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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

A Statistical Model of Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A number of vehicle emission models are overly simple, such as static speed-dependent models widely used in

Cappiello, Alessandra

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Modeling...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

More Documents & Publications GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of VehicleFuel Systems Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model...

3

Data Needs for Evolving Motor Vehicle Emission Modeling Approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model was originally developed by the TransportationSystems Center of the USDepartment Transportationto support vehicle of energy

Guensler, Randall

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Tim Johnson October 16, 2012 2 Environmental Technologies Summary * Regulations - LEVIII finalized, Tier 3? RDE in Europe developing and very...

5

Using Local and Regional Air Quality Modeling and Source Apportionment Tools to Evaluate Vehicles and Biogenic Emission Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and inventories of CO, NO_(x) and VOCs from on-road vehicles estimated by vehicle emission factor models and biogenic emissions of isoprene estimated by a popular biogenic emission model are evaluated using local and regional scale air quality modeling and source...

Kota, Sri H

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

6

Vehicle Emissions Review - 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Review - 2011 (so far) Tim Johnson October 4, 2011 DOE DEER Conference, Detroit JohnsonTV@Corning.com 2 Summary * California LD criteria emission regs are tightening....

7

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per mile as vehicles...

8

Emissions from US waste collection vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Life-cycle emissions for alternative fuel technologies. ? Fuel consumption of alternative fuels for waste collection vehicles. ? Actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles. ? Diesel-fueled waste collection vehicle emissions. - Abstract: This research is an in-depth environmental analysis of potential alternative fuel technologies for waste collection vehicles. Life-cycle emissions, cost, fuel and energy consumption were evaluated for a wide range of fossil and bio-fuel technologies. Emission factors were calculated for a typical waste collection driving cycle as well as constant speed. In brief, natural gas waste collection vehicles (compressed and liquid) fueled with North-American natural gas had 610% higher well-to-wheel (WTW) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to diesel-fueled vehicles; however the pump-to-wheel (PTW) GHG emissions of natural gas waste collection vehicles averaged 6% less than diesel-fueled vehicles. Landfill gas had about 80% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel. Biodiesel waste collection vehicles had between 12% and 75% lower WTW GHG emissions relative to diesel depending on the fuel source and the blend. In 2011, natural gas waste collection vehicles had the lowest fuel cost per collection vehicle kilometer travel. Finally, the actual driving cycle of waste collection vehicles consists of repetitive stops and starts during waste collection; this generates more emissions than constant speed driving.

Maimoun, Mousa A., E-mail: mousamaimoun@gmail.com [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Reinhart, Debra R. [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Gammoh, Fatina T. [Quality Department, Airport International Group, Amman (Jordan); McCauley Bush, Pamela [Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Consumer Vehicle Choice Model Documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the Fuel Economy and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions standards, automobile manufacturers will need to adopt new technologies to improve the fuel economy of their vehicles and to reduce the overall GHG emissions of their fleets. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed the Optimization Model for reducing GHGs from Automobiles (OMEGA) to estimate the costs and benefits of meeting GHG emission standards through different technology packages. However, the model does not simulate the impact that increased technology costs will have on vehicle sales or on consumer surplus. As the model documentation states, While OMEGA incorporates functions which generally minimize the cost of meeting a specified carbon dioxide (CO2) target, it is not an economic simulation model which adjusts vehicle sales in response to the cost of the technology added to each vehicle. Changes in the mix of vehicles sold, caused by the costs and benefits of added fuel economy technologies, could make it easier or more difficult for manufacturers to meet fuel economy and emissions standards, and impacts on consumer surplus could raise the costs or augment the benefits of the standards. Because the OMEGA model does not presently estimate such impacts, the EPA is investigating the feasibility of developing an adjunct to the OMEGA model to make such estimates. This project is an effort to develop and test a candidate model. The project statement of work spells out the key functional requirements for the new model.

Liu, Changzheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

11

Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fraction of light-duty gasoline vehicle particulate matterQuinone emissions from gasoline and diesel motor vehicles.32 organic compounds from gasoline- powered motor vehicles.

Jakober, Chris A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions Reduction Off-Highway Heavy Vehicle Diesel Efficiency Improvement and Emissions Reduction 2005 Diesel Engine...

13

Emission Estimation of Heavy Duty Diesel Vehicles by Developing Texas Specific Drive Cycles with Moves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driving cycles are acting as the basis of the evaluation of the vehicle performance from air quality point of view, such as fuel consumption or pollutant emission, especially in emission modeling and emission estimation. The original definition...

Gu, Chaoyi

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Impact of California Reformulated Gasoline On Motor Vehicle Emissions. 1. Mass Emission Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California reformulated gasoline on motor vehicle emissions.Impact of California Reformulated Gasoline OIl Motor Vehicleprogress, increased vehicle Gasoline Motor on Vehicle travel

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Singer, Brett C.; Harley, Robert A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Trends in on-road vehicle emissions of ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motor vehicle emissions of ammonia have been measured at a California highway tunnel in the San Francisco Bay area. Between 1999 and 2006, light-duty vehicle ammonia emissions decreased by 38 {+-} 6%, from 640 {+-} 40 to 400 {+-} 20 mg kg{sup -1}. High time resolution measurements of ammonia made in summer 2001 at the same location indicate a minimum in ammonia emissions correlated with slower-speed driving conditions. Variations in ammonia emission rates track changes in carbon monoxide more closely than changes in nitrogen oxides, especially during later evening hours when traffic speeds are highest. Analysis of remote sensing data of Burgard et al. (Environ Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 7018-7022) indicates relationships between ammonia and vehicle model year, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Ammonia emission rates from diesel trucks were difficult to measure in the tunnel setting due to the large contribution to ammonia concentrations in a mixed-traffic bore that were assigned to light-duty vehicle emissions. Nevertheless, it is clear that heavy-duty diesel trucks are a minor source of ammonia emissions compared to light-duty gasoline vehicles.

Kean, A.J.; Littlejohn, D.; Ban-Weiss, G.A.; Harley, R.A.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Lunden, M. M.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

VEHICLE EMISSIONS AND TRAFFIC MEASURES: EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF FIELD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEHICLE EMISSIONS AND TRAFFIC MEASURES: EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF FIELD OBSERVATIONS AT SIGNALIZED between vehicle emissions and traffic control measures is an important step toward reducing the potential roadway design and traffic control, have the ability to reduce vehicle emissions. However, current vehicle

Frey, H. Christopher

17

Advanced Clean Cars Zero Emission Vehicle Regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Clean Cars Zero Emission Vehicle Regulation ZEV #12;Advanced Clean Cars ZEV Program 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 Current Regulation -ZEVs Current Regulation -PHEVs Projected: PHEVs 15Net ­ Blueprint Plan ­ Regional clusters, environmental and economic analysis · Clean Fuels Outlet

California at Davis, University of

18

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Control...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines Presentation given by Oak Ridge National...

19

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Particulate Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration...

20

On-road remote sensing of vehicle emissions in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-road remote sensing of vehicle emissions in the Auckland Region August 2003 Technical 1877353000 www.arc.govt.nz #12;TP 198 On-Road Remote Sensing of Vehicle Emissions in the Auckland Region #12;Page i TP 198 On-Road Remote Sensing of Vehicle Emissions in the Auckland Region On-road remote sensing

Denver, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Using Vehicle Taxes to Reduce Carbon Dioxide Emissions Rates of New Passenger Vehicles: Evidence from France, Germany, and Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

France, Germany, and Sweden link vehicle taxes to the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions rates of passenger vehicles. Based on new vehicle registration data from 20052010, a vehicles tax is negatively correlated with its ...

Klier, Thomas

22

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

Particulate Measurements and Emissions Characterization of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Exhaust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to measure and characterize particulate emissions from light-duty alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and equivalent gasoline-fueled vehicles. The project included emission testing of a fleet of 129 gasoline-fueled vehicles and 19 diesel vehicles. Particulate measurements were obtained over Federal Test Procedure and US06 cycles. Chemical characterization of the exhaust particulate was also performed. Overall, the particulate emissions from modern technology compressed natural gas and methanol vehicles were low, but were still comparable to those of similar technology gasoline vehicles.

Durbin, T. D.; Truex, T. J.; Norbeck, J. M. (Center for Environmental Research and Technology College of Engineering, University of California - Riverside, California)

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vehicle air-conditioning can significantly impact fuel economy and tailpipe emissions of conventional and hybrid electric vehicles and reduce electric vehicle range. In addition, a new US emissions procedure, called the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure, has provided the motivation for reducing the size of vehicle air-conditioning systems in the US. The SFTP will measure tailpipe emissions with the air-conditioning system operating. Current air-conditioning systems can reduce the fuel economy of high fuel-economy vehicles by about 50% and reduce the fuel economy of today's mid-sized vehicles by more than 20% while increasing NOx by nearly 80% and CO by 70%.

Farrington, R.; Rugh, J.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

25

On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Pokharel, Gary A. Bishop and Donald H. Stedman Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Model Year FailureRate(%) Gasoline Vehicles Natural Gas Bi/day382252Diesel trucks Tons/day2730220Gasohol (LTK, PAS) Tons/day3748369Gasoline (LTK, PAS) g per kg of fuel

Denver, University of

26

Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

MO) Vehicles Home About Vehicle Technologies Office Plug-in Electric Vehicles & Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Alternative Fuels Modeling, Testing, Data & Results Education...

27

Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory for the Denver Metropolitan Area Sajal S of Denver 2101 E. Wesley Ave. Denver, CO 80208 #12;Mobile Source Emissions Inventory Methods MOBILE emission factors -g/mile uncertain Vehicle miles traveled -very uncertain Speed correction factors Inventory

Denver, University of

28

Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions from gasoline and diesel motor vehicles. Environ.of four dilutions of diesel engine exhaust for a subchronicautomobiles and heavy-duty diesel trucks. Environ. Sci.

Jakober, Chris A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Joint Development and Coordination of Emissions Control Data and Models (CLEERS Analysis and Coordination)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the joint...

30

Aggregate vehicle travel forecasting model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a model for forecasting total US highway travel by all vehicle types, and its implementation in the form of a personal computer program. The model comprises a short-run, econometrically-based module for forecasting through the year 2000, as well as a structural, scenario-based longer term module for forecasting through 2030. The short-term module is driven primarily by economic variables. It includes a detailed vehicle stock model and permits the estimation of fuel use as well as vehicle travel. The longer-tenn module depends on demographic factors to a greater extent, but also on trends in key parameters such as vehicle load factors, and the dematerialization of GNP. Both passenger and freight vehicle movements are accounted for in both modules. The model has been implemented as a compiled program in the Fox-Pro database management system operating in the Windows environment.

Greene, D.L.; Chin, Shih-Miao; Gibson, R. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Study Pinpoints Sources of Polluting Vehicle Emissions (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unburned lubricant produces 60%-90% of organic carbon emissions. While diesel fuel is often viewed as the most polluting of conventional petroleum-based fuels, emissions from gasoline engines can more significantly degrade air quality. Gasoline exhaust is at least as toxic on a per-unit-mass basis as diesel exhaust, and contributes up to 10 times more particulate matter (PM) to the emission inventory. Because emissions from both fuels can gravely impact health and the environment, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched a study to understand how these pollutants relate to fuels, lubricants, and engine operating conditions. NREL's Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) project tested a variety of vehicles over different drive cycles at moderate (72 F) and cold (20 F) temperatures. Testing included: (1) Normal and high-emitting light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicles; (2) Gasoline, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles; (3) New and aged lubricants representative of those currently on the market; and (4) Gasoline containing no ethanol, E10, Texas-mandated low-emission diesel fuel, biodiesel, and CNG. The study confirmed that normally functioning emission control systems for gasoline light-duty vehicles are very effective at controlling organic carbon (OC) emissions. Diesel vehicles without aftertreatment emission control systems exhibited OC emissions approximately one order of magnitude higher than gasoline vehicles. High-emitter gasoline vehicles produced OC emissions similar to diesel vehicles without exhaust aftertreatment emission control. Exhaust catalysts combusted or converted more than 75% of lubricating oil components in the exhaust gases. Unburned crankcase lubricant made up 60%-90% of OC emissions. This OC represented 20%-50% of emitted PM in all but two of the vehicles. Three-way catalysts proved effective at reducing most of the OC. With high PM emitters or vehicles with deteriorated aftertreatment, high-molecular-weight fuel components and unburned lubricant were emitted at higher rates than in vehicles in good repair, with functioning emissions systems. Light-duty gasoline, medium-duty diesel, and heavy-duty natural gas vehicles produced more particles with fresh oil than with aged oil. The opposite trend was observed in light- and medium-duty high PM emitters. This effect was not readily apparent with heavy-duty diesel vehicles, perhaps because the lubricant represented a much smaller fraction of the total PM in those trucks.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Houston Zero Emission Delivery Vehicle Deployment Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

33

Effects of Mid-Level Ethanol Blends on Conventional Vehicle Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were conducted in 2008 on 16 late-model conventional vehicles (1999-2007) to determine short-term effects of mid-level ethanol blends on performance and emissions. Vehicle odometer readings ranged from 10,000 to 100,000 miles, and all vehicles conformed to federal emissions requirements for their federal certification level. The LA92 drive cycle, also known as the Unified Cycle, was used for testing because it more accurately represents real-world acceleration rates and speeds than the Federal Test Procedure. Test fuels were splash-blends of up to 20 volume percent ethanol with federal certification gasoline. Both regulated and unregulated air-toxic emissions were measured. For the 16-vehicle fleet, increasing ethanol content resulted in reductions in average composite emissions of both nonmethane hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide and increases in average emissions of ethanol and aldehydes.

Knoll, K.; West, B.; Huff, S.; Thomas, J.; Orban, J.; Cooper, C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Zero Emission Vehicle Program Changes In 1990, California embarked on a plan to reduce vehicle emissions to zero through the gradual introduction of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12/10/01 Zero Emission Vehicle Program Changes In 1990, California embarked on a plan to reduce vehicle emissions to zero through the gradual introduction of zero emission vehicles (ZEVs). Specifically, and in 1998 to allow partial ZEV (PZEV) credits for extremely clean vehicles that were not pure ZEVs

Gille, Sarah T.

35

Development and applications of GREET 2.7 -- The Transportation Vehicle-CycleModel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a vehicle-cycle module for the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. The fuel-cycle GREET model has been cited extensively and contains data on fuel cycles and vehicle operations. The vehicle-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission effects associated with vehicle material recovery and production, vehicle component fabrication, vehicle assembly, and vehicle disposal/recycling. With the addition of the vehicle-cycle module, the GREET model now provides a comprehensive, lifecycle-based approach to compare the energy use and emissions of conventional and advanced vehicle technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel cell vehicles). This report details the development and application of the GREET 2.7 model. The current model includes six vehicles--a conventional material and a lightweight material version of a mid-size passenger car with the following powertrain systems: internal combustion engine, internal combustion engine with hybrid configuration, and fuel cell with hybrid configuration. The model calculates the energy use and emissions that are required for vehicle component production; battery production; fluid production and use; and vehicle assembly, disposal, and recycling. This report also presents vehicle-cycle modeling results. In order to put these results in a broad perspective, the fuel-cycle model (GREET 1.7) was used in conjunction with the vehicle-cycle model (GREET 2.7) to estimate total energy-cycle results.

Burnham, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Wu, Y.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cold-Start Emissions Control in Hybrid Vehicles Equipped with...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Control in Hybrid Vehicles Equipped with a Passive Adsorber for Hydrocarbons and NOx Z. Gao, C.S. Daw, M.-Y. Kim, J.-S. Choi, J.E. Parks II, and D.E. Smith Oak Ridge...

37

Vehicle emissions and energy consumption impacts of modal shifts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growing concern over air quality has prompted the development of strategies to reduce vehicle emissions in these areas. Concern has also been expressed regarding the current dependency of the U,S, on foreign oil. An option for addressing...

Mallett, Vickie Lynn

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Lubricating Oil Dominates Primary Organic Aerosol Emissions from Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lubricating Oil Dominates Primary Organic Aerosol Emissions from Motor Vehicles David R. Worton to "fresh" lubricating oil. The gas chromatography retention time data indicates that the cycloalkane ring with lubricating oil being the dominant source from both gasoline and diesel-powered vehicles, with an additional

Cohen, Ronald C.

39

Testing hybrid electric vehicle emissions and fuel economy at the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Challenge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From June 12--20, 1994, an engineering design competition called the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Challenge was held in Southfield, Michigan. This collegiate-level competition, which involved 36 colleges and universities from across North America, challenged the teams to build a superior HEV. One component of this comprehensive competition was the emissions event. Special HEV testing procedures were developed for the competition to find vehicle emissions and correct for battery state-of-charge while fitting into event time constraints. Although there were some problems with a newly-developed data acquisition system, they were able to get a full profile of the best performing vehicles as well as other vehicles that represent typical levels of performance from the rest of the field. This paper will explain the novel test procedures, present the emissions and fuel economy results, and provide analysis of second-by-second data for several vehicles.

Duoba, M.; Quong, S.; LeBlanc, N.; Larsen, R.P.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 7, vehicle emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of exhaust and evaporative emissions from Clean Fleet vans running on M-85, compressed natural gas (CNG), California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), propane gas, and a control gasoline (RF-A) are presented. Three vans from each combination of vehicle manufacturer and fuel were tested at the California Air Resources Board (ARB) as they accumulated mileage in the demonstration. Data are presented on regulated emissions, ozone precursors, air toxics, and greenhouse gases. The emissions tests provide information on in-use emissions. That is, the vans were taken directly from daily commercial service and tested at the ARB. The differences in alternative fuel technology provide the basis for a range of technology options. The emissions data reflect these differences, with classes of vehicle/fuels producing either more or less emissions for various compounds relative to the control gasoline.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Development of a dedicated ethanol ultra-low-emissions vehicle (ULEV): Phase 3 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the 3.5 year project discussed in this report was to develop a commercially competitive vehicle powered by ethanol (or an ethanol blend) that can meet California`s Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (ULEV) standards and equivalent Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) energy efficiency for a light duty passenger car application. This particular report summarizes the third phase of the project, which lasted 12 months. Emissions tests were conducted with advanced after-treatment devices on one of the two, almost identical, test vehicles, a 1993 Ford Taurus flexible fuel vehicle. The report also covers tests on the engine removed from the second Taurus vehicle. This engine was modified for an increased compression ratio, fitted with air assist injectors, and included an advanced engine control system with model-based control.

Dodge, L.; Callahan, T.; Leone, D.; Naegeli, D.; Shouse, K.; Smith, L.; Whitney, K. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Gasoline-fueled hybrid vs. conventional vehicle emissions and fuel economy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the relative fuel economy and emissions behavior, both measured and modeled, of technically comparable, contemporary hybrid and conventional vehicles fueled by gasoline, in terms of different driving cycles. Criteria pollutants (hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides) are discussed, and the potential emissions benefits of designing hybrids for grid connection are briefly considered. In 1997, Toyota estimated that their grid-independent hybrid vehicle would obtain twice the fuel economy of a comparable conventional vehicle on the Japan 10/15 mode driving cycle. This initial result, as well as the fuel economy level (66 mpg), made its way into the U.S. press. Criteria emissions amounting to one-tenth of Japanese standards were cited, and some have interpreted these results to suggest that the grid-independent hybrid can reduce criteria emissions in the U.S. more sharply than can a conventional gasoline vehicle. This paper shows that the potential of contemporary grid-independent hybrid vehicle technology for reducing emissions and fuel consumption under U.S. driving conditions is less than some have inferred. The importance (and difficulty) of doing test and model assessments with comparable driving cycles, comparable emissions control technology, and comparable performance capabilities is emphasized. Compared with comparable-technology conventional vehicles, grid-independent hybrids appear to have no clear criteria pollutant benefits (or disbenefits). (Such benefits are clearly possible with grid-connectable hybrids operating in zero emissions mode.) However, significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions (i.e., fuel consumption) are possible with hybrid vehicles when they are used to best advantage.

Anderson, J.; Bharathan, D.; He, J.; Plotkin, S.; Santini, D.; Vyas, A.

1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

43

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Vehicle Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWay TransportEthanolAll-Electric VehiclesBiodiesel Vehicle

44

Impact of California Reformulated Gasoline on Motor Vehicle Emissions. 2. Volatile Organic Compound Speciation and Reactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Reformulated Gasoline On Motor Vehicle EmissionsCalifornia Reformulated Gasoline on Motor Vehicle EmmissionsBerkeley Environ. ScLTechnoL gasoline Impact California of

Kirchstetter, Thomas; Singer, Brett; Harley, Robert

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Zero-emission vehicle technology assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New York State adopted the California Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) program that includes a sales mandate for ZEVs starting in 1988. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) was required to perform a technology review of zero-emission vehicles (ZEVs) in 1994, and examine technology developments and issues relating to ZEV performance in New York State, by the amendments to 6NYCRR Part 218, February 1992. The Final Report presents an overview of technology as of the spring of 1995, and a projection of technology status over the next 10 years.

Woods, T.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 4. The Vehicle Fleet Is Dominated by Newer Vehicles______________ 8 5. More Recent Vehicle Models

Denver, University of

47

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricity Fuel Basics to someoneEthanol Vehicle

48

TECHNICAL PAPER Multispecies remote sensing measurements of vehicle emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements. The remote sensing mean gram per kilogram carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC), and oxideTECHNICAL PAPER Multispecies remote sensing measurements of vehicle emissions on Sherman Way in Van Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Denver, Denver, CO, USA 2 National Renewable Energy

Denver, University of

49

Future Emissions Impact On Off-Road Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summaries of paper: Emission requirements dictate vehicle update cycles; Packaging, performance and cost impacted; Styling updates can be integrated; Opportunity to integrate features and performance; Non-uniform regulations challenge resources; and Customers won't expect to pay more or receive less.

Kirby Baumgard; Steve Ephraim

2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

50

Zero-Emission Vehicle Scenario Cost Analysis Using A Fuzzy Set-Based Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cell Vehicle Analysis of Energy Use, Emissions, and Cost,"Cost Analysis of Conventional and Fuel Cell/Battery Powered Urban Passenger Vehicles,cost analysis of several types of AFVs, but did not include fuel cell vehicles

Lipman, Timothy Edward

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Zero-Emission Vehicle Scenario Cost Analysis Using A Fuzzy Set-Based Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cell Vehicle Analysis of Energy Use, Emissions, and Cost,&Cost Analysis of Conventional and Fuel Cell/Battery Powered Urban Passenger Vehicles,cost analysis of several types of AFV s, but did not include fuel cell vehicles

Lipman, Timothy E.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fact #771: March 18, 2013 California Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1: March 18, 2013 California Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate is Now in Effect Fact 771: March 18, 2013 California Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate is Now in Effect A waiver granted by...

53

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear Guide Remote55 Jefferson Ave.Emission Basics

54

A zinc-air battery and flywheel zero emission vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) developed a compliance plan known as the Low Emission Vehicle Program. An integral part of that program was a sales mandate to the top seven automobile manufacturers requiring the percentage of Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEVs) sold in California to be 2% in 1998, 5% in 2001 and 10% by 2003. Currently available ZEV technology will probably not meet customer demand for range and moderate cost. A potential option to meet the CARB mandate is to use two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) technologies, namely, zinc-air refuelable batteries (ZARBs) and electromechanical batteries (EMBs, i. e., flywheels) to develop a ZEV with a 384 kilometer (240 mile) urban range. This vehicle uses a 40 kW, 70 kWh ZARB for energy storage combined with a 102 kW, 0.5 kWh EMB for power peaking. These technologies are sufficiently near-term and cost-effective to plausibly be in production by the 1999-2001 time frame for stationary and initial vehicular applications. Unlike many other ZEVs currently being developed by industry, our proposed ZEV has range, acceleration, and size consistent with larger conventional passenger vehicles available today. Our life-cycle cost projections for this technology are lower than for Pb-acid battery ZEVs. We have used our Hybrid Vehicle Evaluation Code (HVEC) to simulate the performance of the vehicle and to size the various components. The use of conservative subsystem performance parameters and the resulting vehicle performance are discussed in detail.

