Sample records for vehicle waste heat

  1. Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  2. Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by GenTherm at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thermoelectric waste heat recovery...

  4. Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  5. Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  6. Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10% Phase 5 Objectives Improve cylindrical TEG prototype manufacture with improved tooling and subassembly component manufacture Integrate TEGs into BMW and Ford vehicles for...

  7. Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUEValidation of& Systems Simulation| Department of

  8. Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    confidential or otherwise restricted information Project ID ace47lagrandeur Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program- 2009 Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  9. Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Start Date: Oct '04 Program End date: Oct '10 Percent Complete: 80% 2 Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program- Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit...

  10. Thermoelectrici Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectrici Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine-Powered Vehicle Thermoelectrici Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine-Powered Vehicle 2005...

  11. Enhancing the Figure-of-Merit in Half-Heuslers for Vehicle Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Figure-of-Merit in Half-Heuslers for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Enhancing the Figure-of-Merit in Half-Heuslers for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Good ZT can occur in...

  12. An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficient, scalable, and low cost vehicular thermoelectric generators development will include rapid synthesis of thermoelectric materials, different device geometries, heat sink designs, and durability and long-term performance tests

  13. 2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program 2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies...

  14. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes...

  15. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MHRC System Concept ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with...

  16. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermoelectric generator shorting system provides the capability to monitor and short-out individual thermoelectric couples in the event of failure. This makes the series configured thermoelectric generator robust to individual thermoelectric couple failure. Open circuit detection of the thermoelectric couples and the associated short control is a key technique to ensure normal functionality of the TE generator under failure of individual TE couples. This report describes a five-year effort whose goal was the understanding the issues related to the development of a thermoelectric energy recovery device for a Class-8 truck. Likely materials and important issues related to the utility of this generator were identified. Several prototype generators were constructed and demonstrated. The generators developed demonstrated several new concepts including advanced insulation, couple bypass technology and the first implementation of skutterudite thermoelectric material in a generator design. Additional work will be required to bring this system to fruition. However, such generators offer the possibility of converting energy that is otherwise wasted to useful electric power. Uur studies indicate that this can be accomplished in a cost-effective manner for this application.

  17. Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

  18. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT RECOVREY M. E. Ward and N. G. Solomon E. S. Tabb Solar Turbines International and Gas Research Institute San Diego, California Chicago, Illinois ABSTRACT i I One hundred fifty reports were reviewed along with interviews... tests, promising low temperature heat exchanger tube alloys and coated surfaces were identified. 1INTROUCTION of advanced technology heat recovery techniques 1_ Recovering waste heat from the flue gases of the pr~ary objective. Specific objectives...

  19. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on a OTR truck schock.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle Thermoelectric Conversion of...

  20. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ace049schock2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle Thermoelectric Conversion of...

  1. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maryland. merit08schock.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle Efficiency Improvement in an...

  2. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    truck system. schock.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste...

  3. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2006deerschock.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectrici Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine-Powered Vehicle Development of Thermoelectric...

  4. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by the Application of Advanced Thermoelectric Systems Implemented in a Hybrid Configuration Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle...

  5. Specifying Waste Heat Boilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.

    or hydrochloric acid vapor should be mentioned upfront so the HRSG designer can take proper precauations while designing the unit.Material selection is also impacted by the presence of corrosive gases.If partial pressure of hydrogen is high in the gas stream...SPECIFYING WASTE HEAT BOILERS V.Ganapathy.ABCO Industries Abilene,Texas ABSTRACT Waste heat boilers or Heat Recovery Steam 'Generators(HRSGs) as they are often called are used to recover energy from waste gas streams in chemical plants...

  6. Emissions from US waste collection vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maimoun, Mousa A., E-mail: mousamaimoun@gmail.com [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Reinhart, Debra R. [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Gammoh, Fatina T. [Quality Department, Airport International Group, Amman (Jordan); McCauley Bush, Pamela [Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Life-cycle emissions for alternative fuel technologies. ? Fuel consumption of alternative fuels for waste collection vehicles. ? Actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles. ? Diesel-fueled waste collection vehicle emissions. - Abstract: This research is an in-depth environmental analysis of potential alternative fuel technologies for waste collection vehicles. Life-cycle emissions, cost, fuel and energy consumption were evaluated for a wide range of fossil and bio-fuel technologies. Emission factors were calculated for a typical waste collection driving cycle as well as constant speed. In brief, natural gas waste collection vehicles (compressed and liquid) fueled with North-American natural gas had 6–10% higher well-to-wheel (WTW) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to diesel-fueled vehicles; however the pump-to-wheel (PTW) GHG emissions of natural gas waste collection vehicles averaged 6% less than diesel-fueled vehicles. Landfill gas had about 80% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel. Biodiesel waste collection vehicles had between 12% and 75% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel depending on the fuel source and the blend. In 2011, natural gas waste collection vehicles had the lowest fuel cost per collection vehicle kilometer travel. Finally, the actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles consists of repetitive stops and starts during waste collection; this generates more emissions than constant speed driving.

  7. Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by GMZ Energy Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about nanostructured high...

  9. Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

  10. Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite TE modules were...

  11. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruch, M. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -expanding variety of industrial processes. One notable application in recent years has been for combustion airs preheat of fired heaters in petroleum refineries and petrochemical plants. Another recent development has been a waste heat recovery boiler using heat...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cost-competitive advanced...

  13. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    be 500 oC deer09schock.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle Thermoelectric Conversion of...

  14. Energy Management by Recycling of Vehicle Waste Oil in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan Ali Durrani

    Abstract: Pakistan has been suffering from an energy crisis for about half a decade now. The power crisis is proving to be unbearable, so importing huge amount of hydrocarbons from abroad to meet its energy needs. This study therefore focuses on the analysis of energy and environmental benefits for vehicle waste lubricant oil pertaining to its reuse by means of: (i) regain the heating value of used oils in a combustion process and (ii) recycling of waste oil to make fresh oil products. The waste oil samples were tested by ICP method and the test results were compared with standard requirements. It was found that the matter could effectively be solved by means of waste oil management practices together with collection centers, transports and processors by encouraging and financial help for the recycling industry. The importance and worth of this work concludes minor levels of hazardous elements when regained the heating value from the waste lubricating oil.

  15. Thermoelectric Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Generator Development for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and...

  16. Economic Options for Upgrading Waste Heat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are at least six major types of equipment that upgrade waste heat: (1) thermocompressor; (2) electric drive compressor heat pump; (3) absorption heat pump; (4) high temperature heat powered compressor heat pump; (5) reverse absorption heat...

  17. Economic Options for Upgrading Waste Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are at least six major types of equipment that upgrade waste heat: (1) thermocompressor; (2) electric drive compressor heat pump; (3) absorption heat pump; (4) high temperature heat powered compressor heat pump; (5) reverse absorption heat...

  18. Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Discusses progress...

  19. An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, D. F.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery of waste heat energy is one element of a complete energy conservation plan. In addition to contributing to the goal of saving energy, utilization of waste heat is also an important source of cost savings. This presentation details...

  20. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...

  1. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat...

  2. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Power Electronics...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    waste heat recovery devices for vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermal Control of Power Electronics of Electric Vehicles with Small Channel Coolant Boiling...

  4. Vehicle hydraulic system that provides heat for passenger compartment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bartley, Bradley E. (Manito, IL); Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL); Gibson, Dennis H. (Chillicothe, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vehicle includes a vehicle housing which defines a passenger compartment. Attached to the vehicle housing is a hydraulic system, that includes a hydraulic fluid which flows through at least one passageway within the hydraulic system. Also attached to the vehicle housing is a passenger compartment heating system. The passenger compartment heating system includes a heat exchanger, wherein a portion of the heat exchanger is a segment of the at least one passageway of the hydraulic system.

  5. Waste Heat Recapture from Supermarket Refrigeration Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to determine the potential energy savings associated with improved utilization of waste heat from supermarket refrigeration systems. Existing and advanced strategies for waste heat recovery in supermarkets were analyzed, including options from advanced sources such as combined heat and power (CHP), micro-turbines and fuel cells.

  6. Industrial Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altin, M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, some common and emerging techniques to better utilize energy in the chemical process industries are discussed. Temperature levels of waste heat available are pointed out. Emerging practices for further economical utilization of waste...

  7. Combustion & Fuels Waste Heat Recovery & Utilization Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion & Fuels Waste Heat Recovery & Utilization Project Project Technical Lead - Thermoelectric Analysis & Materials 27 February 2008 2008 DOE OVT Annual Merit Review 2008...

  8. Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Gregory P. Meisner General Motors Global Research & Development March 21, 2012 3rd Thermoelectric...

  9. Waste Heat Recovery System: Lightweight Thermal Energy Recovery (LIGHTER) System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GM is using shape memory alloys that require as little as a 10°C temperature difference to convert low-grade waste heat into mechanical energy. When a stretched wire made of shape memory alloy is heated, it shrinks back to its pre-stretched length. When the wire cools back down, it becomes more pliable and can revert to its original stretched shape. This expansion and contraction can be used directly as mechanical energy output or used to drive an electric generator. Shape memory alloy heat engines have been around for decades, but the few devices that engineers have built were too complex, required fluid baths, and had insufficient cycle life for practical use. GM is working to create a prototype that is practical for commercial applications and capable of operating with either air- or fluid-based heat sources. GM’s shape memory alloy based heat engine is also designed for use in a variety of non-vehicle applications. For example, it can be used to harvest non-vehicle heat sources, such as domestic and industrial waste heat and natural geothermal heat, and in HVAC systems and generators.

  10. Waste Heat Recovery Using a Circulating Heat Medium Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, E., Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by a circulating heat medium loop where waste heat is recovered for useful purposes. The heat medium chosen is turbine fuel. It is pumped around the refinery to pick up heat at the crude distilling unit, the hydrocracker, the catalytic cracker...

  11. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruch, M. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering...

  12. Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems This presentation covers...

  13. Absorptive Recycle of Distillation Waste Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.; Lutz, E. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSORPTIVE RECYCLE OF DISTILLATION WASTE HEAT Donald C. Erickson and Edward J. Lutz Jr. Energy Concepts Company Annapolis, Maryland ABSTRACT When the heat source available to a distillation process is at a significantly higher temperature... which conserve 60 to 70%. Also, there are ver sions which incorporate separate low tem perature waste heat streams and thereby conserve over 90% of the required dis tillation energy. The main limitations of the R/AHP are the need for sufficient...

  14. Advanced Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, G. R.

    ADVANCED FLUIDIZED BED WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS G. R. PETERSON Project Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office Idaho Falls, Idaho ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industri al Programs, has sponsored... the development of a Fluidized Bed Waste Heat Recovery System (FBWHRS) and a higher temperature variant, the Ceramic Tubular Distributor Plate (CTOP) Fluidized Bed Heat Exchanger (FBHX) system. Both systems recover energy from high-temperature flue gases...

  15. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Caterpillar Inc. 2002deerhopmann.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat...

  16. An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An overview presentation of R&D...

  17. Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity Presents successful incorporation of one of the most...

  18. Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the Automotive Industry Opportunities and Challenges of Thermoelectrlic Waste Heat Recovery in the Automotive Industry 2005...

  19. Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty...

  20. Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control Overview of progress...

  1. Heat Recovery From Solid Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, O. W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    areas of evaluation, including the cost of fuel, cost of solid waste disposal, plant energy requirements, available technology, etc....

  2. Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on feedwater economizers for waste heat recovery provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  3. Mobile power plants : waste body heat recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbons, Jonathan S. (Jonathan Scott), 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel methods to convert waste metabolic heat into useful and useable amounts of electricity were studied. Thermoelectric, magneto hydrodynamic, and piezo-electric energy conversions at the desired scope were evaluated to ...

  4. Waste Heat Recovery – Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Heat Recovery- Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF) Thomas O?Brien Recycled Energy Development, LLC tobrien@recycled-energy.com Submerged Arc Furnaces are used to produce high temperature alloys. These furnaces typically run at 3000oF using...

  5. Energy Efficient Design of a Waste Heat Rejection System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.

    In small and medium sized manufacturing facilities, several situations exist where sources of waste heat and sinks needing heat transfer coexist. Examples of waste heat include but are not limited to: drained hot water streams from water cooled...

  6. Harvesting Electricity From Wasted Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwede, Jared

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists as SLAC National Laboratory explain the concept, Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE), and how this process can capture more energy from photovoltaic panels by harnessing heat energy from sunlight.

  7. Harvesting Electricity From Wasted Heat

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Schwede, Jared

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists as SLAC National Laboratory explain the concept, Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE), and how this process can capture more energy from photovoltaic panels by harnessing heat energy from sunlight.

  8. Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, H. Z.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat recovery from refrigeration machines is a concept which has great potential for implementation in many businesses. If a parallel requirement for refrigeration and hot water exists, the installation of a system to provide hot water as a by...

  9. Author's personal copy Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heat conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Author's personal copy Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heat conduction Felix Y. Lee heat harvesting Olsen cycle a b s t r a c t Waste heat can be directly converted into electrical energy Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Large amounts of waste heat are released as a by

  10. Low and high Temperature Dual Thermoelectric Generation Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and high Temperature Dual Thermoelectric Generation Waste Heat Recovery System for Light-Duty Vehicles Low and high Temperature Dual Thermoelectric Generation Waste Heat Recovery...

  11. Light weight and economical exhaust heat exchanger for waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dual Loop ParallelSeries Waste Heat Recovery System CNG-Hybrid: A Practical Path to "Net Zero Emissions" in Commuter Rail Improving Process Heating System Performance: A...

  12. Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and...

  13. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  14. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES) -...

  15. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications...

  16. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...

  17. Keywordscondensation tube, surface modification, waste heat and condensation water recovery system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Keywordscondensation tube, surface modification, waste heat and condensation water recovery techniques is waste heat and condensation water recovery system. Waste heat and condensation water recovery system is one of the most important facilities in power plants. High efficiency waste heat

  18. Recovering Industrial Waste Heat by the Means of Thermoelectricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    as a heat pump) to the surroundings. This heat was interpreted as the lost work of the device. The aimRecovering Industrial Waste Heat by the Means of Thermoelectricity Spring 2010 Department

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Leaders in Advanced Vehicle...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    21st Century Truck Partnership, the Army will demonstrate technology that converts waste heat from an exhaust system to electricity used in its Stryker vehicle. | Photo courtesy...

  20. Use of photovoltaics for waste heat recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polcyn, Adam D

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for recovering waste heat in the form of radiated light, e.g. red visible light and/or infrared light includes a housing having a viewing window, and a photovoltaic cell mounted in the housing in a relationship to the viewing window, wherein rays of radiated light pass through the viewing window and impinge on surface of the photovoltaic cell. The housing and/or the cell are cooled so that the device can be used with a furnace for an industrial process, e.g. mounting the device with a view of the interior of the heating chamber of a glass making furnace. In this manner, the rays of the radiated light generated during the melting of glass batch materials in the heating chamber pass through the viewing window and impinge on the surface of the photovoltaic cells to generate electric current which is passed onto an electric load.

  1. Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

  2. Organic rankine cycle waste heat applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brasz, Joost J.; Biederman, Bruce P.

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A machine designed as a centrifugal compressor is applied as an organic rankine cycle turbine by operating the machine in reverse. In order to accommodate the higher pressures when operating as a turbine, a suitable refrigerant is chosen such that the pressures and temperatures are maintained within established limits. Such an adaptation of existing, relatively inexpensive equipment to an application that may be otherwise uneconomical, allows for the convenient and economical use of energy that would be otherwise lost by waste heat to the atmosphere.

  3. Indirect Heat Transfer Technology For Waste Heat Recovery Can Save You Money

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyrau, J. A.; Bogel, N. G.; Seifert, W. F.; Wuelpern, L. E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constraints of an existing installation makes the conventional flue gas to air energy recovery technology impractical to employ. A successful alternative is the transfer of waste heat to an intermediate heat transfer fluid (i.e., DOWTHERM Heat Transfer Fluid...

  4. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trubocompound Technology Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Trubocompound Technology 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Inc. 2003deeralgrain.pdf...

  5. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery with a 10% fuel economy improvement without increasing emissions. deer09yang2.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  6. Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat" RejectionRecycling Hybrid GHP Systems in Hot, Arid or Semiarid Climates Like Texas Geothermal Project Jump to:...

  7. Waste Heat Recovery in the Metal Working Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMann, F. C.; Thurman, J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WASTE HEAT RECOVERY IN THE METAL WORKING INDUSTRY Fred C. McMann Jimmy Thurman North American Manufacturing Co. Combustion Services Company Woodlands, Texas Houston, Texas The use of exhaust gas heat exchangers to preheat combustion air...

  8. Electric Adsorption Heat Pump for Electric Vehicles: Electric-Powered Adsorption Heat Pump for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a new class of advanced nanomaterial called an electrical metal organic framework (EMOF) for EV heating and cooling systems. The EMOF would function similar to a conventional heat pump, which circulates heat or cold to the cabin as needed. However, by directly controlling the EMOF's properties with electricity, the PNNL design is expected to use much less energy than traditional heating and cooling systems. The EMOF-based heat pumps would be light, compact, efficient, and run using virtually no moving parts.

  9. Waste heat driven absorption refrigeration process and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, William H. (Columbus, OH)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption cycle refrigeration processes and systems are provided which are driven by the sensible waste heat available from industrial processes and other sources. Systems are disclosed which provide a chilled water output which can be used for comfort conditioning or the like which utilize heat from sensible waste heat sources at temperatures of less than 170.degree. F. Countercurrent flow equipment is also provided to increase the efficiency of the systems and increase the utilization of available heat.

  10. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites INTRODUCTION In part I

  11. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling (TEG) designed for automotive waste heat recovery systems. This model is capable of computing bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from

  12. Power Generation From Waste Heat Using Organic Rankine Cycle Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    universal bottoming cycle that can convert the energy in waste heat streams into usable shaft power. The nominal rating of the unit is 600 KWe or 900 SHP. The basic bottoming cycle concept is shown in Figure I. GAS TURBINE -, Y. DIESEL PROCESS HEAT... in Figure 2. The diverter valve directs the waste heat stream through the vaporizer. The working fluid is boiled and slightly superheated in the vaporizer. The superheated vapor expands through the turbine, generating mechanical power. This expansion...

  13. Waste water heat recovery appliance. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapin, H.D.; Armstrong, P.R.; Chapin, F.A.W.

    1983-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient convective waste heat recovery heat exchanger was designed and tested. The prototype appliance was designed for use in laundromats and other small commercial operations which use large amounts of hot water. Information on general characteristics of the coin-op laundry business, energy use in laundromats, energy saving resources already in use, and the potential market for energy saving devices in laundromats was collected through a literature search and interviews with local laundromat operators in Fort Collins, Colorado. A brief survey of time-use patterns in two local laundromats was conducted. The results were used, with additional information from interviews with owners, as the basis for the statistical model developed. Mathematical models for the advanced and conventional types were developed and the resulting computer program listed. Computer simulations were made using a variety of parameters; for example, different load profiles, hold-up volumes, wall resistances, and wall areas. The computer simulation results are discussed with regard to the overall conclusions. Various materials were explored for use in fabricating the appliance. Resistance to corrosion, workability, and overall suitability for laundromat installations were considered for each material.

  14. High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power Generation High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power Generation 2005 Diesel Engine...

  15. High-Temperature Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat Recovery Systems on Combustion Engines High-Temperature Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat Recovery...

  16. An analysis of a reversed absorption heat pump for low temperature waste heat utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Glenn William

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ANALYSIS OF A REVERSED ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP FOR LOW TEMPERATURE WASTE HEAT UTILIZATION A Thesis by GLENN WILLIAM WADE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering AN ANALYSIS OF A REVERSED ABSORPTION HEAT PUMP FOR LOW TEMPERATURE WASTE HEAT UTILIZATION A Thesis by GLENN WILLIAM WADE Approved as to style and content by: Chai n of Committee...

  17. Waste Heat Boilers for Incineration Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.

    Incineration is a widely used process for disposing of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generated in various types of industries. In addition to destroying pollutants, energy may also be recovered from the waste gas streams in the form of steam...

