generate realizations of the velocity fields of presupernova convective shells. We find that the slope of the solenoidal mode power spectrum remains mostly constant throughout the evolution of convection in the oxygen shell in both 2D and 3D simulations. We also find that the characteristic radial scales of the convective elements are smaller in 3D than in 2D, while the angular scales are larger in 3D.

  3. Discretising the velocity distribution for directional dark matter experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley J. Kavanagh

    2015-06-16

    Dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments which are directionally-sensitive may be the only method of probing the full velocity distribution function (VDF) of the Galactic DM halo. We present an angular basis for the DM VDF which can be used to parametrise the distribution in order to mitigate astrophysical uncertainties in future directional experiments and extract information about the DM halo. This basis consists of discretising the VDF in a series of angular bins, with the VDF being only a function of the DM speed $v$ within each bin. In contrast to other methods, such as spherical harmonic expansions, the use of this basis allows us to guarantee that the resulting VDF is everywhere positive and therefore physical. We present a recipe for calculating the event rates corresponding to the discrete VDF for an arbitrary number of angular bins $N$ and investigate the discretisation error which is introduced in this way. For smooth, Standard Halo Model-like distribution functions, only $N=3$ angular bins are required to achieve an accuracy of around $10-30\\%$ in the number of events in each bin. Shortly after confirmation of the DM origin of the signal with around 50 events, this accuracy should be sufficient to allow the discretised velocity distribution to be employed reliably. For more extreme VDFs (such as streams), the discretisation error is typically much larger, but can be improved with increasing $N$. This method paves the way towards an astrophysics-independent analysis framework for the directional detection of dark matter.

  4. The Department of Energy Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-02-04

    The supplied-air suits that protect DOE contractor and federal employees from exposure to harmful atmospheres and radioactive contaminants are not included in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification process for respiratory protective devices. Therefore, with the awareness and acknowledgement of NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Department established a system for acceptance testing of supplied-air suits.

  5. Impact of the dark matter velocity distribution on capture rates in the Sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Rott, C. E-mail: rott@skku.edu

    2014-05-01

    Dark matter could be captured in the Sun and self-annihilate, giving rise to an observable neutrino flux. Indirect searches for dark matter looking for this signal with neutrino telescopes have resulted in tight constraints on the interaction cross-section of dark matter with ordinary matter. We investigate how robust limits are against astro-physical uncertainties. We study the effect of the velocity distribution of dark matter in our Galaxy on capture rates in the Sun. We investigate four sources of uncertainties: orbital speed of the Sun, escape velocity of dark matter from the halo, dark matter velocity distribution functions and existence of a dark disc. We find that even extreme cases currently discussed do not decrease the sensitivity of indirect detection significantly because the capture is achieved over a broad range of the velocity distribution by integration over the velocity distribution. The effect of the uncertainty in the high-velocity tail of dark matter halo is very marginal as the capture process is rather inefficient at this region. The difference in capture rate in the Sun for various scenarios is compared to the expected change in event rates for direct detection. The possibility of co-rotating structure with the Sun can largely boost the signal and hence makes the interpretation of indirect detection conservative compared to direct detection.

  6. Characterization of the alumina-zirconia ceramic system by ultrasonic velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carreon, Hector; Ruiz, Alberto; Medina, Ariosto; Barrera, Gerardo; Zarate, Juan

    2009-08-15

    In this work an alumina-zirconia ceramic composites have been prepared with {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents from 10 to 95 wt.%. The alumina-zirconia ceramic system was characterized by means of precise ultrasonic velocity measurements. In order to find out the factors affecting the variation in wave velocity, the ceramic composite have been examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (SEM) scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the ultrasonic velocity measurements changed considerably with respect to the ceramic composite composition. In particular, we studied the behavior of the physical material property hardness, an important parameter of the ceramic composite mechanical properties, with respect to the variation in the longitudinal and shear wave velocities. Shear wave velocities exhibited a stronger interaction with microstructural and sub-structural features as compared to that of longitudinal waves. In particular, this phenomena was observed for the highest {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content composite. Interestingly, an excellent correlation between ultrasonic velocity measurements and ceramic composite hardness was observed.

  7. Local computation of angular velocity in rotational visual motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grzywacz, Norberto

    Local computation of angular velocity in rotational visual motion Jose´ F. Barraza and Norberto M discrimination of angular velocity is local. Local discrimination of angular velocity requires an accurate of rotation result in a predictable systematic error when one is estimating local angular velocity. Our

  8. An Accurate Distance to High-Velocity Cloud Complex C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Thom; J. E. G. Peek; M. E. Putman; Carl Heiles; K. M. G. Peek; R. Wilhelm

    2008-04-23

    We report an accurate distance of d = 10+/-2.5kpc to the high-velocity cloud Complex C. Using high signal-to-noise Keck/HIRES spectra of two horizontal-branch stars, we have detected CaII K absorption lines from the cloud. Significant non-detections toward a further 3 stars yield robust lower distance limits. The resulting HI mass of Complex C is 4.9^{+2.8}_{-2.2} x 10^6 Msun; a total mass of 8.2^{+4.6}_{-2.6} x 10^6 Msun is implied, after corrections for helium and ionization. At 10kpc, Complex C has physical dimensions 3x15 kpc, and if it is as thick as it is wide, then the average density is log ~ -2.5. We estimate the contribution of Complex C to the mass influx may be as high as ~0.14 Msun/yr.

  9. Equation of State Measurements of Materials Using a Three-Stage Gun to Impact Velocities of 11km/s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REINHART,WILLIAM D.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; CARROLL,DANIEL E.; THORNHILL,T.G.; WINFREE,N.A.

    2000-09-26

    Understanding high pressure behavior of homogeneous as well as heterogeneous materials is necessary in order to address the physical processes associated with hypervelocity impact events related to space science applications including orbital debris impact and impact lethality. At very high impact velocities, material properties will be subjugated to phase-changes, such as melting and vaporization. These phase states cannot be obtained through conventional gun technology. These processes need to be represented accurately in hydrodynamic codes to allow credible computational analysis of impact events resulting from hypervelocity impact. In this paper, techniques that are being developed and implemented to obtain the needed shock loading parameters (Hugoniot states) for material characterization studies, namely shock velocity and particle velocity, will be described at impact velocities up to 11 km/s. What is new in this report is that these techniques are being implemented for use at engagement velocities never before attained utilizing two-stage light-gas gun technology.

  10. Linear Regression of Eye Velocity on Eye Position and Head Velocity Suggests a Common Oculomotor Neural Integrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tank, David

    . The linear regression method presented here is valid for both fixation and low head velocity VOR dataLinear Regression of Eye Velocity on Eye Position and Head Velocity Suggests a Common Oculomotor Aksay, David W. Tank, and H. S. Seung. Linear regression of eye velocity on eye position and head

  11. Toward a constructive physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, H.P.; Gefwert, C.; Manthey, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    We argue that the discretization of physics which has occurred thanks to the advent of quantum mechanics has replaced the continuum standards of time, length and mass which brought physics to maturity by counting. The (arbitrary in the sense of conventional dimensional analysis) standards have been replaced by three dimensional constants: the limiting velocity c, the unit of action h, and either a reference mass (eg m/sub p/) or a coupling constant (eg G related to the mass scale by hc/(2..pi..Gm/sub p//sup 2/) approx. = 1.7 x 10/sup 38/). Once these physical and experimental reference standards are accepted, the conventional approach is to connect physics to mathematics by means of dimensionless ratios. But these standards now rest on counting rather than ratios, and allow us to think of a fourth dimensionless mathematical concept, which is counting integers. According to constructive mathematics, counting has to be understood before engaging in the practice of mathematics in order to avoid redundancy. In its strict form constructive mathematics allows no completed infinities, and must provide finite algorithms for the computation of any acceptable concept. This finite requirement in constructive mathematics is in keeping with the practice of physics when that practice is restricted to hypotheses which are testable in a finite time. In this paper we attempt to outline a program for physics which will meet these rigid criteria while preserving, in so far as possible, the successes that conventional physics has already achieved.

  12. Coiled tubing velocity strings keep wells unloaded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesson, H.R.; Shursen, J.L.

    1989-07-01

    Liquid loading is a problem in many older and even some newer gas wells, particularly in pressure depletion type reservoirs. This liquid loading results in decreased production and may even kill the well. The use of coiled tubing as a velocity string (or siphon string) has proved to be an economically viable alternative to allow continued and thus, increased cumulative production for wells experiencing liquid loading problems. Coiled tubing run inside the existing production string reduces the flow area, whether the well is produced up the tubing or up the annulus. This reduction in flow area results in an increase in flow velocity and thus, an increase in the well's ability to unload fluids.

  13. Radial velocities of southern visual multiple stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Pribulla, Theodor; Fischer, Debra E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of visual multiple stars were taken in 2008–2009 to detect or confirm spectroscopic subsystems and to determine their orbits. Radial velocities of 93 late-type stars belonging to visual multiple systems were measured by numerical cross-correlation. We provide the individual velocities, the width, and the amplitude of the Gaussians that approximate the correlations. The new information on the multiple systems resulting from these data is discussed. We discovered double-lined binaries in HD 41742B, HD 56593C, and HD 122613AB, confirmed several other known subsystems, and constrained the existence of subsystems in some visual binaries where both components turned out to have similar velocities. The orbits of double-lined subsystems with periods of 148 and 13 days are computed for HD 104471 Aa,Ab and HD 210349 Aa,Ab, respectively. We estimate individual magnitudes and masses of the components in these triple systems and update the outer orbit of HD 104471 AB.

  14. @Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    @Why Physics Comprehensive Physics Major. From the basic laws of physics to the resulting emergent behavior, physics studies what the universe is made of and how it works. As a Physics major that surrounds us, to the structure and evolution of the entire universe. We offer three degrees in Physics

  15. E:FoodEngineering& PhysicalProperties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, John

    E:FoodEngineering& PhysicalProperties JFS E: Food Engineering and Physical Properties Ultrasonic pressure or under vacuum (to minimize bubble nucleation). Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation (nominally were evident in both air-mixed and vacuum-mixed doughs, suggesting that ultrasound was sensitive

  16. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machida, Masahiro N.

    2014-11-20

    A protostellar jet and outflow are calculated for ?270 yr following the protostar formation using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation, in which both the protostar and its parent cloud are spatially resolved. A high-velocity (?100 km s{sup –1}) jet with good collimation is driven near the disk's inner edge, while a low-velocity (? 10 km s{sup –1}) outflow with a wide opening angle appears in the outer-disk region. The high-velocity jet propagates into the low-velocity outflow, forming a nested velocity structure in which a narrow high-velocity flow is enclosed by a wide low-velocity flow. The low-velocity outflow is in a nearly steady state, while the high-velocity jet appears intermittently. The time-variability of the jet is related to the episodic accretion from the disk onto the protostar, which is caused by gravitational instability and magnetic effects such as magnetic braking and magnetorotational instability. Although the high-velocity jet has a large kinetic energy, the mass and momentum of the jet are much smaller than those of the low-velocity outflow. A large fraction of the infalling gas is ejected by the low-velocity outflow. Thus, the low-velocity outflow actually has a more significant effect than the high-velocity jet in the very early phase of the star formation.

  17. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into the Effect of the Electron Velocity Distribution on Chaotic Oscillations in an Electron Beam under Virtual Cathode Formation Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. A. Kalinin; A. E. Hramov

    2006-04-11

    The effect of the electron transverse and longitudinal velocity spread at the entrance to the interaction space on wide-band chaotic oscillations in intense multiple-velocity beams is studied theoretically and numerically under the conditions of formation of a virtual cathode. It is found that an increase in the electron velocity spread causes chaotization of virtual cathode oscillations. An insight into physical processes taking place in a virtual cathode multiple velocity beam is gained by numerical simulation. The chaotization of the oscillations is shown to be associated with additional electron structures, which were separated out by constructing charged particle distribution functions.

  18. Experimental investigation on structures and velocity of liquid jets in a supersonic crossflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhen-guo Wu, Liyin; Li, Qinglian; Li, Chun

    2014-09-29

    Particle image velocimetry was applied in the study focusing on the structure and velocity of water jets injected into a Ma?=?2.1 crossflow. The instantaneous structures of the jet, including surface waves in the near-injector region and vortices in the far-field, were visualized clearly. Spray velocity increases rapidly to 66% of the mainstream velocity in the region of x/d?velocity grows slowly in the far-field region, where the liquid inside the spray is accelerated mainly by the continuous driven force provided by the mainstream with the gas-liquid shear. The injection and atomization of liquid jet in a supersonic crossflow serves as a foundation of scramjet combustion process, by affecting the combustion efficiency and some other performances. With various forces acting on the liquid jet (Mashayek et al. [AIAA J. 46, 2674–2686 (2008)] and Wang et al. [AIAA J. 50, 1360–1366 (2012)]), the atomization process involves very complex flow physics. These physical processes include strong vortical structures, small-scale wave formation, stripping of small droplets from the jet surface, formations of ligaments, and droplets with a wide range of sizes.

  19. Low velocity limits of cold atom clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Muñoz; I. Lizuain; J. G. Muga

    2009-09-08

    Fundamental low-energy limits to the accuracy of quantum clock and stopwatch models in which the clock hand motion is activated by the presence of a particle in a region of space have been studied in the past, but their relevance for actual atomic clocks had not been assessed. In this work we address the effect of slow atomic quantum motion on Rabi and Ramsey resonance fringe patterns, as a perturbation of the results based on classical atomic motion. We find the dependence of the fractional error of the corresponding atomic clocks on the atomic velocity and interaction parameters.

  20. The Musca cloud: a 6 pc-long velocity-coherent, sonic filament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacar, A; Tafalla, M; Beuther, H; Alves, J

    2015-01-01

    Filaments play a key role in the molecular clouds' evolution, but their internal dynamical properties remain poorly characterized. To further explore the physical state of these structures, we have investigated the kinematic properties of the Musca cloud. We have sampled the main axis of this filamentary cloud in $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O (2--1) lines using APEX observations. The different line profiles in Musca shows that this cloud presents a continuous and quiescent velocity field along its $\\sim$6.5 pc of length. With an internal gas kinematics dominated by thermal motions (i.e. $\\sigma_{NT}/c_s\\lesssim1$) and large-scale velocity gradients, these results reveal Musca as the longest velocity-coherent, sonic-like object identified so far in the ISM. The (tran-)sonic properties of Musca present a clear departure from the predicted supersonic velocity dispersions expected in the Larson's velocity dispersion-size relationship, and constitute the first observational evidence of a filament fully decoupled from th...

  1. Angular velocity of gravitational radiation from precessing binaries and the corotating frame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Boyle

    2013-04-10

    This paper defines an angular velocity for time-dependent functions on the sphere, and applies it to gravitational waveforms from compact binaries. Because it is geometrically meaningful and has a clear physical motivation, the angular velocity is uniquely useful in helping to solve an important---and largely ignored---problem in models of compact binaries: the inverse problem of deducing the physical parameters of a system from the gravitational waves alone. It is also used to define the corotating frame of the waveform. When decomposed in this frame, the waveform has no rotational dynamics and is therefore as slowly evolving as possible. The resulting simplifications lead to straightforward methods for accurately comparing waveforms and constructing hybrids. As formulated in this paper, the methods can be applied robustly to both precessing and nonprecessing waveforms, providing a clear, comprehensive, and consistent framework for waveform analysis. Explicit implementations of all these methods are provided in accompanying computer code.

  2. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 42200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 42200 Biophysics Designation: Undergraduate Catalog and membranes. In depth study of the physical basis of selected systems including vision, nerve transmission. Prerequisites: Prereq.: 1 yr. of Math, 1 yr. of Physics (elective for Physics Majors and Biomedical Engineering

  3. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 32300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 32300 Quantum Mechanics for Engineers Designation: required for Physics majors in the Applied Physics Option Undergraduate Catalog description: Basic experiments, wave: Physics 20700 and 20800, Math 39100 and Math 39200 Textbook and other suggested material: Scherrer

  4. Velocity-selected molecular pulses produced by an electric guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C.; Motsch, M.; Chervenkov, S.; Buuren, L. D. van; Zeppenfeld, M.; Pinkse, P. W. H.; Rempe, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Electrostatic velocity filtering is a technique for the production of continuous guided beams of slow polar molecules from a thermal gas. We extended this technique to produce pulses of slow molecules with a narrow velocity distribution around a tunable velocity. The pulses are generated by sequentially switching the voltages on adjacent segments of an electric quadrupole guide synchronously with the molecules propagating at the desired velocity. This technique is demonstrated for deuterated ammonia (ND{sub 3}), delivering pulses with a velocity in the range of 20-100 m/s and a relative velocity spread of (16{+-}2)% at full width at half maximum. At velocities around 60 m/s, the pulses contain up to 10{sup 6} molecules each. The data are well reproduced by Monte Carlo simulations, which provide useful insight into the mechanisms of velocity selection.

  5. Subatomic Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P-25 Subatomic Physics We play a major role in large-scale scientific collaborations around the world, performing nuclear physics experiments that advance the understanding of the...

  6. Two-dimensional Imaging Velocity Interferometry: Technique and Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erskine, D J; Smith, R F; Bolme, C; Celliers, P; Collins, G

    2011-03-23

    We describe the data analysis procedures for an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image at a moment in time, i.e. a snapshot 2d-VISAR. Velocity interferometers (VISAR) measuring target motion to high precision have been an important diagnostic in shockwave physics for many years Until recently, this diagnostic has been limited to measuring motion at points or lines across a target. We introduce an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image, which could be called a snapshot 2d-VISAR. If a sufficiently fast movie camera technology existed, it could be placed behind a traditional VISAR optical system and record a 2d image vs time. But since that technology is not yet available, we use a CCD detector to record a single 2d image, with the pulsed nature of the illumination providing the time resolution. Consequently, since we are using pulsed illumination having a coherence length shorter than the VISAR interferometer delay ({approx}0.1 ns), we must use the white light velocimetry configuration to produce fringes with significant visibility. In this scheme, two interferometers (illuminating, detecting) having nearly identical delays are used in series, with one before the target and one after. This produces fringes with at most 50% visibility, but otherwise has the same fringe shift per target motion of a traditional VISAR. The 2d-VISAR observes a new world of information about shock behavior not readily accessible by traditional point or 1d-VISARS, simultaneously providing both a velocity map and an 'ordinary' snapshot photograph of the target. The 2d-VISAR has been used to observe nonuniformities in NIF related targets (polycrystalline diamond, Be), and in Si and Al.

  7. Velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.

    1980-10-10

    Interpretation of seismic velocity and attenuation in partially molten rocks has been limited, with few exceptions, to models that assume the melt to be distributed either as spheres or as thin films. However, other melt phase geometries, such as interconnected tubes along grain edges, might equally well account for seismic observations if there is a much larger fraction of melt. Seismic velocity and attenuation are estimated in rocks in which the melt phase has the tube geometry, and the results are compared with results expected for the more familiar film model under similar conditions. For a given melt fraction, tubes are found to give moduli intermediate between moduli for rigid spherical inclusions and compliant films. For example, in polycrystalline olivine at 20 kbar the model predicts a decrease in V/sub s/ of 10% and a decrease in V/sub p/ of 5% at 0.05 melt fraction, without considering inelastic relaxation. Shear attenuation appears to be dominated by viscous flow of melt between the tubes and/or films. For olivine the tube model predicts the increment of relaxation due to melt, ..delta mu../..mu.., to be 0.01 at 0.05 melt fraction. Relaxation of the bulk modulus is dominated by flow between melt pockets of different shape, heat flow, and solid-melt phase change. If melt is present, considerable bulk attenuation is expected, although the relaxation may be observable only at long periods, outside the seismic body wave band.

  8. Radial Velocity Variability of Field Brown Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prato, L; Rice, E L; McLean, I S; Kirkpatrick, J D; Burgasser, A J; Kim, S S

    2015-01-01

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R~20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity precision of ~2 km/s, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1 sigma upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included 7 known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant radial velocity variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant ...

  9. The Systemic Velocity of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2004-06-23

    High-resolution spectra of molecular hydrogen in the Homunculus nebula allow for the first direct measurement of the systemic velocity of Eta Carinae. Near-infrared long-slit data for H2 1-0 S(1) lambda 21218 obtained with the Phoenix spectrometer on the Gemini South telescope give Vsys=-8.1pm1 km/s (heliocentric), or VLSR=-19.7pm1 km/s, from the average of the near and far sides of the Homunculus. This measurement considerably improves the precision for the value of -7pm10 km/s inferred from neighboring O-type stars in the Carina nebula. New near-infrared spectra also provide a high-resolution line profile of [Fe II] lambda 16435 emission from gas condensations known as the Weigelt objects without contamination from the central star, revealing a line shape with complex kinematic structure. Previously, uncertainty in the Weigelt knots' kinematics was dominated by the adopted systemic velocity of Eta Car.

  10. Modeling coiled tubing velocity strings for gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, J.; Martinez, A.

    1995-12-31

    Multiphase flowing pressure and velocity prediction models are necessary to coiled tubing velocity string design. A model used by most of the coiled tubing service companies or manufacturers is reviewed. Guidance is provided for selecting a coiled tubing of the proper size. The steps include: (1) Measured data matching; (2) Fluid property adjustment; (3) Pressure, velocity, and holdup selection; (4) Correlation choice; (5) Coiled tubing selection. A velocity range for the lift of liquid is given.

  11. Low velocity blunt impacts on composite aircraft structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whisler, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    as predict the velocity and energy right before the impacthit right at failure confirms the failure energy. To be

  12. GRADUATE BOOKLET Physics / Applied Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    GRADUATE BOOKLET Physics / Applied Physics This booklet contains rules, guidelines and general information about graduate studies in the Physics Department at Texas Tech University. It does not replace documents. Contents I. General Comments: Admission, general policies, deadlines, etc II. Minimum

  13. Case History Imaging permafrost velocity structure using high resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Kumar

    horizontal and vertical checkerboard tests confirm the robustness of the velocity model in detailing small the permafrost velocity structure in lateral and vertical directions. It is inferred from the velocity model reflection data. More specifically, geothermal heterogeneities within the permafrost are associated

  14. Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron

  15. 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (650) 725-8400 http://healthlibrary.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    211 Quarry Road, Suite 201, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (650) 725-8400 · http is my tax-deductible contribution of $______________ Payment Method: Check enclosed Visa Master

  16. Modeling Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta Under a Broad Suite of Potential Future Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01

    a Broad Suite of Potential Future Scenarios Kathleen M.Holocene, recent, and future accretion in channel marshas well as possible future trends in sediment sup- ply and

  17. The Earth's velocity for direct detection experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher McCabe

    2014-02-26

    The Earth's velocity relative to the Sun in galactic coordinates is required in the rate calculation for direct detection experiments. We provide a rigorous derivation of this quantity to first order in the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit. We also discuss the effect of the precession of the equinoxes, which has hitherto received little explicit discussion. Comparing with other expressions in the literature, we confirm that the expression of Lee, Lisanti and Safdi is correct, while the expression of Lewin and Smith, the de facto standard expression, contains an error. For calculations of the absolute event rate, the leading order expression is sufficient while for modulation searches, an expression with the eccentricity is required for accurate predictions of the modulation phase.