Tokarz, F.; Smith, J.R.; Cooper, J.; Bender, D.; Aceves, S.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

55

NMOG Emissions Characterizations and Estimation for Vehicles Using Ethanol-Blended Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethanol is a biofuel commonly used in gasoline blends to displace petroleum consumption; its utilization is on the rise in the United States, spurred by the biofuel utilization mandates put in place by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the statutory responsibility to implement the EISA mandates through the promulgation of the Renewable Fuel Standard. EPA has historically mandated an emissions certification fuel specification that calls for ethanol-free fuel, except for the certification of flex-fuel vehicles. However, since the U.S. gasoline marketplace is now virtually saturated with E10, some organizations have suggested that inclusion of ethanol in emissions certification fuels would be appropriate. The test methodologies and calculations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations for gasoline-fueled vehicles have been developed with the presumption that the certification fuel does not contain ethanol; thus, a number of technical issues would require resolution before such a change could be accomplished. This report makes use of the considerable data gathered during the mid-level blends testing program to investigate one such issue: estimation of non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions. The data reported in this paper were gathered from over 600 cold-start Federal Test Procedure (FTP) tests conducted on 68 vehicles representing 21 models from model year 2000 to 2009. Most of the vehicles were certified to the Tier-2 emissions standard, but several older Tier-1 and national low emissions vehicle program (NLEV) vehicles were also included in the study. Exhaust speciation shows that ethanol, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde dominate the oxygenated species emissions when ethanol is blended into the test fuel. A set of correlations were developed that are derived from the measured non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions and the ethanol blend level in the fuel. These correlations were applied to the measured NMHC emissions from the mid-level ethanol blends testing program and the results compared against the measured NMOG emissions. The results show that the composite FTP NMOG emissions estimate has an error of 0.0015 g/mile {+-}0.0074 for 95% of the test results. Estimates for the individual phases of the FTP are also presented with similar error levels. A limited number of tests conducted using the LA92, US06, and highway fuel economy test cycles show that the FTP correlation also holds reasonably well for these cycles, though the error level relative to the measured NMOG value increases for NMOG emissions less than 0.010 g/mile.

Sluder, Scott [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

NMOG Emissions Characterization and Estimation for Vehicles Using Ethanol-Blended Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethanol is a biofuel commonly used in gasoline blends to displace petroleum consumption; its utilization is on the rise in the United States, spurred by the biofuel utilization mandates put in place by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the statutory responsibility to implement the EISA mandates through the promulgation of the Renewable Fuel Standard. EPA has historically mandated an emissions certification fuel specification that calls for ethanol-free fuel, except for the certification of flex-fuel vehicles. However, since the U.S. gasoline marketplace is now virtually saturated with E10, some organizations have suggested that inclusion of ethanol in emissions certification fuels would be appropriate. The test methodologies and calculations contained in the Code of Federal Regulations for gasoline-fueled vehicles have been developed with the presumption that the certification fuel does not contain ethanol; thus, a number of technical issues would require resolution before such a change could be accomplished. This report makes use of the considerable data gathered during the mid-level blends testing program to investigate one such issue: estimation of non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions. The data reported in this paper were gathered from over 600 cold-start Federal Test Procedure (FTP) tests conducted on 68 vehicles representing 21 models from model year 2000 to 2009. Most of the vehicles were certified to the Tier-2 emissions standard, but several older Tier-1 and national low emissions vehicle program (NLEV) vehicles were also included in the study. Exhaust speciation shows that ethanol, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde dominate the oxygenated species emissions when ethanol is blended into the test fuel. A set of correlations were developed that are derived from the measured non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions and the ethanol blend level in the fuel. These correlations were applied to the measured NMHC emissions from the mid-level ethanol blends testing program and the results compared against the measured NMOG emissions. The results show that the composite FTP NMOG emissions estimate has an error of 0.0015 g/mile {+-}0.0074 for 95% of the test results. Estimates for the individual phases of the FTP are also presented with similar error levels. A limited number of tests conducted using the LA92, US06, and highway fuel economy test cycles show that the FTP correlation also holds reasonably well for these cycles, though the error level relative to the measured NMOG value increases for NMOG emissions less than 0.010 g/mile.

Sluder, Scott [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Topology-Based Vehicle Systems Modelling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The simulation tools that are used to model vehicle systems have not been advancing as quickly as the growth of research and technology surrounding the (more)

Yam, Edward

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Total energy cycle energy use and emissions of electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total energy cycle analysis (TECA) of electric vehicles (EV) was recently completed. The EV energy cycle includes production and transport of fuels used in power plants to generate electricity, electricity generation, EV operation, and vehicle and battery manufacture. This paper summarizes the key assumptions and results of the EVTECA. The total energy requirements of EVS me estimated to be 24-35% lower than those of the conventional, gasoline-fueled vehicles they replace, while the reductions in total oil use are even greater: 55-85%. Greenhouse gases (GHG) are 24-37% lower with EVs. EVs reduce total emissions of several criteria air pollutants (VOC, CO, and NO{sub x}) but increase total emissions of others (SO{sub x}, TSP, and lead) over the total energy cycle. Regional emissions are generally reduced with EVs, except possibly SO{sub x}. The limitations of the EVTECA are discussed, and its results are compared with those of other evaluations of EVs. In general, many of the results (particularly the oil use, GHG, VOC, CO, SO{sub x}, and lead results) of the analysis are consistent with those of other evaluations.

Singh, M. K.

1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

59

Alcohol-fueled vehicles: An alternative fuels vehicle, emissions, and refueling infrastructure technology assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in alternative motor vehicle fuels has grown tremendously over the last few years. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the National Energy Policy Act of 1992 and the California Clean Air Act are primarily responsible for this resurgence and have spurred both the motor fuels and vehicle manufacturing industries into action. For the first time, all three U.S. auto manufacturers are offering alternative fuel vehicles to the motoring public. At the same time, a small but growing alternative fuels refueling infrastructure is beginning to develop across the country. Although the recent growth in alternative motor fuels use is impressive, their market niche is still being defined. Environmental regulations, a key driver behind alternative fuel use, is forcing both car makers and the petroleum industry to clean up their products. As a result, alternative fuels no longer have a lock on the clean air market and will have to compete with conventional vehicles in meeting stringent future vehicle emission standards. The development of cleaner burning gasoline powered vehicles has signaled a shift in the marketing of alternative fuels. While they will continue to play a major part in the clean vehicle market, alternative fuels are increasingly recognized as a means to reduce oil imports. This new role is clearly defined in the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The Act identifies alternative fuels as a key strategy for reducing imports of foreign oil and mandates their use for federal and state fleets, while reserving the right to require private and municipal fleet use as well.

McCoy, G.A.; Kerstetter, J.; Lyons, J.K. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Effects of Retrofitting Emission Control Systems on In-Use Heavy Diesel Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use emissions from heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Environ. Sci.Sci. Technol. (7) Johnson, T. V. Diesel Emission Control inNO x control on heavy-duty diesel truck emissions. Environ.

Millstein, Dev E.; Harley, Robert A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Valuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential of plug-in vehicles remains small compared to ownership cost. As such, to offer a socially efficient approach to emissions and oil consumption reduction, lifetime cost of plug-in vehicles mustValuation of plug-in vehicle life-cycle air emissions and oil displacement benefits Jeremy J

Michalek, Jeremy J.

62

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ace079mukundan2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Robust Nitrogen OxideAmmonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions Control Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

64

An analysis on long term emission benefits of a government vehicle fleet replacement plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehicle scrappage program was launched by the Unocal Corporation (known as the South Coast Recycled Auto duty vehicle Á Survival probability Á Lifetime emissions J. Lin (&) Department of Civil and Materials

Illinois at Chicago, University of

65

Vehicle Technologies Office's Research Recognized by R&D 100...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Vehicles Home About Vehicle Technologies Office Plug-in Electric Vehicles & Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Alternative Fuels Modeling, Testing, Data & Results Education...

66

A Midwest Regional Inventory of Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Midwest Regional Inventory of Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Emissions by Christopher D. Dresser OF WISCONSIN - MADISON Abstract A Midwest Regional Inventory of Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Emissions Christopher Studies This study presents a "bottom-up" emissions inventory for NOx, PM2.5, SO2, CO, and VOCs from heavy

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

67

Improving efficiency of a vehicle HVAC system with comfort modeling...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

efficiency of a vehicle HVAC system with comfort modeling, zonal design, and thermoelectric devices Improving efficiency of a vehicle HVAC system with comfort modeling, zonal...

68

Canadas Voluntary Agreement on Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions: When the Details Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

goals. Science 301, 506508. General Motors Canada (GM Canada), 2005. Vehicle emissions & fuels. Canada, 2006. Canadas clean

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Control for Lean Gasoline Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about emissions...

70

Modelling and control strategy development for fuel cell electric vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling and control strategy development for fuel cell electric vehicles Andreas Schell b , Huei applicable to the development of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs reserved. Keywords: Fuel cell electric vehicle; Hybrid vehicles; Modelling 1. Introduction Advanced

Peng, Huei

71

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

internal combustion engine vehicles, the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle has the advantages of high energy efficiency and low emissions

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Fuel Economy and Emissions of a Vehicle Equipped with an Aftermarket Flexible-Fuel Conversion Kit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grants Certificates of Conformity for alternative fuel conversion systems and also offers other forms of premarket registration of conversion kits for use in vehicles more than two model years old. Use of alternative fuels such as ethanol, natural gas, and propane are encouraged by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) produce emissions-certified vehicles capable of using alternative fuels, and several alternative fuel conversion system manufacturers produce EPA-approved conversion systems for a variety of alternative fuels and vehicle types. To date, only one manufacturer (Flex Fuel U.S.) has received EPA certifications for ethanol fuel (E85) conversion kits. This report details an independent evaluation of a vehicle with a legal installation of a Flex Fuel U.S. conversion kit. A 2006 Dodge Charger was baseline tested with ethanol-free certification gasoline (E0) and E20 (gasoline with 20 vol % ethanol), converted to flex-fuel operation via installation of a Flex Box Smart Kit from Flex Fuel U.S., and retested with E0, E20, E50, and E81. Test cycles included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP or city cycle), the highway fuel economy test (HFET), and the US06 test (aggressive driving test). Averaged test results show that the vehicle was emissions compliant on E0 in the OEM condition (before conversion) and compliant on all test fuels after conversion. Average nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions exceeded the Tier 2/Bin 5 intermediate life NO{sub X} standard with E20 fuel in the OEM condition due to two of three test results exceeding this standard [note that E20 is not a legal fuel for non-flexible-fuel vehicles (non-FFVs)]. In addition, one E0 test result before conversion and one E20 test result after conversion exceeded the NOX standard, although the average result in these two cases was below the standard. Emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde increased with increasing ethanol, while nonmethane organic gas and CO emissions remained relatively unchanged for all fuels and cycles. Higher fraction ethanol blends appeared to decrease NO{sub X} emissions on the FTP and HFET (after conversion). As expected, fuel economy (miles per gallon) decreased with increasing ethanol content in all cases.

Thomas, John F [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

THE POTENTIAL FOR CO2 EMISSIONS TRADING IN TRANSPORT: THE CASE OF PERSONAL VEHICLES AND FREIGHT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 THE POTENTIAL FOR CO2 EMISSIONS TRADING IN TRANSPORT: THE CASE OF PERSONAL VEHICLES AND FREIGHT, it is of some interest to explore the inclusion of road transport in emission trading schemes. Starting from

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

74

The California Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate: A Study of the Policy Process, 1990-2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emission goal cannot be achieved by merely improving the mainstream technology (internal combustion engine),emissions equivalent to a certain, bigger number of hybrid electric vehicles, and because internal combustion engines

Collantes, Gustavo O

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Reduction in Vehicle Idling Emissions Using RFID Parking Permits Dawson, Pakes-Ahlman, Graham, Gutierrez, Vilasdaechanont  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reduction in Vehicle Idling Emissions Using RFID Parking Permits 9/20/13 Dawson, Pakes Frequency Identification permits (RFID) allow drivers to remain in their vehicles without coming this conversion to RFID equates to shorter vehicle queues, lower idling time and, ultimately, lower fuel

Sprott, Julien Clinton

77

Zero-emission vehicle technology assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report in the Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) Technology Assessment, performed for NYSERDA by Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc. Booz-Allen wrote the final report, and performed the following tasks as part of the assessment: assembled a database of key ZEV organizations, their products or services, and plans; described the current state of ZEV technologies; identified barriers to widespread ZEV deployment and projected future ZEV technical capabilities; and estimated the cost of ZEVs from 1998 to 2004. Data for the ZEV Technology Assessment were obtained from several sources, including the following: existing ZEV industry publications and Booz-Allen files; major automotive original equipment manufacturers; independent electric vehicle manufacturers; battery developers and manufacturers; infrastructure and component developers and manufacturers; the U.S. Department of Energy, the California Air Resources Board, and other concerned government agencies; trade associations such as the Electric Power Research Institute and the Electric Transportation Coalition; and public and private consortia. These sources were contacted by phone, mail, or in person. Some site visits of manufacturers also were conducted. Where possible, raw data were analyzed by Booz-Allen staff and/or verified by independent sources. Performance data from standardized test cycles were used as much as possible.

Woods, T.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Argonne's Michael Wang talks about the GREET Model for reducing vehicle emi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To fully evaluate energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies and new transportation fuels, the fuel cycle from wells to wheels and the vehicle cycle through material recovery and vehicle disposal need to be considered. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Argonne has developed a full life-cycle model called GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation). It allows researchers and analysts to evaluate various vehicle and fuel combinations on a full fuel-cycle/vehicle-cycle basis. The first version of GREET was released in 1996. Since then, Argonne has continued to update and expand the model. The most recent GREET versions are the GREET 1 2012 version for fuel-cycle analysis and GREET 2.7 version for vehicle-cycle analysis.

Michael Wang

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

79

Argonne's Michael Wang talks about the GREET Model for reducing vehicle emi  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

To fully evaluate energy and emission impacts of advanced vehicle technologies and new transportation fuels, the fuel cycle from wells to wheels and the vehicle cycle through material recovery and vehicle disposal need to be considered. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Argonne has developed a full life-cycle model called GREET (Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation). It allows researchers and analysts to evaluate various vehicle and fuel combinations on a full fuel-cycle/vehicle-cycle basis. The first version of GREET was released in 1996. Since then, Argonne has continued to update and expand the model. The most recent GREET versions are the GREET 1 2012 version for fuel-cycle analysis and GREET 2.7 version for vehicle-cycle analysis.

Michael Wang

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

80

California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (Update) (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The state of California was given authority under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) to set emissions standards for light-duty vehicles that exceed federal standards. In addition, other states that do not comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) set by the Environmental Protection Agency under CAAA90 were given the option to adopt Californias light-duty vehicle emissions standards in order to achieve air quality compliance. CAAA90 specifically identifies hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and NOx as vehicle-related air pollutants that can be regulated. California has led the nation in developing stricter vehicle emissions standards, and other states have adopted the California standards.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Shaping the Terms of Competition: Environmental Regulation and Corporate Strategies to Reduce Diesel Vehicle Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Vehicle Emissions by Christine Bik-Kay Ng B.S., Civil and Environmental Engineering University Strategies to Reduce Diesel Vehicle Emissions by Christine Bik-Kay Ng Submitted to the Engineering Systems. This research explains the conditions under which competitive regulatory strategies are pursued in the diesel

de Weck, Olivier L.

82

Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles Chris A. Jakober, 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles 1 Chris A0205CH11231. LBNL752E #12;Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles 1Chris A DATE * mjkleeman@ucdavis.edu, (530)-752-8386 ABSTRACT Carbonyls from gasoline powered light

83

that minimizes vehicle emissions during design of routes in congested environments with time-dependent travel speeds, hard time windows,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that minimizes vehicle emissions during design of routes in congested environments with time-dependent travel speeds, hard time windows, andcapacityconstraints.ThiscreatesanewtypeofVRP,theemissions vehicle routing problem (EVRP). BACKGROUND AND LITERATURE REVIEW There is extensive literature related to vehicle

Bertini, Robert L.

84

Impacts of ethanol fuel level on emissions of regulated and unregulated pollutants from a fleet of gasoline light-duty vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study investigated the impact of ethanol blends on criteria emissions (THC, NMHC, CO, NOx), greenhouse gas (CO2), and a suite of unregulated pollutants in a fleet of gasoline-powered light-duty vehicles. The vehicles ranged in model year from 1984 to 2007 and included one Flexible Fuel Vehicle (FFV). Emission and fuel consumption measurements were performed in duplicate or triplicate over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) driving cycle using a chassis dynamometer for four fuels in each of seven vehicles. The test fuels included a CARB phase 2 certification fuel with 11% MTBE content, a CARB phase 3 certification fuel with a 5.7% ethanol content, and E10, E20, E50, and E85 fuels. In most cases, THC and NMHC emissions were lower with the ethanol blends, while the use of E85 resulted in increases of THC and NMHC for the FFV. CO emissions were lower with ethanol blends for all vehicles and significantly decreased for earlier model vehicles. Results for NOx emissions were mixed, with some older vehicles showing increases with increasing ethanol level, while other vehicles showed either no impact or a slight, but not statistically significant, decrease. CO2 emissions did not show any significant trends. Fuel economy showed decreasing trends with increasing ethanol content in later model vehicles. There was also a consistent trend of increasing acetaldehyde emissions with increasing ethanol level, but other carbonyls did not show strong trends. The use of E85 resulted in significantly higher formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions than the specification fuels or other ethanol blends. BTEX and 1,3-butadiene emissions were lower with ethanol blends compared to the CARB 2 fuel, and were almost undetectable from the E85 fuel. The largest contribution to total carbonyls and other toxics was during the cold-start phase of FTP.

Karavalakis, Georgios; Durbin, Thomas; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zheng, Zhongqing; Villella, Phillip M.; Jung, Hee-Jung

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Final report for measurement of primary particulate matter emissions from light-duty motor vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a particulate emissions study conducted at the University of California, Riverside, College of Engineering-Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) from September of 1996 to August of 1997. The goal of this program was to expand the database of particulate emissions measurements from motor vehicles to include larger numbers of representative in-use vehicles. This work was co-sponsored by the Coordinating Research Council (CRC), the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and was part of a larger study of particulate emissions being conducted in several states under sponsorship by CRC. For this work, FTP particulate mass emission rates were determined for gasoline and diesel vehicles, along with the fractions of particulates below 2.5 and 10 microns aerodynamic diameter. A total of 129 gasoline-fueled vehicles and 19 diesel-fueled vehicles were tested as part of the program.

Norbeck, J. M.; Durbin, T. D.; Truex, T. J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

California's Zero Emission Vehicle Program Cleaner air needed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are powered by a combination of electric motors and internal combustion engines, and fuel cell vehicles and other alternative fueled vehicles, super-clean gasoline vehicles, fuel-efficient hybrids powered by electricity created from pollution-free hydrogen. ARB is not suggesting that every Californian

Gille, Sarah T.

87

Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Hybrid Human Powered Vehicle (Phase 3) The Zero EMission (ZEM) Vehicle Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Construction of ZEM Car ­ a hybrid human/electric/solar powered vehicle (P-2) (2007-2008) Principal) Hybrid human pedaling/ electric powered vehicle- Designed and constructed P-1 prototype Sponsor: SJSU) Hybrid human pedaling/ Electric/solar powered vehicle (HPV-ZEM)-Designed P-2 Sponsor: SJSU-COE 16 ME + 3

Su, Xiao

89

Fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of tripled fuel economy vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the full cycle energy and emissions impacts of light-duty vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) as currently being developed by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Seven engine and fuel combinations were analyzed: reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines; low sulfur diesel and dimethyl ether in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines; and hydrogen and methanol in fuel-cell vehicles. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translated directly into reductions in total energy demand, petroleum demand, and carbon dioxide emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency resulted in substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter smaller than 10 microns, particularly under the High Market Share Scenario.

Mintz, M.M.; Wang, M.Q.; Vyas, A.D.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

In-Vehicle Testing and Computer Modeling of Electric Vehicle Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-extending series hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) by the student members of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAEIn-Vehicle Testing and Computer Modeling of Electric Vehicle Batteries B. Thomas, W.B. Gu, J driving conditions as opposed to purely experimental testing. The new approach is cost- effective, greatly

Wang, Chao-Yang

91

DOD/NREL Model Integrates Vehicles, Renewables & Microgrid (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet on microgrid model created by the Electric Vehicle Grid Integration program at the Fort Carson Army facility.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Drive-by Motor Vehicle Emissions: Immediate Feedback in Reducing Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Denver, Colorado 80208 L E N O R A B O H R E N The National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control & Safety system. The Smart Sign used a combination of words, colors, and graphics to connect with its audience

Denver, University of

93

Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2014: Robust Nitrogen oxideAmmonia Sensors for Vehicle on-board Emissions Control CumminsORNL-FEERC CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines...

94

Regulatory Control of Vehicle and Power Plant Emissions: How Effective and at What Cost?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Passenger vehicles and power plants are major sources of greenhouse gas emissions. While economic analyses generally indicate that a broader market-based approach to greenhouse gas reduction would be less costly and more ...

Paltsev, S.

95

The origin of Californias zero emission vehicle mandate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that one million alternative fuel vehicles be sold in thethe adoption of alternative fuels (particularly methanol) asof the adoption of alternative fuels. A key recommendation

Sperling, Dan; Collantes, Gustavo O

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Zero-Emission...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

given by South Coast Air Quality Management District at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

97

Well-to-wheels analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed for mass production by the automotive industry. PHEVs have been touted for their potential to reduce the US transportation sector's dependence on petroleum and cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by (1) using off-peak excess electric generation capacity and (2) increasing vehicles energy efficiency. A well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis - which examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation - can help researchers better understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for PHEV recharging, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs. For the WTW analysis, Argonne National Laboratory researchers used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne to compare the WTW energy use and GHG emissions associated with various transportation technologies to those associated with PHEVs. Argonne researchers estimated the fuel economy and electricity use of PHEVs and alternative fuel/vehicle systems by using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) model. They examined two PHEV designs: the power-split configuration and the series configuration. The first is a parallel hybrid configuration in which the engine and the electric motor are connected to a single mechanical transmission that incorporates a power-split device that allows for parallel power paths - mechanical and electrical - from the engine to the wheels, allowing the engine and the electric motor to share the power during acceleration. In the second configuration, the engine powers a generator, which charges a battery that is used by the electric motor to propel the vehicle; thus, the engine never directly powers the vehicle's transmission. The power-split configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 10- and 20-mile electric range because they require frequent use of the engine for acceleration and to provide energy when the battery is depleted, while the series configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 30- and 40-mile electric range because they rely mostly on electrical power for propulsion. Argonne researchers calculated the equivalent on-road (real-world) fuel economy on the basis of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency miles per gallon (mpg)-based formulas. The reduction in fuel economy attributable to the on-road adjustment formula was capped at 30% for advanced vehicle systems (e.g., PHEVs, fuel cell vehicles [FCVs], hybrid electric vehicles [HEVs], and battery-powered electric vehicles [BEVs]). Simulations for calendar year 2020 with model year 2015 mid-size vehicles were chosen for this analysis to address the implications of PHEVs within a reasonable timeframe after their likely introduction over the next few years. For the WTW analysis, Argonne assumed a PHEV market penetration of 10% by 2020 in order to examine the impact of significant PHEV loading on the utility power sector. Technological improvement with medium uncertainty for each vehicle was also assumed for the analysis. Argonne employed detailed dispatch models to simulate the electric power systems in four major regions of the US: the New England Independent System Operator, the New York Independent System Operator, the State of Illinois, and the Western Electric Coordinating Council. Argonne also evaluated the US average generation mix and renewable generation of electricity for PHEV and BEV recharging scenarios to show the effects of these generation mixes on PHEV WTW results. Argonne's GREET model was designed to examine the WTW energy use and GHG emissions for PHEVs and BEVs, as well as FCVs, regular HEVs, and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs). WTW results are reported for charge-depleting (CD) operation of PHEVs under different recharging scenarios. The combined WTW results of CD and charge-sustaining (CS) PHEV operations (using the utility factor method) were also examined and reported. According to the utility factor method, the share of vehicle miles trav

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

ANALYTICAL EMISSION MODELS FOR SIGNALISED ARTERIALS Bruce Hellinga, Mohammad Ali Khan, and Liping Fu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYTICAL EMISSION MODELS FOR SIGNALISED ARTERIALS Bruce Hellinga, Mohammad Ali Khan, and Liping for quantifying vehicle tailpipe emissions. In this paper we present non-linear regression models that can be used for emission data is examined using field data. The proposed models have adjusted R 2 values ranging from 0

Hellinga, Bruce

99

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Note: PSAT included after-treatment thermal efficiency penalty to the diesel fuel economy · CD ElectricWell-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Amgad engine vehicles (ICEVs) Regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs

100

Modeling and Simulation of Electric and Hybrid Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and fuel cell vehicles, such as electric machines, power electronics, electronic continuously variableINVITED P A P E R Modeling and Simulation of Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Tools that can model embedded software as well as components, and can automate the details of electric and hybrid vehicle design

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Predicting Vehicle Crashworthiness: Validation of Computer Models for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting Vehicle Crashworthiness: Validation of Computer Models for Functional and Hierarchical. Cafeo, Chin-Hsu Lin, and Jian Tu Abstract The CRASH computer model simulates the effect of a vehicle colliding against different barrier types. If it accurately represents real vehicle crash- worthiness

Berger, Jim

102

Modelling, Simulation, Testing, and Optimization of Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Powertrains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling, Simulation, Testing, and Optimization of Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Powertrains By Jeffrey of the author. #12;ii Modelling, Simulation, Testing and Optimization of Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Powertrains prototypes. A comprehensive survey of the state of the art of commercialized hybrid vehicle powertrains

Victoria, University of

103

Phenomenological Driving Behavior Model of the Suburban Vehicle-to-Vehicle Propagation Channel at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phenomenological Driving Behavior Model of the Suburban Vehicle-to-Vehicle Propagation Channel at 5 a hierarchical phenomenological model of driving behavior to describe this observation. As an example, we a phenomenological model in a hierarchical manner to describe the expected relative velocity vs. distance of two

Stancil, Daniel D.

