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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Hazardous Material Security (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All facilities processing, storing, managing, or transporting hazardous materials must be evaluated every five years for security issues. A report must be submitted to the Department of the...

2

BNL | CFN: Transport of Hazardous Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials Transportation of Hazardous Materials and Nanomaterials The following contains guidance for transporting materials to and from BNL and for on-site transfers. All staff and users must adhere to Laboratory guidelines when making plans to move materials either by commercial carrier or in rented or personal vehicles. BNL hazardous material transport guidelines apply for products that meet the definition of hazardous materials according to 49 CFR 171.8 and any nanomaterial that has known hazardous properties (toxic, flammable, reactive). BNL guidelines are also provided for all other nanomaterials even if they have not been identified as hazardous materials. Some materials may be transported in personal vehicles as per "Materials of Trade" (MOT) guidance. The regulations for transporting MOT are much

3

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHSS EHSS Industrial Hygiene Group HazMat Transport/Shipping Home Biological & Infectious Substances Chemicals Compressed Gas Cryogens Dry Ice Engineered Nanomaterials Gasoline Lithium Betteries Radioactive Materials Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Mixed Hazardous Materials Personal/Rental Vehicles HazMat Transport/Shipping Transporting and shipping hazardous materials can be dangerous, but both activities can be done safely - much of it by the researchers themselves. Each of the items below is subject to some transportation or shipping restrictions. Click on the applicable hazardous material icon below to learn how you can safely (and legally) transport that hazardous material and to learn what laboratory resources are available to you for your shipping needs.

4

Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Manufacturers use propulsion (or powertrain) materials in the components that move vehicles of every size and shape. Conventional vehicles use these materials in...

5

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FHWA FHWA R d W h M P FHWA R d W h M P FHWA Road Weather Management Program FHWA Road Weather Management Program " "Weather and the transport of Hazardous Materials" Ray Murphy Office of Technical Services Ray Murphy, Office of Technical Services U.S. DOT - Federal Highway Administration Breako t Session Using Technolog to Dispatch U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Breakout Session: Using Technology to Dispatch and Monitor Shipments During Adverse Conditions Presentation Contents Presentation Contents * * Context Context Cl Cl I iti ti I iti ti * * Clarus Clarus Initiative Initiative * * Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather Connected Vehicles & Weather U.S. DOE National Transportation Stakeholder Forum

6

Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials Manufacturers use propulsion (or powertrain) materials in the components that move vehicles of every size and shape. Conventional vehicles use these materials in components such as the engine, transmission, fuel system, and exhaust after-treatment systems. Electric drive vehicles use propulsion materials in their electric motors and power electronics. Developing advanced propulsion materials is essential to commercializing new, highly efficient automotive technologies that have technical requirements that existing powertrain materials cannot meet. The Vehicle Technology Office's (VTO) research in propulsion materials focuses on four areas: Materials for hybrid and electric drive systems Materials for high efficiency combustion engines Materials to enable energy recovery systems and control exhaust gases

7

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Waste -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Do not transport or ship hazardous material wastes off-site. Only Waste Management, Radiation Protection or approved...

8

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials such as high-strength steel, magnesium (Mg) alloys, aluminum (Al) alloys, carbon fiber, and polymer composites can directly reduce the weight of a vehicle's body...

9

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation...

10

Materials - Vehicle Recycling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

end-of-life vehicles are shredded, along with other metal bearing items such as home appliances, process equipment and demolition debris, and their metals content is recovered for...

11

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications...

12

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications.

Sidney Diamond; D. Ray Johnson

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials

14

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium Batteries Lithium batteries are considered hazardous materials when shipped by air. Notify Shipping for any shipments that include lithium batteries. Note: If you need to...

15

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin Blackwell for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16,...

16

Hazardous Material Transportation Safety (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the Division of Highway Safety, in the Department of Public Safety, to promulgate regulations pertaining to the safe transportation of hazardous materials by a motor...

17

Date: ____________ MATERIAL FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 2003 Date: ____________ MATERIAL FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL 1) Source: Bldg: ________________________________________ Disinfection? cc YES, Autoclaved (each container tagged with `Treated Biomedical Waste') cc YES, Chemical

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

18

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCYRESPONSE TRAINING...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Authorization Act authorized the establishment of Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training and Education Centers at Department of Energy sites...

19

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

Ray Johnson

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemicals Chemicals Hand-Carry Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Hand-Carry Employees may hand-carry small quantities of hazardous materials between adjacent buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, stairs, etc.) within buildings, provided it can be done safely and without spilling the materials. Staff must use hand carts, drip trays, or another type of secondary container to contain any spills should they occur during self-transport. Hazardous materials hand-carried between non-adjacent buildings should be packaged to a higher level of integrity. As a best practice, package these substances following the General Requirements listed under the Self-Transport by Vehicle. As with any work involving chemicals, staff must also have completed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Proceedings: Hazardous Waste Material Remediation Technology Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the proceedings of an EPRI workshop on hazardous waste materials remediation. The workshop was the fourth in a series initiated by EPRI to aid utility personnel in assessing technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. This workshop focused on specific aspects of hazardous waste management as they relate to nuclear plant decommissioning. The information will help utilities understand hazardous waste issues, select technologies for their individual projects, and reduce decom...

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

22

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Railroad Hazardous g Railroad Hazardous g Materials Transportation Safety Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Kevin R. Blackwell Radioactive Materials Program Manager Radioactive Materials Program Manager H d M t i l Di i i H d M t i l Di i i Hazmat Hazardous Materials Division Hazardous Materials Division Federal Railroad Administration Federal Railroad Administration Presentation for the Presentation for the DOE NTSF Meeting DOE NTSF Meeting May 10 May 10- -12, 2011 12, 2011 Our Regulated Community * More than 550 l d railroads * 170,000 miles of track * 220,000 employees * 1.3 million railcars * 20,000 locomotives Hazmat * 3,500 chemical shippers * Roughly 2 Million Roughly 2 Million annual HM shipments HM-232E Introduction * Notice of Proposed Rulemaking d b * Issued December 21, 2006 * Interim Final Rule

23

Detection device for hazardous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a detection device that is activated by the interaction of a hazardous chemical with a coating interactive with said chemical on an optical fiber thereby reducing the amount of light passing through the fiber to a light detector. A combination of optical filters separates the light into a signal beam and a reference beam which after detection, appropriate amplification, and comparison with preset internal signals, activates an alarm means if a predetermined level of contaminant is observed.

Partin, J.K.; Grey, A.E.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act,...

25

Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

Osterman, Robert A. (Canonsburg, PA); Cox, Robert (West Mifflin, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Training Program EHS 657 ~ Self-Transporting Hazardous Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Health, & Safety Training Program EHS 657 Self-Transporting Hazardous Materials Training Course Syllabus...

27

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Permit Fees for Hazardous Waste Material Management (Connecticut...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Material Management (Connecticut) Permit Fees for Hazardous Waste Material Management (Connecticut) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government...

29

Nuclear and hazardous material perspective  

SciTech Connect

The reemerging nuclear enterprise in the 21. century empowering the power industry and nuclear technology is still viewed with fear and concern by many of the public and many political leaders. Nuclear phobia is also exhibited by many nuclear professionals. The fears and concerns of these groups are complex and varied, but focus primarily on (1) management and disposal of radioactive waste [especially spent nuclear fuel and low level radioactive waste], (2) radiation exposures at any level, and (3) the threat nuclear terrorism. The root cause of all these concerns is the exaggerated risk perceived to human health from radiation exposure. These risks from radiation exposure are compounded by the universal threat of nuclear weapons and the disastrous consequences if these weapons or materials become available to terrorists or rogue nations. This paper addresses the bases and rationality for these fears and considers methods and options for mitigating these fears. Scientific evidence and actual data are provided. Radiation risks are compared to similar risks from common chemicals and familiar human activities that are routinely accepted. (authors)

Sandquist, Gary M. [Applied Science Professionals, PO Box 9052 Salt Lake City, UT 84109 (United States); Kunze, Jay F. [Idaho State University PO Box 8060 Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Rogers, Vern C. [University of Utah PO Box 510087 Salt Lake City, UT 84151 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

31

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOT/PHMSA DOT/PHMSA A ti iti Activities Michael Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Radioactive Materials U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Overview * Harmonization with International Regulations * Update on Revisions to International Regulations * Recent Letters of Interpretation * Update on Rulemakings * PHMSA Information Resources - 2 - * PHMSA Information Resources 2 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-230 Harmonized with 2000 Version of IAEA's 1996 Edition - 3 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

32

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stiffness, and ductility) Improving their manufacturing (material cost, production rate, or yield) Developing alloys of advanced materials In the short term, replacing heavy...

33

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lightweight Materials Lightweight Material Mass Reduction Magnesium 30-70% Carbon fiber composites 50-70% Aluminum and Al matrix composites 30-60% Titanium 40-55% Glass fiber...

34

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #642: September 27, 2010 Material Content  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: September 27, 2: September 27, 2010 Material Content per Light Vehicle, 1995 and 2008 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #642: September 27, 2010 Material Content per Light Vehicle, 1995 and 2008 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #642: September 27, 2010 Material Content per Light Vehicle, 1995 and 2008 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #642: September 27, 2010 Material Content per Light Vehicle, 1995 and 2008 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #642: September 27, 2010 Material Content per Light Vehicle, 1995 and 2008 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #642: September 27, 2010 Material Content per Light Vehicle, 1995 and 2008 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #642:

35

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for High Efficiency Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Efficiency Combustion Engines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for High Efficiency Combustion Engines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle...

36

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S....

37

Hazard avoidance for high-speed rough-terrain unmanned ground vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-speed unmanned ground vehicles have important applications in rough-terrain. In these applications unexpected and dangerous situations can occur that require rapid hazard avoidance maneuvers. At high speeds, there is ...

Spenko, Matthew J. (Matthew Julius), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Vehicle Technologies Office: ORNL's High Temperature Materials Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL's High Temperature ORNL's High Temperature Materials Laboratory Assists NASCAR Teams to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: ORNL's High Temperature Materials Laboratory Assists NASCAR Teams on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: ORNL's High Temperature Materials Laboratory Assists NASCAR Teams on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: ORNL's High Temperature Materials Laboratory Assists NASCAR Teams on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: ORNL's High Temperature Materials Laboratory Assists NASCAR Teams on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: ORNL's High Temperature Materials Laboratory Assists NASCAR Teams on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: ORNL's High Temperature Materials Laboratory Assists NASCAR Teams on AddThis.com...

39

Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The hazardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

Rofer, C.K.; Buelow, S.J.; Dyer, R.B.; Wander, J.D.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

Experiment Hazard Class 8.1 - Radioactive Materials/Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Radioactive Materials 1 - Radioactive Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving radioactive materials as samples. The requirements of this hazard class also apply to sealed radioactive sources that are used as a sample (i.e. a target for x-ray radiation). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The current requirements can be found in the APS Policy for Conducting Radioactive Sample Experiments in APS Experiment Enclosures. NOTE: The APS must be notified of shipment of any radioactive materials to the site well in advance of the proposed experiment. All radioactive materials must arrive through Argonne Receiving in Building 46 and the Argonne Materials Control & Accountability group (MC&A). Please contact

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Cryogens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

applicable guidance. Controls & Limits required for Self-Transporting Cryogens by Vehicle flow chart General Requirements General requirements are designed to minimize the...

42

Toll Policies for Mitigating Hazardous Materials Transport Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate toll setting as a policy tool to regulate the use of roads for dangerous goods shipments. We propose a mathematical formulation as well as a solution method for the hazardous materials toll problem. Based on a comparative ... Keywords: bilevel programming, hazardous materials transportation, network design, toll setting

Patrice Marcotte; Anne Mercier; Gilles Savard; Vedat Verter

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hazardous materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center strategic plan  

SciTech Connect

This strategic Plan was developed in keeping with the Department of Energy`s mission for partnership with its customers to contribute to our Nation`s welfare by providing the technical information and the scientific and educational foundation for the technology, policy and institutional leadership necessary to achieve efficiency in energy use, diversity in energy sources, a more productive and competitive economy, improved environmental quality, and a secure national defense. The Plan provides the concepts for realigning the Departments`s Hazardous Materials Spill Center (HSC) in achieving its vision of becoming the global leader in meeting the diverse HAZMAT needs in the areas of testing, training, and technology. Each of these areas encompass many facets and a multitude of functional and operational requirements at the Federal, state, tribal, and local government levels, as well as those of foreign governments and the private sector. The evolution of the limited dimensional Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility into a multifaceted HAZMAT Spill Center will require us to totally redefine our way of thinking as related to our business approach, both within and outside of the Department. We need to establish and maintain a viable and vibrant outreach program through all aspects of the public (via government agencies) and private sectors, to include foreign partnerships. The HAZMAT Spill Center goals and objectives provide the direction for meeting our vision. This direction takes into consideration the trends and happenings identified in the {open_quotes}Strategic Outlook{close_quotes}, which includes valuable input from our stakeholders and our present and future customers. It is our worldwide customers that provide the essence of the strategic outlook for the HAZMAT Spill Center.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development and deployment of advanced vehicle technologies, including advances in electric vehicles, engine efficiency, and lightweight materials....

45

Experiment Hazard Class 7.5 - Human Tissue/Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 - Human Tissue/Materials 5 - Human Tissue/Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving biohazards requiring the use of human tissue/materials. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Human tissue/materials must also be evaluated for their biosafety level and as such will have to go through the process for that particular Biosafety Level. IMPORTANT NOTE: For non-Argonne employees, all experiment protocols involving human tissue are required to be either reviewed or declared exempt from review by their home institution's Institutional Review Board (IRB). Documentation of the review should be filed in the ESAF system and with the APS BioSafety Officer (BSO) (Nena Moonier 2-8504,

46

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice Dry ice is regulated as a hazardous material if shipped by air or water. Contact Shipping for any shipments that include dry ice (x5094, x4388, or shipping@lbl.gov)....

47

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Hybrid and for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Hybrid and Electric Drive Systems on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines

49

Conversion of hazardous materials using supercritical water oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for destruction of hazardous materials in a medium of supercritical water without the addition of an oxidant material. The harzardous material is converted to simple compounds which are relatively benign or easily treatable to yield materials which can be discharged into the environment. Treatment agents may be added to the reactants in order to bind certain materials, such as chlorine, in the form of salts or to otherwise facilitate the destruction reactions.

Rofer, Cheryl K. (Los Alamos, NM); Buelow, Steven J. (Los Alamos, NM); Dyer, Richard B. (Los Alamos, NM); Wander, Joseph D. (Parker, FL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Biological...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

containment as needed to keep the primary containers upright. Remove gloves and wash hands after preparing biological materials for transport. Lab coat, clean gloves, and...

51

Numerical assessment of flood hazard risk to people and vehicles in flash floods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flash flooding often leads to extremely dangerous and sometimes catastrophic conditions in rivers due to characteristics such as: short timescales, the limited opportunity for issuing warnings, and the frequent high average mortality. Many past extreme ... Keywords: Flash floods, Flood hazard risk, Numerical assessment, People safety, Vehicle safety

Junqiang Xia; Roger A. Falconer; Binliang Lin; Guangming Tan

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Material instability hazards in mine-processing operations  

SciTech Connect

Many accidents occur in the mining industry as a result of the instability of material during handling and processing operation. Accidents due to dump point instability at stockpiles, and at spoil or waste piles, for example, occur with alarming frequency. Miners must be trained to be better aware of these hazards. Information on safe working procedures at stockpiles and surge piles is provided. Mine operators must review their training and operating procedures regularly to ensure that hazardous conditions are avoided.

Fredland, J.W.; Wu, K.K.; Kirkwood, D.W.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: March 8, 2004 0: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310: March 8, 2004 Average Material Consumption for a Domestic Automobile on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #310:

54

Energy and Materials Issues That Affect Electric Vehicle Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leaching processes on the spent battery (without smelting). Argonne has published several papers on Ni-MH batteries. Energy and Materials Issues That Affect Electric Vehicle...

55

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Energy Recovery Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems and Controlling Exhaust Gases to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials for Energy Recovery Systems and Controlling Exhaust Gases on Facebook...

56

A Study on the Characteristics of Materials for Railway Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Study on the Characteristics of Materials for Railway Vehicles · A Study on ... Preparation and Characterization of UV-cured Hybrid Nanofiber Membrane by ...

57

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber to someone by E-mail Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight Materials Long-Term Applied Research: Magnesium and Carbon Fiber on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lightweight

58

Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials Ensuring Safe Shipment of Hazardous Materials March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A truck carries a waste shipment from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. EM completed legacy cleanup activities at the site last year. A truck carries a waste shipment from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. EM completed legacy cleanup activities at the site last year. Emergency responders participate in a training exercise in the Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP), which also recently released its annual report. Administered by EM’s Office of Packaging and Transportation, TEPP ensures federal, state, tribal and local responders have access to the plans, training and technical assistance necessary to safely, efficiently and effectively respond to radiological transportation accidents.

59

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

60

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act contains information on prevention strategies for hazardous material release, permits for facilities managing hazardous waste, and response tactics and liability in the event such release...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment  

SciTech Connect

For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

McGinnis, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bolton, P.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, R.K. [RKR, Inc. (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Radioactive Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials Radioactive Materials Refer to transportation guidelines in the applicable Radioactive Work Authorization (RWA). Contact the Radiation Protection Group (x7652) if transportation assistance is needed or if radioactive materials need to be shipped. Refer to RPG's Zone sheet to identifying the RCT or HP for your building: https://ehswprod.lbl.gov/rpg/who_to_call.shtml Need radioactive material shipped from LBNL? Please complete the request for shipment form online, print, sign, and forward to your building assigned RPG support person: RPG Transportation - Request for Shipment Form: http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/rpg/assets/docs/Transportation4.pdf Receiving radioactive material at LBNL? If receiving radioactive material at LBNL; radioactive material should be sent to the following address:

63

Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal. 40 figs.

Murray, H. Jr.

1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

64

Method and apparatus for the management of hazardous waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for storing hazardous waste material, particularly radioactive waste material, consists of a cylindrical body and lid of precipitation hardened C17510 beryllium-copper alloy, and a channel formed between the mated lid and body for receiving weld filler material of C17200 copper-beryllium alloy. The weld filler material has a precipitation hardening temperature lower than the aging kinetic temperature of the material of the body and lid, whereby the weld filler material is post weld heat treated for obtaining a weld having substantially the same physical, thermal, and electrical characteristics as the material of the body and lid. A mechanical seal assembly is located between an interior shoulder of the body and the bottom of the lid for providing a vacuum seal.

Murray, Jr., Holt (Hopewell, NJ)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper...

66

Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (<1 second) and long reaction times (>5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #556: February 2, 2009 Change in Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: February 2, 6: February 2, 2009 Change in Material Content of Light Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #556: February 2, 2009 Change in Material Content of Light Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #556: February 2, 2009 Change in Material Content of Light Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #556: February 2, 2009 Change in Material Content of Light Vehicles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #556: February 2, 2009 Change in Material Content of Light Vehicles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #556: February 2, 2009 Change in Material Content of Light Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #556: February 2, 2009 Change in Material Content of Light Vehicles on

69

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

70

Vehicle Technologies Office: Materials by Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

improve research on a variety of technologies, such as: Magnetics for electric motors Thermoelectric materials for energy recovery Improved catalysts for exhaust...