  18. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manz, P.; Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching ; Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D.; Müller, S. H.; Fuchert, G.; Stroth, U.; Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching

    2013-10-15

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  19. Test-Suite Reduction and Prioritization for Modified Condition/Decision Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrold, Mary Jean

    Test-Suite Reduction and Prioritization for Modified Condition/Decision Coverage James A. Jones (MC/DC) adequate. Despite its cost, there is evidence that MC/DC is an effective verification technique, and can help to uncover safety faults. As the software is modified and new test cases are added

  20. Test-Suite Reduction and Prioritization for Modified Condition/Decision Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrold, Mary Jean

    Test-Suite Reduction and Prioritization for Modified Condition/Decision Coverage James A. Jones condition/decision coverage (MC/DC) adequate. Despite its cost, there is evidence that MC/DC is an effective verification technique and can help to uncover safety faults. As the software is modified and new test cases

  1. STUDIES ON THE GOES-R HYPERSPECTRAL ENVIRONMENTAL SUITE (HES) ON , Timothy, J. Schmit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    resolution infrared radiances from the Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) on Geostationary Operational with capabilities from current sensors. Corresponding author address: Jun Li, Cooperative Institute and 2 km relative humidity (RH) rms were created to evaluate the retrieval difference between LW + LMW

  2. On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing Gregg Rothermel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing Gregg Rothermel , Sebastian Elbaum}@cse.unl.edu August 31, 2004 Abstract Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost

  3. On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing. Gregg Rothermel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    On Test Suite Composition and Cost-Effective Regression Testing. Gregg Rothermel , Sebastian Elbaum}@cse.unl.edu August 30, 2003 Abstract Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost

  4. TSpaces Services Suite: Automating the Development and Management of Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontoura, Marcus F.

    TSpaces Services Suite: Automating the Development and Management of Web Services Marcus Fontoura Page Mill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 yuhong.xiong@hp.com ABSTRACT Web services allow authorized entities and implemented an infrastructure and a set of tools to simplify the development and management of Web services

  5. Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand Michael D. Ernst, research advisor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskov, Barbara

    Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand David Saff Michael D. Ernst, research and Subject Descriptors: D.2.5 (Testing and Debug­ ging): Testing tools General Terms: Algorithms, Design, Performance, Verification Keywords: test factoring, mock objects, unit testing 1. Problem: slow, unfocused

  6. Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand Michael D. Ernst, research advisor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskov, Barbara

    Test Factoring: Focusing Test Suites for the Task at Hand David Saff Michael D. Ernst, research and Subject Descriptors: D.2.5 (Testing and Debug- ging): Testing tools General Terms: Algorithms, Design, Performance, Verification Keywords: test factoring, mock objects, unit testing 1. Problem: slow, unfocused

  7. Towards High-Performance Optimizations of the Unstructured Open-Source SU2 Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Juan J.

    , materials, heat transfer, vortical flows, and combustion. CFD simulations run the gamut of computational. This article presents a snapshot of ongoing efforts to optimize an open-source CFD anal- ysis and design suite-based, finite volume CFD solvers, making efficient use of memory within a heavily object-oriented solver

  8. Status and Outlook of Integrated Transport Analysis Suite, TASK3D-a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Suite TASK3D-a01 (2012.9) Automated Experimental Energy Balance Analysis Significant progress (NBI) Experimental energy/momentum balance wout (VMEC) newboz.dat Te(reff) ne(reff) Ti(reff) output eg-UD) close collaboration with LHD Experiment Group and Kyoto University 1 #12;/14 LHD, the world largest

  9. Citizens' Utility Board of Oregon 610 S.W. Broadway, Suite 308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Citizens' Utility Board of Oregon 610 S.W. Broadway, Suite 308 Portland, Oregon 97205 Phone 503 for the Future Role of the Bonneville Power Administration in Power Supply Dear Mr. Walker, The Citizens' Utility towards an allocation of the existing system through long term contracts and to serve utilities beyond

  10. A suite of web-based programs to search for transcriptional regulatory motifs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    A suite of web-based programs to search for transcriptional regulatory motifs Yueyi Liu, Liping Wei, the individual sites used to con- struct the motifs and the location of each site on the input sequences. The web for these three programs have been tested and published. We have since developed them into interactive web

  11. PULSE: A Suite of R Functions for Detecting Pulsatile Hormone Secretions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuedong

    PULSE: A Suite of R Functions for Detecting Pulsatile Hormone Secretions Yu­Chieh Yang Department 93106. email: yuedong@pstat.ucsb.edu September 7, 2004 1 Introduction PULSE is a R package for hormone pulse detection and estimation based on the nonlinear mixed e#ects partial spline models proposed

  12. PULSE: A Suite of R Functions for Detecting Pulsatile Hormone Secretions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuedong

    PULSE: A Suite of R Functions for Detecting Pulsatile Hormone Secretions Yu-Chieh Yang Department 93106. email: yuedong@pstat.ucsb.edu September 7, 2004 1 Introduction PULSE is a R package for hormone pulse detection and estimation based on the nonlinear mixed effects partial spline models proposed

  13. Wi-HTest: Compliance Test Suite for Diagnosing Devices in Real-Time WirelessHARTTM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    {deji.chen, mark.nixon}@emerson.com HART Communication Foundation, 9390 Research Blvd., Suite I-350 and interoperability. To ensure the compliance with the HARTTM Communication Protocol and the adherence to its strict timing requirements, all WirelessHART devices must be thoroughly tested and registered with the HART

  14. Name: Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network located at 257 Queen, Suite 400 Position Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Name: Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network ­ located at 257 Queen, Suite 400 Position Description: The Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network (QAHN) is a non-profit, non-partisan umbrella organization that promotes the preservation of the built, cultural and natural heritage of Quebec. QAHN aims to advance

  15. A Parallel Java Grande Benchmark Suite L. A. Smith and J. M. Bull

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bull, Mark

    A Parallel Java Grande Benchmark Suite L. A. Smith and J. M. Bull EPCC, The King's Buildings Republic. email: xobdrzal@fi.muni.cz Abstract Increasing interest is being shown in the use of Java for large scale or Grande applications. This new use of Java places specific demands on the Java execution

  16. Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office, Edinburgh EH14 4AP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    .uk/our-work/wetland-habitats/wetlands-in-my-backyard). 3. Presentations and discussion Seven presentations were made to the group on various aspects1 Minutes of Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office of the group Kate Heal welcomed the participants and summarised the history and original aims of the CWRG

  17. UCSF tomography: An integrated software suite for real-time electron microscopic tomographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agard, David

    suite provides full automation from data collec- tion to real-time reconstruction by which the three pixel images which are subsequently computationally binned four- fold for the on-line reconstruction improving both productivity and efficiency of system resources. The total time from start of data collection

  18. Proc. FASE 2015, (c) Springer Facilitating Reuse in Multi-Goal Test-Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyer, Dirk

    approach for automated product-line test-suite generation incorporating extensive reuse of reachability. Keywords: Software Product Lines, Automated Test Generation, Sym- bolic Model Checking, CPAchecker, CPA Product Lines Johannes Bürdek1 , Malte Lochau1 , Stefan Bauregger1 , Andreas Holzer2 , Alexander von Rhein

  19. Physics from information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jae-Weon Lee

    2012-01-28

    This is an ongoing review on the idea that the phase space information loss at causal horizons is the key ingredient of major physical laws. Assuming that information is fundamental and the information propagates with finite velocity, one can find that basic physical laws such as Newton's second law and Einstein's equation simply describe the energy-information relation (dE=TdS) for matter or space time crossing causal horizons. Quantum mechanics is related to the phase space information loss of matter crossing the Rindler horizon, which explains why superluminal communication is impossible even with quantum entanglement. This approach also explains the origin of Jacobson's thermodynamic formalism of Einstein gravity and Verlinde's entropic gravity. When applied to a cosmic causal horizon, the conjecture can reproduce the observed dark energy and the zero cosmological constant. Quantum entanglement, path integral, and holography are also natural consequences of this theory.

  20. On the Representation of Physical Quantities in Natural Language Text

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    velocity of gas molecules is higher than the velocity of molecules in a liquid." being able to identifyOn the Representation of Physical Quantities in Natural Language Text Sven E. Kuehne (skuehne Abstract In this paper we investigate the forms in which quantity information can appear in written natural

  1. The GENIE Neutrino Monte Carlo Generator: Physics and User Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreopoulos, Costas; Dytman, Steve; Gallagher, Hugh; Golan, Tomasz; Hatcher, Robert; Perdue, Gabriel; Yarba, Julia

    2015-01-01

    GENIE is a suite of products for the experimental neutrino physics community. This suite includes i) a modern software framework for implementing neutrino event generators, a state-of-the-art comprehensive physics model and tools to support neutrino interaction simulation for realistic experimental setups (the Generator product), ii) extensive archives of neutrino, charged-lepton and hadron scattering data and software to produce a comprehensive set of data/MC comparisons (the Comparisons product), and iii) a generator tuning framework and fitting applications (the Tuning product). This book provides the definite guide for the GENIE Generator: It presents the software architecture and a detailed description of its physics model and official tunes. In addition, it provides a rich set of data/MC comparisons that characterise the physics performance of GENIE. Detailed step-by-step instructions on how to install and configure the Generator, run its applications and analyze its outputs are also included.

  2. THEORETICAL PHYSICS Faculty of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    of Field Theory and Statistical Physics RG Division of General Relativity and Gravitation MP DivisionINSTITUTE OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS Faculty of Physics Warsaw University 1998-1999 Warsaw 2000 #12;INSTITUTE OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS Address: Hoza 69, PL-00 681 Warsaw, Poland Phone: (+48 22) 628 33 96 Fax

  3. Rock Physics Based Determination of Reservoir Microstructure for Reservoir Characterization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adesokan, Hamid 1976-

    2013-01-09

    of pore shape distribution is needed to explain the often-encountered complex interrelationship between seismic parameters (e.g. seismic velocity) and the independent physical properties (e.g. porosity) of hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, our knowledge...

  4. Electron heat flow in the solar corona: Implications of non-Maxwellian velocity distributions, the solar gravitational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scudder, Jack

    Electron heat flow in the solar corona: Implications of non-Maxwellian velocity distributions, the solar gravitational field, and Coulomb collisions John C. Dorelli Space and Atmospheric Science Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA Jack D. Scudder Department of Physics

  5. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  6. Building:__________ Suite:_________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Clothes Yes No Yes, but ask Yes No Yes, but ask Yes No Yes, but ask Yes No Yes, but ask Food Yes No Yes responsibilities: Sweeping/vacuuming, emptying the trash, dusting, picking up/tidying room, defrosting

  7. Dispersive pulse dynamics and associated pulse velocity measures This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oughstun, Kurt

    , the group velocity has become one of the most misused concepts in modern physics, engineering and applied Contact us My IOPscience #12;INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF OPTICS A: PURE AND APPLIED OPTICS and the precursor fields (or forerunners). Modern asymptotic theory has extended these results, providing

  8. Radiation Hydrodynamics Test Problems with Linear Velocity Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendon, Raymond C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-22

    As an extension of the works of Coggeshall and Ramsey, a class of analytic solutions to the radiation hydrodynamics equations is derived for code verification purposes. These solutions are valid under assumptions including diffusive radiation transport, a polytropic gas equation of state, constant conductivity, separable flow velocity proportional to the curvilinear radial coordinate, and divergence-free heat flux. In accordance with these assumptions, the derived solution class is mathematically invariant with respect to the presence of radiative heat conduction, and thus represents a solution to the compressible flow (Euler) equations with or without conduction terms included. With this solution class, a quantitative code verification study (using spatial convergence rates) is performed for the cell-centered, finite volume, Eulerian compressible flow code xRAGE developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Simulation results show near second order spatial convergence in all physical variables when using the hydrodynamics solver only, consistent with that solver's underlying order of accuracy. However, contrary to the mathematical properties of the solution class, when heat conduction algorithms are enabled the calculation does not converge to the analytic solution.

  9. Discretising the velocity distribution for directional dark matter experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments which are directionally-sensitive may be the only method of probing the full velocity distribution function (VDF) of the Galactic DM halo. We present an angular basis for the DM VDF which can be used to parametrise the distribution in order to mitigate astrophysical uncertainties in future directional experiments and extract information about the DM halo. This basis consists of discretising the VDF in a series of angular bins, with the VDF being only a function of the DM speed $v$ within each bin. In contrast to other methods, such as spherical harmonic expansions, the use of this basis allows us to guarantee that the resulting VDF is everywhere positive and therefore physical. We present a recipe for calculating the event rates corresponding to the discrete VDF for an arbitrary number of angular bins $N$ and investigate the discretisation error which is introduced in this way. For smooth, Standard Halo Model-like distribution functions, only $N=3$ angular bins ar...

  10. A wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedt, J.-M [SENSeOR, 32 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 25044 Besancon (France); Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S. [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST, 32 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 25044 Besancon (France)

    2010-01-15

    Monitoring physical quantities using acoustic wave devices can be advantageously achieved using the wave characteristic dependence to various parametric perturbations (temperature, stress, and pressure). Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are particularly well suited to such applications as their resonance frequency is directly influenced by these perturbations, modifying both the phase velocity and resonance conditions. Moreover, the intrinsic radio frequency (rf) nature of these devices makes them ideal for wireless applications, mainly exploiting antennas reciprocity and piezoelectric reversibility. In this paper, we present a wireless SAW sensor interrogation unit operating in the 434 MHz centered ISM band--selected as a tradeoff between antenna dimensions and electromagnetic wave penetration in dielectric media--based on the principles of a frequency sweep network analyzer. We particularly focus on the compliance with the ISM standard which reveals complicated by the need for switching from emission to reception modes similarly to radar operation. In this matter, we propose a fully digital rf synthesis chain to develop various interrogation strategies to overcome the corresponding difficulties and comply with the above-mentioned standard. We finally assess the reader interrogation range, accuracy, and dynamics.

  11. Branching actin network remodeling governs the force-velocity relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel B. Smith; Jian Liu

    2011-11-28

    Actin networks, acting as an engine pushing against an external load, are fundamentally important to cell motility. A measure of the effectiveness of an engine is the velocity the engine is able to produce at a given force, the force-velocity curve. One type of force-velocity curve, consisting of a concave region where velocity is insensitive to increasing force followed by a decrease in velocity, is indicative of an adaptive response. In contrast, an engine whose velocity rapidly decays as a convex curve in response to increasing force would indicate a lack of adaptive response. Even taken outside of a cellular context, branching actin networks have been observed to exhibit both concave and convex force-velocity curves. The exact mechanism that can explain both force-velocity curves is not yet known. We carried out an agent-based stochastic simulation to explore such a mechanism. Our results suggest that upon loading, branching actin networks are capable of remodeling by increasing the number filaments growing against the load. Our model provides a mechanism that can account for both convex and concave force-velocity relationships observed in branching actin networks. Finally, our model gives a potential explanation to the experimentally observed force history dependence for actin network velocity.

  12. Cooling history of lunar Mg-suite gabbronorite 76255, troctolite 76535 and Stillwater pyroxenite SC-936: The record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganguly, Jibamitra

    Cooling history of lunar Mg-suite gabbronorite 76255, troctolite 76535 and Stillwater pyroxenite SC determined cooling rates of orthopyroxene crystals from two Mg-suite lunar samples (gabbronorite 76255), on the basis of their Fe­Mg ordering states. In addition, a cooling rate of 76255 was determined by modeling

  13. Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite in Real-Time Maude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ã?lveczky, Peter Csaba

    Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite in Real-Time Maude Peter-Time Maude tool and the Maude formal methodology to the specification and analysis of the AER/NCA suite-sensitive behavior, the presence of probabilistic algorithms, and the composability of its components, AER/NCA poses

  14. The SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity survey of M dwarfs. I. Description of the survey and science goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshpande, R.; Bender, C. F.; Mahadevan, S.; Terrien, R. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Fleming, S. W.; Blake, C. H.; Carlberg, J. K.; Zasowski, G.; Hearty, F.; Crepp, J.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reylé, C.; Nidever, D. L.; Prieto, C. Allende; Hernández, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Ebelke, G.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Ge, J.; and others

    2013-12-01

    We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object near-infrared APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations will be used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey, as well as results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that will be publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present radial velocities and rotational velocities of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsin i precision of ?2 km s{sup –1} and a measurement floor at vsin i = 4 km s{sup –1}. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for rotational velocities and radial velocity variability (at ?100-200 m s{sup –1}), and will inform and advance the target selection for planned radial velocity and photometric searches for low-mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as the Habitable Zone Planet Finder, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and adaptive optics imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution APOGEE spectra, covering the entire H band, provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and radial velocities for over 1400 stars spanning the spectral range M0-L0, providing the largest set of near-infrared M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsin i values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we hope to achieve a relative velocity precision floor of 50 m s{sup –1} for bright M dwarfs. With three or more epochs, this precision is adequate to detect substellar companions, including giant planets with short orbital periods, and flag them for higher-cadence followup. We present preliminary, and promising, results of this telluric modeling technique in this paper.

  15. Comparison of Poloidal Velocity Meassurements to Neoclassical Theory on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, R E; Kaye, S M; Kolesnikov, R A; LeBlance, B P; Rewolldt, G; Wang, W X

    2010-04-07

    Knowledge of poloidal velocity is necessary for the determination of the radial electric field, Er, which along with its gradient is linked to turbulence suppression and transport barrier formation. Recent measurements of poloidal flow on conventional tokamaks have been reported to be an order of magnitude larger than expected from neoclassical theory. In contrast, recent poloidal velocity measurements on the NSTX spherical torus [S. M. Kaye et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] are near or below neoclassical estimates. A novel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic is used, which features active and passive sets of up/down symmetric views to produce line-integrated poloidal velocity measurements that do not need atomic physics corrections. Local profiles are obtained with an inversion. Poloidal velocity measurements are compared with neoclassical values computed with the codes NCLASS [W. A. Houlberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 3230 (1997)] and GTC-Neo [W. X. Wang, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 082501 (2006)], which has been updated to handle impurities. __________________________________________________

  16. Velocity Dependence of Baryon Screening in a Hot Strongly Coupled Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christiana Athanasiou; Hong Liu; Krishna Rajagopal

    2008-05-12

    The L-dependence of the static potential between Nc quarks arranged in a circle of radius L (a "baryon") immersed in the hot plasma of a gauge theory with Nc colors defines a screening length Ls. We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to compute this screening length for the case of heavy quarks in the plasma of strongly coupled N=4 super Yang-Mills theory moving with velocity v relative to the baryon. We find that in the v -> 1 limit, Ls \\propto (1-v^2)^{1/4}/T, and find that corrections to this velocity dependence are small at lower velocities. This result provides evidence for the robustness of the analogous behavior of the screening length defined by the static quark-antiquark pair, which has been computed previously and in QCD is relevant to quarkonium physics in heavy ion collisions. Our results also show that as long as the hot wind is not blowing precisely perpendicular to the plane of the baryon configuration that we analyze, the Nc different quarks are not all affected by the wind velocity to the same degree, with those quarks lying perpendicular to the wind direction screened most effectively.

  17. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA); Brodeur, Pierre H. (Smyrna, GA); Jackson, Theodore G. (Atlanta, GA)

    1998-01-01

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

  18. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1998-07-14

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

  19. Multifractal statistics of Lagrangian velocity and acceleration in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; B. J. Devenish; A. Lanotte; F. Toschi

    2004-03-11

    The statistical properties of velocity and acceleration fields along the trajectories of fluid particles transported by a fully developed turbulent flow are investigated by means of high resolution direct numerical simulations. We present results for Lagrangian velocity structure functions, the acceleration probability density function and the acceleration variance conditioned on the instantaneous velocity. These are compared with predictions of the multifractal formalism and its merits and limitations are discussed.

  20. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.; Park, HyeKyoung

    2014-12-01

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, ?0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, ?0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  1. Modified definition of group velocity and electromagnetic energy conservation equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changbiao Wang

    2015-05-11

    The classical definition of group velocity has two flaws: (a) the group velocity can be greater than the phase velocity and break Fermat's principle in a non-dispersive, lossless, non-conducting, anisotropic uniform medium; (b) the definition is not consistent with the principle of relativity for a plane wave in a moving isotropic uniform medium. To remove the flaws, a modified definition is proposed. A criterion is set up to identify the justification of group velocity definition. A "superluminal power flow" is constructed to show that the electromagnetic energy conservation equation cannot uniquely define the power flow if the principle of Fermat is not taken into account.

  2. Waveinduced velocities inside a model seagrass bed Mitul Luhar,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi M.

    the seabed. Reduced resuspension improves water clarity, leading to greater light penetration and increased. By damping nearbed water velocities, seagrasses reduce local resuspension and promote the retention

  3. Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crust and Upper Mantle P Wave Velocity Structure Beneath Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Results from the Jemez Teleseismic Tomography Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  4. Velocity Effects on the Deflection of Light by Gravitational Microlenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Heyrovsky

    2004-10-07

    We study the influence of general lens and source velocities on the gravitational deflection of light by single and two-point-mass microlenses with general axis orientation. We demonstrate that in all cases the lens equation preserves its form exactly. However, its parameters -- the Einstein radius and the binary-lens separation -- are influenced by the lens velocity. In Galactic microlensing settings the velocity mainly affects the inferred separation for wide binary-star or star+planet microlenses oriented close to the line of sight. We briefly discuss the case of lenses moving with highly relativistic velocities.

  5. Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic Velocity And Attenuation Structure Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Seismic...

  6. Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to:...

  7. USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  8. Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface Geologic and Hydrologic Structure Within the Coso Geothermal Field California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  9. MEASUREMENTS OF JET VELOCITY IN UNSTRATIFIED AND STRATIFIED FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Civil Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology February 2000 #12;MEASUREMENTS OF JET VELOCITYMEASUREMENTS OF JET VELOCITY IN UNSTRATIFIED AND STRATIFIED FLUIDS A Thesis Presented

  10. Defending mining claims and mineral leases in environmental suits against federal land managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twelker, E. )

    1989-01-01

    Suits in the last 4-5 years jeopardize the title of thousands of mining claims and mineral leases. The cases presenting the most striking examples are National Wildlife Federation v. Burford, Connor v. Burford, Sierra Club V. Watt, and Bob Marshall Alliance v. Watt. From the claimants' and lessees' point of view, these decisions granted environmental groups sweeping, though somewhat ill-defined, relief. The challenges by environmental groups are based on statutes designed to bring environmental considerations before federal decision makers. The claimants and lessees are caught in the middle of the exchange between environmentalists and federal agencies. Lawsuits that indirectly challenge leases and claims are unlike environmental challenges to fixed projects such as highways or dams. Those affected often times do not know exactly what is at stake. When the challenge is indirect, unexplored, or partially explored, proper ties have only speculative value and the claimants and lessees are often unwilling or unable to engage in a fight with well-heeled environmental public interest law firms. While the federal government has defended the suits, their interests and those of the claimants and lessees may diverge. In the context of the four cases mentioned above, this paper addresses the rights and remedies of claimants and lessees before, during, and after environmental procedural suits that indirectly challenge federal mining claims and mineral leases.

  11. Lie-admissible approach to ''extended relativity. '' I. Nonlinear velocity, mass, and charge transformations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Animalu, A.O.E.

    1987-11-01

    A new approach to the ''extended relativity'' principle proposed by Recami, Mignani, and others, in which the speed of light (c) is invariant with respect to both subluminal (vc) linear generalized Lorentz transformations in vacuum, is presented, in order to take into account some novel nonlinear velocity transformations (v, V) ..-->.. (v', V'), associated with changes in motion at the interface between vacuum and a deformable hadronic medium, envisaged in Santilli's notion of quarks as mutations of physical leptons (''eletons'') inside hadrons. The new approach demands a generalization of the usual ralation (vV = c/sup 2/) between subluminal and superluminal inertial frames or objects to the (Lie-admissible) form (vV = c/sup 2/ = V'/sup 2/-v'/sup 2/), which is tantamount to a principle of relativistic invariance in velocity space.

  12. The structural and mechanical properties of a Cu??Zr??(at. %) alloy processed by High-Velocity-Injection (HVI) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Charles C.

