National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for vehicle hazardous materials

  1. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bulk Packaging Placarding Requirements - Placarding of Packages vs. Placarding Vehicle * LSASCO Scenarios - 7 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

  2. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities...

  3. Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Ford 2,773,175 Partners * Vehma International * Ford Motor Company This presentation ... and test the vehicle, c) demonstrate integration of the light weight material vehicle ...

  4. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being

  5. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  6. Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety - DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    60.1D, Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety by Ashok Kapoor Functional areas: Hazardous Materials, Packaging and Transportation, Safety and Security, Work...

  7. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Presented by Kevin R. Blackwell, Radioactive Materials Program Manager. PDF icon Enhancing Railroad Hazardous...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office - Materials Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office Materials Technologies Ed Owens Jerry Gibbs Will Joost eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Materials Technologies Materials Technologies $36.9 M Lightweight Materials $28.0 M Values are FY14 enacted Propulsion Materials $8.9 M Properties and Manufacturing Multi-Material Enabling Modeling & Computational Mat. Sci. Engine Materials, Cast Al & Fe High Temp Alloys Exhaust Sys. Materials, Low T Catalysts Lightweight Propulsion FY13 Enacted $27.5 M

  9. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, S.; Johnson, D.R.

    1999-04-26

    The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications.

  10. Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Power Efficient Simple Clean Today Industrial Power Efficient Simple Clean Today Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient F Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient F Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient F Matching

  11. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  12. Hazardous Material Shipments | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Material Shipments GET (General Employee Training): General Information: Materials and Transportation personnel perform domestic and international shipping activities associated with hazardous materials transported onsite and offsite. All activities are performed by personnel who have been trained for their respective transportation functions, as required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) and International Air Transport Association (IATA). Shipments are made for the research and

  13. Hazardous Material Packaging for Transport - Administrative Procedures

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1986-09-30

    To establ1sh administrative procedures for the certification and use of radioactive and other hazardous materials packaging by the Department of Energy (DOE).

  14. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16,...

  15. Hazard index for underground toxic material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.; McKone, T.E.

    1980-06-01

    To adequately define the problem of waste management, quantitative measures of hazard must be used. This study reviews past work in the area of hazard indices and proposes a geotoxicity hazard index for use in characterizing the hazard of toxic material buried underground. Factors included in this index are: an intrinsic toxicity factor, formulated as the volume of water required for dilution to public drinking-water levels; a persistence factor to characterize the longevity of the material, ranging from unity for stable materials to smaller values for shorter-lived materials; an availability factor that relates the transport potential for the particular material to a reference value for its naturally occurring analog; and a correction factor to accommodate the buildup of decay progeny, resulting in increased toxicity.

  16. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-01-01

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  17. Detection device for hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-04-05

    A detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chcal with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

  18. Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-20

    The Order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials, and for modal transportation.

  19. Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osterman, Robert A.; Cox, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

  20. Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit ...

  1. A high capability teleoperated vehicle for hazardous applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudar, A.M.; Witherspoon, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    The Robotics Development Group at the Savannah River Site is developing a high performance teleoperated vehicle for use in radioactive and hazardous environments. The three-wheeled vehicle incorporates a highly dexterous 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF), hydraulically-powered manipulator made by Schilling Development, Inc. The teleoperator is called Little MoRT (MObile Radio-controlled Teleoperator) and is a modified version of a commercially available, battery-powered, warehouse vehicle. Little MoRT is controlled remotely by a universal robot controller either through a radio frequency link or a tethered cable. Six video cameras and a microphone provide the operator with audio-visual feedback of the vehicle and its surrounding environment. The vehicle also incorporates a hydraulic power unit consisting of a propane-driven engine for powering the Schilling manipulator. Little MoRT is capable of operating in outdoor as well as indoor environments and is well suited for decontamination and decommissioning activities such as dismantling, sorting, and surveying of radioactive waste.

  2. Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

  3. 49 CFR Parts 171-177: Hazardous Materials Regulations (DOT)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration regulates the transport of hazardous materials through Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR), Subchapter C, "Hazardous Materials Regulations." Parts 171-177 provide general information on hazardous materials and regulation for their packaging and their shipment by rail, air, vessel, and public highway.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles Presentation given by VEHMA at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies ...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Multi-Material...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles Presentation given by VEHMA at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies ...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles | Department of Energy Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles Presentation given by VEHMA at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about multi-material lightweight vehicles. lm072_skszek_2014_o.pdf (1.89 MB) More Documents & Publications Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle Vehicle Technologies Office Merit

  7. Multilayer Thin-Film Thermoelectric Materials for Vehicle Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multilayer Thin-Film Thermoelectric Materials for Vehicle Applications Multilayer Thin-Film Thermoelectric Materials for Vehicle Applications 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction ...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Materials for Cars and Trucks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturers use propulsion (or powertrain) materials in the components that move vehicles of every size and shape. Conventional vehicles use these materials in components such as the engine,...

  9. Determining risks for hazardous material operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Dare, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated Safety Management (ISM) is structured to manage and control work at the activity level. Fundamental to ISM is that all work will be performed safely while meeting the applicable institutional-, facility-, and activity-level expectations. High and medium initial risk activities require certain levels of independent peer and/or Environmental, Health & Safety subject matter expert reviews prior to authorization. A key responsibility of line management and chemical workers is to assign initial risk adequately, so that the proper reviews are obtained. Thus, the effectiveness of an ISM system is largely dependent upon the adequacy and accuracy of this initial risk determination. In the following presentation, a Risk Determination Model (RDM) is presented for physical, health and ecological hazards associated with materials. Magnitude of exposure (Le., dose or concentration), frequency, duration, and quantity are the four factors most difficult to capture in a research and development setting. They are factored into the determination, as a function of the quantity of material. Quantity and magnitude of exposure components are simplified by using boundary criteria. This RDM will promote conformity and consistency in the assignment of risk to hazardous material activities. In conclusion, the risk assessors (line manager and chemical worker) should be capable of more accurately assessing the risk of exposure to a specific chemical with regard to the employee, public, and the environment.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles: Mach II Design | Department of Energy Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach II Design Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach II Design Presentation given by VEHMA at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about multi-material lightweight vehicles: Mach II design. lm088_skszek_2014_o.pdf (2.33 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Tailored Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Tailored Materials for Improved ... at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit ...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report PDF icon 2008propulsionmaterials.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle ...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Novel Anode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials Vehicle Technologies Office ...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach II Design Presentation given by VEHMA at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and ...

  15. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruez, Jacky; Shoukry, Samir; Williams, Gergis; Shoukry, Mark

    2013-08-31

    The main objective of this project is to develop, analyze and validate data, methodologies and tools that support widespread applications of automotive lightweighting technologies. Two underlying principles are guiding the research efforts towards this objective: • Seamless integration between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their durability while reducing their Life-Cycle-Costs (LCC). • Smooth migration of the experience and findings accumulated so far at WVU in the areas of designing with lightweight materials, innovative joining concepts and durability predictions, from applications to the area of weight savings for heavy vehicle systems and hydrogen storage tanks, to lightweighting applications of selected systems or assemblies in light–duty vehicles.