71

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

Gotovchikov, Vitaly T. (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Alexander V. (Moscow, RU); Filippov, Eugene A. (Moscow, RU)

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials: Recent Progress and Future Plans  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program provides enabling materials technology for the U.S. DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program is based on an industry assessment and the technology roadmap for the OHVT. A five-year program plan was published in 2000. Major efforts in the program are materials for diesel engine fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, and air handling. Additional efforts include diesel engine valve-train materials, structural components, and thermal management. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications. Selected technical issues and planned and ongoing projects as well as brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Rules and Regulations for the Investigation and Remediation of Hazardous Material Releases (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish procedures for the investigation and remediation of contamination resulting from the unpermitted release of hazardous materials. The regulations aim to protect water...

75

Review of composite material applications in the automotive industry for the electric and hybrid vehicle. Annual report, November 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive review is made of the state-of-the-art in regard to the use of composite materials for reducing the structural mass of automobiles. Reduction of mass will provide, in addition to other engineering improvements, increased performance/range advantages that are particularly needed in the electric and hybrid vehicle field. Problems to be overcome include the attainment of mass production techniques and the prevention of environmental hazards.

Bauer, J.L.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

An evaluation of current hazardous material management procedures for the Texas Department of Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dealing with hazardous materials on a day-to-day basis requires a fine--tuned material management system to minimize risk of exposure or injury to workers or to the public. An effective hazardous material management system should also keep up with all current regulatory requirements. This study evaluates the current hazardous material management procedures that the Texas Department of Transportation (TXDOT) is utilizing to ensure that if falls within the legal scope of the law and to provide recommendations for any areas of concern that may need to be improved. To satisfy this objective, a review of all the current and applicable federal regulations is conducted to determine the correct procedures for handling the hazardous materials that TXDOT uses daily. A discussion of the various state regulatory agencies is also included, as well as, a copy of all the applicable forms and documents that TXDOT must complete for these agencies. Since federal compliance is required of all the state transportation agencies, a brief review of several state DOT hazardous material management plans is covered to determine-nine how other agencies are handling their hazardous materials. And finally, TxDOT's current hazardous material handling procedures are discussed, including identification of several problem areas of concern, along with a series of recommendations to help improve TxDOT's current hazardous material management system.

Lovell, Cheryl Alane

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fuel Cell Vehicle World Survey 2003-Introductory Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Vehicle Fuel Cell Vehicle World Survey 2003 Breakthrough Technologies Institute Washington, D.C. 20006 February 2004 Notes Organization. We have organized the auto industry reports alphabetically. The automobile industry is interconnected via cross ownership, and fuel cell research projects are often collaborations. This leads to some duplication in our reports, but we hope it helps the reader to find specific information quickly. Quotes. The field visits and telephone calls were on a not-for-attribution basis. Any material appearing in quotations in the document comes from published sources. Photographs and Art Work. We believe that all photos and artwork contained herein are in the public domain. BTI would be happy to attribute these materials to their author wherever

78

GRR/Section 18 - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 18 - Waste and Hazardous Material Assessment Process 18 - WasteAndHazardousMaterialAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Environmental Protection Agency Regulations & Policies RCRA CERCLA 40 CFR 261 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 18 - WasteAndHazardousMaterialAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The use of underground and above ground storage tanks, discovery of waste

79

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

HM-ACCESS Project (Framework for the Use of Electronic Shipping Papers for the Transport of Hazardous Materials)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-ACCESS Initiative James Simmons Acting Chief, Research and Development Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Engineering and Research Division May 2012 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 2 H-azardous M-aterials A-utomated C-argo C-ommunication for E-fficient and S-afe S-hipments U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Background Purpose: To identify and eliminate barriers to the use of paperless hazard communication technologies to improve the delivery of critical hazardous materials (HM) safety information throughout the transportation chain.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. PTS13-01.doc More Documents & Publications Order Module--DOE O 460.1C, PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION SAFETY, DOE O

82

A hybrid GA-TS algorithm for open vehicle routing optimization of coal mines material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the open vehicle routing problem (OVRP), the objective is to minimize the number of vehicles and the total distance (or time) traveled. This study primarily focuses on solving an open vehicle routing problem (OVRP) by applying a novel hybrid genetic ... Keywords: Coal mine material, Genetic algorithms, Hybrid, Open vehicle routing problem, Optimize, Tabu search

Shiwei Yu; Chang Ding; Kejun Zhu

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations.

Borgeson, M.E.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

84

An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect

The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

Yurconic, M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect

The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

Yurconic, M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Screening tests for hazard classification of complex waste materials - Selection of methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study we describe the development of an alternative methodology for hazard characterization of waste materials. Such an alternative methodology for hazard assessment of complex waste materials is urgently needed, because the lack of a validated instrument leads to arbitrary hazard classification of such complex waste materials. False classification can lead to human and environmental health risks and also has important financial consequences for the waste owner. The Hazardous Waste Directive (HWD) describes the methodology for hazard classification of waste materials. For mirror entries the HWD classification is based upon the hazardous properties (H1-15) of the waste which can be assessed from the hazardous properties of individual identified waste compounds or - if not all compounds are identified - from test results of hazard assessment tests performed on the waste material itself. For the latter the HWD recommends toxicity tests that were initially designed for risk assessment of chemicals in consumer products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biocides, food, etc.). These tests (often using mammals) are not designed nor suitable for the hazard characterization of waste materials. With the present study we want to contribute to the development of an alternative and transparent test strategy for hazard assessment of complex wastes that is in line with the HWD principles for waste classification. It is necessary to cope with this important shortcoming in hazardous waste classification and to demonstrate that alternative methods are available that can be used for hazard assessment of waste materials. Next, by describing the pros and cons of the available methods, and by identifying the needs for additional or further development of test methods, we hope to stimulate research efforts and development in this direction. In this paper we describe promising techniques and argument on the test selection for the pilot study that we have performed on different types of waste materials. Test results are presented in a second paper. As the application of many of the proposed test methods is new in the field of waste management, the principles of the tests are described. The selected tests tackle important hazardous properties but refinement of the test battery is needed to fulfil the a priori conditions.

Weltens, R., E-mail: reinhilde.weltens@vito.be [VITO Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vanermen, G.; Tirez, K. [VITO Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B 2400 Mol (Belgium); Robbens, J. [University of Antwerp - Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Deprez, K.; Michiels, L. [University of Hasselt - Biomedical Research Institute, University Hasselt, Campus Diepenbeek, Agoralaan A, B3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Regulations Establishing Restricted Zones for the Transportation of Hazardous Materials (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations establish a Shore Clearance Line which cannot be crossed except in an emergency by any vessel transporting oil or hazardous materials in bulk in Long Island Sound. For the purpose...

88

Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability: Real-Time Modeling of Airborne Hazardous Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a centralized federal project for assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous materials in real time. Since ARAC began making assessments in 1974, the ...

Thomas J. Sullivan; James S. Ellis; Connee S. Foster; Kevin T. Foster; Ronald L. Baskett; John S. Nasstrom; Walter W. Schalk III

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Surveillance Guides - PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. 2.0 References DOE O 460.1A, Packaging and Transportation Safety DOE O 460.2, Chg1, Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging

90

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Flows of selected hazardous materials by rail. Final report for Sep 87-Apr 91  

SciTech Connect

The report is a review of hazardous materials rail traffic in the continental United States. It focuses on the year 1986, a relatively typical recent year in which an estimated total of 1,477 million net tons of freight was moved by rail. Of this, 63 million net tons, or four percent of the total, were hazardous materials. The report is designed to characterize the flow of selected hazardous materials and show their geographical distribution. It focusses on materials that (1) have large tonnages moving by rail, such as Products of Refining, (2) are regarded as especially dangerous, such as Products That May Be Toxic by Inhalation, or (3) have been recently designated as hazardous materials, such as molten or liquid sulphur. Its scope includes national, state and Business Economic Areas (BEAs) rail traffic. The purpose of the report is to help those in government and industry who are interested in the flows of hazardous materials see how these materials are geographically distributed by rail.

Beier, F.; Church, R.; Zebe, P.; Frev, J.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Improved Empty Vehicle Balancing in Automated Material Handling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of automated guided vehicles in high-tech industries such as the semiconductor industry results, due to the size of such factories, in highly complex rail-networks. In contrast to the routing of vehicles that are transporting a lot to its destination, ... Keywords: Vehicle Balancing, AMHS, Semiconductor, Simulation

Roland Wertz; Christian Fischmann; Fabian Böttinger; Martin Kasperczyk

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Experiment Hazard Class 6.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials .7 - Explosive and Energetic Materials Applicability All experiments involving the use of small quantities ( < 10 mg total) of explosive material for beamline analysis. Visiting scientists at the APS periodically perform beamline experiments involving small quantities of explosive material (ie, TATB, HMX, RDX, PETN, HNFX). The samples that are analyzed within the x-ray beam are typically encased within a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) that is designed to exert pressures of ~ 100 GPa as its routine function. Following a few hours of analysis within the x-ray flux, the samples degrade and must be replenished. For this purpose, up to ten 1 mg samples of the explosive material are shipped with the DAC to allow for a complete data set. Explosive material must be transported to and from ANL through Bldg. 46,

94

Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Organic and Inorganic Hazardous Waste Stabilization Using Coal Combustion By-Product Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a laboratory investigation of four clean-coal by-products to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous waste stream materials. The wastes included API separator sludge, metal oxide-hydroxide waste, metal plating sludge, and creosote-contaminated soil. Overall, the investigation showed that the high alkalinity of the by-products may cost-effectively stabilize the acidic components of hazardous waste.

1994-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

96

ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information.

Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

97

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Compressed Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gases Compressed Gases Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Self-Transport by Vehicle Ship by Common Carrier Conduct Field Work Return Cylinders Self-Transport by Hand & Foot Staff may personally move (self-transport) compressed gas cylinders by hand & foot between buildings and in connecting spaces (i.e., hallways, elevators, etc.) within buildings provided it can be done safely. The following safety precautions apply: Use standard cylinder dollies to transport compressed gas cylinders. While dollies are preferred, cylinders weighing 11 Kg (25 lbs) or less may be hand-carried. Never move a cylinder with a regulator connected to it. Cylinder valve-protection caps and valve-opening caps must be in place when moving cylinders. Lecture bottles and other cylinders that are

98

Emergency response planning for railroad transportation related spills of oil or other hazardous materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In December 1984 an unintentional release of poison gas from a chemical plant in Bhopal, India killed over 2,500 people. Thousands of others were injured. Although this material was not in transportation at the time, this accident raised public awareness. Americans began to ask, "What if something similar happened here?" Chemicals with hazardous properties have become part of daily life. Industry, government, and the public have become aware of the need to respond to problems involving hazardous materials. Safe transportation of hazardous materials is very important. Union Pacific Railroad transports more hazardous material shipments than any other carrier. Early on they realized the benefits to having a dedicated team of personnel to respond to incidents involving hazardous materials. In order to remain the safest carrier of these commodities, an emergency response plan utilizing in house response personnel was needed. This document describes how that plan was created and includes a copy of the plan for the Union Pacific Railroad's Settegast Yard in Houston, Texas. Other carriers may use this as a template to establish their own in house response teams or emergency response plans.

Reeder, Geoffrey Benton

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Materials Development for Vehicle Weight Reduction and the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For example, weight reduction can also enable wider use of electric and hybrid drive vehicles by improving range or reducing battery size. Heavy-duty trucks can  ...

100

Ultraviolet reflector materials for solar detoxification of hazardous waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Organic waste detoxification requires cleavage of carbon bonds. Such reactions can be photo-driven by light that is energetic enough to disrupt such bonds. Alternately, light can be used to activate catalyst materials, which in turn can break organic bonds. In either case, photons with wavelengths less than 400 nm are required. Because the terrestrial solar resource below 400 nm is so small (roughly 3% of the available spectrum), highly efficient optical concentrators are needed that can withstand outdoor service conditions. In the past, optical elements for solar application have been designed to prevent ultraviolet (uv) radiation from reaching the reflective layer to avoid the potentially harmful effects of such light on the collector materials themselves. This effectively forfeits the uv part of the spectrum in return for some measure of protection against optical degradation. To optimize the cost/performance benefit of photochemical reaction systems, optical materials must be developed that are not only highly efficient but also inherently stable against the radiation they are designed to concentrate. The requirements of uv optical elements in terms of appropriate spectral bands and level of reflectance are established based upon the needs of photochemical applications. Relevant literature on uv reflector materials is reviewed which, along with discussions with industrial contacts, allows the establishment of a data base of currently available materials. Although a number of related technologies exist that require uv reflectors, to date little attention has been paid to achieving outdoor durability required for solar applications. 49 refs., 3 figs.

Jorgensen, G.; Govindarajan, R.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Electrolytic decontamination of conductive materials for hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

Electrolytic removal of plutonium and americium from stainless steel and uranium surfaces has been demonstrated. Preliminary experiments were performed on the electrochemically based decontamination of type 304L stainless steel in sodium nitrate solutions to better understand the metal removal effects of varying cur-rent density, pH, and nitrate concentration parameters. Material removal rates and changes in surface morphology under these varying conditions are reported. Experimental results indicate that an electropolishing step before contamination removes surface roughness, thereby simplifying later electrolytic decontamination. Sodium nitrate based electrolytic decontamination produced the most uniform stripping of material at low to intermediate pH and at sodium nitrate concentrations of 200 g L{sup -1} and higher. Stirring was also observed to increase the uniformity of the stripping process.

Wedman, D.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Hazardous material minimization for radar assembly. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendment, enacted in November 1990, empowered the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to completely eliminate the production and usage of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by January 2000. A reduction schedule for methyl chloroform beginning in 1993 with complete elimination by January 2002 was also mandated. In order to meet the mandates, the processes, equipment, and materials used to solder and clean electronic assemblies were investigated. A vapor-containing cleaning system was developed. The system can be used with trichloroethylene or d-Limonene. The solvent can be collected for recycling if desired. Fluxless and no-clean soldering were investigated, and the variables for a laser soldering process were identified.

Biggs, P.M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Lightweight materials in the light-duty passenger vehicle market: Their market penetration potential and impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a lightweight materials study. Various lightweight materials are examined and the most cost effective are selected for further analysis. Aluminum and high-performance polymer matrix composites (PMCS) are found to have the highest potential for reducing the weight of automobiles and passenger-oriented light trucks. Weight reduction potential for aluminum and carbon fiber-based PMCs are computed based on a set of component-specific replacement criteria (such as stiffness and strength), and the consequent incremental cost scenarios are developed. The authors assume that a materials R and D program successfully reduces the cost of manufacturing aluminum and carbon fiber PMC-intensive vehicles. A vehicle choice model is used to project market shares for the lightweight vehicles. A vehicle survival and age-related usage model is employed to compute energy consumption over time for the vehicle stock. After a review of projected costs, the following two sets of vehicles are characterized to compete with the conventional materials vehicles: (1) aluminum vehicles with limited replacement providing 19% weight reduction (AIV-Mid), and (2) aluminum vehicles with the maximum replacement providing 31% weight reduction (AIV-Max). Assuming mass-market introduction in 2005, the authors project a national petroleum energy savings of 3% for AIV-Mid and 5% for AIV-Max in 2030.

Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research]|[Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Quantifying the Heat-Related Hazard for Children in Motor Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirty-seven children on average die each year in the United States from vehicle-related hyperthermia. In many cases, the parent or care-giver intentionally left the child unattended in the car, unaware of how quickly temperatures may reach ...

Andrew Grundstein; John Dowd; Vernon Meentemeyer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Original Research Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2):151-156.

Robert Jones Md; Brandon Wills Do; Christopher Kang Md

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Hazardous Material Technician Apprenticeship Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes an apprenticeship training program for hazardous material technician. This entry-level category is achieved after approximately 216 hours of classroom and on-the-job training. Procedures for evaluating performance include in-class testing, use of on-the-job checks, and the assignment of an apprentice mentor for each trainee. (TEM)

Steiner, S.D.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

SUFFOLK COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES TOXIC/HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRANSFER FACILITY DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facilities transferring toxic/hazardous materials with the following exceptions: A) gasoline station or similar installation solely incident to the retail sale or personal consumption of motor fuels for motor, phone number, signature and seal: C) Suffolk County tax map number (District-Section-Block-Lot); D

Homes, Christopher C.

108

Emergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-492-6025. For Non-Emergency Fire and Natural Gas Questions call the CU Fire Marshall @ 303-492-4042. AdditionalEmergency Action Plan For incidents involving hazardous materials, fires, explosions, or natural gas leaks, the following actions should be taken: 1) Life Safety First 2) Evacuate Immediate Area 3

Colorado at Boulder, University of

109

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment plan - Developed By NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance Objective: Verify that packaging and transportation safety requirements of hazardous materials and materials of national security interest have been established and are in compliance with DOE Orders 461.1 and 460.1B Criteria: Verify that safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE/NNSA offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport have been established [DOE O 460.1B, 1, "Objectives"]. Verify that the contractor transporting a package of hazardous materials is in compliance with the requirements of the Hazardous Materials Regulations

110

Method for acid oxidation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed organic waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a process for reducing the volume of low level radioactive and mixed waste to enable the waste to be more economically stored in a suitable repository, and for placing the waste into a form suitable for permanent disposal. The invention involves a process for preparing radioactive, hazardous, or mixed waste for storage by contacting the waste starting material containing at least one organic carbon-containing compound and at least one radioactive or hazardous waste component with nitric acid and phosphoric acid simultaneously at a contacting temperature in the range of about 140.degree. C. to about 210 .degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the organic carbon-containing compound to gaseous products, thereby producing a residual concentrated waste product containing substantially all of said radioactive or inorganic hazardous waste component; and immobilizing the residual concentrated waste product in a solid phosphate-based ceramic or glass form.