    1986-01-01

    THE STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF A Cu6OZr4D(at. X) ALLOY PROCESSED BY HIGH-VELOCITY- INJECTION (HVI) A Thesis by CHARLES C. HAYS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Physics THE STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF A CuBOZr4O(at. %) ALLOY PROCESSED BY HIGH-VELOCITY- INJECTION (HVI ) A Thesis by CHARLES C. HAYS Approved as to style and content by: D. G...

  13. High Velocity Rain: The Terminal Velocity of Model of Galactic Infall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert A. Benjamin; Laura Danly

    1996-12-18

    A model is proposed for determining the distances to falling interstellar clouds in the galactic halo by measuring the cloud velocity and column density and assuming a model for the vertical density distribution of the Galactic interstellar medium. It is shown that falling clouds with $N(H I) \\sim 0.4 kpc$ one or more of the following occurs: (1) the neutral fraction of the cloud decreases to $\\sim 31 \\pm 14%$, (2) the density drops off faster than characterized by Reynolds, or (3) there is a systematic decrease in drag coefficient with increasing z.

  14. Neurocomputing 6566 (2005) 907913 Conduction velocity costs energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, William B.

    2005-01-01

    Neurocomputing 65­66 (2005) 907­913 Conduction velocity costs energy Thomas Sangrey, William B Levy we investigate the metabolic cost of conduction velocity. By manipulating ion channel density metabolic cost. Thus, in addition to the cost of information transmission (Neural Comput. 8(1996) 531 [9

  15. Project Report Evaluation of TDWR Range-Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, John Y. N.

    Project Report ATC-310 Evaluation of TDWR Range-Velocity Ambiguity Mitigation Techniques J. Y. N the degree of mitigation offered by existing phase diversity methods to these problems. Using optimized-OOG·OOO2. 16. Abstract Range and velocity ambiguities pose significant data quality challenges

  16. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moos, Daniel (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  17. Universality of the de Broglie-Einstein velocity equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf Z. Umul

    2007-12-06

    The de Broglie-Einstein velocity equation is derived for a relativistic particle by using the energy and momentum relations in terms of wave and matter properties. It is shown that the velocity equation is independent from the relativistic effects and is valid also for the non-relativistic case. The results of this property is discussed.

  18. Front velocity in models with quadratic autocatalysis Vladimir K. Vanaga)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    Front velocity in models with quadratic autocatalysis Vladimir K. Vanaga) and Irving R. Epstein reaction­diffusion models based on the Oregonator model of the Belousov­Zhabotinsky reaction. Each system the dependence of the front velocity on the diffusion coefficients of X and R, the interconversion rates

  19. Extremal Trajectories for Bounded Velocity Mobile Robots Devin J. Balkcom and Matthew T. Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balkcom, Devin

    with velocity and angular velocity controls. The systems are differentiated only by the bounds on the con- trols, with velocity and angular velocity controls. For these sys- tems, the instantaneous rotation center. For the steered car, the bounds on velocity and angular velocity are derived from con- straints on steering angle

  20. Deposition Velocities of Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Slurries in Pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Adkins, Harold E.; Abrefah, John; Casella, Andrew M.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; Nigl, Franz; Minette, Michael J.; Toth, James J.; Tingey, Joel M.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-03-25

    The WTP pipe plugging issue, as stated by the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Executive Summary, is as follows: “Piping that transports slurries will plug unless it is properly designed to minimize this risk. This design approach has not been followed consistently, which will lead to frequent shutdowns due to line plugging.” A strategy was employed to perform critical-velocity tests on several physical simulants. Critical velocity is defined as the point where a stationary bed of particles deposits on the bottom of a straight horizontal pipe during slurry transport operations. Results from the critical velocity testing provide an indication of slurry stability as a function of fluid rheological properties and transport conditions. The experimental results are compared to the WTP design guide on slurry transport velocity in an effort to confirm minimum waste velocity and flushing velocity requirements as established by calculations and critical line velocity correlations in the design guide. The major findings of this testing is discussed below. Experimental results indicate that the use of the Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation in the design guide is conservative—Slurry viscosity has a greater affect on particles with a large surface area to mass ratio. The increased viscous forces on these particles result in a decrease in predicted critical velocities from this traditional industry derived equations that focus on particles large than 100 ?m in size. Since the Hanford slurry particles generally have large surface area to mass ratios, the reliance on such equations in the Hall (2006) design guide is conservative. Additionally, the use of the 95% percentile particle size as an input to this equation is conservative. However, test results indicate that the use of an average particle density as an input to the equation is not conservative. Particle density has a large influence on the overall result returned by the correlation. Lastly, the viscosity correlation used in the WTP design guide has been shown to be inaccurate for Hanford waste feed materials. The use of the Thomas (1979) correlation in the design guide is not conservative—In cases where 100% of the particles are smaller than 74 ?m or particles are considered to be homogeneous due to yield stress forces suspending the particles the homogeneous fraction of the slurry can be set to 100%. In such cases, the predicted critical velocity based on the conservative Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation is reduced to zero and the design guide returns a value from the Thomas (1979) correlation. The measured data in this report show that the Thomas (1979) correlation predictions often fall below that measured experimental values. A non-Newtonian deposition velocity design guide should be developed for the WTP— Since the WTP design guide is limited to Newtonian fluids and the WTP expects to process large quantities of such materials, the existing design guide should be modified address such systems. A central experimental finding of this testing is that the flow velocity required to reach turbulent flow increases with slurry rheological properties due to viscous forces dampening the formation of turbulent eddies. The flow becomes dominated by viscous forces rather than turbulent eddies. Since the turbulent eddies necessary for particle transport are not present, the particles will settle when crossing this boundary called the transitional deposition boundary. This deposition mechanism should be expected and designed for in the WTP.

  1. Simultaneous temperature and velocity Lagrangian measurements in turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liot, O; Zonta, F; Chibbaro, S; Coudarchet, T; Gasteuil, Y; Pinton, J -F; Salort, J; Chillà, F

    2015-01-01

    We report joint Lagrangian velocity and temperature measurements in turbulent thermal convection. Measurements are performed using an improved version (extended autonomy) of the neutrally-buoyant instrumented particle that was used by to performed experiments in a parallelepipedic Rayleigh-Benard cell. The temperature signal is obtained from a RFtransmitter. Simultaneously, we determine particle's position and velocity with one camera, which grants access to the Lagrangian heat flux. Due to the extended autonomy of the present particle, we obtain well converged temperature and velocity statistics, as well as pseudo-eulerian maps of velocity and heat flux. Present experimental results have also been compared with the results obtained by a corresponding campaign of Direct Numerical Simulations and Lagrangian Tracking of massless tracers. The comparison between experimental and numerical results show the accuracy and reliability of our experimental measurements. Finally, the analysis of lagrangian velocity and t...

  2. Tracking moving radar targets with parallel, velocity-tuned filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickel, Douglas L.; Harmony, David W.; Bielek, Timothy P.; Hollowell, Jeff A.; Murray, Margaret S.; Martinez, Ana

    2013-04-30

    Radar data associated with radar illumination of a movable target is processed to monitor motion of the target. A plurality of filter operations are performed in parallel on the radar data so that each filter operation produces target image information. The filter operations are defined to have respectively corresponding velocity ranges that differ from one another. The target image information produced by one of the filter operations represents the target more accurately than the target image information produced by the remainder of the filter operations when a current velocity of the target is within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation. In response to the current velocity of the target being within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation, motion of the target is tracked based on the target image information produced by the one filter operation.

  3. No evidence for bulk velocity from type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huterer, Dragan; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    We revisit the effect of peculiar velocities on low-redshift type Ia supernovae. Velocities introduce an additional guaranteed source of correlations between supernova magnitudes that should be considered in all analyses of nearby supernova samples but has largely been neglected in the past. Applying a likelihood analysis to the latest compilation of nearby supernovae, we find no evidence for the presence of these correlations, although, given the significant noise, the data is also consistent with the correlations predicted for the standard LCDM model. We then consider the dipolar component of the velocity correlations - the frequently studied "bulk velocity" - and explicitly demonstrate that including the velocity correlations in the data covariance matrix is crucial for drawing correct and unambiguous conclusions about the bulk flow. In particular, current supernova data is consistent with no excess bulk flow on top of what is expected in LCDM and effectively captured by the covariance. We further clarify ...

  4. Discrimination of porosity and fluid saturation using seismic velocity analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The method of the invention is employed for determining the state of saturation in a subterranean formation using only seismic velocity measurements (e.g., shear and compressional wave velocity data). Seismic velocity data collected from a region of the formation of like solid material properties can provide relatively accurate partial saturation data derived from a well-defined triangle plotted in a (.rho./.mu., .lambda./.mu.)-plane. When the seismic velocity data are collected over a large region of a formation having both like and unlike materials, the method first distinguishes the like materials by initially plotting the seismic velocity data in a (.rho./.lambda., .mu./.lambda.)-plane to determine regions of the formation having like solid material properties and porosity.

  5. An Optical Velocity for the Phoenix Dwarf Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mike Irwin; Eline Tolstoy

    2002-07-03

    We present the results of a VLT observing program carried out in service mode using FORS1 on ANTU in Long Slit mode to determine the optical velocities of nearby low surface brightness galaxies. As part of our program of service observations we obtained long-slit spectra of several members of the Phoenix dwarf galaxy from which we derive an optical helio-centric radial velocity of -13 +/- 9km/s. This agrees very well with the velocity of the most promising of the HI clouds seen around Phoenix, which has a helio-centric velocity of -23 km/s, but is significantly different to the recently published optical heliocentric velocity of Phoenix of -52 +/- 6 km/s of Gallart et al. (2001).

  6. Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state. Formed at high temperatures, plasmas consist of freely moving ions and free electrons. They are often called the "fourth state of matter" because their unique physical...

  7. Theoretical Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEP Theoretical Physics Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email Bruce Carlsten (505) 667-5657 Email...

  8. Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Plasma Physics By leveraging plasma under extreme conditions, we concentrate on solving critical scientific challenges such as detecting smuggled nuclear materials, advancing...

  9. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING STELLAR RADIAL VELOCITY JITTER AS A FUNCTION OF WAVELENGTH: THE SUN AS A PROXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchwinski, Robert C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Robertson, Paul; Ramsey, Lawrence; Harder, Jerald E-mail: suvrath@astro.psu.edu E-mail: lwr@psu.edu

    2015-01-01

    Using solar spectral irradiance measurements from the SORCE spacecraft and the F/F' technique, we have estimated the radial velocity (RV) scatter induced on the Sun by stellar activity as a function of wavelength. Our goal was to evaluate the potential advantages of using new near-infrared (NIR) spectrographs to search for low-mass planets around bright F, G, and K stars by beating down activity effects. Unlike M dwarfs, which have higher fluxes and therefore greater RV information content in the NIR, solar-type stars are brightest at visible wavelengths, and, based solely on information content, are better suited to traditional optical RV surveys. However, we find that the F/F' estimated RV noise induced by stellar activity is diminished by up to a factor of four in the NIR versus the visible. Observations with the upcoming future generation of NIR instruments can be a valuable addition to the search for low-mass planets around bright FGK stars in reducing the amount of stellar noise affecting RV measurements.

  10. ADEPT SCIENTIFIC ENDNOTE LANDESLIZENZ VEREINBARUNG Dies ist eine Vereinbarung zwischen Thomson ResearchSoft mit Hauptsitz in 2141 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 350,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Albrecht

    ResearchSoft mit Hauptsitz in 2141 Palomar Airport Road, Suite 350, Carlsbad, CA 92009, USA vertreten durch

  11. University Scholarships and Financial Aid 800 Washington St SW Suite 200 Blacksburg, VA 24061 540/231-5179 Fax 540/231-9139 Email finaid@vt.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University Scholarships and Financial Aid · 800 Washington St SW Suite 200 Blacksburg, VA 24061 Flashmail University Scholarships and Financial Aid · 800 Washington St SW Suite 200 Blacksburg, VA 24061-8913. #12;USFA Flashmail University Scholarships and Financial Aid · 800 Washington St SW Suite 200

  12. Modeling Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta Under a Broad Suite of Potential Future Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01

    energy zones because of their higher inorganic sediment supply.supply (25 suites of 18 model scenarios each), we could not clearly define a single tertiary The high- and low-energy

  13. Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Graystone Group Advertising, 2710 North Ave, Suite 200 Bridgeport, CT 06604 Phone: 8005440005 or 2035490060 Fax: 2035490061 Email: ads@graystoneadv.com Placing Recruitment Advertising To assist University departments with all recruitment and advertising needs, Clemson is now partnered

  14. Physics & Astronomy Degree options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    148 Physics & Astronomy Degree options BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Astrophysics Physics MPhys (Single Honours Degrees) Astrophysics Physics Theoretical Physics BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) Physics) Theoretical Physics and Mathematics MSci (Joint Honours Degree) Physics and Chemistry Entrance Requirements

  15. The Carmen-Suite: Maya Plisetskaya Challenging Soviet Culture and Policy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalashnikova, Anna

    2014-04-24

    or the character, and affect or express the performer’s identity. To examine the legacy of the Carmen-Suite today, I will use Victor Turner’s work “Social Dramas and Stories About Them” and Mikhail Bakhtin’s essay “Art and Answerability.” Theorizing Carmen... detachment and choreographic indifference and will argue that intimacy is the factor that influences the ballerina’s placement of the continuum of choreographic empathy – choreographic detachment/indifference. Finally, I will apply Mikhail Bakhtin’s concept...

  16. Space-time attributes of physical objects and the laws of space-time physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Field

    2008-09-24

    Physical time intervals are attributes of single physical object whereas physical space intervals are a relational attribute of two physical objects. Some consequences of the breaking of the space-time exchange symmetry inherent in the Lorentz transformation following from the above distinction are investigated. In particular, it is shown that the relativity of simultaneity and length contraction effects which naively follow from space-time symmetry of the Lorentz transformation do not occur. Seven laws describing the relation between observations of space intervals, time intervals and velocities in different reference frames are given. Only two of these laws are respected by conventional special relativity theory.

  17. Measuring Oscillatory Velocity Fields Due to Swimming Algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guasto, Jeffrey S; Gollub, J P

    2010-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video, we present the first time-resolved measurements of the oscillatory velocity field induced by swimming unicellular microorganisms. Confinement of the green alga C. reinhardtii in stabilized thin liquid films allows simultaneous tracking of cells and tracer particles. The measured velocity field reveals complex time-dependent flow structures, and scales inversely with distance. The instantaneous mechanical power generated by the cells is measured from the velocity fields and peaks at 15 fW. The dissipation per cycle is more than four times what steady swimming would require.

  18. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2014-06-01

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  19. Two-stream instability with time-dependent drift velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Hong [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Davidson, Ronald C. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The classical two-stream instability driven by a constant relative drift velocity between two plasma components is extended to the case with time-dependent drift velocity. A solution method is developed to rigorously define and calculate the instability growth rate for linear perturbations relative to the time-dependent unperturbed two-stream motions. Stability diagrams for the oscillating two-stream instability are presented over a large region of parameter space. It is shown that the growth rate for the classical two-stream instability can be significantly reduced by adding an oscillatory component to the relative drift velocity.

  20. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  1. Cosmic Ray Velocity and Electric Charge Measurements in the AMS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arruda, Luísa

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle physics detector designed to measure charged cosmic ray spectra with energies up to the TeV region and with high energy photon detection capability up to few hundred GeV. It will be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008 and will operate for more than three years. Due to its large acceptance, the flight duration and the state-of-art of particle identification techniques, AMS will have a remarkable sensitivity on antimatter and dark matter searches. The addition of different detector systems provide AMS with complementary and redundant electric charge and velocity measurements. The velocity of singly charged particles is expected to be measured with a precision of 0.1% and charge separation up to iron is attainable. The AMS capability of measuring a large range of electric charges and accurate velocities, will largely contribute to a better understanding of cosmic ray production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms in the galaxy.

  2. Cosmic Ray Velocity and Electric Charge Measurements in the AMS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AMS Collaboration; Luísa Arruda

    2008-01-30

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle physics detector designed to measure charged cosmic ray spectra with energies up to the TeV region and with high energy photon detection capability up to few hundred GeV. It will be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008 and will operate for more than three years. Due to its large acceptance, the flight duration and the state-of-art of particle identification techniques, AMS will have a remarkable sensitivity on antimatter and dark matter searches. The addition of different detector systems provide AMS with complementary and redundant electric charge and velocity measurements. The velocity of singly charged particles is expected to be measured with a precision of 0.1% and charge separation up to iron is attainable. The AMS capability of measuring a large range of electric charges and accurate velocities, will largely contribute to a better understanding of cosmic ray production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms in the galaxy.

  3. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Physics 35400

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, John R.

    , electromagnetic waves in vacuum and in matter, guided waves ­ transmission lines and waveguides, electromagnetic-varying sources 7. calculate the electromagnetic radiation fields and power emitted for electric dipole sources 8DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS Syllabus Physics 35400 Electricity and Magnetism II Designation

  4. Report of IAU Commission 30 on Radial Velocities (2009-2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, G; Lovis, C; Marcy, G W; Mathieu, R D; Mazeh, T; Meibom, S; Minniti, D; Moutou, C; Pepe, F; Pourbaix, D; Turon, C; Udry, S; Zwitter, T

    2011-01-01

    Brief summaries are given of the following subjects of interest to IAU Commission 30: Large-scale radial-velocity surveys; The role of radial-velocity measurements in studies of stellar angular momentum evolution and stellar age; Radial velocities in open clusters; Toward higher radial-velocity precision; High-precision radial velocities applied to studies of binary stars; Doppler boosting effect; Working groups (Stellar radial velocity bibliography; Radial velocity standards; Catalogue of orbital elements of spectroscopic binaries [SB9]).

  5. Deposition Velocities of Non-Newtonian Slurries in Pipelines: Complex Simulant Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Bonebrake, Michael L.; Casella, Andrew M.; Johnson, Michael D.; Toth, James J.; Adkins, Harold E.; Chun, Jaehun; Denslow, Kayte M.; Luna, Maria; Tingey, Joel M.

    2009-07-01

    One of the concerns expressed by the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) is about the potential for pipe plugging at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Per the review’s executive summary, “Piping that transports slurries will plug unless it is properly designed to minimize this risk. This design approach has not been followed consistently, which will lead to frequent shutdowns due to line plugging.” To evaluate the potential for plugging, deposition-velocity tests were performed on several physical simulants to determine whether the design approach is conservative. Deposition velocity is defined as the velocity below which particles begin to deposit to form a moving bed of particles on the bottom of a straight horizontal pipe during slurry-transport operations. The deposition velocity depends on the system geometry and the physical properties of the particles and fluid. An experimental program was implemented to test the stability-map concepts presented in WTP-RPT-175 Rev. 01. Two types of simulant were tested. The first type of simulant was similar to the glass-bead simulants discussed in WTP-RPT-175 Rev. 0 ; it consists of glass beads with a nominal particle size of 150 µm in a kaolin/water slurry. The initial simulant was prepared at a target yield stress of approximately 30 Pa. The yield stress was then reduced, stepwise, via dilution or rheological modifiers, ultimately to a level of <1 Pa. At each yield-stress step, deposition-velocity testing was performed. Testing over this range of yield-stress bounds the expected rheological operating window of the WTP and allows the results to be compared to stability-map predictions for this system. The second simulant was a precipitated hydroxide that simulates HLW pretreated sludge from Hanford waste tank AZ-101. Testing was performed in a manner similar to that for the first simulant over a wide range of yield stresses; however, an additional test of net-positive suction-head required (NPSHR) was performed at each yield stress condition. Unlike the previous simulant, the sizes and densities of the particles that can deposit in the piping are a result of the simulant precipitation process; there is expected to be a complex mixture of particles of various sizes and densities that make it difficult to predict a stability map. The objective of the testing is to observe whether behavior consistent with the stability-map concept occurs in complex simulants with mixtures of different sizes and densities.

  6. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from Transit Timing Variations and Radial Velocity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffen, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses---Radial Velocities (RVs) and Transit Timing Variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable---as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This ``sensitivity bias'' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in...

  7. Multipole seismoelectric logging while drilling (LWD) for acoustic velocity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhenya

    2012-01-01

    In seismoelectric well logging, an acoustic wave propagates along a borehole and induces electrical signals along the borehole wall. The apparent velocities of these seismoelectric signals are equal to the formation ...

  8. Superluminal Velocity of Photons in a Gravitational Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich

    1994-11-20

    The influence of radiative corrections on the photon propagation in a gravitational background is investigated without the low-frequency approximation $\\omega \\ll m$. The conclusion is made in this way that the velocity of light can exceed unity.

  9. Tsallis Entropy Based Velocity Distribution in Open Channel Flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Hao

    2010-07-14

    The Tsallis entropy is applied to derive both 1-D and 2-D velocity distributions in an open channel cross section. These distributions contain a parameter m through which the Tsallis entropy becomes a generalization of the Shannon entropy. Different...

  10. Experimental High Velocity Acid Jetting in Limestone Carbonates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Christopher

    2014-04-30

    Acid jetting is a well stimulation technique that is used in carbonate reservoirs. It typically involves injecting acid down hole at high flow rates through small orifices which cause high velocities of acid to strike the borehole wall...

  11. Seismic velocity and Q anisotropy in fractured poroelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The energy-velocity vector ve of the qP and qSV waves is ..... A., On the spatial variability of parameters of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, Water Res.

  12. CHANGES OF ACTION POTENTIAL SHAPE AND VELOCITY FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Alex J.

    at constant velocity. Both assumptions offer the great computational advantage of permitting the partial are illustrated in Fig. 1; included are sealed termination, step decrease or increase of diameter, taper or flare

  13. Design of regulated velocity flow assurance device for petroleum industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yardi, Chaitanya Narendra

    2005-02-17

    ABSTRACT Design of Regulated Velocity Flow Assurance Device for the Petroleum Industry. (December 2004) Chaitanya Yardi, B.E., Gujarat University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Reza Langari The petroleum industry faces problems in transportation of crude...

  14. Physical Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of...

  15. Pore fluid effects on seismic velocity in anisotropic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01

    A simple new technique predicts the high- and low-frequency saturated velocities in anisotropic rocks entirely in terms of measurable dry rock properties without the need for idealized crack geometries. Measurements of dry velocity versus pressure and porosity versus pressure contain all of the necessary information for predicting the frequency-dependent effects of fluid saturation. Furthermore, these measurements automatically incorporate all pore interaction, so there is no limitation to low crack density. The velocities are found to depend on five key interrelated variables: frequency, the distribution of compliant crack-like porosity, the intrinsic or noncrack anisotropy, fluid viscosity and compressibility, and effective pressure. The sensitivity of velocities to saturation is generally greater at high frequencies than low frequencies. The magnitude of the differences from dry to saturated and from low frequency to high frequency is determined by the compliant or crack-like porosity. Predictions of saturated velocities based on dry data for sandstone and granite show that compressional velocities generally increase with saturation and with frequency. However, the degree of compressional wave anisotropy may either increase or decrease upon saturation depending on the crack distribution, the effective pressure, and the frequency at which the measurements are made. Shear-wave velocities can either increase or decrease with saturation, and the degree of anisotropy depends on the microstructure, pressure, and frequency. Consequently great care must be taken when interpreting observed velocity anisotropy for measurements at low frequencies, typical of in situ observations, will generally be different from those at high frequencies, typical of the laboratory.

  16. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  17. Noise pair velocity and range echo location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-02-16

    An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution is disclosed. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna. 46 figs.