  16. Mr. Steve lappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P o. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 FEB I 3110 New Mexico Environment Department...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: US DRIVE Materials Technical Team...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US DRIVE Materials Technical Team Roadmap Vehicle Technologies Office: US DRIVE Materials Technical Team Roadmap The Materials Technical Team (MTT) of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership ...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems | Department of Energy Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) is working to lower the cost and increase the convenience of electric drive vehicles, which include hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles. These vehicles use advanced power electronics and electric motors that face barriers because their subcomponents have specific material limitations. Novel propulsion materials

  19. Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center strategic plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    This strategic Plan was developed in keeping with the Department of Energy`s mission for partnership with its customers to contribute to our Nation`s welfare by providing the technical information and the scientific and educational foundation for the technology, policy and institutional leadership necessary to achieve efficiency in energy use, diversity in energy sources, a more productive and competitive economy, improved environmental quality, and a secure national defense. The Plan provides the concepts for realigning the Departments`s Hazardous Materials Spill Center (HSC) in achieving its vision of becoming the global leader in meeting the diverse HAZMAT needs in the areas of testing, training, and technology. Each of these areas encompass many facets and a multitude of functional and operational requirements at the Federal, state, tribal, and local government levels, as well as those of foreign governments and the private sector. The evolution of the limited dimensional Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility into a multifaceted HAZMAT Spill Center will require us to totally redefine our way of thinking as related to our business approach, both within and outside of the Department. We need to establish and maintain a viable and vibrant outreach program through all aspects of the public (via government agencies) and private sectors, to include foreign partnerships. The HAZMAT Spill Center goals and objectives provide the direction for meeting our vision. This direction takes into consideration the trends and happenings identified in the {open_quotes}Strategic Outlook{close_quotes}, which includes valuable input from our stakeholders and our present and future customers. It is our worldwide customers that provide the essence of the strategic outlook for the HAZMAT Spill Center.

  20. EERE Success Story-Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Helps Bring

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies to Market | Department of Energy Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Helps Bring Technologies to Market EERE Success Story-Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Helps Bring Technologies to Market July 26, 2016 - 11:26am Addthis Although the Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle (MMLV) is never going to appear on a dealership lot, this project demonstrated the feasibility of integrating lightweight materials and joining technologies into current production vehicles. Built by Vehma

  1. Advanced Materials Laboratory hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, B.; Banda, Z.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy Order 55OO.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the AML. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is a nominal area that conforms to DOE boundaries and physical/jurisdictional boundaries such as fence lines and streets.

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    08 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report PDF icon 2008propulsionmaterials.pdf More ...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report The Lightweight Materials research and development (R&D) area within the ...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon 2013ProgressReportforPropulsionMaterials.pdf More Documents & Publications NOx sensor development Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual ...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: US DRIVE Materials Technical Team Roadmap |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy US DRIVE Materials Technical Team Roadmap Vehicle Technologies Office: US DRIVE Materials Technical Team Roadmap The Materials Technical Team (MTT) of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership focuses primarily on reducing the mass of structural systems such as the body and chassis in light-duty vehicles (including passenger cars and light trucks). Mass reduction also enables improved vehicle efficiency regardless of the vehicle size or propulsion system employed. This roadmap lays out

  6. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by VEHMA at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about multi-material lightweight vehicles.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Lightweight Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview | Department of Energy Lightweight Materials Overview Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Lightweight Materials Overview Presentation given by U.S. Department of Energy at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about lightweight materials overview. lm999_joost_2015_o.pdf (3.16 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Overview of VTO Material

  9. Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rofer, Cheryl K.; Buelow, Steven J.; Dyer, Richard B.; Wander, Joseph D.

    1992-01-01

    A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The harzardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

  10. Design for containment of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, R.C. ); McDonald, J.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Department of Energy, (DOE), facilities across the United States, use wind and tornado design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. In addition, other programs such as Advanced Light Water Reactors, New Production Reactors, and Individual Plant Examinations for External Events for commercial nuclear power plants utilize design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. The use of probabilistic performance goals is a departure from design practice for commercial nuclear power plants which have traditionally been designed utilizing a conservative specification of wind and tornado loading combined with deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits. Approaches which utilize probabilistic wind and tornado hazard curves for specification of loading and deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits are discussed in this paper. Through the use of such design/evaluation approaches, it may be demonstrated that there is high likelihood that probabilistic performance goals can be achieved. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Overview of VTO Material

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies | Department of Energy Material Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Overview of VTO Material Technologies Presentation given by U.S. Department of Energy at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about overview of VTO Material Technologies. lm000_joost_2015_o.pdf (3.21 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Overview of VTO

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Tailored Materials for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improved Internal Combustion Engine Efficiency | Department of Energy Tailored Materials for Improved Internal Combustion Engine Efficiency Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Tailored Materials for Improved Internal Combustion Engine Efficiency Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about tailored materials for improved internal

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Materials Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Materials Development for High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 ...

  14. Lightweight Composite Materials for Heavy Duty Vehicles (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    between the lightweight materials selected for certain vehicle systems, cost-effective methods for their design and manufacturing, and practical means to enhance their ...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon 2009propulsionmaterials.pdf More Documents & Publications Magnetic Material for PM Motors Permanent Magnet Development for Automotive Traction Motors Vehicle ...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials by Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by Design Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials by Design According to the Materials Genome Initiative, it generally requires more than 20 years to develop and implement a new or improved material for automotive applications. To accelerate this process, the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research to develop and implement new or improved application-specific materials through Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME). This approach combines advanced characterization,

  17. Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Todd, Terry A.; Burchfield, Larry A.; Anshits, Alexander G.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Sapozhnikova, Natalia V.

    2006-10-03

    Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Propulsion Materials Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Construction | Department of Energy UQM Technologies, Inc. at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Electric Drive Systems edt044_ley_2016_o_web.pdf (1.13 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Unique Lanthide-Free Motor Construction Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Unique Lanthide-Free Motor Construction Unique Lanthide-Free Motor

  19. 49 CFR Subchapter C, Parts 171-177: Hazardous Materials Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration regulates the transport of hazardous materials through Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR), Subchapter C, "Hazardous Materials Regulations." Parts 171-177 provide general information on hazardous materials and regulation for their packaging and their shipment by rail, air, vessel, and public highway.

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's ...

  1. Scanning of vehicles for nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, J. I.

    2014-05-09

    Might a nuclear-armed terrorist group or state use ordinary commerce to deliver a nuclear weapon by smuggling it in a cargo container or vehicle? This delivery method would be the only one available to a sub-state actor, and it might enable a state to make an unattributed attack. Detection of a weapon or fissile material smuggled in this manner is difficult because of the large volume and mass available for shielding. Here I review methods for screening cargo containers to detect the possible presence of nuclear threats. Because of the large volume of innocent international commerce, and the cost and disruption of secondary screening by opening and inspection, it is essential that the method be rapid and have a low false-positive rate. Shielding can prevent the detection of neutrons emitted spontaneously or by induced fission. The two promising methods are muon tomography and high energy X-radiography. If they do not detect a shielded threat object they can detect the shield itself.

  2. Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal insulation materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlemiller, T.J.; Rogers, F.E.

    1980-07-01

    Work on the smolder ignitability in cellulosic insulation and on thermal analytical characterization of the oxidation of this material is presented. Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) shows that both retarded and unretarded cellulosic insulation oxidizes in two overall stages, both of which are exothermic. The second stage (oxidation of the char left as a residue of the first stage) is much more energetic on a unit mass basis than the first. However, kinetics and a sufficient exothermicity make the first stage responsible for ignition in most realistic circumstances. Existing smolder retardants such as boric acid have their major effect on the kinetics of the second oxidation stage and thus produce only a rather small (20/sup 0/C) increase in smolder ignition temperature. Several simplified analogs of attic insulations have been tested to determine the variability of minimum smolder ignition temperature. These employed planar or tubular constant temperature heat sources in a thermal environment quite similar to a realistic attic application. Go/no-go tests provided the borderline (minimum) ignition temperature for each configuration. The wide range (150/sup 0/C) of minimum ignition temperatures confirmed the predominant dependence of smolder ignition on heat flow geometry. Other factors (bulk density, retardants) produced much less effect on ignitability.