Pierce, Robert A. (Aiken, SC); Smith, James R. (Corrales, NM); Ramsey, William G. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Bickford, Dennis F. (Folly Beach, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Materials used in new generation vehicles: supplies, shifts, and supporting infrastructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program intends to develop new designs for automobiles that will reduce fuel consumption by two thirds but otherwise have price, comfort, safety, and other measures of performance similar to the typical automobile now on the market. PNGV vehicle designs are expected to substitute lightweight materials, such as aluminum, magnesium, carbon-reinforced polymer composites, glass-reinforced polymer composites, and ultra- light steel, for heavier materials such as steel and iron in automobile components. The target mass of a PNGV vehicle is 1,960 pounds, as compared to the average current vehicle that weights 3,240 pounds. Other changes could include the use of different ferrous alloys, engineering changes, or incorporation of advanced ceramic components. Widespread adoption of these vehicle designs would affect materials markets and require concurrent development and adoption of supporting technologies to supply the materials and to use and maintain them in automobiles. This report identifies what would be required to bring about these changes and developments in materials substitution; identifies reasons that might make these substitutions difficult to accomplish within the overall objectives and timetable of the PNGV program; and identifies any issues arising from the substitution that could prompt consideration of policies to deal with them. The analysis in this paper uses scenarios that assume the production of new generation vehicles will begin in 2007 and that their market share will increase gradually over the following 25 years. The scenarios on which the analysis is based assume a maximum substitution of each potential replacement material considered. This maximum substitution of individual materials (i.e., the amount of replacement material by weight that would be added to the baseline vehicle`s composition) is as follows: ULSAB (high strength steel), 298 lbs.; glass-reinforced composites, 653 lbs.; carbon-reinforced composites, 379 lbs.; aluminum, 926 lbs.; and magnesium, 216 lbs. The substitutions (and the steel and iron they replace) are multiplied by the number of new generation vehicles produced on an annual basis out to 2030 to determine the total quantity of material used in new generation vehicles and the quantity of steel that would be displaced. We identified six stages in the life cycle of materials--mining or extraction of resources; smelting or other processing to produce the material from the resource; producing components from the material; assembling the components into vehicles, using, maintaining, and repairing vehicles; and disposing of the vehicle, including any recycling of materials for automotive or other use--and identified what might be required to supply and use the substitute materials at different life cycle stages. The variables considered are the mineral or material supply, the capital and equipment (including necessary capacity, technical changes, cost, and location), labor and employment, energy, material complements, and environmental emissions and impacts. The analysis shows that raw materials to produce each of the replacement materials are sufficiently available, and adequate mining or extraction capacity exists for each. However, challenges are possible at the material production stage for three of the four materials. For aluminum and magnesium the difficulties are associated with requirements for significant new production capacity, necessary for aluminum because new production equipment will be needed to produce the material in a cost-effective manner and for magnesium because current production capacity is inadequate. The required capacity investment for magnesium to meet demand in 2030 is $13.1 billion. Both materials also would sharply increase energy requirements, and both industries would likely develop mostly--if not entirely--outside the United States. To produce the carbon-based fiber to meet PNGV demand in 2015, an entire new industry must be developed--a $4.6 billion investment. Significant environmental concerns

Das, S.; Curlee, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexnayder, S.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliance Alliance Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program Update: Ensuring Safe Transportation of Radioactive Material Carlisle Smith Director, Hazardous Materials Programs Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Email: carlisles@cvsa.org Phone: 301-830-6147 CVSA Levels of Inspections Level I Full inspection Level II Walk Around - Driver - Vehicle Level III Driver - Paperwork Level IV Special Project - Generally focus on one item CVSA Levels of Inspections Level V Vehicle Only Level VI Enhanced RAM Level VII Jurisdictional Mandated * 8 basic classes/year held in various states * Prerequisites: CVSA Level I and HAZMAT certified * Industry attends course * To date 135 classes/2268 attendees * Currently 702 certified Level VI

113

An overview of safety assessment, regulation, and control of hazardous material use at NREL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the methodology we use to ensure the safe use of hazardous materials at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). First, we analyze the processes and the materials used in those processes to identify the hazards presented. Then we study federal, state, and local regulations and apply the relevant requirements to our operations. When necessary, we generate internal safety documents to consolidate this information. We design research operations and support systems to conform to these requirements. Before we construct the systems, we perform a semiquantitative risk analysis on likely accident scenarios. All scenarios presenting in unacceptable risk require system or procedural modifications to reduce the risk. Following these modifications, we repeat the risk analysis to ensure that the respective accident scenarios present acceptable risk. Once all risks are acceptable, we conduct an operational readiness review (ORR). A management appointed panel performs the ORR ensuring compliance with all relevant requirements. After successful completion of the ORR, operations can begin.

Nelson, B.P.; Crandall, R.S. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Review of the Lawrence Livermore Nationa Laboratory Identiified Defective Department of Transportation Hazardous Material Packages  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Site Visit Report - Review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Identified Defective Department of Transportation Hazardous Material Packages This site visit report documents the results of Office of Health, Safety and Security's review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) identification, immediate actions, communications, documentation, evaluation, reporting and follow-up to the discovery of defective Department of Transportation (DOT) UN1A2 55- and 30-gallon open head single bolt closure steel drums intended for storage and transportation of hazardous waste and materials. This review, conducted on January 26-29, 2010, was sponsored by the DOE Livermore Site Office (LSO) to support interface with the lab and this report is intended to support follow-up

115

FY 2006 Annual Progress Report - Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc.) ... 67 4. MATERIALS FOR AIR HANDLING AND THERMAL MANAGEMENT... 75 A. Austenitic Stainless Steel...

116

Functional design criteria for the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Within the United States, there are few hands-on training centers capable of providing integrated technical training within a practical application environment. Currently, there are no training facilities that offer both radioactive and chemical hazardous response training. There are no hands-on training centers that provide training for both hazardous material operations and emergency response that also operate as a partnership between organized labor, state agencies, tribes, and local emergency responders within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Available facilities appear grossly inadequate for training the thousands of people at Hanford, and throughout the Pacific Northwest, who are required to qualify under nationally-mandated requirements. It is estimated that 4,000 workers at the Hanford Site alone need hands-on training. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, the potential target audience would be over 30,000 public sector emergency response personnel, as well as another 10,000 clean-up workers represented by organized labor. The HAMMER Training Center will be an interagency-sponsored training center. It will be designed, built, and operated to ensure that clean-up workers, fire fighters, and public sector management and emergency response personnel are trained to handle accidental spills of hazardous materials. Training will cover wastes at clean-up sites, and in jurisdictions along the transportation corridors, to effectively protect human life, property, and the environment.

Sato, P.K.

1995-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hydrogen Storage Materials for Fuel Cell-Powered Vehicles - DOE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to design suitable methods using MgH 2 as a model system. These methods included: Synthesis of new materials by mechanical alloying using * ball milling. Determining...

118

Heavy Vehicle Materials Program 2005 Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MERIT REVIEW & PEER EVALUATION REPORT MERIT REVIEW & PEER EVALUATION REPORT HEAVY VEHICLE MATERIALS PROGRAM Less dependence on foreign oil, and eventual transition to an emissions-free, petroleum-free vehicle F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 2005 Dear Colleague: This document summarizes the comments provided by the Review Panel for the FY 2005 Department of Energy (DOE) Heavy Vehicle Materials Program Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, held September 13-15, 2005 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The goal of this document is to provide the reader with a summary of the comments and scores from expert reviewers from industry and government on these Materials Technologies projects.

119

Transportation of RCRA hazardous wastes. RCRA Information Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA) regulate the transport of hazardous wastes. Under these statutes, specific pretransport regulatory requirements must be met by DOE before the shipment of hazardous wastes, including radioactive mixed wastes. The pretransport requirements are designed to help reduce the risk of loss, leakage, or exposure during shipment of hazardous materials and to communicate information on potential hazards posed by the hazardous material in transport. These goals are accomplished through the tracking of shipments, correctly packaging and labeling containers, and communicating potential hazards. Specific requirements include manifesting, packaging, marking and labeling waste packages; placarding transport vehicles; choosing appropriate waste transporters and shipment destinations; and record keeping and reporting. This information Brief focuses primarily on the transporter requirements both for transportation within a DOE facility and using a commercial transporter to transport RCRA hazardous wastes off-site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination oaf plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

Gotovchikov, Vitaly T. (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Alexander V. (Moscow, RU); Filippov, Eugene A. (Moscow, RU)

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for October 1998 Through March 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OIT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOX and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulate. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OIT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1,2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and tribological stresses and higher temperatures of advanced designs limit the engine designer; advanced materials allow the design of components that may operate reliably at higher stresses and temperatures, thus enabling more efficient engine designs. Advanced materials also offer the opportunity to improve the emissions, NVH, and performance of diesel engines for pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. The principal areas of research are: (1) Cost Effective High Performance Materials and Processing; (2) Advanced Manufacturing Technology; (3)Testing and Characterization; and (4) Materials and Testing Standards.

Johnson, R.D.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hazardous properties and environmental effects of materials used in solar heating and cooling (SHAC) technologies: interim handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General background informaion related to SHAC systems, how a particular material was chosen for this handbook, and codes and standards are given. Materials are categorized according to their functional use in SHAC systems as follows: (1) heat transfer fluids and fluid treatment chemicals, (2) insulation materials, (3) seals and sealant materials, (4) glazing materials, (5) collector materials, and (6) storage media. The informaion is presented under: general properties, chemical composition, thermal degradation products, and thermoxidative products of some commercial materials; toxic properties and other potential health effects; fire hazard properties; and environmental effects of and disposal methods for SHAC materials. (MHR)

Searcy, J.Q.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1999 through September 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks.

Johnson, D.R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program: Semiannual progress report, April 1996--September 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for contributions to this report.

Johnson, D.R.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1998 thru September 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

Johnson, D.R.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AUG 0 3 1998 AUG 0 3 1998 Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Dr. S. Denver, Colorado 80222-1530 _,l ' 7. ,;:""" I,!._ -~~ . Dear Mr. Simpson: We have reviewed your letter of July 10, 1998, requesting that the Department of Energy (DOE) reconsider its decision to exclude the Marion Millsite in Boulder County, Colorado, from remediation under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). As you may know, FUSRAP is no longer administered and executed by DOE as Congress transferred the program to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers beginning.in fiscal year 1998. Nonetheless, we weighed the information included in your letter against the

128

Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation of Hazardous Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 16, 2012 HMCRP Project HM-04: Emerging Technologies Applicable to Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety and Security 2 The HM-04 Team * Battelle - Prime - Bill Tate, Project Director/PI & Co-Author * Dr. Mark Abkowitz, Vanderbilt University - Co-Author * American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) - Dan Murray, Lead * Visionary Solutions, LLC - Dan Hoglund, Lead * Olin Chemical Chlor-Alkali Division - Don Loftis 3 Project Objectives * Develop a list of near-term (less than 5 years) and longer-term (5-15 years) technologies that are candidates for enhancing safety and security of Hazmat transportation; * Identify emerging technologies that hold the greatest promise (in terms of effectiveness) of being introduced

129

ORNL IntelligentFreight Initiative:Enhanced End-to-End Supply Chain Visibility of Security Sensitive Hazardous Materials  

SciTech Connect

In the post September 11, 2001 (9/11) world the federal government has increased its focus on the manufacturing, distributing, warehousing, and transporting of hazardous materials. In 2002, Congress mandated that the Transportation Security Agency (TSA) designate a subset of hazardous materials that could pose a threat to the American public when transported in sufficiently large quantities. This subset of hazardous materials, which could be weaponized or subjected to a nefarious terrorist act, was designated as Security Sensitive Hazardous Materials (SSHM). Radioactive materials (RAM) were of special concern because actionable intelligence had revealed that Al Qaeda desired to develop a homemade nuclear device or a dirty bomb to use against the United States (US) or its allies.1 Because of this clear and present danger, it is today a national priority to develop and deploy technologies that will provide for visibility and real-time exception notification of SSHM and Radioactive Materials in Quantities of Concern (RAMQC) in international commerce. Over the past eight years Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing, implementing, and deploying sensor-based technologies to enhance supply chain visibility. ORNL s research into creating a model for shipments, known as IntelligentFreight, has investigated sensors and sensor integration methods at numerous testbeds throughout the national supply chain. As a result of our research, ORNL believes that most of the information needed by supply chain partners to provide shipment visibility and exceptions-based reporting already exists but is trapped in numerous proprietary or agency-centric databases.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Shankar, Mallikarjun [ORNL; Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Safety Analysis: Evaluation of Accident Risks in the Transporation of Hazardous Materials by Truck and Rail at the Savannah River Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of the consequences and risks of accidents resulting from hazardous material transportation at the Savannah River Plant.

Blanchard, A.

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Chemical stability of salt cake in the presence of organic materials. [Detonation hazard  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-level waste stored as salt cake is principally NaNO/sub 3/. Some organic material is known to have been added to the waste tanks. It has been suggested that some of this organic material may have become nitrated and transformed to a detonable state. Arguments are presented to discount the presence of nitrated organics in the waste tanks. Nitrated organics generated accidentally usually explode at the time of formation. Detonation tests show that salt cake and ''worst-case'' organic mixtures are not detonable. Organic mixtures with salt cake are compared with black powder, a related exothermic reactant. Black-powder mixtures of widely varying composition can and do burn explosively; ignition temperatures are 300-450/sup 0/C. However, black-powder-type mixes cannot be ignited by radiation and are shock-insensitive. Temperatures generated by radionuclide decay in the salt are below 175/sup 0/C and would be incapable of igniting any of these mixtures. The expected effect of radiation on organics in the waste tanks is a slow dehydrogenation and depolymerization along with a slight increase in sensitivity to oxidation. The greatest explosion hazard, if any exists, is a hydrogen--oxygen explosion from water radiolysis, but the hydrogen must first be generated and then trapped so that the concentration of hydrogen can rise above 4 vol percent. This is impossible in salt cake. Final confirmation of the safety against organic-related explosive reactions in the salt cake will be based upon analytical determinations of organic concentrations. 12 tables, 5 fig. (DLC)

Beitel, G.A.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Life-cycle analysis of hazardous chemicals in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIT policies set forth by the Department of Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS) require that all laboratories maintain a chemical inventory to properly document the use of hazardous chemicals. While EHS has provided a ...

Chia, Valerie Jing-chi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Qualitative evaluation of the accuracy of maps for release of hazardous materials.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LinguisticBelief%C2%A9 software tool developed by Sandia National Laboratories was applied to provide a qualitative evaluation of the accuracy of various maps that provide information on releases of hazardous material, especially radionuclides. The methodology, %E2%80%9CUncertainty for Qualitative Assessments,%E2%80%9D includes uncertainty in the evaluation. The software tool uses the mathematics of fuzzy sets, approximate reasoning, and the belief/ plausibility measure of uncertainty. SNL worked cooperatively with the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) and the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop models for three types of maps for use in this study. SNL and RSL developed the maps for %E2%80%9CAccuracy Plot for Area%E2%80%9D and %E2%80%9CAerial Monitoring System (AMS) Product Confidence%E2%80%9D. SNL and LLNL developed the %E2%80%9CLLNL Model%E2%80%9D. For each of the three maps, experts from RSL and LLNL created a model in the LinguisticBelief software. This report documents the three models and provides evaluations of maps associated with the models, using example data. Future applications will involve applying the models to actual graphs to provide a qualitative evaluation of the accuracy of the maps, including uncertainty, for use by decision makers. A %E2%80%9CQuality Thermometer%E2%80%9D technique was developed to rank-order the quality of a set of maps of a given type. A technique for pooling expert option from different experts was provided using the PoolEvidence%C2%A9 software.

Darby, John L.; Marianno, Craig [National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV] National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Expansion of the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT EXPANSION OF THE VOLPENTEST HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING AND EDUCATION CENTER HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2002 1 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact This page intentionally left blank. 2 November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1412, for expanding training and equipment testing facilities at the Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) on the

135

Wind tunnel simulation of wind effects and associated displacement hazards on flat surface construction materials such as plywood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accidents and hazards continue to plague the construction industry. One often overlooked hazard to workers is the potential for flying debris and materials during high winds. This research was designed to evaluate the wind velocity required to create such an airborne hazard with flat surface materials such as plywood. This research was developed to show select correlations between the wind velocity, lifting forces and the susceptibility to movement of large surface area flat sheets of construction material, specifically four feet by eight feet sheets of floordeck plywood weighing 107 pounds. It also examined and evaluated the correlation of a shape coefficient to movement of materials and wind velocities, so that calculations can be made to adequately predict the potential movement of these materials. This will allow construction supervisors to reasonably prepare for such anticipated conditions. The Texas A&M University low speed wind tunnel was used to place a ftffl-scale stack of plywood floor decking material with the air stream flowing over the stack until top sheet separated or lifted from the stack. Next, a half-scale model was placed in the test section of the tunnel with pressure ports attached to a high speed sampling transducer to measure the actual pressures at select velocities. This allowed for a correlation between the ftifl-scale data and the sampled data. Tests were performed for several front and side angles of the wind striking the edge surface of the materials. Velocities were used up to 60 miles per hour full-scale equivalent. The full-scale model achieved lift forces exceeding the material weight of 107 pounds at one orientation angle at a velocity just below 30 miles per hour. This was consistent with the half-scale test pressures for a similar orientation. Various orientations yielded different forces as was anticipated. From this information a pressure coefficient was developed which when applied with a safety factor allows for reasonable calculations to be made to determine potential hazards and adequately secure materials on any sites where large flat materials may be handled or stored.

Madeley, Jack T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799, 799A, and 770C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials & Fuel Complex (MFC) facilities 799 Sodium Processing Facility (a single building consisting of two areas: the Sodium Process Area (SPA) and the Carbonate Process Area (CPA), 799A Caustic Storage Area, and 770C Nuclear Calibration Laboratory have been declared excess to future Department of Energy mission requirements. Transfer of these facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management, and an associated schedule for doing so, have been agreed upon by the two offices. The prerequisites for this transfer to occur are the removal of nonexcess materials and chemical inventory, deinventory of the calibration source in MFC-770C, and the rerouting and/or isolation of utility and service systems. This report provides a description of the current physical condition and any hazards (material, chemical, nuclear or occupational) that may be associated with past operations of these facilities. This information will document conditions at time of transfer of the facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management and serve as the basis for disposition planning. The process used in obtaining this information included document searches, interviews and facility walk-downs. A copy of the facility walk-down checklist is included in this report as Appendix A. MFC-799/799A/770C are all structurally sound and associated hazardous or potentially hazardous conditions are well defined and well understood. All installed equipment items (tanks, filters, etc.) used to process hazardous materials remain in place and appear to have maintained their integrity. There is no evidence of leakage and all openings are properly sealed or closed off and connections are sound. The pits appear clean with no evidence of cracking or deterioration that could lead to migration of contamination. Based upon the available information/documentation reviewed and the overall conditions observed during the facilities walk-down, it is concluded that these facilities may be disposed of at minimal risk to human health, safety or the environment.

Gary Mecham; Don Konoyer

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project  

SciTech Connect

TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

Laul, Jadish C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Journal of Hazardous Materials 179 (2010) 895900 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. [7] showed that TCLP-Pb (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) of the surface soil in a Florida shooting range exceeded USEPA hazardous waste criteria of 5 mg Pb L-1. The TCLP-Pb leachability rate (TCLP-Pb:total Pb) was controlled by lead carbonate precipi- tation/dissolution reactions in soils

Ma, Lena

139

Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

Abdelghani, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly project status report discusses research projects being conducted on hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. We continued to seek improvement in our methods of communication and interactions to support the inter-disciplinary, inter-university collaborators within this program. In addition to the defined collaborative research teams, there is increasing interaction among investigators across projects. Planning for the second year of the project has included the development of our internal request for proposals, and refining the review process for selection of proposals for funding.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials February 2013 FINAL REPORT This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise,

142

Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semi-annual progress report for October 1997 through March 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

Johnson, D.R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Quantitative transportation risk analysis based on available data/databases: decision support tools for hazardous materials transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historical evidence has shown that incidents due to hazardous materials (HazMat) releases during transportation can lead to severe consequences. The public and some agencies such as the Department of Transportation (DOT) show an increasing concern with the hazard associated with HazMat transportation. Many hazards may be identified and controlled or eliminated through use of risk analysis. Transportation Risk Analysis (TRA) is a powerful tool in HazMat transportation decision support system. It is helpful in choosing among alternate routes by providing information on risks associated with each route, and in selecting appropriate risk reduction alternatives by demonstrating the effectiveness of various alternatives. Some methodologies have been developed to assess the transportation risk; however, most of those proposed methodologies are hard to employ directly by decision or policy makers. One major barrier is the lack of the match between available data/database analysis and the numerical methodologies for TRA. In this work methodologies to assess the transportation risk are developed based on the availability of data or databases. The match between the availability of data/databases and numerical TRA methodologies is pursued. Each risk component, including frequency, release scenario, and consequence, is assessed based on the available data/databases. The risk is measured by numerical algorithms step by step in the transportation network. Based on the TRA results, decisions on HazMat transportation could be made appropriately and reasonably. The combination of recent interest in expanding or building new facilities to receive liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers, along with increased awareness and concern about potential terrorist action, has raised questions about the potential consequences of incidents involving LNG transportation. One of those consequences, rapid phase transition (RPT), is studied in this dissertation. The incidents and experiments of LNG-water RPT and theoretical analysis about RPT mechanism are reviewed. Some other consequences, like pool spread and vapor cloud dispersion, are analyzed by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) model.