  18. Noise pair velocity and range echo location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna.

  19. SELF-CONSISTENT SIZE AND VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF COLLISIONAL CASCADES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Margaret [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schlichting, Hilke E., E-mail: mpan@astro.berkeley.edu, E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential size spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan and Sari can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of size. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-sized bodies for the Kuiper belt, the asteroid belt, and extrasolar debris disks may constrain the mass and number of large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies' internal strengths.

  20. Physics Based on Physical Monism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seong-Dong Kim

    2006-03-22

    Based on a physical monism, which holds that the matter and space are classified by not a difference of their kind but a difference of magnitude of their density, I derive the most fundamental equation of motion, which is capable of providing a deeper physical understanding than the known physics. For example, this equation answers to the substantive reason of movement, and Newton's second law, which has been regarded as the definition of force, is derived in a substantive level from this equation. Further, the relativistic energy-mass formula is generalized to include the potential energy term, and the Lorentz force and Maxwell equations are newly derived.

  1. Verification and Validation of Carbon-Fiber Laminate Low Velocity Impact Simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    English, Shawn Allen; Nelson, Stacy Michelle; Briggs, Timothy; Brown, Arthur

    2014-10-01

    Presented is a model verification and validation effort using low - velocity impact (LVI) of carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminate experiments. A flat cylindrical indenter impacts the laminate with enough energy to produce delamination, matrix cracks and fiber breaks. Included in the experimental efforts are ultrasonic scans of the damage for qualitative validation of the models. However, the primary quantitative metrics of validation are the force time history measured through the instrumented indenter and initial and final velocities. The simulations, whi ch are run on Sandia's Sierra finite element codes , consist of all physics and material parameters of importance as determined by a sensitivity analysis conducted on the LVI simulation. A novel orthotropic damage and failure constitutive model that is cap able of predicting progressive composite damage and failure is described in detail and material properties are measured, estimated from micromechanics or optimized through calibration. A thorough verification and calibration to the accompanying experiment s are presented. Specia l emphasis is given to the four - point bend experiment. For all simulations of interest, the mesh and material behavior is verified through extensive convergence studies. An ensemble of simulations incorporating model parameter unc ertainties is used to predict a response distribution which is then compared to experimental output. The result is a quantifiable confidence in material characterization and model physics when simulating this phenomenon in structures of interest.

  2. Physics & Astronomy Degree options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    138 Physics & Astronomy Degree options BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Astrophysics Physics MPhys (Single Honours Degrees) Astrophysics Physics Theoretical Physics BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) Physics combinations is under review. MPhys (Joint Honours Degree) Theoretical Physics and Mathematics MSci (Joint

  3. Review of Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2010-01-01

    11. Particle Physics Education Sites . . . . . . . . .ONLINE PARTICLE PHYSICS INFORMATION 1.11. Particle Physics Education Sites . . . . . . . . . . 12.

  4. REVIEW OF PARTICLE PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beringer, Juerg

    2013-01-01

    ONLINE PARTICLE PHYSICS INFORMATION 1.3. Particle Physics Information Platforms . . . . . . . . .14. Particle Physics Education and Outreach

  5. Propagation velocities of gas rings in collisional ring galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Vorobyov; D. Bizyaev

    2003-01-27

    The propagation velocity of the first gas ring in collisional ring galaxies, i.e. the velocity at which the maximum in the radial gas density profile propagates radially in the galactic disk, is usually inferred from the radial expansion velocity of gas in the first ring. Our numerical hydrodynamics modeling of ring galaxy formation however shows that the maximum radial expansion velocity of gas in the first ring ($v_{gas}$) is invariably below the propagation velocity of the first gas ring itself ($v_{ring}$). Modeling of the Cartwheel galaxy indicates that the outer ring is currently propagating at $v_{ring} \\approx$ 100 km/s, while the maximum radial expansion velocity of gas in the outer ring is currently $v_{gas} \\approx$ 65 km/s. Modeling of the radial B-V/V-K color gradients of the Cartwheel ring galaxy also indicates that the outer ring is propagating at $v_{ring} \\ge $ 90 km/s. We show that a combined effect of inclination, finite thickness, and warping of the Cartwheel's disk might be responsible for the lack of angular difference in the peak positions found for the azimuthally averaged $H\\alpha$, K and B surface brightness profiles of the Cartwheel's outer ring. Indeed, the radial $H\\alpha$ surface brightness profiles obtained along the Cartwheel's major axis, where effects of inclination and finite thickness are minimized, do peak exterior to those at K- and B-bands. The angular difference in peak positions implies $v_{ring}$ = 110 km/s, which is in agreement with the model predictions. We briefly discuss the utility of radio continuum emission and spectral line equivalent widths for determining the propagation velocity of gas rings in collisional ring galaxies.

  6. Cap Bubble Drift Velocity in a Confined Test Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Mamoru Ishii; Frank W. Lincoln; Stephen G. Beus

    2002-10-09

    In the two-group interfacial area transport equation, bubbles are categorized into two groups, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as group 1 and cap/slug/churn-turbulent bubbles as group 2. The bubble rise velocities for both groups of bubbles may be estimated by the drift flux model by applying different distribution parameters and drift velocities for both groups. However, the drift velocity for group 2 bubbles is not always applicable (when the wall effect becomes important) as in the current test loop of interest where the flow channel is confined by two parallel flat walls, with a dimension of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. The previous experiments indicated that no stable slug flow existed in this test section, which was designed to permit visualization of the flow patterns and bubble characteristics without the distortion associated with curved surfaces. In fact, distorted cap bubbly and churn-turbulent flow was observed. Therefore, it is essential to developed a correlation for cap bubble drift velocity in this confined flow channel. Since the rise velocity of a cap bubble depends on its size, a high-speed movie camera is used to capture images of cap bubbles to obtain the bubble size information. Meanwhile, the rise velocity of cap and elongated bubbles (called cap bubbles hereafter) is investigated by examining the captured images frame by frame. As a result, the conventional correlation of drift velocity for slug bubbles is modified and acceptable agreements between the measurements and correlation estimation are achieved.

  7. Physics | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics ORNL Physics Environment Safety and Health More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Physics SHARE Physics Bottom view of the 25 million volt tandem...

  8. Compulsory Elective Theoretical Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutz, Hartmut

    Aug Sep Compulsory Elective Theoretical Physics (physics606 or - if done previously - 1 module out of physics751, physics754, physics755, physics760, physics7501) 7 cp Specialization (at least 24 cp out of physics61a, -61b, -61c and/or physics62a, -62b, -62c) 24 cp Elective Advanced Lectures (at least 18 cp out

  9. Planetary Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation | Center for GasPhysics Physics PrintPicture

  10. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium-heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth System Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Abernathey, R.; Pradal, M.-A.

    2014-11-20

    This paper uses a suite of Earth System models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science. The helium-heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in the earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedi that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a fewmore »hundred m2 s?1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Because helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere, but radiocarbon equilibrates slowly, it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the Southeast Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi in the deep ocean than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.« less

  11. PyTrx: Feature Tracking Software for Automated Production of Glacier Velocity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Addison, Lynne

    2015-11-26

    finds texture in the velocity field of Kronebreen, consistent with variable velocity due to crevassing. Identifiable inaccuracy in the velocity measurements is likely caused by poor quality of the DEM used to project to geographic space and weather...

  12. Exceptional Ground Accelerations and Velocities Caused by Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, John

    2008-01-17

    This project aims to understand the characteristics of the free-field strong-motion records that have yielded the 100 largest peak accelerations and the 100 largest peak velocities recorded to date. The peak is defined as the maximum magnitude of the acceleration or velocity vector during the strong shaking. This compilation includes 35 records with peak acceleration greater than gravity, and 41 records with peak velocities greater than 100 cm/s. The results represent an estimated 150,000 instrument-years of strong-motion recordings. The mean horizontal acceleration or velocity, as used for the NGA ground motion models, is typically 0.76 times the magnitude of this vector peak. Accelerations in the top 100 come from earthquakes as small as magnitude 5, while velocities in the top 100 all come from earthquakes with magnitude 6 or larger. Records are dominated by crustal earthquakes with thrust, oblique-thrust, or strike-slip mechanisms. Normal faulting mechanisms in crustal earthquakes constitute under 5% of the records in the databases searched, and an even smaller percentage of the exceptional records. All NEHRP site categories have contributed exceptional records, in proportions similar to the extent that they are represented in the larger database.

  13. Cometary water expansion velocity from OH line shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. -L. Tseng; D. Bockelée-Morvan; J. Crovisier; P. Colom; W. -H. Ip

    2007-02-07

    We retrieve the H_2O expansion velocity in a number of comets, using the 18-cm line shapes of the OH radical observed with the Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope. The H_2O velocity is derived from the large base of a trapezium fitted to the observed spectra. This method, which was previously applied to 9 comets, is now extended to 30 further comets. This allows us to study the evolution of their water molecule outflow velocity over a large range of heliocentric distances and gas production rates. Our analysis confirms and extends previous analyses. The retrieved expansion velocities increases with increasing gas production rates and decreasing heliocentric distances. Heuristic laws are proposed, which could be used for the interpretation of observations of cometary molecules and as a touchstone for hydrodynamical models. The expansion velocities retrieved from 18 cm line shapes are larger than those obtained from millimetric observations of parent molecules with smaller fields of view, which demonstrates the acceleration of the gas with cometocentric distance. Our results are in reasonable quantitative agreement with current hydrodynamical models of cometary atmospheres.

  14. Ion velocities in a micro-cathode arc thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang Taisen; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael; Beilis, Isak

    2012-06-15

    Ion velocities in the plasma jet generated by the micro-cathode arc thruster are studied by means of time-of-flight method using enhanced ion detection system (EIDS). The EIDS triggers perturbations (spikes) on arc current waveform, and the larger current in the spike generates denser plasma bunches propagating along with the mainstream plasma. The EIDS utilizes double electrostatic probes rather than single probes. The average Ti ion velocity is measured to be around 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} m/s without a magnetic field. It was found that the application of a magnetic field does not change ion velocities in the interelectrode region while leads to ion acceleration in the free expanding plasma plume by a factor of about 2. Ion velocities of about 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} m/s were detected for the magnetic field of about 300 mT at distance of about 100-200 mm from the cathode. It is proposed that plasma is accelerated due to Lorentz force. The average thrust is calculated using the ion velocity measurements and the cathode mass consumption rate, and its increase with the magnetic field is demonstrated.

  15. Physics 4810 / 7810 Teaching and Learning Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Physics 4810 / 7810 Teaching and Learning Physics Fall 2008 Finkelstein A course on how people learn and understand key concepts in physics. Readings in physics, physics education research, education. Useful for all students, especially for those interested in physics, teaching and education research

  16. PHYSICS, B.S. BIOMEDICAL PHYSICS (BIMD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    PHYSICS, B.S. BIOMEDICAL PHYSICS (BIMD) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements ______ 3 PHYS 37000 Biomedical Physics Seminar ______ 3 PHYS 41800 Thermal Physics ______ 3 PHYS 44200): ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ #12;PHYSICS, B.S. PLAN--BIOMEDICAL PHYSICS (BIMD) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) Term: Year: 2015 Term: Year

  17. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-07-23

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of interests under the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) purview ranging from facilities, buildings, Government property, and employees to national security interests such as classified information, special nuclear material (SNM), and nuclear weapons. Cancels Section A of DOE M 470.4-2 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 473.3.

  18. Planar velocity analysis of diesel spray shadow images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sedarsky, David; Blaisot, J-B; Rozé, C

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this work is to demonstrate how spatially resolved image information from diesel fuel injection events can be obtained using a forward-scatter imaging geometry, and used to calculate the velocities of liquid structures on the periphery of the spray. In order to obtain accurate velocities directly from individual diesel spray structures, those features need to be spatially resolved in the measurement. The distributed structures measured in a direct shadowgraphy arrangement cannot be reliably analyzed for this kind of velocity information. However, by utilizing an intense collimated light source and adding imaging optics which modify the signal collection, spatially resolved optical information can be retrieved from spray edge regions within a chosen object plane. This work discusses a set of measurements where a diesel spray is illuminated in rapid succession by two ultrafast laser pulses generated by a mode-locked Ti-Sapphire oscillator seeding a matched pair of regenerative amplifiers. Light fro...

  19. Motion of Euglena Gracilis: Active Fluctuations and Velocity Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 23, 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a...

  20. Mixing between high velocity clouds and the galactic halo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritton, Jeffrey A.; Shelton, Robin L.; Kwak, Kyujin E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu

    2014-11-01

    In the Galactic halo, metal-bearing Galactic halo material mixes into high velocity clouds (HVCs) as they hydrodynamically interact. This interaction begins long before the clouds completely dissipate and long before they slow to the velocity of the Galactic material. In order to make quantitative estimates of the mixing efficiency and resulting metal enrichment of HVCs, we made detailed two- and three-dimensional simulations of cloud-interstellar medium interactions. Our simulations track the hydrodynamics and time-dependent ionization levels. They assume that the cloud originally has a warm temperature and extremely low metallicity while the surrounding medium has a high temperature, low density, and substantial metallicity, but our simulations can be generalized to other choices of initial metallicities. In our simulations, mixing between cloud and halo gas noticeably raises the metallicity of the high velocity material. We present plots of the mixing efficiency and metal enrichment as a function of time.

  1. Physics 321 Course Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    ­ conservation of motion · Huygens ­ motion = mass x velocity · Leibniz ­ vis viva = mass x velocity2 Newton's 0th Law The quantity of motion is the measure of the same, arising from the velocity and quantity. = A way to measure/define force Newton's 3rd Law To every action there is always an equal reaction; or

  2. Modeling and Control of High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray: A Tutorial Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mingheng; Christofides, Panagiotis D.

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Analysis of a Wire- Feed, High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Gas Flow Charac- teristics in a High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel

  3. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  4. High velocity clumps and cluster of galaxies evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo; M. Gambera

    2002-08-19

    We study the effect of the interaction between small scale clumps having velocities larger than the average escape velocity v_{\\rm esc} and bound clumps (having v

  5. Relativistic Rotation in the Large Radius, Small Angular Velocity Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert D. Klauber

    2002-09-09

    Relativistic rotation is considered in the limit of angular velocity approaching zero and radial distance approaching infinity, such that centrifugal acceleration is immeasurably small while tangent velocity remains close to the speed of light. For this case, the predictions of the traditional approach to relativistic rotation using local co-moving Lorentz frames are compared and contrasted with those of the differential geometry based non-time-orthogonal analysis approach. Different predictions by the two approaches imply that only the non-time-orthogonal approach is valid.

  6. Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, A.; Zweben, S. J.; Stotler, D. P.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2012-08-10

    Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

  7. Fermi velocity renormalization and dynamical gap generation in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Popovici; C. S. Fischer; L. von Smekal

    2015-01-12

    We study the renormalization of the Fermi velocity by the long-range Coulomb interactions between the charge carriers in the Dirac-cone approximation for the effective low-energy description of the electronic excitations in graphene at half filling. Solving the coupled system of Dyson-Schwinger equations for the dressing functions in the corresponding fermion propagator with various approximations for the particle-hole polarization we observe that Fermi velocity renormalization effects generally lead to a considerable increase of the critical coupling for dynamical gap generation and charge-density wave formation at the semimetal-insulator transition.

  8. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kalesse, Heike

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  9. Lattice Gauge Theory for Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2012-12-01

    Quantum Chromodynamcs (QCD) is now established as the theory of strong interactions. A plethora of hadronic physics phenomena can be explained and described by QCD. From the early days of QCD, it was clear that low energy phenomena require a non-perturbative approach. Lattice QCD is a non-perturbative formulation of QCD that is particularly suited for numerical calculations. Today, supercomputers have achieved performance cabable of performing calculations that allow us to understand complex phenomana that arise from QCD. In this talk I will review the most recent results, relevant to nuclear physics. In particular, I will focus on results relevant to the structure and interactions of hadrons. Finally, I will comment on the opportunities opening up as we approach the era of exaflop computing.

  10. Mathematics and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $author.value

    Associate Professor of Mathematics and Physics Website: [Webpage] [Bio] ... Research Interests: mathematical physics, condensed matter theory ...

  11. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01

    High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network RequirementsCalifornia. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Networkof High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics, DOE Office of

  12. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    This Manual establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Chg 1, dated 3/7/06. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B

  13. Physical Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-08-26

    Establishes requirements for the physical protection of safeguards and security interests. Copies of Section B, Safeguards and Security Alarm Management System, which contains Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information, and Appendix 1, Security Badge Specifications, which contains Official Use Only information, are only available, by request, from the program manager, Protection Program Operations, 301-903-6209. Cancels: DOE M 473.1-1 and DOE M 471.2-1B.

  14. THE EFFECT OF THE PRE-DETONATION STELLAR INTERNAL VELOCITY PROFILE ON THE NUCLEOSYNTHETIC YIELDS IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Yeunjin; Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, Carlo; Lamb, D. Q.; Truran, J. W.; Meyer, B. S.

    2013-07-01

    A common model of the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae is based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf. A variety of models differ primarily in the method by which the deflagration leads to a detonation. A common feature of the models, however, is that all of them involve the propagation of the detonation through a white dwarf that is either expanding or contracting, where the stellar internal velocity profile depends on both time and space. In this work, we investigate the effects of the pre-detonation stellar internal velocity profile and the post-detonation velocity of expansion on the production of {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, which are the primary nuclei produced by the detonation wave. We perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion phase of the white dwarf for center and off-center detonations with five different stellar velocity profiles at the onset of the detonation. In order to follow the complex flows and to calculate the nucleosynthetic yields, approximately 10,000 tracer particles were added to every simulation. We observe two distinct post-detonation expansion phases: rarefaction and bulk expansion. Almost all the burning to {sup 56}Ni occurs only in the rarefaction phase, and its expansion timescale is influenced by pre-existing flow structure in the star, in particular by the pre-detonation stellar velocity profile. We find that the mass fractions of the {alpha}-particle nuclei, including {sup 56}Ni, are tight functions of the empirical physical parameter {rho}{sub up}/v{sub down}, where {rho}{sub up} is the mass density immediately upstream of the detonation wave front and v{sub down} is the velocity of the flow immediately downstream of the detonation wave front. We also find that v{sub down} depends on the pre-detonation flow velocity. We conclude that the properties of the pre-existing flow, in particular the internal stellar velocity profile, influence the final isotopic composition of burned matter produced by the detonation.

  15. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium–heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth system models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Pradal, M.-A.; Abernathey, R.

    2015-07-27

    This paper uses a suite of Earth system models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science, each of which results from an inconsistency between theoretically motivated global energy balances and direct observations. The helium–heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in Earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedimore »that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a few hundred m2 s?1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere and thus exhibit large gradients along isopycnals while radiocarbon equilibrates slowly and thus exhibits smaller gradients along isopycnals. Thus it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox, by increasing the transport of mantle helium to the surface more than it would radiocarbon. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the southeastern Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi below the thermocline than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so-called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.« less

  16. Measurement of turbulent wind velocities using a rotating boom apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandborn, V.A.; Connell, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The present report covers both the development of a rotating-boom facility and the evaluation of the spectral energy of the turbulence measured relative to the rotating boom. The rotating boom is composed of a helicopter blade driven through a pulley speed reducer by a variable speed motor. The boom is mounted on a semiportable tower that can be raised to provide various ratios of hub height to rotor diameter. The boom can be mounted to rotate in either the vertical or horizontal plane. Probes that measure the three components of turbulence can be mounted at any location along the radius of the boom. Special hot-film sensors measured two components of the turbulence at a point directly in front of the rotating blade. By using the probe rotated 90/sup 0/ about its axis, the third turbulent velocity component was measured. Evaluation of the spectral energy distributions for the three components of velocity indicates a large concentration of energy at the rotational frequency. At frequencies slightly below the rotational frequency, the spectral energy is greatly reduced over that measured for the nonrotating case measurements. Peaks in the energy at frequencies that are multiples of the rotation frequency were also observed. We conclude that the rotating boom apparatus is suitable and ready to be used in experiments for developing and testing sensors for rotational measurement of wind velocity from wind turbine rotors. It also can be used to accurately measure turbulent wind for testing theories of rotationally sampled wind velocity.

  17. Harmonic analysis of the Ha velocity field of NGC 4254

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Chemin; Olivier Hernandez; Chantal Balkowski; Claude Carignan; Philippe Amram

    2005-12-20

    The ionized gas kinematics of the Virgo Cluster galaxy NGC 4254 (Messier 99) is analyzed by an harmonic decomposition of the velocity field into Fourier coefficients. The aims of this study are to measure the kinematical asymmetries of Virgo cluster galaxies and to connect them to the environment. The analysis reveals significant $m=1,2,4$ terms which origins are discussed.

  18. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mellors, Robert J.

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  19. Estimating seismic velocities at ultrasonic frequencies in partially saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01

    Seismic velocities in rocks at ultrasonic frequencies depend not only on the degree of saturation but also on the distribution of the fluid phase at various scales within the pore space. Two scales of saturation heterogeneity are important: (1) saturation differences between thin compliant pores and larger stiffer pores, and (2) differences between saturated patches and undersaturated patches at a scale much larger than any pore. The authors propose a formalism for predicting the range of velocities in partially saturated rocks that avoids assuming idealized pore shapes by using measured dry rock velocity versus pressure and dry rock porosity versus pressure. The pressure dependence contains all of the necessary information about the distribution of pore compliance for estimating effects of saturation at the finest scales where small amounts of fluid in the thinnest, most compliant parts of the pore space stiffen the rock in both compression and shear (increasing both P- and S-wave velocities) in approximately the same way that confining pressure stiffens the rock by closing the compliant pores. Large-scale saturation patches tend to increase only the high-frequency bulk modulus by amounts roughly proportional to the saturation. The pore-scale effects will be most important at laboratory and logging frequencies when pore-scale pore pressure gradients are unrelaxed. The patchy-saturation effects can persist even at seismic field frequencies if the patch sizes are sufficiently large and the diffusivities are sufficiently low for the larger-scale pressure gradients to be unrelaxed.

  20. Scale-dependent seismic velocity in heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G.; Mujica, D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Lucet, N. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)] [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-07-01

    The measurable traveltime of seismic events propagating in heterogeneous media depend on the geologic scale, the seismic wavelength, and the propagation distance. In general, the velocity inferred from arrival times is slower when the wavelength is longer than the scale of heterogeneity and faster when the wavelength is shorter. For normal incidence propagation in stratified media, this is the difference between averaging elastic compliance sin the long wavelength limit. In two and three dimensions there is also the path effect. Shorter wavelengths tend to find faster paths, thus biasing the traveltimes to lower values. In the shorter wavelength limit, the slowness inferred from the average traveltime is smaller than the mean slowness of the medium. When the propagation distance is much larger than the scale of the heterogeneity, the path effect causes the velocity increase from long to short wavelengths to be much larger in two dimensions than in one dimension, and even larger in three dimensions. The amount of velocity dispersion can be understood theoretically, but there is some discrepancy between theory and experiment as to what ratio of wavelength to heterogeneity scale separates the long and short wavelength limits. The scale-dependent traveltime implies that a measured velocity depends not just on rock properties, but also on the scale of the measurement relative to he scale of the geology.

  1. Efficient Constant-Velocity Reconfiguration of Crystalline Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, Joseph

    Efficient Constant-Velocity Reconfiguration of Crystalline Robots Greg Aloupis S appeared at WAFR 2008 [Aloupis et al., 2008a], with title Realistic Reconfiguration of Crystalline (and in [Murata and Kurokawa, 2007, Yim et al., 2007]. In this paper we focus on the (modular) Crystalline [Rus

  2. Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmann, Herman F.; Paisley, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention discloses a novel method of operating a gasifier for production of fuel gas from carbonaceous fuels. The process disclosed enables operating in an entrained mode using inlet gas velocities of less than 7 feet per second, feedstock throughputs exceeding 4000 lbs/ft.sup.2 -hr, and pressures below 100 psia.