104

Effect of E85 on Tailpipe Emissions from Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

E85, which consists of nominally 85% fuel grade ethanol and 15% gasoline, must be used in flexible-fuel (or 'flexfuel') vehicles (FFVs) that can operate on fuel with an ethanol content of 0-85%. Published studies include measurements of the effect of E85 on tailpipe emissions for Tier 1 and older vehicles. Car manufacturers have also supplied a large body of FFV certification data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, primarily on Tier 2 vehicles. These studies and certification data reveal wide variability in the effects of E85 on emissions from different vehicles. Comparing Tier 1 FFVs running on E85 to similar non-FFVs running on gasoline showed, on average, significant reductions in emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx; 54%), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs; 27%), and carbon monoxide (CO; 18%) for E85. Comparing Tier 2 FFVs running on E85 and comparable non-FFVs running on gasoline shows, for E85 on average, a significant reduction in emissions of CO (20%), and no significant effect on emissions of non-methane organic gases (NMOGs). NOx emissions from Tier 2 FFVs averaged approximately 28% less than comparable non-FFVs. However, perhaps because of the wide range of Tier 2 NOx standards, the absolute difference in NOx emissions between Tier 2 FFVs and non-FFVs is not significant (P 0.28). It is interesting that Tier 2 FFVs operating on gasoline produced approximately 13% less NMOGs than non-FFVs operating on gasoline. The data for Tier 1 vehicles show that E85 will cause significant reductions in emissions of benzene and butadiene, and significant increases in emissions of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in comparison to emissions from gasoline in both FFVs and non-FFVs. The compound that makes up the largest proportion of organic emissions from E85-fueled FFVs is ethanol.

Yanowitz, J.; McCormick, R. L.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ON-ROAD REMOTE SENSING OF VEHICLE EMISSIONS IN MONTERREY, N.L. MEXICO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON-ROAD REMOTE SENSING OF VEHICLE EMISSIONS IN MONTERREY, N.L. MEXICO Final Report Prepared for the University of Denver traveled to Monterrey, N.L. Mexico to monitor remotely the carbon monoxide (CO with other cities that have been sampled in Mexico. The on-road emission averages are similar to the latest

Denver, University of

106

Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Integrated Nozzle Flow, Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary...

107

Model Based Vehicle Tracking for Autonomous Driving in Urban Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model Based Vehicle Tracking for Autonomous Driving in Urban Environments Anna Petrovskaya environments. This paper describes moving vehicle tracking module that we developed for our autonomous driving in this area. DARPA has organized a series of competitions for autonomous vehicles. In 2005, autonomous

108

Vehicle Trajectory Prediction based on Motion Model and Maneuver Recognition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle Trajectory Prediction based on Motion Model and Maneuver Recognition Adam Houenou, Philippe is a crucial task for an autonomous vehicle, in order to avoid collisions on its planned trajectory. It is also necessary for many Advanced Driver Assistance Systems, where the ego- vehicle's trajectory has

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

109

Development of a dedicated ethanol ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this 3.5 year project is to develop a commercially competitive vehicle powered by ethanol (or ethanol blend) that can meet California`s ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) standards and equivalent corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) energy efficiency for a light-duty passenger car application. The definition of commercially competitive is independent of fuel cost, but does include technical requirements for competitive power, performance, refueling times, vehicle range, driveability, fuel handling safety, and overall emissions performance. This report summarizes a system design study completed after six months of effort on this project. The design study resulted in recommendations for ethanol-fuel blends that shall be tested for engine low-temperature cold-start performance and other criteria. The study also describes three changes to the engine, and two other changes to the vehicle to improve low-temperature starting, efficiency, and emissions. The three engine changes are to increase the compression ratio, to replace the standard fuel injectors with fine spray injectors, and to replace the powertrain controller. The two other vehicle changes involve the fuel tank and the aftertreatment system. The fuel tank will likely need to be replaced to reduce evaporative emissions. In addition to changes in the main catalyst, supplemental aftertreatment systems will be analyzed to reduce emissions before the main catalyst reaches operating temperature.

Bourn, G.; Callahan, T.; Dodge, L.; Mulik, J.; Naegeli, D.; Shouse, K.; Smith, L.; Whitney, K. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Development of a dedicated ethanol ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) -- Phase 2 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this 3.5-year project is to develop a commercially competitive vehicle powered by ethanol (or an ethanol blend) that can meet California`s ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) standards and equivalent corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) energy efficiency for a light-duty passenger car application. The definition of commercially competitive is independent of fuel cost, but does include technical requirements for competitive power, performance, refueling times, vehicle range, driveability, fuel handling safety, and overall emissions performance. This report summarizes the second phase of this project, which lasted 12 months. This report documents two baseline vehicles, the engine modifications made to the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) engines, advanced aftertreatment testing, and various fuel tests to evaluate the flammability, lubricity, and material compatibility of the ethanol fuel blends.

Dodge, L.G.; Bourn, G.; Callahan, T.J.; Naegeli, D.W.; Shouse, K.R.; Smith, L.R.; Whitney, K.A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies

112

Cold-Start Emissions Control in Hybrid Vehicles Equipped with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

with a Passive Adsorber for Hydrocarbons and NOx Reports results from study of potential for using chemisorbing materials to temporally trap HC and NOx emissions during...

113

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the short and long term (between 2010 and 2030), covering urban and regional air pollutants as well as emissions of climate forcers. The scenarios include the potential...

114

Htfiffi m'* Effects of Alternative Fuels on Vehicle Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: gasoline, gasoline-ethanol l'rlends, diesel, biodiesel blends, LPG lquefied petroleurn gas) ancl CNG operating on gasoline arrd a similar non-FF\\-. llir:s rs a in-al ethanol composition blend requires vehicle in the atmosphere. For many r.ears, the primary vehicie fuels used have been gasoline and diesel fuels. These iuels

115

Parameter estimation of a linear vehicle model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(1987) . It has already been seen that the discrete-time vehicle model can be described by equation 5. 1 as Y(kr) = Md CdY((k 1)r) Md Rdr((k 2)Y) +ldd SldU((k 1)Y) + Md 82dU((k 1)Y) + N(kr) + Md CdN((k-1)Y) + ldd RdN((k ? 2) Y) A discrete state...-space representation of the model of the form T(k+1) = [F ]T(k) + [G ]U? X(k) = [HQT(k) Y(k) = X(k) + N(k) is now sought. If the state vector I (k) is given by (5. 28) x(k) 1(k) = X(k+1) Md SldU(k) then the state-space model can be described as follows: (5...

Helin, Franz

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Comparative Emissions Testing of Vehicles Aged on E0, E15 and E20 Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act passed into law in December 2007 has mandated the use of 36 billion ethanol equivalent gallons per year of renewable fuel by 2022. A primary pathway to achieve this national goal is to increase the amount of ethanol blended into gasoline. This study is part of a multi-laboratory test program coordinated by DOE to evaluate the effect of higher ethanol blends on vehicle exhaust emissions over the lifetime of the vehicle.

Vertin, K.; Glinsky, G.; Reek, A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Measurement of vehicle emissions and the associated dispersion near roadways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

halance I, echnique sufl'ers I&vo disadva&i&, ages: (1) the emission factor may &&nly l&e calcula4cd for exis&, ing roads and (2) I, he analys4 &nusI, have accuraLe air quality, I, raflic, and inel, eorological da4a to estimal, e the emission rate...

Hlavinka, M. W

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Development of a dedicated ethanol ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV): Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a commercially competitive vehicle powered by ethanol (or an ethanol blend) that can meet California`s ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) standards and equivalent corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) energy efficiency for a light-duty passenger car application. The definition of commercially competitive is independent of fuel cost, but does include technical requirements for competitive power, performance, refueling times, vehicle range, driveability, fuel handling safety, and overall emissions performance. This report summarizes the fourth and final phase of this project, and also the overall project. The focus of this report is the technology used to develop a dedicated ethanol-fueled ULEV, and the emissions results documenting ULV performance. Some of the details for the control system and hardware changes are presented in two appendices that are SAE papers. The demonstrator vehicle has a number of advanced technological features, but it is currently configured with standard original equipment manufacturer (OEM) under-engine catalysts. Close-coupled catalysts would improve emissions results further, but no close-coupled catalysts were available for this testing. Recently, close-coupled catalysts were obtained, but installation and testing will be performed in the future. This report also briefly summarizes work in several other related areas that supported the demonstrator vehicle work.

Dodge, L.; Bourn, G.; Callahan, T.; Grogan, J.; Leone, D.; Naegeli, D.; Shouse, K.; Thring, R.; Whitney, K. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Modeling and adaptive control of indoor unmanned aerial vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The operation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in constrained indoor environments presents many unique challenges in control and planning. This thesis investigates modeling, adaptive control and trajectory optimization ...

Michini, Bernard (Bernard J.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Model-Based Analysis of Electric Drive Options for Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Medium-duty vehicles are used in a broad array of fleet applications, including parcel delivery. These vehicles are excellent candidates for electric drive applications due to their transient-intensive duty cycles, operation in densely populated areas, and relatively high fuel consumption and emissions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted a robust assessment of parcel delivery routes and completed a model-based techno-economic analysis of hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle configurations. First, NREL characterized parcel delivery vehicle usage patterns, most notably daily distance driven and drive cycle intensity. Second, drive-cycle analysis results framed the selection of drive cycles used to test a parcel delivery HEV on a chassis dynamometer. Next, measured fuel consumption results were used to validate simulated fuel consumption values derived from a dynamic model of the parcel delivery vehicle. Finally, NREL swept a matrix of 120 component size, usage, and cost combinations to assess impacts on fuel consumption and vehicle cost. The results illustrated the dependency of component sizing on drive-cycle intensity and daily distance driven and may allow parcel delivery fleets to match the most appropriate electric drive vehicle to their fleet usage profile.

Barnitt, R. A.; Brooker, A. D.; Ramroth, L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cost of Ownership and Well-to-Wheels Carbon Emissions/Oil Use of Alternative Fuels and Advanced Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) updated their analysis of the well-to-wheels (WTW) greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions, petroleum use, and the cost of ownership (excluding insurance, maintenance, and miscellaneous fees) of vehicle technologies that have the potential to significantly reduce GHG emissions and petroleum consumption. The analyses focused on advanced light-duty vehicle (LDV) technologies such as plug-in hybrid, battery electric, and fuel cell electric vehicles. Besides gasoline and diesel, alternative fuels considered include natural gas, advanced biofuels, electricity, and hydrogen. The Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) and Autonomie models were used along with the Argonne and NREL H2A models.

Elgowainy, Mr. Amgad [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Rousseau, Mr. Aymeric [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wang, Mr. Michael [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ruth, Mr. Mark [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Andress, Mr. David [David Andress & Associates, Inc.; Ward, Jacob [U.S. Department of Energy; Joseck, Fred [U.S. Department of Energy; Nguyen, Tien [U.S. Department of Energy; Das, Sujit [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuel Efficiency and Emissions | Department of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudha Patri Mechanical EngineerEnergy Vehicle

123

Investigation of Direct Injection Vehicle Particulate Matter Emissions |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOE VehicleStationary FuelPresentation from theDepartment of

124

California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In July 2002, California Assembly Bill 1493 (A.B. 1493) was signed into law. The law requires that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) develop and adopt, by January 1, 2005, greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles that provide the maximum feasible reduction in emissions. In estimating the feasibility of the standard, CARB is required to consider cost-effectiveness, technological capability, economic impacts, and flexibility for manufacturers in meeting the standard.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Issues in emissions testing of hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has tested more than 100 prototype HEVs built by colleges and universities since 1994 and has learned that using standardized dynamometer testing procedures can be problematic. This paper addresses the issues related to HEV dynamometer testing procedures and proposes a new testing approach. The proposed ANL testing procedure is based on careful hybrid operation mode characterization that can be applied to certification and R and D. HEVs also present new emissions measurement challenges because of their potential for ultra-low emission levels and frequent engine shutdown during the test cycles.

Duoba, M.; Anderson, J.; Ng, H.

2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

126

ON-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSIONS FROM AROUND THE WORLD Donald H. Stedman and Gary A. Bishop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSIONS FROM AROUND THE WORLD Donald H. Stedman and Gary A. Bishop@du.edu ABSTRACT In 1993, on-road emissions in Continental Europe showed a pronounced South/North declining gradient for CO, HC and NO fuel specific emissions (gm/kg). Emissions in Hamburg and Rotterdam were

Denver, University of

127

Project Information Form Project Title Strategies for Transitioning to Zero-Emission Vehicles--Freight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Source(s) and Amounts Provided (by each agency or organization) US DOT $38,884 Total Project Cost $38Project Information Form Project Title Strategies for Transitioning to Zero-Emission Vehicles Description of Research Project According to the EIA, freight modes accounted for 29% of transportation fuel

California at Davis, University of

128

Project Information Form Project Title White Paper on Strategies for Transitioning to Zero-Emission Vehicles--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or organization) US DOT $38,875 Total Project Cost $38,875 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 StartProject Information Form Project Title White Paper on Strategies for Transitioning to Zero and End Dates July 2014 to September 2014 Brief Description of Research Project Zero-emission vehicles

California at Davis, University of

129

Determine Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Once a Federal agency has identified its most important mobile greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources overall, it can work with individual sites to determine vehicle usage and refueling trends. Agencies can compare the results of this analysis to internal standards and requirements to identify GHG mitigation opportunities for assets that are underperforming or underutilized.

130

Inhalation of primary motor vehicle emissions: Effects of urbanpopulation and land area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Urban population density can influence transportation demand, as expressed through average daily vehicle-kilometers traveled per capita (VKT). In turn, changes in transportation demand influence total passenger vehicle emissions. Population density can also influence the fraction of total emissions that are inhaled by the exposed urban population. Equations are presented that describe these relationships for an idealized representation of an urban area. Using analytic solutions to these equations, we investigate the effect of three changes in urban population and urban land area (infill, sprawl, and constant-density growth) on per capita inhalation intake of primary pollutants from passenger vehicles. The magnitude of these effects depends on density-emissions elasticity ({var_epsilon}{sub e}), a normalized derivative relating change in population density to change in vehicle emissions. For example, if urban population increases, per capita intake is less with infill development than with constant-density growth if {var_epsilon}{sub e} is less than -0.5, while for {var_epsilon}{sub e} greater than -0.5 the reverse is true.

Marshall, Julian D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Nazaroff, William W.

2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology, Nationalof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissionsof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Greenhouse gas emission impacts of alternative-fueled vehicles: Near-term vs. long-term technology options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alternative-fueled vehicle technologies have been promoted and used for reducing petroleum use, urban air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, greenhouse gas emission impacts of near-term and long-term light-duty alternative-fueled vehicle technologies are evaluated. Near-term technologies, available now, include vehicles fueled with M85 (85% methanol and 15% gasoline by volume), E85 (85% ethanol that is produced from corn and 15% gasoline by volume), compressed natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. Long-term technologies, assumed to be available around the year 2010, include battery-powered electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, vehicles fueled with E85 (ethanol produced from biomass), and fuel-cell vehicles fueled with hydrogen or methanol. The near-term technologies are found to have small to moderate effects on vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. On the other hand, the long-term technologies, especially those using renewable energy (such as biomass and solar energy), have great potential for reducing vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. In order to realize this greenhouse gas emission reduction potential, R and D efforts must continue on the long-term technology options so that they can compete successfully with conventional vehicle technology.

Wang, M.Q.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Projection of Chinese motor vehicle growth, oil demand, and CO{sub 2}emissions through 2050.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the vehicle population in China increases, oil consumption and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions associated with on-road transportation are rising dramatically. During this study, we developed a methodology to project trends in the growth of the vehicle population, oil demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions associated with on-road transportation in China. By using this methodology, we projected--separately--the number of highway vehicles, motorcycles, and rural vehicles in China through 2050. We used three scenarios of highway vehicle growth (high-, mid-, and low-growth) to reflect patterns of motor vehicle growth that have occurred in different parts of the world (i.e., Europe and Asia). All are essentially business-as-usual scenarios in that almost none of the countries we examined has made concerted efforts to manage vehicle growth or to offer serious alternative transportation means to satisfy people's mobility needs. With this caveat, our projections showed that by 2030, China could have more highway vehicles than the United States has today, and by 2035, it could have the largest number of highway vehicles in the world. By 2050, China could have 486-662 million highway vehicles, 44 million motorcycles, and 28 million rural vehicles. These numbers, which assume essentially unmanaged vehicle growth, would result in potentially disastrous effects on the urban infrastructure, resources, and other social and ecological aspects of life in China. We designed three fuel economy scenarios, from conservative to aggressive, on the basis of current policy efforts and expectations of near-future policies in China and in developed countries. It should be noted that these current and near-future policies have not taken into consideration the significant potential for further fuel economy improvements offered by advanced technologies such as electric drive technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel-cell vehicles). By using vehicle growth projections and potential vehicle fuel economy, we projected that China's on-road vehicles could consume approximately 614-1016 million metric tons of oil per year (12.4-20.6 million barrels per day) and could emit 1.9-3.2 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year in 2050, which will put tremendous pressure on the balance of the Chinese and world oil supply and demand and could have significant implications on climate change. Our analysis shows that, while improvements in vehicle fuel economy are crucial for reducing transportation energy use, containing the growth of the vehicle population could have an even more profound effect on oil use and CO{sub 2} emissions. This benefit is in addition to other societal and environmental benefits--such as reduced congestion, land use, and urban air pollution--that will result from containing vehicle population growth. Developing public transportation systems for personal travel and rail and other modes for freight transportation will be important for containing the growth of motor vehicles in China. Although the population of passenger cars will far exceed that of all truck types in China in the future, our analysis shows that oil use by and CO{sub 2} emissions from the Chinese truck fleet will be far larger than those related to Chinese passenger cars because trucks are very use intensive (more vehicle miles traveled per year) and energy intensive (lower fuel economy). Unfortunately, the potential for improving fuel economy and reducing air pollutant emissions for trucks has not been fully explored; such efforts are needed. Considering the rapid depletion of the world's oil reserve, the heightened global interest in addressing greenhouse gas emissions, and the geopolitical complications of global oil supply and demand, the study results suggest that unmanaged vehicle growth and limited improvements in vehicle fuel efficiency will lead to an unsustainable and unstable transportation system in China. In other words, while our projections do not definitively indicate what will happen in the Chinese transportation sector by 2050, they do demonstrate

Wang, M.; Huo, H.; Johnson, L.; He, D.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

Projection of Chinese motor vehicle growth, oil demand, and Co{sub 2} emissions through 2050.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the vehicle population in China increases, oil consumption and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions associated with on-road transportation are rising dramatically. During this study, we developed a methodology to project trends in the growth of the vehicle population, oil demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions associated with on-road transportation in China. By using this methodology, we projected separately the number of highway vehicles, motorcycles, and rural vehicles in China through 2050. We used three scenarios of highway vehicle growth (high-, mid-, and low-growth) to reflect patterns of motor vehicle growth that have occurred in different parts of the world (i.e., Europe and Asia). All are essentially business-as-usual scenarios in that almost none of the countries we examined has made concerted efforts to manage vehicle growth or to offer serious alternative transportation means to satisfy people's mobility needs. With this caveat, our projections showed that by 2030, China could have more highway vehicles than the United States has today, and by 2035, it could have the largest number of highway vehicles in the world. By 2050, China could have 486-662 million highway vehicles, 44 million motorcycles, and 28 million rural vehicles. These numbers, which assume essentially unmanaged vehicle growth, would result in potentially disastrous effects on the urban infrastructure, resources, and other social and ecological aspects of life in China. We designed three fuel economy scenarios, from conservative to aggressive, on the basis of current policy efforts and expectations of near-future policies in China and in developed countries. It should be noted that these current and near-future policies have not taken into consideration the significant potential for further fuel economy improvements offered by advanced technologies such as electric drive technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel-cell vehicles). By using vehicle growth projections and potential vehicle fuel economy, we projected that China's on-road vehicles could consume approximately 614-1016 million metric tons of oil per year (12.4-20.6 million barrels per day) and could emit 1.9-3.2 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} per year in 2050, which will put tremendous pressure on the balance of the Chinese and world oil supply and demand and could have significant implications on climate change. Our analysis shows that, while improvements in vehicle fuel economy are crucial for reducing transportation energy use, containing the growth of the vehicle population could have an even more profound effect on oil use and CO{sub 2} emissions. This benefit is in addition to other societal and environmental benefits--such as reduced congestion, land use, and urban air pollution--that will result from containing vehicle population growth. Developing public transportation systems for personal travel and rail and other modes for freight transportation will be important for containing the growth of motor vehicles in China. Although the population of passenger cars will far exceed that of all truck types in China in the future, our analysis shows that oil use by and CO{sub 2} emissions from the Chinese truck fleet will be far larger than those related to Chinese passenger cars because trucks are very use intensive (more vehicle miles traveled per year) and energy intensive (lower fuel economy). Unfortunately, the potential for improving fuel economy and reducing air pollutant emissions for trucks has not been fully explored; such efforts are needed. Considering the rapid depletion of the world's oil reserve, the heightened global interest in addressing greenhouse gas emissions, and the geopolitical complications of global oil supply and demand, the study results suggest that unmanaged vehicle growth and limited improvements in vehicle fuel efficiency will lead to an unsustainable and unstable transportation system in China. In other words, while our projections do not definitively indicate what will happen in the Chinese transportation sector by 2050, they do demonstrate th

Huo, H.; Wang, M.; Johnson, L.; He, D.; Energy Systems; Energy Foundation

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus Area EnergyMohawk MunicipalMontvale,GTZVehicle Emission

137

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solely from stored electric energy during the day. With theIn Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions UsingIn Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Comparing Emissions Benefits from Regulating Heavy Vehicle Idling |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheat TwoDepartment of Energy Emissions

139

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Heavy-Duty Engine Systems and Emissions...

140

Business models for sustainable technologies: Exploring business model evolution in the case of electric vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of electric vehicles Ren Bohnsacka , Jonatan Pinkseb , & Ans Kolka a University of Amsterdam Business School in the case of electric vehicles Abstract Sustainable technologies challenge prevailing business practices models for electric vehicles. Based on a qualitative analysis of electric vehicle projects of key

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Measuring congestion and emissions : a network model for Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Congestion is a major problem for the major cities of today. It reduces mobility, slows economic growth, and is a major cause of emissions. Vehicles traveling at slow speeds emit significantly more pollutants than vehicles ...

Amano, Yasuaki Daniel, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table ES-3: Summaryof Hybrid Vehicle Fuel Economy Results onmal ICE and Series Hybrid Vehicles (t) Vehicle Test Weight (I) Conventional and Series Hybrid Vehicles had same weight,

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Photon emission within the linear sigma model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft-photon emission rates are calculated within the linear sigma model. The investigation is aimed at answering the question to which extent the emissivities map out the phase structure of this particular effective model of strongly interacting matter.

F. Wunderlich; B. Kampfer

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

144

TEG On-Vehicle Performance & Model Validation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emissions Research (DEER) Dearborn, MI October 18, 2012 2 WHO WE ARE * Major supplier of thermoelectric products for automotive applications * More than 5000 employees worldwide *...

145

Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the worlds roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the worlds roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the worlds roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Direct-Hydrogen, Load-Following Fuel Cell Vehicle, SAEversus a Direct-Hydrogen Load-Following Fuel Cell Vehicle,vehicle model of a load-following direct hydrogen fuel cell

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Dynamic household Alternative-fuel Vehicle Demand Model Using Stated and Revealed Transaction Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

market share for alternative-fuel vehicles drop from thePreferences for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles, Brownstone DavidA Dynamic Household Alternative-fuel Vehicle Demand Model

Sheng, Hongyan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Comparative urban drive cycle simulations of light-duty hybrid vehicles with gasoline or diesel engines and emissions controls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric hybridization is a very effective approach for reducing fuel consumption in light-duty vehicles. Lean combustion engines (including diesels) have also been shown to be significantly more fuel efficient than stoichiometric gasoline engines. Ideally, the combination of these two technologies would result in even more fuel efficient vehicles. However, one major barrier to achieving this goal is the implementation of lean-exhaust aftertreatment that can meet increasingly stringent emissions regulations without heavily penalizing fuel efficiency. We summarize results from comparative simulations of hybrid electric vehicles with either stoichiometric gasoline or diesel engines that include state-of-the-art aftertreatment emissions controls for both stoichiometric and lean exhaust. Fuel consumption and emissions for comparable gasoline and diesel light-duty hybrid electric vehicles were compared over a standard urban drive cycle and potential benefits for utilizing diesel hybrids were identified. Technical barriers and opportunities for improving the efficiency of diesel hybrids were identified.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Contribution of vehicle emissions to ambient carbonaceous particulate matter: A review and synthesis of the available data in the South Coast Air Basin. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Table of Contents: Executive Summary; Introduction; Ambient Carbonaceous Particulate Matter in the South Coast Air Basin; Measurements of Emissions from In-Use Motor Vehicles in the South Coast Air Basin; Integration of Emissions Measurements into Comprehensive Emissions Inventories; Relating Emissions fom Motor Vehicles to Particulate Air Quality; Synthesis: The Combined Effect of All Vehicle-Related Source Contributions Acting Together; Trends in More Recent Years; Opportunities for Further Research; References; Appendix A: Detailed Mass Emissions Rates for Organic Compounds from Motor Vehicle Exhaust; and Appendix B: Organic Compounds Emitted from Tire Dust, Paved Road Dust, and Brake Lining Wear Dust.