Qiao, Yuanhua

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Rapid road repair vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

Mara, L.M.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STD-5507-2013 STD-5507-2013 February 2013 DOE STANDARD Standard for Communicating Waste Characterization and DOT Hazard Classification Requirements for Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects [This Standard describes acceptable, but not mandatory means for complying with requirements. Standards are not requirements documents and are not to be construed as requirements in any audit or appraisal for compliance with associated rule or directives.] U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 Distribution Statement: A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services,

147

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

148

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Progress Report 3 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on

149

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Progress Report 4 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program on

150

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Safety analysis report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMS). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance. This document contains the appendices to the NREL safety analysis report.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, December 30, 1992--December 29, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and by the year 2000. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. These research and education projects are particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s programs aimed at addressing aquatic pollution problems associated with DOE National Laboratories. First year funding supported seven collaborative cluster projects and twelve initiation projects. This report summarizes research results for period December 1992--December 1993.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

ASSET RECOVERY OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS BENEFICIAL REUSE OF RADIOLOGICALLY ENCUMBERED LEAD STOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underutilized and surplus lead stocks and leaded components are a common legacy environmental problem across much of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. While seeking to dispose of these items through its Environmental Management Program, DOE operational programs continue to pursue contemporary mission requirements such as managing and/or storing radioactive isotopes that require lead materials for shielding. This paradox was identified in late 1999 when DOE's policies for managing scrap metal were assessed. In January 2000, the Secretary of Energy directed the National Center of Excellence for Materials Recycle (NMR) to develop and implement a comprehensive lead reuse program for all of DOE. Fluor Hanford, contractor for DOE Richland Operations, subsequently contacted NMR to pilot lead reclamation and reuse at the Hanford Site. This relationship resulted in the development of a beneficial reuse pathway for lead reclaimed from spent fuel transport railcars being stored at Hanford. The 1.3 million pounds of lead in the railcars is considered radiologically encumbered due to its prior use. Further, the material was considered a mixed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) low-level radioactive waste that would require expensive storage or macro encapsulation to meet land disposal restrictions prior to burial. Working closely with Flour Hanford and the Office of Air, Water, and Radiation (EH-412), NMR developed a directed reuse pathway for this and other radiologically encumbered lead. When derived supplemental release limits were used, the lead recovered from these railcars became eligible for reuse in shielding products to support DOE and commercial nuclear industry operations. Using this disposition pathway has saved Hanford one third of the cost of disposing of the lead and the cost of acquiring additional lead for nuclear shielding applications. Furthermore, the environmental costs associated with mining and producing new lead for shielding products a nd stewardship of the waste was eliminated. Methods and processes developed in cooperation with Fluor Hanford are applicable to, and have been successfully applied to, lead stocks at DOE sites such as Savannah River, Mound, Los Alamos, and Idaho.

Lloyd, E.R.; Meehan, R.W.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thermal Management of Batteries in Advanced Vehicles Using Phase-Change Materials (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Powerpoint presentation examines battery thermal management using PCM and concludes excellent performance in limiting peak temperatures at short period extensive battery use; although, vehicle designers will need to weigh the potential increase in mass and cost associated with adding PCM against the anticipated benefits.

Kim, G.-H.; Gonder, J.; Lustbader, J.; Pesaran, A.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cars on a diet : the material and energy impacts of passenger vehicle weight reduction in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle weight reduction is a known strategy to address growing concerns about greenhouse gas emissions and fuel use by passenger vehicles. We find that every 10% reduction in vehicle weight can cut fuel consumption by ...

Cheah, Lynette W. (Lynette Wan Ting)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Development of Low Cost Carbonaceous Materials for Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries for Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final report on the US DOE CARAT program describes innovative R & D conducted by Superior Graphite Co., Chicago, IL, USA in cooperation with researchers from the Illinois Institute of Technology, and defines the proper type of carbon and a cost effective method for its production, as well as establishes a US based manufacturer for the application of anodes of the Lithium-Ion, Lithium polymer batteries of the Hybrid Electric and Pure Electric Vehicles. The three materials each representing a separate class of graphitic carbon, have been developed and released for field trials. They include natural purified flake graphite, purified vein graphite and a graphitized synthetic carbon. Screening of the available on the market materials, which will help fully utilize the graphite, has been carried out.

Barsukov, Igor V.

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

158

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) Hazardous Wastes Management (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines This legislation gives regulatory authority to the Department of Environmental Management to monitor commercial sites for hazardous wastes; fees on waste received at such sites; hearings and investigations. The legislation also states responsibilities of generators and transporters of hazardous waste as well as responsibilities of hazardous waste storage and treatment facility and hazardous waste disposal site operators. There

159

User`s guide for the KBERT 1.0 code: For the knowledge-based estimation of hazards of radioactive material releases from DOE nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of worker exposure to radioactive materials during accidents at nuclear facilities is a principal concern of the DOE. The KBERT software has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories under DOE support to address this issue by assisting in the estimation of risks posed by accidents at chemical and nuclear facilities. KBERT is an acronym for Knowledge-Based system for Estimating hazards of Radioactive material release Transients. The current prototype version of KBERT focuses on calculation of doses and consequences to in-facility workers due to accidental releases of radioactivity. This report gives detailed instructions on how a user who is familiar with the design, layout and potential hazards of a facility can use KBERT to assess the risks to workers in that facility. KBERT is a tool that allows a user to simulate possible accidents and observe the predicted consequences. Potential applications of KBERT include the evaluation of the efficacy of evacuation practices, worker shielding, personal protection equipment and the containment of hazardous materials.

Browitt, D.S.; Washington, K.E.; Powers, D.A. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 April--30 June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a cluster of twenty separate project reports concerning the fate, environmental transport, and toxicity of hazardous wastes in the Mississippi River Basin. Some of topics investigated involve: biological uptake and metabolism; heavy metal immobilization; biological indicators; toxicity; and mathematical models.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 of 5 Page 1 of 5 VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS 1 Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2011 Nissan Leaf VIN: JN1AZ0CP5BT000356 Class: Mid-size Seatbelt Positions: 5 Type: EV Motor Type: Three-Phase, Four-Pole Permanent Magnet AC Synchronous Max. Power/Torque: 80 kW/280 Nm Max. Motor Speed: 10,390 rpm Cooling: Active - Liquid cooled Battery Manufacturer: Automotive Energy Supply Corporation Type: Lithium-ion - Laminate type Cathode/Anode Material: LiMn 2 O 4 with LiNiO 2 /Graphite Pack Location: Under center of vehicle Number of Cells: 192 Cell Configuration: 2 parallel, 96 series Nominal Cell Voltage: 3.8 V Nominal System Voltage: 364.8 V Rated Pack Capacity: 66.2 Ah Rated Pack Energy: 24 kWh Max. Cell Charge Voltage 2 : 4.2 V Min. Cell Discharge Voltage 2 : 2.5 V

162

Fate and transport processes controlling the migration of hazardous and radioactive materials from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS)  

SciTech Connect

Desert vadose zones have been considered as suitable environments for the safe and long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. Low precipitation, high evapotranspiration and thick unsaturated alluvial deposits commonly found in deserts make them attractive as waste disposal sites. The fate and transport of any contaminant in the subsurface is ultimately determined by the operating retention and transformation processes in the system and the end result of the interactions among them. Retention (sorption) and transformation are the two major processes that affect the amount of a contaminant present and available for transport. Retention processes do not affect the total amount of a contaminant in the soil system, but rather decrease or eliminate the amount available for transport at a given point in time. Sorption reactions retard the contaminant migration. Permanent binding of solute by the sorbent is also possible. These processes and their interactions are controlled by the nature of the hazardous waste, the properties of the porous media and the geochemical and environmental conditions (temperature, moisture and vegetation). The present study summarizes the available data and investigates the fate and transport processes that govern the migration of contaminants from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While the site is currently used only for low-level radioactive waste disposal, past practices have included burial of material now considered hazardous. Fundamentals of chemical and biological transformation processes are discussed subsequently, followed by a discussion of relevant results.

Estrella, R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hazardous Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   General refractory disposal options...D landfill (b) Characterized hazardous waste by TCLP

164

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rural Driving Hazards Rural Driving Hazards SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Rural Driving Hazards The rural location of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site facilities requires that visitors travel on unpaved, dirt and gravel, roads. Visitors should be aware of the driving hazards this presents by taking the following precautions: Proceed cautiously: Many rural roads have unmarked and blind intersections. Slow down: Sanded and gravel raods can cause a vehicle to swerve. Maintain a safe following distance: During the dry season, vehicles

165

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lubricants to someone by Lubricants to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research Materials Technologies Lubricants As most vehicles are on the road for more than 15 years before they are retired, investigating technologies that will improve today's vehicles is

166

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS 1 Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN: 1G1RD6E48BUI00815 Class: Compact Seatbelt Positions: 4 Type 2 : Multi-Mode PHEV (EV, Series, and Power-split) Motor Type: 12-pole permanent magnet AC synchronous Max. Power/Torque: 111 kW/370 Nm Max. Motor Speed: 9500 rpm Cooling: Active - Liquid cooled Generator Type: 16-pole permanent magnet AC synchronous Max. Power/Torque: 55 kW/200 Nm Max. Generator Speed: 6000 rpm Cooling: Active - Liquid cooled Battery Manufacturer: LG Chem Type: Lithium-ion Cathode/Anode Material: LiMn 2 O 4 /Hard Carbon Number of Cells: 288 Cell Config.: 3 parallel, 96 series Nominal Cell Voltage: 3.7 V Nominal System Voltage: 355.2 V Rated Pack Capacity: 45 Ah Rated Pack Energy: 16 kWh Weight of Pack: 435 lb

167

Alternative Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are a number of alternative and advanced vehicles—or vehicles that run on alternative fuels. Learn more about the following types of vehicles:

168

Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research; project: hazardous materials in aquatic environments; subproject: biomarkers and risk assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established in 1989 as the umbrella organization to coordinate environmental research at both universities. CBR projects funded by the DOE under the Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments grant are defining the following: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants through wetlands environments, (2) the actual and potential impact of contaminants on ecological systems and health, (3) the mechanisms and new technologies through which these impacts might be remediated, and (4) new programs aimed at educating and training environmental workers of the future. The subproject described in this report, `Biomarkers and Risk Assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LN`, is particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program aimed at solving problems related to hazard monitoring and clean-up prioritization at sites with aquatic pollution problems in the DOE complex.

Ide, C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. The area surrounding HWSF, the buildings and structures at HWSF, and the processes used at HWSF are described in this report. All nonradiological hazardous materials at the HWSF were identified (radiological hazardous materials are not stored at HWSF) and screened against threshold quantities according to DOE Order 5500.3A guidance. Two of the identified hazardous materials exceeded their specified threshold quantity. This report discusses the potential release scenarios and consequences associated with an accidental release for each of the two identified hazardous materials, lead and mercury. Emergency considerations, such as emergency planning zones, emergency classes, protective actions, and emergency action levels, are also discussed based on the analysis of potential consequences. Evaluation of the potential consequences indicated that the highest emergency class for operational emergencies at the HWSF would be a Site Area Emergency.

Knudsen, J.K.; Calley, M.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

FAQ 12-What are the hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride? What are the hazards associated with uranium hexafluoride? The characteristics of UF6 pose potential health risks, and the material is...

171

Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part D, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 6, Hazard summaries for important materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Task 6 of Oak Ridge Phase I Health Studies is to provide summaries of current knowledge of toxic and hazardous properties of materials that are important for the Oak Ridge Reservation. The information gathered in the course of Task 6 investigations will support the task of focussing any future health studies efforts on those operations and emissions which have likely been most significant in terms of off-site health risk. The information gathered in Task 6 efforts will likely also be of value to individuals evaluating the feasibility of additional health,study efforts (such as epidemiological investigations) in the Oak Ridge area and as a resource for citizens seeking information on historical emissions.

Bruce, G.M.; Walker, L.B.; Widner, T.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

CHSP: HAZARD CONTROLS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP HAZARD CONTROLS CONTROLS FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS arrow image WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS arrow image CHEMICAL STORAGE GUIDELINES DECOMISSIONING LAB AND SHOP SPACES SPECIFIC CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES arrow image EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND EQUIPMENT arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image spacer image HAZARD CONTROLS This section discusses control procedures for limiting employee exposure to chemical hazards. Technical Areas Technical areas include laboratories, shops, workrooms, and similar areas where non-administrative activities are performed. For the purpose of the

173

Hazardous Waste Program (Alabama)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule states criteria for identifying the characteristics of hazardous waste and for listing hazardous waste, lists of hazardous wastes, standards for the management of hazardous waste and...

174

Electrical hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

associated with your work or the equipment you are using, stop the work and ask your CAT representative for guidance in developing safe work practices that minimize the hazards...

175

Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Machines to Electrical Machines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Electrical Machines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Power Electronics Electrical Machines Thermal Control & System Integration Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Electrical Machines Emphasis in the electrical machines activity is on advanced motor

176

Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Electronics to Power Electronics to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Power Electronics on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Power Electronics Electrical Machines Thermal Control & System Integration Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Power Electronics The power electronics activity focuses on research and development (R&D)

177

Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batteries to someone by Batteries to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Batteries Battery Systems Applied Battery Research Long-Term Exploratory Research Ultracapacitors Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Batteries battery/cell diagram Battery/Cell Diagram Batteries are important to our everyday lives and show up in various

178

Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles Vehicles Vehicles EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. Image of three semi truck cabs. The one on the left is yellow, the middle is green, and the far right truck is red. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development and deployment of advanced vehicle technologies, including advances in electric vehicles, engine efficiency, and lightweight materials. Since 2008, the Department of

179

Safety analysis report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMS). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance. This document contains the appendices to the NREL safety analysis report.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Unmanned submarine vehicle  

SciTech Connect

An unmanned self-propelled submarine vehicle is provided with a material exchanger-container having a vertical axis of symmetry aligned with both the vehicle's center of gravity and its center of volume. The exchanger-container has a moveable diaphragm which divides the interior into two compartments, a lower ballast compartment equipped with an unloading apparatus and an upper compartment adapted to receive collected material. Ballast is unloaded during material loading to maintain the weight of the vehicle constant during loading.

Hervieu

1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Basics: Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

182

Energy Basics: Propane Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

183

Energy Basics: Alternative Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

184

Energy Basics: Alternative Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuels. Learn more about the following types of vehicles: Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

185

EERE: Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Office and initiatives, using efficient vehicles, and access vehicle and fuel information. Photo of a ethanol and biodiesel fueling station Photo of three big-rig...

186

Hybrid Vehicle Technology - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Batteries * Batteries * Modeling * Testing Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Hybrid Vehicle Technology revolutionize transportation Argonne's Research Argonne researchers are developing and testing various hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and their components to identify the technologies, configurations, and engine control strategies that provide the best combination of high fuel economy and low emissions. Vehicle Validation Argonne also serves as the lead laboratory for hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) and technology validation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). HIL is a

187

Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities in Vehicles Activities in Vehicles We conduct work in four key areas to develop and deploy vehicle technologies that reduce the use of petroleum while maintaining or improving performance, power, and comfort. Research and development (R&D); testing and analysis; government and community stakeholder support; and education help people access and use efficient, clean vehicles that meet their transportation needs. Researcher loads a sample mount of battery cathode materials for X-ray diffraction, an analysis tool for obtaining information on the crystallographic structure and composition of materials. Research and Development of New Technologies Develop durable and affordable advanced batteries as well as other forms of energy storage. Improve the efficiency of combustion engines.

188

advanced vehicle technologies awards table  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

format cells with extremely high energy density, that meet performance, life, and safety requirements of electric drive vehicles. Applied Materials Inc. Santa Clara, CA...

189

Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis.

Osterman, R.A.; Cox, R.

1991-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

190

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in...

191

Vehicle Tank & Loading Rack Meters - 2013-04-22  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vehicle Tank & Loading Rack Meters. Purpose: ... Participants should bring a calculator to the training. Materials & Supplies: ...

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

192

Radioactive Material or Multiple Hazardous Materials Decontamination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for performing decontamination of individuals who have entered a “hot zone” during transportation incidents involving  radioactive.

193

Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid and Vehicle Hybrid and Vehicle Systems to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Modeling & Simulation Integration & Validation Benchmarking Parasitic Loss Reduction Propulsion Systems Advanced Vehicle Evaluations Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines

194

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urban Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban...

195

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid...

196

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing...

197

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Urban Electric Vehicles Toyota Urban Electric Vehicle Urban electric vehicles (UEVs) are regular passenger vehicles with top speeds of about 60 miles per hour (mph) and a...

198

Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 9 1 Identification of Hazardous Chemical Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Chemical Waste Management Reference Guide for Laboratories 9 1 · Identification of Hazardous Chemical Waste OBJECTIVES Do you know how to do the following? If you do, skip ahead a material must be considered a hazardous chemical waste by using the Radiological-Chemical

Ford, James

199

Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of electrochemical capacitors for advanced vehicle applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrochemical capacitors are a candidate for traction power assists in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Other advanced automotive applications, while not the primary focus of current development efforts, are also possible. These include load leveling high-energy batteries, power conditioning electronics, electrically hated catalysts, electric power steering, and engine starter power. Higher power and longer cycle life are expected for electrochemical capacitors than for batteries. Evaluation of environmental, health, and safety (EH and S) issues of electrochemical capacitors is an essential part of the development and commercialization of electrochemical capacitors for advanced vehicles. This report provides an initial EH and S assessment. This report presents electrochemical capacitor electrochemistry, materials selection, intrinsic material hazards, mitigation of those hazards, environmental requirements, pollution control options, and shipping requirements. Most of the information available for this assessment pertains to commercial devices intended for application outside the advanced vehicle market and to experiment or prototype devices. Electrochemical capacitors for power assists in HEVs are not produced commercially now. Therefore, materials for advanced vehicle electrochemical capacitors may change, and so would the corresponding EH and S issues. Although changes are possible, this report describes issues for likely electrochemical capacitor designs.

Vimmerstedt, L.J.; Hammel, C.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residual Oil Distillate Oil Motor Gasoline Other Petroleumthe use of lubricating oil by motor vehicles is based on theuse of lubricating oil related to motor- vehicle use (g/mi).

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Argonne CNM: Shipping MaterialsM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CNM General In general, users are not permitted to transport hazardous material on the Argonne site or arrange for shipment directly to the CNM. Hazardous materials must be...

202

Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on AddThis.com...

204

FIRE HAZARDS ANALYSIS - BUSTED BUTTE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas at the Busted Butte Test Facility and to ascertain whether the DOE fire safety objectives are met. The objective, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Section 4.2, is to establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees. (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R. Longwell; J. Keifer; S. Goodin

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method of recycling hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

The production of primary metal from ores has long been a necessary, but environmentally devastating process. Over the past 20 years, in an effort to lessen environmental impacts, the metal processing industry has developed methods for recovering metal values from certain hazardous wastes. However, these processes leave residual molten slag that requires disposal in hazardous waste landfills. A new process recovers valuable metals, metal alloys, and metal oxides from hazardous wastes, such as electric arc furnace (EAF) dust from steel mills, mill scale, spent aluminum pot liners, and wastewater treatment sludge from electroplating. At the same time, the process does not create residual waste for disposal. This new method uses all wastes from metal production processes. These hazardous materials are converted to three valuable products - mineral wool, zinc oxide, and high-grade iron.