  3. The angular velocity of the apsidal rotation in binary stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Vasiliev

    2004-05-19

    The shape of a rotating star consisting of equilibrium plasma is considered. The velocity of apsidal rotation of close binary stars (periastron rotation) which depends on the star shapes is calculated. The obtained estimations are in a good agreement with the observation data of the apsidal motion in binary systems.

  4. The velocity and angular momentum of a free Dirac electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu Lin

    1998-04-22

    It is shown that, in Dirac theory, there is a spatial velocity of a free electron which commutes with the Hamiltonian, so it is a conserved quantity of the motion. Furthermore, there is a spatial orbital angular momentum which also commutes with the Hamiltonian and is a constant of the motion.

  5. Background resistivity model from seismic velocities Dieter Werthmller1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are conductive, for in- stance, brine, or resistive, for instance, hydrocarbons. Geophysicists process seismic of aligning seismic arrivals. This process of deriving a geophysical property directly from the dataBackground resistivity model from seismic velocities Dieter Werthmüller1 , Anton Ziolkowski1

  6. Noninvasive electromechanical wave imaging and conduction velocity estimation in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    Noninvasive electromechanical wave imaging and conduction velocity estimation in vivo Elisa University, New York, NY, USA E-mail: ek2191@columbia.edu Abstract-- Electromechanical imaging is a novel identify and separate the electromechanical waves from the hemodynamically induced waves and determine

  7. VELOCITY FIELD OF A ROUND TURBULENT TRANSVERSE JET Suman Muppidi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    - bulent jet in a laminar crossflow. The velocity ratio is 5.7 and the Reynolds number is 5000. Mean Jets in crossflow, also called `transverse jets' are defined as the flow field where a jet of fluid enters and interacts with a crossflowing fluid. Examples of jets in crossflow are fuel injectors

  8. Pedestrian Simulation using Geometric Reasoning in Velocity Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Pedestrian Simulation using Geometric Reasoning in Velocity Space Sean Curtis and Dinesh Manocha://gamma.cs.unc.edu/PEDS Abstract. We present a novel pedestrian representation based on a new model of pedestrian motion coupled with a geometric optimization method. The model of pedestrian motion seeks to capture the underlying physiological

  9. Continuous subsurface velocity measurement with coda wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Fenglin

    . The experiment site is located 10 km west to the seismically very active Xiaojiang fault zone. An electric hammer was used as a source to generate highly repeatable seismic waves, which were recorded by 5 short is interpreted as the velocity response to the barometric pressure. A multivariate linear regression analysis

  10. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  11. Deep water properties, velocities, and dynamics over ocean trenches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gregory C.

    Deep water properties, velocities, and dynamics over ocean trenches by Gregory C. Johnson1 ABSTRACT Observations of water properties and deep currents over several trenches in the Paci c Ocean central basins and modeled owing away from an eastern deep-water source (Warren, 1982) and toward an eastern deep-water sink

  12. Radial velocities in the globular cluster omega Centauri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Reijns; P. Seitzer; R. Arnold; K. C. Freeman; T. Ingerson; R. C. E. van den Bosch; G. van de Ven; P. T. de Zeeuw

    2005-09-08

    We have used the ARGUS multi-object spectrometer at the CTIO 4m Blanco telescope to obtain 2756 radial velocity measurements for 1966 individual stars in the globular cluster omega Centauri brighter than blue photographic magnitude of about 16.5. Of these, 1589 stars are cluster members. A comparison with two independent radial velocity studies, carried out by Suntzeff & Kraft and by Mayor et al., demonstrates that the median error of our measurements is below 2 km/s for the stars brighter than B-magnitude 15, which constitute the bulk of the sample. The observed velocity dispersion decreases from about 15 km/s in the inner few arcmin to about 6 km/s at a radius of 25 arcmin. The cluster shows significant rotation, with a maximum amplitude of about 6 km/s in the radial zone between 6 and 10 arcmin. In a companion paper by van de Ven et al., we correct these radial velocities for the perspective rotation caused by the space motion of the cluster, and combine them with the internal proper motions of nearly 8000 cluster members measured by van Leeuwen et al., to construct a detailed dynamical model of omega Centauri and to measure its distance.

  13. Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators are severely hampered in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stentz, Tony

    Abstract Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators approach meets the requirements for cutting straight entries and mining the proper amount of coal per cycle. Introduction The mining of soft materials, such as coal, is a large industry. Worldwide, a total of 435 million

  14. Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators are severely hampered in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stentz, Tony

    Abstract Underground coal mining is an industry well suited for robotic automation. Human operators are severely hampered in dark, dusty, and cramped mines, and productivity suffers. Even a slight improvement. It utilizes natural infrastructure and equipment com­ monly used in mines. We have demonstrated that our

  15. 1977 SW 6TH AVE, SUITE 210 PORTLAND, OR 97201 PHONE: (503) 725-4375 EMAIL: HOUSING@PDX.EDU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzanowski, Marek

    1977 SW 6TH AVE, SUITE 210 PORTLAND, OR 97201 PHONE: (503) 725-4375 EMAIL: HOUSING@PDX.EDU 2015-2016 HOUSING RATES FAMILY BILLING INFORMATION If you are approved to live with a spouse or domestic partner may live in the unit at no additional cost. All Housing charges will be applied to the PSU student

  16. 1977 SW 6TH AVE, SUITE 210 PORTLAND, OR 97201 PHONE: (503) 725-4375 EMAIL: HOUSING@PDX.EDU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elzanowski, Marek

    1977 SW 6TH AVE, SUITE 210 PORTLAND, OR 97201 PHONE: (503) 725-4375 EMAIL: HOUSING@PDX.EDU 2014 a separate rate. Children and dependent minors may live in the unit at no additional charge. All Housing students they must each submit a Housing contract and will be billed separately Family member paperwork

  17. Forging of compressor blades: Temperature and ram velocity effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saigal, A.; Zhen, K.; Chan, T.S.

    1995-07-01

    Forging is one of the most widely used manufacturing process for making high-strength, structurally integrated, impact and creep-resistant Ti-6Al-4V compressor blades for jet engines. In addition, in modern metal forming technology, finite element analysis method and computer modeling are being extensively employed for initial evaluation and optimization of various processes, including forging. In this study, DEFORM, a rigid viscoplastic two-dimensional finite element code was used to study the effects of initial die temperature and initial ram velocity on the forging process. For a given billet, die temperature and ram velocity influence the strain rate, temperature distribution,and thus the flow stress of the material. The die temperature and the ram velocity were varied over the range 300 to 700 F and 15--25 in./sec, respectively, to estimate the maximum forging load and the total energy required to forge compressor blades. The ram velocity was assumed to vary linearly as a function of stroke. Based on the analysis,it was found the increasing the die temperature from 300 to 700 F decreases the forging loads by 19.9 percent and increases the average temperature of the workpiece by 43 F. Similarly, increasing the initial ram velocity from 15 to 25 in./sec decreases the forging loads by 25.2 percent and increases the average temperature of the workpiece by 36 F. The nodal temperature distribution is bimodal in each case. The forging energy required to forge the blades is approximately 18 kips *in./in.

  18. CYBER/PHYSICAL SECURITY VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, Douglas G.; Key, Brad; Clements, Samuel L.; Hutton, William J.; Craig, Philip A.; Patrick, Scott W.; Crawford, Cary E.

    2011-07-17

    This internally funded Laboratory-Directed R&D project by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in conjunction with QinetiQ North America, is intended to identify and properly assess areas of overlap (and interaction) in the vulnerability assessment process between cyber security and physical protection. Existing vulnerability analysis (VA) processes and software tools exist, and these are heavily utilized in the determination of predicted vulnerability within the physical and cyber security domains. These determinations are normally performed independently of one another, and only interact on a superficial level. Both physical and cyber security subject matter experts have come to realize that though the various interactive elements exist, they are not currently quantified in most periodic security assessments. This endeavor aims to evaluate both physical and cyber VA techniques and provide a strategic approach to integrate the interdependent relationships of each into a single VA capability. This effort will also transform the existing suite of software currently utilized in the physical protection world to more accurately quantify the risk associated with a blended attack scenario. Performance databases will be created to support the characterization of the cyber security elements, and roll them into prototype software tools. This new methodology and software capability will enable analysts to better identify and assess the overall risk during a vulnerability analysis.

  19. Physics 3343: Modern Physics Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diestel, Geoff

    Physics 3343: Modern Physics Spring 2013 Professor: Dr. Daniel K. Marble Office: SCI 213E Telephone: Science 232 Textbooks: Required: 1) Modern Physics 3rd Edition by Serway, Moses, and Moyer 2) Schaum's Outline Series: Modern Physics by Gautreau and Savin Recommended: 1) Quantum Physics of Atoms, Atoms

  20. School of Physics & Astronomy Physics Colloquium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Michael W.

    School of Physics & Astronomy Physics Colloquium Abstract: Physics degree holders are among and Technology employers know that with a physics training, a poten- tial hire has acquired a broad problem. Therefore it's no surprise that the majority of physics graduates find employment in private

  1. Physics 480 Introduction to Solid State Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    Physics 480 Introduction to Solid State Physics Spring 2012 Logistics Lecture Room: 1100 (Live Oak://www.csun.edu/~nkioussi Prerequisites Quantum Mechanics or Modern Physics at 375 level Textbook Introduction to Solid State Physics, Charles Kittel, Wiley, 8th Edition Reference: Neil W. Ashcroft and N. David Mermin, Solid State Physics

  2. PHYSICS OF BURNING PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;OUTLINE · Introduction · Three Classes of Burning Plasma Physics inaccessable to contemporary tokamak of inaccessable burning plasma physics · Conclusions FIRE Workshop 2 May 2000 #12;INTRODUCTION · A fusion reactorPHYSICS OF BURNING PLASMAS: PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO PRESENT FACILITIES FIRE Physics Workshop May

  3. The Science Cases for Building a Band 1 Receiver Suite for ALMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Francesco, J; Matthews, B C; Bartel, N; Bronfman, L; Casassus, S; Chitsazzadeh, S; Cunningham, M; Duchene, G; Geisbuesch, J; Hales, A; Ho, P T P; Houde, M; Iono, D; Kemper, F; Kepley, A; Koch, P M; Kohno, K; Kothes, R; Lai, S -P; Lin, K Y; Liu, S -Y; Mason, B; Maccarone, T J; Mizuno, N; Morata, O; Schieven, G; Scaife, A M M; Scott, D; Shang, H; Shimojo, M; Takakuwa, S; Wagg, J; Wootten, A; Yusef-Zadeh, F

    2013-01-01

    We present the various science cases for building Band 1 receivers as part of ALMA's ongoing Development Program. We describe the new frequency range for Band 1 of 35-52 GHz, a range chosen to maximize the receiver suite's scientific impact. We first describe two key science drivers: 1) the evolution of grains in protoplanetary disks and debris disks, and 2) molecular gas in galaxies during the era of re-ionization. Studies of these topics with Band 1 receivers will significantly expand ALMA's Level 1 Science Goals. In addition, we describe a host of other exciting continuum and line science cases that require ALMA's high sensitivity and angular resolution. For example, ALMA Band 1 continuum data will probe the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in galactic clusters, Very Small Grains and spinning dust, ionized jets from young stars, spatial and flaring studies of Sgr A*, the acceleration sites of solar flares, pulsar wind nebulae, radio supernovae, and X-ray binaries. Furthermore, ALMA Band 1 line data will probe che...

  4. On the Relationship Between Joint Angular Velocity and Motor Cortical Discharge During Reaching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moran, Daniel

    On the Relationship Between Joint Angular Velocity and Motor Cortical Discharge During Reaching G, and Andrew B. Schwartz. On the relationship between joint angular velocity and motor cortical discharge angular velocities. Hand velocity is considered a parameter of extrinsic space because it is measured

  5. A Quasi-Classical Model of Intermediate Velocity Particle Production in Asymmetric Heavy Ion Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chernomoretz; L. Gingras; Y. Larochelle; L. Beaulieu; R. Roy; C. St-Pierre; C. O. Dorso

    2002-03-20

    The particle emission at intermediate velocities in mass asymmetric reactions is studied within the framework of classical molecular dynamics. Two reactions in the Fermi energy domain were modelized, $^{58}$Ni+C and $^{58}$Ni+Au at 34.5 MeV/nucleon. The availability of microscopic correlations at all times allowed a detailed study of the fragment formation process. Special attention was paid to the physical origin of fragments and emission timescales, which allowed us to disentangle the different processes involved in the mid-rapidity particle production. Consequently, a clear distinction between a prompt pre- equilibrium emission and a delayed aligned asymmetric breakup of the heavier partner of the reaction was achieved.

  6. On the Velocity Field and the 3D Structure of the Galactic Soccer Ball Abell 43

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Rauch; Klaus Werner; Barbara Ercolano; Joachim Köppen

    2005-09-29

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) and their central stars (CSs) are ideal tools to test evolutionary theory: photospheric properties of their exciting stars give stringent constraints for theoretical predictions of stellar evolution. The nebular abundances display the star's photosphere at the time of the nebula's ejection which allows to look back into the history of stellar evolution - but, more importantly, they even provide a possibility to investigate on the chemical evolution of our Galaxy because most of the nuclear processed material goes back into the interstellar medium via PNe. The recent developments in observation techniques and a new three-dimensional photoionization code MOCASSIN enable us to analyze PNe properties precisely by the construction of consistent models of PNe and CSs. In addition to PNe imaging and spectroscopy, detailed information about the velocity field within the PNe is a pre-requisite to employ de-projection techniques in modeling the physical structureof the PNe.

  7. On the Velocity Field and the 3D Structure of the Galactic Soccer Ball Abell 43

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauch, T; Ercolano, B; Köppen, J; Rauch, Thomas; Werner, Klaus; Ercolano, Barbara; K\\"oppen, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) and their central stars (CSs) are ideal tools to test evolutionary theory: photospheric properties of their exciting stars give stringent constraints for theoretical predictions of stellar evolution. The nebular abundances display the star's photosphere at the time of the nebula's ejection which allows to look back into the history of stellar evolution - but, more importantly, they even provide a possibility to investigate on the chemical evolution of our Galaxy because most of the nuclear processed material goes back into the interstellar medium via PNe. The recent developments in observation techniques and a new three-dimensional photoionization code MOCASSIN enable us to analyze PNe properties precisely by the construction of consistent models of PNe and CSs. In addition to PNe imaging and spectroscopy, detailed information about the velocity field within the PNe is a pre-requisite to employ de-projection techniques in modeling the physical structureof the PNe.

  8. Physical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformance andAreaPhotoinducedCenter Objective ThePhysical

  9. The effect of rainfall on the velocity distribution in shallow channel flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Larry Joe

    1965-01-01

    . Although the I. O 0. 8 0. 6 DEPTH O. I 0. 2 0. 3 0. 4 05 SYMBOL 0 0 0. 4 0. 3 Cl ILI ID IJJ O IJI c( II LLI CI O. I 0. 08 0. 06 004 003 POINT VELOCITY ? MEAN VELOGITY SHEAR VELOCITY v-V (gdS) 2 FIGURE 16 . VELOCITY.... 03 POINT VELOCITY ? MEAN VELOCITY v-V SHEAR VELOCITY Ig (gdSj 2 FIGURE 17 . VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION REGRESSION CURVE USING THE TOTAL HEAD TUBE WITHOUT SIMULATED RAINFALL ON A CONCRETE BED I. O 0. 8 06 DEPTH SYMBOL 0. 2 Q 0. 3 Q 0, 4 35 04...

  10. Report of IAU Commission 30 on Radial Velocities (2006-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Torres; E. V. Glushkova; J. A. Johnson; H. Levato; B. Nordström; D. Pourbaix; G. Torres; S. Udry

    2008-10-24

    Brief summaries are given on the following subjects: Radial velocities and exoplanets (Toward Earth-mass planets; Retired A stars and their planets; Current status and prospects); Toward higher radial velocity precision; Radial velocities and asteroseismology; Radial velocities in Galactic and extragalactic clusters; Radial velocities for field giants; Galactic structure -- Large surveys (The Geneva-Copenhagen Survey; Sloan Digital Sky Survey; RAVE); Working groups (WG on radial velocity standards; WG on stellar radial velocity bibliography; WG on the catalogue of orbital elements of spectroscopic binaries [SB9]).

  11. Report of IAU Commission 30 on Radial Velocities (2006-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, G; Johnson, J A; Levato, H; Nordström, B; Pourbaix, D; Torres, G; Udry, S

    2008-01-01

    Brief summaries are given on the following subjects: Radial velocities and exoplanets (Toward Earth-mass planets; Retired A stars and their planets; Current status and prospects); Toward higher radial velocity precision; Radial velocities and asteroseismology; Radial velocities in Galactic and extragalactic clusters; Radial velocities for field giants; Galactic structure -- Large surveys (The Geneva-Copenhagen Survey; Sloan Digital Sky Survey; RAVE); Working groups (WG on radial velocity standards; WG on stellar radial velocity bibliography; WG on the catalogue of orbital elements of spectroscopic binaries [SB9]).

  12. High velocity compact clouds in the sagittarius C region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Kunihiko; Oka, Tomoharu; Matsumura, Shinji [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan); Nagai, Makoto [Division of Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Ten-noudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kamegai, Kazuhisa, E-mail: ktanaka@phys.keio.ac.jp [Department of Industrial Administration, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    We report the detection of extremely broad emission toward two molecular clumps in the Galactic central molecular zone. We have mapped the Sagittarius C complex (–0.°61 < l < –0.°27, –0.°29 < b < 0.°04) in the HCN J = 4-3, {sup 13}CO J = 3-2, and H{sup 13}CN J = 1-0 lines with the ASTE 10 m and NRO 45 m telescopes, detecting bright emission with 80-120 km s{sup –1} velocity width (in full-width at zero intensity) toward CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22, which are high velocity compact clouds (HVCCs) identified with our previous CO J = 3-2 survey. Our data reveal an interesting internal structure of CO–0.30–0.07 comprising a pair of high velocity lobes. The spatial-velocity structure of CO–0.40–0.22 can be also understood as a multiple velocity component, or a velocity gradient across the cloud. They are both located on the rims of two molecular shells of about 10 pc in radius. Kinetic energies of CO–0.30–0.07 and CO–0.40–0.22 are (0.8-2) × 10{sup 49} erg and (1-4) × 10{sup 49} erg, respectively. We propose several interpretations of their broad emission: collision between clouds associated with the shells, bipolar outflow, expansion driven by supernovae (SNe), and rotation around a dark massive object. These scenarios cannot be discriminated because of the insufficient angular resolution of our data, though the absence of a visible energy source associated with the HVCCs seems to favor the cloud-cloud collision scenario. Kinetic energies of the two molecular shells are 1 × 10{sup 51} erg and 0.7 × 10{sup 51} erg, which can be furnished by multiple SN or hypernova explosions in 2 × 10{sup 5} yr. These shells are candidates of molecular superbubbles created after past active star formation.

  13. Velocity distribution of high-energy particles and the solar neutrino problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Miin Liu

    2001-08-18

    High energy infers high velocity and high velocity is a concept of special relativity. The Maxwellian velocity distribution is corrected to be consistent with special relativity. The corrected distribution reduces to the Maxwellian distribution for small velocities, contains a relatively depleted high-energy tail and vanishes at the velocity of light. This corrected distribution will lower solar neutrino fluxes and change solar neutrino energy spectra but keep solar sound speeds.

  14. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    for Heavy Ion Fusion," Research Trends in Physics, La JollaInternational School of Physics, New York, New York (1992),Professor and Chairman Physics Department University of

  15. Particle Physics Booklet 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    et al., C. Amsler

    2008-01-01

    212 25. Accelerator physics of colliders ? 26. High-energythe full Review. PARTICLE PHYSICS BOOKLET TABLE OF CONTENTSrev. ) Summary Tables of Particle Physics Gauge and Higgs

  16. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    presented at APS Division of Plasma Physics, Denver,of Division of Physics of Beams of APS, InternationalLinear Colliders," APS New Directions in High Energy Physics

  17. Using JULE to Generate a Compliance Test Suite for the UML Standard Panuchart Bunyakiati, Anthony Finkelstein, James Skene and Clovis Chapman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    Using JULE to Generate a Compliance Test Suite for the UML Standard Panuchart Bunyakiati, Anthony certification - test suite generation. The framework uses UML models as the test inputs for the bounded exhaustive-testing approach. Within a size bound for the metamodel types, JULE enumerates only the set of non

  18. CP Tech Center I Iowa State University I 2711 S. Loop Dr. Suite 4700,Ames, IA 50010-8664 I 515-294-5798 FOR MORE INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -294-5798 FOR MORE INFORMATION Concrete Property Suite of Tests www.cptechcenter.org Level C Suite of Tests Development Concrete Strength (3 and 7 day) ASTM C 39 / AASHTO T 22 ASTM C 78 / AASHTO T 97 ASTM C 293 yd3 Air Content ASTM C 231 / AASHTO T 152 ASTM C 173 / AASHTO T 196 every 500 yd3 Permeability

  19. The AMS-RICH velocity and charge reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Barao; M. Aguilar-Benitez; L. Arruda; B. Baret; A. Barrau; G. Barreira; E. Belmont; J. Berdugo; J. Borges; M. Buenerd; D. Casadei; J. Casaus; E. Cortina; M. Costado; D. Crespo; C. Delgado; C. Diaz; L. Derome; P. Goncalves; R. Garcia-Lopez; C. de la Guia; A. Herrero; E. Lanciotti; G. Laurenti; A. Malinin; C. Mana; J. Marin; M. Mangin-Brinet; G. Martinez; A. Menchaca-Rocha; C. Palomares; R. Pereira; M. Pimenta; A. Putze; Y. Sallaz-Damaz; E. S. Seo; I. Sevilla; A. Torrento; M. Vargas-Trevino; O. Veziant

    2007-09-13

    The AMS detector, to be installed on the International Space Station, includes a Ring Imaging Cerenkov detector with two different radiators, silica aerogel (n=1.05) and sodium fluoride (n=1.334). This detector is designed to provide very precise measurements of velocity and electric charge in a wide range of cosmic nuclei energies and atomic numbers. The detector geometry, in particular the presence of a reflector for acceptance purposes, leads to complex Cerenkov patterns detected in a pixelized photomultiplier matrix. The results of different reconstruction methods applied to test beam data as well as to simulated samples are presented. To ensure nominal performances throughout the flight, several detector parameters have to be carefully monitored. The algorithms developed to fulfill these requirements are presented. The velocity and charge measurements provided by the RICH detector endow the AMS spectrometer with precise particle identification capabilities in a wide energy range. The expected performances on light isotope separation are discussed.

  20. Velocity and charge reconstruction with the AMS/RICH detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luísa Arruda; Fernando Barão; João Borges; Fernando Carmo; Patrícia Gonçalves; Mário Pimenta

    2008-02-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008, will be equipped with a proximity focusing Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH). This detector will be equipped with a dual radiator (aerogel+NaF), a lateral conical mirror and a detection plane made of 680 photomultipliers and light-guides, enabling measurements of particle electric charge and velocity. A likelihood method for the Cherenkov angle reconstruction was applied leading to a velocity determination for protons with a resolution around 0.1%. The electric charge reconstruction is based on the counting of the number of photoelectrons and on an overall efficiency estimation on an event-by-event basis. Results from the application of both methods are presented.