  18. automotive waste heat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plant hot water supply. The system utilizes waste superheat from the facility's 1,350-ton ammonia refrigeration system. The heat... Murphy, W. T.; Woods, B. E.; Gerdes, J. E....

  19. Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Electric Power using Skutterudites...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power using Skutterudites, TAGS, PbTe and Bi2Te3 Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Electric Power using Skutterudites, TAGS, PbTe and Bi2Te3 Presentation given at DEER...

  20. Identification of existing waste heat recovery and process improvement technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, R.L.; Dodge, R.E.; Smith, S.A.; Ames, K.R.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General information is provided on waste heat recovery opportunities. The currently available equipment for high- and low-temperature applications are described. Other equipment related to wasteheat recovery equipment such as components, instruments and controls, and cleaning equipment is discussed briefly. A description of the microcomputer data base is included. Suppliers of waste heat equipment are mentioned throughout the report, with specific contacts, addresses, and telephone numbers provided in an Appendix.

  1. Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air...

  2. Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air...

  3. Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration in a Meat Processing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, W. T.; Woods, B. E.; Gerdes, J. E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A case study is reviewed on a heat recovery system installed in a meat processing facility to preheat water for the plant hot water supply. The system utilizes waste superheat from the facility's 1,350-ton ammonia refrigeration system. The heat...

  4. Economic Analysis and Comparison of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Heating and Air-Conditioning System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the heating and air-conditioning system of a high-rise residential building in Northern city, this paper provides a discussion on the choice and matching of different types of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump (WWRHP) heating and air...

  5. Economic Analysis and Comparison of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Heating and Air-Conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the heating and air-conditioning system of a high-rise residential building in Northern city, this paper provides a discussion on the choice and matching of different types of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump (WWRHP) heating and air...

  6. Absorptive Recycle of Distillation Waste Heat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.; Lutz, E. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the heat source available to a distillation process is at a significantly higher temperature than the reboiler temperature, there is unused availability (ability to perform work) in the heat supplied to the reboiler. Similarly, if the reflux...

  7. Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB) to cool process syngas. The gas enters satisfies all 3 design criteria. · Correlations relating our experimental results to a waste heat boiler

  8. TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SRS WASTE TANK OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on waste temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the Type-I Savannah River Site (SRS) tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing long-shaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The model will also be used to provide input to the operation planning. This planning will be used as input to pump run duration in order to maintain temperature requirements within the tank during SMP operation. The analysis model took a parametric approach. A series of the modeling analyses was performed to examine how submersible mixer pumps affect tank temperature during waste removal operation in the Type-I tank. The model domain included radioactive decay heat load, two SMP's, and one Submersible Transfer Pump (STP) as heat source terms. The present model was benchmarked against the test data obtained by the tank measurement to examine the quantitative thermal response of the tank and to establish the reference conditions of the operating variables under no SMP operation. The results showed that the model predictions agreed with the test data of the waste temperatures within about 10%. Transient modeling calculations for two potential scenarios of sludge mixing and removal operations have been made to estimate transient waste temperatures within a Type-I waste tank. When two 200-HP submersible mixers and 12 active cooling coils are continuously operated in 100-in tank level and 40 C initial temperature for 40 days since the initiation of mixing operation, waste temperature rises about 9 C in 48 hours at a maximum. Sensitivity studies for the key operating variables were performed. The sensitivity results showed that the chromate cooling coil system provided the primary cooling mechanism to remove process heat from the tank during operation.

  9. Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILLIS, W.L.

    2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses the preferred combination of design and operational configurations to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. An interim decision for the preferred method to remove the heat from the high-level waste tanks during waste feed delivery operations is presented herein.

  10. Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers combined heat and power (CHP) technologies and their applications.

  11. Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

  12. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  13. Adiabatic Heat of Hydration Calorimetric Measurements for Reference Saltstone Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, James

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of nuclear materials for weapons, medical, and space applications from the mid-1950's through the late-1980's at the Savannah River Site (SRS) generated approximately 35 million gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste, which is currently being processed into vitrified glass for long-term storage. Upstream of the vitrification process, the waste is separated into three components: high activity insoluble sludge, high activity insoluble salt, and very low activity soluble salts. The soluble salt represents 90% of the 35 million gallons of overall waste and is processed at the SRS Saltstone Facility, where it mixed with cement, blast furnace slag, and flyash, creating a grout-like mixture. The resulting grout is pumped into aboveground storage vaults, where it hydrates into concrete monoliths, called saltstone, thus immobilizing the low-level radioactive salt waste. As the saltstone hydrates, it generates heat that slowly diffuses out of the poured material. To ensure acceptable grout properties for disposal and immobilization of the salt waste, the grout temperature must not exceed 95 C during hydration. Adiabatic calorimetric measurements of the heat generated for a representative sample of saltstone were made to determine the time-dependent heat source term. These measurements subsequently were utilized as input to a numerical conjugate heat transfer model to determine the expected peak temperatures for the saltstone vaults.

  14. Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, M.

    applications of heat recovery power generation can be found in Industry (e.g. steel, glass, cement, lime, pulp and paper, refining and petrochemicals), Power Generation (CHP, biomass, biofuel, traditional fuels, gasifiers, diesel engines) and Natural Gas...

  15. An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, D. F.

    our dependence on petroleum-based fuels, paper, glass, and agricultural and automotive and hence improve our merchandise .trade balance. equipment industries have all had proven success with heat recovery projects. Solar, wind, geothermal, oil shale...

  16. Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLEof EnergyPerformance |

  17. Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines Substantial increases in engine efficiency of a...

  18. Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report...

  19. Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program March 16,...

  20. Waste heat recovery in automobile engines : potential solutions and benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz, Joaquin G., 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Less than 30% of the energy in a gallon of gasoline reaches the wheels of a typical car; most of the remaining energy is lost as heat. Since most of the energy consumed by an internal combustion engine is wasted, capturing ...

  1. Waste Heat Recovery Using a Circulating Heat Medium Loop 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, E., Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As energy costs continue to increase, one must be willing to accept greater complexities in heat recovery systems. The days of being satisfied with only simple hot product to cold feed exchange, restricted to the plot boundaries of each unit, are a...

  2. Waste Heat Recovery – Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designed consumes power and fuel that yields an energy efficiency of approximately 40% (Total Btu’s required to reduce to elemental form/ Btu Input). The vast majority of heat is lost to the atmosphere or cooling water system. The furnaces can be modified...

  3. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

  4. How to Put the Dollar Value on Waste Heat Recovery in the Process Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campagne, W. V. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste heat recovery projects should be evaluated on their actual fuel savings and not on Btu recovery. By equating waste heat recovery with potential steam savings, the fuel (or dollar) values of the waste heat as function of its temperature can...

  5. Department of ENENG/ME Spring 2012 Waste Heat Recovery for Small Engine Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of ENENG/ME Spring 2012 Waste Heat Recovery for Small Engine Applications Overview The purpose of this capstone project is to research, test, and apply waste heat recovery to develop laboratory engine test base line results and relate this results to waste heat recovery strategies

  6. Towards model-based control of a steam Rankine process for engine waste heat recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Towards model-based control of a steam Rankine process for engine waste heat recovery Johan Peralez a critical role in enabling good per- formance of Rankine processes for waste heat recovery from prime movers. INTRODUCTION In the last few years, engine waste heat recovery (WHR) systems based on the Rankine thermodynamic

  7. Author's personal copy Towards optimization of a pyroelectric energy converter for harvesting waste heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Direct energy conversion Waste heat harvesting Ferroelectric materials Oscillating flow a b s t r a c for directly converting waste heat into electricity. The two-dimensional mass, momentum, and energy equations of waste heat as required by the second law of thermodynamics. For example, over 50% of the en- ergy

  8. How to Put the Dollar Value on Waste Heat Recovery in the Process Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campagne, W. V. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste heat recovery projects should be evaluated on their actual fuel savings and not on Btu recovery. By equating waste heat recovery with potential steam savings, the fuel (or dollar) values of the waste heat as function of its temperature can...

  9. Finding More Free Steam From Waste Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stremlow, M. D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corning & Midland Plant • Thermal Heat Recovery Oxidation Process • Opportunities • Implementing Improvements • Demonstrating Success • Questions About me • Mike Stremlow – Midland Site Energy Leader – Senior mechanical engineer at Dow Corning charged...-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Questions Mike Stremlow, Midland Site Energy Leader Dow Corning Corporation PO Box 994 Midland, MI 48686 mike.stremlow@dowcorning.com (989)496-5662 18 ESL-IE-14-05-01 Proceedings...

  10. Heat pipe effects in nuclear waste isolation: a review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C.; Pruess, K.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of fractures favors heat pipe development in a geologic repository as does a partially saturated medium. A number of geologic media are being considered as potential repository sites. Tuff is partially saturated and fractured, basalt and granite are saturated and fractured, salt is unfractured and saturated. Thus the most likely conditions for heat pipe formation occur in tuff while the least likely occur in salt. The relative permeability and capillary pressure dependences on saturation are of critical importance for predicting thermohydraulic behavior around a repository. Mineral redistribution in heat pipe systems near high-level waste packages emplaced in partially saturated formations may significantly affect fluid flow and heat transfer processes, and the chemical environment of the packages. We believe that a combined laboratory, field, and theoretical effort will be needed to identify the relevant physical and chemical processes, and the specific parameters applicable to a particular site. 25 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Cogeneration Waste Heat Recovery at a Coke Calcining Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, R. L.

    and performance summary at the plant design point is shown in Figure 1. GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE PLANT The plant has three steam generation units. Each boiler is a natural circulation, single pressure level waste heat recovery boiler. Two of the boilers..." per ANSI/ASME PTC 4 4-1981, Gas Turbine Heat Recovery Steam Generator' All units tested above their design value. The turbine generator set was tested using station instrumentation to verify it was performin at its design point. The overall plant...

  12. Waste heat recovery steam curves with unfired HRSGs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compilation of waste heat recovery steam curves for a sampling of gas turbines ranging in output from around 1 MW to more than 200 MW is presented. The gas turbine output data shown with each set of curves differs from the values given in the Performance Specifications section of the Handbook. That's because the values have been calculated to reflect the effects of a 4 inch inlet and 10 inch outlet pressure drop on power output (lower), heat rate (higher), mass flow (higher), and exhaust temperature (higher).

  13. Waste Heat Doesn't Have to be a Waste of Money- The American & Efird Heat Recovery Project: A First for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, S. W.

    "WASTE HEAT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE A WASTE OF MONEY" THE AMERICAN & EFIRD HEAT RECOVERY PROJECT: A FIRST FOR THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY STEVE W. SMITH, P.E., Program Manager Electrotechnology Sales Duke Power Company Charlotte, NC In 1989 American... and finishing Finishing Plant was targeted as an ideal operations recover energy from their site for a process heat pump installation. wastewater discharges usjng shell and tube Over a three year period, 1987-1990, Duke heat exchangers and preheat incoming...

  14. Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for SKU from Caltech Scale up TE material and cartridge fabrication methods, including tooling and process development, for commercialization quantities 18 FUTURE WORK - DOE...

  15. Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    WORK Material level work: Complete development of net shape manufacturing process and tooling. Define long term material stability. TEG cartridge level work: Produce 200-300...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: Waste Heat Recovery | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of Energy MicrosoftVOLUME I ATheJune 23, 2015

  17. Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,Department ofDepartment of

  18. Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideosSpringoutAPBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF ProjectsRecovery |

  19. Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

    2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

  20. Refinery gas waste heat energy conversion optimization in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, A.D.; Francuz, D.J.; West, E.W. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of refinery fuel gas in gas turbines poses special challenges due to the combustion characteristics of the fuel gas which contains significant concentrations of hydrogen. Proper modifications to the combustion system of the existing gas turbines are required in order to combust such fuel gas streams in gas turbines while minimizing the NO{sub x} emissions. A novel approach to the utilization of this hydrogen bearing fuel gas in gas turbines consists of humidifying the fuel gas with water vapor by direct contact with hot water in a counter-current column, the feed water to the humidifier being first circulated through the refinery to recover waste heat. The refinery waste heat produces additional motive fluid with a result that the waste heat is converted to power in the gas turbine. Furthermore, the water vapor introduced into the fuel gas reduces the NO{sub x} formation and increases the gas turbine output, while the hydrogen present in the fuel gas provides the flame stability required when combusting a fuel gas containing a large concentration of water vapor.

  1. Fluid Bed Waste Heat Boiler Operating Experience in Dirty Gas Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreeger, A. H.

    FLUID BED WASTE HEAT BOILER OPERATING EXPERIENCE IN DIRTY GAS STREAMS Alan H. Kreeger. Aerojet Energy Conversion Company. Sacramento. California ABSTRACT The first industrial fluid bed waste heat boiler in the U. S. is operating... on an aluminium melting furnace at the ALCOA Massena Integrated Aluminum Works in upstate New York. Waste heat from an aluminum melting furnace is captured for general plant use for the first time in this plant. It is accomplished with advanced fluid bed heat...

  2. Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies Increase Vehicle Performance and Reliability; The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes NREL's work with heat transfer technologies to keep hybrid electric and all-electric vehicle power electronic components cool.

  3. Development of an Underamor 1-kW Thermoelectric Generator Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Underamor 1-kW Thermoelectric Generator Waste Heat Recovery System for Military Vehicles Development of an Underamor 1-kW Thermoelectric Generator Waste Heat Recovery System for...

  4. Analysis of vehicle fuel release resulting in waste tank fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARRIS, J.P.

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the calculation documented here is to support in-tank vehicle fuel fire accident frequencies in the Documented Safety Analysis. This analysis demonstrates that the frequency of the pool fire and deflagration scenarios of the in-tank vehicle fuel fire/deflagration accident are ''extremely unlikely'' to ''unlikely.'' The chains of events that result in each scenario are presented in this document and are the same as used in previous analyses of this accident. Probabilities and frequencies are developed for each event, using wherever possible, information from RPP-13121, Tables B-1 and B-2, and from the River Protection Project ORPS. The estimated probabilities are considered reasonably conservative, but do not necessarily assume the worst possible outcomes or the most conservative possible cases. A sensitivity analysis performed in Section 4.2 shows that if the probability of either the ignition of fuel event or the fuel flows into riser event were underestimated by an order of magnitude, the accident frequency for a pool fire could increase and shift into the ''unlikely'' category. If the probability of an increase in riser strikes, or an increase in broken risers, unignited fuel entering a riser, or a fuel ignition source being present in a tank were underestimated by an order of magnitude, the accident frequency for a deflagration would remain in the ''unlikely'' category. When the likelihood of a broken riser is increased by an order of magnitude, a pool fire remains in the ''extremely unlikely'' category. The DSA accident analysis indicates that an unmitigated flammable gas deflagration resulting from an induced gas release event or an organic solvent fire occurring in either an SST or a DST is an anticipated event (> 10{sup -2}). Deflagration in a DST annulus is considered unlikely (> 10{sup -4} to {le}10{sup -2}). These frequencies clearly bound those of the in-tank vehicle fuel fire family of accidents.

  5. Seismic modeling and analysis of a prototype heated nuclear waste storage tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Seismic modeling and analysis of a prototype heated nuclear waste storage tunnel, Yucca Mountain was heated to replicate the effects of long-term storage of decaying nuclear waste and to study the effects for the long- term storage of high-level nuclear waste from reactors and decom- missioned atomic weapons

  6. Program Final Report - Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Meisner

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted a vehicle analysis to assess the feasibility of thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery and conversion to useful electrical power and found that eliminating the 500 W of electrical power generated by the alternator corresponded to about a 7% increase in fuel economy (FE) for a small car and about 6% for a full size truck. Electric power targets of 300 W were established for city and highway driving cycles for this project. We obtained critical vehicle level information for these driving cycles that enabled a high-level design and performance analysis of radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems for several potential vehicle platforms, and we identified the location and geometric envelopes of the radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems. Based on this analysis, we selected the Chevrolet Suburban as the most suitable demonstration vehicle for this project. Our modeling and thermal analysis assessment of a radiator-based thermoelectric generator (TEG), however, revealed severe practical limitations. Specifically the small temperature difference of 100°C or less between the engine coolant and ambient air results in a low Carnot conversion efficiency, and thermal resistance associated with air convection would reduce this conversion efficiency even further. We therefore decided not to pursue a radiator-based waste heat recovery system and focused only on the exhaust gas. Our overall approach was to combine science and engineering: (1) existing and newly developed TE materials were carefully selected and characterized by the material researcher members of our team, and most of the material property results were validated by our research partners, and (2) system engineers worked closely with vehicle engineers to ensure that accurate vehicle-level information was used for developing subsystem models and designs, and the subsystem output was analyzed for potential fuel economy gains. We incorporated material, module, subsystem, and integration costs into the material selection criteria in order to balance various materials, module and subsystem design, and vehicle integration options. Our work on advanced TE materials development and on TEG system design, assembly, vehicle integration, and testing proceeded in parallel efforts. Results from our two preliminary prototype TEGs using only Bi-Te TE modules allowed us to solve various mechanical challenges and to finalize and fine tune aspects of the design and implementation. Our materials research effort led us to quickly abandon work on PbTe and focus on the skutterudite materials due to their superior mechanical performance and suitability at automotive exhaust gas operating temperatures. We synthesized a sufficiently large quantity of skutterudite material for module fabrication for our third and final prototype. Our TEG#3 is the first of its kind to contain state-of-the-art skutterudite-based TE modules to be installed and tested on a production vehicle. The design, which consisted of 24 skutterudite modules and 18 Bi-Te modules, attempted to optimize electrical power generation by using these two kinds of TE modules that have their peak performance temperatures matched to the actual temperature profile of the TEG during operation. The performance of TEG#3 was limited by the maximum temperature allowable for the Bi-Te TE modules located in the colder end of the TEG, resulting in the operating temperature for the skutterudite modules to be considerably below optimum. We measured the power output for (1) the complete TEG (25 Watts) and (2) an individual TE module series string (1/3 of the TEG) operated at a 60°C higher temperature (19 Watts). We estimate that under optimum operating temperature conditions, TEG#3 will generate about 235 Watts. With additional improvements in thermal and electrical interfaces, temperature homogeneity, and power conditioning, we estimate TEG#3 could deliver a power output of about 425 Watts.

  7. Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief. Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Brochure).

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLEof EnergyPerformance |Waste Heat

  8. Engine Waste Heat Recovery Concept Demonstration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngaging Students in2 DOEEngineWaste Heat

  9. Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

  10. Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine...

  11. Process Waste Heat Recovery in the Food Industry - A System Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundberg, W. L.; Mutone, G. A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of an industrial waste heat recovery system concept is discussed. For example purposes, a food processing plant operating an ammonia refrigeration system for storage and blast freezing is considered. Heat is withdrawn from...

  12. Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using relaxor ferroelectric 8/65/35 PLZT and the Olsen cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using relaxor ferroelectric 8/65/35 PLZT and the Olsen December 2011 Published 26 January 2012 Online at stacks.iop.org/SMS/21/025021 Abstract Waste heat can in the online journal) 1. Introduction Waste heat is rejected as a by-product of power, refrigeration or heat

  13. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Waste Heat Recovery Methods for the UBC Microbrewery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into Waste Heat Recovery Methods for the UBC Microbrewery Nazanin Bahrami, Michael Huang, Aldrich Huang into the surrounding environment "waste heat." This report investigates two powerful strategies, namely that of Heat: to recover as much waste heat as possible, hence drastically reducing the economic costs of the brewery

  14. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO); Anderson, Ren (Broomfield, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  15. Assessment of Feasibility of the Beneficial Use of Waste Heat from the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna P. Guillen

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigates the feasibility of using waste heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). A proposed glycol waste heat recovery system was assessed for technical and economic feasibility. The system under consideration would use waste heat from the ATR secondary coolant system to preheat air for space heating of TRA-670. A tertiary coolant stream would be extracted from the secondary coolant system loop and pumped to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, where heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air in the heating and ventilation system. Historical data from Advanced Test Reactor operations over the past 10 years indicates that heat from the reactor coolant was available (when needed for heating) for 43.5% of the year on average. Potential energy cost savings by using the waste heat to preheat intake air is $242K/yr. Technical, safety, and logistics considerations of the glycol waste heat recovery system are outlined. Other opportunities for using waste heat and reducing water usage at ATR are considered.