NONE

1999-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

A unified framework for trajectory planning, threat assessment, and semi-autonomous control of passenger vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the design of an active safety framework that performs trajectory planning, threat assessment, and semi-autonomous control of passenger vehicles in hazard avoidance scenarios. The vehicle navigation ...

Anderson, Sterling J., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

1997 hybrid electric vehicle specifications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US DOE sponsors Advanced Vehicle Technology competitions to help educate the public and advance new vehicle technologies. For several years, DOE has provided financial and technical support for the American Tour de Sol. This event showcases electric and hybrid electric vehicles in a road rally across portions of the northeastern United States. The specifications contained in this technical memorandum apply to vehicles that will be entered in the 1997 American Tour de Sol. However, the specifications were prepared to be general enough for use by other teams and individuals interested in developing hybrid electric vehicles. The purpose of the specifications is to ensure that the vehicles developed do not present a safety hazard to the teams that build and drive them or to the judges, sponsors, or public who attend the competitions. The specifications are by no means the definitive sources of information on constructing hybrid electric vehicles - as electric and hybrid vehicles technologies advance, so will the standards and practices for their construction. In some cases, the new standards and practices will make portions of these specifications obsolete.

Sluder, S.; Larsen, R.; Duoba, M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Vehicle Technologies Office: Annual Progress Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Progress Reports Annual Progress Reports 2013 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review 2012 Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review Energy Storage Research and Development Fuel & Lubricant Technologies Lightweight Materials Propulsion Materials Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing 2011 Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review Energy Storage Research and Development Lightweighting Materials Propulsion Materials Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing 2010 Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors

209

Electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of nickel metal-hydride batteries for electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies important environment, health, and safety issues associated with nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) batteries and assesses the need for further testing and analysis. Among the issues discussed are cell and battery safety, workplace health and safety, shipping requirements, and in-vehicle safety. The manufacture and recycling of Ni-MH batteries are also examined. This report also overviews the ``FH&S`` issues associated with other nickel-based electric vehicle batteries; it examines venting characteristics, toxicity of battery materials, and the status of spent batteries as a hazardous waste.

Corbus, D.; Hammel, C.J.; Mark, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Progress Report 5 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on AddThis.com...

212

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Progress Report 3 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on AddThis.com...

213

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Progress Report 6 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2006 Progress Report for Automotive Lightweighting Materials on AddThis.com...

214

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Combustion Advanced Combustion Engines to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Emission Control Waste Heat Recovery Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Advanced Combustion Engines

215

Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Engine Combustion Engine Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Combustion Engine Research on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Emission Control Waste Heat Recovery Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Combustion Engine Research

216

What is Hazardous Hazardous waste is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is Hazardous Waste? Hazardous waste is any product charac- terized or labeled as toxic, reactive, cor- rosive, flammable, combustible that is unwanted, dis- carded or no longer useful. This waste may be harmful to human health and/ or the environment. Hazardous Waste Disposal EH&S x7233 E-Waste

de Lijser, Peter

217

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provide the world’s uranium enrichment services. With theseenergy efficiency of uranium enrichment, in mWh-enrichment-gas Motor-vehicle flows Uranium enrichment Agriculture Fuel

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maximum, and restricts regenerative energy to be less thanthe extra energy made available by regenerative braking. Theregenerative braking (for fuel-cell vehicles without electro-chemical energy

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery.

220

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles A neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) is 4-wheeled vehicle, larger than a golf cart but smaller than most light-duty passenger vehicles. NEVs are...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy Basics: Propane Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

gasoline vehicles. Dedicated propane vehicles are designed to run only on propane; bi-fuel propane vehicles have two separate fueling systems that enable the vehicle to use...

222

Flex-fuel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Stations that Sell E85 (Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center AFDC) Flexible Fuel Vehicle (FFV) Cost Calculator (compare costs for operating your vehicle...

223

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle...

224

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles What's New 2013 BRP Commander Electric (PDF 195KB) A Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) is technically defined as a Low Speed Vehicle (LSV)...

225

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel Vehicles SuperShuttle CNG Van Alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) are vehicles designed to operate on alternative fuels such as compressed and liquefied natural gas,...

226

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Special Projects on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing...

227

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEVAmerica Baseline Performance Testing 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle 2010 Electric Vehicles International E-Mega 2009 NEVAmerica Baseline...

228

Vehicle Technologies Office: Hybrid and Vehicle Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid and Vehicle Systems Hybrid and vehicle systems research provides an overarching vehicle systems perspective to the technology research and development (R&D) activities of...

229

Safety analysis of natural gas vehicles transiting highway tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A safety analysis was performed to assess the relative hazard of compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled vehicles traveling on various tunnels and bridges in New York City. The study considered those hazards arising from the release of fuel from CNG vehicles ranging in size from a passenger sedan to a full size 53 passenger bus. The approach used was to compare the fuel hazard of CNG vehicles to the fuel hazard of gasoline vehicles. The risk was assessed by estimating the frequency of occurrence and the severity of the hazard. The methodology was a combination of analyzing accident data, performing a diffusion analysis of the gas released in the tunnel and determining the consequences of ignition. Diffusion analysis was performed using the TEMPEST code for various accident scenarios resulting in CNG release inside the Holland Tunnel. The study concluded that the overall hazard of CNG vehicles transiting a ventilated tunnel is less than the hazard from a comparable gasoline fueled vehicle. 134 refs., 23 figs., 24 tabs.

Shaaban, S.H.; Zuzovsky, M.; Anigstein, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Recovering Plastics from Retired Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shredded plastic materials recovered Shredded plastic materials recovered from retired cars and trucks can be used to manufacture new vehicle parts and other plastic products. Left: Items from shredder residue, recovered polyethylene and polypropylene, and a knee bolster manufactured from recovered plastics. Right: Argonne's froth flotation pilot plant. Background For years vehicle manufacturers have been designing and building new cars and trucks with the goal that structural materials in ELVs will be recycled, reducing the flow of material into the solid-waste stream. At the same time, automakers must ensure that the design materials selected for their ability to be recycled do not impair the safety, reliability, and performance of the completed vehicle. In the United States between 12 and 15 million vehicles reach

231

Diesel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Vehicles Audi A3 Diesel vehicles may be making a comeback. Diesel engines are more powerful and fuel-efficient than similar-sized gasoline engines (about 30-35% more fuel efficient). Plus, today's diesel vehicles are much improved over diesels of the past. Better Performance Improved fuel injection and electronic engine control technologies have Increased power Improved acceleration Increased efficiency New engine designs, along with noise- and vibration-damping technologies, have made them quieter and smoother. Cold-weather starting has been improved also. Cleaner Mercedes ML320 BlueTEC Today's diesels must meet the same emissions standards as gasoline vehicles. Advances in engine technologies, ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, and improved exhaust treatment have made this possible.

232

Energy Basics: Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

233

Energy Basics: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

234

Energy Basics: Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

235

Energy Basics: Natural Gas Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

236

Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) 8 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) Chapter 38 Hazardous Waste Permitting Process (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions for storage, treatment, recycling, or disposal of hazardous waste. It provides information about permits and specific requirements for containers, tanks,

237

Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste 2 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) Chapter 32 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department for Environmental Protection This administrative regulation establishes procedures to establish the applicable general provisions for generators of hazardous waste. It also

238

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) Oil or Hazardous Spills Releases Law (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Oil or Hazardous Spills Law requires notice to the Environmental

239

Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Waste Management Act Hazardous Waste Management Act Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) describes a

240

Environmental concerns related to natural gas vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vehicles powered by natural gas are currently used in the United States and other parts of the world. While the number of such vehicles in the US is small, the potential exists for substantial growth. For that reason and because natural gas-fueled vehicles have different performance, emission, and safety characteristics than do gasoline- or diesel-fueled vehicles, a study was conducted to document the environmental concerns related to natural gas vhicles. These concerns include those related to vehicle emissions and air quality regulations, safety hazards and regulations, natural gas supply, regulation of natural gas sales, and institutional impacts. This paper reports the results of that study, updated to include the results of several more recent analyses. The paper concludes in particular that while both the safety and emissions records of these vehicles appear satisfactory to date, a comprehensive data base exists in neither area.

Singh, M.K.; Moses, D.O.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high.

Calley, M.B.; Jones, J.L. Jr.

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Archive to someone 4 Archive to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Archive on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Archive on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Archive on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Archive on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Archive on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Archive on AddThis.com... 2004 Archive #352 Automotive Industry Material Usage December 27, 2004 #351 Gasohol Use Is Up December 20, 2004 #350 U.S. Oil Imports: Top Ten Countries of Origin December 13, 2004 #349 Crude Oil Production: OPEC, the Persian Gulf, and the United States December 6, 2004 #348 U.S. Trade Deficit, 2001-2003 November 29, 2004 #347 The Relationship of VMT and GDP November 22, 2004

243

Radiation dose assessment methodology and preliminary dose estimates to support US Department of Energy radiation control criteria for regulated treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes and materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides unit dose to concentration levels that may be used to develop control criteria for radionuclide activity in hazardous waste; if implemented, these criteria would be developed to provide an adequate level of public and worker health protection, for wastes regulated under U.S, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements (as derived from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA] and/or the Toxic Substances Control Act [TSCA]). Thus, DOE and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission can fulfill their obligation to protect the public from radiation by ensuring that such wastes are appropriately managed, while simultaneously reducing the current level of dual regulation. In terms of health protection, dual regulation of very small quantities of radionuclides provides no benefit.

Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Rhoads, K.; Jarvis, M.F.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

International rail freight transportation in south Texas: Decreasing fuel consumption, roadway damage, and hazardous materials movement on Texas roadways. Research report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the research were to examine impediments to the greater use of rail in the transport of freight, and to document projected reductions in congestion, roadway damage, hazards, and energy usage resulting from such a modal shift. In pursuing these objectives, an examination was made of the roles that are performed by decision-making agencies at the federal, state, and local levels. The findings of this examination are discussed in terms of how these roles interfere with the adoption of increased use of intermodal transportation. Additionally, the logistics associated with cross-border freight transportation are described, documenting the institutional and governmental inefficiencies hindering smooth flow of trade across the border. The balance of the research concerns itself with the potential of rail transportation to mitigate the negative impacts associated with truck transportation.

Roop, S.S.; Dickinson, R.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS VEHICLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fueled truck fleet of more than 100 refuse hauling vehicles and plans to add more will include exhaust from on-road vehicles and from materials handling equipment, dust from refuse renewable natural gas. CR&R plans to add 100 CNG/LNG vehicles to its fleet over the next

246

Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Activities in Key Activities in Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Key Activities in Vehicles on AddThis.com... Key Activities Mission, Vision, & Goals Plans, Implementation, & Results Organization & Contacts National Laboratories Budget Partnerships Key Activities in Vehicles We conduct work in four key areas to develop and deploy vehicle technologies that reduce the use of petroleum while maintaining or

247

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change to “Ethanol, E85 corn, C0/NG50/B50”, where the “B50”on five fuels: RFG, M85, E85, LPG, and CNG. The vehicle wasPM E85 CNG LPG “Off-cycle” emissions,

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel or power generation (coal, natural gas, fuel oil,generation mix for power used to compress fossil natural gas.power (% of electricity generation [EVs, hydrogen vehicles]) NGL = natural gas

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E27C177982 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 981 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

250

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E87C172351 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 105 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 981 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

251

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z07S838122 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4 cylinder Electric Motor: 14.5 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,244 lbs Features: Regenerative braking wABS 4...

252

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2AR194699 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

253

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2WD VIN 1FMYU95H75KC45881 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.3 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 70 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Features: Four wheel drive Regenerative...

254

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4AR144757 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features: Regenerative braking Traction...

255

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z37S813344 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4 cylinder Electric Motor: 14.5 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 1,244 lbs Features: Regenerative braking wABS 4...

256

Vehicle Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4WD VIN 1FMCU96H15KE18237 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.4 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 70 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Features: Four wheel drive Regenerative...

257

Robotic vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

Box, W.D.

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

258

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPECIFICATIONS 1 Vehicle VIN:19XFB5F57CE002590 Class: Compact Seatbelt Positions: 5 Type: Sedan CARB 2 : AT-PZEV EPA CityHwyCombined 3 : 273832 MPGe Tires Manufacturer:...

259

Vehicle Technologies Office: U.S. DRIVE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electrochemical energy storage Electric propulsion systems (e.g., power electronics, electric motors) Fuel cell power systems Lightweight materials Vehicle systems and...

260

Hazard Analysis Database report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Current status of environmental, health, and safety issues of lithium ion electric vehicle batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The lithium ion system considered in this report uses lithium intercalation compounds as both positive and negative electrodes and has an organic liquid electrolyte. Oxides of nickel, cobalt, and manganese are used in the positive electrode, and carbon is used in the negative electrode. This report presents health and safety issues, environmental issues, and shipping requirements for lithium ion electric vehicle (EV) batteries. A lithium-based electrochemical system can, in theory, achieve higher energy density than systems using other elements. The lithium ion system is less reactive and more reliable than present lithium metal systems and has possible performance advantages over some lithium solid polymer electrolyte batteries. However, the possibility of electrolyte spills could be a disadvantage of a liquid electrolyte system compared to a solid electrolyte. The lithium ion system is a developing technology, so there is some uncertainty regarding which materials will be used in an EV-sized battery. This report reviews the materials presented in the open literature within the context of health and safety issues, considering intrinsic material hazards, mitigation of material hazards, and safety testing. Some possible lithium ion battery materials are toxic, carcinogenic, or could undergo chemical reactions that produce hazardous heat or gases. Toxic materials include lithium compounds, nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and dimethoxyethane. Carcinogenic materials include nickel compounds, arsenic compounds, and (possibly) cobalt compounds, copper, and polypropylene. Lithiated negative electrode materials could be reactive. However, because information about the exact compounds that will be used in future batteries is proprietary, ongoing research will determine which specific hazards will apply.

Vimmerstedt, L.J.; Ring, S.; Hammel, C.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Alternative Vehicle Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are a number of alternative and advanced vehicles—or vehicles that run on alternative fuels. Learn more about the following types of vehicles:

263

Advanced Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban...

264

Vehicles | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Companies in Vehicles Sector List of Vehicles Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

265

Vehicles News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Energy Department Announces $45 Million to Advance Next-Generation Vehicle Technologies http://energy.gov/eere/articles/energy-department-announces-45-million-advance-next-generation Energy Department Announces $45 Million to Advance Next-Generation Vehicle Technologies

266

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center -- Recycling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Recycling Research and Process Development Many reports by Argonne National Laboratory on recycling materials especially from vehicles.

267

Nanostructured Materials for Advanced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). High energy and high power densitiesT Nanostructured Materials for Advanced Li-Ion Rechargeable Batteries THE RECENT INCREASE IN demand

Cao, Guozhong

268

Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Smart Thermal Skins for Vehicles With a modest effort, many of the energy-efficient technologies developed for buildings can be transferred to the transportation sector. The goal of vehicle thermal management research at LBL is to save the energy equivalent of one to two billion gallons of gasoline per year, and improve the marketability of next-generation vehicles using advanced solar control glazings and insulating shell components to reduce accessory loads. Spectrally selective and electrochromic window glass and lightweight insulating materials improve the fuel efficiency of conventional and hybrid vehicles and extend the range of electric vehicles by reducing the need for air conditioning and heating, and by allowing the downsizing of equipment.

269

Hazard Analysis Database Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from the results of the hazard evaluations, and (2) Hazard Topography Database: Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

GRAMS, W.H.

2000-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Changes to vehicle traffic-screening Changes to vehicle traffic-screening Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle inspection station Lanes two through five will be open 24 hours a day and won't be staffed by a Laboratory protective force officer. September 1, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

271

Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Just the Basics to Just the Basics to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Just the Basics on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Just the Basics Technology Overviews Biodiesel Combustion Diesel Engine Hybrid and Plug-in Electric Vehicles Ethanol Fuel Cells Hydrogen Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane)

272

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Neighborhood Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neighborhood Electric Vehicles Ford Think Neighbor A neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) is a four-wheeled vehicle that has a top speed of 20-25 miles per hour (mph). It is larger...

273

VEHICLE DETAILS, BATTERY DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 VEHICLE DETAILS, BATTERY DESCRIPTION AND SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Details Base Vehicle: 2011 Nissan Leaf VIN: JN1AZ0CP5BT000356 Propulsion System: BEV Electric Machine: 80 kW...

274

Robotic vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 11 figures.

Box, W.D.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Robotic vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 14 figs.

Box, W.D.

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

276

Vehicle Smart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This article explores criteria necessary for reliable communication between electric vehicles (EVs) and electric vehicle service equipment (EVSE). Data will demonstrate that a G3-PLC system has already met the criteria established by the automotive and utility industries. Multiple international tests prove that a G3-PLC implementation is the optimal low-frequency solution. A similar version of this article appeared in the August 2011 issue of Power Systems Design magazine. For the first time, electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are building a viable market of mobile electrical energy consumers. Not surprisingly, new relationships between electricity providers (the utility companies) and automobile owners are emerging. Many utilities already offer, or are planning to offer, special tariffs, including fixed monthly rates, to EV owners. EVs impose new dynamics and demands on the electrical supply itself. There is, in fact, a symbiotic relationship developing between the EV and energy provider. Because of their large storage capacity, often 10kVH, EVs draw currents of 80A or greater over a period of hours. This strains electrical grid components, especially low-voltage transformers which can overheat and fail while serving consumers ' homes. Meanwhile, the EVs ' electrical storage capacity can also reverse the current flow. It can then supply power back to the grid, thereby helping the utilities to meet demand peaks without starting up high-carbon-output diesel generators. To enable this new dynamic relationship, the EV and the energy provider must communicate. The utility must be able to authenticate the individual vehicle, and bidirectional communications is needed to support negotiation of power flow rates and direction. To

Jim Leclare; Principal Member; Technical Staff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches November 1, 2013 - 8:45am Addthis Hazard Communications Training Deadline Approaches 10 CFR 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, requires all DOE Federal and contractor employees with hazardous chemicals in their workplaces to complete new Hazard Communication Standard Training. The major changes to the standard include hazard classification, labeling, Safety Data Sheets, information and training. In order to assist you with meeting this deadline, training materials can be found at: http://orise.orau.gov/ihos/hottopics/training.htm; or http://efcog.org/wg/esh_cslm/index.htm The Hazard Communication Standard can be found at: https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/ghs-final-rule.html

278

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

279

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Urban Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are designed to carry two or four passengers. Click here for more information About Urban Electric Vehicles (PDF 128KB) Vehicle Testing Reports Ford THINK City Ford Thnk...

280

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that feature one or more advanced technologies, including: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technologies Extended range electric vehicle technologies Hybrid electric, pure...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality A hazardous waste facility permit from the Department of Environmental Quality is required to store, treat or dispose of hazardous waste materials, or to construct, own or operate any facility engaged in the operation of storing, treating or disposing of hazardous waste or storing recyclable materials. The Department shall not issue a permit for the treatment, disposal or temporary storage of any liquid hazardous waste in a

282

Hazard Analysis Database Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved TWRS Authorization Basis (AB). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the TWRS FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The TWRS Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The database supports the preparation of Chapters 3,4, and 5 of the TWRS FSAR and the USQ process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Evaluation Database--Data from the results of the hazard evaluations; and (2) Hazard Topography Database--Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

GAULT, G.W.