  1. Velocity and charge reconstruction with the AMS/RICH detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arruda, Luísa; Borges, João; Carmo, Fernando; Gonçalves, Patrícia; Pimenta, Mário

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008, will be equipped with a proximity focusing Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH). This detector will be equipped with a dual radiator (aerogel+NaF), a lateral conical mirror and a detection plane made of 680 photomultipliers and light-guides, enabling measurements of particle electric charge and velocity. A likelihood method for the Cherenkov angle reconstruction was applied leading to a velocity determination for protons with a resolution around 0.1%. The electric charge reconstruction is based on the counting of the number of photoelectrons and on an overall efficiency estimation on an event-by-event basis. Results from the application of both methods are presented.

  2. Velocity tuning of friction with two trapped atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Jhe, Wonho; Vuleti?, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    Friction is the basic, ubiquitous mechanical interaction between two surfaces that results in resistance to motion and energy dissipation. In spite of its technological and economic significance, our ability to control friction remains modest, and our understanding of the microscopic processes incomplete. At the atomic scale, mismatch between the two contacting crystal lattices can lead to a reduction of stick-slip friction (structural lubricity), while thermally activated atomic motion can give rise to a complex velocity dependence, and nearly vanishing friction at sufficiently low velocities (thermal lubricity). Atomic force microscopy has provided a wealth of experimental results, but limitations in the dynamic range, time resolution, and control at the single-atom level have hampered a full quantitative description from first principles. Here, using an ion-crystal friction emulator with single-atom, single substrate-site spatial resolution and single-slip temporal resolution, we measure the friction force...

  3. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND DARK SATELLITE GALAXIES THROUGH THE STREAM VELOCITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naoz, Smadar; Narayan, Ramesh, E-mail: snaoz@astro.ucla.edu [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    The formation of purely baryonic globular clusters with no gravitationally bound dark matter is still a theoretical challenge. We show that these objects might form naturally whenever there is a relative stream velocity between baryons and dark matter. The stream velocity causes a phase shift between linear modes of baryonic and dark matter perturbations, which translates to a spatial offset between the two components when they collapse. For a 2? (3?) density fluctuation, baryonic clumps with masses in the range 10{sup 5}-2.5 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ?} (10{sup 5}-4 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ?}) collapse outside the virial radii of their counterpart dark matter halos. These objects could survive as long-lived, dark-matter-free objects and might conceivably become globular clusters. In addition, their dark matter counterparts, which were deprived of gas, might become dark satellite galaxies.

  4. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): FOURTH DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Carrillo, I.; Boeche, C.; Roeser, S.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Zwitter, T.; Binney, J.; De Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bijaoui, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Freeman, K.; Munari, U.; Anguiano, B.; and others

    2013-11-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atmospheric parameters are computed using a new pipeline, based on the algorithms of MATISSE and DEGAS. The spectral degeneracies and the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometric information are now better taken into consideration, improving the parameter determination compared to the previous RAVE data releases. The individual abundances for six elements (magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, iron, and nickel) are also given, based on a special-purpose pipeline that is also improved compared to that available for the RAVE DR3 and Chemical DR1 data releases. Together with photometric information and proper motions, these data can be retrieved from the RAVE collaboration Web site and the Vizier database.

  5. Measuring In-Situ Mdf Velocity Of Detonation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horine, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); James, Jr., Forrest B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-10-25

    A system for determining the velocity of detonation of a mild detonation fuse mounted on the surface of a device includes placing the device in a predetermined position with respect to an apparatus that carries a couple of sensors that sense the passage of a detonation wave at first and second spaced locations along the fuse. The sensors operate a timer and the time and distance between the locations is used to determine the velocity of detonation. The sensors are preferably electrical contacts that are held spaced from but close to the fuse such that expansion of the fuse caused by detonation causes the fuse to touch the contact, causing an electrical signal to actuate the timer.

  6. Spectral Type and Radial Velocity Variations in Three SRC Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moncrieff, Kathleen E; Short, C Ian; Bennett, Philip D; Balam, David D; Griffin, Roger F

    2011-01-01

    SRC variables are M supergiants, precursors to Type II supernovae, that vary in brightness with moderately regular periods of order 100-1000 days. Although identified as pulsating stars that obey their own period-luminosity relation, few have been examined in enough detail to follow the temperature and spectral changes that they undergo during their long cycles. The present study examines such changes for several SRC variables revealed by CCD spectra obtained at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) during 2005-2009, as well as by archival spectra from the DAO (and elsewhere) for some stars from the 1960s to 1980s, and Cambridge radial velocity spectrometer measures for Betelgeuse. Described here is our classification procedure and information on the spectral type and radial velocity changes in three of the stars. The results provide insights into the pulsation mechanism in M supergiants.

  7. Analytic expression for poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taguchi, M. [College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, Narashino 275-8576 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    The poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime is calculated by improving the l = 1 approximation for the Fokker-Planck collision operator [M. Taguchi, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 1897 (1988)]. The obtained analytic expression for this flow, which can be used for general axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, agrees quite well with the recently calculated numerical results by Parker and Catto [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 085011 (2012)] in the full range of aspect ratio.

  8. On electromagnetic waves with a negative group velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, V. P.; Rukhadze, A. A.; Samokhin, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    Recent publications devoted to the electrodynamics of media in which waves with a negative group velocity can exist are discussed. The properties of such waves have been studied from the beginning of the past century, and the most important results in this field were obtained by Soviet physicists in the 1940s-1950s. However, in most recent publications, this circumstance has not been taken into account.

  9. Black Hole Statistical Mechanics and The Angular Velocity Ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell Thomson; Charles C. Dyer

    2012-03-29

    An new ensemble - the angular velocity ensemble - is derived using Jaynes' method of maximising entropy subject to prior information constraints. The relevance of the ensemble to black holes is motivated by a discussion of external parameters in statistical mechanics and their absence from the Hamiltonian of general relativity. It is shown how this leads to difficulty in deriving entropy as a function of state and recovering the first law of thermodynamics from the microcanonical and canonical ensembles applied to black holes.

  10. Origins of Intermediate Velocity Particle Production in Heavy Ion Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Gingras; A. Chernomoretz; Y. Larochelle; Z. Y. He; L. Beaulieu; G. C. Ball; F. Grenier; D. Horn; R. Roy; M. Samri; C. St-Pierre; D. Theriault; S. Turbide

    2001-08-31

    Investigation of intermediate-velocity particle production is performed on entrance channel mass asymmetric collisions of 58Ni+C and 58Ni+Au at 34.5 MeV/nucleon. Distinctions between prompt pre-equilibrium ejections, multiple neck ruptures and an alternative phenomenon of delayed aligned asymmetric breakup is achieved using source reconstructed correlation observables and time-based cluster recognition in molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. When Physics met Politics:When Physics met Politics: Physics of Politics? Politics of Physics?Physics of Politics? Politics of Physics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yang-Yuan

    When Physics met Politics:When Physics met Politics: Physics of Politics? Politics of Physics?Physics of Politics? Politics of Physics? :: ?? ?? SaiSai--Ping LiPing Li Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica · Atomic and Molecular Physics · Particle Physics · Astrophysics · Nuclear Physics · Biophysics

  12. The stellar wind velocity field of HD 77581

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manousakis, A

    2015-01-01

    The early acceleration of stellar winds in massive stars is poorly constrained. The scattering of hard X-ray photons emitted by the pulsar in the high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 can be used to probe the stellar wind velocity and density profile close to the surface of its supergiant companion HD 77581. We built a high signal-to-noise and high resolution hard X-ray lightcurve of Vela X-1 measured by Swift/BAT over 300 orbital periods of the system and compared it with the predictions of a grid of hydrodynamic simulations. We obtain a very good agreement between observations and simulations for a narrow set of parameters, implying that the wind velocity close to the stellar surface is twice larger than usually assumed with the standard beta law. Locally a velocity gradient of $\\beta\\sim0.5$ is favoured. Even if still incomplete, hydrodynamic simulations are successfully reproducing several observational properties of Vela X-1.

  13. VELOCITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD DISTRIBUTION IN A FORMING PENUMBRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, P.; Guglielmino, S. L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Frasca, D.; Zuccarello, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia-Sezione Astrofisica, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Ermolli, I. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Tritschler, A.; Reardon, K. P., E-mail: prom@oact.inaf.it [National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak, P.O. Box 62, Sunspot, NM 88349-0062 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We present results from the analysis of high-resolution spectropolarimetric and spectroscopic observations of the solar photosphere and chromosphere, obtained shortly before the formation of a penumbra in one of the leading polarity sunspots of NOAA active region 11490. The observations were performed at the Dunn Solar Telescope of the National Solar Observatory on 2012 May 28, using the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer. The data set is comprised of a 1 hr time sequence of measurements in the Fe I 617.3 nm and Fe I 630.25 nm lines (full Stokes polarimetry) and in the Ca II 854.2 nm line (Stokes I only). We perform an inversion of the Fe I 630.25 nm Stokes profiles to derive magnetic field parameters and the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity at the photospheric level. We characterize chromospheric LOS velocities by the Doppler shift of the centroid of the Ca II 854.2 nm line. We find that, before the formation of the penumbra, an annular zone of 3''-5'' width is visible around the sunspot. In the photosphere, we find that this zone is characterized by an uncombed structure of the magnetic field although no visible penumbra has formed yet. We also find that the chromospheric LOS velocity field shows several elongated structures characterized by downflow and upflow motions in the inner and outer parts of the annular zone, respectively.

  14. Resonant Orbits and the High Velocity Peaks Towards the Bulge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molloy, Matthew; Evans, N Wyn; Shen, Juntai

    2015-01-01

    We extract the resonant orbits from an N-body bar that is a good representation of the Milky Way, using the method recently introduced by Molloy et al. (2015). By decomposing the bar into its constituent orbit families, we show that they are intimately connected to the boxy-peanut shape of the density. We highlight the imprint due solely to resonant orbits on the kinematic landscape towards the Galactic centre. The resonant orbits are shown to have distinct kinematic features and may be used to explain the cold velocity peak seen in the APOGEE commissioning data (Nidever et al. 2012). We show that high velocity peaks are a natural consequence of the motions of stars in the 2:1 orbit family. The locations of the peaks vary with bar angle and, with the tacit assumption that the observed peaks are due to the 2:1 family, we find that the locations of the high velocity peaks correspond to bar angles in the range 10 < theta_bar < 25 (deg). However, some important questions about the nature of the peaks remain...

  15. Creating unstable velocity-space distributions with barium injections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pongratz, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    Large Debye lengths relative to detector dimensions and the absence of confining walls makes space an attractive laboratory for studying fundamental theories of plasma instabilities. However, natural space plasmas are rarely found displaced from equilibrium enough to permit isolation and diagnosis of the controlling parameters and driving conditions. Furthermore, any plasma or field response to the departure from equilibrium can be masked by noise in the natural system. Active experiments provide a technique for addressing the chicken or egg dilemma. Early thermite barium releases were generally conducted at low altitudes from sounding rockets to trace electric fields passively or to study configuration-space instabilities. One can also study velocity-space instabilities with barium releases. Neutral barium vapor releases wherein a typical speed greatly exceeds the thermal speed can be used to produce barium ion velocity-space distributions that should be subject to a number of microinstabilities. We examine the ion velocity-space distributions resulting from barium injections from orbiting spacecraft and shaped-charges.

  16. Physics Illinois Undergraduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    Physics Illinois Undergraduate Programs Department of Physics College of Engineering University to undergraduate education. Over the last 15 years, in collaboration with our nationally recognized Physics Education Research Group, our faculty has reinvented the way undergraduate physics courses are taught

  17. PAPER B3: PHYSICS OF FLUID FLOWS Hilary Term 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Peter L.

    systems · Industry ­ e.g. gases in pipes, polymer flows · Oil extraction ­ liquids flowing through: This defines a `local' . Similar for `local' temperature, velocity, etc. (NB: exclude gases at very low pressure.) [For molecular fluctuations, see Blundell and Blundell, Thermal Physics, p. 375, eq.(33.56): rms

  18. Physics 291: Physics Science Outreach Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baski, Alison

    Physics 291: Physics Science Outreach Course Information Fall 2005 Information (course on General Education List K - Urban) Phys291: Topic - Physical Science Outreach - Richmond Elementary (#14917) Time: Tues & Thurs at 11:00 am to 12:15 pm (plus outreach visits) Location: OLVPH #2121 (located in Physics

  19. Color Imaging Arithmetic: Physics Math > Physics + Math

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Gaurav

    Color Imaging Arithmetic: Physics Math > Physics + Math Gaurav Sharma University of Rochester inter- action commonly form the physical interface by which we connect to the digital cyber-world. Because these devices bridge the physical and the electronic worlds, elegant and effective solutions

  20. People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    #12;People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book Authors James H. Dann, Ph.D. James J. Dann. All rights reserved. Textbook Website http://scipp.ucsc.edu/outreach/index2.html #12;People's Physics) "Each discovery, each advance, each increase in the sum of human riches, owes its being to the physical

  1. Physics Procedia 00 (2013) 16 Physics Procedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Physics Procedia 00 (2013) 1­6 Physics Procedia Educating the next generation of Computational Physicists Joan Adler Physics Department, Technion -IIT, Haifa, Israel, 32000 Abstract Many "senior" Computational Physics researchers began their careers perched on of the other vertices of the Landau triangle

  2. People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    People's Physics Book The People's Physics Book Authors James H. Dann, Ph.D. James J. Dann. All rights reserved. Textbook Website http://scipp.ucsc.edu/outreach/index2.html #12;People's Physics) "Each discovery, each advance, each increase in the sum of human riches, owes its being to the physical

  3. Physics Procedia 00 (2013) 15 Physics Procedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Physics Procedia 00 (2013) 1­5 Physics Procedia Educating the next generation of Computational Physicists Joan Adler Physics Department, Technion -IIT, Haifa, Israel, 32000 Abstract Many "senior" Computational Physics researchers began their careers perched on of the other vertices of the Landau triangle

  4. Physics 129 Nuclear and Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 129 Nuclear and Particle Physics Winter Quarter 2008 Instructor: David A. Williams (office Physics by W. S. C. Williams, Oxford University Press, 1991. Course materials Homework assignments materials will be distributed on the web site above. Nine texts on nuclear and particle physics, all

  5. Physics 375 Introduction to Quantum Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    Physics 375 Introduction to Quantum Physics Fall 2006 Logistics Lecture Room: LO 1100 (Science I, 1 Phone: 818 677-7733 e-mail: nick.kioussis@csun.edu http://www.csun.edu/~nkioussi/ Prerequisites Physics 227 ­ Calculus based course on Thermodynamics, Waves, and Modern Physics Textbook Introductory Quantum

  6. Verification Test Suite (VERTS) For Rail Gun Applications using ALE3D: 2-D Hydrodynamics & Thermal Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najjar, F M; Solberg, J; White, D

    2008-04-17

    A verification test suite has been assessed with primary focus on low reynolds number flow of liquid metals. This is representative of the interface between the armature and rail in gun applications. The computational multiphysics framework, ALE3D, is used. The main objective of the current study is to provide guidance and gain confidence in the results obtained with ALE3D. A verification test suite based on 2-D cases is proposed and includes the lid-driven cavity and the Couette flow are investigated. The hydro and thermal fields are assumed to be steady and laminar in nature. Results are compared with analytical solutions and previously published data. Mesh resolution studies are performed along with various models for the equation of state.

  7. January 2010 Physics 3300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    1 January 2010 Physics 3300 Introduction to Physical Oceanography Instructor: Brad de Young Physics and Physical Oceanography Memorial University, bdeyoung@mun.ca Room C-3000 737-8738 Physics 3300 Introduction? What's next? Texts : Robert H. Stewart, Introduction to Physical Oceanography, Robert H. Stewart

  8. Mathematics and Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    knowledge of mathematics and physics after you graduate." 3thE UnivErsity Of warwick Introduction #12;TheMathematics and Physics Physics at warwick 2016 #12;Physics at Warwick Joint Honours Courses Mathematics and Physics #12;Gary Barker head, Undergraduate admissions "Mathematics and physics are a sensible

  9. Suggestions for dealership development to suit needs of a new kind of John Deere customer: a study of 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pospeshnova, Maria Alexandrovna

    2006-08-16

    SUGGESTIONS FOR DEALERSHIP DEVELOPMENT TO SUIT NEEDS OF A NEW KIND OF JOHN DEERE CUSTOMER: A STUDY OF ?LARGE PROPERTY OWNERS? AND THEIR PREFERENCES A Thesis by MARIA ALEXANDROVNA POSPESHNOVA Submitted to the Office of Graduate... DEERE CUSTOMER: A STUDY OF ?LARGE PROPERTY OWNERS? AND THEIR PREFERENCES A Thesis by MARIA ALEXANDROVNA POSPESHNOVA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  10. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 142, 054301 (2015) Predicting the effect of angular momentum on the dissociation dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Laurie J.

    2015-01-01

    are excellent. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the precession of the angular velocityTHE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 142, 054301 (2015) Predicting the effect of angular momentum the endoergicity. We test the model predictions using previous velocity map imaging and crossed laser

  11. Integration & Co-development of a Geophysical CO2 Monitoring Suite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedmann, S J

    2007-07-24

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has emerged as a key technology for dramatic short-term reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in particular from large stationary. A key challenge in this arena is the monitoring and verification (M&V) of CO2 plumes in the deep subsurface. Towards that end, we have developed a tool that can simultaneously invert multiple sub-surface data sets to constrain the location, geometry, and saturation of subsurface CO2 plumes. We have focused on a suite of unconventional geophysical approaches that measure changes in electrical properties (electrical resistance tomography, electromagnetic induction tomography) and bulk crustal deformation (til-meters). We had also used constraints of the geology as rendered in a shared earth model (ShEM) and of the injection (e.g., total injected CO{sub 2}). We describe a stochastic inversion method for mapping subsurface regions where CO{sub 2} saturation is changing. The technique combines prior information with measurements of injected CO{sub 2} volume, reservoir deformation and electrical resistivity. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. The method can (a) jointly reconstruct disparate data types such as surface or subsurface tilt, electrical resistivity, and injected CO{sub 2} volume measurements, (b) provide quantitative measures of the result uncertainty, (c) identify competing models when the available data are insufficient to definitively identify a single optimal model and (d) rank the alternative models based on how well they fit available data. We present results from general simulations of a hypothetical case derived from a real site. We also apply the technique to a field in Wyoming, where measurements collected during CO{sub 2} injection for enhanced oil recovery serve to illustrate the method's performance. The stochastic inversions provide estimates of the most probable location, shape, volume of the plume and most likely CO{sub 2} saturation. The results suggest that the method can reconstruct data with poor signal to noise ratio and use hard constraints available from many sites and applications. External interest in the approach and method is high, and already commercial and DOE entities have requested technical work using the newly developed methodology for CO{sub 2} monitoring.

  12. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Ferber, Mattison K; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Fox, Ethan E

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Borofloat borosilicate glass, and is a follow-up to a similar study completed by the authors on Starphire soda-lime silicate glass last year. The response of the borosilicate glass to impact testing at different angles was also studied. The Borofloat glass was supplied by the US Army Research Laboratory and its tin-side was impacted or indented. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Borofloat. Seven sphere materials were used whose densities bracket that of rock: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, carbon steel, and a chrome steel. A gas gun or a ball-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against the glass tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Borofloat were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the seven sphere-Borofloat-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) BS glass responded similarly to soda-lime silicate glass when spherically indented but quite differently under sphere impact conditions; (2) Frictional effects contributed to fracture initiation in BS glass when it spherically indented. This effect was also observed with soda-lime silicate glass; (3) The force necessary to initiate fracture in BS glass under spherical impact decreases with increasing elastic modulus of the sphere material. This trend is opposite to what was observed with soda-lime silicate glass. Friction cannot explain this trend and the authors do not have a legitimate explanation for it yet; (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than under quasi-static conditions. That difference decreases with increasing elastic modulus mismatch between the sphere material and borosilicate This trend was opposite in soda-lime silicate glass; (5) Fracture in borosilicate glass occurs at lower velocities (i.e., easier) at 24{sup o} than at 0{sup o} (orthogonal) and 46{sup o} of impact for the same probability of failure. Though not analyzed yet, this suggests that a convolution of kinetic energy and friction is contributing to that trend; (6) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation RCIF. This likely is not a material property nor exclusive to borosilicate glass, rather, it is a statistical response of a combination of local, surface-located flaw and imposed tensile stress. Understanding of the surface flaw population and flaw positioning can likely enable prediction of spherical indentation RCIF; and (7) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Borofloat BS for impact kinetic energies up to {approx} 20 mJ. For kinetic energies between {approx} 20-150 mJ, fracture sometimes initiated. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 150 mJ. The energy values, and their boundaries, were much lower for BS glass than they were for soda-lime silicate glass.

  13. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raptis, A.C.

    1983-09-06

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions. 8 figs.

  14. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  15. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shupe, Matthew

    2013-05-22

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  16. Two RICH detectors as velocity spectrometers in the CKM experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurgen Engelfried et al.

    2002-09-04

    We present the design of two velocity spectrometers, to be used in the recently approved CKM experiment. CKM's main goal is the measurement of the branching ratio of K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} with a precision of 10%, via decays in flight of the K{sup +}. The design of both RICH detectors is based on the SELEX Phototube RICH. We will discuss the design and the expected performance, based on studies with SELEX data and Monte Carlo Simulations.

  17. Analysis of the velocity field of granular hopper flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. G. R. Magalhães; A. P. F. Atman; J. G. Moreira; H. J. Herrmann

    2015-07-22

    We report the analysis of radial characteristics of the flow of granular material through a conical hopper. The discharge is simulated for various orifice sizes and hopper opening angles. Velocity profiles are measured along two radial lines from the hopper cone vertex: along the main axis of the cone and along its wall. An approximate power law dependence on the distance from the orifice is observed for both profiles, although differences between them can be noted. In order to quantify these differences, we propose a Local Mass Flow index that is a promising tool in the direction of a more reliable classification of the flow regimes in hoppers.

  18. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  19. Property:Maximum Velocity(m/s) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, searchContDiv JumpTechDsc JumpLabVelocity

  20. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2013-06-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of ?14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS’ System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  1. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2013-07-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  2. Collision kernels from velocity-selective optical pumping with magnetic depolarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhamre, T.

    We experimentally demonstrate how magnetic depolarization of velocity-selective optical pumping can be used to single out the collisional cusp kernel best describing spin- and velocity-relaxing collisions between potassium ...

  3. Variation of seismic-wave velocities in westerly granite under stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz Muhareb

    1994-01-01

    Seismic-wave velocities in cracked rocks increase with stress. It is believed that, within less than half the rupture pressure, this velocity increase occurs due to the closure of cracks. Previous studies have shown that, ...

  4. The oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity and attenuation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asthenosphere Seismic attenuation Seismic velocity Anelasticity Partial melt Combined interpretation of seismicThe oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity anelastic dispersion (Karato and Jung, 1998; Karato, 2003). A unique interpretation of seismological models

  5. A new velocity map for Byrd Glacier, East Antarctica, derived from high-resolution satellite imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Leigh; Hamilton, Gordon

    2005-06-01

    New ice-velocity measurements are obtained for the main trunk of Byrd Glacier, East Antarctica, using recently acquired Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) imagery. The velocities are derived from the application...

  6. Wavefield Analysis of Rayleigh Waves for Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Chong

    2011-05-18

    Shear (S)-wave velocity is a key property of near-surface materials and is the fundamental parameter for many environmental and engineering geophysical studies. Directly acquiring accurate S-wave velocities from a seismic shot gather is usually...