  16. Bypass valve and coolant flow controls for optimum temperatures in waste heat recovery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meisner, Gregory P

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementing an optimized waste heat recovery system includes calculating a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a heat exchanger of a waste heat recovery system, and predicting a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a material flowing through a channel of the waste heat recovery system. Upon determining the rate of change in the temperature of the material is predicted to be higher than the rate of change in the temperature of the heat exchanger, the optimized waste heat recovery system calculates a valve position and timing for the channel that is configurable for achieving a rate of material flow that is determined to produce and maintain a defined threshold temperature of the heat exchanger, and actuates the valve according to the calculated valve position and calculated timing.

  17. Using Waste Heat for External Processes (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chinese translation of the Using Waste Heat for External Processes fact sheet. Provides suggestions on how to use waste heat in industrial applications. The temperature of exhaust gases from fuel-fired industrial processes depends mainly on the process temperature and the waste heat recovery method. Figure 1 shows the heat lost in exhaust gases at various exhaust gas temperatures and percentages of excess air. Energy from gases exhausted from higher temperature processes (primary processes) can be recovered and used for lower temperature processes (secondary processes). One example is to generate steam using waste heat boilers for the fluid heaters used in petroleum crude processing. In addition, many companies install heat exchangers on the exhaust stacks of furnaces and ovens to produce hot water or to generate hot air for space heating.

  18. Fluid Bed Waste Heat Boiler Operating Experience in Dirty Gas Streams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreeger, A. H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first industrial fluid bed waste heat boiler in the U. S. is operating on an aluminium melting furnace at the ALCOA Massena Integrated Aluminum Works in upstate New York. Waste heat from an aluminum melting furnace is captured for general plant...

  19. Hanford tank initiative vehicle/based waste retrieval demonstration report phase II, track 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berglin, E.J.

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the versatile TracPUMpTm, Environmental Specialties Group, LLC (ES) performed a successful Phase 11 demonstration of a Vehicle- Based Waste Retrieval System (VWRS) for removal of waste material and residual liquid found in the Hanford Underground Storage Tanks (ousts). The purpose of this demonstration was to address issues pertaining to the use of a VWRS in OUSTS. The demonstration also revealed the waste removal capabilities of the TracPumpTm and the most effective techniques and equipment to safely and effectively remove waste simulants. ES successfully addressed the following primary issues: I . Dislodge and convey the waste forms present in the Hanford OUSTS; 2. Access the UST through tank openings as small as twenty-four inches in diameter; 3. Traverse a variety of terrains including slopes, sludges, rocks and hard, slippery surfaces without becoming mired; 4. Dislodge and convey waste within the confinement of the Decontamination Containment Capture Vessel (DCCV) and with minimal personnel exposure; 5. Decontaminate equipment to acceptable limits during retrieval from the UST; 6. Perform any required maintenance within the confinement of the DCCV; and 7. Maintain contaminate levels ``as low as reasonably achievable`` (ALARA) within the DCCV due to its crevice and comer-free design. The following materials were used to simulate the physical characteristics of wastes found in Hanford`s OUSTS: (1) Hardpan: a clay-type material that has high shear strength; (2) Saltcake: a fertilizer-based material that has high compressive strength; and (3) Wet Sludge.- a sticky, peanut- butter- like material with low shear strength. Four test beds were constructed of plywood and filled with a different simulant to a depth of eight to ten inches. Three of the test beds were of homogenous simulant material, while the fourth bed consisted of a mixture of all three simulant types.

  20. QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeid Ghamaty; Sal Marchetti

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices.

  1. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse Do Youl Bae, Calvin Ng, Joseph Pateman University of British Investigation into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse Do Youl Bae Calvin Ng Joseph Pateman March a microbrewery. In order to assess the viability of any potential structures to use this waste heat energy

  2. Improving the Control Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery from a Heavy-Duty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Improving the Control Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery from, Antonio Sciarretta, Luc Voise, Pascal Dufour, Madiha Nadri Abstract-- In recent years, waste heat recovery waste heat from a heavy- duty diesel engine. For this system, a hierarchical and modular control

  3. Heavy Duty Roots Expander for Waste Heat Energy Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  4. Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage in the flue gases.

  5. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery - Potential Applications, Available Technologies and Crosscutting R&D Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report was to explore key areas and characteristics of industrial waste heat and its generation, barriers to waste heat recovery and use, and potential research and development (R&D) opportunities. The report also provides an overview of technologies and systems currently available for waste heat recovery and discusses the issues or barriers for each. Also included is information on emerging technologies under development or at various stages of demonstrations, and R&D opportunities cross-walked by various temperature ranges, technology areas, and energy-intensive process industries.

  6. QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeid Ghamaty

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce the technology for fabricating a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices. In this quarter Hi-Z has continued fabrication of the QW films and also continued development of joining techniques for fabricating the N and P legs into a couple. The upper operating temperature limit for these films is unknown and will be determined via the isothermal aging studies that are in progress. We are reporting on these studies in this report. The properties of the QW films that are being evaluated are Seebeck, thermal conductivity and thermal-to-electricity conversion efficiency.

  7. Hybrid Solar Lighting Provides Energy Savings and Reduces Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Earl, Dennis Duncan [ORNL; Beshears, David L [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL; Parks, James Edgar [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Artificial lighting is the largest component of electricity use in commercial U.S. buildings. Hybrid solar lighting (HSL) provides an exciting new means of reducing energy consumption while also delivering significant ancillary benefits associated with natural lighting in buildings. As more than half of all federal facilities are in the Sunbelt region (defined as having an average direct solar radiation of greater than 4 kWh/m2/day) and as more than half of all square footage available in federal buildings is also in the Sunbelt, HSL is an excellent technology fit for federal facilities. The HSL technology uses a rooftop, 4-ft-wide dish and secondary mirror that track the sun throughout the day (Fig. 1). The collector system focuses the sunlight onto 127 optical fibers. The fibers serve as flexible light pipes and are connected to hybrid light fixtures that have special diffusion rods that spread out the light in all directions. One collector powers about eight hybrid light fixtures-which can illuminate about 1,000 square feet. The system tracks at 0.1 accuracy, required by the two-mirror geometry to keep the focused beam on the fiber bundle. When sunlight is plentiful, the optical fibers in the luminaires provide all or most of the light needed in an area. During times of little or no sunlight, a sensor controls the intensity of the artificial lamps to maintain a desired illumination level. Unlike conventional electric lamps, the natural light produces little to no waste heat and is cool to the touch. This is because the system's solar collector removes the infrared light-the part of the spectrum that generates a lot of the heat in conventional bulbs-from the sunlight.

  8. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ace46schock...

  9. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ace049schock2010o...

  10. Water distillation using waste engine heat from an internal combustion engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mears, Kevin S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the needs of forward deployed soldiers and disaster relief personnel, a mobile water distillation system was designed and tested. This system uses waste engine heat from the exhaust flow of an internal combustion ...

  11. Evaluation of Industrial Energy Options for Cogeneration, Waste Heat Recovery and Alternative Fuel Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hencey, S.; Hinkle, B.; Limaye, D. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the energy options available to Missouri industrial firms in the areas of cogeneration, waste heat recovery, and coal and alternative fuel utilization. The project, being performed by Synergic Resources Corporation...

  12. Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of progress in TE waste heat recovery from sedan gasoline-engine exhaust, TE HVAC system in hybrid sedan, and establishing targets for cost, power density, packaging, durability, and systems integration

  13. Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is to develop the scroll expander for ORC systems to be used in industrial and commercial medium-grade waste heat recovery applications, and to validate and quantify the benefits...

  14. Waste Heat Recovery from High Temperature Off-Gases from Electric Arc Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a study and review of available waste heat in high temperature Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) off gases and heat recovery techniques/methods from these gases. It gives details of the quality and quantity of the sensible and chemical waste heat in typical EAF off gases, energy savings potential by recovering part of this heat, a comprehensive review of currently used waste heat recovery methods and potential for use of advanced designs to achieve a much higher level of heat recovery including scrap preheating, steam production and electric power generation. Based on our preliminary analysis, currently, for all electric arc furnaces used in the US steel industry, the energy savings potential is equivalent to approximately 31 trillion Btu per year or 32.7 peta Joules per year (approximately $182 million US dollars/year). This article describes the EAF off-gas enthalpy model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate available and recoverable heat energy for a given stream of exhaust gases coming out of one or multiple EAF furnaces. This Excel based model calculates sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases during tap to tap time accounting for variation in quantity and quality of off gases. The model can be used to estimate energy saved through scrap preheating and other possible uses such as steam generation and electric power generation using off gas waste heat. This article includes a review of the historical development of existing waste heat recovery methods, their operations, and advantages/limitations of these methods. This paper also describes a program to develop and test advanced concepts for scrap preheating, steam production and electricity generation through use of waste heat recovery from the chemical and sensible heat contained in the EAF off gases with addition of minimum amount of dilution or cooling air upstream of pollution control equipment such as bag houses.

  15. A JOULE-HEATED MELTER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY SE

    2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of joule-heated ceramic lined melters and their application to Hanford's low-activity waste.

  16. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

  17. Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery and Utilization from Residential Appliances and Fixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomlinson, John J [ORNL; Christian, Jeff [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary In every home irrespective of its size, location, age, or efficiency, heat in the form of drainwater or dryer exhaust is wasted. Although from a waste stream, this energy has the potential for being captured, possibly stored, and then reused for preheating hot water or air thereby saving operating costs to the homeowner. In applications such as a shower and possibly a dryer, waste heat is produced at the same time as energy is used, so that a heat exchanger to capture the waste energy and return it to the supply is all that is needed. In other applications such as capturing the energy in drainwater from a tub, dishwasher, or washing machine, the availability of waste heat might not coincide with an immediate use for energy, and consequently a heat exchanger system with heat storage capacity (i.e. a regenerator) would be necessary. This study describes a two-house experimental evaluation of a system designed to capture waste heat from the shower, dishwasher clothes washer and dryer, and to use this waste heat to offset some of the hot water energy needs of the house. Although each house was unoccupied, they were fitted with equipment that would completely simulate the heat loads and behavior of human occupants including operating the appliances and fixtures on a demand schedule identical to Building American protocol (Hendron, 2009). The heat recovery system combined (1) a gravity-film heat exchanger (GFX) installed in a vertical section of drainline, (2) a heat exchanger for capturing dryer exhaust heat, (3) a preheat tank for storing the captured heat, and (4) a small recirculation pump and controls, so that the system could be operated anytime that waste heat from the shower, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, and in any combination was produced. The study found capturing energy from the dishwasher and clothes washer to be a challenge since those two appliances dump waste water over a short time interval. Controls based on the status of the dump valve on these two appliances would have eliminated uncertainty in knowing when waste water was flowing and the recovery system operated. The study also suggested that capture of dryer exhaust heat to heat incoming air to the dryer should be examined as an alternative to using drying exhaust energy for water heating. The study found that over a 6-week test period, the system in each house was able to recover on average approximately 3000 W-h of waste heat daily from these appliance and showers with slightly less on simulated weekdays and slightly more on simulated weekends which were heavy wash/dry days. Most of these energy savings were due to the shower/GFX operation, and the least savings were for the dishwasher/GFX operation. Overall, the value of the 3000 W-h of displaced energy would have been $0.27/day based on an electricity price of $.09/kWh. Although small for today s convention house, these savings are significant for a home designed to approach maximum affordable efficiency where daily operating costs for the whole house are less than a dollar per day. In 2010 the actual measured cost of energy in one of the simulated occupancy houses which waste heat recovery testing was undertaken was $0.77/day.

  18. Parametric Analyses of Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TRUITT, J.B.

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The general thermal hydraulics program GOTH-SNF was used to predict the thermal response of the waste in tanks 241-AY-102 and 241-AZ-102 when mixed by two 300 horsepower mixer pumps. This mixing was defined in terms of a specific waste retrieval scenario. Both dome and annulus ventilation system flow are necessary to maintain the waste within temperature control limits during the mixing operation and later during the sludge-settling portion of the scenario are defined.

  19. The Beckett System Recovery and Utilization of Low Grade Waste Heat From Flue Gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, W. R.; DeBiase, J. F.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Beckett Heat Recovery is a series of techniques for recovering low-grade waste heat from flue gas. Until the cost of fossil fuels began rising rapidly, flue gas below 600 F was considered economically unworthy of reclaim. This paper...

  20. White Paper for U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force: Waste Heat Recovery with Thermoelectric and Lithium-Ion Hybrid Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    By harvesting waste heat from engine exhaust and storing it in light-weight high-capacity modules, it is believed that the need for energy transport by convoys can be lowered significantly. By storing this power during operation, substantial electrical power can be provided during long periods of silent operation, while the engines are not operating. It is proposed to investigate the potential of installing efficient thermoelectric generators on the exhaust systems of trucks and other vehicles to generate electrical power from the waste heat contained in the exhaust and to store that power in advanced power packs comprised of polymer-gel lithium ion batteries. Efficient inexpensive methods for production of the thermoelectric generator are also proposed. The technology that exists at LLNL, as well as that which exists at industrial partners, all have high technology readiness level (TRL). Work is needed for integration and deployment.

  1. Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes Jaschke, Helge Smedsrud, Sigurd Skogestad*, Henrik Manum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes J¨aschke, Helge@chemeng.ntnu.no off-line. This systematic approach is here applied to a waste incineration plant for district heating. In district heating networks, operators usually wish to ob- tain the lowest possible return temperature

  2. Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Felix

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-e?ciency direct conversion of heat to electrical energyJ. Yu and M. Ikura, “Direct conversion of low-grade heat tois concerned with direct conversion of thermal energy into

  3. "Potential for Combined Heat and Power and District Heating and Cooling from Waste-to-Energy Facilities in the U.S. Learning from the Danish Experience"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepard, Kenneth

    "Potential for Combined Heat and Power and District Heating and Cooling from Waste- to Engineering Center and the Henry Krumb School of Mines May 2007 #12;1 Executive Summary In District Heating is used for the generation of electricity. The advantages of district heating using WTE plants are

  4. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with adhesion promoting heat treatment (failure is in bulk material.) * Designed tooling for fabricating ceramic headers for TE modules. * Synthesized several n-type PbTe...

  5. TEMP: A finite line heat transfer code for geologic repositories for nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurm, K.J.; Bloom, S.G.; Atterbury, W.G.; Hetteberg, J.R.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEMP is a FORTRAN computer code for calculating temperatures in a geologic repository for nuclear waste. It will calculate the incremental temperature contributed by a single heat source, by an infinite array of heat sources, or by heat sources geometrically arranged in a finite array. In the finite array geometry, different types of heat sources can be placed in different regions at different times to more closely approximate the emplacement of waste in a repository. TEMP uses a semi-analytical technique for solving the equation for a heat producing finite length line source in an infinite and isotropic medium. Temperature contributions from individual heat sources are superimposed to determine the temperature at a specific location and time in a repository of multiple heat sources. Thermal conductivity of the geologic medium can be a function of temperature, and, when it is, an approximation is made for the temperature dependence of thermal diffusivity. This report derives the equations solved by TEMP and documents its accuracy by comparing its results to known analytical solutions and to the finite-difference and finite-element heat transfer codes HEATING5, HEATING6, THAC-SIP-3D, SPECTROM-41, and STEALTH-2D. The temperature results from TEMP are shown to be very accurate when compared to the analytical solutions and to the results from the finite-difference and finite-element codes. 8 refs., 97 figs., 39 tabs.

  6. Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships ToolkitWaste Heat Waste Heat - - to to - -Organic

  7. Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luong, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kan08] for flow through vertical and horizontal tubes. TheFlow Boiling Heat Transfer Inside Horizontal and Vertical Tubes. ”and thin horizontal tube. 2. Working fluid flow modeled as a

  8. Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    If you’ve ever driven by an industrial plant, you’ve probably noticed big white plumes rising from the tops of the facilities. While it might look like smoke or pollution at first glance, most of the time those white plumes are comprised of steam and heat, or what Ener-G-Rotors CEO Michael Newell calls waste heat. Mike and the researchers of Ener-G-Rotors are finding ways to use this escaped steam and turn it into energy.

  9. Advanced Energy and Water Recovery Technology from Low Grade Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexin Wang

    2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The project has developed a nanoporous membrane based water vapor separation technology that can be used for recovering energy and water from low-temperature industrial waste gas streams with high moisture contents. This kind of exhaust stream is widely present in many industrial processes including the forest products and paper industry, food industry, chemical industry, cement industry, metal industry, and petroleum industry. The technology can recover not only the sensible heat but also high-purity water along with its considerable latent heat. Waste heats from such streams are considered very difficult to recover by conventional technology because of poor heat transfer performance of heat-exchanger type equipment at low temperature and moisture-related corrosion issues. During the one-year Concept Definition stage of the project, the goal was to prove the concept and technology in the laboratory and identify any issues that need to be addressed in future development of this technology. In this project, computational modeling and simulation have been conducted to investigate the performance of a nanoporous material based technology, transport membrane condenser (TMC), for waste heat and water recovery from low grade industrial flue gases. A series of theoretical and computational analyses have provided insight and support in advanced TMC design and experiments. Experimental study revealed condensation and convection through the porous membrane bundle was greatly improved over an impermeable tube bundle, because of the membrane capillary condensation mechanism and the continuous evacuation of the condensate film or droplets through the membrane pores. Convection Nusselt number in flue gas side for the porous membrane tube bundle is 50% to 80% higher than those for the impermeable stainless steel tube bundle. The condensation rates for the porous membrane tube bundle also increase 60% to 80%. Parametric study for the porous membrane tube bundle heat transfer performance was also done, which shows this heat transfer enhancement approach works well in a wide parameters range for typical flue gas conditions. Better understanding of condensing heat transfer mechanism for porous membrane heat transfer surfaces, shows higher condensation and heat transfer rates than non-permeable tubes, due to existence of the porous membrane walls. Laboratory testing has documented increased TMC performance with increased exhaust gas moisture content levels, which has exponentially increased potential markets for the product. The TMC technology can uniquely enhance waste heat recovery in tandem with water vapor recovery for many other industrial processes such as drying, wet and dry scrubber exhaust gases, dewatering, and water chilling. A new metallic substrate membrane tube development and molded TMC part fabrication method, provides an economical way to expand this technology for scaled up applications with less than 3 year payback expectation. A detailed market study shows a broad application area for this advanced waste heat and water recovery technology. A commercialization partner has been lined up to expand this technology to this big market. This research work led to new findings on the TMC working mechanism to improve its performance, better scale up design approaches, and economical part fabrication methods. Field evaluation work needs to be done to verify the TMC real world performance, and get acceptance from the industry, and pave the way for our commercial partner to put it into a much larger waste heat and waste water recovery market. This project is addressing the priority areas specified for DOE Industrial Technologies Program's (ITP's): Energy Intensive Processes (EIP) Portfolio - Waste Heat Minimization and Recovery platform.

  10. An examination of interference in waste solidification through measurement of heat signature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, C.; Stegemann, J.; Caldwell, R. [Water Technology International Corp., Burlington, Ontario (Canada)] [Water Technology International Corp., Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydration of cementing materials is accompanied by heat evolution which is closely related to their structure development. The presence of wastes usually interferes with the hydration of cementing materials. This study examined their interference in waste stabilization/solidification processes through the measurement of adiabatic heat evolution using a computerized Quadrel{trademark} system. Two cementitious materials, an alkali-activated blast furnace slag binder and an ASTM Type 1 Portland cement were used to solidify an electric arc furnace (EAF) dust, which has high concentrations of B, Cr, Hg, Pb, Ni and Zn. The EAF dust contents were 0, 30 and 60% by mass. Different mixing conditions were also examined. The interference of EAF dust with the hydration of cementing materials was described using several parameters derived from the heat evolution curves: equivalent initial time of setting (equivalent time at 20 C); total heat evolution at initial time of setting; equivalent final time of setting, total heat evolution at final time of setting and total heat evolution at equivalent time of 28 and 90 days. Experimental results indicated that the Quadrel{trademark} system was a useful tool to examine the interference in waste stabilization/solidification and to assist with the selection of cementing materials.