Cass, G.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica and dedicated workplace charging infrastructure in the fleet for minimum life cycle cost or GHG emissions over vehicle and battery costs are the major drivers for PHEVs and BEVs to enter and dominate the cost

Michalek, Jeremy J.

152

Modeling radio communication blackout and blackout mitigation in hypersonic vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A procedure for the modeling and analysis of radio communication blackout of hypersonic vehicles is presented. A weakly ionized plasma generated around the surface of a hypersonic reentry vehicle traveling at Mach 23 was simulated using full Navier-Stokes equations in multi-species single fluid form. A seven species air chemistry model is used to compute the individual species densities in air including ionization - plasma densities are compared with experiment. The electromagnetic wave's interaction with the plasma layer is modeled using multi-fluid equations for fluid transport and full Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic fields. The multi-fluid solver is verified for a whistler wave propagating through a slab. First principles radio communication blackout over a hypersonic vehicle is demonstrated along with a simple blackout mitigation scheme using a magnetic window.

Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Beckwith, Kristian; Stoltz, Peter; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Average particle number concentrations and size distributions from {approx}61,000 light-duty (LD) vehicles and {approx}2500 medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) trucks were measured during the summer of 2006 in a San Francisco Bay area traffic tunnel. One of the traffic bores contained only LD vehicles, and the other contained mixed traffic, allowing pollutants to be apportioned between LD vehicles and diesel trucks. Particle number emission factors (particle diameter D{sub p} > 3 nm) were found to be (3.9 {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup 14} and (3.3 {+-} 1.3) x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1} fuel burned for LD vehicles and diesel trucks, respectively. Size distribution measurements showed that diesel trucks emitted at least an order of magnitude more particles for all measured sizes (10 < D{sub p} < 290 nm) per unit mass of fuel burned. The relative importance of LD vehicles as a source of particles increased as D{sub p} decreased. Comparing the results from this study to previous measurements at the same site showed that particle number emission factors have decreased for both LD vehicles and diesel trucks since 1997. Integrating size distributions with a volume weighting showed that diesel trucks emitted 28 {+-} 11 times more particles by volume than LD vehicles, consistent with the diesel/gasoline emission factor ratio for PM{sub 2.5} mass measured using gravimetric analysis of Teflon filters, reported in a companion paper.

Ban-Weiss, George A.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Harley, Robert A.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

Optical and Physical Properties from Primary On-Road Vehicle ParticleEmissions And Their Implications for Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summers of 2004 and 2006, extinction and scattering coefficients of particle emissions inside a San Francisco Bay Area roadway tunnel were measured using a combined cavity ring-down and nephelometer instrument. Particle size distributions and humidification were also measured, as well as several gas phase species. Vehicles in the tunnel traveled up a 4% grade at a speed of approximately 60 km h{sup -1}. The traffic situation in the tunnel allows the apportionment of emission factors between light duty gasoline vehicles and diesel trucks. Cross-section emission factors for optical properties were determined for the apportioned vehicles to be consistent with gas phase and particulate matter emission factors. The absorption emission factor (the absorption cross-section per mass of fuel burned) for diesel trucks (4.4 {+-} 0.79 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1}) was 22 times larger than for light-duty gasoline vehicles (0.20 {+-} 0.05 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1}). The single scattering albedo of particles - which represents the fraction of incident light that is scattered as opposed to absorbed - was 0.2 for diesel trucks and 0.3 for light duty gasoline vehicles. These facts indicate that particulate matter from motor vehicles exerts a positive (i.e., warming) radiative climate forcing. Average particulate mass absorption efficiencies for diesel trucks and light duty gasoline vehicles were 3.14 {+-} 0.88 m{sup 2} g{sub PM}{sup -1} and 2.9 {+-} 1.07 m{sup 2} g{sub PM}{sup -1}, respectively. Particle size distributions and optical properties were insensitive to increases in relative humidity to values in excess of 90%, reinforcing previous findings that freshly emitted motor vehicle particulate matter is hydrophobic.

Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Hallar, A.G.; Ban-Weiss, G.A.; McLaughlin, J.P.; Harley, R.A.; Lunden, M.M.

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Robust Nitrogen oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle on-board Emissions Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Los Alamos National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about robust...

156

Battery Ownership Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Economics of Electrified Vehicles and Related Infrastructure; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric vehicles could significantly reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and dependence on imported petroleum. However, for mass adoption, EV costs have historically been too high to be competitive with conventional vehicle options due to the high price of batteries, long refuel time, and a lack of charging infrastructure. A number of different technologies and business strategies have been proposed to address some of these cost and utility issues: battery leasing, battery fast-charging stations, battery swap stations, deployment of charge points for opportunity charging, etc. In order to investigate these approaches and compare their merits on a consistent basis, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a new techno-economic model. The model includes nine modules to examine the levelized cost per mile for various types of powertrain and business strategies. The various input parameters such as vehicle type, battery, gasoline, and electricity prices; battery cycle life; driving profile; and infrastructure costs can be varied. In this paper, we discuss the capabilities of the model; describe key modules; give examples of how various assumptions, powertrain configurations, and business strategies impact the cost to the end user; and show the vehicle's levelized cost per mile sensitivity to seven major operational parameters.

O'Keefe, M.; Brooker, A.; Johnson, C.; Mendelsohn, M.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

producing zero emissions. . The EPRI studies mentioned abovetwo technical reports, EPRI (2007) published Environmentalsport utility vehicles (EPRI, 2002) An 80% required safety

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Vehicle Thermal Systems Modeling in Simulink  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about vehicle...

159

The Smart Grid, A Scale Demonstration Model Incorporating Electrified Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewable energy resources that can generate and manage power locally, leading to precision control of the electrical grid. Renewable energy is captured using both a student-built 45W solar panel and a 50W wind turbine to charge two separate battery..., further decentralization occurs by employing the LiFeYPO4 battery pack of a PHEV/BEV as a reserve or dynamic storage bank. Use of a commercial vehicle in this manner can lower greenhouse-gas emissions, improve urban air quality, save consumers...

Clemon, Lee; Mattson, Jon; Moore, Andrew; Necefer, Len; Heilman, Shelton

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Analysis, Modeling and Neural Network Traction Control of an Electric Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis, Modeling and Neural Network Traction Control of an Electric Vehicle without Differential Terms--Electric vehicle, electric motor, speed estimation, neural networks, traction control. I. INTRODUCTION Recently, Electric Vehicles (EVs) including fuel-cell and hybrid vehicles have been developed very

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A NETWORK-BASED SHARED AUTOMATED VEHICLE MODEL IN AUSTIN, TEXAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A NETWORK-BASED SHARED AUTOMATED VEHICLE MODEL IN AUSTIN, TEXAS automated vehicle (SAV), combining features of short term rentals with the vehicles' powerful automated self. INTRODUCTION Vehicle automation appears poised to revolutionize the way in which we interface

Kockelman, Kara M.

162

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Kloess, Maximillian; Cardoso, Goncalo; Mgel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Electric Hybrid Truck & Zero Emission Delivery Vehicle Deployment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Houston-Galvelston Area Council at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about hydrogen fuel...

164

The Economic, Energy, and GHG Emissions Impacts of Proposed 20172025 Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increases in the U.S. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards for 2017 to 2025 model year light-duty vehicles are currently under consideration. This analysis uses an economy-wide model with detail in the passenger ...

Karplus, Valerie

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Neural Network Based Energy Storage System Modeling for Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstrates the application of an artificial neural network (ANN) for modeling the energy storage system of a hybrid electric vehicle.

Bhatikar, S. R.; Mahajan, R. L.; Wipke, K.; Johnson, V.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Modeling of Plug-in Electric Vehicles Interactions with a Sustainable Community Grid in the Azores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Generation, Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs), Energy Management, Multi-Building Modeling and Simulation Introduction The Green Islands

Mendes, Goncalo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and Power Systems, 2007 Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and Power Systems, 2007 The models...

168

Vehicle Longitudinal Motion Modeling for nonlinear control K. El Majdoub c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Vehicle Longitudinal Motion Modeling for nonlinear control K. El Majdoub c , F. Giri a,* , H Abstract-- The problem of modeling and controlling vehicle longitudinal motion is addressed for front wheel propelled vehicles. The chassis dynamics are modeled using relevant fundamental laws taking into account

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

169

Vehicle Model Validation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwoVulnerabilities | DepartmentReactive Barrierof|Model

170

Construction of a driver-vehicle model and identification of the driver model parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by , JEMENG SU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requiremr nt for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering CONSTRUCTION OF A DRIVER-VEHICLE MODEL AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DRIVER MODEL PARAMETERS A Thesis by JEMENG SU Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committe ) / I...

Su, Jemeng

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-produced electricity for battery electric vehicles. Already, vehicles powered by compressed natural gas, propane. LIPMAN AND MARK A. DELUCCHI example, promising strategies for powering motor vehicles with reduced GHGEMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES

Kammen, Daniel M.

172

Biofuels, Climate Policy and the European Vehicle Fleet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the effect of biofuels mandates and climate policy on the European vehicle fleet, considering the prospects for diesel and gasoline vehicles. We use the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, ...

Rausch, Sebastian

173

Clean Cities 2011 Vehicle Buyer's Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2011 Clean Cities Light-Duty Vehicle Buyer's Guide is a consumer publication that provides a comprehensive list of commercially available alternative fuel and advanced vehicles in model year 2011. The guide allows for side-by-side comparisons of fuel economy, price, emissions, and vehicle specifications.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Clean Cities 2014 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual guide features a comprehensive list of 2014 light-duty alternative fuel and advanced vehicles, grouped by fuel and technology. The guide provides model-specific information on vehicle specifications, manufacturer suggested retail price, fuel economy, energy impact, and emissions. The information can be used to identify options, compare vehicles, and help inform purchase decisions.

Not Available

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

2012 U.S. Vehicle Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric Vehicles . Dieselperformance of electric vehicles Diesel Vehicle From Tableelectric vehicles 3.15: Emission and fuel efficiency performance of diesel

Lam, Ho Yeung Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Online Center of Gravity Estimation in Automotive Vehicles using Multiple Models and Switching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online Center of Gravity Estimation in Automotive Vehicles using Multiple Models and Switching and switching for realtime estimation of center of gravity (CG) position in automotive vehicles. The method utilizes simple linear vehicle models and assumes availability of standard stock automotive sensors. We

Duffy, Ken

177

Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks Committee Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks) Departmental Member Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) represent a promising future direction

Victoria, University of

178

Integration of Physical Models in the ORQA Framework for Electric Vehicle Energy Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integration of Physical Models in the ORQA Framework for Electric Vehicle Energy Management Borjan Brest, France ABSTRACT The energy management of electric vehicles is located in the storage system Systems]: Consumer Products--electric vehicle Keywords model driven architecture; energy consumption

Boyer, Edmond

179

Development of a Dynamic Model of a Small High-Speed Autonomous Underwater Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of a Dynamic Model of a Small High-Speed Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Haider N. Arafat-- A dynamic model is developed for a small, high- speed autonomous underwater vehicle. The vehicle has manner: 1) Wind angle and angle : From u = V cos , v = V sin sin , and w = V sin cos , we have tan

Virginia Tech

180

THE TRAVEL AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS OF SHARED AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES, USING AGENT-BASED MODEL SCENARIOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 THE TRAVEL AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS OF SHARED AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES, USING AGENT-BASED MODEL an owned asset to a service used on demand. The advent of autonomous or fully self-driving vehicles describes the design of an agent-based model for Shared Autonomous Vehicle (SAV) operations, the results

Kockelman, Kara M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Autonomie Modeling Tool Improves Vehicle Design and Testing,...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

support, is helping U.S. auto manufacturers develop the next generation of hybrid and electric vehicles. Hybrid and electric vehicles require sophisticated electric drive and...

182

Vehicle Level Model and Control Development and Validation Under...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Relevance 5 The objective is to develop the entire vehicle thermal management system for advanced electric drive vehicles (EREVs, HEVs, EVs, PHEVs). Additional energy...

183

Appendix: Mercury Emissions used in CAM-Chem/Hg model. 1. Anthropogenic emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix: Mercury Emissions used in CAM-Chem/Hg model. 1. Anthropogenic emissions The anthropogenic emission of mercury is directly adopted from global mercury emission inventory [Pacyna et al., 2005]. The anthropogenic emissions are shown in annual averaged total mercury emissions. (Unit: µg/m2 /day) 2. Land

Meskhidze, Nicholas

184

Motor Vehicle Fleet Emissions by K I M B E R L Y S . B R A D L E Y ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motor Vehicle Fleet Emissions by OP-FTIR K I M B E R L Y S . B R A D L E Y , K E V I N B . B R O O concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrous oxide (N2O) caused by emissions from to average emissions results obtained from on-road exhaust analysis using individual vehicle remote sensing

Denver, University of

185

Incorporating stakeholders' perspectives into models of new technology diffusion: The case of fuel-cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engines. At time t = 0, gasoline HEVs enter the market, followed by hydrogen-hydrogen vehicles have no tailpipe emissions while at the same time offer private benefits relative to conventional internal combustion engine

Collantes, Gustavo O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Modeling design changes in vehicle assembly systems : platform transition strategies and manufacturing flexibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driven by rising environmental and geopolitical concerns, regulations have been put in place over the last decade to compel car makers to lower the CO2 emissions of their cars. Due to these increasingly stringent vehicle ...

Wstemeyer, Christoph

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Advanced LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

188

Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program,...

189

Advanced HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis Advanced HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

190

Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

191

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions. SAE Technical Paper 2008,Energy Laboratory Diesel Emissions Control - Sulfur Effectsbetween NOx, Particulate Emission, and Fuel Consumption of a

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: ParaChoice: Parametric Vehicle Choice Modeling  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about parametric...

193

MODEL-BASED VEHICLE STATE ESTIMATION USING PREVIEWED ROAD GEOMETRY AND NOISY SENSORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the automotive world. Unfortunately for the designers of vehicle driver assist systems, however, most low- cost states from low-cost sensors remains [2]. In the case of autonomous vehicle guidance or in modeling another sen- sor input to estimate vehicle state. This is a particularly low-cost data source, especially

Brennan, Sean

194

Hybrid Modeling and Experimental Cooperative Control of Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focused on single aerial vehicles. In particular, we have witnessed autonomous or aggressive control autonomous formation flying of autonomous aerial vehicles (UAVs) are [20][24]. In [22] and [23], the authorsHybrid Modeling and Experimental Cooperative Control of Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Selcuk

Fainekos, Georgios E.

195

Using Discrete-Event Simulation to Model Situational Awareness of Unmanned-Vehicle Operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but delegated to the automation onboard the unmanned vehicles (Sheridan, 1992). Reduced workload afforded1 Using Discrete-Event Simulation to Model Situational Awareness of Unmanned-Vehicle Operators Carl vehicles becomes increasingly realizable, the impact on operator situational awareness of such a paradigm

Cummings, Mary "Missy"

196

An Ontology-based Model to Determine the Automation Level of an Automated Vehicle for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Ontology-based Model to Determine the Automation Level of an Automated Vehicle for Co). In addition, an automated vehicle should also self-assess its own perception abilities, and not only perceive this idea, cybercars were designed as fully automated vehicles [3], thought since its inception as a new

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

197

TOWARDS SONAR BASED PERCEPTION AND MODELLING FOR UNMANNED UNTETHERED UNDERWATER VEHICLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOWARDS SONAR BASED PERCEPTION AND MODELLING FOR UNMANNED UNTETHERED UNDERWATER VEHICLES B. Steer will be of critical importance in the development of flexible, adaptive and useful unmanned underwater vehicles will be of critical importance in the de- velopment of flexible, adaptive and useful unmanned un- derwater vehicles

Garner, Philip N.

198

A simple model of spontaneous emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a very simple model of a spontaneous emission from a two-level atom, interacting with a field of a finite number of states. Such a process is often said to occur because of the large number of equally-probable states of environment. We show that in our model increasing the number of field states may and may not cause a practically permanent emission, depending on the details of the model. We also describe how irreversibility emerges with growing number of states. Mathematical tools are reduced to a necessary minimum and hopefully can be well understood by undergraduate students.

Krzysztof Piotr Wjcik

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Renewable Fuel Vehicle Modeling and Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes OfficeTexasEnergyFuel Vehicle Modeling and

200

Evaluating indoor exposure modeling alternatives for LCA: A case study in the vehicle repair industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We evaluated three exposure models with data obtained from measurements among workers who use"aerosol" solvent products in the vehicle repair industry and with field experiments using these products to simulate the same exposure conditions. The three exposure models were the: 1) homogeneously-mixed-one-box model, 2) multi-zone model, and 3) eddy-diffusion model. Temporally differentiated real-time breathing zone volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration measurements, integrated far-field area samples, and simulated experiments were used in estimating parameters, such as emission rates, diffusivity, and near-field dimensions. We assessed differences in model input requirements and their efficacy for predictive modeling. The One-box model was not able to resemble the temporal profile of exposure concentrations, but it performed well concerning time-weighted exposure over extended time periods. However, this model required an adjustment for spatial concentration gradients. Multi-zone models and diffusion-models may solve this problem. However, we found that the reliable use of both these models requires extensive field data to appropriately define pivotal parameters such as diffusivity or near-field dimensions. We conclude that it is difficult to apply these models for predicting VOC exposures in the workplace. However, for comparative exposure scenarios in life-cycle assessment they may be useful.

Demou, Evangelia; Hellweg, Stefanie; Wilson, Michael P.; Hammond, S. Katharine; McKone, Thomas E.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population?s exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of ~;;3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Tast, CynthiaL; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.; Fairley, David

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

202

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission FactorsDerived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California:1967-2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have derived ambient black carbon (BC) concentrations and estimated emission factors for on-road diesel vehicles from archived Coefficient of Haze (COH) data that was routinely collected beginning in 1967 at 11 locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. COH values are a measure of the attenuation of light by particles collected on a white filter, and available data indicate they are proportional to BC concentrations measured using the conventional aethalometer. Monthly averaged BC concentrations are up to five times greater in winter than summer, and, consequently, so is the population's exposure to BC. The seasonal cycle in BC concentrations is similar for all Bay Area sites, most likely due to area-wide decreased pollutant dispersion during wintertime. A strong weekly cycle is also evident, with weekend concentrations significantly lower than weekday concentrations, consistent with decreased diesel traffic volume on weekends. The weekly cycle suggests that, in the Bay Area, diesel vehicle emissions are the dominant source of BC aerosol. Despite the continuous increase in diesel fuel consumption in California, annual Bay Area average BC concentrations decreased by a factor of {approx}3 from the late 1960s to the early 2000s. Based on estimated annual BC concentrations, on-road diesel fuel consumption, and recent measurements of on-road diesel vehicle BC emissions, diesel BC emission factors decreased by an order of magnitude over the study period. Reductions in the BC emission factor reflect improved engine technology, emission controls and changes in diesel fuel composition. A new BC monitoring network is needed to continue tracking ambient BC trends because the network of COH monitors has recently been retired.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Putting policy in drive : coordinating measures to reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. light-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The challenges of energy security and climate change have prompted efforts to reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions in light-duty vehicles within the United States. Failures in the market for lower rates of fuel ...

Evans, Christopher W. (Christopher William)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this research is to quantify diesel- and gasoline-powered motor vehicle emissions within the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) using on-road measurements captured by a mobile laboratory combined with positive ...

Thornhill, D. A.

205

The California Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate: A Study of the Policy Process, 1990-2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ed petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, electricity, and to supply compressed natural gas and electricity though.category are compressed natural gas vehicles, hydrogen

Collantes, Gustavo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The California Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate: A Study of the Policy Process, 1990-2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, electricity, and to supply compressed natural gas and electricity though.category are compressed natural gas vehicles, hydrogen

Collantes, Gustavo O

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* 53% NO x sensors that meet stringent vehicle requirements are not available: a) Cost (Complex sensors compared to the automotive sensor) b) Sensitivity (Need 5ppm or...

208

Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

complete NO x sensors that meet stringent vehicle requirements are not available: a) Cost (Complex sensors compared to the automotive sensor) b) Sensitivity (Need 5ppm or...

209

The California Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate: A Study of the Policy Process, 1990-2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that strongly supported electricdrive vehicles, was workingbattery developers, and electric-drive components industry).on attributes of the electric drive system that would help

Collantes, Gustavo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about fuel...

211

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about particulate...

212

Updating and Enhancing the MA3T Vehicle Choice Model  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

213

Advanced PHEV Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Very limited transient engines and emissions models for PHEV simulations - PHEV optimization needs to include advanced engine combustion modes and emissions controls * Partners...

214

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Model Development and Analysis of Clean & Efficient Engine Combustion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about model...

215

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Coupled Hierarchical Models for Thermal, Mechanical, Electrical and Electrochemical Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about coupled hierarchical models...

216

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Atomistic models of LMRNMC Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about atomistic models...

217

Fuel Property, Emission Test, and Operability Results from a Fleet of Class 6 Vehicles Operating on Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made.

Alleman, T. L.; Eudy, L.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Allison, S.; Corcoran, T.; Chatterjee, S.; Jacobs, T.; Cherrillo, R. A.; Clark, R.; Virrels, I.; Nine, R.; Wayne, S.; Lansing, R.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS -- NOx = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NOx = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY -- The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT -- Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

Stang, John H.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS--NO{sub x} = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NO{sub x} = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY--The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT--Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

John H. Stang

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Biodiesel and Second Generation Biofuels on NOx Emissionsof Biodiesel and Second Generation Biofuels on NOx EmissionsBiodiesel and Second Generation Biofuels on NO x Emissions

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions Comparisons from Alternative Fuel Buses and DieselEmissions Comparisons from Alternative Fuel Buses and Dieselof Biodiesel as an Alternative Fuel for Current and Future

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Incorporating Vehicle Emission Models into the Highway Design Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulator (MOVES). The generated speed profiles were matched with the extracted rates and aggregated during a trip on the grades and curves. In addition, the researcher conducted the environmental evaluation including a benefit-cost analysis with actual...

Ko, Myung-Hoon

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

223

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJunoMedanos EnergyM CommunicationsGDC Power LP Jump

224

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Emissions Modeling: GREET  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. ofUSAPotentiallyDepartment ofUsingTechnologyLife Cycle

225

Determining the Volatility of Ultrafine (UF) PM Emissions from CNG Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Limited research has been done to characterize compressed natural gas (CNG) mass emissions and practically

226

Tyre modelling for use in vehicle dynamics studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new way of representing tyre data obtained from measurements in pure cornering and pure braking conditions has been developed in order to further improve the Dynamic Safety of vehicles. The method makes use of a formula with coefficients which describe some of the typifying quantities of a tyre, such as slip stiffnesses at zero slip and force and torque peak values. The formula is capable of describing the characteristics of side force, brake force and self aligning torque with great accuracy. This mathematical representation is limited to steady-state conditions during either pure cornering or pure braking and forms the basis for a model describing tyre behaviour during combined braking and cornering.

Bakker, E.; Nyborg, L.; Pacejka, H.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Effect of Gasoline Properties on Exhaust Emissions from Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicles -- Final Report: Phase 3; July 28, 2008 - July 27, 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers work the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Office of Automotive Engineering has conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) in support of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). Section 1506 of EPAct requires EPA to produce an updated fuel effects model representing the 2007 light - duty gasoline fleet, including determination of the emissions impacts of increased renewable fuel use. This report covers the exhaust emissions testing of 15 light-duty vehicles with 27 E0 through E20 test fuels, and 4 light-duty flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) on an E85 fuel, as part of the EPAct Gasoline Light-Duty Exhaust Fuel Effects Test Program. This program will also be referred to as the EPAct/V2/E-89 Program based on the designations used for it by the EPA, NREL, and CRC, respectively. It is expected that this report will be an attachment or a chapter in the overall EPAct/V2/E-89 Program report prepared by EPA and NREL.