  3. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B

  4. DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -1 7. Materials Technologies: Propulsion Materials Introduction Advanced materials, including metals, polymers, composites, and intermetallic compounds, can play an important role in improving the efficiency of transportation engines and vehicles. Weight reduction is one of the most effective ways to increase the fuel economy of vehicles while reducing exhaust emissions. The development of propulsion materials and enabling technologies will help reduce costs while improving the durability,

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials for Cars and Trucks |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Lightweight Materials for Cars and Trucks Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials for Cars and Trucks PBS's Motorweek highlights the research and development on lightweight materials supported by the Vehicle Technologies Office at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Read the text version. Advanced materials are essential for boosting the fuel economy of modern automobiles while maintaining safety and performance. Because it takes less energy to accelerate a lighter

  6. Multi-Materials Vehicle R&D Initiative Lightweight 7+ Passenger...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Vehicle R&D Initiative Lightweight 7+ Passenger Vehicle Multi-Materials Vehicle R&D Initiative Lightweight 7+ Passenger Vehicle 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, ...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Materials Development for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements | Department of Energy Materials Development for High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Materials Development for High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements Presentation given by TIAX LLC at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about materials development for

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: Short-Term Lightweight Materials Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Advanced High-Strength Steel and Aluminum) | Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office: Short-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Advanced High-Strength Steel and Aluminum) Vehicle Technologies Office: Short-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Advanced High-Strength Steel and Aluminum) In the short term, replacing heavy steel components with materials such as high-strength steel, aluminum, or glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites can decrease component weight by 10-60 percent.

  9. Classification of poison inhalation hazard materials into severity groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griego, N.R.; Weiner, R.F.

    1996-02-01

    Approximately 1.5 billion tons of hazardous materials (hazmat) are transported in the US annually, and most reach their destinations safely. However, there are infrequent transportation accidents in which hazmat is released from its packaging. These accidental releases can potentially affect the health of the exposed population and damage the surrounding environment. Although these events are rare, they cause genuine public concern. Therefore, the US Department of Transportation Research & Special Programs Administration (DOT- RSPA) has sponsored a project to evaluate the protection provided by the current bulk (defined as larger than 118 gallons) packagings used to transport materials that have been classified as Poison Inhalation Hazards (PIH) and recommend performance standards for these PIH packagings. This project was limited to evaluating bulk packagings larger than 2000 gallons. This project involved classifying the PIH into severity categories so that only one set of packaging performance criteria would be needed for each severity category rather than a separate set of performance criteria for each individual PIH. By grouping the PIH into Hazard Zones, Packaging Groups and performance standards for these Hazard Zones can be defined. Each Hazard Zone can correspond to a Packaging Group or, as in 49CFR173 for non-bulk packagings, one Packaging Group may cover more than one Hazard Zone. If the packaging groups are chosen to correspond to the classification categories presented in this report, then the maximum allowable leak rates used to define these categories could be used as the maximum allowable leak rates for the performance oriented packaging standards. The results discussed in this report are intended to provide quantitative guidance for the appropriate authorities to use in making these decisions.

  10. Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

    2010-10-01

    The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision

  11. Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, H. Jr.

    1995-02-21

    A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal. 40 figs.

  12. Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, Jr., Holt

    1995-01-01

    A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal.

  13. Federal program for regulating highly hazardous materials finally takes off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lessard, P.C. [Block Environmental Services Inc., Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The Risk Management Program (RMP) rule, Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act (CAA), was signed on May 24 and finalized on June 20. RMP is one of the most comprehensive, technically based regulatory programs for preventing, detecting and responding to accidental hazardous materials releases to have been issued in recent times. Although facilities have three years to comply, EPA estimates that the rule will affect an estimated 66,000 facilities that store highly hazardous or acutely toxic materials. The 1990 CAA Amendments are designed to prevent accidental releases of highly hazardous chemicals from stationary sources. Two significant regulatory programs that have emerged from the revised CAA are the Process Safety Management (PSM) standard and RMP. PSM is designed to protect employees and regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. RMP`s purpose is to protect the public and the environment from highly hazardous chemicals. It authorizes EPA to create a list of substances (distinct from the list generated under PSM) known to cause serious adverse effects and to implement a program for accidental chemical release prevention.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overiew of Materials...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overiew of Materials Technologies R&D Presentation given by U.S. Department of Energy at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and ...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for High-Efficiency Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engines | Department of Energy High-Efficiency Combustion Engines Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for High-Efficiency Combustion Engines The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) is supporting work to improve the efficiency of advanced internal combustion engines for automotive, light trucks, and heavy-truck applications by 25% to 50%. However, many of these combustion strategies require high operating temperatures and pressures that exceed current materials' abilities to reliably operate

  16. Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

    1997-03-01

    This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (<1 second) and long reaction times (>5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials Technologies | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced materials are essential for boosting the fuel economy of modern automobiles while maintaining safety and performance. Because it takes less energy to accelerate a lighter...

  18. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2000-06-19

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

  19. Mr. Steve lappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lappe, Project Leader Hazardous Materials Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P o. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 FEB I 3110 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 E. Rodeo Park Drive, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502-6110 Subject Transmittal of the Audit Report for the Savannah River Site/Central Characterization Project Recertification Audit A~ 1 0*01 Dear Mr. Zappe : This letter transmits Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Audit Report A-1 0-01 for the audit of Savannah

  20. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gotovchikov, Vitaly T.; Ivanov, Alexander V.; Filippov, Eugene A.

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

  1. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

  2. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials: Recent Progress and Future Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2001-05-14

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program provides enabling materials technology for the U.S. DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program is based on an industry assessment and the technology roadmap for the OHVT. A five-year program plan was published in 2000. Major efforts in the program are materials for diesel engine fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, and air handling. Additional efforts include diesel engine valve-train materials, structural components, and thermal management. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications. Selected technical issues and planned and ongoing projects as well as brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Lightweight Materials Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Magnesium and Carbon Fiber) | Department of Energy Long-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Magnesium and Carbon Fiber) Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Magnesium and Carbon Fiber) In the long term, advanced materials such as magnesium and carbon fiber reinforced composites could reduce the weight of some components by 50-75 percent. Magnesium Even though magnesium (Mg) can reduce component weight by more than 60 percent, its use is currently limited

  4. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  5. PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment

  6. Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach-II Design Tim Skszek...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    June, 17, 2014 Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach-II Design Tim Skszek, Jeff ... Relevance Project Objectives 1. Design and build Mach-I prototype vehicles, ...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy 8 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report 2008_propulsion_materials.pdf (16.36 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Propulsion Materials

  8. Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Hurdles Into the Future | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Hurdles Into the Future Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Hurdles Into the Future October 28, 2014 - 3:26pm Addthis A team of vehicles experts was present during the crash test for Ford and Magna's Multimaterial Lightweight Vehicle. A team of vehicles experts was present during the crash test for Ford and Magna's Multimaterial Lightweight Vehicle. Reuben Sarkar Reuben Sarkar Deputy Assistant Secretary for Transportation Most owners aren't itching to

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Approach to Development of Lightweight 3GAHSS Vehicle Assembly

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by USAMP at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about integrated computational materials...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Approach to Development of Lightweight 3GAHSS Vehicle Assembly

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by USAMP at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about integrated computational materials...

  11. 20th Hazmat Challenge tests skills of hazardous materials response teams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazmat Challenge tests skills of hazardous materials response teams 20th Hazmat Challenge tests skills of hazardous materials response teams Ten hazardous materials response teams from New Mexico, Missouri, Oklahoma and Nebraska test their skills in a series of graded, timed exercises. July 21, 2016 The Laboratory began the Hazmat Challenge in 1996 to hone the skills of its own hazmat team members. The Laboratory began the Hazmat Challenge in 1996 to hone the skills of its own hazmat team

  12. DRAFT - DOE O 460.1D, Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    60.1D, Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety by Website Administrator The Order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of...