  11. Waste heat recovery system for recapturing energy after engine aftertreatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery (WHR) system including a Rankine cycle (RC) subsystem for converting heat of exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine, and an internal combustion engine including the same. The WHR system includes an exhaust gas heat exchanger that is fluidly coupled downstream of an exhaust aftertreatment system and is adapted to transfer heat from the exhaust gas to a working fluid of the RC subsystem. An energy conversion device is fluidly coupled to the exhaust gas heat exchanger and is adapted to receive the vaporized working fluid and convert the energy of the transferred heat. The WHR system includes a control module adapted to control at least one parameter of the RC subsystem based on a detected aftertreatment event of a predetermined thermal management strategy of the aftertreatment system.

  12. Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

  13. Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Frank G.

    2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This cooperative program between the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology and Caterpillar, Inc. is aimed at demonstrating electric turbocompound technology on a Class 8 truck engine. This is a lab demonstration program, with no provision for on-truck testing of the system. The goal is to demonstrate the level of fuel efficiency improvement attainable with the electric turbocompound system. Also, electric turbocompounding adds an additional level of control to the air supply which could be a component in an emissions control strategy.

  14. Using Waste Heat for External Processes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUE 08:59 FAXFact SheetConditionsOwnersUsing

  15. Method of prevention of deposits in the pipes of waste heat boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettert, H.; Kaempfer, K.

    1983-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for preventing deposits in the pipes of waste heat boilers employed for cooling gases in the partial autothermal oxidation of fossil fuels to prepare hydrogen or synthesis gases, wherein the pipes are flushed, at the operating temperature, with hydrogen-containing gases which contain little or no H/sub 2/S.

  16. Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

  17. Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat may be limited if an energy source cannot be fully utilized in an otherwise available out of phase or unequal capacity end-use process. This paper summarizes the results of a technical and economic...

  18. Influence of wick properties in a vertical LHP on remove waste heat from electronic equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smitka, Martin, E-mail: martin.smitka@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: milan.malcho@fstroj.uniza.sk; Nemec, Patrik, E-mail: martin.smitka@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: milan.malcho@fstroj.uniza.sk; Malcho, Milan, E-mail: martin.smitka@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: milan.malcho@fstroj.uniza.sk [University of Žilina, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Power Engeneering, Univerzitna 1, 010 26 Žilina (Slovakia)

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The loop heat pipe is a vapour-liquid phase-change device that transfers heat from evaporator to condenser. One of the most important parts of the LHP is the porous wick structure. The wick structure provides capillary force to circulate the working fluid. To achieve good thermal performance of LHP, capillary wicks with high permeability and porosity and fine pore radius are expected. The aim of this work is to develop porous wick of sintered nickel powder with different grain sizes. These porous wicks were used in LHP and there were performed a series of measurements to remove waste heat from the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT)

  19. 7-122 A solar pond power plant operates by absorbing heat from the hot region near the bottom, and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    , and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant

  20. Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luong, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat capacity, constant volume Cv, in kJ kgK kJ kgK 13. liquidheat capacity, constant volume Cv, in kJ kgK 12. liquidheat capacity in region 3 Cp3, in kJ kgK 17. saturated liquid

  1. Waste heat recovery from the European Spallation Source cryogenic helium plants - implications for system design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurns, John M. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bäck, Harald [Sweco Industry AB, P.O. Box 286, 201 22 Malmö (Sweden); Gierow, Martin [Lunds Energikoncernen AB, P.O. Box 25, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) neutron spallation project currently being designed will be built outside of Lund, Sweden. The ESS design includes three helium cryoplants, providing cryogenic cooling for the proton accelerator superconducting cavities, the target neutron source, and for the ESS instrument suite. In total, the cryoplants consume approximately 7 MW of electrical power, and will produce approximately 36 kW of refrigeration at temperatures ranging from 2-16 K. Most of the power consumed by the cryoplants ends up as waste heat, which must be rejected. One hallmark of the ESS design is the goal to recycle waste heat from ESS to the city of Lund district heating system. The design of the cooling system must optimize the delivery of waste heat from ESS to the district heating system and also assure the efficient operation of ESS systems. This report outlines the cooling scheme for the ESS cryoplants, and examines the effect of the cooling system design on cryoplant design, availability and operation.

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Waste Heat Recovery for Usage by a Rooftop Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into Waste Heat Recovery for Usage by a Rooftop Greenhouse Rohit Singla, Jeremy Lord, Jorden Hetherington Investigation into Waste Heat Recovery for Usage by a Rooftop Greenhouse April 4, 2013 Dr. Naoko Ellis APSC 262 of a microbrewery, an excess amount of waste heat in the form of steam is produced. In the sustainability principles

  3. Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the alkali bypass gas stream with a specially designed fluidized bed cooler. The heat recovery tubes are kept clean by the scrubbing action of the fluidized bed. A circulating fluidized bed combustor utilizes hot air from the clinker cooler as preheated... combustion air. Air from the clinker cooler which is in excess of the combustion air required for the circulating fluidized bed, is used for preheating of boiler feedwater. A conventional economizer located in the gas stream is used for this service...

  4. Quantity, quality, and availability of waste heat from United States thermal power generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJthmore »of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040.« less

  5. Quantity, quality, and availability of waste heat from United States thermal power generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gingerich, Daniel B [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mauter, Meagan S [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJth of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040.

  6. Conserving Energy by Recovering Heat from Hot Waste Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnuson, E. E.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supply, and 1150?1500 Cement kiln (wet process) 8oo~1100 isn't a shortage of energy then at least somewhat of a Copper reverberatory furnace 2000?~.'500 crisis? Diesel engine exhaust 1000?1200 Forge and billet.heating furnaces 1700?~ZOO... Temp. F aren't they really agreeing that there is going to be Ammonia oxidation process 1350?1475 an energy crisis? Steep price increases occur when Annealing furnace 1100?2000 Cement kiln (dry process) there are shortages, when demand exceeds...

  7. Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

  8. Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLEof EnergyPerformance |Waste

  9. Waste Heat Recovery From Stacks Using Direct-Contact Condensing Heat Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorn, W. F.

    is mainly for general interest and to illustrate the analysis methodology. Two key parameters from Table A-I are needed for a heat recovery analysis. First is the weight of water vapor in the flue gas per unit weight of fuel burned and the second... ........_ ...._ ...._ ...._ ...._ ...._ ....--1 200 260 300 360 400 460 600 660 HEAT RECOVERY UNIT INLET FLUE GAS TEMPERATURE, OF FJpre 2. Efficiency Variation With Heat Recovery Unit Inlet Flue Gas Temperature 428 ESL-IE-86-06-69 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial Energy...

  10. Waste Heat Recovery From Stacks Using Direct-Contact Condensing Heat Exchange 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorn, W. F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Similarly, the recuperator can be interfaced with the auxiliary tank, heat exchanger and boiler controls in a In considering multiple boiler installations, the CON variety of ways. Several recuperators, individually installed X recuperator may...

  11. Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denia Djokic; Steven J. Piet; Layne F. Pincock; Nick R. Soelberg

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system , and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity.

  12. Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model - 13413

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djokic, Denia [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Piet, Steven J.; Pincock, Layne F.; Soelberg, Nick R. [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)] [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system, and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity. (authors)

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Electric PCM Assisted Thermal Heating System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Delphi Automotive at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electric PCM assisted...

  14. Incorporating Cold Cap Behavior in a Joule-heated Waste Glass Melter Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varija Agarwal; Donna Post Guillen

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, an overview of Joule-heated waste glass melters used in the vitrification of high level waste (HLW) is presented, with a focus on the cold cap region. This region, in which feed-to-glass conversion reactions occur, is critical in determining the melting properties of any given glass melter. An existing 1D computer model of the cold cap, implemented in MATLAB, is described in detail. This model is a standalone model that calculates cold cap properties based on boundary conditions at the top and bottom of the cold cap. Efforts to couple this cold cap model with a 3D STAR-CCM+ model of a Joule-heated melter are then described. The coupling is being implemented in ModelCenter, a software integration tool. The ultimate goal of this model is to guide the specification of melter parameters that optimize glass quality and production rate.

  15. Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

    2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

  16. Potential vertical movement of large heat-generating waste packages in salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Daniel James; Martinez, Mario J.; Hardin, Ernest L.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With renewed interest in disposal of heat-generating waste in bedded or domal salt formations, scoping analyses were conducted to estimate rates of waste package vertical movement. Vertical movement is found to result from thermal expansion, from upward creep or heave of the near-field salt, and from downward buoyant forces on the waste package. A two-pronged analysis approach was used, with thermal-mechanical creep modeling, and coupled thermal-viscous flow modeling. The thermal-mechanical approach used well-studied salt constitutive models, while the thermal-viscous approach represented the salt as a highly viscous fluid. The Sierra suite of coupled simulation codes was used for both approaches. The waste package in all simulations was a right-circular cylinder with the density of steel, in horizontal orientation. A time-decaying heat generation function was used to represent commercial spent fuel with typical burnup and 50-year age. Results from the thermal-mechanical base case showed approximately 27 cm initial uplift of the package, followed by gradual relaxation closely following the calculated temperature history. A similar displacement history was obtained with the package density set equal to that of salt. The slight difference in these runs is attributable to buoyant displacement (sinking) and is on the order of 1 mm in 2,000 years. Without heat generation the displacement stabilizes at a fraction of millimeter after a few hundred years. Results from thermal-viscous model were similar, except that the rate of sinking was constant after cooldown, at approximately 0.15 mm per 1,000 yr. In summary, all calculations showed vertical movement on the order of 1 mm or less in 2,000 yr, including calculations using well-established constitutive models for temperature-dependent salt deformation. Based on this finding, displacement of waste packages in a salt repository is not a significant repository performance issue.

  17. The Organic Rankine Cycle System, Its Application to Extract Energy From Low Temperature Waste Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, R. H.; Ichikawa, S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a Rankine Cycle to extract The theoretical Rankine Cycle efficiency (~R) is energy from low temperature waste heat. By 1968, a defined as: 3.8 megawatt unit using R-11 refrigerant was placed in commercial operation in Japan (2) and currently ?ZR.... Figure 2 compares the theo The basic Organic Rankine Cycle may be described retical Rankine efficiency for several hydrocarbons, using the Pressure-Enthalpy Diagram of a typical fluorocarbons and water within the evaporating working fluid (R-11). (See...

  18. Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effect from CO2 emission resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels in utility power plants and the use of chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants, which is currently thought to affect depletion of the ozone layer. The ban on fluorocarbon fluids has been...LIFE CYCLE COST ANALYSIS OF WASTE HEAT OPERATED ABSORPTION COOLING SYSTEMS FOR BUILDING HVAC APPLICATIONS V. Murugavel and R. Saravanan Refrigeration and Air conditioning Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University...

  19. Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

    A first-of-its-kind Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP™) was installed by Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc. in partnership with Energy Concepts Co. at Ultramar Diamond Shamrock's 30,000 barrel per day refinery in Denver...

  20. Electrically heated particulate filter regeneration methods and systems for hybrid vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI)

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system for controlling regeneration of a particulate filter for a hybrid vehicle is provided. The system generally includes a regeneration module that controls current to the particulate filter to initiate regeneration. An engine control module controls operation of an engine of the hybrid vehicle based on the control of the current to the particulate filter.

  1. Vehicle engine use when no longer in transit; exceptions -Vehicle idling gets zero miles per gallon; unnecessary idling wastes fuel and pollutes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    Vehicle engine use when no longer in transit; exceptions - Vehicle idling gets zero miles per, no University vehicle or piece of equipment is to be idled in a non-emergency situation. The operator of the vehicle/equipment is to turn-off the unit and the keys are to be removed from the ignition. EXEMPTIONS

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: ePATHS- electrical PCM Assisted Thermal Heating System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Delphi Automotive at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ePATHS - electrical PCM...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Heavy Duty Roots Expander Heat Energy Recovery (HD-REHER)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Eaton Corporation at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about heavy duty roots expander...

  4. J. Air & Waste Manage. Assoc., vol 58, 2008, p. 45-54 On-board emission measurement of high loaded light duty vehicles in Algeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ; Nejjari et al., 2003, Atek et al., 2004). As a result, many stations of air pollution measurement and Boukadoum, 2005). Vehicle pollutant emissions constitute not only a problem of air quality in big citiesJ. Air & Waste Manage. Assoc., vol 58, 2008, p. 45-54 On-board emission measurement of high loaded

  5. Determination of heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed: Extension to high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jarrett A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pokorny, Richard [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat conductivity ({lambda}) and the thermal diffusivity (a) of reacting glass batch, or melter feed, control the heat flux into and within the cold cap, a layer of reacting material floating on the pool of molten glass in an all-electric continuous waste glass melter. After previously estimating {lambda} of melter feed at temperatures up to 680 deg C, we focus in this work on the {lambda}(T) function at T > 680 deg C, at which the feed material becomes foamy. We used a customized experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples, which monitored the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible with feed was heated at a constant rate from room temperature up to 1100°C. Approximating measured temperature profiles by polynomial functions, we used the heat transfer equation to estimate the {lambda}(T) approximation function, which we subsequently optimized using the finite-volume method combined with least-squares analysis. The heat conductivity increased as the temperature increased until the feed began to expand into foam, at which point the conductivity dropped. It began to increase again as the foam turned into a bubble-free glass melt. We discuss the implications of this behavior for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap.

  6. Fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system development: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patch, K.D.; Cole, W.E.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major energy loss in industry is the heat content of the flue gases from industrial process heaters. One effective way to utilize the energy, which is applicable to all processes, is to preheat the combustion air for the process heater. Although recuperators are available to preheat this air when the flue gases are clean, recuperators to recover the heat from dirty and corrosive flue gases do not exist. The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) system is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, recirculating alumina particles are heated by the flue gas in a raining bed. The hot particles are then removed from the bed and placed in a fluidized bed where they are fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is preheated. The cooled particles are then returned to the raining bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry. In this final report, the design, development, fabrication, and installation of a full-scale FBWHR system is detailed.

  7. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xingshi; Gingerich, Daniel B.; Mauter, Meagan S.

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the fullmore »FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.« less

  8. Water treatment capacity of forward osmosis systems utilizing power plant waste heat

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Xingshi [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gingerich, Daniel B. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mauter, Meagan S. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Forward osmosis (FO) has the potential to improve the energy efficiency of membrane-based water treatment by leveraging waste heat from steam electric power generation as the primary driving force for separation. In this study, we develop a comprehensive FO process model, consisting of membrane separation, heat recovery, and draw solute regeneration (DSR) models. We quantitatively characterize three alternative processes for DSR: distillation, steam stripping, and air stripping. We then construct a mathematical model of the distillation process for DSR that incorporates hydrodynamics, mass and heat transport resistances, and reaction kinetics, and we integrate this into a model for the full FO process. Finally, we utilize this FO process model to derive a first-order approximation of the water production capacity given the rejected heat quantity and quality available at U.S. electric power facilities. We find that the upper bound of FO water treatment capacity using low-grade heat sources at electric power facilities exceeds process water treatment demand for boiler water make-up and flue gas desulfurization wastewater systems.

  9. The composition, heating value and renewable share of the energy content of mixed municipal solid waste in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horttanainen, M., E-mail: mika.horttanainen@lut.fi; Teirasvuo, N.; Kapustina, V.; Hupponen, M.; Luoranen, M.

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • New experimental data of mixed MSW properties in a Finnish case region. • The share of renewable energy of mixed MSW. • The results were compared with earlier international studies. • The average share of renewable energy was 30% and the average LHVar 19 MJ/kg. • Well operating source separation decreases the renewable energy content of MSW. - Abstract: For the estimation of greenhouse gas emissions from waste incineration it is essential to know the share of the renewable energy content of the combusted waste. The composition and heating value information is generally available, but the renewable energy share or heating values of different fractions of waste have rarely been determined. In this study, data from Finnish studies concerning the composition and energy content of mixed MSW were collected, new experimental data on the compositions, heating values and renewable share of energy were presented and the results were compared to the estimations concluded from earlier international studies. In the town of Lappeenranta in south-eastern Finland, the share of renewable energy ranged between 25% and 34% in the energy content tests implemented for two sample trucks. The heating values of the waste and fractions of plastic waste were high in the samples compared to the earlier studies in Finland. These high values were caused by good source separation and led to a low share of renewable energy content in the waste. The results showed that in mixed municipal solid waste the renewable share of the energy content can be significantly lower than the general assumptions (50–60%) when the source separation of organic waste, paper and cardboard is carried out successfully. The number of samples was however small for making extensive conclusions on the results concerning the heating values and renewable share of energy and additional research is needed for this purpose.

  10. Enhancing the Figure-of-Merit in Half-Heuslers for Vehicle Waste Heat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard

  11. Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1982-31 January 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, W.E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

  12. Waste Heat Doesn't Have to be a Waste of Money- The American & Efird Heat Recovery Project: A First for the Textile Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, S. W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 American & Efird, Inc., decided to upgrade their heat recovery system at its Dyeing & Finishing Plant in Mt. Holly, North Carolina. They chose an electric industrial process heat pump to enhance heat recovery and to lower operating costs...

  13. Heat engine and electric motor torque distribution strategy for a hybrid electric vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boberg, Evan S. (Hazel Park, MI); Gebby, Brian P. (Hazel Park, MI)

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for controlling a power train system for a hybrid electric vehicle. The method includes a torque distribution strategy for controlling the engine and the electric motor. The engine and motor commands are determined based upon the accelerator position, the battery state of charge and the amount of engine and motor torque available. The amount of torque requested for the engine is restricted by a limited rate of rise in order to reduce the emissions from the engine. The limited engine torque is supplemented by motor torque in order to meet a torque request determined based upon the accelerator position.

  14. Two component absorption/phase separation chemical heat pump to provide temperature amplification to waste heat streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.C.; Kaplan, S.I.

    1987-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical heat pump that utilizes liquid/liquid phase separation rather than evaporation to separate two components in a heat of mixing chemical heat pump process. 3 figs.

  15. Zhang, K., and H.C. Frey, "Road Grade Estimation for On-Road Vehicle Emissions Modeling Using LIDAR Data," Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the Air & Waste Management Association, June 20-23, 2005, Minneapolis, MN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    is defined as the instantaneous power per unit mass of the vehicle and can be calculated based upon speed Data," Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the Air & Waste Management Association, June 20-23, 2005 and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC 27695 ABSTRACT Vehicle Specific Power (VSP) can be used

  16. German Company Offers to Transform Sofia Waste to Energy The German company AlphaKat has filed a bid at Sofia municipality to construct an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    and might be used for vehicles and heating. AlphaKat explained that under that technology 1liter of diesel of the offered technology include the fact that there would be no need for waste depots and baling systems

  17. Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transpired solar collector was installed on NREL's Waste handling Facility (WHF) in 1990 to preheat ventilation air. The electrically heated WHF was an ideal candidate for the this technology - requiring a ventilation rate of 3,000 cubic feet per meter to maintain safe indoor conditions.