  7. Cosmic density and velocity fields in Lagrangian perturbation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikel Susperregi; Thomas Buchert

    1997-08-04

    A first- and second-order relation between cosmic density and peculiar-velocity fields is presented. The calculation is purely Lagrangian and it is derived using the second-order solutions of the Lagrange-Newton system obtained by Buchert & Ehlers. The procedure is applied to two particular solutions given generic initial conditions. In this approach, the continuity equation yields a relation between the over-density and peculiar-velocity fields that automatically satisfies Euler's equation because the orbits are derived from the Lagrange-Newton system. This scheme generalizes some results obtained by Nusser et al. (1991) in the context of the Zel'dovich approximation. As opposed to several other reconstruction schemes, in this approach it is not necessary to truncate the expansion of the Jacobian given by the continuity equation in order to calculate a first- or second-order expression for the density field. In these previous schemes, the density contrast given by (a) the continuity equation and (b) Euler's equation are mutually incompatible. This inconsistency arises as a consequence of an improper handling of Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates in the analysis. Here, we take into account the fact that an exact calculation of the density is feasible in the Lagrangian picture and therefore an accurate and consistent description is obtained.

  8. Velocity dispersion and upscaling in a laboratory-simulated VSP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rio, P.; Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Marion, D. [Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France)] [Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France)

    1996-03-01

    A laboratory and numerical study was conducted to investigate the impact of scale-dependent seismic wave propagation in randomly layered media, as applied to sonic logs, surface seismic, and vertical seismic profiles (VSPs). Analysis of the laboratory results (1) confirmed the wavelength dependence of velocities inferred from traveltimes, (2) indicated that scale effects can introduce traveltime errors when upscaling from logs to surface seismic and VSPs, and (3) illustrated that erroneous VSP interval velocities can result when layer thicknesses are smaller than about one-tenth of the wavelength. A simple approximate recipe is presented for estimating these traveltimes by successively filtering the medium using a running Backus average and ray theory. The scale-dependent dispersion was also predicted well using a more rigorous invariant imbedding formulation. The predicted traveltimes, using the approximate recipe, compare well with the times observed in the laboratory stack of steel and plastic layers and in numerical studies of stratified media. The dispersion curves predicted by the approximate method also show the overall behavior computed with the more rigorous invariant imbedding formulation.

  9. DETECTION OF LOW-VELOCITY COLLISIONS IN SATURN'S F RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attree, N. O.; Murray, C. D.; Cooper, N. J.; Williams, G. A.

    2012-08-20

    Jets of material extending several hundred kilometers from Saturn's F ring are thought to be caused by collisions at speeds of several tens of ms{sup -1} between {approx}10 km diameter objects such as S/2004 S 6 and the core of the ring. The subsequent effects of Keplerian shear give rise to the multi-stranded nature of the F ring. Observations of the ring by the Imaging Science Subsystem experiment on the Cassini spacecraft have provided evidence that some smaller protrusions from the ring's core are the result of low-velocity collisions with nearby objects. We refer to these protrusions as 'mini-jets' and one such feature has been observed for {approx}7.5 hr as its length changed from {approx}75 km to {approx}250 km while it simultaneously appeared to collapse into the core. Orbit determinations suggest that such mini-jets consist of ring material displaced by a {approx}1 ms{sup -1} collision with a nearby moonlet, resulting in paths relative to the core that are due to a combination of Keplerian shear and epicyclic motion. Detections of mini-jets in the Cassini images suggest that it may now be possible to understand most small-scale F ring structure as the result of such collisions. A study of these mini-jets will therefore put constraints on the properties of the colliding population as well as improve our understanding of low-velocity collisions between icy objects.

  10. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer; Sullivan, Mark; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi; Nugent, Peter E.; Bersier, David; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fransson, Claes; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Quimby, Robert

    2014-06-20

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ?10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  11. Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Fox, Ethan E; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Ferber, Mattison K

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) sphere impact testing of two materials from the lithium aluminosilicate family reinforced with different amounts of ceramic particulate, i.e., glass-ceramic materials, SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-G1 and SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-L. Both materials are provided by SCHOTT Glass (Duryea, PA). This work is a follow-up to similar sphere impact studies completed by the authors on PPG's Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass and SCHOTT BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. A gas gun or a sphere-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) spheres against the glass ceramic tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the glass-ceramics were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between sphere and target material. Quasistatic spherical indentation was also performed on both glass ceramics and their contact damage responses were compared to those of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses. Lastly, variability of contact damage response was assessed by performing spherical indentation testing across the area of an entire glass ceramic tile. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Resistan{trademark}-L glass ceramic required the highest velocity of sphere impact for damage to initiate. Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass was second best, then Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and then BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (2) Glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-L also required the largest force to initiate ring crack from quasi-static indentation. That ranking was followed, in descending order, by Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass, Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (3) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in Resistan{trademark}-G1 from quasi-static spherical indentation. This indicates that friction is affecting ring crack initiation in Resistan{trademark}-G1. Friction also affected ring crack initiation in Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glasses. Among these three materials, friction was the most pronounced (largest slope in the RCIF-elastic modulus graph) in the Starphire{reg_sign} and least pronounced in the BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. The reason for this is not understood, but differences in deformation behavior under high contact stresses could be a cause or contributor to this. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than it is under quasi-static conditions in Resistan{trademark}-L and Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramics. This is a trend observed too in Starphire{reg_sign} and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. (5) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation-induced ring crack initiation forces. This is not a material property nor is it exclusive to glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, rather, it is a statistical mechanical response to an accumulated history of processing and handling of that specific tile.

  12. Physics Resources for Teachers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    Physics Resources for Teachers University of Wisconsin ­ Madison Department of Physics 1150 University Ave. Madison, WI 53706 wonders@physics.wisc.edu (608) 262-2927 Plasma Physics Web Resources Center Plasma Physics Lab http://science-education.pppl.gov/ Coalition for Plasma Science http

  13. General Syllabus Physics 45100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    General Syllabus Physics 45100 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Designation: Undergraduate Catalog description: 45100: Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Temperature; equation of state; work and statistical mechanics; low-temperature physics; the Third Law. 3 HR./Wk.; 3 CR. Prerequisites: Physics 35100

  14. B Physics (Experiment)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Kreps

    2010-08-13

    In past few years the flavor physics made important transition from the work on confirmation the standard model of particle physics to the phase of search for effects of a new physics beyond standard model. In this paper we review current state of the physics of b-hadrons with emphasis on results with a sensitivity to new physics.

  15. wave velocity group velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    -11 3.5e-11 4e-11 4.5e-11 5e-11 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 location(nm) temperature(K) wave location 15 20 25 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 numberdensity(a.u.) frequency (THz) Summary Model Simulation Results Context. - Seitz and Koehler (1956) solve Boltzmann transport equations Monte Carlo approach is used to· 90 100 3e

  16. DOCTORAL PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS, Subprogramme PHYSICS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    area. The nuclear Engineering module treats nuclear technology, operation, nuclear safety, reactorDOCTORAL PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS, Subprogramme PHYSICS, Module NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Slovenia is producing a significant share of its electricity in nuclear power plant. The doctoral programme

  17. Tracking deep mantle reservoirs with ultra-low velocity zones Allen K. McNamara a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Tracking deep mantle reservoirs with ultra-low velocity zones Allen K. McNamara a, , Edward J, that directly overlies the core-mantle boundary (CMB). These regions have been dubbed Ultra-Low Velocity Zones. Introduction For over 15 yrs seismologists have mapped regions of ultra-low P- and S-wave velocities

  18. Ultra-low velocities and Superplumes Garnero, Thorne, McNamara, Rost [2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnero, Ed

    Ultra-low velocities and Superplumes Garnero, Thorne, McNamara, Rost [2005] - 1- Fine-scale ultra-low, Arizona 85287-1404 USA Abstract. Ultra-low velocity layering at Earth's core-mantle boundary has now been in the overlying few hundred km of the mantle. Ultra-low velocity zones contain properties consistent with partial

  19. Rapid determination of particle velocity from space-time images using the Radon transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cauwenberghs, Gert

    Rapid determination of particle velocity from space-time images using the Radon transform Patrick J an alternative method that makes use of the Radon transform to calculate the velocity of streaming particles. We the velocity that makes use of the Radon transform (Deans 1983; Averbuch et al. 2001), which takes a set

  20. Flow Measurement and Instrumentation 9 (1998) 159169 Measurement of angular velocities using electrical impedance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01

    Flow Measurement and Instrumentation 9 (1998) 159­169 Measurement of angular velocities using, the predominant component of velocity is angular in nature. In this paper a novel technique based on electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is introduced for measuring and mapping these angular velocities. The technique

  1. Analyzing Angular Distributions for Two-Step Dissociation Mechanisms in Velocity Map Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Laurie J.

    Analyzing Angular Distributions for Two-Step Dissociation Mechanisms in Velocity Map Imaging Daniel, but that algorithm did not treat the angular distribution of the net velocity vectors. If the initial photolysis step is anisotropic, which is the usual case, the angular distribution of the net velocity vector is affected both

  2. Measurement of angular velocity in the perception of rotation Josee F. Barraza, Norberto M. Grzywacz *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grzywacz, Norberto

    Measurement of angular velocity in the perception of rotation Josee F. Barraza, Norberto M, we report on a series of experiments that explore whether human subjects can use angular velocity. Results showed that humans could rely on a sensitive measurement of angular velocity to perform

  3. Robust stabilization of the angular velocity of a rigid body with two controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pascal

    Robust stabilization of the angular velocity of a rigid body with two controls P. Morin INRIA Journal of Control Abstract The problem of asymptotic stabilization of the angular velocity of a rigid theory. 1 Introduction The angular velocity control of a rigid body with only one or two controls has

  4. Mechanisms underlying the perceived angular velocity of a rigidly rotating object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucci, David J.

    Mechanisms underlying the perceived angular velocity of a rigidly rotating object G.P. Caplovitz The perceived angular velocity of an ellipse undergoing a constant rate of rotation will vary as its aspect underestimation of angular velocity in the domain where ellipses appear to be rotating rigidly. We char- acterize

  5. Leader/Follower synchronization of satellite attitude without angular velocity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    Leader/Follower synchronization of satellite attitude without angular velocity measurements Anne angular velocity measurements are not available. Nonlinear observers are used to estimate the angular law without angular velocity measurements for a single spacecraft and in [8] an output feedback

  6. Carbon monoxide oxidation on Rh(111): Velocity and angular distributions of the CO2 product

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    Carbon monoxide oxidation on Rh(111): Velocity and angular distributions of the CO2 product J. I of surface temperature and oxygen coverage. Both the velocity and angular distributions are bimodal without first accommodating on the surface, the velocity, angular, and internal state distributions may

  7. The Tail of Myosin Reduces Actin Filament Velocity in the In Vitro Motility Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guilford, William

    The Tail of Myosin Reduces Actin Filament Velocity in the In Vitro Motility Assay Bin Guo been observed that heavy meromyosin (HMM) propels actin filaments to higher velocities than native filament velocities, becoming equivalent to native myosin at a ratio of 3 LMM/HMM. NH4 -ATPase assays

  8. Low Velocity Boron Micro-Pellet Injector For Edge And Core Impurity Transport Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Low Velocity Boron Micro-Pellet Injector For Edge And Core Impurity Transport Measurements H. W, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 Abstract A simple Low Velocity Boron Micro-Pellet Injector has been under High velocity, pneumatic, pellet injection systems are applied routinely for injecting frozen pellets

  9. Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: Effect of moisture,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: Effect of moisture, product type, and material direction Guangping Han Qinglin Wu Xiping Wang Abstract The effect of moisture on longitudinal stress-wave veloc- ity, particleboard, and southern pine lumber was evaluated. It was shown that the stress-wave velocity decreased

  10. Contribution of small scale turbulence to burning velocity of flamelets in the thin reaction zone regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Contribution of small scale turbulence to burning velocity of flamelets in the thin reaction zone the turbulent burning velocity under the conditions corresponding to the thin reaction zones regime. Approaches turbulence on flam- elet burning velocity. An expression was derived to estimate the contribution of flame

  11. Impact of Velocity on Corn Stover Pretreatment 977 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113116, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    with velocity, especially in the early reaction stage, suggests that chemical reaction is not the only factorImpact of Velocity on Corn Stover Pretreatment 977 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113 Velocity on Hot Water Only Pretreatment of Corn Stover in a Flowthrough Reactor CHAOGANG LIU AND CHARLES E

  12. Near-coastal surface water velocity field estimation using airborne remote sensing11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Near-coastal surface water velocity field estimation using airborne remote sensing11 Tim J Malthus1. With airborne remote sensing, however, it is possible to determine synoptic changes in velocity fields because properties of successive remotely sensed images may be used to estimate velocity vectors associated

  13. Effect of Velocity Ratio on Noise Source Distribution of Coaxial Jets Dimitri Papamoschou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papamoschou, Dimitri

    Effect of Velocity Ratio on Noise Source Distribution of Coaxial Jets Dimitri Papamoschou and Sara source distribution of coaxial jets with a diameter ratio of 1.6 and variable velocity ratio and secondary cores of the jet. For zero velocity ratio (single-stream jet), the region near the nozzle emits

  14. Physics 100B General Physics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    and Magnetic fields, Currents and circuits, Electromagnetic fields, Optics, Special Theory of Relativity an understanding and appreciation of the fundamental laws of electricity, magnetism and modern physics. At the end, Quantum Theory, Atomic physics, Nuclear Physics, and Elementary particles. (Chapters 19-31) Requirement

  15. Verification and Validation of the AMROC Fluid Solver Framework Coupling with DYNA3D within the Virtual Test Facility Fluid Structure Interaction Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deiterding, Ralf

    the Virtual Test Facility Fluid Structure Interaction Suite Euler equations Hydrodynamic equations Stiffened.4, p1 Air=0, Water=7.415, p1 Water=2962 bar · Cavitation modeling with pressure cutoff at p=0 MPa

  16. Physical Education ! Teaching Materials!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    Physical Education ! Teaching Materials! !!! ! 1. PROGRAMS OF STUDY ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !P.E. Program Physical Activity (DPA) Initiative: Mandatory program introduced in 2005. Schools are required to create opportunities for students to engage in Physical activity. Administrators and all teachers are responsible

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horváth, Ákos

    ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS METHODS LABORATORY PRACTICES #12;Foundations of Environmental Science Lecture Enviromental Physics Methods Laboratory Practices #12;Eötvös Loránd University Faculty of Science ENVIRONMENTAL tankönyvsorozat" (KMR Foundations of Environmental Science Lecture Series). KEYWORDS: Environmental physics

  18. Fundamental parameters of Cepheids. V. Additional photometry and radial velocity for southern Cepheids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Bersier

    2002-01-15

    I present photometric and radial velocity data for Galactic Cepheids, most of them being in the southern hemisphere. There are 1250 Geneva 7-color photometric measurements for 62 Cepheids, the average uncertainty per measurement is better than 0.01 mag. A total of 832 velocity measurements have been obtained with the CORAVEL radial velocity spectrograph for 46 Cepheids. The average accuracy of the radial velocity data is 0.38 km/s. There are 33 stars with both photometry and radial velocity data. I discuss the possible binarity or period change that these new data reveal. I also present reddenings for all Cepheids with photometry. The data are available electronically.

  19. Using the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Maguire, J.; Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important as a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes models that isolate the impacts of specific building components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models; these discrepancies are caused by differences in the models used by the engines or coding errors.

  20. Using the Beopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite to Enable Comparative Analysis Between Energy Simulation Engines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares-Velasco, Paulo Cesar; Maguire, Jeff; Horowitz, Scott; Christensen, Craig

    2014-09-01

    Verification and validation are crucial software quality control procedures to follow when developing and implementing models. This is particularly important because a variety of stakeholders rely on accurate predictions from building simulation programs. This study uses the BEopt Automated Residential Simulation Test Suite (BARTS) to facilitate comparison of two energy simulation engines across various building components and includes building models that isolate the impacts of specific components on annual energy consumption. As a case study, BARTS has been used to identify important discrepancies between the engines for several components of the building models. These discrepancies are caused by differences in the algorithms used by the engines or coding errors.

  1. Space Weather Application Using Projected Velocity Asymmetry of Halo CMEs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Michalek; N. Gopalswamy; S. Yashiro

    2008-01-13

    Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) originating from regions close to the center of the Sun are likely to be responsible for severe geomagnetic storms. It is important to predict geo-effectiveness of HCMEs using observations when they are still near the Sun. Unfortunately, coronagraphic observations do not provide true speeds of CMEs due to the projection effects. In the present paper, we present a new technique allowing estimate the space speed and approximate source location using projected speeds measured at different position angles for a given HCME (velocity asymmetry). We apply this technique to HCMEs observed during 2001-2002 and find that the improved speeds are better correlated with the travel times of HCMEs to Earth and with the magnitudes ensuing geomagnetic storms.

  2. Effective velocity boundary condition at a mixed slip surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sbragaglia, M

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the nature of the effective velocity boundary conditions for liquid flow over a plane boundary on which small free-slip islands are randomly distributed. It is found that, to lowest order in the area fraction $\\beta$ covered by free-slip regions with characteristic size $a$, a macroscopic Navier-type slip condition emerges with a slip length of the order of $a\\beta$. The study is motivated by recent experiments which suggest that gas nano-bubbles may form on solid walls and may be responsible for the appearance of a partial slip boundary conditions for liquid flow. The results are also relevant for ultra-hydrophobic surfaces exploiting the so-called ``lotus effect''.

  3. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, Edwin F. (Alamo, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  4. Low velocity impact of inclined CSM composite laminates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, W.S.; Madjidi, S.; Marshall, I.H.; Robb, M.D.

    1993-12-31

    The damage tolerance of composite laminates subject to low velocity impact is an important aspect of current design philosophies required to ensure the integrity of primary load bearing structures. To the authors knowledge, no work published in the open literature has addressed the damage tolerance of composites subject to impacts at non-perpendicular inclinations, which in practical situations is the most common form of impact. This paper describes an experimental study, devised to assess the influence of inclined impact on the residual strength characteristics of CSM laminates. Preliminary experimental results and comparisons with previous work on flat plate impact tests are presented. The influence of the degree of inclination and impact energy are correlated with the laminates damage area and residual tensile properties.

  5. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-08-08

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphics pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  6. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  7. Photospheric Logarithmic Velocity Spirals as MHD Wave Generation Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumford, S J

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution observations of the solar photosphere have identified a wide variety of spiralling motions in the plasma. These spirals vary in properties, but are observed to be abundant on the solar surface. In this work these spirals are studied for their potential as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave generation mechanisms. The inter-granular lanes, where these spirals are commonly observed, are also regions where the magnetic field strength is higher than average. This combination of magnetic field and spiralling plasma is a recipe for the generation of Alfv\\'en waves and other MHD waves. This work employs numerical simulations of a self-similar magnetic flux tube embedded in a realistic, gravitationally stratified, solar atmosphere to study the effects of a single magnetic flux tube perturbed by a logarithmic velocity spiral driver. The expansion factor of the logarithmic spiral driver is varied, multiple simulations are run for a range of values of the expansion factor centred around observational data. Th...

  8. Ten Low Mass Companions from the Keck Precision Velocity Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven S. Vogt; R. Paul Butler; Geoffrey W. Marcy; Debra A. Fischer; Dimitri Pourbaix; Kevin Apps; Gregory Laughlin

    2001-10-16

    Ten new low mass companions have emerged from the Keck precision Doppler velocity survey, with minimum (msini) masses ranging from 0.8 mjup to 0.34 msun. Five of these are planet candidates with msini < 12 mjup, two are brown dwarf candidates with msini ~30 mjup, and three are low mass stellar companions. Hipparcos astrometry reveals the orbital inclinations and masses for three of the (more massive) companions, and it provides upper limits to the masses for the rest. A new class of extrasolar planet is emerging, characterized by nearly circular orbits and orbital radii greater than 1 AU. The planet HD 4208b appears to be a member of this new class. The mass distribution of extrasolar planets continues to exhibit a rapid rise from 10 mjup toward the lowest detectable masses near 1 msat.

  9. Ten Low Mass Companions from the Keck Precision Velocity Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogt, S S; Marcy, G W; Fischer, D A; Pourbaix, D; Apps, K; Laughlin, G; Vogt, Steven S.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Pourbaix, Dimitri; Apps, Kevin; Laughlin, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    Ten new low mass companions have emerged from the Keck precision Doppler velocity survey, with minimum (msini) masses ranging from 0.8 mjup to 0.34 msun. Five of these are planet candidates with msini < 12 mjup, two are brown dwarf candidates with msini ~30 mjup, and three are low mass stellar companions. Hipparcos astrometry reveals the orbital inclinations and masses for three of the (more massive) companions, and it provides upper limits to the masses for the rest. A new class of extrasolar planet is emerging, characterized by nearly circular orbits and orbital radii greater than 1 AU. The planet HD 4208b appears to be a member of this new class. The mass distribution of extrasolar planets continues to exhibit a rapid rise from 10 mjup toward the lowest detectable masses near 1 msat.

  10. Nuclear Physics: Recent Talks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns Meetings Recent Talks Archived Talks Additional Information Computing at JLab Operations Logbook Physics Topics:...

  11. Nuclear Physics: Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns The Structure of the Nuclear Building Blocks The Structure of Nuclei Symmetry Tests in Nuclear Physics Meetings...

  12. B Physics: Theory Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David London

    2012-07-23

    This is an overview of B physics that can be done at the LHC with the purpose of searching for new physics.

  13. Office of Physical Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Physical Protection is comprised of a team of security specialists engaged in providing Headquarters-wide physical protection.

  14. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Highlights Public Interest Nuclear Physics Accelerator Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns Meetings Recent Talks Archived Talks...

  15. Evaluation of Physics Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    ..........................................................................................23 Cluster: Physics of Transport in Fluids...................................................................................31 TU/e-9 Physics of Cold Atoms.....................................................................................................................................................................35 TU/e-10 Transport in Permeable Media

  16. Physics Advisory Committee Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 Physics Advisory Committee Meeting November 4-6, 2010 Comments and Recommendations Introduction The Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee (PAC) met to consider a number of...

  17. LANSCE Weapons Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 LANSCE Weapons Physics Fortune 500 companies and weapons designers alike rely on our internationally recognized nuclear physics and materials science expertise as well as our...

  18. ORISE: Health physics services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health physics services Nuclear power plant The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) offers comprehensive health physics services in a number of technical areas...

  19. ORISE: Health Physics Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Physics Training Student performs an analysis during an ORAU health physics training course Training and educating a highly skilled workforce that can meet operational...

  20. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing...

  1. A rock physics strategy for quantifying uncertainty in common hydrocarbon indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.M.; Mukerji, T.

    1995-12-31

    We present a strategy for hydrocarbon detection and for quantifying the uncertainty in hydrocarbon indicators, by combining statistical techniques with deterministic rock physics relations derived from the laboratory and theory. A simple example combines Gassmann`s deterministic equation for fluid substitution with statistics inferred from log and core data, to detect hydrocarbons from observed seismic velocities. The formulation gives the most likely estimate of the pore fluid modulus, corresponding to each observed velocity, and also the uncertainty of that interpretation. The variances of seismic velocity and porosity in the calibration data determine the uncertainty of the pore fluid interpretation. As expected, adding information about shear wave velocity, from AVO for example, narrows the uncertainty of the hydrocarbon indicator. The formulation offers a convenient way to implement deterministic fluid substitution equations in the realistic case when the reference porosity and velocity span a range of values.