  13. Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ad Hoc Working Group Transportation Plan Ad Hoc Working Group Guide to Federal Funding, Financing, and Technical Assistance for Plug-in Electric Vehicles and Charging Stations

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: Exploratory Battery Materials R&D | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office: Exploratory Battery Materials R&D Vehicle Technologies Office: Exploratory Battery Materials R&D Lowering the cost and improving the performance of batteries for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) requires improving every part of the battery, from underlying chemistry to packaging. To reach the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge goal of making plug-in electric vehicles as affordable and practical as a 2012 baseline conventional vehicle by 2022, the

  15. Preparedness of hazardous materials emergencies in railyards: Guidance for railroads and adjacent communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Railroads are a key part of the distribution system for hazardous materials and, thus, much hazardous material passes through railyards en route to intermediate or final consumers. While the vast majority of these materials are shipped without incident, both the number of shipments and the nature of the materials themselves dictate that railyards and surrounding communities be prepared to respond quickly and effectively to emergencies. This report contains information on 11 emergency preparedness functions and 150 guidance recommendations.

  16. Fact #556: February 2, 2009 Change in Material Content of Light Vehicles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6: February 2, 2009 Change in Material Content of Light Vehicles Fact #556: February 2, 2009 Change in Material Content of Light Vehicles Light vehicles are made up of many different materials. The materials shown on the graph below are materials with substantial changes over the last ten years. The use of high and medium strength steel has increased from an average of 324 pounds per vehicle to 500 pounds per vehicle in 2006. The use of aluminum and plastics also

  17. Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-11-09

    The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

  18. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review ... More Documents & Publications Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, ...

  19. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review ... More Documents & Publications Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, ...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report As part of the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO), the Lightweight Materials activity (LM) focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTO), the Lightweight Materials (LM) activity focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such

  2. Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    URS Consultants, Inc.

    1992-06-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

  3. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  4. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  5. Impacts of Vehicle Weight Reduction via Material Substitution on Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Jarod C.; Sullivan, John L.; Burnham, Andrew; Elgowainy, Amgad

    2015-10-20

    This study examines the vehicle-cycle impacts associated with substituting lightweight materials for those currently found in light-duty passenger vehicles. We determine part-based energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission ratios by collecting material substitution data from both the literature and automotive experts and evaluating that alongside known mass-based energy use and GHG emission ratios associated with material pair substitutions. Several vehicle parts, along with full vehicle systems, are examined for lightweighting via material substitution to observe the associated impact on GHG emissions. Results are contextualized by additionally examining fuel-cycle GHG reductions associated with mass reductions relative to the baseline vehicle during the use phase and also determining material pair breakeven driving distances for GHG emissions. The findings show that, while material substitution is useful in reducing vehicle weight, it often increases vehicle-cycle GHGs depending upon the material substitution pair. However, for a vehicle’s total life cycle, fuel economy benefits are greater than the increased burdens associated with the vehicle manufacturing cycle, resulting in a net total life-cycle GHG benefit. The vehicle cycle will become increasingly important in total vehicle life-cycle GHGs, since fuel-cycle GHGs will be gradually reduced as automakers ramp up vehicle efficiency to meet fuel economy standards.

  6. DRAFT - DOE O 460.1D, Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The Order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials, and for modal transportation.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  8. Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    UT-Battelle, LLC Enforcement Letter, UT-Battelle, LLC July 13, 2016 Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Letter issued to UT-Battelle, LLC related to worker exposures to ozone On July 13, 2016, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement issued an Enforcement Letter (WEL-2016-03) to UT-Battelle, LLC, regarding deficiencies in hazard identification and abatement that resulted in two workers being exposed to elevated levels of ozone at the Oak Ridge

  9. Multi-Materials Vehicle R&D Initiative Lightweight 7+ Passenger Vehicle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Materials Issues Associated with EGR Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about materials...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Materials Benchmarking Activities for CAMP Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about materials...

  12. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

    1980-04-01

    Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

  13. Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Hazardous Materials Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 OCT 26 2011 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East,...

  14. Vehicle exhaust treatment using electrical discharge and materials chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonkyn, R.G.; Balmer, M.L.; Barlow, S.E.; Orlando, T.M.; Goulette, D.; Hoard, J.

    1997-12-31

    Current 3-way catalytic converters have proven quite effective at removing NO{sub x} from the exhaust of spark ignition vehicles operating near stoichiometric air-to-fuel ratios. However, diesel engines typically operate at very high air-to-fuel ratios. Under such lean burn conditions current catalytic converters are ineffective for NO{sub x} removal. As a result, considerable effort has been made to develop a viable lean NO{sub x} catalyst. Although some materials have been shown to reduce NO{sub x} under lean burn conditions, none exhibit the necessary activity and stability at the high temperatures and humidities found in typical engine exhaust,. As a result, alternative technologies are being explored in an effort to solve the so-called lean NO{sub x} problem. Packed-bed barrier discharge systems are well suited to take advantage of plasma-surface interactions due to the large number of contaminant surface collisions in the bed. The close proximity of the active surface to transient species produced by the plasma may lead to favorable chemistry at considerably lower temperatures than required by thermal catalysts. The authors present data in this paper illustrating that the identity and surface properties of the packing material can alter the discharge-driven chemistry in synthetic leanburn exhaust mixtures. Results using non-porous glass beads as the packing material suggest the limits of NO{sub x} reduction using purely gas phase discharge chemistry. By comparison, encouraging results are reported for several alternative packing materials.

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report The Lightweight Materials activity (LM) focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance,recyclability, and cost. 2010_lightweighting_materials.pdf (9.04

  16. Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

  17. Ultraviolet reflector materials for solar detoxification of hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Govindarajan, R.

    1991-07-01

    Organic waste detoxification requires cleavage of carbon bonds. Such reactions can be photo-driven by light that is energetic enough to disrupt such bonds. Alternately, light can be used to activate catalyst materials, which in turn can break organic bonds. In either case, photons with wavelengths less than 400 nm are required. Because the terrestrial solar resource below 400 nm is so small (roughly 3% of the available spectrum), highly efficient optical concentrators are needed that can withstand outdoor service conditions. In the past, optical elements for solar application have been designed to prevent ultraviolet (uv) radiation from reaching the reflective layer to avoid the potentially harmful effects of such light on the collector materials themselves. This effectively forfeits the uv part of the spectrum in return for some measure of protection against optical degradation. To optimize the cost/performance benefit of photochemical reaction systems, optical materials must be developed that are not only highly efficient but also inherently stable against the radiation they are designed to concentrate. The requirements of uv optical elements in terms of appropriate spectral bands and level of reflectance are established based upon the needs of photochemical applications. Relevant literature on uv reflector materials is reviewed which, along with discussions with industrial contacts, allows the establishment of a data base of currently available materials. Although a number of related technologies exist that require uv reflectors, to date little attention has been paid to achieving outdoor durability required for solar applications. 49 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Multi-Material Vehicle R&D Initiative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost. 2012lightweightmaterials.pdf (28.5 MB) More ...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance,recyclability, and cost. 2010lightweightingmaterials.pdf (9.04 MB) More ...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Novel Anode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about novel anode...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Cell Materials and Design for 300 Mile Range EVs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by OneD Material, LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about innovative cell materials...