  18. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chillers that use waste heat for cooling (see also Stadlerfired natural gas chillers, waste heat or solar heat; •with HX can utilize waste heat for heating or cooling

  19. Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  20. Thermoelectric generators incorporating phase-change materials for waste heat recovery from engine exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meisner, Gregory P; Yang, Jihui

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectric devices, intended for placement in the exhaust of a hydrocarbon fuelled combustion device and particularly suited for use in the exhaust gas stream of an internal combustion engine propelling a vehicle, are described. Exhaust gas passing through the device is in thermal communication with one side of a thermoelectric module while the other side of the thermoelectric module is in thermal communication with a lower temperature environment. The heat extracted from the exhaust gasses is converted to electrical energy by the thermoelectric module. The performance of the generator is enhanced by thermally coupling the hot and cold junctions of the thermoelectric modules to phase-change materials which transform at a temperature compatible with the preferred operating temperatures of the thermoelectric modules. In a second embodiment, a plurality of thermoelectric modules, each with a preferred operating temperature and each with a uniquely-matched phase-change material may be used to compensate for the progressive lowering of the exhaust gas temperature as it traverses the length of the exhaust pipe.

  1. BUOYANCY FLOW IN FRACTURES INTERSECTING A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    discharge •side. As the wastes heat up the rock formationLBL—11112 "Heat Transfer to Nuclear Waste Disposal", ASMEv INTRODUCTION Heat released from a nuclear waste repository

  2. Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lived medium level waste (MLW), heat producing vitri- fiedpackage spacing, and waste package heat output, will resultdisposal gallery for heat-emitting waste and to quantify the

  3. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat ingeothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat inthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

  4. Comparative Performance Analysis of IADR Operating in Natural Gas-Fired and Waste-Heat CHP Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Sand, James R [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel utilization can be dramatically improved through effective recycle of 'waste' heat produced as a by-product of on-site or near-site power generation technologies. Development of modular compact cooling, heating, and power (CHP) systems for end-use applications in commercial and institutional buildings is a key part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy policy. To effectively use the thermal energy from a wide variety of sources which is normally discarded to the ambient, many components such as heat exchangers, boilers, absorption chillers, and desiccant dehumidification systems must be further developed. Recently a compact, cost-effective, and energy-efficient integrated active-desiccant vapor-compression hybrid rooftop (IADR) unit has been introduced in the market. It combines the advantages of an advanced direct-expansion cooling system with the dehumidification capability of an active desiccant wheel. The aim of this study is to compare the efficiency of the IADR operation in baseline mode, when desiccant wheel regeneration is driven by a natural gas burner, and in CHP mode, when the waste heat recovered from microturbine exhaust gas is used for desiccant regeneration. Comparative analysis shows an excellent potential for more efficient use of the desiccant dehumidification as part of a CHP system and the importance of proper sizing of the CHP components. The most crucial factor in exploiting the efficiency of this application is the maximum use of thermal energy recovered for heating of regeneration air.

  5. The Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source for Proliferation-Resistant Low-Waste Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N; Carelli, M; Conway, L; Dzodzo, M; Greenspan, E; Hossain, Q; Saphier, D; Shimada, H; Sienicki, J; Wade, D

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) is a small innovative reactor suitable for use in developing countries. The reference design is a SOMWe lead-bismuth eutectic (Pb-Bi) cooled fast reactor. It is designed so that the fuel is installed and sealed into the reactor module at the factory. The nuclear controls, a major portion of the instrumentation and the Pb-Bi covering the core are also installed at the factory. At the site of operations the reactor module is inserted into a pool of Pb-Bi that contains the steam generators. Major components, such as the pool vessel and steam generators, are permanent and remain in place while the reactor module is replaced every 15 years. At the end of life the sealed reactor module is removed and returned to an internationally controlled recycling center. Thus, the ENHS provides a unique capability for ensuring the security of the nuclear fuel throughout its life. The design also can minimize the user country investment in nuclear technology and staff. Following operation and return of the module to the recycling facility, the useable components, including the fuel, are refurbished and available for reuse. A fuel cycle compatible with this approach has been identified that reduces the amount of nuclear waste.

  6. Estimation of residual MSW heating value as a function of waste component recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling of packaging wastes may be compatible with incineration within integrated waste management systems. To study this, a mathematical model is presented to calculate the fraction composition of residual municipal solid waste (MSW) only as a function of the MSW fraction composition at source and recycling fractions of the different waste materials. The application of the model to the Lisbon region yielded results showing that the residual waste fraction composition depends both on the packaging wastes fraction at source and on the ratio between that fraction and the fraction of the same material, packaging and non-packaging, at source. This behaviour determines the variation of the residual waste LHV. For 100% of paper packaging recycling, LHV reduces 4.2% whereas this reduction is of 14.4% for 100% of packaging plastics recycling. For 100% of food waste recovery, LHV increases 36.8% due to the moisture fraction reduction of the residual waste. Additionally the results evidence that the negative impact of recycling paper and plastic packaging on the LHV may be compensated by recycling food waste and glass and metal packaging. This makes packaging materials recycling and food waste recovery compatible strategies with incineration within integrated waste management systems.

  7. Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High-Power High-efficiency Waste Heat Recovery for Electricity Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large-dimension, high-ZT BiTe and Pb-based nanocomposites produced with a low-cost scalable process were used for development and testing of TE module prototypes, and demonstration of a waste heat recovery system

  8. Combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis of cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agu, R.C.; Amadife, A.E.; Ude, C.M.; Onyia, A.; Ogu, E.O. [Enugu State Univ. of Science and Technology (Nigeria). Faculty of Applied Natural Sciences] [Enugu State Univ. of Science and Technology (Nigeria). Faculty of Applied Natural Sciences; Okafor, M.; Ezejiofor, E. [Nnamdi Azikiwe Univ., Awka (Nigeria). Dept. of Applied Microbiology] [Nnamdi Azikiwe Univ., Awka (Nigeria). Dept. of Applied Microbiology

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of combined heat treatment and acid hydrolysis (various concentrations) on cassava grate waste (CGW) biomass for ethanol production was investigated. At high concentrations of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (1--5 M), hydrolysis of the CGW biomass was achieved but with excessive charring or dehydration reaction. At lower acid concentrations, hydrolysis of CGW biomass was also achieved with 0.3--0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, while partial hydrolysis was obtained below 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (the lowest acid concentration that hydrolyzed CGW biomass) at 120 C and 1 atm pressure for 30 min. A 60% process efficiency was achieved with 0.3 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in hydrolyzing the cellulose and lignin materials present in the CGW biomass. High acid concentration is therefore not required for CGW biomass hydrolysis. The low acid concentration required for CGW biomass hydrolysis, as well as the minimal cost required for detoxification of CGW biomass because of low hydrogen cyanide content of CGW biomass would seem to make this process very economical. From three liters of the CGW biomass hydrolysate obtained from hydrolysis with 0.3M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, ethanol yield was 3.5 (v/v%) after yeast fermentation. However, although the process resulted in gainful utilization of CGW biomass, additional costs would be required to effectively dispose new by-products generated from CGW biomass processing.

  9. Using Waste Heat for External Processes; Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Energy Tips - Process Heating Tip Sheet #10 (Fact Sheet).

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUE 08:59 FAXFact SheetConditionsOwnersUsing10 *

  10. Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery, turbocharging or turbo-compounding, and exhaust aftertreatment.

  11. Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-ef?ciency direct conversion of heat to electricalreports on direct thermal to electrical energy conversion by

  12. The changing character of household waste in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 as a function of home heating methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doležalová, Markéta, E-mail: mdolezalova@email.cz [Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Benatska 2, 128 01 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Benešová, Libuše [Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Benatska 2, 128 01 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Závodská, Anita [School of Adult and Continuing Education, Barry University, 8001 SW 36th Street, Suite #1, Davie, FL 33328 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The character of household waste in the three different types of households were assesed. • The quantity, density and composition of household waste were determined. • The physicochemical characteristics were determined. • The changing character of household waste during past 10 years was described. • The potential of energy recovery of household waste in Czech republic was assesed. - Abstract: The authors of this paper report on the changing character of household waste, in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 in households differentiated by their heating methods. The data presented are the result of two projects, financed by the Czech Ministry of Environment, which were undertaken during this time period with the aim of focusing on the waste characterisation and complete analysis of the physicochemical properties of the household waste. In the Czech Republic, the composition of household waste varies significantly between different types of households based on the methods of home heating employed. For the purposes of these studies, the types of homes were divided into three categories – urban, mixed and rural. Some of the biggest differences were found in the quantities of certain subsample categories, especially fine residue (matter smaller than 20 mm), between urban households with central heating and rural households that primarily employ solid fuel such coal or wood. The use of these solid fuels increases the fraction of the finer categories because of the higher presence of ash. Heating values of the residual household waste from the three categories varied very significantly, ranging from 6.8 MJ/kg to 14.2 MJ/kg in 1999 and from 6.8 MJ/kg to 10.5 MJ/kg in 2009 depending on the type of household and season. The same factors affect moisture of residual household waste which varied from 23.2% to 33.3%. The chemical parameters also varied significantly, especially in the quantities of Tl, As, Cr, Zn, Fe and Mn, which were higher in rural households. Because knowledge about the properties of household waste, as well as its physicochemical characteristics, is very important not only for future waste management, but also for the prediction of the behaviour and influence of the waste on the environment as the country continues to streamline its legislation to the European Union’s solid waste mandates, the results of these studies were employed by the Czech Ministry of Environment to optimise the national waste management strategy.

  13. Oxidation/corrosion of metallic and ceramic materials in an aluminum remelt furnace. [For fluidized bed waste heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federer, J.I.; Jones, P.J.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both metallic alloys and ceramic materials are candidates for the distributor plate and other components of fluidized bed waste heat recovery (FBWHR) systems. Eleven Fe-, Ni-, and Co-base alloys were exposed to air at elevated temperatures in laboratory furnaces and to flue gases in an aluminum remelt furnace to assess their resistance to oxidation and corrosion. Four SiC ceramics and two oxide ceramics were also tested in the aluminum remelt furnace. Some alloys were coated with aluminum or SiO2 by commercial processes in an effort to enhance their oxidation and corrosion resistance.

  14. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    duty fuel cell vehicles using gasoline, methanol, ethanol,fuel-cell vehicle with a proton-exchange membrane (PEM) and methanolmethanol), fuel feedstocks (e.g. , coal), and vehicle types (e.g. , fuel-cell vehicle).

  15. Determination of temperature-dependent heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cold cap is a layer of reacting glass batch floating on the surface of melt in an all-electric continuous glass melter. The heat needed for the conversion of the melter feed to molten glass must be transferred to and through the cold cap. Since the heat flux into the cold cap determines the rate of melting, the heat conductivity is a key property of the reacting feed. We designed an experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples that monitors the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible is heated at a constant rate. Then we used two methods to calculate the heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the reacting feed: the approximation of the temperature field by polynomial functions and the finite-volume method coupled with least-squares analysis. Up to 680°C, the heat conductivity of the reacting melter feed was represented by a linear function of temperature.

  16. Industrial heat pumps in Germany -potentials, technological development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    jet nozzle Closed Cycles: Absorption/Adsorption heat pump thermal compressor driven by waste heat, waste heat, waste water/air (heat recovery) Refrigerant R134a, R407C, R410A, R717 Heating capacity [k

  17. The Beckett System Recovery and Utilization of Low Grade Waste Heat From Flue Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, W. R.; DeBiase, J. F.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . During low demand periods, the unit is gas-fired and produces 150 psi steam at high efficiency. In the fall, the heat exchanger is converted to accept flue gas from the large original water tube boilers. The flue gas heats water, which preheats make...

  18. Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2(53:35:12). And for an H2O2 distillation process, the two promising fluids are Trifluoroethanol (TFE) + Triethylene Glycol Dimethyl ether (DMETEG) and Ammonia+ Water. Thermo-physical properties calculated by Aspen+ are reasonably accurate. Documentation of the installation of pilot-plants or full commercial units were not found in the literature for validating thermo-physical properties in an operating unit. Therefore, it is essential to install a pilot-scale unit to verify thermo-physical properties of working fluid pairs and validate the overall efficiency of the thermal heat pump at temperatures typical of distillation processes. For an HO2 process, the ammonia-water heat pump system is more compact and preferable than the TFE-DMETEG heat pump. The ammonia-water heat pump is therefore recommended for the H2O2 process. Based on the complex nature of the heat recovery system, we anticipated that capital costs could make investments financially unattractive where steam costs are low, especially where co-generation is involved. We believe that the enhanced heat transfer equipment has the potential to significantly improve the performance of TEE crystallizers, independent of the absorption heat-pump recovery system. Where steam costs are high, more detailed design/cost engineering will be required to verify the economic viability of the technology. Due to the long payback period estimated for the TEE open system, further studies on the TEE system are not warranted unless there are significant future improvements to heat pump technology. For the H2O2 distillation cycle heat pump waste heat recovery system, there were no significant process constraints and the estimated 5 years payback period is encouraging. We therefore recommend further developments of application of the thermal heat pump in the H2O2 distillation process with the focus on the technical and economic viability of heat exchangers equipped with the state-of-the-art enhancements. This will require additional funding for a prototype unit to validate enhanced thermal performances of heat transfer equipment, evaluat

  19. Design of organic Rankine cycles for conversion of waste heat in a polygeneration plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiGenova, Kevin (Kevin J.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic Rankine cycles provide an alternative to traditional steam Rankine cycles for the conversion of low grade heat sources, where steam cycles are known to be less efficient and more expensive. This work examines organic ...

  20. GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

  1. Ultramizer®: Waste Heat Recovery System for Commercial and Industrial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and BatteryUS-EU-JapanCatalysts | DepartmentBoilers | Department

  2. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,Department of Energythe Use of7Powered Vehicle |

  3. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,Department of Energythe Use of7Powered Vehicle

  4. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,Department of Energythe UsePowered Vehicle |

  5. temperature heat pumps applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    losses (waste heat) 250-300°C......1100°C ~ 100 TWh/year Low temperature thermal losses (waste heat) 25°C;Waste heat recovery (1) In a decreasing energetic interest order Achema 2012 Frankfurt June 21th 2012>>Twaste #12;Waste heat recovery (2) Achema 2012 Frankfurt June 21th 2012 There is no interesting thermal

  6. Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Presentation from the U.S....

  7. Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and reuse this energy. As shown in Table E-1, non-CO2 GHG emissions from U.S. industry were identified as having 2180 peta joules (PJ) or 2 Quads (quadrillion Btu) of residual chemical fuel value. Since landfills are not traditionally considered industrial organizations, the industry component of these emissions had a value of 1480 PJ or 1.4 Quads. This represents approximately 4.3% of the total energy used in the United States Industry.

  8. Final Report: Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen; Jalal Zia

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research and development (R&D) project exemplifies a shared public private commitment to advance the development of energy efficient industrial technologies that will reduce the U.S. dependence upon foreign oil, provide energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a Direct Evaporator for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for the conversion of waste heat from gas turbine exhaust to electricity. In conventional ORCs, the heat from the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to a hydrocarbon based working fluid by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. The Direct Evaporator accomplishes preheating, evaporation and superheating of the working fluid by a heat exchanger placed within the exhaust gas stream. Direct Evaporation is simpler and up to 15% less expensive than conventional ORCs, since the secondary oil loop and associated equipment can be eliminated. However, in the past, Direct Evaporation has been avoided due to technical challenges imposed by decomposition and flammability of the working fluid. The purpose of this project was to retire key risks and overcome the technical barriers to implementing an ORC with Direct Evaporation. R&D was conducted through a partnership between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and General Electric (GE) Global Research Center (GRC). The project consisted of four research tasks: (1) Detailed Design & Modeling of the ORC Direct Evaporator, (2) Design and Construction of Partial Prototype Direct Evaporator Test Facility, (3) Working Fluid Decomposition Chemical Analyses, and (4) Prototype Evaluation. Issues pertinent to the selection of an ORC working fluid, along with thermodynamic and design considerations of the direct evaporator, were identified. The FMEA (Failure modes and effects analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability analysis) safety studies performed to mitigate risks are described, followed by a discussion of the flammability analysis of the direct evaporator. A testbed was constructed and the prototype demonstrated at the GE GRC Niskayuna facility.

  9. Transport Properties, Thermal Response, and Mechanical Reliability of Thermoelectric Materials and Devices for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  10. Energy Recovery from Solid Waste for Small Cities - Has the Time Really Come?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winn, W. T., Jr.; Paxton, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to consider energy recovery from solid waste using modular, two stage incinerations with waste heat recovery....

  11. Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Hot Topics Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change Green Building Hydraulic Fracturing Nuclear to global warming. The UKgovernment has just announced it is investing $1 billion in their development Green Living Industry Regulation Remediation Research and Technology Sustainability Waste Water Products

  12. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector...

  13. ASSESSMENT OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEM "PREMIUM POWER" APPLICATIONS IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norwood, Zack

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    standpoint. Secondly, waste heat driven thermal coolingin the summer, when waste heat could be used for cooling,

  14. Integrated use of solar panels and a waste heat scavenger. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarrell, J.H.; Miller, B.R.; Smathers, W.M. Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project were to: (1) install energy measurement devices on commercially available solar collectors and a heat scavenger attached to the dairy refrigeration system; and (2) make the results of the demonstration available to other dairy farmers. The objectives have been accomplished. Measurement devices have been installed and are currently establishing a data base on system performance. A demonstration for dairy farmers was sponsored by the Agricultural Economics Department and the Agricultural Engineering Extension Department of the University of Georgia. The demonstration and associated program was held in November of 1980 at Monroe, Georgia which is near the demonstration dairy. A tour of the dairy followed presentation of energy related topics. About 60 farmers attended this program. A copy of the program and a summary of experience with the system are attached.

  15. Engineered Osmosis for Energy Efficient Separations: Optimizing Waste Heat Utilization FINAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT DOE F 241.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NATHAN HANCOCK

    2013-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to design (i) a stripper system where heat is used to strip ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from a diluted draw solution; and (ii) a condensation or absorption system where the stripped NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} are captured in condensed water to form a re-concentrated draw solution. This study supports the Industrial Technologies Program of the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and their Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge award solicitation. Results from this study show that stimulated Oasys draw solutions composed of a complex electrolyte solution associated with the dissolution of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} gas in water can successfully be stripped and fully condensed under standard atmospheric pressure. Stripper bottoms NH{sub 3} concentration can reliably be reduced to < 1 mg/L, even when starting with liquids that have an NH{sub 3} mass fraction exceeding 6% to stimulate diluted draw solution from the forward osmosis membrane component of the process. Concentrated draw solution produced by fully condensing the stripper tops was show to exceed 6 M-C with nitrogen-to-carbon (N:C) molar ratios on the order of two. Reducing the operating pressure of the stripper column serves to reduce the partial vapor pressure of both NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} in solution and enables lower temperature operation towards integration of industrial low-grade of waste heat. Effective stripping of solutes was observed with operating pressures as low as 100 mbar (3-inHg). Systems operating at reduced pressure and temperature require additional design considerations to fully condense and absorb these constituents for reuse within the Oasys EO system context. Comparing empirical data with process stimulation models confirmed that several key parameters related to vapor-liquid equilibrium and intrinsic material properties were not accurate. Additional experiments and refinement of material property databases within the chosen process stimulation software was required to improve the reliability of process simulations for engineering design support. Data from experiments was also employed to calculate critical mass transfer and system design parameters (such as the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP)) to aid in process design. When measured in a less than optimal design state for the stripping of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from a simulated dilute draw solution the HETP for one type of commercial stripper packing material was 1.88 ft/stage. During this study it was observed that the heat duty required to vaporize the draw solution solutes is substantially affected by the amount of water boilup also produced to achieve a low NH{sub 3} stripper bottoms concentration specification. Additionally, fluid loading of the stripper packing media is a critical performance parameter that affects all facets of optimum stripper column performance. Condensation of the draw solution tops vapor requires additional process considerations if being conducted in sub-atmospheric conditions and low temperature. Future work will focus on the commercialization of the Oasys EO technology platform for numerous applications in water and wastewater treatment as well as harvesting low enthalpy energy with our proprietary osmotic heat engine. Engineering design related to thermal integration of Oasys EO technology for both low and hig-grade heat applications is underway. Novel thermal recovery processes are also being investigated in addition to the conventional approaches described in this report. Oasys Water plans to deploy commercial scale systems into the energy and zero liquid discharge markets in 2013. Additional process refinement will lead to integration of low enthalpy renewable heat sources for municipal desalination applications.