  2. Phase Contrast MRI Segmentation Using Velocity and Intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solem, Jan Erik

    Hospital, Sweden 3 Department of Radiation Physics, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden markus information for blood and tissue in the human body. The proposed method uses a variational formulation the level set method. Experiments on phantom data and clinical data support the proposed method. 1

  3. Two-fluid physics and field-reversed configurationsa... Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Avenue Suite A, Boulder, Colorado 80303

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; published online 24 May 2007 In this paper, algorithms for the solution of two-fluid plasma equations Environmental Modeling Reconnection Challenge problem. Equilibrium of FRC is studied. It is shown that starting from a MHD equilibrium produces a relaxed two-fluid equilibrium with strong flows at the FRC edges due

  4. Flat space physics from holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bousso, Raphael

    2009-01-01

    thermodynamics in black hole physics. Phys. Rev. D 9, 3292 (LBNL-53861 Flat space physics from holography RaphaelBousso Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics

  5. The Application of the PEBBED Code Suite to the PBMR-400 Coupled Code Benchmark - FY 2006 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-09-01

    This document describes the recent developments of the PEBBED code suite and its application to the PBMR-400 Coupled Code Benchmark. This report addresses an FY2006 Level 2 milestone under the NGNP Design and Evaluation Methods Work Package. The milestone states "Complete a report describing the results of the application of the integrated PEBBED code package to the PBMR-400 coupled code benchmark". The report describes the current state of the PEBBED code suite, provides an overview of the Benchmark problems to which it was applied, discusses the code developments achieved in the past year, and states some of the results attained. Results of the steady state problems generated by the PEBBED fuel management code compare favorably to the preliminary results generated by codes from other participating institutions and to similar non-Benchmark analyses. Partial transient analysis capability has been achieved through the acquisition of the NEM-THERMIX code from Penn State University. Phase I of the task has been achieved through the development of a self-consistent set of tools for generating cross sections for design and transient analysis and in the successful execution of the steady state benchmark exercises.

  6. THE IMPACT OF THE SUPERSONIC BARYON-DARK MATTER VELOCITY DIFFERENCE ON THE z {approx} 20 21 cm BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McQuinn, Matthew; O'Leary, Ryan M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    Recently, Tseliakhovich and Hirata showed that during the cosmic Dark Ages the baryons were typically moving supersonically with respect to the dark matter with a spatially variable Mach number. Such supersonic motion may source shocks that inhomogeneously heat the universe. This motion may also suppress star formation in the first halos. Even a small amount of coupling of the 21 cm signal to this motion has the potential to vastly enhance the 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations at 15 {approx}< z {approx}< 40, as well as to imprint distinctive acoustic oscillations in this signal. We present estimates for the size of this coupling, which we calibrate with a suite of cosmological simulations of the high-redshift universe using the GADGET and Enzo codes. Our simulations, discussed in detail in a companion paper, are initialized to self-consistently account for gas pressure and the dark matter-baryon relative velocity, v {sub bc} (in contrast to prior simulations). We find that the supersonic velocity difference dramatically suppresses structure formation on 10-100 comoving kpc scales, it sources shocks throughout the universe, and it impacts the accretion of gas onto the first star-forming minihalos (even for halo masses as large as 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }). However, prior to reheating by astrophysical sources, we find that the v {sub bc}-sourced temperature fluctuations can contribute only as much as Almost-Equal-To 10% of the fluctuations in the 21 cm signal. We do find that v {sub bc} in certain scenarios could source an O(1) component in the power spectrum of the 21 cm background on observable scales via the X-ray (but not ultraviolet) backgrounds produced once the first stars formed. In a scenario in which {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub Sun} minihalos reheated the universe via their X-ray backgrounds, we find that the pre-reionization 21 cm signal would be larger than previously anticipated and exhibit more significant acoustic features. Such features would be a direct probe of the first stars and black holes. In addition, we show that structure formation shocks are unable to heat the universe sufficiently to erase a strong 21 cm absorption trough at z {approx} 20 that is found in most models of the sky-averaged 21 cm intensity.

  7. Aspects of Unparticle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind Rajaraman

    2008-10-15

    We review some theoretical and experimental issues in unparticle physics, focusing mainly on collider signatures.

  8. particle physics 2009Highlights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report particle physics 2009ª #12;2 | Contents #12;Contents | 3 contentsª º introduction 4 º News;Introduction | 5 projects, (ii) coordination of national particle physics activities and (iii) reaching outparticle physics 2009ªHighlights and Annual Report Accelerators | Photon Science | Particle Physics

  9. Review of Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Kenzo

    2010-01-01

    careersvc/ • APS Careers in Physics: The American PhysicalAPS/DPF/DPB Summer Study on the Future of Particle Physics (APS Acta Physica Slovaca ARNPS Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science ARNS Annual Review of Nuclear Science ASP Astroparticle Physics

  10. arXiv:0711.0150v1[gr-qc]1Nov2007 Space-based research in fundamental physics and quantum technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    technologies Slava G. Turyshev, Ulf E. Israelsson, Michael Shao, Nan Yu Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California perform direct detection of gravitational waves and are naturally suited for investigations in precision into powerful high-resolution quantum sensors greatly benefiting fundamental physics. We discuss the current

  11. Journal of the Korean Physical Society, Vol. 40, No. 1, January 2002, pp. 8789 Synchronous Mirror Delay for Zero-and Multi-Phase Locking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong Duk

    ) A clock generation circuit used in synchronous SRAM (static random access memory) was de- signedJournal of the Korean Physical Society, Vol. 40, No. 1, January 2002, pp. 8789 Synchronous Mirror by adapting SMD (synchronous mirror delay) scheme. A multi-phase synchronous circuit suited for the double

  12. Health Physics Technician | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technician Department: ESH&S Staff: TSS04 Requisition Number: 1500441 Perform health physics support in the area of radiological assessment and implementation of radiation safety...

  13. Graduate Studies in Physics Ph.D. in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Studies in Physics Ph.D. in Physics M.Sc. in Physics (with thesis) M.Sc. in Physics (with major paper) M.Sc. in Physics (coursework only) www.uwindsor.ca/physics Research Facilities The Physics students an opportunity to be trained in developing new laboratory apparatus. Library resources for physics

  14. Distances to Galactic high-velocity clouds. Complex C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. P. Wakker; D. G. York; J. C. Howk; J. C. Barentine; R. Wilhelm; R. F. Peletier; H. van Woerden; T. C. Beers; Z. Ivezic; P. Richter; U. J. Schwarz

    2007-10-17

    We report the first determination of a distance bracket for the high-velocity cloud (HVC) complex C. Combined with previous measurements showing that this cloud has a metallicity of 0.15 times solar, these results provide ample evidence that complex C traces the continuing accretion of intergalactic gas falling onto the Milky Way. Accounting for both neutral and ionized hydrogen as well as He, the distance bracket implies a mass of 3-14x10^6 M_sun, and the complex represents a mass inflow of 0.1-0.25 M_sun/yr. We base our distance bracket on the detection of CaII absorption in the spectrum of the blue horizontal branch star SDSS J120404.78+623345.6, in combination with a significant non-detection toward the BHB star BS 16034-0114. These results set a strong distance bracket of 3.7-11.2 kpc on the distance to complex C. A more weakly supported lower limit of 6.7 kpc may be derived from the spectrum of the BHB star BS 16079-0017.

  15. The Galactic Nature of High Velocity Cloud Complex WB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Thom; M. E. Putman; B. K. Gibson; N. Christlieb; C. Flynn; T. C. Beers; R. Wilhelm; Y. S. Lee

    2006-01-06

    We have detected absorption lines from the High Velocity Cloud Complex WB in the spectrum of the star HE1048+0231. This detection sets an upper distance limit to the cloud of 8.8^{+2.3}_{-1.3} kpc. Non-detection (at >4 sigma confidence) in the star HE1138-1303 at 7.7 +/- 0.2 kpc sets a probable lower limit. The equivalent width of the CaII K line due to the HVC (114.6 +/- 4.4 mA) corresponds to a column density of 1.32 +/- 0.05 x 10^12 cm^-2. Using an HI spectrum from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn survey, we calculated N(CaII)/N(HI) = 81 +/- 16 x 10^-9. These distance limits imply an HI mass limit of 3.8 x 10^5 Msun < M_HI < 4.9 x 10^5 Msun. The upper distance limit imposed by these observations shows that this HVC complex has a probable Galactic or circum-Galactic origin. Future metallicity measurements will be able to confirm or refute this interpretation.

  16. 3D photospheric velocity field of a Supergranular cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dario Del Moro; Silvia Giordano; Francesco Berrilli

    2007-05-23

    We investigate the plasma flow properties inside a Supergranular (SG) cell, in particular its interaction with small scale magnetic field structures. The SG cell has been identified using the magnetic network (CaII wing brightness) as proxy, applying the Two-Level Structure Tracking (TST) to high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution observations obtained by IBIS. The full 3D velocity vector field for the SG has been reconstructed at two different photospheric heights. In order to strengthen our findings, we also computed the mean radial flow of the SG by means of cork tracing. We also studied the behaviour of the horizontal and Line of Sight plasma flow cospatial with cluster of bright CaII structures of magnetic origin to better understand the interaction between photospheric convection and small scale magnetic features. The SG cell we investigated seems to be organized with an almost radial flow from its centre to the border. The large scale divergence structure is probably created by a compact region of constant up-flow close to the cell centre. On the edge of the SG, isolated regions of strong convergent flow are nearby or cospatial with extended clusters of bright CaII wing features forming the knots of the magnetic network.

  17. Low inlet gas velocity high throughput biomass gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmann, H.F.; Paisley, M.A.

    1989-05-09

    A method is described for operating a gasifier which comprises: introducing inlet gas at a velocity of about 0.5 to 7 ft/sec to fluidize a bed in a gasifier vessel; forming the bed into a fluidized bed in a first space region by means of the inlet gas, the fluidized bed containing a circulating hot relatively fine and inert solid bed particle component; inputting and throughputting carbonaceous material into and through the first space region with fluidized bed at a rate from 500-4400 lbs/ft/sup 2/-hr; endothermally pyrolyzing the carbonaceous material by means of the circulating hot inert particle component so as to form a product gas; forming contiguous to and above the fluidized bed a lower average density entrained space region containing an entrained mixture of inert solid particles, char, and carbonaceous material and the product gas; gradually and continuously removing the entrained mixture and the product gas from the lower average density entrained space region of the gasifier to a separator, residence time of the carbonaceous material in the gasifier not exceeding 3 minutes on average; separating the entrained mixture from the product gas; passing the entrained mixture containing inert solid particles, char, and carbonaceous material through an exothermic reaction zone to add heat; and returning at least the inert solid particles to the first space region.

  18. Coiled tubing velocity string hangoff method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gipson, T.C.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes a method for hanging off a coiled tube velocity string in an active gas production well tubing run, the run having at least a master valve and a first line valve. It includes installing a hangoff assembly in the production well tubing run between the master valve and the first line valve the hangoff assembly comprising a hangoff head, a second line valve, an upper valve, and a hydraulic packoff valve, the hangoff head further comprising a threaded body member, a slip bowl and a threaded cap; inserting through the hydraulic packoff valve, the upper valve, and the hangoff head, coiled tubing for fluid communication with well gases and fluids in the production well tubing run, the coiled tubing having a first downhole end being open to immediately receive and conduct the gases and fluids; opening gas and fluid communication between the production well tubing run and the open end of the coiled tubing whereby the well gases and fluid may pass up through the coiled tubing, the hangoff head sealing the gases and fluids from passing to the hydraulic packoff valve, the upper valve and the second line valve; further inserting the coiled tubing to a desired depth in the production well tubing run; and rotating the cap of the hangoff head to expose the slip bowl.

  19. Sound velocity of tantalum under shock compression in the 18–142?GPa range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xi, Feng Jin, Ke; Cai, Lingcang Geng, Huayun; Tan, Ye; Li, Jun

    2015-05-14

    Dynamic compression experiments of tantalum (Ta) within a shock pressure range from 18–142?GPa were conducted driven by explosive, a two-stage light gas gun, and a powder gun, respectively. The time-resolved Ta/LiF (lithium fluoride) interface velocity profiles were recorded with a displacement interferometer system for any reflector. Sound velocities of Ta were obtained from the peak state time duration measurements with the step-sample technique and the direct-reverse impact technique. The uncertainty of measured sound velocities were analyzed carefully, which suggests that the symmetrical impact method with step-samples is more accurate for sound velocity measurement, and the most important parameter in this type experiment is the accurate sample/window particle velocity profile, especially the accurate peak state time duration. From these carefully analyzed sound velocity data, no evidence of a phase transition was found up to the shock melting pressure of Ta.

  20. Determination of plasma velocity from light fluctuations in a cutting torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2009-09-01

    Measurements of plasma velocities in a 30 A high energy density cutting torch are reported. The velocity diagnostic is based on the analysis of the light fluctuations emitted by the arc which are assumed to propagate with the flow velocity. These light fluctuations originate from plasma temperature and plasma density fluctuations mainly due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Fast photodiodes are employed as the light sensors. The arc core velocity was obtained from spectrally filtered light fluctuations measurements using a band-pass filter to detect light emission fluctuations emitted only from the arc axis. Maximum plasma jet velocities of 5000 m s{sup -1} close to the nozzle exit and about 2000 m s{sup -1} close to the anode were found. The obtained velocity values are in good agreement with those values predicted by a numerical code for a similar torch to that employed in this work.

  1. DOCTORAL PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS, Subprogramme PHYSICS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Safety Administration, Agency for Radioactive Waste Management and other organisations in the nuclear knowledge in energy conversion in nuclear power systems, design and operation of fission reactors, methods acquires a deeper knowledge of reactor physics and related nuclear physics basics. The student is trained

  2. Procedia PHYSICS 00 (2010) 14 Procedia Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Procedia PHYSICS 00 (2010) 1­4 Procedia Physics Visualization of nanodiamond formation in molten the characteristics and visualization of simulations of nanodiamond clusters grown from molten carbon. The general trends of nanodiamond size and quality as functions of growth conditions resemble those found

  3. PHYSICS 7397: NanoPhysics Spring 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Haibing

    to Semiconductor Physics: Band structure, PN junction, Schottky barrier, and MOS structure. 2. Electron Transport) Physics of semiconductor devices / S.M. Sze and Kwok K. Ng. 3rd ed. Place/Publisher Hoboken, NJ : Wiley's responsibility to read and understand the Academic Honesty Policy found in the Student Handbook, which can

  4. Recommended Tritium Oxide Deposition Velocity For Use In Savannah River Site Safety Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, P. L.; Murphy, C. E.; Viner, B. J.; Hunter, C. H.

    2012-07-31

    This report documents the results of examining the deposition velocity of water to forests, the residence time of HTO in forests, and the relation between deposition velocity and residence time with specific consideration given to the topography and experimental work performed at SRS. A simple mechanistic model is used to obtain plausible deposition velocity and residence time values where experimental data are not available and recommendations are made for practical application in a safety analysis model.

  5. Test Loop Demonstration and Evaluation of Slurry Transfer Line Critical Velocity Measurement Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Morgen, Gerald P.; Peters, Timothy J.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Baer, Ellen BK

    2010-07-31

    This report presents the results of the evaluation of three ultrasonic sensors for detecting critical velocity during slurry transfer between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  6. Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Three-dimensional P and S waves velocity structures of the Coso geothermal area, California, from microseismic travel time data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  7. Spectral characterization of Ekman velocities in the Southern Ocean based on surface drifter trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elipot, Shane

    2006-01-01

    stress ocean velocity crosswind component downwind componentsolid lines) and the crosswind components (dashed lines).for the imaginary part (crosswind component). z such, they

  8. Charge state dependence of cathodic vacuum arc ion energy and velocity distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Johanna; Schneider, Jochen M.; Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    velocity in vacuum arc plasmas by arc current perturbationin aluminum vacuum arc plasma. We show that the conflictingdistinguished. Cathodic vacuum arc plasma is well known to

  9. Supplemental Material: Analyzing angular distributions for two-step dissociation mechanisms in velocity map imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Laurie J.

    Supplemental Material: Analyzing angular distributions for two-step dissociation mechanisms in velocity map imaging D. B. Straus,* L. M. Butler, B. W. Alligood,* and L. J

  10. Use of traveltime skips in refraction analysis to delineate velocity inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, H.C.; Dixit, M.M.; Murty, P.R.K.

    1995-08-01

    First arrival refraction data does not normally provide any indication of the velocity inversion problem. However, under certain favorable circumstances, when the low-velocity layer (LVL) is considerably thicker than the overlying higher-velocity layer (HVL), the velocity inversion can be seen in the form of a traveltime skip. Model studies show that in such cases the length of the HVL traveltime branch can be used to determine the thickness of the HVL and the magnitude of the traveltime skip in order to determine the thickness of the LVL. This is also applicable in the case of field data.

  11. PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    - 1 - PHYSICS 122 LABORATORY (Winter, 2015) COURSE GOALS 1. Learn how Tyson 514 Physics tyson@physics.ucdavis.edu 752-3830 Xiangdong Zhu 235 Physics zhu@physics.ucdavis.edu 752-4689 TEACHING ASSISTANTS: Andrew Bradshaw 518

  12. A summary report on the search for current technologies and developers to develop depth profiling/physical parameter end effectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Q.H.

    1994-09-12

    This report documents the search strategies and results for available technologies and developers to develop tank waste depth profiling/physical parameter sensors. Sources searched include worldwide research reports, technical papers, journals, private industries, and work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) at Richland site. Tank waste physical parameters of interest are: abrasiveness, compressive strength, corrosiveness, density, pH, particle size/shape, porosity, radiation, settling velocity, shear strength, shear wave velocity, tensile strength, temperature, viscosity, and viscoelasticity. A list of related articles or sources for each physical parameters is provided.

  13. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  14. A new P-velocity model for the Tethyan margin from a scaled S-velocity model and the inversion of P-and PKP-delay times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Lee, Suzan

    A new P-velocity model for the Tethyan margin from a scaled S-velocity model and the inversion of P- and PKP-delay times Sung-Joon Chang a, , Suzan Van der Lee a , Megan P. Flanagan b a Dept. of Earth Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-205, Livermore, CA 94551, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article

  15. Extension of the operating parameters of the two stage light gas gun to velocities below 2 km/sec.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoe, R S

    2007-08-28

    The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Facility (JASPER) located in area 27 at the Nevada Test Site Has been tasked with providing high accuracy information on the Equation Of State (EOS) and other dynamic properties of weapons grade plutonium and other actinides important to the stockpile stewardship program. In the past 5 years this facility has provided dozens of experimental data points for the accurate determination of pressure density relationship for these materials over a broad pressure range. In order to complete this survey it is necessary to extend the low pressure region to include projectile velocities below 2 km/s. For most gas gun facilities this would present not too great a difficulty, one could simply decrease the amount of propellant along with a decrease in the strength of the petal valve, However JASPER requires that the piston be securely embedded in the Acceleration Reservoir (AR) as part of the containment system. The projectile must remain flat and undistorted. This requirement makes the attainment of slow velocities problematic. This talk will discuss the JASPER Facility, A finite difference code developed to give predictive capability for two stage gas guns, and a set of experiments performed to demonstrate this capability.

  16. Peak Ground Velocities for Seismic Events at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Coppersmith; R. Quittmeyer

    2005-02-16

    This report describes a scientific analysis to bound credible horizontal peak ground velocities (PGV) for the repository waste emplacement level at Yucca Mountain. Results are presented as a probability distribution for horizontal PGV to represent uncertainties in the analysis. The analysis also combines the bound to horizontal PGV with results of ground motion site-response modeling (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027]) to develop a composite hazard curve for horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level. This result provides input to an abstraction of seismic consequences (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169183]). The seismic consequence abstraction, in turn, defines the input data and computational algorithms for the seismic scenario class of the total system performance assessment (TSPA). Planning for the analysis is documented in Technical Work Plan TWP-MGR-GS-000001 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171850]). The bound on horizontal PGV at the repository waste emplacement level developed in this analysis complements ground motions developed on the basis of PSHA results. In the PSHA, ground motion experts characterized the epistemic uncertainty and aleatory variability in their ground motion interpretations. To characterize the aleatory variability they used unbounded lognormal distributions. As a consequence of these characterizations, as seismic hazard calculations are extended to lower and lower annual frequencies of being exceeded, the ground motion level increases without bound, eventually reaching levels that are not credible (Corradini 2003 [DIRS 171191]). To provide credible seismic inputs for TSPA, in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 63.102(j) [DIRS 156605], this complementary analysis is carried out to determine reasonable bounding values of horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level for annual frequencies of exceedance as low as 10{sup -8}. For each realization of the TSPA seismic scenario, the results of this analysis provide a constraint on the values sampled from the horizontal PGV hazard curve for the waste emplacement level. The relation of this analysis to other work feeding the seismic consequence abstraction and the TSPA is shown on Figure 1-1. The ground motion hazard results from the PSHA provide the basis for inputs to a site-response model that determines the effect of site materials on the ground motion at a location of interest (e.g., the waste emplacement level). Peak ground velocity values determined from the site-response model for the waste emplacement level are then used to develop time histories (seismograms) that form input to a model of drift degradation under seismic loads potentially producing rockfall. The time histories are also used to carry out dynamic seismic structural response calculations of the drip shield and waste package system. For the drip shield, damage from seismically induced rockfall also is considered. In the seismic consequence abstraction, residual stress results from the structural response calculations are interpreted in terms of the percentage of the component (drip shield, waste package) damaged as a function of horizontal PGV. The composite hazard curve developed in this analysis, which reflects the results of site-response modeling and the bound to credible horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level, also feeds the seismic consequence abstraction. The composite hazard curve is incorporated into the TSPA sampling process to bound horizontal PGV and related seismic consequences to values that are credible.

  17. QUANTIFYING UNCERTAINTIES IN GROUND MOTION SIMULATIONS FOR SCENARIO EARTHQUAKES ON THE HAYWARD-RODGERS CREEK FAULT SYSTEM USING THE USGS 3D VELOCITY MODEL AND REALISTIC PSEUDODYNAMIC RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, A; Xie, X

    2008-01-09

    This project seeks to compute ground motions for large (M>6.5) scenario earthquakes on the Hayward Fault using realistic pseudodynamic ruptures, the USGS three-dimensional (3D) velocity model and anelastic finite difference simulations on parallel computers. We will attempt to bound ground motions by performing simulations with suites of stochastic rupture models for a given scenario on a given fault segment. The outcome of this effort will provide the average, spread and range of ground motions that can be expected from likely large earthquake scenarios. The resulting ground motions will be based on first-principles calculations and include the effects of slip heterogeneity, fault geometry and directivity, however, they will be band-limited to relatively low-frequency (< 1 Hz).

  18. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Laboratory P.O. Box 451 Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 GPS: 100 Stellarator Road Princeton, NJ 08540 www.pppl.gov 2015 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A...

  19. Probing new physics with flavor physics (and probing flavor physics with new physics)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosef Nir

    2007-08-14

    This is a written version of a series of lectures aimed at graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in particle theory/string theory/particle experiment familiar with the basics of the Standard Model. We begin with an overview of flavor physics and its implications for new physics. We emphasize the "new physics flavor puzzle". Then, we give four specific examples of flavor measurements and the lessons that have been (or can be) drawn from them: (i) Charm physics: lessons for supersymmetry from the upper bound on $\\Delta m_D$. (ii) Bottom physics: model independent lessons on the KM mechanism and on new physics in neutral B mixing from $S_{\\psi K_S}$. (iii) Top physics and beyond: testing minimal flavor violation at the LHC. (iv) Neutrino physics: interpreting the data on neutrino masses and mixing within flavor models.

  20. Review of Higgs physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocariz, Jose; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The eperimental status on Higgs boson physics is reviewed. Results from both ATLAS and CMS, using data collected in LHC run 1, are presented. Prospects for Higgs physics with Run 2 and beyond are discussed.