Whitney, K.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

An agent-based model to study market penetration of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An agent-based model to study market penetration of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Margaret J 2011 Available online 29 April 2011 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Market penetration Agent-based models. A recent joint report by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Natural Resources

Vermont, University of

229

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel and Lubricant Effects on Emissions Control Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about fuel and...

230

Zero-Emission Vehicle Scenario Cost Analysis Using A Fuzzy Set-Based Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Now, a portion of the 10% EV sales mandate can be composeda small percentage of EV sales with the ZEV mandate). Withsale of more high-profit, light-duty trucks and sport-utility vehicles under CAFE regulations. EV

Lipman, Timothy Edward

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Zero-Emission Heavy-Duty Drayage Truck Demonstration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by South Coast Air Quality Management District at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

232

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Unified Modeling...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

FASTSim and ADOPT Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review...

233

J. Air & Waste Manage. Assoc., vol 58, 2008, p. 45-54 On-board emission measurement of high loaded light duty vehicles in Algeria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Nejjari et al., 2003, Atek et al., 2004). As a result, many stations of air pollution measurement and Boukadoum, 2005). Vehicle pollutant emissions constitute not only a problem of air quality in big citiesJ. Air & Waste Manage. Assoc., vol 58, 2008, p. 45-54 On-board emission measurement of high loaded

Boyer, Edmond

234

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural gas engines are predominately unburned fuel, therefore, the non-methane hydrocarbon fraction of THC exhaust emissions typically trends

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

HOT SPOT ANALYSIS OF REAL WORLD VEHICLE EMISSIONS BASED UPON A PORTABLE ON-BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), hydrocarbons (HC), and carbon dioxide (CO2, and open loop/closed loop flag were also recorded using the OEM-2100TM . This paper presents examples percent of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, 77 percent of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, and 25 percent

Frey, H. Christopher

236

Modeling aviation's global emissions, uncertainty analysis, and applications to policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) fuel burn results below 3000 ft. For emissions, the emissions indices were the most influential uncertainties for the variance in model outputs. By employing the model, this thesis examined three policy options for ...

Lee, Joosung Joseph, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

In-vehicle mm-Wave Channel Model and Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and costly cable bundles with wireless links. The current upswing of electrically-propelled vehicles, Ales Prokes The Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communication Brno University of Technology Brno kilometers of wires weighing easily up to 50 kg [1], while vehicle manufacturers appreciate weight savings

Zemen, Thomas

238

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Consumer-Segmented Vehicle Choice Modeling: the MA3T Model  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about consumer...

239

A versatile computer model for the design and analysis of electric and hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary purpose of the work reported in this thesis was to develop a versatile computer model to facilitate the design and analysis of hybrid vehicle drive-trains. A hybrid vehicle is one in which power for propulsion comes from two distinct...

Stevens, Kenneth Michael

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Microsimulation analysis of a hybrid system model of multiple merge junction highway and semiautomatic vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microsimulation analysis of a hybrid system model of multiple merge junction highway and semi­automatic vehicles Marco Antoniottiz Akash Deshpandez Alain Giraultx marcoxa@path.berkeley.edu akash Abstract In this paper we present a protocol that controls semi­automated autonomous vehicles driving

Girault, Alain

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Optical and Physical Properties from Primary On-Road Vehicle Particle Emissions And Their Implications for Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2008). Many global climate models take particulate mass emissions from inventories, assume a size not always yield satisfactory results. In one study the amount of BC in current aerosol inventories had

242

Evaluation of KDOT's Vehicle Fleet's CO2 Emissions and Possible Energy Reductions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their net CO2 emissions when a full life cycle analysis is considered, although some fuel system problems may arise with higher biofuel blends especially in cold weather....

Nielsen, Eric

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

x emissions from biodiesel in newer engine technologies in afeedstock, biodiesel blend level, engine technology, andBiodiesel, Petrodiesel, Neat Methyl Esters, and Alkanes in a New Technology

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

feedstock, biodiesel blend level, engine technology, andx emissions from biodiesel in newer engine technologies in aBiodiesel, Petrodiesel, Neat Methyl Esters, and Alkanes in a New Technology

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Zero-Emission Vehicle Scenario Cost Analysis Using A Fuzzy Set-Based Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a small percentage of EV sales with the ZEV mandate). WithNow, a portion of the 10% EV sales mandate can be composedSales - High Produciton Volume Scenario Subcompact Vehicle Chassis Manufacturing Costs GM Ovonics Projection of Selling Prices of NiMH EV

Lipman, Timothy E.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies ...

Zavala, M.

247

AVCEM: Advanced-Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stack); fuel-cell salvage value (fraction of initial coststack); total cost of vehicle electronics needed specifically for the fuel-cellcosts, expressed as a wage multiplier); specific weight of the fuel-cell stack (

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

In-vehicle UWB Channel Measurement, Model and Spatial Stationarity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

devices of the passengers with the vehicle. Considering the average weight of wire harness in modern- hicle's communication systems. Connection of moving parts, such as wheels for tyre pressure monitoring

Zemen, Thomas

249

Assessing the fuel Use and greenhouse gas emissions of future light-duty vehicles in Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is of great concern in Japan, as well as elsewhere, such as in the U.S. and EU. More than 20% of GHG emissions in Japan come from the transportation sector, and a more than 70% ...

Nishimura, Eriko

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Vehicle Level Model and Control Development and Validation Under Various Thermal Conditions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about vehicle level...

251

Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Vehicle Technologies Office research focuses much of its effort on improving vehicle fuel economy while meeting increasingly stringent emissions standards. Achieving these goals requires a...

252

Stochastic reduced-order model for an automotive vehicle in presence of numerous local elastic modes in the low-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stochastic reduced-order model for an automotive vehicle in presence of numerous local elastic a high modal density in the low-frequency range, such as an automotive vehicle. This type of structure is applied on a complex computational model of an automotive vehicle. 1 INTRODUCTION This work is performed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

Effects of Retrofitting Emission Control Systems on In-Use Heavy Diesel Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. Carbonyl and nitrogen dioxide emissions from gasoline-in the exhaust to nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ). NO 2 in turn ispollutants such as nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), nitrous acid (

Millstein, Dev E.; Harley, Robert A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Methyl Ester Biodiesel Blends on NOx Emissions.Increase When Burning Biodiesel; A New (Old) Theory. FuelE. ; Natarajan, M. Effects of Biodiesel Fuels Upon Criteria

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Impact of Canada's Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production and use of ethanol fuel is being attributed toCH 4 emissions, Increased ethanol fuel mixing, 2002-2010 On-D. Santini, 1999. Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Impact of Canadas Voluntary Agreement on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Light Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production and use of ethanol fuel is being attributed toCH 4 emissions, Increased ethanol fuel mixing, 2002-2010 On-D. Santini, 1999. Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Validation of Material Models for Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about validation of material models...

258

Advances in Electric Drive Vehicle Modeling with Subsequent Experimentation and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficients in order to build a high-level, yet accurate state of charge prediction model. Moreover, this work utilizes automotive grade lithium-based batteries for realistic outcomes in the electrified vehicle realm. The fourth chapter describes an advanced...

Hausmann, Austin Joseph

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matter from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles.D.H. , Chase, R.E. , 1999b. Gasoline vehicle particle sizeFactors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

Ban-Weiss, George A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Incident detection using the Standard Normal Deviate model and travel time information from probe vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCIDENT DETECTION USING THE STANDARD iNORMAL DEVIATE MODEL AND TRAVEL TECHIE INFORMATION FROM PROBE VEHICLES A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER EUGENE MOUNTAIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTFR OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Civil Engineering INCIDENT DETECTION USING THE STANDARD NORMAL DEVIATE MODEL AND TRAVEL TIME INFORMATION FROM PROBE VEHICLES A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER EUGENE MOUNTAIN Submitted...

Mountain, Christopher Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A comparative study of vibrational relaxation models for the aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle flight regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF VIBRATIONAL RELAXATION MODELS FOR AEROASSISTED ORBITAL TRANSFER VEHICLE FLIGHT REGIME A Thesis by DEREK SCOTI' GREEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF VIBRATIONAL RELAXATION MODELS FOR AEROASSISTED ORBITAL TRANSFER VEHICLE FLIGHT REGIME A Thesis by DEREK SCOTT GREEN Approved...

Green, Derek Scott

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A comparative study of vibrational relaxation and chemical reaction models for the Martian entry vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF VIBRATIONAL RELAXATION AND CHEMICAL REACTION MODELS FOR THE MARTIAN ENTRY VEHICLE A Thesis by RAJEEV KOTESHWAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF VIBRATIONAL RELAXATION AND CHEMICAL REACTION MODELS FOR THE MARTIAN ENTRY VEHICLE A Thesis by RAJEEV KOTESHWAR Approved as to style...

Koteshwar, Rajeev

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Method of treating emissions of a hybrid vehicle with a hydrocarbon absorber and a catalyst bypass system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of treating emissions from an internal combustion engine of a hybrid vehicle includes directing a flow of air created by the internal combustion engine when the internal combustion engine is spinning but not being fueled through a hydrocarbon absorber to collect hydrocarbons within the flow of air. When the hydrocarbon absorber is full and unable to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through an electrically heated catalyst to treat the flow of air and remove the hydrocarbons. When the hydrocarbon absorber is not full and able to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through a bypass path that bypasses the electrically heated catalyst to conserve the thermal energy stored within the electrically heated catalyst.

Roos, Bryan Nathaniel; Gonze, Eugene V; Santoso, Halim G; Spohn, Brian L

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

Integrated Mathematical Modeling Software Series of Vehicle Propulsion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. p-11mekari.pdf More Documents & Publications Power & Energyfrom...

265

Advanced quadrupole ion trap instrumentation for low level vehicle emissions measurements. CRADA final report for number ORNL93-0238  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry has been evaluated for its potential use in vehicle emissions measurements in vehicle test facilities as an analyzer for the top 15 compounds contributing to smog generation. A variety of ionization methods were explored including ion trap in situ chemical ionization, atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, and nitric oxide chemical ionization in a glow discharge ionization source coupled with anion trap mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on the determination of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons at parts per million to parts per billion levels. Ion trap in situ water chemical ionization and atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization were both shown to be amenable to the analysis of arenes, alcohols, aldehydes and, to some degree, alkenes. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge also generated molecular ions of methyl-t-butyl ether (MTBE). Neither of these ionization methods, however, were found to generate diagnostic ions for the alkanes. Nitric oxide chemical ionization, on the other hand, was found to yield diagnostic ions for alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and MTBE. The ability to measure a variety of hydrocarbons present at roughly 15 parts per billion at measurement rates of 3 Hz was demonstrated. These results have demonstrated that the ion trap has an excellent combination of sensitivity, specificity, speed, and flexibility with respect to the technical requirements of the top 15 analyzer.

McLuckey, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.; Asano, K.G.; Hart, K.J.; Goeringer, D.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dearth, M.A. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Environmental Research Consortium

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Energy Management for an Electric Vehicle Based on Combinatorial Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy sources (fuel cells, photovoltaic panels, batteries, supercapacitors) with different of the energy system The energy chain of the vehicle concerned is composed of a Fuel Cell System (FCS) using hydrogen as a fuel; its energy is produced from the chemical reaction of hydrogen and oxygen. FCS

Boyer, Edmond

267

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Demonstration/Development of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Vehicle Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Wisconsin Engine Research Consultants at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

268

Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

269

Model Identification for Optimal Diesel Emissions Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we develop a model based con- troller for diesel emission reduction using system identification methods. Specifically, our method minimizes the downstream readings from a production NOx sensor while injecting a minimal amount of urea upstream. Based on the linear quadratic estimator we derive the closed form solution to a cost function that accounts for the case some of the system inputs are not controllable. Our cost function can also be tuned to trade-off between input usage and output optimization. Our approach performs better than a production controller in simulation. Our NOx conversion efficiency was 92.7% while the production controller achieved 92.4%. For NH3 conversion, our efficiency was 98.7% compared to 88.5% for the production controller.

Stevens, Andrew J.; Sun, Yannan; Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

270

Estimating Emissions in Latin America: An Alternative to Traffic Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Emissions in Latin America: An Alternative to Traffic Models Margarita Ossés de Eicker; Hans Hurni, Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern, Switzerland Emissions allow precise estimations of these emissions but are too expensive for a broad application. A simplifed

Richner, Heinz

271

Graduate Opportunities in Atmospheric Modeling to Understand Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Opportunities in Atmospheric Modeling to Understand Greenhouse Gas Emissions University://www.atmos.utah.edu/) seeks multiple graduate students to study greenhouse gas emissions associated with urban development greenhouse gas emissions. Samples of guiding questions as part of the projects include: · What can explain

Lin, John Chun-Han

272

Light-duty vehicle mpg and market shares report, model year 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue of Light-Duty Vehicle MPG and Market Shares Report: Model Year 1988 reports the estimated sales-weighted fuel economies, sales, market shares, and other vehicle characteristics of automobiles and light trucks. The estimates are made on a make and model basis, from model year 1976 to model year 1988. Vehicle sales data are used as weighting factors in the sales-weighted estimation procedure. Thus, the estimates represent averages of the overall new vehicle fleet, reflecting the composition of the fleet. Highlights are provided on the trends in the vehicle characteristics from one model year to the next. Analyses are also made on the fuel economy changes to determine the factors which caused the changes. The sales-weighted fuel economy for the new car fleet in model year 1988 showed an improvement of 0.1 mpg from model year 1987, while light trucks showed a 0.2 mpg loss. The 0.2 mpg loss by the light trucks can be attributed to the fact that every light truck size class experienced either losses or no change in their fuel economies from the previous model year, except for the large van size class. Overall, the sales-weighted fuel economy of the entire light-duty vehicle fleet (automobiles and light trucks combined) has remained relatively stable since model year 1986. Domestic light-duty vehicles began to gain popularity over their import counterparts; and light trucks increased their market shares relative to automobiles. Domestic cars regained 0.3% of the automobile market, reversing the previous trend. Similar to the automobile market, domestic light trucks continued to gain popularity over their import counterparts, partly due to the increasing popularity of domestic small vans. 3 refs., 35 figs., 48 tabs.

Hu, P.S.; Williams, L.S.; Beal, D.J.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Application of positive matrix factorization to on-road measurements for source apportionment of diesel-and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of diesel- and gasoline-powered vehicle emissions in Mexico City D. A. Thornhill, A. E. Williams, T. B be low. The second figure shows the background versus diesel factors. There may be a slight horizontal factors. In this case, even when the diesel factor's contributions are very high, the background factor

Meskhidze, Nicholas

274

Well-to-Wheel Energy, Emissions, and Cost Analysis of Electricity and Fuel Used in Conventional and Electrified Vehicles, and Their Connection to a Sustainable Energy Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced in creating the electricity through a full Life Cycle Analysis. As a result, proper comparison of electrified and conventional vehicles must include a complete Well-to-Wheel (WtW) study including the emissions generated through production and use...

Strecker, Bryan Anthony

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Temperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasoline samples collected at Sacramento area service stations. Vapor-liquid equilibrium relationships were summer 2001. Additional gasoline- related VOC emissions not shown in Figure 1 occur at service stations gasoline permeation through rubber and plastic components of the fuel system. [3] EMFAC [California Air

Silver, Whendee

276

Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that could be powered entirely by electricity using plug- in vehicles. Thus, plug-in vehicles have assessment Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles a b s t r a c t We compare the potential of hybrid, extended-range plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles to reduce lifetime cost and life cycle greenhouse gas

Michalek, Jeremy J.

277

Climate and Energy Policy for U.S. Passenger Vehicles: A Technology-Rich Economic Modeling and Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based relationship between income growth and travel demand, turnover of the vehicle stock, and cost-driven investment both in reduction of internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle fuel consumption as well as in adoptionClimate and Energy Policy for U.S. Passenger Vehicles: A Technology-Rich Economic Modeling

278

A Discrete Event Simulation Model for "Efficient Selection of Relay Vehicles for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Discrete Event Simulation Model for "Efficient Selection of Relay Vehicles for Broadcasting discrete event-driven simulation model for DIB and EDIB protocols on VANET. We define six types of events the ACK message to the sender. The following variables are used in the simulation model: · vehs stores

Lin, Jason Yi-Bing

279

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle On-Road Emissions Characterization and Demonstration Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and willingness to forgive my work responsibilities, ultimately, allowed me to complete my dissertation. Time is a sacred resource, and if you had not been so generous with yours and mine, I might still be working on Chapter 3. Thank you for giving me more....3.1 Statistical Results 360 9.3.2 EM vs. dICE Use Between Operating Modes. 364 9.4 Pollutant Emissions... 377 9.5 Concluding Remarks. 400 CHAPTER 10: Diesel Internal Combustion Engine Use in PHEV...

Hohl, Carrie

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model for Heavy Duty Diesel Vehicles. TransportationAir Contaminant Emissions from Diesel- fueled Engines. Factfor Measuring Emissions from Diesel Engines. 1. Regulated

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Response Surface Energy Modeling of an Electric Vehicle over a Reduced Composite Drive Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Response surface methodology (RSM) techniques were applied to develop a predictive model of electric vehicle (EV) energy consumption over the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standardized drive cycles. The model is based on measurements from a synthetic composite drive cycle. The synthetic drive cycle is a minimized statistical composite of the standardized urban (UDDS), highway (HWFET), and US06 cycles. The composite synthetic drive cycle is 20 minutes in length thereby reducing testing time of the three standard EPA cycles by over 55%. Vehicle speed and acceleration were used as model inputs for a third order least squared regression model predicting vehicle battery power output as a function of the drive cycle. The approach reduced three cycles and 46 minutes of drive time to a single test of 20 minutes. Application of response surface modeling to the synthetic drive cycle is shown to predict energy consumption of the three EPA cycles within 2.6% of the actual measured values. Additionally, the response model may be used to predict energy consumption of any cycle within the speed/acceleration envelope of the synthetic cycle. This technique results in reducing test time, which additionally provides a model that may be used to expand the analysis and understanding of the vehicle under consideration.

Jehlik, Forrest [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Clean Cities 2012 Vehicle Buyer's Guide (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The expanding availability of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles makes it easier than ever to reduce petroleum use, cut emissions, and save on fuel costs. The Clean Cities 2012 Vehicle Buyer's Guide features a comprehensive list of model year 2012 vehicles that can run on ethanol, biodiesel, electricity, propane or natural gas. Drivers and fleet managers across the country are looking for ways to reduce petroleum use, fuel costs, and vehicle emissions. As you'll find in this guide, these goals are easier to achieve than ever before, with an expanding selection of vehicles that use gasoline or diesel more efficiently, or forego them altogether. Plug-in electric vehicles made a grand entrance onto U.S. roadways in model year (MY) 2011, and their momentum in the market is poised for continued growth in 2012. Sales of the all-electric Nissan Leaf surpassed 8,000 in the fall of 2011, and the plug-in hybrid Chevy Volt is now available nationwide. Several new models from major automakers will become available throughout MY 2012, and drivers are benefiting from a rapidly growing network of charging stations, thanks to infrastructure development initiatives in many states. Hybrid electric vehicles, which first entered the market just a decade ago, are ubiquitous today. Hybrid technology now allows drivers of all vehicle classes, from SUVs to luxury sedans to subcompacts, to slash fuel use and emissions. Alternative fueling infrastructure is expanding in many regions, making natural gas, propane, ethanol, and biodiesel attractive and convenient choices for many consumers and fleets. And because fuel availability is the most important factor in choosing an alternative fuel vehicle, this growth opens up new possibilities for vehicle ownership. This guide features model-specific information about vehicle specs, manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP), fuel economy, and emissions. You can use this information to compare vehicles and help inform your buying decisions. This guide includes city and highway fuel economy estimates from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The estimates are based on laboratory tests conducted by manufacturers in accordance with federal regulations. EPA retests about 10% of vehicle models to confirm manufacturer results. Fuel economy estimates are also available on FuelEconomy.gov. For some newer vehicle models, EPA data was not available at the time of this guide's publication; in these cases, manufacturer estimates are provided, if available.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Hydrogen Fuel...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Electric Hybrid Truck & Zero Emission Delivery Vehicle Deployment Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

285

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 2 Report Comparison of Performance and Emissions from Near-Term Hydrogen Fueled Light Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted on the emissions and efficiency from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas (CNG) in light duty vehicles. The different blends used in this investigation were 0%, 15%, 30%, 50%, 80%, 95%, and ~100% hydrogen, the remainder being compressed natural gas. The blends were tested using a Ford F-150 and a Chevrolet Silverado truck supplied by Arizona Public Services. Tests on emissions were performed using four different driving condition tests. Previous investigation by Don Karner and James Frankfort on a similar Ford F-150 using a 30% hydrogen blend showed that there was substantial reduction when compared to gasoline in carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions while the reduction in hydrocarbon (HC) emissions was minimal. This investigation was performed using different blends of CNG and hydrogen to evaluate the emissions reducing capabilities associated with the use of the different fuel blends. The results were then tested statistically to confirm or reject the hypotheses on the emission reduction capabilities. Statistically analysis was performed on the test results to determine whether hydrogen concentration in the HCNG had any effect on the emissions and the fuel efficiency. It was found that emissions from hydrogen blended compressed natural gas were a function of driving condition employed. Emissions were found to be dependent on the concentration of hydrogen in the compressed natural gas fuel blend.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ng, Henry K.; Waller, Thomas

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Application of Finite Mixture Models for Vehicle Crash Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heterogeneity through the use of finite mixture regression models. A Finite mixture of Poisson or NB regression models is especially useful when the count data were generated from a heterogeneous population. To evaluate these models, Poisson and NB mixture...

Park, Byung Jung

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

287

Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Queuing Models of Airport Departure Processes for Emissions Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is validated through a comparison of its predictions with observed data at Boston's Logan International AirportQueuing Models of Airport Departure Processes for Emissions Reduction Ioannis Simaiakis burn and emissions at airports. This paper investigates the possibility of reducing fuel burn

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

289

Joint mixed logit models of stated and revealed preferences for alternative-fuel vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for forecasting demand for alternative-fuel vehicles. In:preferences for alternative-fuel vehicles David Brownstonespondents' preferences for alternative-fuel vehicles. The e

Brownston, David; Bunch, David S.; Train, Kenneth

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Energy 101: Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Integrated Virtual Lab in Supporting Heavy Duty Engine and Vehicle Emission Rulemaking Presentation...

292

System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions Comparative simulations of hybrid...

293

Lifecycle-analysis for heavy vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various alternative fuels and improved engine and vehicle systems have been proposed in order to reduce emissions and energy use associated with heavy vehicles (predominantly trucks). For example, oil companies have proposed improved methods for converting natural gas to zero-aromatics, zero-sulfur diesel fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch process. Major heavy-duty diesel engine companies are working on ways to simultaneously reduce particulate-matter and NOX emissions. The trend in heavy vehicles is toward use of lightweight materials, tires with lower rolling resistance, and treatments to reduce aerodynamic drag. In this paper, we compare the Mecycle energy use and emissions from trucks using selected alternatives, such as Fisher-Tropsch diesel fuel and advanced fuel-efficient engines. We consider heavy-duty, Class 8 tractor-semitrailer combinations for this analysis. The total life cycle includes production and recycling of the vehicle itself, extraction, processing, and transportation of the fuel itself, and vehicle operation and maintenance. Energy use is considered in toto, as well as those portions that are imported, domestic, and renewable. Emissions of interest include greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants. Angonne's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model is used to generate per-vehicle fuel cycle impacts. Energy use and emissions for materials manufacturing and vehicle disposal are estimated by means of materials information from Argonne studies. We conclude that there are trade-offs among impacts. For example, the lowest fossil energy use does not necessarily result in lowest total energy use, and lower tailpipe emissions may not necessarily result in lower lifecycle emissions of all criteria pollutants.

Gaines, L.

1998-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

294

Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proper maintenance can help vehicles perform as designed, positively affecting fuel economy, emissions, and the overall drivability. This effort investigates the effect of one maintenance factor, intake air filter replacement, with primary focus on vehicle fuel economy, but also examining emissions and performance. Older studies, dealing with carbureted gasoline vehicles, have indicated that replacing a clogged or dirty air filter can improve vehicle fuel economy and conversely that a dirty air filter can be significantly detrimental to fuel economy. The effect of clogged air filters on the fuel economy, acceleration and emissions of five gasoline fueled vehicles is examined. Four of these were modern vehicles, featuring closed-loop control and ranging in model year from 2003 to 2007. Three vehicles were powered by naturally aspirated, port fuel injection (PFI) engines of differing size and cylinder configuration: an inline 4, a V6 and a V8. A turbocharged inline 4-cylinder gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine powered vehicle was the fourth modern gasoline vehicle tested. A vintage 1972 vehicle equipped with a carburetor (open-loop control) was also examined. Results reveal insignificant fuel economy and emissions sensitivity of modern vehicles to air filter condition, but measureable effects on the 1972 vehicle. All vehicles experienced a measured acceleration performance penalty with clogged intake air filters.