1999-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type

284

Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(North Carolina) (North Carolina) Hazardous Waste Management (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Fuel Distributor Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources These rules identify and list hazardous waste and set standards for the generators and operators of such waste as well as owners or operators of waste facilities. They also stats standards for surface impoundments and location standards for facilities. An applicant applying for a permit for a hazardous waste facility shall

285

Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Li(Ni{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}Mn{sub 0.4})O{sub 2} was investigated to understand the effect of replacement of the cobalt by aluminum on the structural and electrochemical properties. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed, utilizing a novel in situ electrochemical cell, specifically designed for long-term X-ray experiments. The cell was cycled at a moderate rate through a typical Li-ion battery operating voltage range. (1.0-4.7 V) XAS measurements were performed at different states of charge (SOC) during cycling, at the Ni, Co, and the Mn edges, revealing details about the response of the cathode to Li insertion and extraction processes. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) region of the spectra revealed the changes of bond distance and coordination number of Ni, Co, and Mn absorbers as a function of the SOC of the material. The oxidation states of the transition metals in the system are Ni{sup 2+}, Co{sup 3+}, and Mn{sup 4+} in the as-made material (fully discharged), while during charging the Ni{sup 2+} is oxidized to Ni{sup 4+} through an intermediate stage of Ni{sup 3+}, Co{sup 3+} is oxidized toward Co{sup 4+}, and Mn was found to be electrochemically inactive and remained as Mn{sup 4+}. The EXAFS results during cycling show that the Ni-O changes the most, followed by Co-O, and Mn-O varies the least. These measurements on this cathode material confirmed that the material retains its symmetry and good structural short-range order leading to the superior cycling reported earlier.

Rumble, C.; Conry, T.E.; Doeff, Marca; Cairns, Elton J.; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Deb, Aniruddha

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Alternative Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

following types of vehicles: Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane Vehicles Addthis Related Articles...

287

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

288

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

289

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc. relating to experiment safety at the APS. Internal Reference Material: Transporting Hazardous Materials "Natural" radioactivity...

290

Hazardous Waste Management Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Training Persons (including faculty, staff and students) working be thoroughly familiar with waste handling and emergency procedures ap- plicable to their job responsibilities before handling hazardous waste. Departments are re- quired to keep records of training for as long

Dai, Pengcheng

291

Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Seismic Hazard Models for Department of Energy Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the US. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final seismic hazard models and response spectra recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 15 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Vehicle Technologies Office: Apps for Vehicles Challenge Spurs Innovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apps for Vehicles Apps for Vehicles Challenge Spurs Innovation in Vehicle Data to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Apps for Vehicles Challenge Spurs Innovation in Vehicle Data on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Apps for Vehicles Challenge Spurs Innovation in Vehicle Data on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Apps for Vehicles Challenge Spurs Innovation in Vehicle Data on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Apps for Vehicles Challenge Spurs Innovation in Vehicle Data on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Apps for Vehicles Challenge Spurs Innovation in Vehicle Data on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Apps for Vehicles Challenge Spurs Innovation in Vehicle Data on AddThis.com... Apps for Vehicles Challenge Spurs Innovation in Vehicle Data

293

Vehicle barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

Hirsh, Robert A. (Bethel Park, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The U.S. Army's Vehicle Intelligence Program (AVIP): The Future of Manned, Wheeled Tactical Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle The U.S. Army's Vehicle Vehicle The U.S. Army's Vehicle Intelligence Program (AVIP): Intelligence Program (AVIP): The Future of Manned, Wheeled The Future of Manned, Wheeled Tactical Vehicles Tactical Vehicles H. E. (Bill) Knéé Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Blvd. Knoxville, Tennessee 37932 USA Phone: (865) 946-1300 Fax: (865) 946-1314 E-mail: kneehe@ornl.gov David J. Gorsich U.S. Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command AMSTA-TR-N, Warren, Michigan 49397-5000 USA Phone: (810) 574-7413 Fax: (810) 574-6996 E-mail: GorsichD@tacom.army.mil IV2001 IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium Tokyo, Japan http://www.ornl.gov/ORNLReview/v33_3_00/features.htm 1. Propulsion, Vehicle and Power Systems 2. Information and Decision Support Systems 3. Materials, Structures, and Mechanical Systems

295

Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

Richard C. Logan

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

Materials - Deformation Joining  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ways to combine advanced materials such as ceramic, intermetallics, cermets, and metal matrix composites (MMCs) together for use in complex vehicle engine components, as well as...

297

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 17, 2009 ... Electronic, Magnetic & Photonic Materials .... will support the development of low- cost batteries for electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

298

Railroad accident report: Head-on collision between Iowa Interstate Railroad Extra 470 West and Extra 406 East with release of hazardous materials near Altoona, Iowa, on July 30, 1988. Irregular report  

SciTech Connect

About 11:40 a.m. central daylight saving time on July 30, 1988, Iowa Interstate Railroad Ltd. (IAIS) freight trains Extra 470 West and Extra 406 East collided head on within the yard limits of Altoona, Iowa, about 10 miles east of Des Moines, Iowa. All 5 locomotive units from both trains; 11 cars of Extra 406 East; and 3 cars, including two tank cars containing denatured alcohol, of Extra 470 West derailed. The denatured alcohol, which was released through the pressure relief valves and the manway domes of the two derailed tank cars, was ignited by the fire resulting from the collision of the locomotives. Both crew members of Extra 470 West were fatally injured; the two crew members of Extra 406 East were only slightly injured. The estimated damage (including lading) as a result of this accident exceeded $1 million. The major safety issues in the accident include operational methods employed by the IAIS, training and selection of train and engine personnel, supervisory oversight by the IAIS, design of closure fittings on hazardous materials rail tanks, and oversight of regional railroads by the Federal Railroad Administration.

Not Available

1989-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

299

Materials - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Coatings & Lubricants * Coatings & Lubricants * Nanofluids * Deformation Joining * Recycling * Catalysts * Assessment * Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Materials ring on liner reciprocating tester Tribology Lab: Ring-on-liner reciprocating tester. Argonne National Laboratory plays an important role in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts to develop advanced materials for transportation. The materials are developed with DOE support from the EERE Office of Vehicle Technology and Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies in collaboration with worldwide industrial partners. Examples

300

Voltage Vehicles | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Vehicles Product Voltage Vehicles is a nascent, full-service alternative fuel vehicle distributor specializing in the full spectrum of electric vehicles (EV) and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for High Strength  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Progress Report 4 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2004 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on

302

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: December 27, 2: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #352: December 27, 2004 Automotive Industry Material Usage on AddThis.com...

303

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for High Strength  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Progress Report 5 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2005 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials on

304

Experiment Hazard Class 9 - Magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hazard classification applies to all experiments involving magnets, magnetic fields, and electric fields. Other hazard classifications such as electrical safety and their...

305

Hazardous Waste Management (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The New Mexico Environment Department's Hazardous Waste Bureau is responsible for the management of hazardous waste in the state. The Bureau enforces the rules established by the Environmental...

306

Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batteries Batteries battery/cell diagram Battery/Cell Diagram Batteries are important to our everyday lives and show up in various consumer electronics and appliances, from MP3 players to laptops to our vehicles. Batteries play an important role in our vehicles and are gradually becoming more and more important as they assume energy storage responsibilities from fuel in vehicle propulsion systems. A battery is a device that stores chemical energy in its active materials and converts it, on demand, into electrical energy by means of an electrochemical reaction. An electrochemical reaction is a chemical reaction involving the transfer of electrons, and it is that reaction which creates electricity. There are three main parts of a battery: the anode, cathode, and electrolyte. The anode is the "fuel" electrode which gives up electrons to the external circuit to create the flow of electrons or electricity. The cathode is the oxidizing electrode which accepts electrons in the external circuit. Finally, the electrolyte carries the electric current, as ions, inside the cell, between the anode and cathode.

307

Vehicle Battery Safety Roadmap Guidance  

SciTech Connect

The safety of electrified vehicles with high capacity energy storage devices creates challenges that must be met to assure commercial acceptance of EVs and HEVs. High performance vehicular traction energy storage systems must be intrinsically tolerant of abusive conditions: overcharge, short circuit, crush, fire exposure, overdischarge, and mechanical shock and vibration. Fail-safe responses to these conditions must be designed into the system, at the materials and the system level, through selection of materials and safety devices that will further reduce the probability of single cell failure and preclude propagation of failure to adjacent cells. One of the most important objectives of DOE's Office of Vehicle Technologies is to support the development of lithium ion batteries that are safe and abuse tolerant in electric drive vehicles. This Roadmap analyzes battery safety and failure modes of state-of-the-art cells and batteries and makes recommendations on future investments that would further DOE's mission.

Doughty, D. H.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traction Battery for the ETX-II Vehicle, EGG-EP-9688, IdahoElectric Vehicle Powertrain (ETX-II) Performance: VehicleDevelopment Program - ETX-II, Phase II Technical Report, DOE

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-5): Electric/Hybrid Vehicles: An Emerging Global Industry,1-5): Electric/Hybrid Vehicles: An Emerging Global Industry,1-5): Electric/Hybrid Vehicles: An Emerging Global Industry,

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Electric-powered passenger vehicle program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program plan is presented for developing an electric vehicle incorporating a flywheel regenerative power system with design considerations and goals for safety and for vehicle body construction using lightweight fiber-reinforced composite material. Schedules are included for each of the major steps in the program. (LCL)

Rowlett, B.H.

1977-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

Electric-powered passenger vehicle program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A revised program plan is presented for developing an electric vehicle incorporating a flywheel regenerative power system with design considerations and goals for safety and for vehicle body construction using lightweight fiber-reinforced composite material. Schedules are included for each of the major steps in the program. (LCL)

Rowlett, B.H.

1977-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

MANAGEMENT OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION: LITERATURE SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-011 | March 2006 www.epa.gov/radiation/wipp Karst in the Area of the WIPP Some stakeholders believe that the geologic characterization of the subsurface surrounding the WIPP repository does not adequately identify of karst at WIPP and the possible impacts of the long- termcontainmentofwasteforthe2004WIPPRecertification

313

Proceedings of the Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Vehicle Workshop Proceedings Vehicle Safety DesignElectric Vehicle Workshop Proceedings Federal Motor Vehicle SafetyElectric Vehicle Workshop Proceedings FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY

Lipman, Timothy

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazards Control Hazards Control 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs and policy for establishing controls to mitigate hazards affecting the public, worker, and environment. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to verify implementation of DOE 450.4-1A Volume 2 Appendix E core expectation #3 (CE II-3). CE II-3: An integrated process has been established and is utilized to develop controls which mitigate the identified hazards present within a facility or activity. The set of controls ensure adequate protection of the public, worker, and the environment and are established as agreed upon by DOE.

315

Job Hazard Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Step by Step Instructions - Page 1 of 2 Helpful Information STEP 1. Log in to the EH&S Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) system at https:ehswprod.lbl.govehstrainingjhalogin.aspx...

316

Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Organization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization and Contacts Organization Chart for the Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Technologies and Deployment, Technology Managers Advanced Combustion Engines, Technology...

317

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Association Conference Transportation Association Conference Vancouver, Canada December 2005 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Jim Francfort U.S. Department of Energy - FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program, Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity INL/CON-05-00964 Presentation Outline * Background & goals * Testing partners * Hybrid electric vehicle testing - Baseline performance testing (new HEV models) - 1.5 million miles of HEV fleet testing (160k miles per vehicle in 36 months) - End-of-life HEV testing (rerun fuel economy & conduct battery testing @ 160k miles per vehicle) - Benchmark data: vehicle & battery performance, fuel economy, maintenance & repairs, & life-cycle costs * WWW information location Background * Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - part of the

318

Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL. National Clean Fleets partners are investing in hybrid vehicles to reduce their oil use, vehicle emissions and fuel costs. What's Your PEV Readiness Score? PEV readiness...

319

Vehicles and Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Learn more about exciting technologies and ongoing research in alternative and advanced vehicles—or vehicles that run on fuels other than traditional petroleum.

320

Vehicle Technologies Office: Features  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Event June 2013 The eGallon Tool Advances Deployment of Electric Vehicles May 2013 Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers December 2012 Apps for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volt Vehicle Summary Report: April - June 2013 (PDF 1.3MB) EV Project Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Summary Report: April - June 2013 (PDF 11MB) Residential...

322

Vehicles | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development and deployment of advanced vehicle technologies, including advances in electric vehicles, engine efficiency, and...

323

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

PECH, S.H.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Alternative Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines

325

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light-Duty Light-Duty Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Light-Duty Vehicles on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Alternative Fuel Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Micro Hybrid Vehicles ARRA Vehicle and Infrastructure Projects EVSE Testing Energy Storage Testing Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicles Other ICE

326

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #257: March 3, 2003 Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: March 3, 2003 Vehicle Occupancy by Type of Vehicle to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 257: March 3, 2003 Vehicle Occupancy by Type of Vehicle on...

327

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #253: February 3, 2003 Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: February 3, 2003 Vehicle Age by Type of Vehicle to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 253: February 3, 2003 Vehicle Age by Type of Vehicle on Facebook...

328

NEHRP - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NEHRP logo National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. ... Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction. Highlights. ...

329

Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Testing and Analysis Modeling, Testing and Analysis The Vehicle Technologies Office's robust portfolio is supported by modeling, testing, and analysis. This work complements the research on batteries, power electronics, and materials, helping researchers integrate these components and ensure the whole vehicle meets consumer and commercial needs. Modeling allows researchers to build "virtual vehicles" that simulate fuel economy, emissions and performance of a potential vehicle. The Office has supported the development of several software-based analytic tools that researchers can use or license. Integration and Validation allows researchers to test physical component and subsystem prototypes as if they are in a real vehicle. Laboratory and Fleet Testing provides data on PEVs through both dynamometer and on-the-road testing. Researchers use the data to benchmark current vehicles, as well as validate the accuracy of software models.

330

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Vehicle Technologies Office: About the Vehicle Technologies Office: Moving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Vehicle About the Vehicle Technologies Office: Moving America Forward with Clean Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: About the Vehicle Technologies Office: Moving America Forward with Clean Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: About the Vehicle Technologies Office: Moving America Forward with Clean Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: About the Vehicle Technologies Office: Moving America Forward with Clean Vehicles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: About the Vehicle Technologies Office: Moving America Forward with Clean Vehicles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: About the Vehicle Technologies Office: Moving America Forward with Clean Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: About the

332

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #739: August 6, 2012 Light Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: August 6, 9: August 6, 2012 Light Vehicle Dealership Sales Trends - New Vehicles, Used Vehicles, and Service/Parts to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #739: August 6, 2012 Light Vehicle Dealership Sales Trends - New Vehicles, Used Vehicles, and Service/Parts on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #739: August 6, 2012 Light Vehicle Dealership Sales Trends - New Vehicles, Used Vehicles, and Service/Parts on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #739: August 6, 2012 Light Vehicle Dealership Sales Trends - New Vehicles, Used Vehicles, and Service/Parts on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #739: August 6, 2012 Light Vehicle Dealership Sales Trends - New Vehicles, Used Vehicles, and Service/Parts on Delicious

333

Selection of Lightweighting Strategies for Use Across an Automaker's Vehicle Fleet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle lightweighting, or mass reduction, via materials substitution is a common approach to improve fuel economy. The many subsystems in a vehicle, choices of materials, and manufacturing processes available, though, ...

Kirchain, Randolph E., Jr.

334

Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards Table | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technologies Awards Table Vehicle Technologies Awards Table Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards Table The table contains a listing of the applicants, their locations, the amounts of the awards, and description of each project. The sub-categories of the table include: Advanced fuels and lubricants Light-weighting materials Demonstration Project for a Multi-Material Light-Weight Prototype Vehicle Advanced cells and design technology for electric drive batteries Advanced power electronics and electric motor technology Solid State Thermoelectric Energy Conversion Devices Fleet Efficiency Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation Microsoft Word - VTP $175 Advanced Vehicle Tech project descriptions draft v5 8-2-11 More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards advanced vehicle technologies awards table

335

Experiment Hazard Class 5.3 High Pressure Vessels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 High Pressure Vessels 3 High Pressure Vessels Applicability This hazard classification applies to working with pressure vessels and systems. Other hazard classifications and associated controls may apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls are catergorized as medium risk experiments. Experiments involving new equipment, processes or materials, or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk experiments. Hazard Control Plan Verification Statements Engineered Controls - The establishment of applicable controls in accordance with the (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ASME Boiler and Pressure Code, ASME B.31 Piping Code and applicable federal, state, and local codes. Verify vessel is stampled with ASME Code Symbol or allowable

336

Experiment Hazard Class 7.2 - BSL - 2 Biohazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - BSL-2 Biohazards 2 - BSL-2 Biohazards Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments requiring Biosafety Level 2 (BSL-2) precautions. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. Experiments involving human subjects/materials or living animals, even if not biohazardous, are included in this Hazard Class. Biosafety Level 2 is similar to Biosafety Level 1 and is suitable for work involving agents of moderate potential hazard to personnel and the environment. It differs from BSL-1 in that (1) laboratory personnel have specific training in handling pathogenic agents and are directed by competent scientists; (2) access to the laboratory is limited when work is being conducted; (3) extreme precautions are taken with contaminated sharp

337

Alternative Fuel Vehicle Data  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report contains data on the number of onroad alternative fuel vehicles and hybrid vehicles made available by both the original equipment manufacturers and aftermarket vehicle conversion facilities and data on the use of alternative fueled vehicles and the amount of fuel they consume.

Information Center

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

Identification of Aircraft Hazards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

K. Ashley

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

339

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #805: November 25, 2013 Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: November 25, 5: November 25, 2013 Vehicle Technology Penetration to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #805: November 25, 2013 Vehicle Technology Penetration on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #805: November 25, 2013 Vehicle Technology Penetration on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #805: November 25, 2013 Vehicle Technology Penetration on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #805: November 25, 2013 Vehicle Technology Penetration on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #805: November 25, 2013 Vehicle Technology Penetration on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #805: November 25, 2013 Vehicle Technology Penetration on AddThis.com... Fact #805: November 25, 2013

340

Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ambassadors to someone Ambassadors to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Ambassadors on AddThis.com... Goals Research & Development Testing and Analysis Workplace Charging Partners Ambassadors Resources Community and Fleet Readiness Workforce Development Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics Ambassadors Workplace Charging Challenge Clean Cities Coalitions Clean Cities logo. Clean Cities National: A network of nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions, supported by the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

344

Powered Remote Manipulators Perform Hazardous Retrieval, Handling, and Size Reduction Operations  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a new lightweight, powered remote manipulator (PRM) that S.A.Robotics has developed for remote material handling and size reduction in hazardous environments such as reactor decommissioning projects. PRMs can be mounted to various deployment platforms such as remote controlled track-driven vehicles, commercial All Terrain Vehicles, or crane-mounted arms. They can also be installed as replacements for traditional Master-Slave Manipulators (MSMs) in hot cells. The PRM is a six degree of freedom manipulator with carbon fiber structural components that can provide up to a 3 meter (10 foot) reach. Either electric or hydraulic power options can be used and a variety of hydraulic fluids are available to meet combustible material limitations. The PRM is operated with easy-to-use joystick controls that allow operators to sit in a comfortable work station and handle 90 kg (200 pound) loads with a hydraulic power pack or 45 kg (100 pounds) with electric servo-motor driven equipment. With a quick disconnect tool changer, the manipulator can operate grippers, drills, shears, saws, sampling and survey instruments, and the arm can also deploy cameras and lights to support a wide range of remote applications. (authors)

Cole, M.D.; Owen, J.R.; Adams, S.R. [S.A.Robotics, Inc., 3985 S. Lincoln Avenue, Suite 100, Loveland, Colorado 80241 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment Accelerating Electric Vehicle Deployment More Documents &...