  3. Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Multiple Users | Department of Energy Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of

  4. Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Hazardous Materials Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 OCT 26 2011 New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Recertification Audit Report for Audit A-11-14 of the Idaho National Laboratory Central Characterization Project Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Audit A-11-14 of the processes performed by the Central Characterization

  5. Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Radioactive Material Carlisle Smith Director, Hazardous Materials Programs ... Safety Alliance QUESTIONS? Carlisle Smith Director, Hazardous Materials Programs ...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Material Technologies- Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Department of Energy (DOE) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Lightweighting

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Lightweight Materials research and development (R&D) area within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to commercializing lightweight materials for passenger and commercial vehicles. This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Lightweight Materials area. Past years' reports are listed on the Annual Progress Reports page.

  8. Chapter 8: Advancing Clean Transportation and Vehicle Systems and Technologies | Lightweight Automotive Materials Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweight Automotive Materials Chapter 8: Technology Assessments Introduction to the Technology/System Overview of vehicle lightweighting Reducing vehicle weight affects transportation energy consumption by improving efficiency. Upwards of 85% of the energy in fuel is lost to thermal and mechanical inefficiency in the drivetrain 1 while the remaining 12-15% is used to overcome the tractive forces that resist forward motion. 2 Of these tractive forces, vehicle weight most significantly affects

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Bus and Truck Radial Materials for Fuel Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by PPG at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced bus and truck radial materials...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Anode Material Development for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sinode Systems at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy anode material...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: A Materials Approach to Fuel-Efficient Tires

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by PPG Industries at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a materials approach to fuel...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about validation of material models...

  13. High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric materials, thermal management and interfaces design, and metrology

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the progress made during 2013 on the research and development projects funded by the Propulsion Materials subprogram in the Vehicle Technologies Office. Past year's reports are listed on the Annual Progress Reports page.

  15. Method for acid oxidation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed organic waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierce, Robert A.; Smith, James R.; Ramsey, William G.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Bickford, Dennis F.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for reducing the volume of low level radioactive and mixed waste to enable the waste to be more economically stored in a suitable repository, and for placing the waste into a form suitable for permanent disposal. The invention involves a process for preparing radioactive, hazardous, or mixed waste for storage by contacting the waste starting material containing at least one organic carbon-containing compound and at least one radioactive or hazardous waste component with nitric acid and phosphoric acid simultaneously at a contacting temperature in the range of about 140.degree. C. to about 210 .degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the organic carbon-containing compound to gaseous products, thereby producing a residual concentrated waste product containing substantially all of said radioactive or inorganic hazardous waste component; and immobilizing the residual concentrated waste product in a solid phosphate-based ceramic or glass form.

  16. Materials used in new generation vehicles: supplies, shifts, and supporting infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.; Schexnayder, S.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program intends to develop new designs for automobiles that will reduce fuel consumption by two thirds but otherwise have price, comfort, safety, and other measures of performance similar to the typical automobile now on the market. PNGV vehicle designs are expected to substitute lightweight materials, such as aluminum, magnesium, carbon-reinforced polymer composites, glass-reinforced polymer composites, and ultra- light steel, for heavier materials such as steel and iron in automobile components. The target mass of a PNGV vehicle is 1,960 pounds, as compared to the average current vehicle that weights 3,240 pounds. Other changes could include the use of different ferrous alloys, engineering changes, or incorporation of advanced ceramic components. Widespread adoption of these vehicle designs would affect materials markets and require concurrent development and adoption of supporting technologies to supply the materials and to use and maintain them in automobiles. This report identifies what would be required to bring about these changes and developments in materials substitution; identifies reasons that might make these substitutions difficult to accomplish within the overall objectives and timetable of the PNGV program; and identifies any issues arising from the substitution that could prompt consideration of policies to deal with them. The analysis in this paper uses scenarios that assume the production of new generation vehicles will begin in 2007 and that their market share will increase gradually over the following 25 years. The scenarios on which the analysis is based assume a maximum substitution of each potential replacement material considered. This maximum substitution of individual materials (i.e., the amount of replacement material by weight that would be added to the baseline vehicle`s composition) is as follows: ULSAB (high strength steel), 298 lbs.; glass-reinforced composites, 653 lbs.; carbon

  17. SOFTWARE TOOLS THAT ADDRESS HAZARDOUS MATERIAL ISSUES DURING NUCLEAR FACILITY D and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. COURNOYER; R. GRUNDEMANN

    2001-03-01

    The 49-year-old Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility is where analytical chemistry and metallurgical studies on samples of plutonium and nuclear materials are conduct in support of the Department of Energy's nuclear weapons program. The CMR Facility is expected to be decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) over the next ten to twenty years. Over the decades, several hazardous material issues have developed that need to be address. Unstable chemicals must be properly reassigned or disposed of from the workspace during D and D operation. Materials that have critical effects that are primarily chronic in nature, carcinogens, reproductive toxin, and materials that exhibit high chronic toxicity, have unique decontamination requirements, including the decontrolling of areas where these chemicals were used. Certain types of equipment and materials that contain mercury, asbestos, lead, and polychlorinated biphenyls have special provisions that must be addressed. Utilization of commercially available software programs for addressing hazardous material issues during D and D operations such as legacy chemicals and documentation are presented. These user-friendly programs eliminate part of the tediousness associated with the complex requirements of legacy hazardous materials. A key element of this approach is having a program that inventories and tracks all hazardous materials. Without an inventory of chemicals stored in a particular location, many important questions pertinent to D and D operations can be difficult to answer. On the other hand, a well-managed inventory system can address unstable and highly toxic chemicals and hazardous material records concerns before they become an issue. Tapping into the institutional database provides a way to take advantage of the combined expertise of the institution in managing a cost effective D and D program as well as adding a quality assurance element to the program. Using laboratory requirements as a logic flow

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report 2010 annual progress report focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. 2010_propulsion_materials.pdf (21.92 MB) More Documents & Publications

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report | Department of Energy Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report 2011 annual progress report focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. 2011_propulsion_materials.pdf (21.95 MB) More Documents & Publications

  20. Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vehicles, and the fuel it takes to power them, are an essential part of our American infrastructure and economy. The Energy Department works to develop transportation technologies that will reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

  1. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, K.E.

    1994-11-09

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel.

  2. An overview of safety assessment, regulation, and control of hazardous material use at NREL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, B.P.; Crandall, R.S. ); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. )

    1992-12-01

    This paper summarizes the methodology we use to ensure the safe use of hazardous materials at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). First, we analyze the processes and the materials used in those processes to identify the hazards presented. Then we study federal, state, and local regulations and apply the relevant requirements to our operations. When necessary, we generate internal safety documents to consolidate this information. We design research operations and support systems to conform to these requirements. Before we construct the systems, we perform a semiquantitative risk analysis on likely accident scenarios. All scenarios presenting an unacceptable risk require system or procedural modifications to reduce the risk. Following these modifications, we repeat the risk analysis to ensure that the respective accident scenarios present an acceptable risk. Once all risks are acceptable, we conduct an operational readiness review (ORR). A management-appointed panel performs the ORR ensuring compliance with all relevant requirements. After successful completion of the ORR, operations can begin.

  3. An overview of safety assessment, regulation, and control of hazardous material use at NREL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, B.P.; Crandall, R.S.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-07-01

    This paper summarizes the methodology we use to ensure the safe use of hazardous materials at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). First, we analyze the processes and the materials used in those processes to identify the hazards presented. Then we study federal, state, and local regulations and apply the relevant requirements to our operations. When necessary, we generate internal safety documents to consolidate this information. We design research operations and support systems to conform to these requirements. Before we construct the systems, we perform a semiquantitative risk analysis on likely accident scenarios. All scenarios presenting in unacceptable risk require system or procedural modifications to reduce the risk. Following these modifications, we repeat the risk analysis to ensure that the respective accident scenarios present acceptable risk. Once all risks are acceptable, we conduct an operational readiness review (ORR). A management appointed panel performs the ORR ensuring compliance with all relevant requirements. After successful completion of the ORR, operations can begin.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: Short-Term Lightweight Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In the short term, replacing heavy steel components with materials such as high-strength steel, aluminum, or glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites can decrease component weight ...