Thomas, John F [ORNL] [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL] [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Size-Resolved Particle Number and Volume Emission Factors for On-Road Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

losses when sampling diesel aerosol: A quality assurancefrom on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles. AtmosphericSource apportionment of diesel and spark ignition exhaust

Ban-Weiss, George A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development and Update of Long-Term Energy and GHG Emission Macroeconomic Accounting Tool  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the development...

297

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

graph illustrating three pathways (biofuel, hydrogen, and electric vehicle) to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Electric Vehicle Technologies & Targets 3-D...

298

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Demonstration...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for High Efficiency, Low Emissions Vehicle Applications Presentation given by Wisconsin Engine Research Consultants at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

299

Equivalent circuit modeling of hybrid electric vehicle drive train  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . Figure 3. 4. 6: The motor shaft at no load. Figure 3. 4. 7: Bond graph for the motor shaft. . . Figure 3. 4. 8: Equivalent circuit of the motor shaft. Figure 3. 5. 1: Concrete example: the elevator Figure 3. 5. 2: Electro-mechanical model... model of the elevator. Figure 3. 5. 8: Final equivalent circuit of the elevator. Figure 4. 1. 1: Mechanical model of a shaft. Figure 4. 1. 2: Equivalent circuit of the shaft. Figure 4. 1. 3: Mechanical model of a gearbox. Figure 4. 1. 4: Equivalent...

Routex, Jean-Yves

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model, HX heat exchanger (using combined heat and power capabilities), HPR heat-power ratio, ICE internal combustion engine, GT gas Turbine,

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Experiments and Modeling of Two-Stage Combustion in Low-Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DEER, August 4, 2008 Experiments and Modeling of Two Experiments and Modeling of Two - - Stage Combustion in Stage Combustion in Low Low - - Emissions Diesel Engines Emissions...

302

Energy Star Concepts for Highway Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors of this report, under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program, have investigated the possible application of Energy Star ratings to passenger cars and light trucks. This study establishes a framework for formulating and evaluating Energy Star rating methods that is comprised of energy- and environmental-based metrics, potential vehicle classification systems, vehicle technology factors, and vehicle selection criteria. The study tests several concepts and Energy Star rating methods using model-year 2000 vehicle data--a spreadsheet model has been developed to facilitate these analyses. This study tests two primary types of rating systems: (1) an outcome-based system that rates vehicles based on fuel economy, GHG emissions, and oil use and (2) a technology-based system that rates vehicles based on the energy-saving technologies they use. Rating methods were evaluated based on their ability to select vehicles with high fuel economy, low GHG emissions, and low oil use while preserving a full range of service (size and acceleration) and body style choice. This study concludes that an Energy Star rating for passenger cars and light trucks is feasible and that several methods could be used to achieve reasonable tradeoffs between low energy use and emissions and diversity in size, performance, and body type. It also shows that methods that consider only fuel economy, GHG emissions, or oil use will not select a diverse mix of vehicles. Finally, analyses suggest that methods that encourage the use of technology only, may result in increases in acceleration power and weight rather than reductions in oil use and GHG emissions and improvements in fuel economy.

Greene, D.L.

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

303

Emissions Modeling: GREET Life Cycle Analysis  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPC ENABLE: ECMConstructionApplications | DepartmentEmissions

304

Dynamic Modeling of a Two Wheeled Vehicle : Jourdain Formalism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a motorcycle direct dynamic formulation by the Jourdain's principle approach on the motorcycle's handlebar. Simulation results reveal some dynamics features like load transfer and counter-steering phenomena. keywords Motorcycle modeling, motorcycle control, Jourdain's dynamics principle. 1 Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

305

Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advancement in Fuel Spray and...

306

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

market, plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) are now consideredof Current Knowledge of Hybrid Vehicle Characteristics andalso called PHEV (Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle) because they are

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Conventional vs. Hybrid Vehicles, paper to be presented15 Table 10 Hybrid Vehicle Sales to Date - North America &Power Projections of Hybrid Vehicle Characteristics (1999-

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Vehicle Data for Alternative Fuel Vehicles (AFVs) and Hybrid Fuel Vehicles (HEVs) from the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (AFCD)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The AFDC provides search capabilities for many different models of both light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. Engine and transmission type, fuel and class, fuel economy and emission certification are some of the facts available. The search will also help users locate dealers in their areas and do cost analyses. Information on alternative fuel vehicles and on advanced technology vehicles, along with calculators, resale and conversion information, links to incentives and programs such as Clean Cities, and dozens of fact sheets and publications make this section of the AFDC a valuable resource for car buyers.

309

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Low Temperature Emission Control to Enable Fuel-Efficient Engine Commercialization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about low temperature...

310

Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

Locatelli, R.

311

Modeling Pollutant Emissions of Diesel Engine based on Kriging Models: a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Pollutant Emissions of Diesel Engine based on Kriging Models: a Comparison between.denis-vidal@math.univ-lille1.fr, ghislaine.joly-blanchard@utc.fr) Abstract: In order to optimize the performance of a diesel problems, modelling errors, Automotive emissions, Diesel engines 1. INTRODUCTION The automotive industry

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

312

Battery Ownership Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Economics of Electrified Vehicles and Related Infrastructure (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation uses a vehicle simulator and economics model called the Battery Ownership Model to examine the levelized cost per mile of conventional (CV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in comparison with the cost to operate an electric vehicle (EV) under a service provider business model. The service provider is assumed to provide EV infrastructure such as charge points and swap stations to allow an EV with a 100-mile range to operate with driving profiles equivalent to CVs and HEVs. Battery cost, fuel price forecast, battery life, and other variables are examined to determine under what scenarios the levelized cost of an EV with a service provider can approach that of a CV. Scenarios in both the United States as an average and Hawaii are examined. The levelized cost of operating an EV with a service provider under average U.S. conditions is approximately twice the cost of operating a small CV. If battery cost and life can be improved, in this study the cost of an EV drops to under 1.5 times the cost of a CV for U.S. average conditions. In Hawaii, the same EV is only slightly more expensive to operate than a CV.

O'Keefe, M.; Brooker, A.; Johnson, C.; Mendelsohn, M.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A Transaction Choice Model for Forecasting Demand for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecasting Demand Alternative-Fuel Vehicles for DavldNG DEMANDFOR ALTERNATIVE-FUEL VEHICLES DavidBrownstone,interested in promoting alternative-fuel vehicles. Tlus is

Brownstone, David; Bunch, David S.; Golob, Thomas F.; Ren, Weiping

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A Transactions Choice Model for Forecasting Demand for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecasting Demand Alternative-Fuel Vehicles for DavldNG DEMANDFOR ALTERNATIVE-FUEL VEHICLES DavidBrownstone,interested in promoting alternative-fuel vehicles. Tlus is

Brownstone, David; Bunch, David S; Golob, Thomas F; Ren, Weiping

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Key words. Emissions markets, Cap-and-trade schemes, Equilibrium models, Environmental MARKET DESIGN FOR EMISSION TRADING SCHEMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Key words. Emissions markets, Cap-and-trade schemes, Equilibrium models, Environmental Finance. MARKET DESIGN FOR EMISSION TRADING SCHEMES REN´E CARMONA , MAX FEHR , JURI HINZ , AND ARNAUD PORCHET to help policy makers and regulators understand the pros and the cons of the emissions markets. We propose

Carmona, Rene

316

Analysis and calibration of social factors in a consumer acceptance and adoption model for diffusion of diesel vehicle in Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While large scale diffusion of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) is widely anticipated, the mechanisms that determine their success or failure are ill understood. Analysis of an AFV transition model developed at MIT has ...

Zhang, Qi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), all-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, they have great potential to cut U.S. petroleum use and vehicle emissions.

Not Available

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Recovery Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters...

319

VEHICLE USE RECORD M/Y DEPARTMENT VEHICLE LOCATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEHICLE USE RECORD M/Y DEPARTMENT VEHICLE LOCATION Date Origin/Destination Purpose Time Out Time) Accuracy of Information (b) Valid Driver's License VEHICLE # TAG # VEHICLE MAKE, MODEL, AND YEAR NOTE: Vehicle logs must be maintained for audit purposes. It is important that all of the required information

Watson, Craig A.

320

ISO observations of spirals: modelling the FIR emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISO observations at 200 micron have modified our view of the dust component in spiral galaxies. For a sample of seven resolved spirals we have retrieved a mean temperature of 20K, about 10K lower than previous estimates based on IRAS data at shorter wavelengths. Because of the steep dependence of far-infrared emission on the dust temperature, the dust masses inferred from ISO fluxes are a factor of 10 higher than those derived from IRAS data only, leading to gas-to-dust ratios close to the value observed in the Galaxy. The scale-length of the 200 micron emission is larger than for the IRAS 100 micron emission, with colder dust at larger distances from the galactic centre, as expected if the interstellar radiation field is the main source of dust heating. The 200 micron scale-length is also larger than the optical, for all the galaxies in the sample. This suggests that the dust distribution is more extended than that of the stars.A model of the dust heating is needed to derive the parameters of the dust distribution from the FIR emission. Therefore, we have adapted an existing radiative transfer code to deal with dust emission. Simulated maps of the temperature distribution within the dust disk and of the dust emission at any wavelength can be produced. The stellar spectral energy distribution is derived from observations in the ultraviolet, optical and near infrared. The parameters of the dust distribution (scale-lengths and optical depth) are chosen to reproduce the observed characteristics of the FIR emission, i.e. the shape of the spectrum, the flux and the spatial distribution. We describe the application of the model to one of the galaxies in the sample, NGC 6946.

Simone Bianchi; Paul B. Alton; Jonathan I. Davies

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure Evaluation Electric Drive Vehicle Demonstration and Vehicle Infrastructure Evaluation 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies...

322

Heavy Vehicle Systems, Int. J. of Vehicle Design, Vol. 11, Nos. 3/4, 2004 349 Modelling and control of a medium-duty hybrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tool, and its application to the design of a power management control algorithm. The hybrid electric to improve vehicle fuel economy significantly, compared with the original vehicle, powered only by a diesel engine. Keywords: electric vehicles, electric-vehicle simulation, hybrid electric vehicles, hybrid

Peng, Huei

323

Model Based Vehicle Tracking in Urban Environments Anna Petrovskaya and Sebastian Thrun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the moving vehicle tracking module we developed for our autonomous driving robot Junior. The robot won second and organized a series of competitions for autonomous vehicles. In 2005 autonomous vehicles were able we are concerned with laser based vehicle tracking from the autonomous robotic platform Ju- nior

324

Electric and Gasoline Vehicle Lifecycle Cost and Energy-Use Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analyses of the manufacturing cost of the key unique components of electric vehicles: batteries, fuel cells,

Delucchi, Mark; Burke, Andy; Lipman, Timothy; Miller, Marshall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Radio emission from Colliding-Wind Binaries: Observations and Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed radiative transfer models of the radio emission from colliding-wind binaries (CWB) based on a hydrodynamical treatment of the wind-collision region (WCR). The archetype of CWB systems is the 7.9-yr period binary WR140, which exhibits dramatic variations at radio wavelengths. High-resolution radio observations of WR140 permit a determination of several system parameters, particularly orbit inclination and distance, that are essential for any models of this system. A model fit to data at orbital phase 0.9 is shown, and some short comings of our model described.

S. M. Dougherty; J. M. Pittard; E. P. O'Connor

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

326

Methods for Developing Emissions Scenarios for Integrated Assessment Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research was to contribute data and methods to support the future development of new emissions scenarios for integrated assessment of climate change. Specifically, this research had two main objectives: 1. Use historical data on economic growth and energy efficiency changes, and develop probability density functions (PDFs) for the appropriate parameters for two or three commonly used integrated assessment models. 2. Using the parameter distributions developed through the first task and previous work, we will develop methods of designing multi-gas emission scenarios that usefully span the joint uncertainty space in a small number of scenarios. Results on the autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI) parameter are summarized, an uncertainty analysis of elasticities of substitution is described, and the probabilistic emissions scenario approach is presented.

Prinn, Ronald [MIT; Webster, Mort [MIT

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Market penetration scenarios for fuel cell vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cell vehicles may create the first mass market for hydrogen as an energy carrier. Directed Technologies, Inc., working with the US Department of Energy hydrogen systems analysis team, has developed a time-dependent computer market penetration model. This model estimates the number of fuel cell vehicles that would be purchased over time as a function of their cost and the cost of hydrogen relative to the costs of competing vehicles and fuels. The model then calculates the return on investment for fuel cell vehicle manufacturers and hydrogen fuel suppliers. The model also projects the benefit/cost ratio for government--the ratio of societal benefits such as reduced oil consumption, reduced urban air pollution and reduced greenhouse gas emissions to the government cost for assisting the development of hydrogen energy and fuel cell vehicle technologies. The purpose of this model is to assist industry and government in choosing the best investment strategies to achieve significant return on investment and to maximize benefit/cost ratios. The model can illustrate trends and highlight the sensitivity of market penetration to various parameters such as fuel cell efficiency, cost, weight, and hydrogen cost. It can also illustrate the potential benefits of successful R and D and early demonstration projects. Results will be shown comparing the market penetration and return on investment estimates for direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles compared to fuel cell vehicles with onboard fuel processors including methanol steam reformers and gasoline partial oxidation systems. Other alternative fueled vehicles including natural gas hybrids, direct injection diesels and hydrogen-powered internal combustion hybrid vehicles will also be analyzed.

Thomas, C.E.; James, B.D.; Lomax, F.D. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Anticipating plug-in hybrid vehicle energy impacts in California: Constructing consumer-informed recharge profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

converted plug-in hybrid vehicles. Transportation ResearchM. , 2006. Plug-In Hybrid Vehicle Analysis. Nationalgas emissions from plug-in hybrid vehicles: implications for

Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

The sensitivity of modeled ozone to the temporal distribution of point, area, and mobile source emissions in the eastern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the emissions of NOx from day to night, for example in electric powered vehicles recharged at night, could have vehicles to the fleet (Bloomer et al., 2009) many regulators are focusing on reducing emissions at peak a memorandum of under- standing to reduce NOx emissions from peaking units on high electrical demand days (HEDD

Stehr, Jeffrey

330

Advanced HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

331

Identification of powered parafoil-vehicle dynamics from modelling and flight test data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S consisting of N particles P1,...,PN, suppose that n -m gen- eralized speeds have been introduced, and let vPir denote the rth partial velocity of Pi. Then, if Ri is the resultant of all contact and body forces acting on Pi, then the n -m quantities F1,...,Fn-m...IDENTIFICATION OF POWERED PARAFOIL-VEHICLE DYNAMICS FROM MODELLING AND FLIGHT TEST DATA A Dissertation by GI-BONG HUR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Hur, Gi-Bong

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

332

10 Kammen and others/p. 1 Cost-Effectiveness of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that stretches from fossil fuel­powered conventional vehicles (CVs) through hybrid electric vehicles 1-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Daniel M. Kammen1 , Samuel M. Arons, Derek M. Lemoine and Holmes Hummel Cars per year.2 Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles could alter these trends. On a vehicle technology spectrum

Kammen, Daniel M.

333

Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.

Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventory for Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck Emissions. J. Air &T. A. Cackette (2001), Diesel engines: Environmental impact2003), http://www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/diesel.htm BAAQMD, Bay

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Aguiar, Jeffery; Tonse, Shaheen; Novakov, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Macro-System Model: A Federated Object Model for Cross-Cutting Analysis of Hydrogen Production, Delivery, Consumption and Associated Emissions; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is commonly accepted that the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier for light-duty vehicles involves concomitant technological development of infrastructure elements, such as production, delivery, and consumption, all associated with certain emission levels. To analyze these at a system level, the suite of corresponding models developed by the United States Department of Energy and involving several national laboratories is combined in one macro-system model (MSM). The macro-system model is being developed as a cross-cutting analysis tool that combines a set of hydrogen technology analysis models. Within the MSM, a federated simulation framework is used for consistent data transfer between the component models. The framework is built to suit cross-model as well as cross-platform data exchange and involves features of 'over-the-net' computation.

Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Goldsby, M. E.; Sa, T. J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium GHG emissions rate Variable costand Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium GHG emissions rate (CO 2 -eq/kWh) Cost

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

APPLICATION OF A HYBRID MODEL TO EXPLORE ENERGY EMISSIONS ABATEMENT POLICIES IN CHINA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION OF A HYBRID MODEL TO EXPLORE ENERGY EMISSIONS ABATEMENT POLICIES IN CHINA by Jianjun Tu: Application of a Hybrid Model to Explore Energy Emissions Abatement Policies in China Project No. 360

338

A physics-based emissions model for aircraft gas turbine combustors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, a physics-based model of an aircraft gas turbine combustor is developed for predicting NO. and CO emissions. The objective of the model is to predict the emissions of current and potential future gas turbine ...

Allaire, Douglas L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Adaptive PI control of NOx? emissions in a Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction System using system identification models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Urea SCR System has shown great potential for implementation on diesel vehicles wanting to meet the upcoming emission regulations by the EPA. The objective of this thesis is to develop an adaptive controller that is ...

Ong, Chun Yang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHEV impact on wind energy market (Short et al. , 2006) andVehicles in California Energy Markets, TransportationElectric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets, National Renewable

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems Explores the economics of CO2 emission...

343

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1:...

344

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Robust Nitrogen...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Robust Nitrogen oxideAmmonia Sensors for Vehicle on-board Emissions Control Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Robust Nitrogen...

345

The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts Program - The Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project The FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Health Impacts...

346

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Combustion R&D Annual...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

emissions regulations. 2009advcombustionengine.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Advanced Combustion R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle...

347

Vehicle Electrification is Key to Reducing Petroleum Dependency...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Electrification is Key to Reducing Petroleum Dependency and Greenhouse Gas Emission Vehicle Electrification is Key to Reducing Petroleum Dependency and Greenhouse Gas...

348

Modelling and Design Optimization of Low Speed Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimization of PEM fuel cell power system, and fuel cell powered, low speed electric vehicles. #12;iii TABLEModelling and Design Optimization of Low Speed Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles by Matthew Blair Supervisors: Dr. Zuomin Dong ABSTRACT Electric vehicles, as an emerging transportation platform, have been

Victoria, University of

349

Modelling and control of a symmetric flapping wing vehicle: an optimal control approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a method for designing a flapping wing stroke for a flapping wing vehicle. A flapping wing vehicle is a vehicle such as a bird or an insect that uses its wings for propulsion instead of a conventional propeller or a jet engine...

Jackson, Justin Patrick

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Applications of Probabilistic Graphical Models to Diagnosis and Control of Autonomous Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the performancesof unmanned underwater vehicles were identified in terms of safety for the system itself as well problems of di- agnosis and control of ground and underwater robotic vehicles. In particular, we describe how battery monitoring and control problems related to an underwater and a ground vehicle are solved

351

Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled with CHIMERE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled Keywords: Atmospheric composition European air quality Anthropogenic emissions a b s t r a c t Regional inputs data like anthropogenic surface emissions of NOx, VOCs and particulate matter. These emissions

Menut, Laurent

352

18 Use of Satellite Remote Sensing Data for Modeling Carbon Emissions from Fires: A Perspective in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 Use of Satellite Remote Sensing Data for Modeling Carbon Emissions from Fires: A Perspective of the accurate estimation of carbon emissions from fires. So far, the continental-scale estimates of carbon conventional and satellite data to maximize their utility for fire emission estimation. 18.2 Carbon Emission

Li, Zhanqing

353

On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions including Ammonia, Sulfur Dioxide and Nitrogen Dioxide Don Stedman, Gary Bishop, Allison Peddle, University of Denver Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Denver CO 80208. www.feat.biochem.du.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions including Ammonia, Sulfur Dioxide and Nitrogen Dioxide Don Stedman Nitrogen dioxide: Less than 5% of the NOx BUT with an outstanding peak for the 2007 MY in Fresno 0. Nitrogen dioxide: less than 5% of NOx except the Fresno fleet containing the 2007 Sprinter ambulances. #12;

Denver, University of

354

Advanced LD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and aftertreatment systems in LD passenger vehicles. * Evaluate the merits of specific alternative hybrid engine-battery-aftertreatment configurations and control strategies...

355

Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transporta...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector...

356

ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS S. Brennan & A. Alleyne and spatial re-parameterization of the linear vehicle Bicycle Model is presented utilizing non-dimensional ratios of vehicle parameters called -groups. Investigation of the -groups using compiled data from 44

Brennan, Sean

357

ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ROBUST SCALABLE VEHICLE CONTROL VIA NON-DIMENSIONAL VEHICLE DYNAMICS S. Brennan & A. Alleyne Dept, IL 61801 ABSTRACT A temporal and spatial re-parameterization of the well- known linear vehicle Bicycle Model is presented. This parameterization utilizes non-dimensional ratios of vehicle parameters

Brennan, Sean

358

Models of Forbidden Line Emission Profiles from Axisymmetric Stellar Winds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A number of strong infrared forbidden lines have been observed in several evolved Wolf-Rayet star winds, and these are important for deriving metal abundances and testing stellar evolution models. In addition, because these optically thin lines form at large radius in the wind, their resolved profiles carry an imprint of the asymptotic structure of the wind flow. This work presents model forbidden line profile shapes formed in axisymmetric winds. It is well-known that an optically thin emission line formed in a spherical wind expanding at constant velocity yields a flat-topped emission profile shape. Simulated forbidden lines are produced for a model stellar wind with an axisymmetric density distribution that treats the latitudinal ionization self-consistently and examines the influence of the ion stage on the profile shape. The resulting line profiles are symmetric about line centre. Within a given atomic species, profile shapes can vary between centrally peaked, doubly peaked, and approximately flat-topped in appearance depending on the ion stage (relative to the dominant ion) and viewing inclination. Although application to Wolf-Rayet star winds is emphasized, the concepts are also relevant to other classes of hot stars such as luminous blue variables and Be/B[e] stars.

Richard Ignace; Adam Brimeyer

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

Plugging Vehicles into Clean Energy October, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plugging Vehicles into Clean Energy 1 October, 2012 Plugging Vehicles into Clean Energy Max-in electric vehicles and clean energy. Giving consumers options to offset energy and emissions associated briefly summarizes the relationship between clean energy and vehicle electrification and describes five

California at Davis, University of

360

Electric and Hydrogen Vehicles Past and Progress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

status and TSRC research ­ Future? · Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles ­ 20 years ago ­ 10 years ago ­ Current · Transportation Propulsion, Fuels, & Emissions ­ Electric-drive vehicles (including plug-in hybrid and fuel-cell Electric and Fuel Cell Vehicles?Why Electric and Fuel Cell Vehicles? · Transportation accounts for about 33

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE;2 #12;MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N 20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE cli- mate has on natural emissions of N2 0 and CH4 from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere

362

Modeling of Diesel Combustion, Soot and NO Emissions Based on a Modified Eddy Dissipation Concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling of Diesel Combustion, Soot and NO Emissions Based on a Modified Eddy Dissipation Concept and soot emissions modeling, computational diesel engine simulations, eddy dissipation concept #12 ignition, combustion, NOx and soot emissions over a wide range of operating conditions in a diesel engine

Im, Hong G.

363

The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGAN2.1): an extended and updated framework for modeling biogenic emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGAN2.1) is a modeling framework for estimating fluxes of biogenic compounds between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere using simple mechanistic ...

Guenther, A. B.

364

Model-Free Learning-Based Online Management of Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage Systems in Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model-Free Learning-Based Online Management of Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage Systems in Electric@elpl.snu.ac.kr Abstract--To improve the cycle efficiency and peak output power density of energy storage systems in electric vehicles (EVs), supercapacitors have been proposed as auxiliary energy storage elements

Pedram, Massoud

365

A Bottom-Up Approach to Verification of Hybrid Model-Based Hierarchical Controllers with application to Underwater Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Bottom-Up Approach to Verification of Hybrid Model-Based Hierarchical Controllers with application to Underwater Vehicles M. O'Connor, S. Tangirala, R. Kumar, S. Bhattacharyya, M. Sznaier and L.E. Holloway Abstract -- We present a systematic method of verification for a hierarchical hybrid system

Kumar, Ratnesh

366

Incorporating stakeholders' perspectives into models of new technology diffusion: The case of fuel-cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs) (East may change, internal combustion engines may becometechnology: gasoline internal combustion engines. At time t

Collantes, Gustavo O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Chemical Kinetic Models for Advanced Engine Combustion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

368

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cell Analysis, Modeling, and Prototyping (CAMP) Facility Research Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cell analysis,...