346

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Advanced Vehicle Introduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keywords: Vehicle characteristics; market penetration; advanced technology vehicles; hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) Purpose Vehicle Choice Model - Estimate market penetration...

347

Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulations (Mississippi) Regulations (Mississippi) Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Sales Tax Incentive Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Hazardous Waste Management Regulations follow the EPA's definitions and guidelines for the most part, which are listed in 40 CFR parts 260-282. In addition to these federal regulations the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality requires that each generator of greater than 220

348

Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Response Act (Georgia) Site Response Act (Georgia) Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Public Benefits Fund Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Hazardous Site Response Act is Georgia's version of

349

2010 Vehicle Technologies Market Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past five years, vehicle technologies have advanced on a number of fronts: power-train systems have become more energy efficient, materials have become more lightweight, fuels are burned more cleanly, and new hybrid electric systems reduce the need for traditional petroleum-fueled propulsion. This report documents the trends in market drivers, new vehicles, and component suppliers. This report is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Vehicle Technologies Program, which develops energy-efficient and environmentally friendly transportation technologies that will reduce use of petroleum in the United States. The long-term aim is to develop "leap frog" technologies that will provide Americans with greater freedom of mobility and energy security, while lowering costs and reducing impacts on the environment.

Ward, Jacob [U.S. Department of Energy; Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: February 9, 6: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306: February 9, 2004 Vehicle Type Differences on Vehicle Miles Traveled on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #306:

351

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Specificatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Procedures to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle...

352

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Special Projects on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

353

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Reports to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Reports on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

354

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicle Specificati...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Procedures to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle...

355

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle...

356

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Testing to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Testing on Facebook Tweet...

357

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Special...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Projects to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Special Projects on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

358

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Reports to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Testing Reports on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

359

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Testing The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) to...

360

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Reports to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Urban Electric Vehicle Testing Reports on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

VEHICLE USAGE LOG Department ________________________________________ Vehicle Homebase ____________________________ Week Ended (Sunday) _________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VEHICLE USAGE LOG Department ________________________________________ Vehicle Homebase of the owning Unit. Vehicle Homebase: Enter the City, Zip Code, Building, or other location designation. Week

Johnston, Daniel

362

Effects of Vehicle Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Images of Hybrid Vehicles Each of the householdsbetween hybrid and non-hybrid vehicles was observed in smallowned Honda Civic Hybrids, vehicles that are virtually

Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Ken; Turrentine, Tom

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Search for Model Year 2000 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

364

Search for Model Year 2014 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Type Model Year: 2014 Select Class... Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles...

365

Chapter 2. Vehicle Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Vehicle Characteristics 2. Vehicle Characteristics Chapter 2. Vehicle Characteristics U.S. households used a fleet of nearly 157 million vehicles in 1994. Despite remarkable growth in the number of minivans and sport-utility vehicles, passenger cars continued to predominate in the residential vehicle fleet. This chapter looks at changes in the composition of the residential fleet in 1994 compared with earlier years and reviews the effect of technological changes on fuel efficiency (how efficiently a vehicle engine processes motor fuel) and fuel economy (how far a vehicle travels on a given amount of fuel). Using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, it also explores the relationship between residential vehicle use and family income.

366

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are vehicles designed to operate on alternative fuels such as compressed and liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane), ethanol, biodiesel, electricity, and...

367

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hyundai Sonata (4932) Battery Report 2010 Ultra-Battery Honda Civic Battery Report Some hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) combine a conventional internal combustion engine (using...

368

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Activity North American PHEV Demonstration Monthly Summary Report - Hymotion Prius (V2Green data logger) Total Number Vehicles - 169 (May 2010) Total Cumulative Test...

369

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

motor of an electric vehicle. Other hybrids combine a fuel cell with batteries to power electric propulsion motors. Fuel Cell Concept: Fuel passes through an anode, electrolyte,...

370

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

James Francfort

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medium- and Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Transit Vehicles Trucks Idle Reduction Oil Bypass Filter Airport Ground Support Equipment Medium and Heavy Duty Hybrid Electric Vehicles

372

Vehicle Research Laboratory - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Research Laboratory Vehicle Research Laboratory Expertise The overall FEERC team has been developed to encompass the many disciplines necessary for world-class fuels, engines, and emissions-related research, with experimental, analytical, and modeling capabilities. Staff members specialize in areas including combustion and thermodynamics, emissions measurements, analytical chemistry, catalysis, sensors and diagnostics, dynamometer cell operations, engine controls and control theory. FEERC engineers have many years of experience in vehicle research, chassis laboratory development and operation, and have developed specialized systems and methods for vehicle R&D. Selected Vehicle Research Topics In-use investigation of Lean NOx Traps (LNTs). Vehicle fuel economy features such as lean operation GDI engines,

373

Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hazardous Waste Program, administered by the Hazardous Waste Management Commission in the Department of Natural Resources, regulates the processing, transportation, and disposal of hazardous...

374

Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greenhouse effect, and electric vehicles," Proceedingso/9thInternational Electric Vehicles Symposium, 1988. 14. R. M.of 9th International Electric Vehicles Sympo- sium, 1988.

Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Case for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Evaluation of Fire Dynamics Simulator for Liquefied Natural Gas Vapor Dispersion Hazards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and Pipeline and Hazardous Material Administration (PHMSA) require vapor dispersion modeling as part of a siting analysis for liquefied… (more)

Kohout, Andrew Joseph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Evaluation of fire dynamics simulator for liquefied natural gas vapor dispersion hazards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and Pipeline and Hazardous Material Administration (PHMSA) require vapor dispersion modeling as part of a siting analysis for… (more)

Kohout, Andrew Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Diesel Vehicles Electricity | Hybrid & Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane |...

379

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Conversions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Diesel Vehicles Electricity | Hybrid & Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane |...

380

Vehicle Detection by Sensor Network Nodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

frequency. Table 4.2: ? and ? Ground truth (# of vehicles)truth (# of vehicles) Detection result (# of vehicles) Tabletruth ( of vehicles) Detection result ( of vehicles) Table

Ding, Jiagen; Cheung, Sing-Yiu; Tan, Chin-woo; Varaiya, Pravin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

382

Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Vehicle Technologies Office: Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Adsorption: The adhesion of the molecules of gases, dissolved substances, or liquids in more or less concentrated form to the surface of solids or liquids with which they are in contact. Commercial adsorbent materials have enormous internal surfaces. AEMD (Automotive Electric Drive Motor): A U.S. Department of Energy program to develop low-cost traction drive motors for automotive applications. Aerosol: A cloud consisting of particles dispersed in a gas or gases. AIPM (Automotive Integrated Power Module) A U.S. Department of Energy program to integrate the power devices, control electronics, and thermal management of a vehicle into a single low-cost package that will meet all requirements for automotive motor control applications.

385

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing...

386

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Size Electric Vehicle Basics to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Basics on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing...

387

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Size Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity:...

388

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #586: August 31, 2009 New Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: August 31, 2009 New Vehicle Fuel Economies by Vehicle Type to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 586: August 31, 2009 New Vehicle Fuel Economies by...

389

Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in...

390

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Stop-Start Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stop-Start Vehicles Stop-start Vehicles allow the internal combustion engine to shut-down when the vehicle stops in traffic, and re-start quickly to launch the vehicle. Fuel is...

391

Hazardous Waste Management Keith Williams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hazardous Waste Management Keith Williams DES ­ Environmental Affairs Extension 53163 #12,100 Locally · 1998 Univ of Va $33,990 · 1998 Univ. of MD $0 !!!!! #12;Hazardous Waste Disposal Procedures Hazardous (Chemical) Waste Management in University of Maryland Laboratories o All laboratories and work

Appelbaum, Ian

392

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #285: September 15, 2003 Vehicles per  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: September 15, 5: September 15, 2003 Vehicles per Thousand People: An International Comparison to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #285: September 15, 2003 Vehicles per Thousand People: An International Comparison on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #285: September 15, 2003 Vehicles per Thousand People: An International Comparison on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #285: September 15, 2003 Vehicles per Thousand People: An International Comparison on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #285: September 15, 2003 Vehicles per Thousand People: An International Comparison on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #285: September 15, 2003 Vehicles per Thousand People: An International Comparison on Digg

393

Vehicle Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Vehicle Technologies Office: News to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: News on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: News on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: News on AddThis.com... Vehicle Technologies News Blog Newsletters Information for Media Subscribe to News Updates News December 18, 2013 USDA Offers $118 Million for Renewable Energy, Smart Grid Projects The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced $73 million in funding for renewable energy projects and $45 million for smart grid technology as

394

Vehicle Technologies Office: Favorites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Favorites to someone by Favorites to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Favorites on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Favorites on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Favorites on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Favorites on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Favorites on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Favorites on AddThis.com... Favorites #248 Top Ten Net Petroleum Importing Countries, 2000 December 23, 2002 #246 U.S. Oil Imports - Top 10 Countries of Origin December 9, 2002 #244 Sport Utility Vehicle Spotlight November 25, 2002 #243 Fuel Economy Leaders for 2003 Model Year Light Trucks November 18, 2002 #242 Fuel Economy Leaders for 2003 Model Year Cars November 11, 2002 #238 Automobile and Truck Population by Vehicle Age, 2001 October 14, 2002

395

Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partners to someone by Partners to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Partners on AddThis.com... Goals Research & Development Testing and Analysis Workplace Charging Partners Ambassadors Resources Community and Fleet Readiness Workforce Development Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics Partners The interactive map below highlights Workplace Charging Challenge Partners across the country who are installing plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure for their employees. Select a worksite to learn more about

396

Vehicle Technologies Office: Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vehicles. In fact, every hybrid vehicle on the market currently uses Nickel-Metal-Hydride high-voltage batteries in its battery system. Lithium ion batteries appear to be the...

397

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Number of vehicles: 143 Number of vehicle days driven: 6,598 All operation Overall gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 73.7 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 170...

398

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Number of vehicles: 145 Number of vehicle days driven: 6,817 All operation Overall gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 66.6 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 171...

399

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Number of vehicles: 135 Number of vehicle days driven: 4,746 All operation Overall gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 68.6 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 175...

400

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 2011 Number of vehicles: 66 Number of vehicle days driven: 845 All operation Overall gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 85.0 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 181...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Number of vehicles: 143 Number of vehicle days driven: 5,795 All operation Overall gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 67.8 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 180...

402

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Number of vehicles: 110 Number of vehicle days driven: 3,227 All operation Overall gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 74.8 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 185...

403

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Number of vehicles: 144 Number of vehicle days driven: 7,129 All operation Overall gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 72.5 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 166...

404

Social networking in vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-vehicle, location-aware, socially aware telematic systems, known as Flossers, stand to revolutionize vehicles, and how their drivers interact with their physical and social worlds. With Flossers, users can broadcast and ...

Liang, Philip Angus

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 1.5 million miles of HEV fleet testing (160k miles per vehicle in 36 months) - End-of-life HEV testing (rerun fuel economy & conduct battery testing @ 160k miles per vehicle) -...

406

Cold Weather Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Cold Weather Hazards June 2010 NSA_cwh_Rev10.doc 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility/ North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (ACRF/NSA/AAO) Cold Weather Hazards Winter Conditions at the North Slope of Alaska The North Slope of Alaska is north of the Arctic Circle at latitudes ranging from 69 to 72 degrees. Barrow, the largest town on the North Slope (pop. 4500), is the site of a National Weather Service Station, which has been active for several decades, so the climatology of the Alaska arctic coastal region as represented by Barrow is relatively well known. The North Slope is covered with ice and snow typically eight months of the year (October-May). During part of November, all of December, and most of January, the sun does not come above the horizon; this

407

Safety Hazards of Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Hazards of Batteries Safety Hazards of Batteries Battery technology is at the heart of much of our technological revolution. One of the most prevalent rechargeable batteries in use today is the Lithium-ion battery. Cell phones, laptop computers, GPS systems, iPods, and even cars are now using lithium- ion rechargeable battery technology. In fact, you probably have a lithium-ion battery in your pocket or purse right now! Although lithium-ion batteries are very common there are some inherent dangers when using ANY battery. Lithium cells are like any other technology - if they are abused and not used for their intended purpose catastrophic results may occur, such as: first-, second-, and third-degree burns, respiratory problems, fires, explosions, and even death. Please handle the lithium-ion batteries with care and respect.

408

Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) are capable of operating on gasoline, E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), or a mixture of both. There are almost 8 million flexible fuel vehicles on U.S. roads today, but many FFV owners don't know their vehicle is one.

409

Realising low carbon vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MorganMotorCompany #12;Hybrid and electric vehicle design and novel power trains Cranfield has an impressive track record in the design and integration of near-to-market solutions for hybrid, electric and fuel cell vehicles coupe body the vehicle is powered by advanced lithium-ion batteries, and also features a novel all-electric

410

Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

NONE

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

411

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: February 5, 5: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles on AddThis.com... Fact #455: February 5, 2007 Household Vehicle Miles The graphs below show the average vehicle miles of travel (VMT) - daily

412

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: October 3, 2: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #392: October 3, 2005 Household Vehicle Ownership Household vehicle ownership has changed significantly over the last 40

413

Oil and Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota) Oil and Hazardous Substance Discharge Preparedness (Minnesota) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural...

414

National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Staff ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Staff. National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (731.05). Dr. John (Jack) R. Hayes, Jr. ...

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

415

Development and applications of GREET 2.7 -- The Transportation Vehicle-CycleModel.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a vehicle-cycle module for the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. The fuel-cycle GREET model has been cited extensively and contains data on fuel cycles and vehicle operations. The vehicle-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission effects associated with vehicle material recovery and production, vehicle component fabrication, vehicle assembly, and vehicle disposal/recycling. With the addition of the vehicle-cycle module, the GREET model now provides a comprehensive, lifecycle-based approach to compare the energy use and emissions of conventional and advanced vehicle technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel cell vehicles). This report details the development and application of the GREET 2.7 model. The current model includes six vehicles--a conventional material and a lightweight material version of a mid-size passenger car with the following powertrain systems: internal combustion engine, internal combustion engine with hybrid configuration, and fuel cell with hybrid configuration. The model calculates the energy use and emissions that are required for vehicle component production; battery production; fluid production and use; and vehicle assembly, disposal, and recycling. This report also presents vehicle-cycle modeling results. In order to put these results in a broad perspective, the fuel-cycle model (GREET 1.7) was used in conjunction with the vehicle-cycle model (GREET 2.7) to estimate total energy-cycle results.

Burnham, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Wu, Y.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

416

VEHICLE FOR SLAVE ROBOT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reeling device is designed for an electrical cable supplying power to the slave slde of a remote control manipulator mounted on a movable vehicle. As the vehicle carries the slave side about in a closed room, the device reels the cable in and out to maintain a variable length of the cable between the vehicle and a cable inlet in the wall of the room. The device also handles a fixed length of cable between the slave side and the vehicle, in spite of angular movement of the slave side with respect to the vehicle. (AEC)

Goertz, R.C.; Lindberg, J.F.

1962-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Green Materials and Processes for Managing Electronic Waste - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disassembly — selective disassembly, targeting hazardous or valuable components ... materials for the refining process, such as grinding plastics into powders.

418

Vehicle Technologies Office: Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment Deployment Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Vehicle Technologies Office: Deployment to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Deployment on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Deployment on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Deployment on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Deployment on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Deployment on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Deployment on AddThis.com... Energy Policy Act (EPAct) Clean Cities Educational Activities Deployment Our nation's energy security depends on the efficiency of our transportation system and on which fuels we use. Transportation in the United States already consumes much more oil than we produce here at home

419

CHSP: Material Safety Data Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYGIENE HYGIENE AND SAFETY PLAN CHSP SITE MAP WHO TO CALL MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES arrow image CHEMICAL PROCUREMENT, TRANSPORTATION AND INVENTORY arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD: DEFINITION arrow image CHEMICAL HAZARD ASSESSMENTS arrow image HAZARD CONTROLS arrow image TRAINING AND HAZARD INFORMATION arrow image EXPOSURE MONITORING & MEDICAL CONSULTATION arrow image APPENDICES arrow image FAQs QUESTIONS Search the CHSP: > Go spacer image EH&S Home PUB 3000 LBNL Home LBNL A-Z Index LBNL Search LBNL Phone Book Privacy & Security Notice spacer spacer image spacer image Material Safety Data Sheets and Chemical Information Resources A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is a manufacturer/importer's informational document of a hazardous chemical that describes its physical and chemical properties, hazards, and recommended precautions for handling, storage and disposal. How to Read an MSDS

420

Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mediated electrochemical hazardous waste destruction  

SciTech Connect

There are few permitted processes for mixed waste (radioactive plus chemically hazardous) treatment. We are developing electrochemical processes that convert the toxic organic components of mixed waste to water, carbon dioxide, an innocuous anions such as chloride. Aggressive oxidizer ions such as Ag{sup 2+} or Ce{sup +4} are produced at an anode. These can attack the organic molecules directly. They can also attack water which yields hydroxyl free radicals that in turn attack the organic molecules. The condensed (i.e., solid and/or liquid) effluent streams contain the inorganic radionuclide forms. These may be treated with existing technology and prepared for final disposal. Kinetics and the extent of destruction of some toxic organics have been measured. Depending on how the process is operated, coulombic efficiency can be nearly 100%. In addition, hazardous organic materials are becoming very expensive to dispose of and when they are combined with transuranic radioactive elements no processes are presently permitted. Mediated electrochemical oxidation is an ambient-temperature aqueous-phase process that can be used to oxidize organic components of mixed wastes. Problems associated with incineration, such as high-temperature volatilization of radionuclides, are avoided. Historically, Ag (2) has been used as a mediator in this process. Fe(6) and Co(3) are attractive alternatives to Ag(2) since they form soluble chlorides during the destruction of chlorinated solvents. Furthermore, silver itself is a toxic heavy metal. Quantitative data has been obtained for the complete oxidation of ethylene glycol by Fe(6) and Co(3). Though ethylene glycol is a nonhalogenated organic, this data has enabled us to make direct comparisons of activities of Fe(6) and Co(3) with Ag(2). Very good quantitative data for the oxidation of ethylene glycol by Ag(2) had already been collected. 4 refs., 6 figs.

Hickman, R.G.; Farmer, J.C.; Wang, F.T.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Hazardous waste identification: A guide to changing regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) was enacting in 1976 and amended in 1984 by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). Since then, federal regulations have generated a profusion of terms to identify and describe hazardous wastes. Regulations that5 define and govern management of hazardous wastes are codified in Title 40 of the code of Federal Regulations, Protection of the environment''. Title 40 regulations are divided into chapters, subchapters and parts. To be defined as hazardous, a waste must satisfy the definition of solid waste any discharged material not specifically excluded from regulation or granted a regulatory variance by the EPA Administrator. Some wastes and other materials have been identified as non-hazardous and are listed in 40 CFR 261.4(a) and 261.4(b). Certain wastes that satisfy the definition of hazardous waste nevertheless are excluded from regulation as hazardous if they meet specific criteria. Definitions and criteria for their exclusion are found in 40 CFR 261.4(c)-(f) and 40 CFR 261.5.