  16. Comparative Assessment of Status and Opportunities for CO2 Capture and Storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuel in terms of waste volume, heat load, and radiotoxicity,heat-induced flow perturbations expected from emplacement of waste.

  17. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hui-Hai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sorption including waste heat, hyperalkaline solutions frome.g. , heat production from the decay of the waste, re-waste packages along the tunnels, to achieve a distributed heat

  18. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mara, Leo M. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are improvments to a rapid road repair vehicle comprising an improved cleaning device arrangement, two dispensing arrays for filling defects more rapidly and efficiently, an array of pre-heaters to heat the road way surface in order to help the repair material better bond to the repaired surface, a means for detecting, measuring, and computing the number, location and volume of each of the detected surface imperfection, and a computer means schema for controlling the operation of the plurality of vehicle subsystems. The improved vehicle is, therefore, better able to perform its intended function of filling surface imperfections while moving over those surfaces at near normal traffic speeds.

  19. Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaven, S.J. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region`s existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs.

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF WORKSHOP ON THERMOMECHANICAL-HYDROCHEMICAL MODELING FOR A HARDROCK WASTE REPOSITORY. JULY 29-31, 1980. MARRIOTT INN, BERKELEY, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    repository to the emplaced waste heat source. Identificationformation, Some nuclear wastes are heat generat- ing waste;2D, IFD, waste isolation flow-heat, 2D, FE, waste isolation

  1. Automotive Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Conversion to Electricity Automotive Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Conversion to Electricity Working...

  2. Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications Model...

  3. Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications...

  4. absorption heat pumps: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heating capacity k jet nozzle Closed Cycles: AbsorptionAdsorption heat pump thermal compressor driven by waste heat1 Industrial heat pumps in Germany - potentials,...

  5. absorption heat pump: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heating capacity k jet nozzle Closed Cycles: AbsorptionAdsorption heat pump thermal compressor driven by waste heat1 Industrial heat pumps in Germany - potentials,...

  6. HEAT TRANSFER IN UNDERGROUND HEATING EXPERIMENTS IN GRANITE, STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Session on Heat Transfer in Nuclear Waste Disposal, C'.heat transfer processes associated with underground nuclear wasteheat transfer and related processes in an un­ derground environment similar to that expected in a mined nuclear waste

  7. Effects of heat treatment and formulation on the phase composition and chemical durability of the EBR-ll ceramic waste form.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, W. E.; Dietz, N. L.; Janney, D. E.

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level radioactive waste salts generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II will be immobilized in a ceramic waste form (CWF). Tests are being conducted to evaluate the suitability of the CWF for disposal in the planned federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. In this report, the results of laboratory tests and analyses conducted to address product consistency and thermal stability issues called out in waste acceptance requirements are presented. The tests measure the impacts of (1) variations in the amounts of salt and binder glass used to make the CWF and (2) heat treatments on the phase composition and chemical durability of the waste form. A series of CWF materials was made to span the ranges of salt and glass contents that could be used during processing: between 5.0 and 15 mass% salt loaded into the zeolite (the nominal salt loading is 10.7%, and the process control range is 10.6 to 11.2 mass%), and between 20 and 30 mass% binder glass mixed with the salt-loaded zeolite (the nominal glass content is 25% and the process control range is 20 to 30 mass%). In another series of tests, samples of two CWF products made with the nominal salt and glass contents were reheated to measure the impact on the phase composition and durability: long-term heat treatments were conducted at 400 and 500 C for durations of 1 week, 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year; short-term heat treatments were conducted at 600, 700, 800, and 850 C for durations of 4, 28, 52, and 100 hours. All of the CWF products that were made with different amounts of salt, zeolite, and glass and all of the heat-treated CWF samples were analyzed with powder X-ray diffraction to measure changes in phase compositions and subjected to 7-day product consistency tests to measure changes in the chemical durability. The salt loading had the greatest impact on phase composition and durability. A relatively large amount of nepheline, Na{sub 4}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 4}, was formed in the material made with 5.0 mass% salt loading, which was also the least durable of the materials that were tested. Nepheline was not detected in materials made with salt-loaded zeolites containing 15 or 20 mass% salt. Conversely, halite was not detected with XRD in materials made with 5.0 or 7.5 mass% salt loading, but similar amounts of halite were measured in the other CWF materials. The sodalite contents of all materials were similar. The halite content in the CWF source material used in the short-term heat-treatment study, which had the nominal salt and binder glass loadings, was determined to be about 1.3 mass% by standard addition analysis. Heat treatment had only a small effect on the phase composition: the amount of halite increased to as much as 3.7 mass%, and trace amounts of nepheline were detected in samples treated at 800 and 850 C. The CWF samples treated at high temperatures had lower amounts of halite detected in the rapid water-soluble test. The releases of B, Na, and Si in the product consistency tests (PCTs) were not sensitive to the heat-treatment conditions. The PCT responses of all salt-loaded and heat-treated CWF materials were well below that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass.

  8. Waste IncIneratIon and Waste PreventIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and heat. In 2005/2006, German waste incineration plants provided some 6 terawatt hours (TWh-/Abfallgesetz) continues to hold: Waste prevention has priority over recovery and disposal. Nevertheless, the use of waste for en- ergy recovery is an indispensable element of sus- tainable waste management. Waste incineration

  9. Heat Pump for High School Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, K.; Wang, H.; Zhou, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat pump system used for recycling and reusing waste heat in s high school bathroom was minutely analyzed in its coefficient of performance, onetime utilization ratio of energy, economic property and so on. The results showed that this system...

  10. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    instrumented tubes, are ;i 0 W Q. presented in Figures 5, 6, and 7. Figure 5 shows 2 w .. -100 the response of the tube to header weld joint which .. ~ TIC 89- TIC 93 w ?200 Q results from the thermal isolation design. Note the SHEll INLET TEMPERATURE... low thermal gradient across the weld joints, thermo DECREASES TO AMBIENT ?300 couples 65 and 81 and thermocouples 82 and 90. How -400 0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 TIME (MINUTES) ever, the tube which was directly welded to the hot header had a much higher...

  11. Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT

  12. Design Considerations for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bywaters, R. P.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recovery design considerations as well as a summary of typical "waste heat" sources and application sites. A procedure for conducting industrial waste heat surveys is presented. Thermodynamic and heat transfer factors are discussed. Problems associated...

  13. Design Considerations for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bywaters, R. P.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recovery design considerations as well as a summary of typical "waste heat" sources and application sites. A procedure for conducting industrial waste heat surveys is presented. Thermodynamic and heat transfer factors are discussed. Problems associated...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle...

  15. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willigan, Rhonda

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objectives of Phase I were: (a) carry out cost, performance and system level models, (b) quantify the cost benefits of cathodic arc and heterogeneous nanocomposites over sputtered material, (c) evaluate the expected power output of the proposed thermoelectric materials and predict the efficiency and power output of an integrated TE module, (d) define market acceptance criteria by engaging Caterpillar's truck OEMs, potential customers and dealers and identify high-level criteria for a waste heat thermoelectric generator (TEG), (e) identify potential TEG concepts, and (f) establish cost/kWatt targets as well as a breakdown of subsystem component cost targets for the commercially viable TEG.

  16. Armored Vehicle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is focused on designing a new generation of CAD tools that could help a ”hybrid vehicle” designer with the design process to come up with better vehicle configurations. The conventional design process for any type of hybrid...

  17. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Observation of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Facility Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems Hazards Analysis Activities...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: In-Situ Investigation of Microstructural Evolution During Solidification and Heat Treatment in a Die-Cast Magnesium Alloy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about in-situ...

  19. Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, Harris R.; Blink, James A.; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Ross, Amber D. [University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of transient heat transfer analytical solutions for a finite line source, a series of point sources, and a series of parallel infinite line sources were combined with a quasi-steady-state multi-layered cylindrical solution to simulate the temperature response of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository with multi-layered natural and engineered barriers. This evaluation was performed to provide information to scientists and decision makers to compare candidate geologic media for a repository (crystalline rock [granite], clay, salt, and deep borehole), and to provide input for the future evaluation of the trade-off between pre-emplacement surface storage time, waste package size, and repository footprint. This approach was selected in favor of the finite element solution typically used to analyze the temperature response because it allowed rapid comparison of a large number of alternative disposal options and design configurations. More than 100 combinations of waste form, geologic environment, repository design configuration, and surface storage times were analyzed and compared. The analytical solution approach used to analyze the repository temperature response allowed rapid comparison of a large number of alternative disposal options and design configurations. More than 100 combinations of waste form, geologic environment, repository design configuration, and surface storage times were analyzed and compared. This approach allowed investigation of the sensitivity of the results to combinations of parameters that show that there is much flexibility to be gained in terms of spent fuel management options by varying a few key parameters. This initial analysis used representative design concepts and thermal constraints based on international design concepts, and it also included waste forms representing future fuel cycles with high burnup fuels. Unlike repository designs with large open tunnels and pre-closure ventilation, all of the disposal concepts analyzed in this study used enclosed emplacement modes, where the waste packages were in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. The deep borehole repository concept limits the size of the SNF waste packages and may require rod consolidation to fit within the drill casing diameter. A single assembly waste package, assuming rod consolidation, was evaluated in the current analysis. Similar size restrictions apply for the HLW canisters. At this time no thermal constraints have been defined for the deep borehole repository concept. Representative EBS materials and properties were evaluated. However, changes in EBS design concepts and materials can also have significant effects on the maximum waste package surface temperature. Increased thermal conductivity of the buffer layer can be achieved by using an engineered buffer consisting of a mixture of graphite, sand, and bentonite [14]. One of the advantages of the analytical model is that it highlights the sensitivity of the results to the parameters that define the repository layout, including spacing between axial and lateral neighboring waste packages and drifts. It is clear that repository layout adjustments can be made to reduce the calculated peak temperatures. The results also show that significant reductions in required surface storage times can be achieved if higher thermal constraints can be justified Additional studies are planned to evaluate the trade-offs between surface storage times, repository layout parameters, and variations in EBS design concepts. Model validation and uncertainties will also be addressed. It is expected that shorter surface storage times and more optimized repository design configurations may be achieved. (authors)

  20. THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    released by the buried wastes and heat remain­ ing in theOF 10-YEAR-OLD WASTES Waste Heat Source C h a r a c t e r ia t e r s e c t i o n s . WASTE HEAT SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION

  1. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chiller is supplied by waste heat from CHP units as well aswith HX can utilize waste heat for heating or cooling

  2. Thermoelectric generator for motor vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bass, John C. (6121 La Pintra Dr., La Jolla, CA 92037)

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric generator for producing electric power for a motor vehicle from the heat of the exhaust gasses produced by the engine of the motor vehicle. The exhaust gasses pass through a finned heat transfer support structure which has seat positions on its outside surface for the positioning of thermoelectric modules. A good contact cylinder provides a framework from which a spring force can be applied to the thermoelectric modules to hold them in good contact on their seats on the surface of the heat transfer support structure.

  3. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utilization, ICE: internal combustion engine with waste heatlifetime: 10 years internal combustion engine with heat

  4. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lifetime: 10 years internal combustion engine with heatutilization, ICE: internal combustion engine with waste heat

  5. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  6. BUOYANCY FLOW IN FRACTURES INTERSECTING A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11112 "Heat Transfer to Nuclear Waste Disposal", ASME WinterIN FPACTUHES INTERSECTING A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY J.S.Y.Heat released from a nuclear waste repository in a

  7. An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borglin, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variety of waste streams and released heat can be convertedmatter in wastes produces gas products with heat and fuelvarious types of waste. MSW has an average heat value of 8

  8. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  9. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Electric Vehicle Charging...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Charging Equipment (EVSE) Testing Data Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Electric Vehicle Charging Equipment (EVSE) Testing Data Electric vehicle chargers (otherwise known as...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis...

  12. Commercial Vehicle Classification using Vehicle Signature Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hang; Jeng, Shin-Ting; Andre Tok, Yeow Chern; Ritchie, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traffic Measurement and Vehicle Classification with SingleG. Ritchie. Real-time Vehicle Classification using InductiveReijmers, J.J. , "On-line vehicle classification," Vehicular

  13. Woven heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  14. Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLEof EnergyPerformance

  15. Heat Supply Who What Where and -Why

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ................................................. 6 District-heating (DH) supply: key figures .............................. 6 What is biomass Geothermics ..........................................................................11 Waste for heat supplyHeat Supply in Denmark Who What Where and - Why #12;Title: Heat Supply in Denmark - Who What Where

  16. Waste Toolkit A-Z Food waste (recycling on-site)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    into compost in 14 days, when mixed with wood chippings (from your grounds/gardens). The waste is heated usingWaste Toolkit A-Z Food waste (recycling on-site) How can I recycle food waste on-site? Recycling food waste on-site is a new concept as the University typically has its waste collected and taken away

  17. A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate Heat Exchanger...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate Heat Exchanger for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery System A Thermoelectric Generator with an Intermediate Heat Exchanger for...

  18. Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norwood, Zack

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas generator with waste heat recovery at a facilityCCHP locations that are using waste heat for cooling alsouse some of the waste heat directly for water or space

  19. date 04/2009 Waste Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fibres #12;date 04/2009 Waste Incineration Plant at Munich North ­ Using Combined Heat and Power production of electrical power · 792,351 MWh production of heat for district heating · 238,000 t reductiondate 04/2009 Waste Management In The City Of Munich #12;date 04/2009 Waste Management Corporation

  20. Low-Cost Microchannel Heat Exchanger

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    process Produce prototype heat exchangers for electronics cooling and high pressure waste heat recovery power system applications Test integrity and confirm high...

  1. High vacuum indirectly-heated rotary kiln for the removal and recovery of mercury from air pollution control scrubber waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawk, G.G.; Aulbaugh, R.A. [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)] [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    SepraDyne corporation (Denton, TX, US) has conducted pilot-scale treatability studies of dewatered acid plant blowdown sludge generated by a copper smelter using its recently patented high temperature and high vacuum indirectly-heated rotary retort technology. This unique rotary kiln is capable of operating at internal temperatures up to 850 C with an internal pressure of 50 torr and eliminates the use of sweep gas to transport volatile substances out of the retort. By removing non-condensables such as oxygen and nitrogen at relatively low temperatures and coupling the process with a temperature ramp-up program and low temperature condensation, virtually all of the retort off-gases produced during processing can be condensed for recovery. The combination of rotation, heat and vacuum produce the ideal environment for the rapid volatilization of virtually all organic compounds, water and low-to-moderate boiling point metals such as arsenic, cadmium and mercury.

  2. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  3. Vitrification of waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wicks, G.G.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

  4. Thermoelectric Conversion of Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle Thermoelectric Conversion of Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle Presentation given at the 16th...

  5. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  6. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  7. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W.D.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendible appendages, each of which is radially extendible relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendible members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  8. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W.D.

    1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  9. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  10. A STUDY OF REGIONAL TEMPERATURE AND THERMOHYDROLOGICAL EFFECTS OF AN UNDERGROUND REPOSITORY FOR NUCLEAR WASTES IN HARD ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of heat generated by the stored nuclear wastes. Spent fuelmode of heat transfer from the nuclear waste to the rockdensity of heat generated by the stored nuclear wastes Fig.

  11. RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE IN MINED CAVERNS IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK-RESULTS OF FIELD INVESTIGATIONS AT STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the presence of heat-generating, radioactive wastes, and theBecause the heat output of radioactive waste decays withthe heat produced by the decay of radioactive wastes. Full-

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Tractor Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tractor Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office - AVTA: Hybrid-Electric Tractor Vehicles The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid and Vehicle Systems Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems Hybrid and vehicle systems research provides an overarching vehicle systems perspective to the...

  14. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy, geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wastedenergy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heatthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

  15. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  16. Autonomous vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyrowitz, A.L. [Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence, Washington, DC (United States)] [Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence, Washington, DC (United States); Blidberg, D.R. [Autonomous Undersea Systems Inst., Lee, NH (United States)] [Autonomous Undersea Systems Inst., Lee, NH (United States); Michelson, R.C. [Georgia Tech Research Inst., Smyrna, GA (United States)] [Georgia Tech Research Inst., Smyrna, GA (United States); [International Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems, Smyrna, GA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are various kinds of autonomous vehicles (AV`s) which can operate with varying levels of autonomy. This paper is concerned with underwater, ground, and aerial vehicles operating in a fully autonomous (nonteleoperated) mode. Further, this paper deals with AV`s as a special kind of device, rather than full-scale manned vehicles operating unmanned. The distinction is one in which the AV is likely to be designed for autonomous operation rather than being adapted for it as would be the case for manned vehicles. The authors provide a survey of the technological progress that has been made in AV`s, the current research issues and approaches that are continuing that progress, and the applications which motivate this work. It should be noted that issues of control are pervasive regardless of the kind of AV being considered, but that there are special considerations in the design and operation of AV`s depending on whether the focus is on vehicles underwater, on the ground, or in the air. The authors have separated the discussion into sections treating each of these categories.

  17. Why Blow Away Heat? Harvest Server's Heat Using Ther-moelectric Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    ABSTRACT This paper argues for harvesting energy from servers' wasted heat in data centers. Our approach. INTRODUCTION A data center consumes vast amount of electricity and produces enormous amount of wasted heat that needs to be removed by cooling facilities. This paper looks at wasted heat as opportunities for energy

  18. Heat Recovery from Coal Gasifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, H.; Lou, S. C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with heat recovery from pressurized entrained and fixed bed coal gasifiers for steam generation. High temperature waste heat, from slagging entrained flow coal gasifier, can be recovered effectively in a series of radiant...

  19. Challenges in Industrial Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafft, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will address several completed and working projects involving waste heat recovery in a chemical plant. Specific examples will be shown and some of the challenges to successful implementation and operation of heat recovery projects...

  20. Challenges in Industrial Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafft, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will address several completed and working projects involving waste heat recovery in a chemical plant. Specific examples will be shown and some of the challenges to successful implementation and operation of heat recovery projects...

  1. Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    applicable to manufacturing facilities in the chemical, food, pharma- ceutical, and refinery markets, which typically have effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD) and availability...

  2. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vehicles except the methanol/fuel cell vehicle and the BPEVe estimates for the methanol/fuel cell vehicle are based onbiomass-derived methanol used in fuel cell vehicles. Several

  3. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W. Donald (115 Newhaven Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

  4. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

  5. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W.D.

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 14 figs.

  6. Robotic vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Box, W.D.

    1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 11 figures.

  7. Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    form · Separate liquid from solid · Radionuclide · Separate all but H3/C14 #12;#12;Radioactive Waste;Radioactive Waste H3/C14 solids Type B (non-incinerable) metal glass hazardous materials #12;#12;Radioactive#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (AVTA) Data and Results The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports work to develop test procedures and carry out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies...

  9. Method and apparatus for conserving waste energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldifrawi, A.A.

    1981-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for conserving waste energy by transferring waste heat from an internal combustion engine, solar energy or from any other source of waste heat energy of a temperature of 200/sup 0/F or above, to a carrier liquid includes conveying the heated carrier liquid to a heat exchanger, pressurizing a refrigerant by heating the refrigerant with heat energy extracted from the heated carrier liquid and performing work with the pressurized refrigerant. The preferred embodiments include a modified Rankine-Sterling cycle engine and a dual absorption generator system.

  10. WASTE DISPOSAL IN GRANITE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, N.G.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the heat released by the radioactive decay of waste inwaste must increase, establishing a temperature gradient away from it to allowforthe dissipation of the heat

  11. UPGRADING OF WASTE-TO-ENERGY PLANT IN BRESCIA, ITALY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    and district heating, gas supply, waste collection, treatment and disposal, and wastewa- ter treatment. Brescia was one of the first cities to have a well-established district heating net- work. Today, the waste

  12. Vehicle Cooling Systems: Improvements to efficiently, safely, and inexpensively cool vehicles during prolonged sun exposure

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Vehicles left in sunny areas can quickly heat up to temperatures as high as 50-70 degrees C (122-158 degrees F) or even up to 121 degrees C (250 degrees F) in certain geographical areas. The windows and windshields of vehicles cause this greenhouse effect. Excess heat damages instrument panels (dash boards) and electronic equipment, causes passenger thermal discomfort, and increases fuel consumption and emissions with heavy air conditioning loads. Scientists at NREL have designed efficient,...