369

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Thermoplastic Pultrusion with Modeling and Experiments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by University of Alabama at Birmingham at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

370

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operating conditions. Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell System Modelconditions for a direct hydrogen fuel cell system Table 1simulation tool for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal of

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Will China's Vehicle Population Grow Even Faster than Forecasted?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011. Chinas Soaring Vehicle Population: Even Greater Thanversion, Chinas Soaring Vehicle Population: Even Greater2012. Modeling Future Vehicle Sales and Stock in China,

Wang, Yunshi; Teter, Jacob; Sperling, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A nanoflare model of quiet Sun EUV emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoflares have been proposed as the main source of heating of the solar corona. However, detecting them directly has so far proved elusive, and extrapolating to them from the properties of larger brightenings gives unreliable estimates of the power-law exponent $\\alpha$ characterising their distribution. Here we take the approach of statistically modelling light curves representative of the quiet Sun as seen in EUV radiation. The basic assumption is that all quiet-Sun EUV emission is due to micro- and nanoflares, whose radiative energies display a power-law distribution. Radiance values in the quiet Sun follow a lognormal distribution. This is irrespective of whether the distribution is made over a spatial scan or over a time series. We show that these distributions can be reproduced by our simple model.

Anuschka Pauluhn; Sami K. Solanki

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

Dr. Atul Jain

2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

Vehicle Technologies Office | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Read more Buying a New Car? Buying a New Car? Compare gas mileage, emissions, air pollution ratings, and safety data for new and used vehicles. Read more The Vehicle...

375

Analytical models to evaluate system performance measures for vehicle based material-handling systems under various dispatching policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are considered. Those are workcenter-initiated vehicle dispatching rules and vehicle-initiated vehicle dispatching rules. For the workcenterinitiated vehicle dispatching rule, the Closest Transporter Allocation Rule (CTAR) was used to assign empty transporters...

Lee, Moonsu

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

376

Modeling, Simulation Design and Control of Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Drives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ohio State University (OSU) is uniquely poised to establish such a center, with interdisciplinary emphasis on modeling, simulation, design and control of hybrid-electric drives for a number of reasons, some of which are: (1) The OSU Center for Automotive Research (CAR) already provides an infrastructure for interdisciplinary automotive research and graduate education; the facilities available at OSU-CAR in the area of vehicle and powertrain research are among the best in the country. CAR facilities include 31,000 sq. feet of space, multiple chassis and engine dynamometers, an anechoic chamber, and a high bay area. (2) OSU has in excess of 10 graduate level courses related to automotive systems. A graduate level sequence has already been initiated with GM. In addition, an Automotive Systems Engineering (ASE) program cosponsored by the mechanical and electrical engineering programs, had been formulated earlier at OSU, independent of the GATE program proposal. The main objective of the ASE is to provide multidisciplinary graduate education and training in the field of automotive systems to Masters level students. This graduate program can be easily adapted to fulfill the spirit of the GATE Center of Excellence. (3) A program in Mechatronic Systems Engineering has been in place at OSU since 1994; this program has a strong emphasis on automotive system integration issues, and has emphasized hybrid-electric vehicles as one of its application areas. (4) OSU researchers affiliated with CAR have been directly involved in the development and study of: HEV modeling and simulation; electric drives; transmission design and control; combustion engines; and energy storage systems. These activities have been conducted in collaboration with government and automotive industry sponsors; further, the same researchers have been actively involved in continuing education programs in these areas with the automotive industry. The proposed effort will include: (1) The development of a laboratory facility that will include: electric drive and IC engine test benches; a test vehicle designed for rapid installation of prototype drives; benches for the measurement and study of HEV energy storage components (batteries, ultra-capacitors, flywheels); hardware-in-the-loop control system development tools. (2) The creation of new courses and upgrades of existing courses on subjects related to: HEV modeling and simulation; supervisory control of HEV drivetrains; engine, transmission, and electric drive modeling and control. Specifically, two new courses (one entitled HEV Component Analysis: and the other entitled HEV System Integration and Control) will be developed. Two new labs, that will be taught with the courses (one entitled HEV Components Lab and one entitled HEV Systems and Control lab) will also be developed. (3) The consolidation of already existing ties among faculty in electrical and mechanical engineering departments. (4) The participation of industrial partners through: joint laboratory development; internship programs; continuing education programs; research project funding. The proposed effort will succeed because of the already exceptional level of involvement in HEV research and in graduate education in automotive engineering at OSU, and because the PIs have a proven record of interdisciplinary collaboration as evidenced by joint proposals, joint papers, and co-advising of graduate students. OSU has been expanding its emphasis in Automotive Systems for quite some time. This has led to numerous successes such as the establishment of the Center of Automotive Research, a graduate level course sequence with GM, and numerous grants and contracts on automotive research. The GATE Center of Excellence is a natural extension of what educators at OSU already do well.

Giorgio Rizzoni

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light- Dutyreduce their CO2 emissions. The emerging technologiessignificantly reduce their CO2 emissions. These technologies

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

QUANTIFYING THE EXTERNAL COSTS OF VEHICLE USE: EVIDENCE FROM AMERICA'S TOP SELLING LIGHT-DUTY MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-selling passenger cars and light-duty trucks in the U.S. Among these external costs, those associated with crashes estimated for several other vehicles of particular interest, including GM's Hummer and several hybrid drive: small cars, mid-sized cars, large cars, luxury cars, crossover utility vehicles (CUVs), sport

Kockelman, Kara M.

379

Clean Cities Offers Fleets New Tool to Evaluate Benefits of Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AFLEET Tool allows fleets to calculate payback periods and emissions benefits of alternative fuel vehicles.

380

Plug-in electric vehicle introduction in the EU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) could significantly reduce gasoline consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the EU's transport sector. However, PEV well-towheel (WTW) emissions depend on improvements in vehicle ...

Sisternes, Fernando J. de $q (Fernando Jos Sisternes Jimnez)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

IN-VEHICLE, HIGH-POWER ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- electric and hybrid vehicle configurations - vehicle modeling (Autonomie) - fuel cells - Hardware in the Loop (HIL) techniques - power electronics - combustion - controls -...

382

Sensitivity of Battery Electric Vehicle Economics to Drive Patterns, Vehicle Range, and Charge Strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gas emissions, but high upfront costs discourage many potential purchasers. Making an economic comparison with conventional alternatives is complicated in part by strong sensitivity to drive patterns, vehicle range, and charge strategies that affect vehicle utilization and battery wear. Identifying justifiable battery replacement schedules and sufficiently accounting for the limited range of a BEV add further complexity to the issue. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the Battery Ownership Model to address these and related questions. The Battery Ownership Model is applied here to examine the sensitivity of BEV economics to drive patterns, vehicle range, and charge strategies when a high-fidelity battery degradation model, financially justified battery replacement schedules, and two different means of accounting for a BEV's unachievable vehicle miles traveled (VMT) are employed. We find that the value of unachievable VMT with a BEV has a strong impact on the cost-optimal range, charge strategy, and battery replacement schedule; that the overall cost competitiveness of a BEV is highly sensitive to vehicle-specific drive patterns; and that common cross-sectional drive patterns do not provide consistent representation of the relative cost of a BEV.

Neubauer, J.; Brooker, A.; Wood, E.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crude oil availabil- ity has the following results: less overall fuel consumption,crude-oil-equivalent fuels), the emissions penalty (in gigatonnes of carbon equivalent), and the total emissions from fuel production and consumption (

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Incorporating stakeholders' perspectives into models of new technology diffusion: The case of fuel-cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions while at the same time offer private benefits relative to conventional internal combustion engine

Collantes, Gustavo O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Inverse modeling of surface emissions for local pollution: A new methodology applied to academic test cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inverse modeling of surface emissions for local pollution: A new methodology applied to academic; (2) LISA Creteil France Needs: Optimize surface emissions using daily recorded ozone and NOX by PRIMEQUAL2, program of the french ministry of environment Firstguess emissions inventory for the Paris

Menut, Laurent

386

An Active Oscillator Model Describes the Statistics of Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article An Active Oscillator Model Describes the Statistics of Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions, sounds that are known as spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. They are a signature of the active amplification mechanism in the cochlea. Emissions occur at frequencies that are unique for an individual

Juelicher, Frank

387

SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased 18 March 2011. [1] Topdown constraints on global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are inferred through of GEOSChem for inversion of SO2 columns to emissions. The seasonal mean SO2 lifetime calculated with the GEOS

Martin, Randall

388

Intertemporal Emissions Trading and Market Power: A Dominant Firm with Competitive Fringe Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Intertemporal Emissions Trading and Market Power: A Dominant Firm with Competitive Fringe Model Julien Chevallier1 May 26, 2009 Abstract In international emissions trading schemes such as the Kyoto Protocol and the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme, the suboptimal negotiation of the cap

Boyer, Edmond

389

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins-ORNL/FEERC...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cummins-ORNLFEERC Emissions CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins-ORNLFEERC Emissions...

390

Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program Emissions Benefit Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool...

391

Vehicle Technologies Office: Directions in Engine-Efficiency...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Vehicle Technologies Office: Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference The...

392

Effect of Gasoline Properties on Exhaust Emissions from Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicles -- Final Report: Phases 4, 5, & 6; July 28, 2008 - July 27, 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers work the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Office of Automotive Engineering has conducted for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in support of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). Section 1506 of EPAct requires the EPA to produce an updated fuel effects model representing the 2007 light-duty gasoline fleet, including determination of the emissions impacts of increased renewable fuel use.

Whitney, K.; Shoffner, B.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model: Version 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is the part of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) that represents the human systems. EPPA is a recursive-dynamic multi-regional general equilibrium model ...

Paltsev, Sergey.

394

A Forward Looking Version of the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper documents a forward looking multi-regional general equilibrium model developed from the latest version of the recursive-dynamic MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model. The model represents ...

Babiker, Mustafa M.H.

395

Long-term effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions simulated with a complex earth system model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term effects of anthropogenic CO2 emissions simulated with a complex earth system model Uwe earth system model con- sisting of an atmospheric general circulation model, an ocean general

Winguth, Arne

396

Guidelines for the Establishment of a Model Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Fleet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity tests neighborhood electric vehicles (NEVs) in both track and fleet testing environments. NEVs, which are also known as low speed vehicles, are light-duty vehicles with top speeds of between 20 and 25 mph, and total gross vehicle weights of approximately 2,000 pounds or less. NEVs have been found to be very viable alternatives to internal combustion engine vehicles based on their low operating costs. However, special charging infrastructure is usually necessary for successful NEV fleet deployment. Maintenance requirements are also unique to NEVs, especially if flooded lead acid batteries are used as they have watering requirements that require training, personnel protection equipment, and adherence to maintenance schedules. This report provides guidelines for fleet managers to follow in order to successfully introduce and operate NEVs in fleet environments. This report is based on the NEV testing and operational experience of personnel from the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Electric Transportation Applications, and the Idaho National Laboratory.

Roberta Brayer; Donald Karner; Kevin Morrow; James Francfort

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Vehicle-to-Grid Power: Battery, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Vehicle-to-Grid Power: Battery, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles as Resources for Distributed Resources Board (CARB), battery and fuel cell EDVs are considered Zero Emission Vehicles (ZEV), hybrids for carrying power from hybrid and fuel cell vehicles to the grid. Implications for current industry directions

Firestone, Jeremy

398

DOE Project: Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies "University Research in Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control" Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the present technology development was to increase the efficiency of internal combustion engines while minimizing the energy penalty of meeting emissions regulations. This objective was achieved through experimentation and the development of advanced combustion regimes and emission control strategies, coupled with advanced petroleum and non-petroleum fuel formulations. To meet the goals of the project, it was necessary to improve the efficiency of expansion work extraction, and this required optimized combustion phasing and minimized in-cylinder heat transfer losses. To minimize fuel used for diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, soot emissions were also minimized. Because of the complex nature of optimizing production engines for real-world variations in fuels, temperatures and pressures, the project applied high-fidelity computing and high-resolution engine experiments synergistically to create and apply advanced tools (i.e., fast, accurate predictive models) developed for low-emission, fuel-efficient engine designs. The companion experiments were conducted using representative single- and multi-cylinder automotive and truck diesel engines.

Reitz, Rolf; Foster, D.; Ghandhi, J.; Rothamer, D.; Rutland, C.; Sanders, S.; Trujillo, M.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

Proceedings of the International Electronics Packaging Education Conference (at the ECTC), May 30, 2006 Using Teardown Analysis as a Vehicle to Teach Electronic Systems Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2006 Using Teardown Analysis as a Vehicle to Teach Electronic Systems Manufacturing Cost Modeling Peter product teardowns and reverse engineering ideas has proven to be an effective vehicle for educating engineers involved in the design of electronic systems did not concern themselves with the cost

Sandborn, Peter

400

Modeling the performance and cost of lithium-ion batteries for electric-drive vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the Battery Performance and Cost model (BatPaC) developed at Argonne National Laboratory for lithium-ion battery packs used in automotive transportation. The model designs the battery for a specified power, energy, and type of vehicle battery. The cost of the designed battery is then calculated by accounting for every step in the lithium-ion battery manufacturing process. The assumed annual production level directly affects each process step. The total cost to the original equipment manufacturer calculated by the model includes the materials, manufacturing, and warranty costs for a battery produced in the year 2020 (in 2010 US$). At the time this report is written, this calculation is the only publically available model that performs a bottom-up lithium-ion battery design and cost calculation. Both the model and the report have been publically peer-reviewed by battery experts assembled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This report and accompanying model include changes made in response to the comments received during the peer-review. The purpose of the report is to document the equations and assumptions from which the model has been created. A user of the model will be able to recreate the calculations and perhaps more importantly, understand the driving forces for the results. Instructions for use and an illustration of model results are also presented. Almost every variable in the calculation may be changed by the user to represent a system different from the default values pre-entered into the program. The distinct advantage of using a bottom-up cost and design model is that the entire power-to-energy space may be traversed to examine the correlation between performance and cost. The BatPaC model accounts for the physical limitations of the electrochemical processes within the battery. Thus, unrealistic designs are penalized in energy density and cost, unlike cost models based on linear extrapolations. Additionally, the consequences on cost and energy density from changes in cell capacity, parallel cell groups, and manufacturing capabilities are easily assessed with the model. New proposed materials may also be examined to translate bench-scale values to the design of full-scale battery packs providing realistic energy densities and prices to the original equipment manufacturer. The model will be openly distributed to the public in the year 2011. Currently, the calculations are based in a Microsoft{reg_sign} Office Excel spreadsheet. Instructions are provided for use; however, the format is admittedly not user-friendly. A parallel development effort has created an alternate version based on a graphical user-interface that will be more intuitive to some users. The version that is more user-friendly should allow for wider adoption of the model.

Nelson, P. A.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrifying transportation can reduce or eliminate dependence on foreign fuels, emission of green house gases, and emission of pollutants. One challenge is finding a pathway for vehicles that gains wide market acceptance to achieve a meaningful benefit. This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective including opportunity charging, replacing the battery over the vehicle life, improving battery life, reducing battery cost, and providing electric power directly to the vehicle during a portion of its travel. Many combinations of PHEV electric range and battery power are included. For each case, the model accounts for battery cycle life and the national distribution of driving distances to size the battery optimally. Using the current estimates of battery life and cost, only the dynamically plugged-in pathway was cost-effective to the consumer. Significant improvements in battery life and battery cost also made PHEVs more cost-effective than today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (CVs).

Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J. P.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHG- emitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 ?m) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

404

Evaluation of fuel consumption potential of medium and heavy duty vehicles through modeling and simulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this report is to provide quantitative data to support the Committee in its task of establishing a report to support rulemaking on medium- and heavy-duty fuel efficiency improvement. In particular, it is of paramount importance for the Committee to base or illustrate their conclusions on established models and actual state-of-the art data. The simulations studies presented in the report have been defined and requested by the members of the National Academy committee to provide quantitative inputs to support their recommendations. As such, various technologies and usage scenarios were considered for several applications. One of the objective is to provide the results along with their associated assumptions (both vehicle and drive cycles), information generally missing from public discussions on literature search. Finally, the advantages and limitations of using simulation will be summarized. The study addresses several of the committee tasks, including: (1) Discussion of the implication of metric selection; (2) Assessing the impact of existing technologies on fuel consumption through energy balance analysis (both steady-state and standard cycles) as well as real world drive cycles; and (3) Impact of future technologies, both individually and collectively.

Delorme, A.; Karbowski, D.; Sharer, P.; Energy Systems

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Characterization and modeling of a shape memory allow actuated biomimetic vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of a biomimetic active hydrofoil that utilizes Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuator technology is presented herein. This work is the first stage prototype of a vehicle that will consist of many actuated body segments. The current work...

Garner, Luke Jay

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Adaptive control of hypersonic vehicles in the presence of modeling uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper proposes an adaptive controller for a hypersonic cruise vehicle subject to aerodynamic uncertainties, center-of-gravity movements, actuator saturation, failures, and time-delays. The adaptive control architecture ...

Gibson, Travis Eli

407

The electric vehicle experiment : developing the theoretical model for 2.672  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this project was to develop a computer simulation of the proposed 2.672 electric vehicle experiment (EVE) to estimate the magnitudes of the powers required in different components of the drive train, piecewise ...

Zedler, Matthew R. (Matthew Robert)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Modeling for Market Analysis: HTEB, TRUCK, and LVChoice  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by TA Engineering, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about HTEB, TRUCK, and...

409

Electric vehicle charging infrastructure deployment : policy analysis using a dynamic behavioral spatial model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The United States government is committed to promoting a market for electric vehicles. To ensure that this electrification program does not result in the same failure that has come be associated with its predecessor programs, ...

Kearney, Michael J. (Michael Joseph)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Learning, Modeling, and Understanding Vehicle Surround Using Multi-Modal Sensing /  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simon, W. Niehsen, and C. Stiller, Detection of close cut-Liu, J. Sparbert, and C. Stiller, Immpda vehicle trackingH. Loose, U. Franke, and C. Stiller, Kalman particle filter

Sivaraman, Sayanan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A discrete event simulation model for unstructured supervisory control of unmanned vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most current Unmanned Vehicle (UV) systems consist of teams of operators controlling a single UV. Technological advances will likely lead to the inversion of this ratio, and automation of low level tasking. These advances ...

McDonald, Anthony D. (Anthony Douglas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

AVCEM: Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model. Overview of AVCEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stack); fuel-cell salvage value (fraction of initial coststack); total cost of vehicle electronics needed specifically for the fuel-cellcosts, expressed as a wage multiplier); specific weight of the fuel-cell stack (

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Verification of a six-degree of freedom simulation model for the REMUS autonomous underwater vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mproving the performance of modular, low-cost autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) in such applications as long-range oceanographic survey, autonomous docking, and shallow-water mine countermeasures requires improving the ...

Prestero, Timothy (Timothy Jason), 1970-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Incorporating stakeholders' perspectives into models of new technology diffusion: The case of fuel-cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dual superiority of hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs) hasneeded to position the hydrogenfuel cell combination as ainclude on-board hydrogen storage and fuel cell durability.

Collantes, Gustavo O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Modeling real-time human-automation collaborative scheduling of unmanned vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent advances in autonomy have enabled a future vision of single operator control of multiple heterogeneous Unmanned Vehicles (UVs). Real-time scheduling for multiple UVs in uncertain environments will require the ...

Clare, Andrew S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Developing a methodology to account for commercial motor vehicles using microscopic traffic simulation models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehicle (CMV) weight and classification data used as input to critical tasks in transportation design, operations, and planning. The evolution of Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) technologies has been providing transportation engineers and planners...

Schultz, Grant George

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Integrated perception, modeling, and control paradigm for bistatic sonar tracking by autonomous underwater vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, a fully autonomous and persistent bistatic anti-submarine warfare (ASW) surveillance solution is developed using the autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). The passive receivers are carried by these AUVs, ...

Lum, Raymond Hon Kit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Scenario analysis of hybrid class 3-7 heavy vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of hybridization on heavy-duty vehicles are not well understood. Heavy vehicles represent a broader range of applications than light-duty vehicles, resulting in a wide variety of chassis and engine combinations, as well as diverse driving conditions. Thus, the strategies, incremental costs, and energy/emission benefits associated with hybridizing heavy vehicles could differ significantly from those for passenger cars. Using a modal energy and emissions model, they quantify the potential energy savings of hybridizing commercial Class 3-7 heavy vehicles, analyze hybrid configuration scenarios, and estimate the associated investment cost and payback time. From the analysis, they conclude that (1) hybridization can significantly reduce energy consumption of Class 3-7 heavy vehicles under urban driving conditions; (2) the grid-independent, conventional vehicle (CV)-like hybrid is more cost-effective than the grid-dependent, electric vehicle (EV)-like hybrid, and the parallel configuration is more cost-effective than the series configuration; (3) for CV-like hybridization, the on-board engine can be significantly downsized, with a gasoline or diesel engine used for SUVs perhaps being a good candidate for an on-board engine; (4) over the long term, the incremental cost of a CV-like, parallel-configured Class 3-4 hybrid heavy vehicle is about %5,800 in the year 2005 and $3,000 in 2020, while for a Class 6-7 truck, it is about $7,100 in 2005 and $3,300 in 2020; and (5) investment payback time, which depends on the specific type and application of the vehicle, averages about 6 years under urban driving conditions in 2005 and 2--3 years in 2020.

An, F.; Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Eberhardt, J. J.

1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a typical Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicle and awhile an Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) suppliesoff and the internal combustion engine starts to operate.

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by adding additional batteries to the design, allowing theincreases. Advanced Batteries for Electric-Drive Vehicles (generally require larger batteries with correspondingly

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2b: Emissions Impact Of Roadway-powered Electric Buses, Light-duty Vehicles, And Automobiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIGHT-DUTY VEHICLES, AND AUTOMOBILES Mark A. Miller Victorand The analysis involves automobiles in California arePowered Electric Automobiles -a---- Range of Estimated

Miller, Mark A.; Dato, Victor; Chira-chavala, Ted

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency Vehicle Technologies Office: Maximizing Alternative Fuel Vehicle Efficiency Besides their energy security and environmental benefits,...

423

Test and evaluation of the Philips Model PE 1701 and Lester Model 9865 electric vehicle battery chargers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Philips Model PE 1701 and the Lester Model 9865 electric vehicle battery chargers have been tested by the Tennessee Valley Authority. Charger input/output voltage, current, power characteristics, and input waveform distortion were measured and induced electromagnetic interference was evaluated while the chargers recharged a fully discharged lead-acid battery pack. Electrical quantities were measured with precision volt-ampere-watt meters, frequency counters, a digital storage oscilloscope, and a spectrum analyzer. The Philips charger required 12.2 hours to recharge a 144-V battery; it had an energy efficiency of 86.0 percent and a specific power of 87.4 W/kg (39.7 W/lb). Input current distortion was between 6.9 and 23.0 percent, and electromagnetic interference was observed on AM radio. The Lester charger required 8.2 hours to recharge a 106-V battery; it had an energy efficiency of 83.0 percent and a specific power of 117.3 W/kg (53.3 W/lb). Current distortion was between 52.7 and 97.4 percent, and electromagnetic interference was observed on AM radio.

Reese, R.W.; Driggans, R.L.; Keller, A.S.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle...

425

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle...

426

SAE Paper 04P-273 Modeling of Diesel Combustion and NO Emissions Based on a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAE Paper 04P-273 Modeling of Diesel Combustion and NO Emissions Based on a Modified Eddy of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT This paper reports the development of a model of diesel combustion about global warming and hazardous emissions bring about a need for an improved understanding of diesel

Im, Hong G.

427

MEASUREMENT AND MODELLING OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS AT WASTE TREATMENT LAGOON-ATMOSPHERIC INTERFACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEASUREMENT AND MODELLING OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS AT WASTE TREATMENT LAGOON-ATMOSPHERIC INTERFACE animals ( 32 Tg N -1yr-1). Waste storage and treatment lagoons are used to treat the excreta of hogs waste storage and treatment lagoon in NC using a dynamic emission flux chamber. Results of model

Aneja, Viney P.

428

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Cell/Pack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental Validation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by EC Power at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about evelopment of cell/pack level models...

429

Application of Distribution Transformer Thermal Life Models to Electrified Vehicle Charging Loads Using Monte-Carlo Method: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrated purchasing patterns of plug-in vehicles may result in localized distribution transformer overload scenarios. Prolonged periods of transformer overloading causes service life decrements, and in worst-case scenarios, results in tripped thermal relays and residential service outages. This analysis will review distribution transformer load models developed in the IEC 60076 standard, and apply the model to a neighborhood with plug-in hybrids. Residential distribution transformers are sized such that night-time cooling provides thermal recovery from heavy load conditions during the daytime utility peak. It is expected that PHEVs will primarily be charged at night in a residential setting. If not managed properly, some distribution transformers could become overloaded, leading to a reduction in transformer life expectancy, thus increasing costs to utilities and consumers. A Monte-Carlo scheme simulated each day of the year, evaluating 100 load scenarios as it swept through the following variables: number of vehicle per transformer, transformer size, and charging rate. A general method for determining expected transformer aging rate will be developed, based on the energy needs of plug-in vehicles loading a residential transformer.

Kuss, M.; Markel, T.; Kramer, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Emissions from In-Use NG, Propane, and Diesel Fueled Heavy Duty...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and CO, compared to diesel vehicles, while meeting certification requirements deer11johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Emissions Review - 2012 Emissions Control...