Stults, R.G. (OHM Remediation Services Corp., Findlay, OH (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hazardous Waste: Resource Pack for Trainers and Communicators Agency/Company /Organization: International Solid Waste Association (ISWA), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) Sector: Energy, Land, Water Focus Area: Renewable Energy, - Waste to Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Adaptation, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Guide/manual, Training materials Website: www.trp-training.info/ Cost: Paid Language: English References: Training Resource Pack[1] "The new TRP+ provides a structured package of notes, technical summaries, visual aids and other training material concerning the (hazardous) waste

424

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: January 8, 1: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips on AddThis.com... Fact #451: January 8, 2007 Household Vehicle Trips In a day, the average household traveled 32.7 miles in 2001 (the latest

425

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: March 8, 2010 3: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on AddThis.com... Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates The average number of persons occupying a car is 1.59 and has not changed

426

Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2008 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FY 2008 DOE Vehicle FY 2008 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2008 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2008 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2008 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2008 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2008 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: FY 2008 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review on AddThis.com... Publications

427

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #558: February 16, 2009 Transit Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: February 16, 8: February 16, 2009 Transit Vehicle Age and Cost to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #558: February 16, 2009 Transit Vehicle Age and Cost on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #558: February 16, 2009 Transit Vehicle Age and Cost on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #558: February 16, 2009 Transit Vehicle Age and Cost on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #558: February 16, 2009 Transit Vehicle Age and Cost on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #558: February 16, 2009 Transit Vehicle Age and Cost on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #558: February 16, 2009 Transit Vehicle Age and Cost on AddThis.com... Fact #558: February 16, 2009 Transit Vehicle Age and Cost

428

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: January 22, 3: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership on AddThis.com... Fact #453: January 22, 2007 Household Vehicle Ownership

429

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 1-2, 2013 2013 Natural Gas Vehicle Conference & Expo November 18-21, 2013 World LNG Fuels Conference & Expo January 21-23, 2014 More Events Contacts | Web Site Policies |...

430

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric Vehicles What's New 2012 Hyundai Sonata (4932) Battery Report (PDF 574KB) 2010 Ultra-Battery Honda Civic Battery Report (PDF 614KB) 2013 Chevrolet Malibu Baseline...

431

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Electric Vehicle Preparedness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

state or reflect those of the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. INLEXT-13-29359 Electric Vehicle Preparedness Task 1: Assessment of Data and Survey Results for Joint Base...

432

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Electric Vehicle Preparedness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

state or reflect those of the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. INLEXT-13-29360 Electric Vehicle Preparedness Task 1: Assessment of Data and Survey Results for NAS...

433

Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hazardous Gas Production by Alpha Particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focused on the production of hazardous gases in the radiolysis of solid organic matrices, such as polymers and resins, that may be associated with transuranic waste material. Self-radiolysis of radioactive waste is a serious environmental problem because it can lead to a change in the composition of the materials in storage containers and possibly jeopardize their integrity. Experimental determination of gaseous yields is of immediate practical importance in the engineering and maintenance of containers for waste materials. Fundamental knowledge on the radiation chemical processes occurring in these systems allows one to predict outcomes in materials or mixtures not specifically examined, which is a great aid in the management of the variety of waste materials currently overseen by Environmental Management.

Jay A. LaVerne, Principal Investigator

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

435

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

436

Search for Model Year 2001 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

437

Search for Model Year 2004 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Bifuel (Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

438

Search for Model Year 2008 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Class... Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

439

Search for Model Year 2003 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

440

Search for Model Year 2002 Vehicles by Fuel or Vehicle Type  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Propane) Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flex-Fuel (E85) Vehicles Hybrid Vehicles Search by Make Search by Model Search by EPA Size Class...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Communication in hazardous environments  

SciTech Connect

Radios were investigated for use in hazardous environments where protective breathing equipment such as plastic suits and respirators interfere with communication. A radio system, manufactured by Communications-Applied technology (C-AT), was identified that was designed specifically for hazardous environment communications. This equipment had been used successfully by the US Army and NASA for several years. C-AT equipment was evaluated in plantwide applications at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) using temporary frequencies obtained by the Department of Energy-Savannah River (DOE-SR). Radios performed well in all applications, which included a tritium facility, high-level caves, a nuclear reactor building, tank farm, and a canyon building interior. Permanent frequencies were obtained by DOE-SR for two complete six-man C-AT systems at SRP. Because of the relatively short range of these systems, replicates will cover all applications of this type of equipment plantwide. Twelve radio systems are currently being used successfully in plantwide applications.

Rankin, W N; Herold, T R

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emission Control R&D to Emission Control R&D to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Emission Control Waste Heat Recovery Fuels & Lubricants Materials Technologies Emission Control R&D

443

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: May 10, 2004 9: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #319: May 10, 2004 Highway Vehicle Emissions: 1970-2001 Comparison on

444

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #300: December 29, 2003 World Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

300: December 29, 300: December 29, 2003 World Vehicle Production by Country/Region to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #300: December 29, 2003 World Vehicle Production by Country/Region on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #300: December 29, 2003 World Vehicle Production by Country/Region on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #300: December 29, 2003 World Vehicle Production by Country/Region on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #300: December 29, 2003 World Vehicle Production by Country/Region on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #300: December 29, 2003 World Vehicle Production by Country/Region on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #300: December 29, 2003 World Vehicle Production by Country/Region on

445

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #605: January 11, 2010 Light Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: January 11, 5: January 11, 2010 Light Vehicle Sales by Month, 2008-2009 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #605: January 11, 2010 Light Vehicle Sales by Month, 2008-2009 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #605: January 11, 2010 Light Vehicle Sales by Month, 2008-2009 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #605: January 11, 2010 Light Vehicle Sales by Month, 2008-2009 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #605: January 11, 2010 Light Vehicle Sales by Month, 2008-2009 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #605: January 11, 2010 Light Vehicle Sales by Month, 2008-2009 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #605: January 11, 2010 Light Vehicle Sales by Month, 2008-2009 on AddThis.com...

446

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #539: October 6, 2008 Light Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

39: October 6, 39: October 6, 2008 Light Vehicle Production by State to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #539: October 6, 2008 Light Vehicle Production by State on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #539: October 6, 2008 Light Vehicle Production by State on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #539: October 6, 2008 Light Vehicle Production by State on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #539: October 6, 2008 Light Vehicle Production by State on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #539: October 6, 2008 Light Vehicle Production by State on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #539: October 6, 2008 Light Vehicle Production by State on AddThis.com... Fact #539: October 6, 2008

447

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #711: January 23, 2012 Top Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: January 23, 1: January 23, 2012 Top Vehicles around the Globe, 2011 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #711: January 23, 2012 Top Vehicles around the Globe, 2011 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #711: January 23, 2012 Top Vehicles around the Globe, 2011 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #711: January 23, 2012 Top Vehicles around the Globe, 2011 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #711: January 23, 2012 Top Vehicles around the Globe, 2011 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #711: January 23, 2012 Top Vehicles around the Globe, 2011 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #711: January 23, 2012 Top Vehicles around the Globe, 2011 on AddThis.com...

448

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #598: November 23, 2009 Hybrid Vehicle  

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8: November 23, 8: November 23, 2009 Hybrid Vehicle Sales by Model to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #598: November 23, 2009 Hybrid Vehicle Sales by Model on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #598: November 23, 2009 Hybrid Vehicle Sales by Model on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #598: November 23, 2009 Hybrid Vehicle Sales by Model on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #598: November 23, 2009 Hybrid Vehicle Sales by Model on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #598: November 23, 2009 Hybrid Vehicle Sales by Model on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #598: November 23, 2009 Hybrid Vehicle Sales by Model on AddThis.com... Fact #598: November 23, 2009

449

Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Kilowatts * Battery replacement or charging, defense (platoon power), telecom backup, remote, auxiliary power Buildings & Facilities * 100 Kilowatts to Megawatts * Consumer...

450

Hazardous Waste Act (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Hazardous waste" means any solid waste or combination of solid wastes that because of their quantity, concentration or physical, chemical or infectious characteristics may:  cause or significantly...

451

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lubricants Lubricants As most vehicles are on the road for more than 15 years before they are retired, investigating technologies that will improve today's vehicles is essential. Because 11.5 percent of fuel energy is consumed by engine friction, decreasing this friction through lubricants can lead to substantial improvements in the fuel economy of current vehicles, without needing to wait for the fleet to turn over. In fact, a 1 percent fuel savings in the existing vehicle fleet possible through lubricants could save 97 thousand barrels of oil a day or $3.5 billion a year. Because of these benefits, the Vehicle Technologies Office supports research on lubricants that can improve the efficiency of internal combustion engine vehicles, complementing our work on advanced combustion engine technology.

452

Vehicle Technologies Office: Favorites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Favorites Favorites #248 Top Ten Net Petroleum Importing Countries, 2000 December 23, 2002 #246 U.S. Oil Imports - Top 10 Countries of Origin December 9, 2002 #244 Sport Utility Vehicle Spotlight November 25, 2002 #243 Fuel Economy Leaders for 2003 Model Year Light Trucks November 18, 2002 #242 Fuel Economy Leaders for 2003 Model Year Cars November 11, 2002 #238 Automobile and Truck Population by Vehicle Age, 2001 October 14, 2002 #234 2003 Model Year Alternative Fuel Vehicles September 16, 2002 #233 Vehicles per Thousand People: U.S. Compared to Other Countries September 9, 2002 #230 Hybrid Electric Vehicles in the United States August 19, 2002 #229 Medium and Heavy Truck Sales August 12, 2002 #228 New Light Vehicle Sales Shares, 1976-2001 August 5, 2002

453

CMVRTC: Overweight Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

overweight vehicle data collection overweight vehicle data collection scale The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration requested information regarding overweight and oversized vehicle traffic entering inspection stations (ISs) in order to develop strategies for future research efforts and possibly help guide regulatory issues involving overweight commercial motor vehicles (CMVs). For a period of one month, inspection stations in Knox County and Greene County, Tennessee, recorded overweight and oversized vehicles that entered these ISs. During this period, 435 CMVs were recorded using an electronic form filled out by enforcement personnel at the IS. Of the 435 CMVs recorded, 381 had weight information documented with them. The majority (52.2%) of the vehicles recorded were five-axle combination

454

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Prospects for electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the current state-of- the-art of electric vehicles (EVs) with examples of recently developed prototype vehicles - Electric G-Van, Chrysler TEVan, Eaton DSEP and Ford/GE ETX-II. The acceleration, top speed and range of these electric vehicles are delineated to demonstrate their performance capabilities, which are comparable with conventional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. The prospects for the commercialization of the Electric G-van and the TEVan and the improvements expected from the AC drive systems of the DSEP and ETX-II vehicles are discussed. The impacts of progress being made in the development of a fuel cell/battery hybrid bus and advanced EVs on the competitiveness of EVs with ICE vehicles and their potential for reduction of air pollution and utility load management are postulated.

Patil, P.G. (Research and Development, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Div., U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (US))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

ELV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... it stipulates that vehicle manufacturers and material and equipment manufacturers must ... of hazardous substances when designing vehicles; ...

457

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL helps industry partners develop the next generation of energy efficient, high performance vehicles and fuels. NREL's transportation research spans from the materials to the systems level. NREL conducts research on the full range of vehicle types, from light-duty passenger cars to heavy-duty freight trucks. NREL's credible transportation research is grounded in real-world data. NREL's integrated approach links automotive technology advances to the full spectrum of renewable energy solutions. NREL researchers examine infrastructure, market conditions and driver behavior, as well as fuels and vehicles. NREL helps put fuel-efficient, low-emission cars and trucks on the road through research and innovation in electric vehicle, biofuel, and conventional automotive technologies. Researchers collaborate with industry

458

Vehicle Technologies Office: Ultracapacitors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

converter, which would increase the cost of the vehicle. The use of ultracapacitors for regenerative braking can greatly improve fuel efficiency under stop-and-go urban driving...

459

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM - Energy  

75 vehicle technologies program ed wall, program manager ed.wall@ee.doe.gov (202) 586-8055 venture capital technology showcase aug 21 and 22, 2007

460

Electric Vehicle Public Charging -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Public Charging - Time vs. Energy March, 2013 A critical factor for successful PEV adoption is the deployment and use of charging infrastructure in non-...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electric Vehicle Fleet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A98 0577 Electric Vehicle Fleet Operations in the United States Jim Francfort Presented to: 31st International Symposium on Automotive Technology and Automation Dusseldorf, Germany...

462

MOTOR VEHICLE MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... about half of the value added in light vehicles ... Selected Program White Papers. ... This white paper defines a program which supports the development ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

463

Mobile Autonomous Vehicle Obstacle Detection and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... vehicles from different manufacturers and to ... for Automated Guided Vehicle Safety Standards ... Control of Manufacturing Vehicles Research Towards ...

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

464

Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Incentive Program A fact sheet detailling the advanced technology vehicles...

465

Memorandum on Chemical Reactors and Reactor Hazards  

SciTech Connect

Two important problems in the investigation of reactor hazards are the chemical reactivity of various materials employed in reactor construction and the chracteristics of heat transfer under transient conditions, specifically heat transfer when driven by an exponentially increasing heat source (exp t/T). Although these problems are independent of each other, when studied in relation to reactor hazards they may occur in a closely coupled sequence. For example the onset of a dangerous chemical reactor may be due to structural failure of various reactor components under an exponentially rising heat source originating with a runaway nuclear reactor. For this reason, these two problems should eventually be studied together after an exploratory experimental survey has been made in which they are considered separately.

Mills, M.M.; Pearlman, H.; Ruebsamen, W.; Steele, G., Chrisney, J.

1951-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

466

Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System tutorial  

SciTech Connect

This manual is the tutorial for the Hazardous Solvent Substitution Data System (HSSDS), an online, comprehensive system of information on alternatives to hazardous solvents and related subjects. The HSSDS data base contains product information, material safety data sheets, toxicity reports, usage reports, biodegradable data, product chemical element lists, and background information on solvents. HSSDS use TOPIC{reg_sign} to search for information based on a query defined by the user. TOPIC provides a full text retrieval of unstructured source documents. In this tutorial, a series of lessons is provided that guides the user through basic steps common to most queries performed with HSSDS. Instructions are provided for both window-based and character-based applications.

Twitchell, K.E.; Skinner, N.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Electric Utility Terrain Vehicle Demonstration in a Military Base Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility terrain vehicles (UTVs), also called all terrain vehicles (ATVs), are used for a variety of purposes ranging from transporting people and materials to recreation. Examples of uses include transportation at military bases, for beach patrols, at ports, agricultural locations, industrial sites, and local/municipal applications such as at parks and schools. As of August 30, 2012 the Federal Highway Administration estimated that annual fuel usage of All-terrain vehicles to be approximately 173 ...

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

468

Electric Energy Industry Workforce: Trends in Motor Vehicle Crashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established an ongoing injury/illness research programthe Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) Programto provide information about the occurrence of workplace injury and illness among the electric energy industry workforce. Vehicles operated by electric utility workers typically include bucket trucks, digger/derrick trucks, washer trucks, pole and material trucks and trailers, and other vehicles used in line construction and maintenance. These vehicles are generally operated over low m...

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Trends in Household Vehicle Stock The 1991 RTECS counted more than 150 million vehicles in use by U.S. households. This chapter examines recent trends in the vehicle stock, as measured by the RTECS and other reputable vehicle surveys. It also provides some details on the type and model year of the household vehicle stock, and identifies regional differences in vehicle stock. Because vehicles are continuously being bought and sold, this chapter also reports findings relating to turnover of the vehicle stock in 1991. Finally, it examines the average vehicle stock in 1991 (which takes into account the acquisition and disposal of household vehicles over the course of the year) and identifies variations in the average number of household vehicles based on differences in household characteristics. Number of Household Vehicles Over the past 8 years, the stock of household vehicles has

470

American Electric Vehicles Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicles Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name American Electric Vehicles Inc Place Palmer Lake, Colorado Zip 80133 Sector Vehicles Product American Electric Vehicles (AEV) builds...

471

Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards Microsoft Word - VTP 175 Advanced Vehicle Tech project descriptions draft v5 8-2-11 AdvancedVehiclesTechn...

472

Electric-Drive Vehicle Basics (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes the basics of electric-drive vehicles, including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, all-electric vehicles, and the various charging options.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - PDF Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1 U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 Table 2 U.S. per Household Vehicle Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel ...

474

Vehicle Technologies Program Awards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technologies Program Awards Vehicle Technologies Program Awards vtpnum.zip More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Technologies Awards Table Advanced Vehicle...

475

Vehicle Technologies Program (EERE) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technologies Program (EERE) Vehicle Technologies Program (EERE) information about the Vehicle Technologies Program (EERE) Vehicle Technologies Program (EERE) More Documents...

476

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: April 12, 8: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic Statistics to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic Statistics on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic Statistics on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic Statistics on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic Statistics on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic Statistics on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #618:

477

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #304: January 26, 2004 Hybrid Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: January 26, 4: January 26, 2004 Hybrid Vehicle Purchases Earn Federal Tax Deductions to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #304: January 26, 2004 Hybrid Vehicle Purchases Earn Federal Tax Deductions on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #304: January 26, 2004 Hybrid Vehicle Purchases Earn Federal Tax Deductions on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #304: January 26, 2004 Hybrid Vehicle Purchases Earn Federal Tax Deductions on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #304: January 26, 2004 Hybrid Vehicle Purchases Earn Federal Tax Deductions on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #304: January 26, 2004 Hybrid Vehicle Purchases Earn Federal Tax Deductions on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #304:

478

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #806: December 2, 2013 Light Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: December 2, 6: December 2, 2013 Light Vehicle Market Shares, Model Years 1975-2012 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #806: December 2, 2013 Light Vehicle Market Shares, Model Years 1975-2012 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #806: December 2, 2013 Light Vehicle Market Shares, Model Years 1975-2012 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #806: December 2, 2013 Light Vehicle Market Shares, Model Years 1975-2012 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #806: December 2, 2013 Light Vehicle Market Shares, Model Years 1975-2012 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #806: December 2, 2013 Light Vehicle Market Shares, Model Years 1975-2012 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #806:

479

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full-Size Electric Vehicle Fleet and Reliability Test Reports to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Full-Size Electric Vehicle Fleet and Reliability Test...

480

Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Plug-in Electric Vehicle Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle hazardous materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Vehicle Technologies Office: Draft Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle R&D Plan to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Draft Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle R&D Plan on Facebook Tweet about...

482

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #322: May 31, 2004 Hybrid Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: May 31, 2004 Hybrid Vehicle Registrations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 322: May 31, 2004 Hybrid Vehicle Registrations on Facebook Tweet about...

483

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #475: June 25, 2007 Light Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: June 25, 2007 Light Vehicle Weight on the Rise to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 475: June 25, 2007 Light Vehicle Weight on the Rise on Facebook...

484

VEHICLE AND BATTERY DESCRIPTIONS AND SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Details  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 VEHICLE AND BATTERY DESCRIPTIONS AND SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Details Base Vehicle: 2011 Honda CR-Z VIN: JHMZF1C67BS004466 Electric Machine 1 : 10 kW (peak), permanent magnet...

485

VEHICLE AND BATTERY DESCRIPTIONS AND SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Details  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 VEHICLE AND BATTERY DESCRIPTIONS AND SPECIFICATIONS Vehicle Details Base Vehicle: 2011 Honda CR-Z VIN: JHMZF1C64BS002982 Electric Machine 1 : 10 kW (peak), permanent magnet...

486

Effects of Vehicle Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles Reid R. HeffnerImage in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles Reid R. Heffner,6, 2005 Abstract Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) have image,

Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Ken; Turrentine, Tom

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487