  13. Hydrogen Generation in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis Cells Using a Heat-Regenerated Salt Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , which can be regenerated using low-temperature waste heat, can also produce sufficient voltage technologies and waste heat making the MREC a useful method for hydrogen gas production from wastes

  14. Secretary Chu Announces $187 Million to Improve Vehicle Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    idling technologies, waste heat recovery to increase engine efficiency, advanced combustion techniques, and powertrain hybridization. The remaining six projects totaling more...

  15. Impact of Vehicle Efficiency Improvements on Powertrain Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    19M) Volvo Group Truck Technology High Efficiency Combustion - Waste Heat Recovery - Turbo-Compound - Downspeeding - ... Advanced Driver Aids Rolling Resistance Reduction...

  16. Industrial Heat Pumps--Types and Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, R. N.; Bliem, C. J.; Mills, J. I.; Demuth, O. J.; Plaster, D. S.

    workings. from the waste heat flowing toward the cooling The three categories are: (a) electrically driven, utility. In practice, achieving. this objective (b) prime heat driven, and (c) waste heat driven. requires both proper integration of' the heat... shown in Figure 2 still holds except that the low temperature or waste heat is split, with part, Qb, going to the heat pump to be boosted to a higher temperature and part, Qd, going to the driver to drive the heat pump. The COP is defined as: COP...

  17. DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Systems DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Vehicle Systems Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program research efforts 2009meritreview1.p...

  18. Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure), Vehicle Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure), Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure), Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) Describes...

  19. Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) (Fact Sheet) Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle...

  20. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Vehicle...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Vehicle Systems Simulation and Testing 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Vehicle Systems Simulation and Testing Vehicle systems research and development...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Vehicle and Systems Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing...

  2. GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATION OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATION OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEMS for Certification of Combined Heat and Power Systems Pursuant to the Waste Heat and Carbon Emissions Reduction Act Heat and Power System Pursuant to the Waste Heat and Carbon Emissions Reduction Act, Public Utilities

  3. arabidopsis small heat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wasted heat could be converted to useful power, it would Columbia University 369 Heat testing methodology comparison. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Pre-operative...

  4. From Heat to Electricity: How "nano" Saved Thermoelectrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    , reliable #12;Thermoelectric applications Waste heat recovery · Automobiles · Over the road trucks% of energy becomes waste heat, even a 10% capture and conversion to useful forms can have huge impact

  5. Dead heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oppenheimer, M.; Boyle, R.H.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the prospect of global warming. This paper proposes a workable solution, and a road map for getting there. The author explains how we became addicted to fossil fuels and evokes a bleak picture should this dependence continue. But the book also explores how industry can become a vehicle for solving, instead of precipitating, the global environmental crisis. The decoupling of energy from pollution can be accomplished without sacrificing prosperity by powering the economy with solar energy. Dead Heat takes us step by step to a greenhouse-friendly world fueled only by the sun.

  6. Department of Engineering Spring 2013 Project Name Boeing Team 1 Unmanned Ground Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Vehicle Overview Develop an autonomous, heat-seeking robotic rover, capable of detecting thermal targets as a scale model for a future, larger autonomous vehicle Proved proof of concept to sponsor of delivering

  7. CHP, Waste Heat & District Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cost Savings - Offset Utility3rd Party kWh's + Therms - Reduce Utility Demand Charges - Demand Response - Improved Power ReliabilityQuality * Emissions Reductions - In the same...

  8. Hybrid Heat Pump Design and Application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, J. R.; Koebberman, W. F.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hybrid Heat Pump (HHP) converts industrial waste heat into process steam. Waste heat at temperatures as low as approximately 200°F can be used. Steam output covers a range between 12,000 Ib/h and 50,000 Ib/h, depending on the application...

  9. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Office of River Protection review of the High Level Waste Facility heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. Independent Oversight Activity Report,...

  10. Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview and status of project to develop thermoelectric generator for automotive waste heat recovery and achieve at least 10% fuel economy improvement. deer08gundlach.pdf More...

  11. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles UCD-ITS-RR-92-14 September bycost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would becost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would be

  12. Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load Southern Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

  13. Ris DTU 09-06-08 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (focusing on Denmark) Long tradition for waste incineration for district heating · How to model waste that supply base-load district heating. #12;Risø DTU 09-06-08 13 Modelling new Waste for Energy Technologies-to-energy technologies in the Pan-European NEEDS- TIMES model Waste incineration for electricity and heat, landfill gas

  14. 1.12.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/24 8. Heat pumps, heat pipes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    of low-temperature (waste) heat, replacing sources of (unnecessarily) high temperature heat (and, 3) outside water heat and 4) heat from another indoor space, or 5) waste heat from a process1.12.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/24 8. Heat

  15. Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Accelerated Reliability Test Battery Electric Vehicle Fast Charge Test Battery Energy Storage Performance Test For DC Fast Charge Demand Reduction...

  16. Vehicle Modeling and Simulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Modeling and Simulation Vehicle Modeling and Simulation Matthew Thornton National Renewable Energy Laboratory matthewthornton@nrel.gov phone: 303.275.4273 Principal...

  17. Passive cooling system for a vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Thoensen, Thomas

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  18. Passive Cooling System for a Vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, T. J.; Thoensen, T.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  19. Applied heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapathy, V.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer principles are discussed with emphasis on the practical aspects of the problems. Correlations for heat transfer and pressure drop from several worldwide sources for flow inside and outside of tubes, including finned tubes are presented, along with design and performance calculations of heat exchangers economizers, air heaters, condensers, waste-heat boilers, fired heaters, superheaters, and boiler furnaces. Vibration analysis for tube bundles and heat exchangers are also discussed, as are estimating gas-mixture properties at atmospheric and elevated pressures and life-cycle costing techniques. (JMT)

  20. Load calculation and system evaluation for electric vehicle climate control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves-Saborio, S.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1993-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Providing air conditioning for electric vehicles (EVs) represents an important challenge, because vapor compression air conditioners, which are common in gasoline powered vehicles, may consume a substantial part of the total energy stored in the EV battery. This report consists of two major parts. The first part is a cooling and heating load calculation for electric vehicles. The second part is an evaluation of several systems that can be used to provide the desired cooling and heating in EVs. Four cases are studied. Short range and full range EVs are each analyzed twice, first with the regular vehicle equipment, and then with a fan and heat reflecting windows, to reduce hot soak. Recent legislation has allowed the use of combustion heating whenever the ambient temperature drops below 5{degrees}C. This has simplified the problem of heating, and made cooling the most important problem. Therefore, systems described in this project are designed for cooling, and their applicability to heating at temperatures above 5{degrees}C is described. If the air conditioner systems cannot be used to cover the whole heating load at 5{degrees}C, then the vehicle requires a complementary heating system (most likely a heat recovery system or electric resistance heating). Air conditioners are ranked according to their overall weight. The overall weight is calculated by adding the system weight and the weight of the battery necessary to provide energy for system operation.

  1. Enhanced surfaces lead to increased heat transfer and power density.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electric vehicles (HEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) to con- vert DC battery power into a form that can IHTC-14, Washington, DC, USA. Moreno, G., 2010,"Characterization and Development of Advanced Heat

  2. Industrial and Commercial Heat Pump Applications in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niess, R. C.

    compression cycle. Using readily available fluorocarbon refrigerants as the heat pump working fluid, this cycle is commonly used because of its wide application opportunities. Compressed Vapors Heat Pump Compressor Heat Sink PrOCess (Condenser... and refrigerants most commonly used and the open-cycle mechanical vapor compression heat pumps. Waste heat sources, heat loads served by heat pumps--and typical applications using heat pumps for large-scale space heating, domestic water heating, and industrial...

  3. Development of a 100-Watt High Temperature Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery Status of Segmented Element Thermoelectric Generator for Vehicle Waste Heat...

  4. Heat Pump Strategies and Payoffs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After evaluating numerous waste heat sources and heat pump designs for energy recovery, we have become aware that a great deal of confusion exists about the economics of heat pumps. The purpose of this article is to present some simple formulas...

  5. Heat Pump Strategies and Payoffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After evaluating numerous waste heat sources and heat pump designs for energy recovery, we have become aware that a great deal of confusion exists about the economics of heat pumps. The purpose of this article is to present some simple formulas...

  6. WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Removed grit and sludge are mixed with the waste oil. Photon-counting spectrofluorimeter Substitution 54 or composted at the stump dump. Plant Engineering grounds vehicle wash system * Waste minimization 8,000 Oils and eliminates the potential of oil and grease being released to soil. Organic solvents Substitution 678

  7. AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results The...

  8. Massachusetts Electric Vehicle Efforts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Massachusetts Electric Vehicle Efforts Christine Kirby, MassDEP ZE-MAP Meeting October 24, 2014 #12 · Provide Clean Air · Grow the Clean Energy Economy · Electric vehicles are a key part of the solution #12 is promoting EVs 4 #12;TCI and Electric Vehicles · Established the Northeast Electric Vehicle Network through

  9. > 070131-073Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marques, Eduardo R. B.

    on collaborative control ofAutonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV), Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) and Autonomous. In another configuration, Swordfish mounts a docking station for the autonomous underwater vehicle Isurus Terms-Autonomous Surface Vehicles, ocean robotics, marine science operations, unmanned survey vessels. I

  10. Alternative Fuel Vehicle Data

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual data released on the number of on-road alternative fuel vehicles and hybrid vehicles made available by both the original equipment manufacturers and aftermarket vehicle conversion facilities. Data on the use of alternative fueled vehicles and the amount of fuel they consume is also available.

  11. AGGREGATION ALGORITHMS IN A VEHICLE-TO-VEHICLE-TO-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Jeffrey A.

    -to-infrastructure (V2V2I) architecture, which is a hybrid of the vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle proposing is a hybrid of the V2I and V2V architectures, which is the vehicle-to-vehicle-to-infrastructure (VAGGREGATION ALGORITHMS IN A VEHICLE-TO-VEHICLE-TO- INFRASTRUCTURE (V2V2I) INTELLIGENT

  12. Heat Exchanger Fouling- Prediction, Measurement and Mitigation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, G. R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP) sponsors the development of innovative heat exchange systems. Fouling is a major and persistent cost associated with most industrial heat exchangers and nationally wastes...

  13. Modeling Thermal-Hydrologic Processes for a Heated Fractured Rock System: Impact of a Capillary-Pressure Maximum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T. A.; Lee, K. H.; Hao, Y.; James, S. C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    package spac- ing and waste-package heat generation rate,Radioactive heat of decay from waste packages emplaced inwaste packages and emplacement drifts, and for heat ?ow at

  14. ENVIROCARE OF UTAH: EXPANDING WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA TO PROVIDE LOW-LEVEL AND MIXED WASTE DISPOSAL OPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, B.; Loveland, K.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Envirocare of Utah operates a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility 80 miles west of Salt Lake City in Clive, Utah. Accepted waste types includes NORM, 11e2 byproduct material, Class A low-level waste, and mixed waste. Since 1988, Envirocare has offered disposal options for environmental restoration waste for both government and commercial remediation projects. Annual waste receipts exceed 12 million cubic feet. The waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the Envirocare facility have significantly expanded to accommodate the changing needs of restoration projects and waste generators since its inception, including acceptable physical waste forms, radiological acceptance criteria, RCRA requirements and treatment capabilities, PCB acceptance, and liquids acceptance. Additionally, there are many packaging, transportation, and waste management options for waste streams acceptable at Envirocare. Many subcontracting vehicles are also available to waste generators for both government and commercial activities.

  15. Light-Duty Drive Cycle Simulations of Diesel Engine-Out Exhaust Properties for an RCCI-Enabled Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuels to achieve low-temperature reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) can reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Moreover, the dual-fueling RCCI is able to achieve these benefits by tailoring combustion reactivity over a wider range of engine operation than is possible with a single fuel. However, the currently demonstrated range of stable RCCI combustion just covers a portion of the engine speed-load range required in several light-duty drive cycles. This means that engines must switch from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the stable RCCI range. In this study we investigated the impact of RCCI as it has recently been demonstrated on practical engine-out exhaust temperature and emissions by simulating a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over two urban and two highway driving cycles. To implement our simulations, we employed experimental engine maps for a multi-mode RCCI/CDC engine combined with a standard mid-size, automatic transmission, passenger vehicle in the Autonomie vehicle simulation platform. Our results include both detailed transient and cycle-averaged engine exhaust temperature and emissions for each case, and we note the potential implications of the modified exhaust properties on catalytic emissions control and utilization of waste heat recovery on future RCCI-enabled vehicles.

  16. Industrial and Commercial Heat Pump Applications in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niess, R. C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy crisis of 1973 accelerated the development of large-scale heat pumps in the United States. Since that time, the commercial, institutional, and industrial applications of heat pumps for waste heat recovery have expanded. This paper reviews...

  17. NREL's Building-Integrated Supercomputer Provides Heating and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    allowing it to help meet building heating loads. At least 90 percent of the computer's waste heat is captured and reused as the primary heat source for the ESIF offices and...

  18. Effects of Vehicle Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Turrentine, Tom

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Images of Hybrid Vehicles Each of the householdsbetween hybrid and non-hybrid vehicles was observed in smallowned Honda Civic Hybrids, vehicles that are virtually

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Vehicle and Systems Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vehicle evaluation, codes and standards development, and heavy vehicle systems optimization. 2012vsstreport.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office:...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Vehicle and Systems Simulation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    vehicle evaluation, codes and standards development, and heavy vehicle systems optimization. 2011vsstreport.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office:...

  1. Heat rejection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Gregory C. (Richland, WA); Tokarz, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Parry, Jr., Harvey L. (Richland, WA); Braun, Daniel J. (Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

  2. Natural convection in high heat flux tanks at the Hanford Waste Site / [by] Mark van der Helm and Mujid S. Kazimi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van der Helm, Mark Johan, 1972-

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was carried out on the potential for natural convection and the effect of natural convection in a High Heat Flux Tank, Tank 241-C-106, at the Hanford Reservation. To determine the existence of natural convection, ...

  3. Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The REVi plan addresses the electric vehicle market in Richmond and then addresses a regional plan, policies, and analysis of the the communities readiness. richmondevinitiative....

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Electric Vehicle Community...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to maximize usage, educating the public and coordinating with utilities. The Vehicle Technologies Office is partnering with city governments, local organizations, and...

  5. Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Readiness Plan | 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary...

  6. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting arravt072vssmackie2012...

  7. Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation arravt072vssmackie2011...

  8. Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EVSE Designed And Manufactured To Allow Power And Energy Data Collection And Demand Response Control Residential EVSE Installed For All Vehicles 1,300...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Diesel Internal Combusion...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Diesel Internal Combusion Engine Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Diesel Internal Combusion Engine Vehicles The Advanced Vehicle...

  10. The Case for Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

  11. Electric Vehicle Smart Charging Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Ching-Yen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Multiplexed Electric Vehicle Charging”, US20130154561A1,Chynoweth, ”Intelligent Electric Vehicle Charging System”,of RFID Mesh Network for Electric Vehicle Smart Charging

  12. Coordinating Automated Vehicles via Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bana, Soheila Vahdati

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 Vehicle Automation . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.1 Controlareas of technology in vehicle automation and communicationChapter 1 Introduction Vehicle Automation Automation is an

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Vehicle Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EfficiencyVehicle Technologies Vehicle Technologies Combustion Research Facility (CRF) Vehicle Technology programs at Sandia share a common goal: reducing dependence on...

  14. activity-long life waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The heat of an eternally inherent low heating value on the other. Current status of Solid Waste Management The MSW Rules Columbia University 25 Recommendations for developing...

  15. VEHICLE USAGE LOG Department ________________________________________ Vehicle Homebase ____________________________ Week Ended (Sunday) _________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    VEHICLE USAGE LOG Department ________________________________________ Vehicle Homebase ____________________________ Week Ended (Sunday) _________________ Door #____________ License Plate ____________________ Vehicle/Supplies (Enter Description such as grade sheets, artifacts, money, etc.) 6. Taking vehicle to Automotive Shop

  16. Analysis of Energy-Rescued Potential of a Hot Water Heating Network 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, J.; Wang, D.; Tian, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and electricity factory in Jinan, we analyze the energy waste caused by hydraulic power maladjustment and improper control of heating temperature in heating season. We conclude that proper adjustment of the heating network and controlling the heating supply...

  17. Industrial Heat Pumps- A Reexamination in Light of Current Energy Trends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, N.; Simon, M.; Terry, S.; Leach, J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat pumps have been used for nearly one hundred years mostly providing heating and cooling for homes and residential settings. However, industrial heat pumps are also used and may be driven by waste heat streams from the manufacturing facility...

  18. Industrial Heat Pumps- A Reexamination in Light of Current Energy Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, N.; Simon, M.; Terry, S.; Leach, J.

    Heat pumps have been used for nearly one hundred years mostly providing heating and cooling for homes and residential settings. However, industrial heat pumps are also used and may be driven by waste heat streams from the manufacturing facility...

  19. Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for high-level nuclear waste. Journal of Contaminantfor a Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at YuccaHeat Flow Near High-Level Nuclear Waste Packages Emplaced in

  20. Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip Sheet #3 (Fact Sheet), Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUE 08:59 FAXFact Sheet UraniumThrough the Use

  1. Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

  2. Treatment of mercury containing waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Melamed, Dan (Gaithersburg, MD); Patel, Bhavesh R (Elmhurst, NY); Fuhrmann, Mark (Babylon, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

  3. Social networking in vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Philip Angus

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-vehicle, location-aware, socially aware telematic systems, known as Flossers, stand to revolutionize vehicles, and how their drivers interact with their physical and social worlds. With Flossers, users can broadcast and ...

  4. Process for treating fission waste. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohrmann, C.A.; Wick, O.J.

    1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for the treatment of fission waste. A glass forming agent, a metal oxide, and a reducing agent are mixed with the fission waste and the mixture is heated. After melting, the mixture separates into a glass phase and a metal phase. The glass phase may be used to safely store the fission waste, while the metal phase contains noble metals recovered from the fission waste.

  5. FACULTY OF TECHNOLOGY Heat Engineering Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    FACULTY OF TECHNOLOGY Heat Engineering Laboratory Combined thermal treatment of CCA-wood waste Report 2007-1 #12;- i - Report 2007-1 Combined thermal treatment of CCA-wood waste and municipal sewage sludge for arsenic emissions control Johan Sipilä1 , Maria Zevenhoven2 and Ron Zevenhoven1 1 Heat

  6. Automated Vehicle-to-Vehicle Collision Avoidance at Intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    Automated Vehicle-to-Vehicle Collision Avoidance at Intersections M. R. Hafner1 , D. Cunningham2 on modified Lexus IS250 test vehicles. The system utilizes vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) Dedicated Short the velocities of both vehicles with automatic brake and throttle commands. Automatic commands can never cause

  7. Fluid cooled vehicle drive module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Meyer, Andreas A.; Gollhardt, Neil; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric vehicle drive includes a support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EM/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  8. Motor Vehicle Record Procedure Objective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    Motor Vehicle Record Procedure Objective Outline the procedure for obtaining motor vehicle record (MVR) through Fleet Services. Vehicle Operator Policy 3. Operators with 7 or more points on their motor vehicle record

  9. An Analysis of the Use of Fluidized-Bed Heat Exchangers for Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, G. J.; Grogan, P. J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principles of fluidized-bed operation and the factors affecting the performance of a fluidized-bed waste heat boiler (FBWHB) are discussed in detail. Factors included in the discussion are bed temperature and pressure, heat transfer coefficient...