431

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Transportation Energy Transition Modeling and Analysis: the LAVE-Trans Model  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the LAVE-Trans...

432

VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION MADALENA CHAVES, ROBERT DAY, LUCIA GOMEZ a network of vehicles exchanging information among themselves with the intention of achieving a specified the performance of the vehicle network. A stochastic model for information flow is also considered, allowing

433

Modeling of Particulate Matter Emissions from Agricultural Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Air Pollution Regulation Agencies (SAPRAs) issue and enforce permits that limit particulate matter emissions from all sources including layer and broiler facilities, cattle feedyards, dairies, cotton gins, and grain elevators...

Bairy, Jnana 1988-

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

434

HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE OWNERSHIP AND FUEL ECONOMY ACROSS TEXAS: AN APPLICATION OF SPATIAL MODELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and environmental policies (Koo et al. 2012). While EV sales (including both HEVs and PEVs) have risen considerably significant. If households registering more fuel- efficient vehicles, including hybrid EVs, are also more inclined to purchase plug-in EVs, these #12;findings can assist in spatial planning of charging

Kockelman, Kara M.

435

On the Higher-Order MoM-PO Electromagnetic Modeling of Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehicles (cars, airplanes, helicopters, spacecraft, etc.). From the electromagnetic point of view and accurate higher-order, large-domain hybrid computational technique based on the method of moments (Mo the efficiency and accuracy of the hybrid higher-order computational technique and its advantages over

Notaros, Branislav M.

436

Full vehicle dynamics model of a formula SAE racecar using ADAMS/Car  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Texas A&M University Formula SAE program currently has no rigorous method for analyzing or predicting the overall dynamic behavior of the student-designed racecars. The objective of this study is to fulfill this need by creating a full vehicle...

Mueller, Russell Lee

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NOVA-NREL Optimal Vehicle Acquisition Analysis (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal fleet managers face unique challenges in accomplishing their mission - meeting agency transportation needs while complying with Federal goals and mandates. Included in these challenges are a variety of statutory requirements, executive orders, and internal goals and objectives that typically focus on petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions, alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) acquisitions, and alternative fuel use increases. Given the large number of mandates affecting Federal fleets and the challenges faced by all fleet managers in executing day-to-day operations, a primary challenge for agencies and other organizations is ensuring that they are as efficient as possible in using constrained fleet budgets. An NREL Optimal Vehicle Acquisition (NOVA) analysis makes use of a mathematical model with a variety of fleet-related data to create an optimal vehicle acquisition strategy for a given goal, such as petroleum or GHG reduction. The analysis can helps fleets develop a vehicle acquisition strategy that maximizes petroleum and greenhouse gas reductions.

Blakley, H.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle (BEV) with an electric motor capable of supplyingmode operation uses the electric motor to run during low-PHEV x can be run on the electric motor only for the first x

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cummins-ORNL/FEERC Emissions CRADA: NOx Control & Measurement Technology for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Cummins-ORNL...

440

Modeling of EUV Emission and Conversion Efficiency from Laser-Produced Tin Plasmas for Nanolithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of EUV Emission and Conversion Efficiency from Laser-Produced Tin Plasmas simulation tools. Here, we investigate the radiative properties of tin and tin-doped foam plasmas heated by 1 at intermediate focus (IF). Laser-generated plasmas containing lithium, xenon or tin are potentially good emission

Harilal, S. S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 23, GB1007, doi:10.1029/2008GB003180. 1. Introduction [2] Carbon (C) sequestration has

442

Electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Bremsstrahlung emission modelling and application to fast electron physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of fast electron bremsstrahlung (FEB) using hard X-ray (HXR) cameras provide a unique diagnostic for the fast electron dynamics, with resolution in space, time and energy. A synthetic HXR diagnostic is developed to calculate the distribution function and FEB emission, such that experimental results can be directly compared with simulations. Using this comparison, the role of fast electron radial transport in radio-frequency current drive is investigated. For two cases studied in this paper, the HXR emission is consistent with negligible radial transport, although in one case this is in disagreement with the measured driven current.

Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Artaud, J.-F.; Basiuk, V.; Ekedahl, A.; Mazon, D. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Coda, S.; Gnesin, S.; Goniche, M. [CRPP, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Sharma, P. K. [IPR, Bhat, Gandhinagar - 382428 (India)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

444

HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis HyDIVE (Hydrogen Dynamic Infrastructure and Vehicle Evolution) Model Analysis Presentation by NREL's...

445

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

internal combustion engine is working, it reasonably can be assumed to have similar emissionInternal Combustion Engine (ICE) supplies additional power for high- speed/power operation. Although some studies capture emission

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Modeling methane emissions from the Alaskan Yukon River basin, 19862005, by coupling a large-scale hydrological model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling methane emissions from the Alaskan Yukon River basin, 1986­2005, by coupling a large-scale hydrological model and a process-based methane model Xiaoliang Lu1 and Qianlai Zhuang1,2 Received 25 August has been made in methane modeling for the Arctic. However, there is still large uncertainty

447

Model based pavement-vehicle interaction simulation for life cycle assessment of pavements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Responsible for about a third of the annual energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the U.S. transportation Network needs to attain a higher level of sustainability. This is particularly true for the roadway ...

Akbarian, Mehdi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Long-Term Trends in Motor Vehicle Emissions in U.S. Urban Areas Brian C. McDonald and Drew R. Gentner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suggest rates of reduction in NMHC versus CO emissions may differ somewhat. Emission ratios of CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2), and carbon monoxide (CO) are coemitted with carbon dioxide (CO2) during which are mostly diesel powered. Emission reduction measures in the U.S. have been implemented over

Cohen, Ronald C.

449

A Statistical Model to Assess Indirect CO2 Emissions of the UAE Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Determination of household energy using ?fingerprints? from energy billing data. Energy Research 10(4), pp: 393?405. [5] Snakin JPA, 2000. An engineering model for heating energy and emission assessment The case of North Karelia, Finland. Applied Energy...

Radhi, H.; Fikry, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Emissions and Energy: An Integral Approach Using an Online Energy Management and Optimization Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management and Optimization Model Diego Ruiz Carlos Ruiz Oscar Santollani Tyler Reitmeier Soteica Ideas & Technology LLC Houston, TX 77079 Abstract With the expected legislation on the horizon in the U.S., the cost of CO2 emissions...

Ruiz, D.; Ruiz, C.; Santollani, O.; Reitmeier, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Modeling ruminant methane emissions from the U.S. beef cattle industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer models were constructed to estimate methane emissions from cow/calf, replacement heifers, burs, stockers and feedlot sectors of the U.S. beef cattle industry. Methane (CH4) yields were calculated based on net energy values and forage...

Turk, Danny Carroll

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Journal of Asian Electric Vehicles, Volume 8, Number 1, June 2010 Simplified Thermal Model of PM Motors in Hybrid Vehicle Applications Taking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mounted PM synchronous motor (SPMSM) is developed in this paper. Due to the high conductivity of the rare of PM Motors in Hybrid Vehicle Applications Taking into Account Eddy Current Loss in Magnets Xiaofeng, University of Michigan-Dearborn, mi@ieee.org Abstract Permanent Magnet (PM) Motors are popular choices

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

453

Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

Ozpineci, Burak

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

454

Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

Ozpineci, Burak

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

455

Energy Efficiency in Heavy Vehicle Tires, Drivetrains, and Braking Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was prepared to support the primary goals of the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. These were recently stated as follows: ''Develop by 2004 the enabling technologies for a class 7-8 truck with a fuel efficiency of 10 mpg (at 65 mph) which will meet prevailing emission standards. For Class 3-6 trucks operating on an urban driving cycle, develop by 2004 commercially viable vehicles that achieve at least double the fuel economy of comparable current vehicles (1999), and as a research goal, reduce criteria pollutants to 30% below EPA standards. Develop by 2004 the diesel engine enabling technologies to support large-scale industry dieselization of Class 1 and 2 trucks, achieving a 35 % fuel efficiency improvement over comparable gasoline-fueled trucks, while meeting applicable emissions standards.'' The enabling technologies for improving the fuel efficiency of trucks, include not only engine technologies but also technologies involved with lowering the rolling resistance of tires, reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag, improving thermal management, and reducing parasitic frictional losses in drive train components. Opportunities also exist for making better use of the energy that might ordinarily be dissipated during vehicle braking. Braking systems must be included in this evaluation since safety in truck operations is vital, and braking requirements are greater for vehicles having lowered resistance to rolling. The Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies has initiated a program to improve the aerodynamics of heavy vehicles through wind tunnel testing, computational modeling, and on-road evaluations. That activity is described in a separate multi-year plan; therefore, emphasis in this document will be on tires, drive trains, and braking systems. Recent, dramatic fluctuations in diesel fuel prices have emphasized the importance of effecting savings in truck fuel economy by implementing new component designs and materials.

Peter J. Blau

2000-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of a variety of vehicle, fuel, and technology choices. Overview Measures the petroleum displacement and greenhouse gas emissions of medium and heavy-duty vehicles and...

457

Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle (MARV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has recently developed a 16 cm{sup 3} (1 in{sup 3}) autonomous robotic vehicle which is capable of tracking a single conducting wire carrying a 96 kHz signal. This vehicle was developed to assess the limiting factors in using commercial technology to build miniature autonomous vehicles. Particular attention was paid to the design of the control system to search out the wire, track it, and recover if the wire was lost. This paper describes the test vehicle and the control analysis. Presented in the paper are the vehicle model, control laws, a stability analysis, simulation studies and experimental results.

Feddema, J.T.; Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Spletzer, B.L.; Weber, T.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Effect of SoyEffect of Soy--Based B20 Biodiesel on Fuel UseBased B20 Biodiesel on Fuel Use and Emissions of 15 Construction Vehiclesand Emissions of 15 Construction Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of SoyEffect of Soy--Based B20 Biodiesel on Fuel UseBased B20 Biodiesel on Fuel Use Tests with B20 Biodiesel ­ Based on Regular NCDOT Duty Schedule Overview of Study Design for Field for Other Pollutants B20 Biodiesel Tier 0Tier 0 VehicleVehicle Tier 1Tier 1 Tier 2Tier 2 Tier 3Tier 3 0 40

Frey, H. Christopher

459

User's guide to DIANE Version 2. 1: A microcomputer software package for modeling battery performance in electric vehicle applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DIANE is an interactive microcomputer software package for the analysis of battery performance in electric vehicle (EV) applications. The principal objective of this software package is to enable the prediction of EV performance on the basis of laboratory test data for batteries. The model provides a second-by-second simulation of battery voltage and current for any specified velocity/time or power/time profile. The capability of the battery is modeled by an algorithm that relates the battery voltage to the withdrawn current, taking into account the effect of battery depth-of-discharge (DOD). Because of the lack of test data and other constraints, the current version of DIANE deals only with vehicles using fresh'' batteries with or without regenerative braking. Deterioration of battery capability due to aging can presently be simulated with user-input parameters accounting for an increase of effective internal resistance and/or a decrease of cell no-load voltage. DIANE 2.1 is written in FORTRAN language for use on IBM-compatible microcomputers. 7 refs.

Marr, W.W.; Walsh, W.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Symons, P.C. (Electrochemical Engineering Consultants, Inc., Morgan Hill, CA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Table 5.5. U.S. Vehicle Fuel Efficiency by Model Year, 1994  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2 10,037.24. U.S. Vehicle Fuel7. U.S.8....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Table 5.6. U.S. Average Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Model Year, 1994  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2 10,037.24. U.S. Vehicle Fuel7.

462

Fact #854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulie A. Reddick| DepartmentVehiclesTwo and a HalfNew Light

463

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

market, allowing our model to focus on the supply of crude oil andterms of the model equations [7]). The oil market in ROMEO

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Commercial Vehicle Classification using Vehicle Signature Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic Measurement and Vehicle Classification with SingleG. Ritchie. Real-time Vehicle Classification using InductiveReijmers, J.J. , "On-line vehicle classification," Vehicular

Liu, Hang; Jeng, Shin-Ting; Andre Tok, Yeow Chern; Ritchie, Stephen G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Emissions of volatile organic compounds from stationary combustion sources: Numerical modeling capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A collaborative research program initiated to study the emissions of a wide variety of chemical species from stationary combustion systems. These product species have been included in the Clean Air act legislation and their emissions must be rigidly controlled, but there is a need for much better understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms that produce and consume them. We are using numerical modeling study the chemical reactions and fluid mechanical factors that occur in industrial processes: we are examining systems including premixed and diffusion flames, stirred reactors and plug flow reactors in these modeling studies to establish the major factors leading to emissions of these chemicals. In addition, we are applying advanced laser diagnostic techniques to validate the model predictions and to study the possibilities of developing sophisticated sensors to detect emissions of undesirable species in real time. This paper will discuss the organization of this collaborative effort and its results to date.

Seebold, J.G. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States); Kee, R.J.; Lutz, A.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Senkan, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Modelling the global prospects and impacts of heavy duty liquefied natural gas vehicles in computable general equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural gas vehicles have the prospects of making substantial contributions to transportation needs. The adoption of natural gas vehicles could lead to impacts on energy and environmental systems. An analysis of the main ...

Yip, Arthur Hong Chun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

StreetSmart : modeling vehicle fuel consumption with mobile phone sensor data through a participatory sensing framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle energy efficiency has become a priority of governments, researchers, and consumers in the wake of rising fuels costs over the last decade. Traditional Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicles are particularly ...

Oehlerking, Austin Louis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Foreseeing the Market for Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles: Stakeholders' Perspectives and Models of New Technology Diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Market for Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles: Stakeholdersdual superiority of hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs) hasneeded to position the hydrogen-fuel cell combination as a

Collantes, Gustavo O

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

FORESEEING THE MARKET FOR HYDROGEN FUEL-CELL VEHICLES: STAKEHOLDERS PERSPECTIVES AND MODELS OF NEW TECHNOLOGY DIFFUSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Market for Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles: Stakeholdersdual superiority of hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs) hasneeded to position the hydrogen-fuel cell combination as a

Collantes, Gustavo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007) Impacts of Electric-drive Vehicles on California'sInteractions between electric-drive vehicles and the powerin emissions found for electric- drive vehicles is a result

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The future of electric two-wheelers and electric vehicles in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAE Hybrid Vehicle Symposium, San Diego CA, 1314 February.emissions from a plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) in China has2008. Nissans Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Program.

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Inverse modeling of emissions for local photo-oxidant pollution : Testing a new methodology with kriging constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inverse modeling of emissions for local photo-oxidant pollution : Testing a new methodology. Abstract For chemistry-transport models operating at regional scales, surface emissions are the input data a methodology to optimize surface emissions at local scale i.e. to compute correction factors for the available

Menut, Laurent

473

Mack LNG vehicle development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to install a production-ready, state-of-the-art engine control system on the Mack E7G natural gas engine to improve efficiency and lower exhaust emissions. In addition, the power rating was increased from 300 brake horsepower (bhp) to 325 bhp. The emissions targets were oxides of nitrogen plus nonmethane hydrocarbons of less than 2.5 g/bhp-hr and particulate matter of less than 0.05 g/bhp-hr on 99% methane. Vehicle durability and field testing were also conducted. Further development of this engine should include efficiency improvements and oxides of nitrogen reductions.

Southwest Research Institute

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

474

Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As defined by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction strategies for Federal vehicles and equipment are based on the three driving principles of petroleum reduction: Reduce vehicle miles traveled Improve fuel efficiency Use alternative fuels.

475

A Self-triggered Visual Servoing Model Predictive Control Scheme for Under-actuated Underwater Robotic Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extensively used in the past for the autonomous operation of underwater robotic vehicles. Complex missions Robotic Vehicles Shahab Heshmati-Alamdari, Alina Eqtami, George C. Karras, Dimos V. Dimarogonas and Kostas Control (NMPC) scheme for an under- actuated underwater robotic vehicle. In this scheme, the control loop

Dimarogonas, Dimos

476

Developing the Galactic Diffuse Emission Model for the GLAST Large Area Telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffuse emission is produced in energetic cosmic ray (CR) interactions, mainly protons and electrons, with the interstellar gas and radiation field and contains the information about particle spectra in distant regions of the Galaxy. It may also contain information about exotic processes such as dark matter annihilation, black hole evaporation etc. A model of the diffuse emission is important for determination of the source positions and spectra. Calculation of the Galactic diffuse continuum g-ray emission requires a model for CR propagation as the first step. Such a model is based on theory of particle transport in the interstellar medium as well as on many kinds of data provided by different experiments in Astrophysics and Particle and Nuclear Physics. Such data include: secondary particle and isotopic production cross sections, total interaction nuclear cross sections and lifetimes of radioactive species, gas mass calibrations and gas distribution in the Galaxy (H{sub 2}, H I, H II), interstellar radiation field, CR source distribution and particle spectra at the sources, magnetic field, energy losses, g-ray and synchrotron production mechanisms, and many other issues. We are continuously improving the GALPROP model and the code to keep up with a flow of new data. Improvement in any field may affect the Galactic diffuse continuum g-ray emission model used as a background model by the GLAST LAT instrument. Here we report about the latest improvements of the GALPROP and the diffuse emission model.

Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Digel, Seth W.; Porter, Troy A.

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

477

Challenges and Potential Solutions for Reducing Climate Control Loads in Conventional and Hybrid Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory, is collaborating with U.S. automotive manufacturers to develop innovative techniques to reduce national fuel consumption and vehicle tailpipe emissions by reducing vehicle climate control loads. A new U.S. emissions test, the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (SFTP), will soon begin measuring tailpipe emissions with the air conditioning system operating. Modeled results show that emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) more than double during the air conditioning part of the SFTP. Reducing the transmittance of the glazing can have a greater impact on the cabin soak temperature than ventilating the vehicle during a hot soak. Reducing the amount of outside air can decrease cooling and heating loads but requires that the recirculated air be cleaned. We discuss a photocatalytic oxidation air-cleaning process for removing volatile organic compounds and bioareosols. We conclude with an example of modeling the thermal comfort of the occupants. An auxiliary load increase of only 400 Watts (W) results in a 0.4 km/L (1 mpg) decrease for a conventional 11.9-L/100-km (28-mpg) vehicle. If every vehicle in the United States were to save only 0.4 km/L (1 mpg), $4 billion (U.S. dollars) would be saved annually in gasoline and oil costs. Further information can be found at http://www.ctts.nrel.gov/auxload.html.

Farrington, R.B., Anderson, R., Blake, D.M., Burch, S.D.; Cuddy, M.R., Keyser, M.A., Rugh, J.P.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Elucidating secondary organic aerosol from diesel and gasoline vehicles through detailed characterization of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elucidating secondary organic aerosol from diesel and gasoline vehicles through detailed 19, 2012 (received for review July 22, 2012) Emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles composition, mass distribu- tion, and organic aerosol formation potential of emissions from gasoline

Silver, Whendee

479

Multi-scale Modeling Approach to Acoustic Emission during Plastic Deformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address the long standing problem of the origin of acoustic emission commonly observed during plastic deformation. We propose a frame-work to deal with the widely separated time scales of collective dislocation dynamics and elastic degrees of freedom to explain the nature of acoustic emission observed during the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect. The Ananthakrishna model is used as it explains most generic features of the phenomenon. Our results show that while acoustic emission bursts correlated with stress drops are well separated for the type C serrations, these bursts merge to form nearly continuous acoustic signals with overriding bursts for the propagating type A bands.

Jagadish Kumar; G. Ananthakrishna

2011-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

480

Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past decade has seen the development of various scenarios describing long-term patterns of future Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with each new approach adding insights to our understanding of the changing dynamics of energy consumption and aggregate future energy trends. With the recent growing focus on China's energy use and emission mitigation potential, a range of Chinese outlook models have been developed across different institutions including in China's Energy Research Institute's 2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report, McKinsey & Co's China's Green Revolution report, the UK Sussex Energy Group and Tyndall Centre's China's Energy Transition report, and the China-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same time, the China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a bottom-up, end-use energy model for China with scenario analysis of energy and emission pathways out to 2050. A robust and credible energy and emission model will play a key role in informing policymakers by assessing efficiency policy impacts and understanding the dynamics of future energy consumption and energy saving and emission reduction potential. This is especially true for developing countries such as China, where uncertainties are greater while the economy continues to undergo rapid growth and industrialization. A slightly different assumption or storyline could result in significant discrepancies among different model results. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the key models in terms of their scope, methodologies, key driver assumptions and the associated findings. A comparative analysis of LBNL's energy end-use model scenarios with the five above studies was thus conducted to examine similarities and divergences in methodologies, scenario storylines, macroeconomic drivers and assumptions as well as aggregate energy and emission scenario results. Besides directly tracing different energy and CO{sub 2} savings potential back to the underlying strategies and combination of efficiency and abatement policy instruments represented by each scenario, this analysis also had other important but often overlooked findings.

Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "vehicle emission modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

ARMY VEHICLE DURABILITY OPTIMIZATION & RELIABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARMY VEHICLE DURABILITY OPTIMIZATION & RELIABILITY How to Optimize the Vehicle Design to Minimize/Reduce the Weight? Under These Uncertainties, How to Achieve Component Level Reliability? Under These Uncertainties, How to Achieve System Level Reliability? Dynamics Analysis FE Model System Model Dynamic Stress

Kusiak, Andrew

482

Modeling the transient operation of an endothermic fuel cooling system for high Mach number vehicle missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A computer model was developed to simulate the transient operation of a hypothetical endothermic fuel cooling system. The model simulated the performance of a cross-flow, shell and tube heat exchanger. This model was applied to a representative...

Williams, Mark Robert

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Hybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application to Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implemented in Canada, what would be the response of the industrial sector in terms of energy consumptionHybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application for modeling industrial energy consumption, among them a series of environmental and security externalities

484

Green Petroleum Refining -Mathematical Models for Optimizing Petroleum Refining Under Emission Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green Petroleum Refining - Mathematical Models for Optimizing Petroleum Refining Under Emission understand that my thesis may be made electronically available to the public. #12;iii Abstract Petroleum and treating options for petroleum refinery waste streams. The performance of the developed model

Anderson, Charles H.

485

TECHNICAL NOTE HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL VEHICLE (HDDV) IDLING ACTIVITY AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;TECHNICAL NOTE HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL VEHICLE (HDDV) IDLING ACTIVITY AND EMISSIONS STUDY: PHASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Current Diesel Idling Emissions Factors

486

Vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program : FY 2008 benefits analysis, methodology and results --- final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the approach to estimating the benefits and analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the Vehicle Technologies (VT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identifying technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, and (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 08 the Heavy Vehicles program continued its involvement with various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. These changes are the result of a planning effort that first occurred during FY 04 and was updated in the past year. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. The market penetrations are used as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY08 Budget Request. The energy savings models are utilized by the VT program for internal project management purposes.

Singh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

487

Robotic vehicle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Robotic vehicle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

Box, W. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Reassessing the...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Reassessing the Outlook of US Oil Dependence Using Oil Security Metrics Model (OSMM) Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014:...

490

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2012 Space Vehicle Water Drop Test and Vehicle Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2012 Space Vehicle Water Drop Test and Vehicle Design Overview The team was tasked with modelling the accelerations and pressures of an impact of the scaled landing vehicle to reduce the accelerations and pressures of the vehicle. Objectives Provide

Demirel, Melik C.

491

Fact #854 January 5, 2015 Driving Ranges for All-Electric Vehicles in Model  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFYOxide EmissionEconomy thanNew Light

492

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Long-Term Energy and GHG Emission Macroeconomic Accounting Tool Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

493

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Nanolubricants...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reduced Emissions in Engines Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

494

System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions Zhiming Gao Veerathu K. Chakravarthy Josh Pihl C. Stuart Daw Maruthi Devarakonda Jong Lee...

495

Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the United States while simultaneously reducing GHGs through the expanded use of renewable electricity-fueled transportation and reduced emissions per vehicle-mile (VMT). On a...

496

Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Improve Vehicle Fuel Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to improve vehicle fuel efficiency, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy.

497

Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to reduce vehicle miles traveled, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy.

498

Understanding the catalytic conversion of automobile exhaust emissions using model catalysts: CO+NO reaction on Pd(111)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the catalytic conversion of automobile exhaust emissions using model catalysts: CO and the quantity of the exhaust gases originating from mobile sources such as automobile emissions by the automobile industry for emission control purposes due to its technical and economical advantages [2

Goodman, Wayne

499

Modeling X-ray Emissions from Rocket Triggered A Thesis Submitted in Partial Satisfaction Of the Requirements for the Degree  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling X-ray Emissions from Rocket Triggered Lightning A Thesis Submitted in Partial Satisfaction . . . 3 1.1 X-ray emissions from lightning . . . 4 1.2 Gamma-ray emissions . . . 5 1.3 Detection by the return stroke. The dart leader/return stroke sequence can repeat multiple times. The net eect

Belanger, David P.

500

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Accelerating the Evaluation and Market Introduction of Advanced Technologies Through Model Based System Engineering  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about accelerating the...