  5. Fact #642: September 27, 2010 Material Content per Light Vehicle...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3,694 4,070 *Other Materials include: Regular steel, other steels, magnesium castings, copper and brass, lead, zinc castings, powder metal, other metals, rubber, coatings, ...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. ...

  7. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fiber-filled engineered plastic alternatives Re-design a lighter, more compact steel bead * Milestones - Status Identify alternate materials that provide comparable...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. 2011propulsionmaterials.pdf (21.95 MB) More Documents & ...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. 2010propulsionmaterials.pdf (21.92 MB) More Documents & ...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. 2012propulsionmaterials.pdf (22.34 MB) More Documents & ...

  11. WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VEHICLES TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE WORKSHOP REPORT: Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials February 2013 FINAL REPORT This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Applied Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) for New Propulsion Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Applied...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for High-Efficiency Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    engines for automotive, light trucks, and heavy-truck applications by 25% to 50%. ... light-weight engine materials for automotive applications as well as new iron-based ...

  14. Tulane/Xavier University hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Brief summaries of individual investigators participating in the Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Ecosystems are provided.

  15. Hazardous Materials Verification and Limited Characterization Report on Sodium and Caustic Residuals in Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799/799A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mecham

    2010-08-01

    This report is a companion to the Facilities Condition and Hazard Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Sodium Processing Facilities MFC-799/799A and Nuclear Calibration Laboratory MFC-770C (referred to as the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment). This report specifically responds to the requirement of Section 9.2, Item 6, of the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment to provide an updated assessment and verification of the residual hazardous materials remaining in the Sodium Processing Facilities processing system. The hazardous materials of concern are sodium and sodium hydroxide (caustic). The information supplied in this report supports the end-point objectives identified in the Transition Plan for Multiple Facilities at the Materials and Fuels Complex, Advanced Test Reactor, Central Facilities Area, and Power Burst Facility, as well as the deactivation and decommissioning critical decision milestone 1, as specified in U.S. Department of Energy Guide 413.3-8, “Environmental Management Cleanup Projects.” Using a tailored approach and based on information obtained through a combination of process knowledge, emergency management hazardous assessment documentation, and visual inspection, this report provides sufficient detail regarding the quantity of hazardous materials for the purposes of facility transfer; it also provides that further characterization/verification of these materials is unnecessary.

  16. Converting environmentally hazardous materials into clean energy using a novel nanostructured photoelectrochemical fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Yong X.; Gan, Bo J.; Clark, Evan; Su, Lusheng; Zhang, Lihua

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ? A photoelectrochemical fuel cell has been made from TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. ? The fuel cell decomposes environmentally hazardous materials to produce electricity. ? Doping the anode with a transition metal oxide increases the visible light sensitivity. ? Loading the anode with a conducting polymer enhances the visible light absorption. -- Abstract: In this work, a novel photoelectrochemical fuel cell consisting of a titanium dioxide nanotube array photosensitive anode and a platinum cathode was made for decomposing environmentally hazardous materials to produce electricity and clean fuel. Titanium dioxide nanotubes (TiO{sub 2} NTs) were prepared via electrochemical oxidation of pure Ti in an ammonium fluoride and glycerol-containing solution. Scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the morphology of the nanotubes. The average diameter, wall thickness and length of the as-prepared TiO{sub 2} NTs were determined. The photosensitive anode made from the highly ordered TiO{sub 2} NTs has good photo-catalytic property, as proven by the decomposition tests on urea, ammonia, sodium sulfide and automobile engine coolant under ultraviolet (UV) radiation. To improve the efficiency of the fuel cell, doping the TiO{sub 2} NTs with a transition metal oxide, NiO, was performed and the photosensitivity of the doped anode was tested under visible light irradiation. It is found that the NiO-doped anode is sensitive to visible light. Also found is that polyaniline-doped photosensitive anode can harvest photon energy in the visible light spectrum range much more efficiently than the NiO-doped one. It is concluded that the nanostructured photoelectrochemical fuel cell can generate electricity and clean fuel by decomposing hazardous materials under sunlight.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Materials Issues Associated with EGR Systems (Agreement ID:18571) Project ID:18518

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about materials...

  18. Project T100 -- Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center (HAMMER)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, C.E.

    1994-11-09

    The scope of this Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) is to provide a system of Quality Assurance reviews and verifications on the design and construction of the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center, project 95L-EWT-100 at Hanford. The reviews and verifications will be on activities associated with design, procurement, and construction of the HAMMER project which includes, but is not limited to earthwork, placement of concrete, laying of rail, drilling of wells, water and sewer line fabrication and installation, communications systems, fire protection/detection systems, line tie-ins, building and mock-up (prop) construction, electrical, instrumentation, pump and valves and special coatings.

  19. Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gotovchikov, Vitaly T.; Ivanov, Alexander V.; Filippov, Eugene A.

    1999-03-16

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination oaf plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

  20. Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

    1999-03-16

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

  1. Containment system for experiments on radioactive and other hazardous materials in a Paris-Edinburgh press

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jacobsen, M. K.; Velisavljevic, N.

    2015-11-20

    Recent technical developments using the large volume Paris-Edinburgh press platform have enabled x-ray synchrotron studies at high pressure and temperature conditions. However, its application to some materials of interest, such as high hazard materials that require special handling due to safety issues, reactivity, or other challenges, has not been feasible without the introduction of special containment systems to eliminate the hazards. However, introduction of a containment system is challenging due to the requirement to provide full safety containment for operation in the variety of environments available, while not hindering any of the experimental probes that are available for inert samplemore » measurement. In this work, we report on the development and implementation of a full safety enclosure for a Paris-Edinburgh type press. During the initial development and subsequent application stage of work, experiments were performed on both cerium dioxide (CeO2) and uranium (U). As a result, this device allows for full implementation of all currently available experimental probes involving the Paris-Edinburgh press at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team sector of the Advanced Photon Source.« less

  2. Containment system for experiments on radioactive and other hazardous materials in a Paris-Edinburgh press

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, M. K.; Velisavljevic, N.

    2015-11-20

    Recent technical developments using the large volume Paris-Edinburgh press platform have enabled x-ray synchrotron studies at high pressure and temperature conditions. However, its application to some materials of interest, such as high hazard materials that require special handling due to safety issues, reactivity, or other challenges, has not been feasible without the introduction of special containment systems to eliminate the hazards. However, introduction of a containment system is challenging due to the requirement to provide full safety containment for operation in the variety of environments available, while not hindering any of the experimental probes that are available for inert sample measurement. In this work, we report on the development and implementation of a full safety enclosure for a Paris-Edinburgh type press. During the initial development and subsequent application stage of work, experiments were performed on both cerium dioxide (CeO2) and uranium (U). As a result, this device allows for full implementation of all currently available experimental probes involving the Paris-Edinburgh press at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team sector of the Advanced Photon Source.

  3. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for October 1998 Through March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OIT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOX and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulate. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OIT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1,2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and

  4. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1999 through September 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks.

  5. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program: Semiannual progress report, April 1996--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for contributions to this report.

  6. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.; Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Cooper Tire at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about improving vehicle fuel efficiency...

  8. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1998 thru September 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  9. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-364-2202, Armco Advanced Materials Corporation, Butler, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tubbs, R.L.; Moss, C.E.; Fleeger, A.

    1992-04-01

    In response to a management request, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at ARMCO Advanced Materials Corporation (SIC-3312), Butler, Pennsylvania. ARMCO produced primarily specialty steel products. An indirect method of electric heating was used at the facility to make steel. Concern was expressed about employee exposures to infrasound, electromagnetic radiation, and various dusts throughout the melt shop. The investigation was then expanded to include radiofrequency exposures at the Ultra-Rapid Annealing (URA) furnace located in the Strip Coating and Silicon Anneal Building (SCSAB). Air samples analyzed indicated that the recommended levels were being exceeded for chromium (7440473), manganese (7439965) and lead (7439921). Radiofrequency radiation measurements at the URA furnace and the visible radiation levels near the electric arc furnaces in the melt shops exceeded the appropriate evaluation criteria. The authors conclude that health hazards existed during the survey from excessive airborne levels of hexavalent chromium, manganese, and lead, high levels of optical radiation near the electric arc furnaces, and radiofrequency radiation at the URA furnace. The authors recommended measures to lower these exposures and suggested the institution of medical and environmental surveillance programs.

  10. Safety analysis for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.; Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.

    1993-12-31

    A wide range of hazardous production materials (HPMs) are used in industrial and university facilities engaged in research and development (R&D) related to semiconductor and photovoltaic devices. Because of the nature of R&D facilities where research activities are constantly changing, it is important for facility managers to pro-actively control the storage, distribution, use and disposal of these HPMs. As part of this control process, facility managers must determine the magnitude of the risk presented by their operations and the protection afforded by the administrative, engineering and personnel controls that have been implemented to reduce risks to life and property to acceptable levels. Facility auditing combined with process hazard analysis (PHA), provides a mechanism for identifying these risks and evaluating their magnitude. In this paper, the methods and results of a PHA for a photovoltaic R&D facility handling HPMs are presented. Of the 30 potential accidents identified, none present High or even Moderate Risks; 18 present Low Risks; and, 12 present Routine Risks. Administrative, engineering and personal safety controls associated with each accident are discussed. 15 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Safety analysis for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.; Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.

    1993-11-01

    A wide range of hazardous production materials (HPMs) are used in industrial and university facilities engaged in research and development (R and D) related to semiconductor and photovoltaic devices. Because of the nature of R and D facilities where research activities are constantly changing, it is important for facility managers to pro-actively control the storage, distribution, use and disposal of these HPMs. As part of this control process, facility managers must determine the magnitude of the risk presented by their operations and the protection afforded by the administrative, engineering and personnel controls that have been implemented to reduce risks to life and property to acceptable levels. Facility auditing combined with process hazard analysis (PHA), provides a mechanism for identifying these risks and evaluating their magnitude. In this paper, the methods and results of a PHA for a photovoltaic R and D facility handling HPMs are presented. Of the 30 potential accidents identified, none present High or even Moderate Risks; 18 present Low Risks; and, 12 present Routine Risks. Administrative, engineering and personal safety controls associated with each accident are discussed.

  12. Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

    2010-11-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

  13. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program semiannual progress report for October 1996 through March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and tribological stresses and higher temperatures of advanced designs limit the engine designers; advanced materials allow the design of components that may operate reliably at higher stresses and temperatures, thus enabling more efficient engine designs. Advanced materials also offer the opportunity to improve the emissions, NVH, and performance of diesel engines for pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. The principal areas of research are: (1) cost effective high performance materials and processing; (2) advanced manufacturing technology; (3) testing and characterization; and (4) materials and testing standards.

  14. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight PI: Tim Donley Cooper Tire & Rubber Company June 19, 2014 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Project ID: VSS083 Overview Timeline * Project start date: Oct. 1, 2011 * Project end date: Sept. 30, 2014 * Project complete: 85% Barriers 1) Cost / Premium Product 2) Manufacturability Budget * Total project funding: $3,679,309 - DOE share: $1,500,000 -

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) Development of Carbon Fiber Composites for Lightweight Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ford at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Lightweighting

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Approach to Development of Lightweight 3GAHSS Vehicle Assembly

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by USAMP at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Lightweighting

  17. Safety Analysis: Evaluation of Accident Risks in the Transporation of Hazardous Materials by Truck and Rail at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-04-15

    This report presents an analysis of the consequences and risks of accidents resulting from hazardous material transportation at the Savannah River Plant.

  18. Assessment of natural radioactivity and associated radiation hazards in some building materials used in Kilpenathur, Tiruvannamalai dist, Tamilnadu, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghu, Y.; Harikrishnan, N.; Ravisankar, R.; Chandrasekaran, A.

    2015-08-28

    The present study aimed to measure the radioactivity concentration of naturally occuring radionuclides in the locally used building materials from Kilpenthaur, Tiruvannmalai Dist, Tamilnadu, India. This study will also evaluate the radiation hazard arising due to the use of these materials in the construction of dwellings. The concentrations of natural radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K in five types of building materials have been measured by gamma spectrometry using NaI (Tl) 3” x 3”detector. The estimated radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), indoor absorbed gamma dose rate (D{sub R}), annual effective dose rate (H{sub R}) and the external hazard indexes(H{sub ex}) were lower than the recommended safe limit and are comparable with results from similar studies conducted in other countries. Therefore, the use of these building material samples under investigation in the construction of dwellings is considered to be safe for inhabitants.

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Materials for Advanced Turbocharger Designs (Agreement ID:17257) Project ID:18518

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about materials for...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Validation of Material Models for Crash Simulation of Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures (VMM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ford Motor Company at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about validation of material...

  1. Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles: Workshop Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles October 29, 2015 Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (This page intentionally left blank) Section title Unt utaerest in pos eum quo con et iii ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR COLD AND CRYOGENIC HYDROGEN STORAGE APPLICATIONS IN FUEL CELL ELECTRIC VEHICLES Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Advanced Bus and Truck Radial Materials for Fuel Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by PPG at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Vehicle Systems

  3. Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799, 799A, and 770C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mecham; Don Konoyer

    2009-11-01

    The Materials & Fuel Complex (MFC) facilities 799 Sodium Processing Facility (a single building consisting of two areas: the Sodium Process Area (SPA) and the Carbonate Process Area (CPA), 799A Caustic Storage Area, and 770C Nuclear Calibration Laboratory have been declared excess to future Department of Energy mission requirements. Transfer of these facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management, and an associated schedule for doing so, have been agreed upon by the two offices. The prerequisites for this transfer to occur are the removal of nonexcess materials and chemical inventory, deinventory of the calibration source in MFC-770C, and the rerouting and/or isolation of utility and service systems. This report provides a description of the current physical condition and any hazards (material, chemical, nuclear or occupational) that may be associated with past operations of these facilities. This information will document conditions at time of transfer of the facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management and serve as the basis for disposition planning. The process used in obtaining this information included document searches, interviews and facility walk-downs. A copy of the facility walk-down checklist is included in this report as Appendix A. MFC-799/799A/770C are all structurally sound and associated hazardous or potentially hazardous conditions are well defined and well understood. All installed equipment items (tanks, filters, etc.) used to process hazardous materials remain in place and appear to have maintained their integrity. There is no evidence of leakage and all openings are properly sealed or closed off and connections are sound. The pits appear clean with no evidence of cracking or deterioration that could lead to migration of contamination. Based upon the available information/documentation reviewed and the overall conditions observed during the facilities walk-down, it is concluded that these facilities may be disposed of

  4. Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STD-5507-2013 February 2013 DOE STANDARD Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects [This Standard describes acceptable, but not mandatory means for complying with requirements. Standards are not requirements documents and are not to be construed as requirements in any audit or appraisal for compliance with associated rule or directives.] U.S. Department of Energy SAFT

  5. WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials February 2013 FINAL REPORT This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

  6. Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, Jagdish C

    2010-04-19

    TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

  7. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  8. Improving Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Through Tire Design, Materials, and Reduced Weight

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  9. Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Approach to Development of Lightweight 3GAHSS Vehicle Assembly

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  10. Waste management facilities cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.; Burton, D.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains cost information on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex waste streams that will be addressed by DOE in the programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) project. It describes the results of the task commissioned by DOE to develop cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste. It contains transportation costs for most types of DOE waste streams: low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), alpha LLW and alpha MLLW, Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) LLW and DOE equivalent waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and hazardous waste. Unit rates for transportation of contact-handled (<200 mrem/hr contact dose) and remote-handled (>200 mrem/hr contact dose) radioactive waste are estimated. Land transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste is subject to regulations promulgated by DOE, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and state and local agencies. The cost estimates in this report assume compliance with applicable regulations.

  11. Hazard evaluation for 244-AR vault facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRAUN, D.J.

    1999-08-25

    This document presents the results of a hazard identification and evaluation performed on the 244-AR Vault Facility to close a USQ (USQ No.TF-98-0785, Potential Inadequacy in Authorization Basis (PIAB): To Evaluate Miscellaneous Facilities Listed In HNF-2503 And Not Addressed In The TWRS Authorization Basis) that was generated as part of an evaluation of inactive TWRS facilities. A hazard evaluation for the Hanford Site 244-AR Vault Facility was performed. The process and results of the hazard evaluation are provided in this document. A previous hazard evaluation was performed for the 244-AR Vault Facility in 1996 in support of the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The results of that evaluation are provided in the BIO. Upon review of those results it was determined that hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the 244-AR vaults due to flooding was not addressed in the original hazards evaluation. This supplemental hazard evaluation addresses this oversight of the original hazard evaluation. The results of the hazard evaluation were compared to the current TWRS BIO to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting changes to the AB. It is only intended to provide information about hazardous conditions associated with the condition and configuration of the 244-AR vault facility. The AB Control Decision process could be used to determine the applicability and adequacy of existing AB controls as well as any new controls that may be needed for the identified hazardous conditions associated with 244-AR vault flooding. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  12. Fleet Vehicles | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fleet Vehicles General Information: The Materials and Transportation Fleet Vehicle section provides acquisition, utilization and maintenance records, and disposal of vehicles used...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Temperature Materials for High Efficiency Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Temperature Materials for High Efficiency Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Innovative SCR Materials and Systems for Low Temperature Aftertreatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Microscopy Investigation on the Fading Mechanism of Electrode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Electrode Materials Design and Failure Prediction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Development of High-Energy Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: High Energy Anode Material Development for Li-Ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sinode Systems at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: First Principles Calculations of Existing and Novel Electrode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Predicting and Understanding Novel Electrode Materials From First-Principles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: First Principles Calculations of Existing and Novel Electrode Material

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Massachusetts Institute of Technology at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about first...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Predicting and Understanding Novel Electrode Materials From First-Principles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Predicting and Understanding Novel Electrode Materials from First-Principles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Design of High Performance, High Energy Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about design...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Design and Synthesis of Advanced High-Energy Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Design and Synthesis of Advanced High-Energy Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about design...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Enabling Materials for High Temperature Power Electronics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about enabling...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Design and Synthesis of Advanced High-Energy Cathode Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Atomistic models of LMRNMC Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about atomistic models...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Continuum Modeling as a Guide to Developing New Battery Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Process Development and Scale up of Advanced Active Battery Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Process...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Process Development and Scale Up of Advanced Electrolyte Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about process...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Tailored Materials for Improved Internal Combustion Engine Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Design of High Performance, High Energy Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about design...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: User Facilities for Energy Storage Materials Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about user facilities...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about first principles calculations...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Microscopy Investigation on the Fading Mechanism of Electrode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Microscopy Investigation on the Fading Mechanism of Electrode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Design of High Performance, High Energy Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Development of High-Energy Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Active, Tailorable Adhesives for Dissimilar Material Bonding, Repair and Assembly

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Michigan State University at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Active, tailorable...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Active, Tailorable Adhesives for Dissimilar Material Bonding, Repair and Assembly

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Michigan State University at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about active, tailorable...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Active, Tailorable Adhesives for Dissimilar Material Bonding, Repair and Assembly

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Michigan State University at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Lightweighting

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Advanced In Situ Diagnostic Techniques for Battery Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of High-Energy Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: First Principles Calculations of Existing and Novel Electrode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Massachusetts Institute of Technology at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about first...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Understanding Structural Changes in LMR-NMC Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about understanding...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Low Cost Manufacturing of Advanced Silicon-Based Anode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Group14 at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced In-Situ Diagnostic Techniques for Battery Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Brookhaven National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced in...

  13. Preliminary report of the past and present uses, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, M.

    1985-12-01

    This report contains the findings of a records search performed to survey the past and present use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials and wastes at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site. This report provides a point of departure for further planning of environmental protection activities at the site. This report was conducted using the LLNL archives and library, documents from the US Navy, old LLNL Plant Engineering blueprint files, published articles and reports, Environmental Protection Program records, employee interviews, and available aerial photographs. Sections I and II of this report provide an introduction to the LLNL site and its environmental characteristics. Several tenants have occupied the site prior to the establishment of LLNL, currently operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy. Section III of this report contains information on environmentally related operations of early site users, the US Navy and California Research and Development. Section IV of this report contains information on the handling of hazardous materials and wastes by LLNL programs. The information is presented in 12 sub-sections, one for each currently operating LLNL program. General site areas, i.e., garbage trenches, the traffic circle landfill, the taxi strip, and old ammunition bunkers are discussed in Section V. 12 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs.

  14. Demonstration of improved vehicle fuel efficiency through innovative tire design, materials, and weight reduction technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donley, Tim

    2014-12-31

    Cooper completed an investigation into new tire technology using a novel approach to develop and demonstrate a new class of fuel efficient tires using innovative materials technology and tire design concepts. The objective of this work was to develop a new class of fuel efficient tires, focused on the “replacement market” that would improve overall passenger vehicle fuel efficiency by 3% while lowering the overall tire weight by 20%. A further goal of this project was to accomplish the objectives while maintaining the traction and wear performance of the control tire. This program was designed to build on what has already been accomplished in the tire industry for rolling resistance based on the knowledge and general principles developed over the past decades. Cooper’s CS4 (Figure #1) premium broadline tire was chosen as the control tire for this program. For Cooper to achieve the goals of this project, the development of multiple technologies was necessary. Six technologies were chosen that are not currently being used in the tire industry at any significant level, but that showed excellent prospects in preliminary research. This development was divided into two phases. Phase I investigated six different technologies as individual components. Phase II then took a holistic approach by combining all the technologies that showed positive results during phase one development.

  15. Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semi-annual progress report for October 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

  16. Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. ); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. )

    1992-07-01

    To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

  17. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mara, L.M.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

  18. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: High Temperature Materials for High Efficiency Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Applied Computational Methods for New Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Materials Benchmarking Activities For CAMP Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Electrode Architecture-Assembly of Battery Materials and Electrodes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Hydro Quebec at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electrode architecture-assembly...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Lithium-Ion Battery Production and Recycling Materials Issues

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about lithium-ion...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Process Development and Scale-Up of Critical Battery Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Process Development and Scale-up of Advanced Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about process development and scale...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Mixed Polyanion (MP) Glasses as Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about mixed polyanion...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Lithium-Bearing Mixed Polyanion Glasses as Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about lithium-bearing...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Electrode Architecture-Assembly of Battery Materials and Electrodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Hydro-Québec at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about electrode architecture-assembly...

  9. Fact #642: September 27, 2010 Material Content per Light Vehicle, 1995 and 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The use of high and medium strength steels in light vehicle construction increased by more than 60% from 1995 to 2008. Plastic and plastic composites, aluminum, and stainless steel also saw...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Post-Test Analysis of Lithium-Ion Battery Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Batteries