  10. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

  11. Washington State Electric Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Washington State Electric Vehicle Implementation Bryan Bazard Maintenance and Alternate Fuel Technology Manager #12;Executive Order 14-04 Requires the procurement of electric vehicles where and equipment with electricity or biofuel to the "extent practicable" by June 2015 1. The vehicle is due

  12. Automotive vehicle sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  13. Powertrain & Vehicle Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Powertrain & Vehicle Research Centre Low Carbon Powertrain Development S. Akehurst, EPSRC Advanced Research Fellow A vehicles powertrain is a complex combination of interacting sub-systems which include complexity ·More efficient Vehicles, quicker to market, reduced cost to consumer The Optimisation Task

  14. Powertrain & Vehicle Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Powertrain & Vehicle Research Centre Low Carbon Powertrain Development S Akehurst, EPSRC Advanced Viewing Trade-Offs and Finding Optima Realism Advanced Engine Test Vehicle Test Rolling Road Powertrain Simulation Basic Engine Test Vehicle Test Cost & Complexity Towards Final Product Lean Powertrain Development

  15. Thermal Energy Storage/Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Food Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combes, R. S.; Boykin, W. B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from waste heat streams for reuse in the processing operations. This paper addresses the recovery of waste heat and the storage of thermal energy as a means of energy conservation in food processing. An energy conservation project in a poultry...

  16. Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Combined Heat and Power 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    treatment facilities are ideal for developing CHP systems as they use the waste heat onsite to warm of developing CHP at such sites depends on a large and constant need for waste heat throughout the year. DG

  17. Anisotropic Heat and Water Transport in a PEFC Cathode Gas Diffusion Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reaction ORR in the cathode CL to recombine with oxygen and producing water and waste heat. Despite amount of waste heat as it does electric power output. Furthermore, PEFCs tolerate only a small

  18. William and Mary Athletics State Vehicle / Rental Vehicle / Personal Vehicle Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaddle, John

    William and Mary Athletics State Vehicle / Rental Vehicle / Personal Vehicle Policies Last Update: 2/14/14 W&M's vehicle use policy requires that a driver authorization form be completed and approved before driving any vehicle (including a personal vehicle) for university business or a university

  19. advanced branching control: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    food production, solid waste processing and the crew. The goal of autonomously waste heat. Waste: collects and conditions waste material from anywhere in the vehicle...

  20. Impact of increased electric vehicle use on battery recycling infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Hammel, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Jungst, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State and Federal regulations have been implemented that are intended to encourage more widespread use of low-emission vehicles. These regulations include requirements of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and regulations pursuant to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and the Energy Policy Act. If the market share of electric vehicles increases in response to these initiatives, corresponding growth will occur in quantities of spent electric vehicle batteries for disposal. Electric vehicle battery recycling infrastructure must be adequate to support collection, transportation, recovery, and disposal stages of waste battery handling. For some battery types, such as lead-acid, a recycling infrastructure is well established; for others, little exists. This paper examines implications of increasing electric vehicle use for lead recovery infrastructure. Secondary lead recovery facilities can be expected to have adequate capacity to accommodate lead-acid electric vehicle battery recycling. However, they face stringent environmental constraints that may curtail capacity use or new capacity installation. Advanced technologies help address these environmental constraints. For example, this paper describes using backup power to avoid air emissions that could occur if electric utility power outages disable emissions control equipment. This approach has been implemented by GNB Technologies, a major manufacturer and recycler of lead-acid batteries. Secondary lead recovery facilities appear to have adequate capacity to accommodate lead waste from electric vehicles, but growth in that capacity could be constrained by environmental regulations. Advances in lead recovery technologies may alleviate possible environmental constraints on capacity growth.

  1. Heat Recovery and Indirect Evaporative Cooling for Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckley, C. C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two thirds of the waste heat sources in the U.S. are in the low temperature range of less than 200 deg F. A primary contributor of this heat is building exhaust. Heat pipe exchangers are ideally suited for recovering this waste. Plant comfort air...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. This page provides data on the hybrid electric versions of the Volkswagen Jetta, Ford C-Max, Chevrolet Malibu, Honda Civic, Hyundai Sonata, Honda CRZ, Honda Civic with Advanced Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery, Mercedes Benz, Toyota Prius Gen III, Ford Fusion, Honda Insight and Honda CR-Z.

  3. International Sorption Heat Pump Conference June 2224, 2005; Denver, CO, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    .S. Department of Energy ABSTRACT The value of "waste heat" is demonstrated by a 2,500-ton absorption chiller in the nation to use the approach of recycling waste heat to drive an absorption chiller. Capital cost; waste heat; thermal energy MODULAR INTEGRATED ENERGY SYSTEM (IES) DESCRIPTION The modular integrated

  4. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from athermal energy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy,

  5. General Vehicle Performance Specifications for the UPRM AUV Vehicle Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    General Vehicle Performance Specifications for the UPRM AUV Vehicle Specifications Vehicle Characteristics Specification Maximum Depth 700m with 1.5 safety factor Vehicle power 2kWHr Li Ion Rechargeable Transducer 700m rated Paroscientific Depth Sensor will be integrated into the vehicle navigation stream

  6. VEHICLE USE RECORD M/Y DEPARTMENT VEHICLE LOCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    VEHICLE USE RECORD M/Y DEPARTMENT VEHICLE LOCATION Date Origin/Destination Purpose Time Out Time) Accuracy of Information (b) Valid Driver's License VEHICLE # TAG # VEHICLE MAKE, MODEL, AND YEAR NOTE: Vehicle logs must be maintained for audit purposes. It is important that all of the required information

  7. Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and Demonstration Activity Advanced Vehicle...

  8. Vehicle underbody fairing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Salari, Kambiz (Livermore, CA); McCallen, Rose (Livermore, CA)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A vehicle underbody fairing apparatus for reducing aerodynamic drag caused by a vehicle wheel assembly, by reducing the size of a recirculation zone formed under the vehicle body immediately downstream of the vehicle wheel assembly. The fairing body has a tapered aerodynamic surface that extends from a front end to a rear end of the fairing body with a substantially U-shaped cross-section that tapers in both height and width. Fasteners or other mounting devices secure the fairing body to an underside surface of the vehicle body, so that the front end is immediately downstream of the vehicle wheel assembly and a bottom section of the tapered aerodynamic surface rises towards the underside surface as it extends in a downstream direction.

  9. Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 2: appendices A-D to technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline- powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume II contains additional details on the vehicle, utility, and materials analyses and discusses several details of the methodology.

  10. Accomodating Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasheim, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accommodating Electric Vehicles Dave Aasheim 214-551-4014 daasheim@ecotality.com A leader in clean electric transportation and storage technologies ECOtality North America Overview Today ? Involved in vehicle electrification... ECOtality North America Overview Today ?Warehouse Material Handling ? Lift trucks ? Pallet Jacks ? Over 200 Customers ? Over 5,000 Installations ECOtality North America Overview Today ? 1990?s involved in EV1 ? EV Chargers ? Vehicle & battery...

  11. Accomodating Electric Vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasheim, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accommodating Electric Vehicles Dave Aasheim 214-551-4014 daasheim@ecotality.com A leader in clean electric transportation and storage technologies ECOtality North America Overview Today ? Involved in vehicle electrification... ECOtality North America Overview Today ?Warehouse Material Handling ? Lift trucks ? Pallet Jacks ? Over 200 Customers ? Over 5,000 Installations ECOtality North America Overview Today ? 1990?s involved in EV1 ? EV Chargers ? Vehicle & battery...

  12. Electric-Drive Vehicle Basics (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes the basics of electric-drive vehicles, including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, all-electric vehicles, and the various charging options.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating Military Bases...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Military Bases and Fleet Readiness for Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating Military Bases and Fleet Readiness for Electric Vehicles The Vehicle...

  14. Brake blending strategy for a hybrid vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boberg, Evan S. (Hazel Park, MI)

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including a transmission for driving a pair of wheels of a vehicle and a heat engine and an electric motor/generator coupled to the transmission. A friction brake system is provided for applying a braking torque to said vehicle. A controller unit generates control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system for controllably braking the vehicle in response to a drivers brake command. The controller unit determines and amount of regenerative torque available and compares this value to a determined amount of brake torque requested for determining the control signals to the electric motor/generator and the friction brake system.

  15. Advanced Soldier Thermoelectric Power System for Power Generation from Battlefield Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Hogan, Tim; Case, Eldon D.; Cauchy, Charles J.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. military uses large amounts of fuel during deployments and battlefield operations. This project sought to develop a lightweight, small form-factor, soldier-portable advanced thermoelectric (TE) system prototype to recover and convert waste heat from various deployed military equipment (i.e., diesel generators/engines, incinerators, vehicles, and potentially mobile kitchens), with the ultimate purpose of producing power for soldier battery charging, advanced capacitor charging, and other battlefield power applications. The technical approach employed microchannel technology, a unique “power panel” approach to heat exchange/TE system integration, and newly-characterized LAST (lead-antimony-silver-telluride) and LASTT (lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride) TE materials segmented with bismuth telluride TE materials in designing a segmented-element TE power module and system. This project researched never-before-addressed system integration challenges (thermal expansion, thermal diffusion, electrical interconnection, thermal and electrical interfaces) of designing thin “power panels” consisting of alternating layers of thin, microchannel heat exchangers (hot and cold) sandwiching thin, segmented-element TE power generators. The TE properties, structurally properties, and thermal fatigue behavior of LAST and LASTT materials were developed and characterized such that the first segmented-element TE modules using LAST / LASTT materials were fabricated and tested at hot-side temperatures = 400 °C and cold-side temperatures = 40 °C. LAST / LASTT materials were successfully segmented with bismuth telluride and electrically interconnected with diffusion barrier materials and copper strapping within the module electrical circuit. A TE system design was developed to produce 1.5-1.6 kW of electrical energy using these new TE modules from the exhaust waste heat of 60-kW Tactical Quiet Generators as demonstration vehicles.

  16. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs.

  17. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Institute 1990 Fuel Cell Status," Proceedings ofMiller, "Introduction: Fuel-Cell-Powered Vehicle DevelopmentPrograms," presented at Fuel Cells for Transportation,

  18. Flex Fuel Vehicle Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flex Fuel Vehicle Systems * Bosch FFV Project Structure and Partners * Purpose of Work - Project Highlights * Barriers - Existing Flex Fuel Systems and Problems * Approach - Bosch...

  19. Georgia Tech Vehicle Acquisition and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2012 Georgia Tech 10/10/2012 Vehicle Acquisition and Disposition Manual #12;2 Vehicle Procedures Regardless of value, all vehicles should be included in this process. Acquisition of a Vehicle 1. Contact Fleet Coordinator to guide the departments in the purchasing process for all vehicles. 2. Fill out

  20. Process for remediation of plastic waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pol, Vilas G; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of about 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically carbon nanotubes having a partially filled core (encapsulated) adjacent to one end of the nanotube. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  1. Process for remediation of plastic waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pol, Vilas G. (Westmont, IL); Thiyagarajan, Pappannan (Germantown, MD)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically egg-shaped and spherical-shaped solid carbons. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  2. "Developing novel heat transfer diagnostics for nanosystems."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    become an increasingly popular technology for waste heat recovery in the last few years. The efficiency"Developing novel heat transfer diagnostics for nanosystems." Patrick Hopkins Assistant Professor Young Investigator Award for heat transfer across solid/fluid interfaces · 2013 AFOSR Young Investigator

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Plug-in Electric Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plug-in Electric Vehicle On-Road Demonstration Data Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Plug-in Electric Vehicle On-Road Demonstration Data Through the American Recovery and...

  4. Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Changes to vehicle traffic-screening Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle inspection station Lanes two through five will be open 24 hours a day and...

  5. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 534

  6. Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619 (9:1) OR Biohazard symbol (if untreated) and identity of liquid waste Biohazard symbol Address

  7. Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    this paper, an analysis was performed to determine that the increased production of waste heat associated with lower generation efficiencies cannot compensate for the lower...

  8. NREL Works to Increase Electric Vehicle Efficiency Through Enhanced Thermal Management (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at NREL are providing new insight into how heating and cooling systems affect the distance that electric vehicles can travel on a single charge. Electric vehicle range can be reduced by as much as 68% per charge because of climate-control demands. NREL engineers are investigating opportunities to change this dynamic and increase driving range by improving vehicle thermal management. NREL experts are collaborating with automotive industry partners to investigate promising thermal management technologies and strategies, including zone-based cabin temperature controls, advanced heating and air conditioning controls, seat-based climate controls, vehicle thermal preconditioning, and thermal load reduction technologies.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Intertek at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced vehicle testing and...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Vehicle and Systems Simulation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    vehicle evaluation, codes and standards development, and heavy vehicle systems optimization. 2010vsstreport.pdf More Documents & Publications AVTA PHEV Demonstrations and...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Vehicle and Systems Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and field evaluations, codes and standards, industry projects, and vehicle systems optimization. 2013vsstreport.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office:...

  12. MKV Carrier Vehicle Sensor Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotnik, Aaron M.

    The Multiple Kill Vehicle (MKV) system, which is being developed by the US Missile Defense Agency (MDA), is a midcourse payload that includes a carrier vehicle and a number of small kill vehicles. During the mission, the ...

  13. The Vehicle Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Vehicle Technologies Market Report Center for Transportation Analysis 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies T he Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Analysis developed and published the first Vehicle Technologies Market

  14. Innovative Miniaturized Heat Pumps for Buildings: Modular Thermal Hub for Building Heating, Cooling and Water Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEETIT Project: Georgia Tech is using innovative components and system design to develop a new type of absorption heat pump. Georgia Tech’s new heat pumps are energy efficient, use refrigerants that do not emit greenhouse gases, and can run on energy from combustion, waste heat, or solar energy. Georgia Tech is leveraging enhancements to heat and mass transfer technology possible in microscale passages and removing hurdles to the use of heat-activated heat pumps that have existed for more than a century. Use of microscale passages allows for miniaturization of systems that can be packed as monolithic full-system packages or discrete, distributed components enabling integration into a variety of residential and commercial buildings. Compared to conventional heat pumps, Georgia Tech’s design innovations will create an absorption heat pump that is much smaller, has higher energy efficiency, and can also be mass produced at a lower cost and assembly time.

  15. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, D.E.

    1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe{sup 3+} provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided. 21 figs.

  16. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

  17. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Waste Analysis Plan This...

  18. Understanding Emissions from Combined Heat and Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipley, A. M.; Greene, N.; Carter, S.; Elliott, R. N.

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) is more energy efficient than separate generation of electricity and thermal energy. In CHP, heat that is normally wasted in conventional power generation is recovered as useful energy for satisfying an existing thermal...

  19. CCHP System with Interconnecting Cooling and Heating Network 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, L.; Geng, K.; Zheng, Z.; Jiang, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The consistency between building heating load, cooling load and power load are analyzed in this paper. The problem of energy waste and low equipment usage in a traditional CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power) system with generated electricity...

  20. CCHP System with Interconnecting Cooling and Heating Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, L.; Geng, K.; Zheng, Z.; Jiang, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The consistency between building heating load, cooling load and power load are analyzed in this paper. The problem of energy waste and low equipment usage in a traditional CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power) system with generated electricity...

  1. Development of an Advanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    calcination in a fluidized bed with an advanced CHP system using the off-gases and the waste heat from the calcined coke. The total amount of recycled heat from the newly...

  2. Direct Refrigeration from Heat Recovery Using 2-Stage Absorption Chillers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hufford, P. E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the cost of some fossil fuels has moderated, the importance of energy conservation by heat recovery has not diminished. The application of waste heat generated steam to produce chilled water is not new. However, there is a newly developed...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office research focuses much of its effort on improving vehicle fuel economy while meeting increasingly stringent emissions standards. Achieving these goals requires a...

  4. Gasoline Ultra Fuel Efficient Vehicle

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Strategy Phase 2 Demonstrator Vehicle (GDCI) 2011 Sonata 6MT, 2.0L GDI Theta Turbo Technologies on Vehicle: Stop start EMS Control Algorithms Calibration GDi pump...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Vehicle Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vehicle Technologies Energy Efficiency On November 11, 2010, in Solid-State Lighting Vehicle Technologies Energy Efficiency News Energy Frontier Research Center for Solid-State...

  6. Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

  7. Design manual. [High temperature heat pump for heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, T.E.; Chancellor, P.D.; Dyer, D.F.; Maples, G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance of a waste heat recovery system which utilizes a high temperature heat pump and which is intended for use in those industries incorporating indirect drying processes are described. It is estimated that use of this heat recovery system in the paper, pulp, and textile industries in the US could save 3.9 x 10/sup 14/ Btu/yr. Information is included on over all and component design for the heat pump system, comparison of prime movers for powering the compressor, control equipment, and system economics. (LCL)

  8. Analysis of Energy-Rescued Potential of a Hot Water Heating Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, J.; Wang, D.; Tian, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Architecture energy consumption occupies a big ratio of overrall energy consumption, while heating energy consumption is a main part of it. Therefore, analyzing the generation of heat waste is important. In this paper, based on a test of a heating...

  9. A Verified Hybrid Controller For Automated Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lygeros, J.; Godbole, D. N.; Sastry, S.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    con- trollers for vehicle automation," in American ControlTomizuka, Vehicle lateral control for highway automation,"

  10. The renewable energy contribution from waste across Europe.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incineration with Energy Recovery Mixed residual waste WtE Steam -> Electr. & Heat Av 50 Range 47-80 Landfill Biomass Energy Plants incineration,gasification Collected & sorted waste wood BEP Steam -> Electr. & Heat in total 11 #12;Anaerobic Digestion underlying assumptions units 2006 2010 2020Real 2020 Pot Volume

  11. Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA- Neighborhood All-Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) uses standard procedures and test specifications to test and collect data from vehicles on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Data on the following vehicles is available in downloadable form: 2013 BRP Commander Electric, 2010 Electric Vehicles International E-Mega, 2009 Vantage Pickup EVX1000, and 2009 Vantage Van EVC1000.

  13. Renting Vehicles Renting Vehicles from MSU Motor Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Renting Vehicles Renting Vehicles from MSU Motor Pool Motor Pool/Transportation Services Motor Pool vehicles may ONLY be used for club-related travel). 2) Valid U.S. driver's license in good standing; 3) Completed Vehicle Use Authorization form for all drivers; and 4) Personal medical insurance

  14. ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    - 1 - ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS S. Brennan & A. Alleyne and spatial re-parameterization of the linear vehicle Bicycle Model is presented utilizing non-dimensional ratios of vehicle parameters called -groups. Investigation of the -groups using compiled data from 44

  15. ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS S. Brennan & A. Alleyne Dept, IL 61801 ABSTRACT A temporal and spatial re-parameterization of the well- known linear vehicle Bicycle Model is presented. This parameterization utilizes non-dimensional ratios of vehicle parameters

  16. 1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , thermal solicitation comes from the heat emitting from the radioactive waste packages. On one hand1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal, argillite is being elements from the waste package towards the environment. During the construction and exploitation phase

  17. An Underwater Robotic Network for Monitoring Nuclear Waste Storage Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeavons, Peter

    , it is still necessary to store this waste in cool- ing ponds for 20 to 60 years to remove the heatAn Underwater Robotic Network for Monitoring Nuclear Waste Storage Pools Sarfraz Nawaz1 , Muzammil spread with grow- ing world population. However, the radioactive waste generated in these power plants

  18. Blast resistant vehicle seat

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are various seats for vehicles particularly military vehicles that are susceptible to attack by road-bed explosive devices such as land mines or improvised explosive devices. The seats often have rigid seat shells and may include rigid bracing for rigidly securing the seat to the chassis of the vehicle. Typically embodiments include channels and particulate media such as sand disposed in the channels. A gas distribution system is generally employed to pump a gas through the channels and in some embodiments the gas is provided at a pressure sufficient to fluidize the particulate media when an occupant is sitting on the seat.

  19. NOTES AND DISCUSSIONS Note on thermal heating efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    ; but there is a dual theorem about the maximum efficiency with which heat at one temperature can be converted into heat part of the world's energy resources are actually used for heating rather than production of work if the engine is reversible. In the latter case the ``wasted energy'' Q1 Carnot Q2 T1 T2 2 is delivered as heat

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Smith Electric...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced...