Sample records for vegetation types douglas

  1. Douglas Doerfler

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscovering HowAna Moore Anne JonesDouglas Doerfler Douglas

  2. Ten-year development of douglas-fir and associated vegetation after different site preparation on coast range clearcuts. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, W.I.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten-years results are presented from an operational-sized, replicated experiment in the Coast Ranges of Oregon to determine the effects of six site-preparation methods on the subsequent survival and growth of Douglas-fir and associated species. Site preparation and seedling protection with plastic mesh tubing significantly enhanced tree development. Site preparation also produced large differences in frequency and cover of associated species but only minor differences in the species represented.

  3. Marcus Douglas Hilliard The Dissertation Committee for Marcus Douglas Hilliard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    Copyright by Marcus Douglas Hilliard 2008 #12;The Dissertation Committee for Marcus Douglas Hilliard certifies that this is the approved version of the following dissertation: A Predictive Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas by Marcus Douglas Hilliard, B.S.Ch.E.; M.S.E. Dissertation Presented

  4. SYMBOLIC AND ALGEBRAIC DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS DOUGLAS LIND AND KLAUS SCHMIDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    SYMBOLIC AND ALGEBRAIC DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS DOUGLAS LIND AND KLAUS SCHMIDT ____________ Date: September 30, 2000. 1 #12; 2 DOUGLAS LIND

  5. Curriculum Vitae Douglas E. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Douglas E.

    6/2014 Curriculum Vitae Douglas E. Smith ADDRESS Department of Physics, University of California Foundation Fellowship, 2003 · Beckman Young Investigator Award, 2003 #12;Doug Smith CV 7/2014 2 · Searle.E. Smith Physical Review Letters 112, 248101 (2014) - Highlighted by a perspective in Science: Yann R

  6. Team Leader: Dr. Ellen Douglas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Ellen M.

    Team Leader: Dr. Ellen Douglas Assistant Professor, Hydrology Current Team Members: Steve Kichefski, BS EEOS (graduated June 2008) Team Hydro was established in 2008 and is made up of a diverse group of Environmental, Earth and Ocean Sciences (EEOS). The mission of Team Hydro is to promote a sense of community

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hunter Douglas Aluminum...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hunter Douglas Aluminum Plant Div of Bridgeport Brass Co - CA 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: HUNTER DOUGLAS ALUMINUM PLANT, DIV. OF BRIDGEPORT BRASS CO. (CA.11 ) Eliminated from...

  8. One on One- Douglas K Woods

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A September 2014 interview with Douglas K Woods, the President of the Association for Manufacturing Technology, on the state of US manufacturing.

  9. Douglas Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Douglas Electric Cooperative offers rebates to its members for the purchase of energy efficient products and measures. Rebates include clothes washers, heat pumps, manufactured homes, and...

  10. Comprehension by Derivation Douglas R. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehension by Derivation Douglas R. Smith Kestrel Institute 3260 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, California 94304 USA smith@kestrel.edu Abstract We argue that to comprehend a software system is to have

  11. Guide to Douglas Point, Charles County, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, B.L.; Miles, K.J.; Strass, P.K.; McDonald, B.S. Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1974, the tract of land now known as the Douglas Point Ecology Laboratory was pieced together from approximately 10 smaller pieces by the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) for the purpose of developing a nuclear power generating station. At that time they decided to leave the bulk of the property in its natural state for ecological research. Douglas Point is reasonably representative of a large section of the Atlantic Coastal plain. Results from research on the site may be applicable to larger coastal plain areas. This section of Charles County is one of the least populated areas in Maryland, and the portion of the county known as Maryland Point, which includes Douglas Point, contains some of the most extensive, continuous forested tracts of land remaining in the state. The present publication is intended to be used as an introduction to Douglas Point, its history, biology, geology, topography, soils, and climatology.

  12. SYMBOLIC AND ALGEBRAIC DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS DOUGLAS LIND AND KLAUS SCHMIDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    SYMBOLIC AND ALGEBRAIC DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS DOUGLAS LIND AND KLAUS SCHMIDT Date: September 30, 2000. 1 #12;2 DOUGLAS LIND AND KLAUS SCHMIDT Part 1. Introduction This article gives a brief survey of a class

  13. SYMBOLIC AND ALGEBRAIC DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS DOUGLAS LIND AND KLAUS SCHMIDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    SYMBOLIC AND ALGEBRAIC DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS DOUGLAS LIND AND KLAUS SCHMIDT Date: September 30, 2000. 1 #12; 2 DOUGLAS LIND AND KLAUS SCHMIDT Part 1. Introduction This article gives a brief survey

  14. Caching in with Multigrid Algorithms: Problems in Two Craig C. Douglas 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, USA; Computer Science Department, Yale University, New of the types of caches currently in use by the computer industry is beyond the scope of this paper (see [13Caching in with Multigrid Algorithms: Problems in Two Dimensions Craig C. Douglas 1 1 IBM T. J

  15. Douglas Waldron | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscovering HowAna Moore Anne JonesDouglas DoerflerDouglas

  16. School Of Education Douglas Biklen, Dean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    School Of Education Douglas Biklen, Dean 230 Huntington Hall soe.syr.edu About The College/Dean's Message Welcome to Syracuse University's School of Education, a national leader in inclusive urban education. The school offers a variety of degree programs in teaching and nonteaching areas. Many

  17. School Of Education Douglas Biklen, Dean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    School Of Education Douglas Biklen, Dean 230 Huntington Hall soe.syr.edu About The College Welcome to Syracuse University's School of Education, a national leader in inclusive urban education. The school. Many of our faculty members hold dual appointments in the School of Education and another college

  18. The Apollo Archive Explorer Douglas W. Oard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oard, Doug

    The Apollo Archive Explorer Douglas W. Oard College of Information Studies/UMIACS University jmalionek@gmail.com ABSTRACT A system for exploring the rich recorded legacy of the Apollo missions of the historical record. The Apollo missions offer an outstanding testbed for applying time-synchronized event

  19. Repeated manual release in a young plantation: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, hardwoods, shrubs, forbs, and grasses. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata Resource Area, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were released by chain sawing and grubbing competing vegetation around them at different frequencies (0, 2, and 3 grubbings) over a 5-year period. After 5 years, average Douglas-fir stem diameter (measured at 12 inches above mean groundline) of seedlings grubbed at ages 1, 2, and 5 was 0.91 inches, and of seedlings grubbed after the first and fifth growing season was 0.95 inches. Both were significantly larger than counterparts in the control (0.57 inches).

  20. Artificial MusclesArtificial Muscles Douglas ThorDouglas Thor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    muscles to cure problems suchreplacement muscles to cure problems such as muscular atrophy, certain types valves andRequires large and heavy electric valves and air compressorair compressor http

  1. ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND AND DOUGLAS LIND 1. Introduction An algebraic Zd-action is an action of Zd

  2. A SPANNING TREE INVARIANT FOR MARKOV SHIFTS DOUGLAS LIND AND SELIM TUNCEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    A SPANNING TREE INVARIANT FOR MARKOV SHIFTS DOUGLAS LIND AND SELIM DOUGLAS LIND AND SELIM TUNCEL Fig. 1. A typical tree at r, and a graph

  3. Synthesis of Propositional Satisfiability Solvers Douglas R. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synthesis of Propositional Satisfiability Solvers Douglas R. Smith Stephen J. Westfold Kestrel Institute Palo Alto, CA, 94304 USA {smith,westfold}@kestrel.edu April 2008 1 Introduction Development

  4. Equivariant Adaptive Selective Transmission Scott C. Douglas \\Lambday

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Scott C.

    3573. Electronic mail address: douglas@seas.smu.edu. World Wide Web URL: http://www.seas.smu.edu/ee/. y

  5. Douglas Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Douglas Electric Cooperative offers rebates to its members for the purchase of energy efficient products and measures. Rebates include clothes washers, heat pumps, manufactured homes, and...

  6. Douglas H. Green Piper & Marbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such wastes are also subject to regulation under the Atomic Energy Act by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission type, of an exemption for commercial mixed waste is appropriate. In light of this rulemaking effort Signed: April 7, 1997] Re: Reproposal of HWIR Waste Rule and Commercial Mixed Waste Dear Mr. Green

  7. Douglas H. Lowndes | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscovering HowAna Moore Anne JonesDouglas Doerfler

  8. Dr. Douglas G. Horner Receives Research Award Dr. Douglas G. Horner, OD PhD, has received an award to support a new collaborative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Dr. Douglas G. Horner Receives Research Award Dr. Douglas G. Horner, OD PhD, has received an award. Peabody, OD, of IUSO on, "Developing and Implementing 21st Century Ideas on Optometry through Area Studies

  9. Toward a Classification Approach to Design Douglas R. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Douglas R.

    Toward a Classification Approach to Design Douglas R. Smith Kestrel Institute, 3260 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA smith@kestrel.edu 18 March 1996 Abstract. This paper addresses

  10. Requirement Enforcement by Transformation Automata Douglas R. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leavens, Gary T.

    Requirement Enforcement by Transformation Automata Douglas R. Smith Kestrel Institute 3260 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, California 94304 USA smith@kestrel.edu ABSTRACT The goal of this work is to treat

  11. Toward the Synthesis of Constraint Solvers Douglas R. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Douglas R.

    Toward the Synthesis of Constraint Solvers Douglas R. Smith Stephen J. Westfold Kestrel Institute Palo Alto, CA 94304 {smith,westfold}@kestrel.edu 2 November 2013 Abstract We develop a basic

  12. Metallurgical Process Design A tribute to Douglas' conceptual design approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linninger, Andreas A.

    and systematic flowsheet generation1-2. . Although perfected for continuous petrochemical processes, this work1 Metallurgical Process Design A tribute to Douglas' conceptual design approach Andreas A. Linninger Laboratory for Product and Process Design Department of Chemical Engineering, University

  13. Vegetable Soup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vegetable Soup 10 cups water 1/4 c tamari, salt reduced 2 potatoes, cut in medium 1 t basil sized chunks 1 t thyme 2 carrots, sliced 1 c string beans, cut in 1 in. ... About 15 minutes before end of cooking time, add cooked grains or spaghetti...

  14. J. Douglas Streit, Information Security Officer Office of Computing and Communications Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Douglas Streit, Information Security Officer Office of Computing and Communications Services Last updated February 6, 2012 Old Dominion University Information Technology Security Program #12;J. Douglas Streit, Information Security Officer Office of Computing and Communications Services Last updated

  15. A SPANNING TREE INVARIANT FOR MARKOV SHIFTS DOUGLAS LIND AND SELIM TUNCEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    A SPANNING TREE INVARIANT FOR MARKOV SHIFTS DOUGLAS LIND AND SELIM TUNCEL Abstract. We introduce. The authors were supported in part by NSF Grant DMS-9622866. 1 #12;2 DOUGLAS LIND AND SELIM TUNCEL Fig. 1

  16. ALGEBRAIC Z d ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    ALGEBRAIC Z d ­ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND Abstract. We of the Yale Mathematics Department. 1 #12; 2 MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND 1. Introduction An algebraic

  17. ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS OF ENTROPY RANK ONE MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND Abstract. We of the Yale Mathematics Department. 1 #12;2 MANFRED EINSIEDLER AND DOUGLAS LIND 1. Introduction An algebraic

  18. A SPANNING TREE INVARIANT FOR MARKOV SHIFTS DOUGLAS LIND AND SELIM TUNCEL #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    A SPANNING TREE INVARIANT FOR MARKOV SHIFTS DOUGLAS LIND AND SELIM TUNCEL # Abstract. We introduce, Seattle, WA 98195. The authors were supported in part by NSF Grant DMS­9622866. 1 #12; 2 DOUGLAS LIND

  19. Vegetable Gardening in Containers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are indicated in Table 1. * Growing Media Synthetic "soils" are best suited for vegetable container gardening. These mixes may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, ver miculite or almost any other type of media. Regardless of what... "soils" are available from gar den centers, or one can be pre pared by mixing horticultu ral grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate, and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons...

  20. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  1. Contact-Free Electrical Measurements of VO2 Powder Benjamin Huber, Will Hardy, Heng Ji, and Douglas Natelson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Heng Ji, and Douglas Natelson Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas, U

  2. Genomics and computational molecular biology Douglas L Brutlag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    340 Genomics and computational molecular biology Douglas L Brutlag There has been a dramatic increase in the number of completely sequenced bacterial genomes during the past two years as a result of the efforts both of public genome agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. The availability of completely

  3. SOCIAL NETWORKS, COGNITION AND CULTURE Douglas R. White

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    1 SOCIAL NETWORKS, COGNITION AND CULTURE Douglas R. White Blackwell Companion to Handbook are core concepts formalized by network analysis to provide tests of social theory. As for core problems that can be understood in relation to social processes. Network ethnography can also operate in this way

  4. Applications of microfluidics in chemical biology Douglas B Weibel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Applications of microfluidics in chemical biology Douglas B Weibel1 and George M Whitesides2 This review discusses the application of microfluidics in chemical biology. It aims to introduce the reader to microfluidics, describe characteristics of microfluidic systems that are useful in studying chemical biology

  5. Marcus Douglas Hilliard Thermodynamics of Aqueous Piperazine/Potassium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T.

    /Potassium Carbonate/Carbon Dioxide Characterized by the Electrolyte NRTL Model within Aspen Plus by Marcus Douglas Characterized by the Electrolyte NRTL Model within Aspen Plus APPROVED BY SUPERVISING COMMITTEE T. Rochelle The Electrolyte Nonrandom Two Liquid (NRTL) Activity Coefficient model within Aspen Plus

  6. The R environment for statistical computing and Douglas Nychka,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nychka, Douglas

    The R environment for statistical computing and graphics. Douglas Nychka, Emaj Some History by the National Science Foundation DMS #12;Some History The S language was developed in the Bell labs statistics. Currently R is the primary tool for most research in statistics and is also used extensively for data

  7. Voluntary Control of Human Jaw Stiffness Douglas M. Shiller,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stiffness. Using a robotic device, a series of force pulses was applied to the jaw to elicit changes of human arm movement in which variability in endpoint position has been related to cocontraction bothVoluntary Control of Human Jaw Stiffness Douglas M. Shiller,1 Guillaume Houle,1 and David J. Ostry1

  8. EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES, AND THOMAS WARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND of Zd * *on compact metric spaces was proposed by Boyle and Lind in terms of expansive

  9. Douglas County School District (Nevada) Bonds Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Douglas County School District faced a challenging combination of aging equipment and buildings (most over 37 years old), rising energy costs, and limited access to taxpayer funds due to the fiscally-conservative makeup of the regions voters.. Case study is excerpted from Financing Energy Upgrades for K-12 School Districts: A Guide to Tapping into Funding for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Improvements. Author: Merrian Borgeson and Mark Zimring

  10. 2011 Cecilia J. Hillard, PhD Douglas R. Campbell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 Cecilia J. Hillard, PhD Douglas R. Campbell Hubert V. Forster, PhD 2010 Tom P. Aufderheide, MD Roger W. Byhardt, MD Marlene D. Melzer-Lange, MD 2009 Owen W. Griffith, PhD Karen J. Marcdante, MD John E. Moulder, MD 2008 Michael J. Chusid, MD James S. Hyde, PhD Sally Twining, PhD Michael J. Dunn, MD

  11. anthropogenic vegetation fires: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    types of input needed in the development of fire management programs for mediterranean climate on the vegetation in the mediterranean region of France. Vlez carries this...

  12. Update and Expand Existing Landcover Classification A landcover classification is a visual description of the type vegetation or ground cover in an area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    due to natural or human impacts, such as hurricanes or dredging. Further, resource mapping be determined. It is less costly and time-consuming to map the benthic resources by major habitat type, although

  13. Hydrodynamics of vegetated channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    This paper highlights some recent trends in vegetation hydrodynamics, focusing on conditions within channels and spanning spatial scales from individual blades, to canopies or vegetation patches, to the channel reach. At ...

  14. Relative radiant heat absorption characteristics of two types of mirror shields and a polished aluminum shield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herron, Steven Douglas

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELATIVE RADIANT HEAT ABSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO TYPES OF MIRROR SHIELDS AND A POLISHED ALUMINUM SHIELD A Thesis by STEVEN DOUGLAS HERRON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene RELATIVE RADIANT HEAT ABSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO TYPES OF MIRROR SHIELDS AND A POLISHED ALUMINUM SHIELD A Thesis by STEVEN DOUGLAS HERRON Approved...

  15. Douglas Electric Coop, Inc (South Dakota) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjin Semichem Co JumpDongyingDoorsDouglas

  16. PUD No 1 of Douglas County | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympiaAnalysis) Jump to:PUD No 1 of Douglas County

  17. City of Douglas, Georgia (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.TelluricPowerCity ofInformation City of Detroit Lakes,Douglas,

  18. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spera, D.A. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (USA). Lewis Research Center) [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (USA). Lewis Research Center; Esgar, J.B. (Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Cleveland, OH (USA)) [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Cleveland, OH (USA); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. (Gougeon Bros., Bay City, MI (USA)) [Gougeon Bros., Bay City, MI (USA)

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  19. Vegetables: Selection, Care, Cooking.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reasonover, Frances; Mason, Louise; Tribble, Marie; Cox, Maeona

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    them well on absorbent paper; salt and serve them hot. How to Steam Vegetables A steamer is a pan with a rack and a tight cover. Place enough water in the steamer to form sufficient steam, but do not let the water touch the rack. Place... the vegetable on the rack, time is somewhat longer than for boiling. cover the steamer and let the water boil vigor- Steaming is more satisfactory for white, yel- ously. Since the vegetables are cooked entirely low and red vegetables than for green vege...

  20. StateTreasurer Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff DouglasCampus Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    StateTreasurer Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff DouglasCampus Center December 9, 2011 #12; Christie been complicated by the severe weather events this year including: A Hurricane (Irene), a

  1. EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Z d ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES, AND THOMAS WARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Z d ­ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES spaces was proposed by Boyle and Lind in terms of expansive behavior along lower­dimensional subspaces

  2. EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES, AND THOMAS WARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lind, Douglas A.

    EXPANSIVE SUBDYNAMICS FOR ALGEBRAIC Zd-ACTIONS MANFRED EINSIEDLER, DOUGLAS LIND, RICHARD MILES spaces was proposed by Boyle and Lind in terms of expansive behavior along lower-dimensional subspaces

  3. Nucleotide diversity and neutrality testing in genes involved in adaptation in Douglas-fir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nucleotide diversity and neutrality testing in genes involved in adaptation in Douglas-fir B. Pande-Oregon region, and 684 SNPs were identified in total. We report the estimation of nucleotide diversity and tests

  4. Vegetation and sediment characteristics of created and natural Spartina alterniflora marshes in Lower Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albertson, Andrea Kai

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five natural and ten created Spartina altemiflora marshes in the Lower Galveston Bay System, Texas, were compared to determine if there were significantly different vegetative and sediment characteristics associated with each marsh type. Vegetative...

  5. Vegetable Gardening in Containers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shade than those which bear fruit, such as cucumbers, peppers, toma toes and eggplant. One advan tage to container gardening is mobility. Container gardening makes it possible to position the vegetables in areas where they can receive the best...

  6. Virtual Field Trip: Temperate Rain Forest Douglas Fir and Western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Disturbance Cascade Creek fire on the southwest flank of Mount Adams. Sept 2012 #12;Frequency: none Frequency: 250-500 yrs Severity: high Size: large Frequency: 50-90 yrs Severity: low Size: small Fire in the PNW Natural Disturbance #12;Vegetation Succession #12;Species and Trophic relationships Pacific Giant

  7. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

  8. Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan

    1 Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines Based on Sustainability Goals for the Macquarie Campus #12.................................................................................................................................10 4.2.5 Shale-Sandstone soil transition...................................................................................................................................11 #12;3 1. Purpose This document provides a guideline for specific grounds management procedures

  9. Investigation of the effect of a circular patch of vegetation on turbulence generation and sediment deposition using four case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Alejandra C

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study describes the spatial distribution of sediment deposition in the wake of a circular patch of model vegetation and the effect of the patch on turbulence and mean flow. Two difference types pf vegetation were used ...

  10. Perspectives and Integration in SOLAS Science Veronique C. Garcon, Thomas G. Bell, Douglas Wallace,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fennel, Katja

    Perspectives and Integration in SOLAS Science 5 Veronique C. Garcon, Thomas G. Bell, Douglas, and Franziska Ziska Abstract Why a chapter on Perspectives and Integration in SOLAS Science in this book? SOLAS the remarkable diversity of cross-cutting approaches and tools in the gigantic puzzle of the SOLAS realm. Here we

  11. February 4, 2013 Douglas Bolton, 71687115 ESRI Scholarship 2013 University of British Columbia 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an international audience of researchers interested in estimating carbon storage in forests. Carbon storageFebruary 4, 2013 Douglas Bolton, 71687115 ESRI Scholarship 2013 University of British Columbia 1 by a changing climate. I use ArcGIS and Python extensively in my research to explore the spatial processes

  12. PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S. Cairns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials structures such as wind turbine blades. Design methodologies to prevent such failures have static and fatigue loading. INTRODUCTION Composite material structures such as wind turbine blades1 PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S

  13. POWER SYSTEM DESIGN ISSUES FOR SMART Douglas K. Lindner and Sriram Chandrasekaran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindner, Douglas K.

    POWER SYSTEM DESIGN ISSUES FOR SMART MATERIALS Douglas K. Lindner and Sriram Chandrasekaran of bidirectional power flow on the power distribution system of an aircraft is addressed in this paper. The active-actuator" into the power distribution system of the aircraft is studied in detail. The effect of circulating energy between

  14. Practical High Breakdown Regression David J. Olive and Douglas M. Hawkins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olive, David

    Practical High Breakdown Regression David J. Olive and Douglas M. Hawkins Southern Illinois breakdown n consistent regression es- timators exist. The response plot of the fitted values versus@umn.edu), School of Statistics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0493, USA. Their work was supported

  15. Douglas Fisher, Kathleen Merrigan and Robert Goodman Report to the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    of Agriculture October 2009 Spotlight on USDA Deputy Secretary's Visit to Rutgers Executive Dean of Agriculture Jersey on October 14. Merrigan was accompanied by New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Douglas Fisher opportunity "to bridge the disconnect between agriculture and the public." Merrigan added, "Not every family

  16. Ellen Marie Douglas, PE, PG, PhD Assistant Professor, Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Ellen M.

    Ellen Marie Douglas, PE, PG, PhD Assistant Professor, Hydrology Environmental, Earth and Ocean. 9758 1998 M.S. CIVIL ENGINEERING, University of New Hampshire 1994 B.S. in HYDROLOGY, University of New Hampshire, GPA 3.94/4.00 1991 Summa Cum Laude , University Honors in Hydrology AWARDS EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING

  17. The Comparison of Usage and Availability Measurements for Evaluating Resource Douglas H. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steury, Todd D.

    The Comparison of Usage and Availability Measurements for Evaluating Resource Preference Douglas H and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use~etyof Amenca THE COMPARISON OF USAGE AND AVAILABILITY MEASUREMENTS FOR EVALUATING RESOURCE PREFERENCE1

  18. Fungal endophytes in woody roots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fungal endophytes in woody roots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and ponderosa pine (Pinus baseline data for future surveys of fungal endophytes. Examination of internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 evidence of host species or plant association effects on total recovery of fungal endophytes or recovery

  19. The smallest k-regular h-edge-connected graphs without , Douglas B. West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Douglas B.

    -regular graph with no cut-edge has a 1-factor. This has many generalizations. Showing that every kThe smallest k-regular h-edge-connected graphs without 1-factors John Ganci , Douglas B. West March-regular (k - 1)-edge-connected graph of even order has a 1-factor is a standard elementary exercise (#3

  20. The MMOCAA for Reservoir Flow Problems Jim Douglas, Jr. \\Lambda Frederico Furtado y Felipe Pereira z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    disconnected matrix blocks. This model corresponds to waterflooding a naturally­fractured petroleum reservoirThe MMOCAA for Reservoir Flow Problems Jim Douglas, Jr. \\Lambda Frederico Furtado y Felipe Pereira which has been developed to study flow in possibly fractured, heterogeneous reservoirs is described

  1. Vegetable Gardening in Containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masabni, Joseph; Cotner, Sam

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    physical support in order to grow healthy plants. A good growing media must also drain well. Synthetic or soilless mixes are well suited for vegetable container gardening and may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, or vermiculite... by mixing horticultural grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons of limestone, 5 tablespoons of 0-20-0 (superphosphate) and 1 cup of garden fertil- izer...

  2. An Emergent Framework for Self-Motivation in Developmental Robotics James B. Marshall Douglas Blank Lisa Meeden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meeden, Lisa A.

    An Emergent Framework for Self-Motivation in Developmental Robotics James B. Marshall Douglas Blank Swarthmore College Claremont, CA 91711 Bryn Mawr, PA 19010 Swarthmore, PA 19081 marshall@cs.pomona.edu dblank

  3. Short Paper: Troubleshooting Distributed Systems via Data Mining David A. Cieslak, Douglas Thain, and Nitesh V. Chawla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thain, Douglas

    Short Paper: Troubleshooting Distributed Systems via Data Mining David A. Cieslak, Douglas Thain. Data mining allows the extraction of patterns within large amounts of data and therefore forms outlines a successful application of data mining in troubleshooting distributed systems, proposes

  4. Woody vegetation of the lower Navasota River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Harriet Louise Gell

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characteristics: Upland, Transition, Bottomland and Ephemeral Stream. Within these habitat types, stands were grouped into dominance types based on the leading dominant(s). Nine dominance types were found: Post Oak, Post Oak-Hickory, Winged Elm, Cedar Elm..., Overcup Oak, Hackberry-Cedar Elm, Swamp Privet and Water Elm. Post oak was the most widespread upland dominant, while cedar elm dominated the bottomlands. The woody vegetation is best viewed as dominance types along a iv community continuum...

  5. A Douglas-Rachford type primal-dual method for solving inclusions ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 3, 2012 ... Most importantly, the algorithms allow to process ... regression, portfolio optimization problems as well as signal and image processing prob-.

  6. A SelfStabilized Minor Subspace Rule Scott C. Douglas 1 , S.Y. Kung 2 , and Shunichi Amari 3 \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Scott C.

    : (214) 7683573. Electronic mail address: douglas@seas.smu.edu. World Wide Web URL: http://www.seas.smu

  7. Fast Exact Adaptive Algorithms for Feedforward Active Noise David S. Nelson 1 , Scott C. Douglas 2 and Marc Bodson 3 \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Scott C.

    : (214) 7683573. Electronic mail address: douglas@seas.smu.edu. World Wide Web URL: http://www.seas.smu

  8. On Gradient Adaptation With UnitNorm Constraints Scott C. Douglas 1 , Shunichi Amari 2 , and S.Y. Kung 3 \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Scott C.

    3573. Electronic mail address: douglas@seas.smu.edu. World Wide Web URL: http://www.seas.smu.edu/ee/. 0 This work

  9. Ammonium nitrate, urea, and biuret fertilizers increase volume growth of 57-year-old douglas-fir trees within a gradient of nitrogen deficiency. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.E.; Reukema, D.L.; Hazard, J.W.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a nitrogen-deficient plantation in southwest Washington, the authors (1) compared effects of 224 kg N/ha as ammonium nitrate, urea, and biuret on volume growth of dominant and codominant Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco); (2) determined how 8-year response of these trees to fertilization was related to their distance from a strip of the plantation interplanted with nitrogen-fixing red alder (alnus rubra Bong.); and (3) observed effects of biuret on understory vegetation. On both sides of the strip centerline, the authors grouped subject trees into 30 plots of 4 trees each, based on slope position and distance from alder. The authors randomly assigned three fertilizers and a control within each plot. They analyzed separately data from east and west of the mixed stand certerline. Initial volume differed greatly among the 120 trees on each side, so they used covariance analysis to adjust observed treatment means. Adjusted mean volume growth was increased (p equal to or less than 0.10) by 22 to 28 percent on the east side and by 11 to 14 percent on the west side, with no significant difference in response to the three fertilizers.

  10. Texas Home Vegetable Gardening Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masabni, Joseph

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    With this manual, home gardeners are sure to be successful growing vegetables. It includes information on garden planning, crop selection, soil preparation, fertilization, planting techniques, watering, pest control and harvesting. Tables show...

  11. Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Enda

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

  12. Initial and continued effects of a release spray in a coastal Oregon douglas-fir plantation. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.E.; Obermeyer, E.L.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portions of a 4-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) plantation were sprayed with herbicide. Five years after spraying the authors established 18 plots and used several means to determine retrospectively that six plots probably received full spray treatment and six others received no spray. Various portions of the remaining six plots were sprayed. Herbicide reduced number and size of red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.), increased number and size of planted Douglas-fir, damaged terminal shoots of Douglas-fir resulting in more abnormal boles and branching, and increased number of volunteer conifers. Fifteen of the eighteen plots were thinned, in the subsequent 6 years, thinned plots that had received full release at age 4 averaged 9 percent more volume growth (all species) than plots not released.

  13. Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2008 MANAGEMENT TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    's Wilt 489 Using Herbicides with Plastic Mulch 490 Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial

  14. The influence of vegetation on frost dynamics, infiltration rate and surface stability in Icelandic Andisolic rangelands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orradottir, Berglind

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only occurred where vegetation cover was sparse. Seasonal changes in infiltration rates, measured with double-ring infiltrometers, varied with soil frost depth and type, as indicated by the depth of visible ice crystals and size and number of ice...

  15. Fire Regimes of the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Temporal and Spatial Variability and Implications for Vegetation Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatley, William 1977-

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    influence of climate on past fire occurrence. Third, I sampled vegetation composition in four different stand types along a topographic moisture gradient, including mesic cove, sub-mesic white pine (Pinus strobus L.) hardwood, sub-xeric oak (Quercus L...

  16. Formal Derivation of Concurrent Garbage Collectors Dusko Pavlovic1, Peter Pepper2, and Douglas R. Smith1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlovic, Dusko

    Formal Derivation of Concurrent Garbage Collectors Dusko Pavlovic1, Peter Pepper2, and Douglas Rat Berlin and Fraunhofer FIRST, Berlin pepper@cs.tu-berlin.de Abstract. Concurrent garbage collectors are notoriously difficult to implement correctly. Previous approaches to the issue of producing correct collectors

  17. CO Adsorption on Au(110)-(1 2): An IRAS Investigation Douglas C. Meier, V. Bukhtiyarov,, and D. Wayne Goodman*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    CO Adsorption on Au(110)-(1 2): An IRAS Investigation Douglas C. Meier, V. Bukhtiyarov,, and D ReceiVed: April 24, 2003 IRAS studies of CO adsorption on the Au(110)-(1 2) surface were performed adsorption (-Hads) of 10.9 kcal/mol at low coverages and 7.8 kcal/mol at coverages greater than 19

  18. HILDERBRAND, DOUGLAS CLARENCE. Risk assessment of North Carolina tropical cyclones (1925-2000). (Under the direction of Dr. Lian Xie)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Paul

    conditions with 3.67 cubic miles of water. The next-highest value from previous tropical cyclones management decisions. #12;RISK ASSESSMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA TROPICAL CYCLONES (1925-2000) by DOUGLAS C. In 1995, he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in geology and was accepted to

  19. Charles J. Vorosmarty, Ellen M. Douglas, Pamela A. Green and Carmen Revenga Geospatial Indicators of Emerging Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas, Ellen M.

    Charles J. Vorosmarty, Ellen M. Douglas, Pamela A. Green and Carmen Revenga Geospatial Indicators. Geospatial analysis at 8 km resolution shows that 64% of Africans rely on water resources that are limited explicit geospatial indicators that link biogeophysical, socioeconomic, and engineering perspectives

  20. DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E. Sherry'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE 1 ~) ~ ~ By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E solid waste landfill in which lateral displacements of up to 900 ft (275 m) and vertical settlements municipal solid waste landfill occupies 135 acres (546 km 2 ) approximately 9 miles (15.3 km) n

  1. Social Networks, Cognition and Culture Douglas R. White Social_Nets_Cog-June2010a.doc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    1 Social Networks, Cognition and Culture Douglas R. White Social_Nets_Cog-June2010a.doc Blackwell of social network interactions and contexts. Elements of network structure may thus be perceived of the relation between social networks, cognition and culture. Approaches and findings are explored in a series

  2. Time-bounded Adaptation for Automotive System Software Serena Fritsch, Aline Senart Douglas C. Schmidt Siobhn Clarke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    Time-bounded Adaptation for Automotive System Software Serena Fritsch, Aline Senart Douglas C. This paper provides three contributions to the study of time-bounded adaptation for automotive system software. First, we categorise automotive systems with respect to re- quirements for dynamic software

  3. Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

  4. Environmental Effects of Woody Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    . In rural loca- tions, woody vegetation provides for man's protection and preservation. Farm windbreaks in improv- ing human comfort by shielding people from direct solar radiation. What happens to the solar but significant amount is used for heating tree parts. The portion of solar radiation used in photosynthesis (food

  5. Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GTOS GTOS 55 Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling and Data Submission Shashi Verma #12;(intentionally blank) #12;Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Forestry University, Bejing 100083, China 5 University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 6 Microsoft Research

  6. Spatiotemporal Monitoring of Urban Vegetation Christopher Small

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Christopher

    in vegetation abundance influence environmental conditions and energy fluxes by selective reflection and absorbtion of solar radiation, by modulation of evapotranspiration and by sequestration of pollutants of the urban/suburban environment. Vegetation influences urban environmental conditions and energy fluxes

  7. Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2005 MANAGEMENT TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Labeled for Row Middle Use in Vegetable Crops 446 Kudzu Turning Over New Leaves in Indiana Counties 447

  8. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-page fact sheet discussing the pitfalls of using straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a transportation fuel.

  9. EXAMINING VEGETATION AND CLIMATE INTERACTIONS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION TYPES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    . The mechanisms responsible for influencing the climate away from the surface, into the atmosphere, and to remote reduction in latent cooling. In contrast, boreal deforestation causes a large surface temperature cooling

  10. Development of a mixed shrub-tanoak-douglas-fir community in a treated and untreated condition. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On a medium site in northern California, a tanoak-mixed shrub community was given several treatments (manual release two and three times, a combination chainsaw and cut surface herbicide treatment, two foliar herbicides, and a tank mix of the two herbicides) to study its development in both a natural (control) and treated condition. The herbicides were 2,4-D, Garlon 3A, and Garlon 4, each applied two times. Survival of planted Douglas-fir seedlings was recorded for 11 years and growth was quantified for 9 years after the last treatment application. In addition to Douglas-fir, data are presented individually for the two most abundant species (tanoak and snowbrush), for greenleaf manzanita, and for the hardwood tree and shrubs combined. The treatment response data, cost information, and plant community relationships provides the forest land manager with knowledge on how to attain some specific plant communities in the future, and their developmental potentials.

  11. arctic vegetation types: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecosystems, June 22 of manpower and finance would be desirable. The classic Mediterranean climate features warm to hot dry summers Standiford, Richard B. 33 Reviewers Rapid...

  12. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen He,o

  13. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen

  14. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen/::vI

  15. The biopolitics of the vegetative subject

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelaprat, Etienne

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Michel. 1984. Nietzsche, Genealogy, History. Pp. 76-100Michel. 2006. On the Genealogy of Ethics: An Overview ofof life, death and the genealogy of the vegetative

  16. An application of predictive vegetation mapping to mountain vegetation in Sweden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Janet Alexis

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive vegetation mapping was employed to predict the distribution of vegetation communities and physiognomies in the portion of the Scandinavian mountains in Sweden. This was done to address three main research questions: (1) what environmental...

  17. Vegetation of the Northern Korean Peninsula and its relation to Vegetation of Northeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer

    & Valachovic 1996); (4) vegetation of water bodies (Kolbek & Dostlek 1996); (5) nitrophilous ponds and river) and soya bean fields (Dostlek et al. 1990); (8) grassland vegetation (Srtek & Kolbek 1992, Blazkov 1993

  18. Energy Input and Quality of Pellets Made from Steam-Exploded Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Lim, C. Jim [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Melin, Staffan [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground softwood Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) was treated with pressurized saturated steam at 200-220 C (1.6-2.4 MPa) for 5-10 min in a sealed container. The contents of the container were released to the atmosphere for a sudden decompression. The steam-exploded wood particles were dried to 10% moisture content and pelletized in a single-piston-cylinder system. The pellets were characterized for their mechanical strength, chemical composition, and moisture sorption. The steamtreated wood required 12-81% more energy to compact into pellets than the untreated wood. Pellets made from steam-treated wood had a breaking strength 1.4-3.3 times the strength of pellets made from untreated wood. Steam-treated pellets had a reduced equilibrium moisture content of 2-4% and a reduced expansion after pelletization. There was a slight increase in the high heating value from 18.94 to 20.09 MJ/kg for the treated samples. Steam-treated pellets exhibited a higher lengthwise rigidity compared to untreated pellets.

  19. Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

  20. International Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    of southern Russia and climatic changes" 15.00 ­ Dr. A. Skorobogatov (Voronezh University, Russia). "TheInternational Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human Society to Climatic Changes in Ukraine- Ukrainian team started to investigate Holocene climate changes and the resulting vegetation and human

  1. Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management Plans in Oregon Maribeth V. Gibbons is an integrated aquatic vegetation management plan? When is an IAVMP required? Part II: Developing a Plan Chapter and Reservoirs · Portland State University · Portland OR 97207 #12;Acknowledgements This manual benefited

  2. Mulching to regenerate a harsh site: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, forbs, grasses, and ferns. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata District, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were planted in an effort to restore the natural forest to what was then pastureland. Douglas-fir seedlings were released from a complex forb-gass-fern plant community by applying very large (10-ft square) and very small (2-foot square) durable mulches one month after planting. In spite of high cost, the promising role of large mulches for establishing fast-growing Douglas-fir seedlings on a harsh site and the increased stability and sustainability that the future trees will bring to the more natural plant community give large mulches a place in the toolkit of ecosystem managers.

  3. Interaction between flow, transport and vegetation spatial structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhar, Mitul

    This paper summarizes recent advances in vegetation hydrodynamics and uses the new concepts to explore not only how vegetation impacts flow and transport, but also how flow feedbacks can influence vegetation spatial ...

  4. Genetic variation and seed zones of douglas-fir in the Siskiyou National Forest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.K.; Sugano, A.I.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The provisional seed zones and breeding zones were developed for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Siskiyou National Forest in southwestern Oregon. Zones were based on maps of genetic variation patterns obtained by evaluating genotypes of trees from 260 locations in the region. Genotypes controlling growth vigor and growth rhythm were assessed in the common garden. Within the Forest, three breeding blocks were recommended, with different numbers of elevational bands in each block: from 0 to 610 meters, from 611 to 838 meters, and then a series of bands 152 meters wide at higher elevations.

  5. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The work involved will be to clear tall growing vegetation that is...

  6. Special study on vegetative covers. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions. 28 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Vegetative covers: Special study. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, (2) define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and (3) develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites (Shiprock, New Mexico; Burrell, Pennsylvania; and Clive, Utah) where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions.

  8. Remote sensing-based characterization of plant functional type distributions at the Barrow Environmental Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  9. Remote sensing-based characterization, 2-m, Plant Functional Type Distributions, Barrow Environmental Observatory, 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zachary Langford; Forrest Hoffman; Jitendra Kumar

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  10. Remote sensing-based characterization, 2-m, Plant Functional Type Distributions, Barrow Environmental Observatory, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachary Langford; Forrest Hoffman; Jitendra Kumar

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  11. Remote sensing-based characterization of plant functional type distributions at the Barrow Environmental Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  12. Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Lan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who...

  13. Quantifying Vegetation Recovery on Santa Rosa Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rentschlar, Elizabeth

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of recovery on barrier islands after hurricanes is not well understood, because the majority of studies have focused on the geomorphic impact of storms on barrier islands. Dune vegetation recovery is a vital component of barrier island...

  14. Safe Storage of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper storage of fresh fruits and vegetables can help consumers avoid foodborne illness. This publication explains how to safely store apples, bananas, berries, beets, broccoli, carrots, corn, grapes, herbs, lettuce and greens, melons, nectarines...

  15. Nonlinear Characteristics of Wave Propagation over Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkattaramanan, Aravinda

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The attenuation of wave energy by submerged or near-emergent coastal vegetation is one of the prominent methods of energy dissipation in areas with significant presence of wetlands. In this thesis, the nature of this dissipation in nearshore random...

  16. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  17. The limited growth of vegetated shear layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghisalberti, M.

    In contrast to free shear layers, which grow continuously downstream, shear layers generated by submerged vegetation grow only to a finite thickness. Because these shear layers are characterized by coherent vortex structures ...

  18. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center of the uncertainties with climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems is understanding where transitions

  19. Safe Handling of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    *Program Specialist, The Texas A&M System Fresh fruits and vegetables are an important part of a healthful diet. They provide vitamins, minerals and fiber to help keep your body healthy. Occasionally, fresh fruits and vegetables can become... contaminated with harmful bacteria or viruses, which are also known as pathogens. Examples of pathogens include Salmonella, E. coli 0157:H7 and Hepatitis A. This contamination can occur at any point from the field to your table. If eaten, contaminated...

  20. Effects of aridity and vegetation on plant-wax dD in modern lake sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polissar, Pratigya J.

    Effects of aridity and vegetation on plant-wax dD in modern lake sediments Pratigya J. Polissar Abstract We analyzed the deuterium composition of individual plant-waxes in lake sediments from 28 fractionation (ea) between plant-wax n-alkanes and precipitation differs with watershed ecosystem type

  1. RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin Á O. Heiri Á W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

  2. RESIDENTIAL WATER DEMAND MANAGEMENT: LESSONS FROM AURORA, COLORADO1 Douglas S. Kenney, Christopher Goemans, Roberta Klein, Jessica Lowrey, and Kevin Reidy2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    RESIDENTIAL WATER DEMAND MANAGEMENT: LESSONS FROM AURORA, COLORADO1 Douglas S. Kenney, Christopher). In this study of Aurora, Colorado, factors influencing residential water demand are reviewed during a turbulent Reidy, 2008. Residential Water Demand Management: Lessons from Aurora, Colorado. Journal of the American

  3. Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (2010) In 2001, Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas) is released from prison after serving eight years for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    is pregnant, and Bretton reveals to Moore that the Chinese investment is going into bunk solar panels the research and save the company. She signs the money over to Moore who then entrusts it to GekkoWall Street: Money Never Sleeps (2010) In 2001, Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas) is released from

  4. Age-class structure of old growth ponderosa pine/douglas-fir stands and its relationship to fire history. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arno, S.F.; Scott, J.H.; Hartwell, M.G.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes age structure of nine old growth ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir stands in western Montana. Interprets the influence of past fires and 20th century five exclusion on stand structure. Gives implications for management to restore and maintain these forests for multiple resource values.

  5. Variation in phenology and monoterpene patterns of defoliated and nondefoliated douglas-fir ( pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca'). Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muzika, R.M.; Engle, J.; Parks, C.; Wickman, B.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foliage was collected from paired Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) trees characterized as either resistant' or susceptible' to western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) attack. Resistant trees produced more foliage monoterpenes and broke bud 7 to 10 days earlier than susceptible trees.

  6. Semantic Awareness in Product Lifecycle Management Systems Casey James Baker, Douglas Eddy, Dr. Sundar Krishnamurty, Dr. Ian Grosse, Dr. Jack Wileden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Semantic Awareness in Product Lifecycle Management Systems Casey James Baker, Douglas Eddy, Dr enterprises turn to Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) systems to organize product development and to reduce), in which the PLM system was used to help with the design and fabrication of a product. Windchill

  7. How Believable Are Real Faces? Towards a Perceptual Basis for Conversational Douglas W. Cunningham, Martin Breidt, Mario Kleiner, Christian Wallraven, Heinrich H. Blthoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and conversational agents, virtual humans and avatars, behavioral animation, vision techniques in animation 1 of whether the humans involved are virtual or real, well-developed conversational skills are a necessityHow Believable Are Real Faces? Towards a Perceptual Basis for Conversational Animation Douglas W

  8. Extended rotations and culmination age of coast douglas-fir: Old studies speak to current issues. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, R.O.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trends of mean annual increment and periodic annual increment were examined in 17 long-term thinning studies in Douglas-fir (Pseuditsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in western Washington, western Oregon, and British Columbia. Problems in evaluating growth trends and culmination ages are discussed. None of the stands had clearly reached culmination of mean annual increment, although some seemed close. The observed trends seem generally consistent with some other recent comparisons. These comparisons indicate that rotations can be considerably extended without reducing long-term timber production; value production probably would increase. A major problem in such a strategy is design of thinning regimes that can maintain a reasonable level of timber flow during the transition period while producing stand conditions compatible with other management objectives. The continuing value of long-term permanent plot studies is emphasized.

  9. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ennis, Mike J [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have helped to fuel their resurgence in industrial and urban settings. There are many environmental and economical benefits that can be realized by incorporating a vegetative roof into the design of a building. These include storm-water retention, energy conservation, reduction in the urban heat island effect, increased longevity of the roofing membrane, the ability of plants to create biodiversity and filter air contaminants, and beautification of the surroundings by incorporating green space. The vegetative roof research project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was initiated to quantify the thermal performance of various vegetative roofing systems relative to black and white roofs. Single Ply Roofing Institute (SPRI) continued its long-term commitment to cooperative research with ORNL in this project. Low-slope roof systems for this study were constructed and instrumented for continuous monitoring in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. This report summarizes the results of the annual cooling and heating loads per unit area of three vegetative roofing systems with side-by-side comparison to black and white roofing systems as well as a test section with just the growing media without plants. Results showed vegetative roofs reduced heat gain (reduced cooling loads) compared to the white control system due to the thermal mass, extra insulation, and evapo-transpiration associated with the vegetative roofing systems. The 4-inch and tray systems reduced the heat gain by approximately 61%, while the reduction with the 8-inch vegetative roof was found to be approximately 67%. The vegetative roofing systems were more effective in reducing heat gain than in reducing heat losses (heating loads). The reduction in heat losses for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 40% in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. It should be noted that these values are climate dependent. Vegetative roofs also reduced the temperature (heat exposure) and temperature fluctuations (thermal stress) experienced by the membrane. In the cooling season of East Tennessee, the average peak temperature of the 4-inch and tray systems was found to be approximately 94 F cooler than the control black roofing system. The average temperature fluctuations at the membrane for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 10 F compared to 125 F for black and 64 F for white systems. As expected, the 8-inch vegetative roof had the lowest fluctuations at approximately 2 F. Future work will include modeling of the energy performance of vegetative roof panels in the test climate of East Tennessee. The validated model then will be used to predict energy use in roofs with different insulation levels and in climates different from the test climate.

  10. Ecological impacts of using chloropicrin to control laminated root rot in northwest conifer forests: Growth and mycorrhiza formation of planted douglas-fir seedlings after two growing seasons. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castellano, M.A.; McKay, D.; Thies, W.G.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barefoot Douglas-fir seedlings inoculated with Rhizopogon sp. and processed by standard nursery and reforestation procedures performed equally well whether planted near Douglas-fir stumps previously fumigated with two dosages of choloropicrin to control Phellinus weirri infection or near stumps not fumigated. Before stump fumigation can be generally recommended for Phellinus-rehabilitation sites, the fate of the chemical and its derivates must be directly assessed under various conditions of stand age, soil, and weather.

  11. Easy Gardening.....Harvesting and Handling Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam; Masabni, Joseph; Wagner, Al

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Easy Gardening Joseph Masabni, Assistant Professor and Extension Horticulturist, The Texas A&M University System HARVESTING ? HANDLING ? STORING VEGETABLES -1- T ohelpensurethatthevegetables yougrowandprepareareofhigh quality.... Acknowledgments Thispublicationwasrevisedfromearlierversionswrittenby SamCotner,ProfessorEmeritusandformerExtension Horticulturist,andAlWagner,formerProfessorand ExtensionHorticulturist. -6- Produced by AgriLife Communications, The Texas A&M System Extension...

  12. Bringing fruit, vegetaBle and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molinari, Marc

    and the Canary Islands do not count as being part of the EU. P P fruits vegetables plant products #12; travelling, Canary Islands, Ceuta, Croatia, Cyprus (the area not effectively controlled by the Government the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands) For these purposes, EU countries also include: Andorra

  13. Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

  14. Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations Jozsef Szilagyi1 Abstract: Multiyear Seevers and Ottmann 1994; Nicholson et al. 1996; Sz- ilagyi et al. 1998; Szilagyi and Parlange 1999; Szilagyi 2000 . Different authors drew differing conclusions about the appli- cability of NDVI to estimate

  15. Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

  16. Momentum and scalar transport in vegetated shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghisalberti, Marco (Marco Andrea), 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental aquatic flows are seldom free of vegetative influence. However, the impact of submerged vegetation on the hydrodynamics and mixing processes in aquatic flows remains poorly understood. In this thesis, I present ...

  17. Levels-of-growing-stock cooperative study in douglas-fir: Report No. 13. The Francis study, 1963-90. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, G.E.; Andersen, N.A.; Marshall, D.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The levels-of-growing-stock studies in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), were designed to test the influence of treatment regimes by using a wide range of retained growing stock on the development of forest growth, yield, and stand structure. Results of the Francis installation located in the headwaters of the Willapa River in Pacific County, Washington, are summarized from calibration at age 15 through age 42 (completion of 60 feet of height growth from calibration, and the planned course of the experimental thinnings plus 5 years). In addition to the eight basic treatments and control common to the other eight study installations in the region, five additional treatments were added at Francis; four late first thinnings (at age 25), which matched the level of growing stock of four standard fixed treatments, and an unthinned western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.). Estimated Douglas-fir site index (50-year base) of this plantation is 124, a mid site II.

  18. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

  19. Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data. Abstract Creation of accurate vegetation maps from optical satellite data requires use of reference data to aid

  20. Improving vegetable preference and consumption among preschool children: evaluating results from an educational intervention using vegetable gardening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Saundra Gail

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's exposure to a variety of vegetables through the incorporation of weekly gardening supplemented with classroom activities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of vegetable gardening to improve preschool children's affective responses...

  1. ?Aceite Vegetal Puro Como Combustible Diesel? (Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? Spanish Version) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

  2. How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs.

  3. Fire Regimes of the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Temporal and Spatial Variability and Implications for Vegetation Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatley, William 1977-

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    explaining contemporary vegetation properties and is often an essential consideration for ecosystem restoration (Baker 1994, Foster et al. 1996, Ful? et al. 1997, Foster 2000). Fire is a particularly important source of disturbance that controls the global... distribution of fire-dependent ecosystems (Bond and Keeley 2005), the landscape-scale spatial arrangement of community types, and individual species establishment or persistence (Barton 1993). Extensive fire research has been carried out in coniferous...

  4. Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are required forest areas for Vietnam Erosion Risk Map Cover types C1 Natural Forests >1.7 Plantation forest.2 (ESRI, 2008), to generate a map of required protective forest area for Vietnam. (3) (4) (5Results Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5& Map

  5. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  6. Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

  7. Overview of Opportunities for Co-Location of Solar Energy Technologies and Vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Beatty, B.; Hill, G.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale solar facilities have the potential to contribute significantly to national electricity production. Many solar installations are large-scale or utility-scale, with a capacity over 1 MW and connected directly to the electric grid. Large-scale solar facilities offer an opportunity to achieve economies of scale in solar deployment, yet there have been concerns about the amount of land required for solar projects and the impact of solar projects on local habitat. During the site preparation phase for utility-scale solar facilities, developers often grade land and remove all vegetation to minimize installation and operational costs, prevent plants from shading panels, and minimize potential fire or wildlife risks. However, the common site preparation practice of removing vegetation can be avoided in certain circumstances, and there have been successful examples where solar facilities have been co-located with agricultural operations or have native vegetation growing beneath the panels. In this study we outline some of the impacts that large-scale solar facilities can have on the local environment, provide examples of installations where impacts have been minimized through co-location with vegetation, characterize the types of co-location, and give an overview of the potential benefits from co-location of solar energy projects and vegetation. The varieties of co-location can be replicated or modified for site-specific use at other solar energy installations around the world. We conclude with opportunities to improve upon our understanding of ways to reduce the environmental impacts of large-scale solar installations.

  8. arctic vegetation amplify: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamics in arctic vegetation Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the...

  9. african vegetation phenology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rainy season. Further research is needed to address interaction between groundwater under climate change. 1. Introduction "Vegetation phenology" refers to the periodic biological...

  10. african vegetation fires: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vegetation and climate change recorded in alpine bog sediments from the Borreguiles de la Virgen, Sierra Nevada, southern Spain Geosciences Websites Summary: to heating of the...

  11. Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH...

  12. ambiental ceniza vegetal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    roadside vegetation management policies and practices include the encouragement of quick plant growth after construction (to avoid soil erosion), the control of invasive species,...

  13. affects arabidopsis vegetative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The vegetation reacts with changes in species composition and a decrease in biodiversity. Artificial snowing modifies some of these impacts: The soil frost is mitigated due to an...

  14. arctic vegetation damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gradient. Here we examine the complex interrelationships between patterned ground, climate, vegetation and soil along a north-south transect through all five bioclimate...

  15. arctic tundra vegetation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of woody vegetation in arctic tundra? Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: 33124, USA. Global climate warming is projected to promote the increase of woody plants, especially of...

  16. Levels-of-growing-stock cooperative studies in douglas-fir: Report No. 10. The Hoskins study. 1963-83. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, D.D.; Bell, J.F.; Tappeiner, J.C.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of the Hoskins levels-of-growing-stock (LOGS) study in western Oregon are summarized and management implications discussed through the fifth and final planned treatment period. To age 40 thinnings in this low site I Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) stand resulted in large increases in diameter growth with reductions in basal area and volume growth and yield. Growth was strongly related to the level of growing stock. Culmination of cubic-foot mean annual increment does not appear to be near for any of the treatments.

  17. Combining MSS and AVHRR imagery to assess vegetation biomass and dynamics in an arid pastoral ecosystem, Turkana District, Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, J.E.; Swift, D.M.; Hart, T.C.; Dick, O.B.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landsat multi-spectral scanner (MSS) imagery was used to develop a vegetation type-biomass map of the 84,000 Km/sup 2/ Turkana District, Kenya. NOAA satellite advanced very high resolution radiometry (AVHRR) imagery was overlaid on the MSS map to trace the seasonal and annual dynamics of vegetation communities used by Turkana pastoral nomads, 1981-1984. Four regions (sub-sectional territories) were compared with respect to peak herbaceous biomass, woody canopy cover, and seasonal fluxes in total green biomass. Results demonstrated major variations among regions and between wet and dry season ranges within regions. Pastoral land use patterns appear to minimize effects of seasonal vegetation fluxes on livestock herds.

  18. Managing Insect and Mite Pests in Vegetable Gardens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, John A.

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing your own vegetables is a pleasant and satisfying way to enjoy nature and save money. But managing garden pest populations in the vegetable garden isn't always easy. This publication discusses ways to accomplish that goal. 38 pages and 3...

  19. Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

  20. Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

  1. The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

  2. ForPeerReview From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ForPeerReview Only From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to polyols and main Auvergne, Remi; ICGM CAILLOL, Sylvain; ICGM, IAM Boutevin, Bernard; ICGM Keywords: vegetable oils, biobased polyols, polyurethanes, epoxidized vegetable oils, commercial polyols URL: http

  3. Interactions among flow, sediment deposition and aquatic vegetation in a channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong, Lijun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquatic vegetation is commonly present in rivers in many forms. This thesis consists of two studies, which examine the flow structure around a patch of emergent, rigid vegetation in a laboratory channel. The vegetation ...

  4. Bryant University | 1150 Douglas Pike | Smithfield, RI 02917 | (877) 353-5667 | www.bryant.edu b r y a n t u n i v e r s i t y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    Bryant University | 1150 Douglas Pike | Smithfield, RI 02917 | (877) 353-5667 | www.bryant.edu b r, if available. Please complete all that apply. I/we have provided for a bequest to Bryant University in the amount of $ ­ Or ­ My/Our current estate plan states that Bryant University will receive percent of my

  5. Analysis of Vegetative on Six Different Landfill Cover Profiles in an Arid Environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; McClellan, Yvonne; Reavis, Bruce A.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Newman, Gretchen; Wolters, Gale

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs was constructed and monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle 'D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle 'C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for arid environments. The demonstration was intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. A portion of this project involves the characterization of vegetation establishment and growth on the landfill covers. The various prototype landfill covers were expected to have varying flux rates (Dwyer et al 2000). The landfill covers were further expected to influence vegetation establishment and growth, which may impact site erosion potential and long-term site integrity. Objectives of this phase were to quantify the types of plants occupying each site, the percentage of ground covered by these plants, the density (number of plants per unit area) of plants, and the plant biomass production. The results of this vegetation analysis are presented in this report.3 DRAFT07/06/14AcknowledgementsWe would like to thank all technical and support staff from Sandia and the USDA Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Station not included in the authors' list of this document for their valuable contributions to this research. We would also like to acknowledge the Department of Energy's Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area for funding this work.4

  6. Pacific northwest region vegetation and inventory monitoring system. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Max, T.A.; Schreuder, H.T.; Hazard, J.W.; Oswald, D.D.; Teply, J.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A grid sampling strategy was adopted for broad-scale inventory and monitoring of forest and range vegetation on National Forest System lands in the Pacific Northwest Region, USDA Forest Service. This paper documents the technical details of the adopted design and discusses alternative sampling designs that were considered. The design is flexible and can be used with many types of maps. The theory of point and change estimation is described, as well as estimates of variation that assess the statistical precision of estimates.

  7. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  8. Fresh Vegetables: Getting the Most Nutrition for Your Money

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    be poisonous. E-28 5-00 Fresh Vegetables Getting the Most Nutrition For Your Money By Jenna Anding* *Extension Nutrition Specialist, The Texas A&M University System. If there is a concern about the presence of contaminants on the vegetables, simply peel off... the skin. Keep in mind that peeling reduces nutritional value. P r e p a c ka g e d, prewashed vegetables like lettuce and baby carrots should be rinsed before they are eaten just in case any con- tamination occurred during processing or packaging. If you...

  9. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  10. Lysimeter study of vegetative uptake from saltstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1990-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Savannah River Site, liquid, low-level nuclear waste will be disposed of by incorporating the waste in concrete, a wasteform called saltstone. Saltstone monoliths will then be buried in the earth. To study the potential uptake of radionuclides by trees and other plants growing in the soil in the area containing buried saltstone, a lysimeter study has been in progress since 1984. Thirty two lysimeters were designed, constructed, and filled with soil. Saltstone samples, containing the liquid, low-level supernate from the tank 50 in-tank precipitation demonstration, were buried in some of the lysimeters. Other lysimeters, not containing saltstone, were used as controls. Crops, grass, and trees were planted in the lysimeters and sampled periodically to determine radionuclide concentrations. Water samples were also collected from the lysimeter sumps and analyzed for radionuclide content. This report documents the results of vegetative and lysimeter sump water measurements from the beginning of the project in November of 1984 through September of 1989. 6 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  12. Award Types

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugust AugustInstruments on theAward Types Types of

  13. EIS-0097: Bonneville Power Administration Transmission Facilities Vegetation Management Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energys Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic implications of various alternatives associated with implementing a vegetation management program.

  14. Columbia River Gorge Vegetation Management Project Final Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    appreciate your addressing in the assessment '" . 1. Chemical Maintenance Off right+f-way mortality- i.e, how willBPA insure that no impacts will result to vegetation and prope...

  15. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Salt Marsh Vegetation across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daehyun

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeographic patterns across a landscape are developed by the interplay of environmental processes operating at different spatial and temporal scales. This research investigated dynamics of salt marsh vegetation on the Skallingen salt marsh...

  16. Flow-induced reconfiguration of buoyant and flexible aquatic vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Plant posture can play a key role in the health of aquatic vegetation, by setting drag, controlling light availability, and mediating the exchange of nutrients and oxygen. We study the flow-induced reconfiguration of ...

  17. Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

  18. Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley...

  19. Spatial distribution of deposition within a patch of vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong, Lijun

    This laboratory study describes the spatial pattern of deposition observed in a patch of vegetation located at the wall of a channel. There are two sources of sediment flux to the patch: the advection of particles across ...

  20. Flow and Transport in Regions with Aquatic Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    This review describes mean and turbulent flow and mass transport in the presence of aquatic vegetation. Within emergent canopies, the turbulent length scales are set by the stem diameter and spacing, and the mean flow is ...

  1. Final Report of the NPS Vegetation Mapping Project at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    1 Final Report of the NPS Vegetation Mapping Project at Fire Island National Seashore Scott DServe Julie Lundgren The Nature Conservancy April 2002 CMI-GRS 02-03 Conservation Management Institute GIS

  2. Woody vegetation of the lower Navasota River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Harriet Louise Gell

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WOODY VEGETATION OF THE LOWER NAVASOTA RIVER WATERSHED A Thesis by DIl 5~ HARRIET ?GELL ALLEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1974 Major Subject: Range Science WOODY VEGETATION OF THE LOWER NAVASOTA RIVER WATERSHED A Thesis by HARRIET GELL ALLEN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1974...

  3. Early survival and height growth of douglas-fir and lodgepole pine seedling and variations in site factors following treatment of logging residues. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopushinsky, W.; Zabowski, D.; Anderson, T.D.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Logging residues were (1) broadcast burned, (2) piled and burned, (3) removed, or (4) left in place after clearcutting in a high elevation subalpine fir/lodgepole pine forest in north-central Washington. Survival, height growth, and nutrient content of foliage of planted Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine seedlings, and variations in soil factors (nutrients, temperature, moisture, and compaction) and air temperature were compared for the four treatments. Little height growth occurred the first year, and it was similar for all treatments, probably due to transplant shock. Height growth the second year increased the most in the burned treatments, and the least in the slash-left treatment. Levels of nutrients in foliage were similar for all treatments and above threshold-deficiency levels except for sulfur. Extractable soil nutrients increased with burn treatments but returned to levels in other treatments within 3 years, best performance of seedlings during the first 2 years was in burn treatments.

  4. Jim Douglas's Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lecture Notes in Pure and Applied Mathematics, 202 (1999) 53-73, Marcel .... Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 87 (1991) 157-174.

  5. Jim Douglas: Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The approximation of nuclear contaminant transport in porous media. Comput. Appl. Math., 21(2):409-428, 2002. Special issue on multi-scale science (Nova...

  6. PP-107 APS Douglas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartmentGas and OilGeothermal andof Fuels P -1 1 1 1 1 1 1

  7. Influence of metal process micronic and submicronic particles on vegetables quality and ecosystems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    sativa) and parsley (Petroselinum crispum), vegetables currently cultivated in kitchen gardens with high

  8. Uncertainty analysis of vegetation distribution in the northern high latitudes during the 21st century with a dynamic vegetation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yueyang

    This study aims to assess how high-latitude vegetation may respond under various climate scenarios during the 21st century with a focus on analyzing model parameters induced uncertainty and how this uncertainty compares ...

  9. Vegetable Gardening in South Central Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L GE organic matter improves drain age and aeration and allows for better root development. Ifthe soil is a sandy type, adding li beral amounts oforganic matter helps it hold water and nut rients'. Organic matter also serves as a food source... Globe', White Icicle; (Winter) Black Spanish, White Chinese Rutabaga - American Purple Top Spinach - Early Hybrid 7, Dixie Savoy, Bloomsdale; (summer production) New Zealand, Malabar (Basella alba) Squash - Early Prolific Straightneck, Goldneck, Dixie...

  10. Soil respiration at mean annual temperature predicts annual total across vegetation types and biomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.0 License. Biogeosciences Soil respiration at mean annualI. L. , and Carvalho, J. E. M. : Effects of soil watercontent on soil res- piration in forests and cattle pastures

  11. Nutrient release from combustion residues of two contrasting herbaceous vegetation types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    (muffle and flame burning) to combust herbaceous biomass from contrasting nutrient level sites to estimate combustion methods yielded contrasting results, where temperatures greatly affected nutrient quantity by a variety of parame- ters such as fuel load quantity and quality, moisture content, ambient air temperature

  12. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from a section of BPA's Ponderosa--Pilot Butte Transmission Line Right-of-way to facilitate relocation of structure 18/3. Work would begin in mid-March and end in April, 2001. (1) Description of right-of-way and vegetation management needed--The project involves cutting all tall growing trees and brush within BPA's 100-foot wide transmission line right-of-way. An encroachment by the City of Bend Sewer Treatment facility, and future expansion plans, compelled the relocation of this portion of the right-of-way. Structures 18/2 and 18/4 will be modified in place to accommodate the new angle of the right-of-way. Structure 18/3 will be moved approximately 300 feet westerly to allow for the expansion of the sewer treatment facility. Only vegetation within the new portion of the right-of-way, totaling approximately 3.5 acres, will be controlled. No herbicides will be used on this project. Vegetation to be controlled: Juniper trees are the only tall growing tree species within this portion of the right-of-way requiring treatment. The density of vegetation within the new right-of-way is light to medium. The right-of-way boundaries will be examined for danger trees and if found, danger trees will be marked and cut according to danger tree policy.

  13. Growing Fall Vegetables and Annuals in South Central Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, Jerry; Cotner, Sam; Johnson, Jerral; Janne, Everett; Stewart, J. W.; Roberts, Roland; Johnson, Shirley

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetable Variety Selection.. . . . . .. .. . . .. .. .. 7 Micro-Gardens for Mini-Places ............... 18 Establishing Vegetables in Summer Heat ....... 8 Compost Pile Valuable ...................... 19 Watering...-Sept. 1 Radish Aug. 1-Nov. 1 Aug. 13-Nov. 25 Aug. 30-Dec. 1 Spinach Aug. 15-Sept. 30 Sept. 1-0ct. 15 Sept. 15-Dec. 1 Squash, summer July 30-Aug. 30 Aug. 13-Sept. 10 Sept. 1-0ct. 1 Squash, winter July 1-July 30 July 10-Aug. 10 Aug. 1-Sept. 1 Tomato...

  14. E-print Network Topics: V

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cells vegetative compatibility groups vegetative compatibility types vegetative covers umtra vegetative cutting capacity vegetative filter strips vegetative growth yield...

  15. Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip H. Henna

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

  16. Site vegetation report: Terrestrial vegetation survey (1993--1995) for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring Program (EcMP) was designed to investigate the long-term ecological trends in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems at the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) (DOE 1993). Field sampling was conducted during 1993, 1994, and 1995, until the program was terminated in late 1995. This report presents the terrestrial vegetation data that were gathered by the EcMP. The site is located on the Colorado Piedmont, east of the Front Range, between Boulder and Golden, approximately 25 km (16 miles) northwest of Denver. The topography and proximity of the Site to the mountain front result in an interesting mixture of prairie and mountain plant species. The Site is one of the few large, relatively undisturbed areas of its kind that remains along the Colorado Piedmont. Until 1989, the primary mission of the Site was the production of nuclear weapons components (DOE 1993). After production ceased, Site personnel shifted their focus to cleanup and closure.

  17. 9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgman, Mark

    management remains widely cited as the most logical and elegant frame- work for continuous improvement9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes David H Duncan1 of the `adaptive management' paradigm to natural resource man- agement, using regional management of native

  18. Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    with those observed in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Difference Vegetation the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) extending back to 1981. The NDVI is derived by subtracting in the hydrological, energy and carbon cycles, through influences of land cover change on hydrologic responses

  19. RAPID SEPARATION OF ACTINIDES AND RADIOSTRONTIUM IN VEGETATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in vegetation samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. The actinides in vegetation method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in vegetation sample analysis can be performed in less than 8 h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles or vegetation residue after furnace heating is effectively digested.

  20. Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    urbanization effects on the water cycle. Although there are many stormwater best management practices (BMPs (ET) and soil media water storage between storm events. Lazzarin et al. (2005) estimated that ET ratesVegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1

  1. Influence of Vegetation Management on Yield and Quality Surface Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smeins, F. E.

    of this study was to determine the influence of vegetation characteristics, grazing systems and precipitation on surface runoff from rangeland on the Edwards Plateau region of Texas. Water yield, organic-N, N03-N, NH4-N, N02-N, total and ortho-P, Ca, Mg, K, p...

  2. Carbonaceous aerosol particles from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallock, K.A.; Mazurek, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Cass, G.R. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon due to fine organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere has become an area of increased environmental concern. Aerosol particles can be derived from many emission sources. In this report, we focus on identifying organic aerosols derived from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon. These aerosols are expected to be significant contributors to the total atmospheric organic aerosol content. Aerosol samples from living vegetation were collected by resuspension of surface wax and resin components liberated from the leaves of vegetation common to areas of the Grand Canyon. The samples were analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Probable identification of compounds was made by comparison of sample spectra with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral references and positive identification of compounds was made when possible by comparison with authentic standards as well as NIST references. Using these references, we have been able to positively identify the presence of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid homolog series in the surface waxes of the vegetation sampled. Several monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes were identified also as possible biogenic aerosols which may contribute to the total organic aerosol abundance leading to visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon.

  3. Fire Feedbacks with Vegetation and Alternative Stable States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckage, Brian

    landscape composition and that (ii) hurricane disturbances can mediate the frequency of fire that leads frequency. Our results indicate that gradual changes in global climate that influence disturbance frequency.Beckage@uvm.edu Positive feedbacks between vegetation and fire disturbance may lead to nonlinear ecosystem responses

  4. Vegetarian Chili 2 tbsp. olive or vegetable oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    stock 2 cups water (plus more if too thick) 1 (32oz) can crushed tomatoes 1 (14oz) can black beans 1 (14-5 minutes to soften vegetables. Deglaze pan with broth and water, add tomatoes, beans, lentils, and barleyoz) can of garbanzo beans 1 (14oz) can of dark red kidney beans 1 (14oz) can of green lentils

  5. Beyond Biodiesel Running on Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    20 Beyond Biodiesel ­ Running on Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO) The green tree has many branches in the development and promotion of biodiesel for nearly two decades. Technologies based on the use of hydrogen in a low-percentage mixture with petroleum fuel. Hence the development of biodiesel. Paul Trella, New

  6. Sweet potatoes are a warm-weather vegetable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweet potatoes are a warm- weather vegetable related to the morning glory family.Although Louisiana sweet potatoes are often referred to as yams, they truly are sweet potatoes. The Louisiana producers began calling the orange-fleshed sweet potatoes grown in Louisiana"yams" to distinguish them from

  7. Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Mammalian and Vegetative Communities of the Barrier Islands of Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoggin, Annaliese K.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The barrier islands of the gulf coast of the U.S. have been shaped and changed by hurricanes for centuries. These storms can alter the vegetation of the barrier islands by redistributing sediments, scouring off vegetation, physical damage...

  8. The role of vegetation in the CO[subscript 2] flux from a tropical urban neighbourhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velasco, E.

    Urban surfaces are usually net sources of CO[subscript 2]. Vegetation can potentially have an important role in reducing the CO[subscript 2] emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly when vegetation is ...

  9. Bales away... Hay baler can be used to roll up plastic used for vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compress plastic used for growing vegetables into a 4-feet by 5-feet ball, saving growers money in labor's dirty, often with vegetable material left in and it's black, not usually favored by recycling companies

  10. Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation GLAS Optimization Remote sensing Vegetation structure The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) has optimized a noise coefficient which could be constant or vary according to observation period or noise

  11. Best Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    . Develop educational materials related to aquatic plant identification and their specific managementBest Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E vegetation management with the ultimate goal of producing the best management practices protocol in Iowa

  12. Historical patterns of western spruce budworm and douglas-fir tussock moth outbreaks in the northern Blue Mountains, Oregon, since a.d. 1700. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swetnam, T.W.; Wickman, B.E.; Paul, H.G.; Baisan, C.H.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tree-ring samples from 21 mixed-conifer stands in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon were analyzed for evidence of past western spruce budworm and Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreaks. Comparison of host and nonhost tree-ring growth provided an objective basis for distinguishing climatic effects from insect defoliation effects. Our reconstruction shows that since ca. A.D. 1700 at least eight regional budworm outbreaks occurred at intervals of about 21 to 53 years. Reduced radial growth periods caused by defoliation lasted from 13 to 17 years. Two regional budworm out-breaks occurred in the 19th century (ca. 1806 to 1822 and ca. 1851 to 1867), three outbreaks occurred in the northern Blue Mountains in the 20th century (ca. 1898 to 1910, ca. 1946 to 1958, and ca. 1980 to present), and an additional outbreak occurred in the Eagle Cap Wilderness (ca. 1925 to 1939). These findings generally lend support to the hypothesis that budworm outbreaks have increased in frequency and severity in the 20th century in northeastern Oregon.

  13. The effects of nutrition education on attitudes and behaviors of children regarding fruits and vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Sharon Elaine, 1976-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1997). This questionnaire has also been used in a study involving Junior Girl Scouts and similar reliabilities of alpha=0. 74 for the vegetable portion and alpha=0. 72 for the fruit portion were reported (Cullen et al. , 1997). The questionnaire... for interventions to change nutrition behavior (Cullen et. al. , 1997). Importance of Eating Fruits and Vegetables Diets lacking in fruits and vegetables can contribute to chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Fruits and vegetables...

  14. Thin-layer drying behavior of vegetable wastes from wholesale market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Iguaz, A.; Esnoz, A.; Virseda, P.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thin-layer drying behavior of vegetable wastes (as a mix of lettuce and cauliflower leaves) from wholesale market for a temperature range of 50--150 C was determined. Drying of this material was found to take part only in the falling-rate period. The experimental data were fitted to the simple exponential model and the Page model. Both models have good prediction capability. Effective diffusion coefficient varied from 6.03 x 10{sup {minus}9} to 3.15 x 10{sup {minus}8} m{sup 2}/s with an activation energy of diffusion of 19.82 kJ/mol. The temperature dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient was expressed by an Arrhenius-type relationship.

  15. Trends in vegetation activity and their climatic correlates: China 1982 to 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    suggests an increasing carbon stock in forest biomass in China, which supports previous studies basedTrends in vegetation activity and their climatic correlates: China 1982 to 1998 JINGFENG XIAO in vegetation activity and their correlation with climate variability in China between 1982 and 1998. Vegetation

  16. Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban neighbourhoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban the Queen in Right of Canada 2013 Abstract Estimating the relative importance of vegetation on residential land (gardens, yards, and street-trees) and vegetation on non-residential land (parks and other large

  17. Sensing vegetation growth with reflected GPS signals Eric E. Small,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    Vegetative Index (NDVI) to gauge vegetation status. NDVI is inversely correlated with the magnitude- drological hypotheses [RodriguezIturbe, 2000]. Remote sensing using microwave radar is one approach for doc- umenting vegetation growth. Unlike optical methods, radar measurements are not hindered by cloud cover

  18. A vegetational analysis of an East Texas bottomland hardwood area with special emphasis on wood duck habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrill, William Irl

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in each of 5 activities during each hour of the day. 46 LIST OF FIGURES Figures Page Map of the Angelina-Neches Scientific Area in Jasper County, Texas, showing the four vegetative types and the major water bodies including the Angelina and Neches...) with days at each level on a line and the average designated by a dashed line. 7 Nap of the Angelina-Neches Scientific Area in Jasper County, Texas, showing the ten sloughs (shaded) that wood duck activity transects were run on marked by a number...

  19. Soil and vegetation response to soil compaction and forest floor removal after aspen harvesting. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alban, D.H.; Host, G.E.; Elioff, J.D.; Shadis, D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced soil porosity and organic matter removal have been identified as common factors associated with loss of forest productivity (Powers et al. 1990). In both agriculture and forestry, management activities can modify soil porosity and organic matter with resultant impacts on vegetative growth. As part of a nationwide long-term soil productivity (LTSP) study soil porosity and organic matter are being experimentally manipulated on large plots to determine the impacts of such manipulations on growth and species diversity for a wide range of forest types.

  20. Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY February 2013 Academic Writing Guide Part 2 Assignment Types: This section outlines the basic types of written assignments, providing structural elements and examples. #12;2 II. Assignment Types 1. Essay Writing

  1. Activity of polymerized trichloroacetic acid for highway vegetation control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiedenfeld, R. P

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mem r ember Play 1/74 ABSTRACT Activity of Polymer- zed Trichloroacetic Acid for Highway Vegetation Control. (May 1/74) Hobert Phillip Wieaenfeld, B. S. , California State University, Humboldt Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wayne G. Mc... applied to highway roadsides near Fort Worth, Lufkin and Yoakum, Texas in the spring of 1g'7$. Two polymerizing activates which differed in their solubility were used. TCA polymerized with the more soluble activate and applied at a rate of '3 lbs...

  2. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  3. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  4. Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships Capital Costs (or

  5. The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils Aerial deposition of Ni from a refinery in Port Colborne, Ontario, Canada has resulted in the enrichment in vegetable crops grown in the vicinity of the refinery. Conversely, dolomitic lime- stone additions resulted

  6. Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    End Time: Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate Soft drink, water and beer bottles; mouthwash bottles; peanut butter containers; salad dressing and vegetable oil containers; ovenable food trays. 2 high density polyethylene Milk jugs, juice bottles; bleach

  7. Estimating production functions with damage control inputs: an application to Korean vegetable production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Pil Ja

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (1997) explore the implicanons of the Lichienberg and Zilberman model, particularly the assumption that damage abatement is independent of all other inputs. The general functional form proposed by Lichtenberg and Zilbennan is (2. 2) q = f[z, G(x... with damage abatement functions G(x, y) as the input were estimated, using the chosen model for the variance 3. 3. ) Esrimationoff (xyz) For f( ), a Cobb-Douglas, translog and quadratic were estimated. The respective model specifications are: (3. 6) f...

  8. Nutrient leaching characteristics of vegetation common to Texas reservoir sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weldon, Clark Pierce

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decomposition of vegetation and the higher rate of nitrogen release that was observed. The fact that oxygen depletion was greatest when nitrogen 80 S 60 o m bO o 4 4J Distilled Water Lake Somerville Yegua Creek 40 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13... Lake Somerville Yegua Creek 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Time in Days Figure 6: K)eldahl Nitrogen Release with Time for Coastal Bermuda Grass Using Three Different Leaching Solutions Under Aeration (Test Series 1) m 6 c Distilled Water...

  9. Types of Commissioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several commissioning types exist to address the specific needs of equipment and systems across both new and existing buildings. The following commissioning types provide a good overview.

  10. Some dry season plants recommended as edible vegetables in Anyigba, Kogi State, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiga, AKPOVUGHAYE Dr.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vegetables cultivated in Nigeria are: cabbage, lettuce,Community in Kogi State, Nigeria, there are inadequateGovernment Area, Kogi State, Nigeria. Each of the fresh

  11. Stand-Level Gas-Exchange Responses to Seasonal Drought in Very Young Versus Old Douglas-fir Forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Bible, K; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

    2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines how stand age affects ecosystem mass and energy exchange response to seasonal drought in three adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests. The sites include two early seral stands (ES) (0-15 years old) and an old-growth (OG) ({approx} 450-500) forest in the Wind River Experiment Forest, Washington, USA. We use eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (F{sub NEE}), latent energy ({lambda}E) and sensible heat (H) to derive evapotranspiration rate (E{sub T}), bowen ratio ({beta}), water use efficiency (WUE), canopy conductance (G{sub c}), the Priestley-Taylor coefficient ({alpha}) and a canopy decoupling factor ({Omega}). The canopy and bulk parameters are examined to see how ecophysiological responses to water stress, including changes in available soil water ({theta}{sub r}) and vapor pressure deficit ({delta}e) differ among the two forest successional-stages. Despite very different rainfall patterns in 2006 and 2007, we observed distinct successional-stage relationships between E{sub T}, {alpha}, and G{sub c} to {delta}e and {theta}{sub r} during both years. The largest stand differences were (1) higher morning G{sub c} (> 10 mm s{sup -1}) at the OG forest coinciding with higher CO{sub 2} uptake (F{sub NEE} = -9 to -6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) but a strong negative response in G{sub c} to moderate {delta}e later in the day and a subsequent reduction in E{sub T}, and (2) higher E{sub T} at the ES stands because midday canopy conductance did not decrease until very low water availability levels (<30%) were reached at the end of the summer. Our results suggest that early seral stands are more likely than mature forests to experience declines in production if the summer drought becomes longer or intensifies because water conserving ecophysiological responses were only observed at the very end of the seasonal drought period in the youngest stands.

  12. 488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

  13. Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    05-1 Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408-Revenue Relationships Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets Three main classes of capital costs: 1. Depreciable Investment: Investment allocated

  14. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

  15. Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California; revised 29 March 2011; accepted 1 April 2011; published 7 May 2011. [1] Beryllium7 is a potentially potential as a sediment tracer in desert environments. Beryllium7 in vegetation and the upper few cm of soil

  16. Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new numerical scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    ii Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new.S. Fairbanks, Alaska August 2005 #12;iii Abstract The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS........................................................................................................................... 24 Evaluation of snow depth and soil temperatures predicted by the Hydro- Thermodynamic Soil

  17. Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS) Pamela Spier, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK Abstract This paper presents an evaluation of the Hydro. Introduction and Motivation The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS, Kramm et al. 1996, Mölders

  18. Comparing Optical and Microwave Remote Sensing-based Vegetation Density over Mongolia for 1988-2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Vegetation Index (NDVI), derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) series.vandijk@csiro.au Abstract ­ Vegetation density plays an important role in water and energy balance. Satellite-based optical product (Tucker et al., 2005). It can provide a relatively high spatial resolution product (up to 1km

  19. Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1@mnhn.fr Abstract. In French Guiana, inselbergs are granite outcrops rising abruptly from the surrounding rain substrate. Shrub granitic vegetation, organised in thickets on open exposed rocks of inselbergs

  20. Climate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    : burning; arid ecosystems; livestock; climate; broad-scale climate; Southern Russia; socio-economic change by decreasing livestock numbers, vegetation changes, climate change, or interactions of these factors. OurClimate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid Ecosystems of Southern

  1. VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND KU for submission to the university library. Date Dr. David Long Chair, Graduate Committee Accepted of Engineering and Technology #12;ABSTRACT VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER

  2. VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH the urbanization process. This study evaluated the performance and feasibility of using vegetated or green roof systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

  3. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A. Atchley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A purposes. #12;ABSTRACT Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have

  4. The Potential for Reducing Urban Air Temperatures and Energy Consumption Through Vegetative Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consumption Through Vegetative Coolingt Dan M. Kurn, Sarah E. Bretz, Benson Huang*, Hashem Akbari Heat Island Consumption Through Vegetative Cooling May 1994 Dan M. Kum, Sarah E. Bretz, Benson Huang, and Hashem Akbari in obtaining the data used in this study. Disclaimer The research reported here was funded in part

  5. P.M. Vermeersch (ed.) 3 -WOODY VEGETATION AND ITS USE DURING THE NEOLITHIC AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinova, Elena

    because they have been submitted for 14 C dating. The site is located in a tributary wadi of the wadi). The modern arboreal vegetation of the Tree Shelter wadi is limited to a lonely Acacia tree at the en- trance of the wadi. The modern vegetation in the broad area of the Red Sea coastal land between wadi Qena

  6. Vegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    by insulating vegetation from winter wind and temperature extremes, modifying winter soil temperaturesVegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow ) open-topped fiberglass chambers (OTCs) to study the effects of changes in winter snow cover and summer

  7. The consequences of pleistocene climate change on lowland neotropical vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Oliveira, P.E.; Colinvaux, P.A. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama City (Panama))

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Palynological reconstructions indicate that lowland tropical America was subject to intense cooling during the last ice-age. The descent of presently montane taxa into the lowlands of Amazonia and Minas Gerais indicate temperature depressions ranging from 5[degrees]C to 9[degrees]C cooler-than-present. The strengthened incursion of southerly airmasses caused a reassortment of vegetation throughout Amazonia. Presently allopatric species are found to have been sympatric as novel forest assemblages and formed and dissolved. Modest drying, perhaps a 20% reduction in precipitation, accounts for all the records that show a Pleistocene expansion of savanna. No evidence is found to support the fragmentation of Amazonian forests during glacial times, and the hypothesis of forest refuges as an explanation of tropical speciation is rejected on empirical grounds.

  8. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks to climate in Earth system models.

  9. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-10)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

  10. VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

  11. Types of Reuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

  12. Fruit and Vegetable Servings in Local Farm-Sourced and Standard Lunches Offered to Children in a Head Start Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Amy M.

    2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    . Independent-samples t-tests were performed using SPSS. There were no significant differences in either fruit or vegetable consumption between conventional lunches and locally-sourced lunches. Even though there was more variety of fruit and vegetable offerings...

  13. Presentations Using Autograph Douglas Butler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    the word "normal" ... This presentation will also look at how other software titles have coped with all a number of topics using dynamic software and amazing web resources. These will be based on those magic and functions (in 2D and 3D), conic sections (in 2D and 3D), applications of the parabola through world-wide

  14. Curriculum Vitae Robert Douglas Cairns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    and Applications, University of Toronto, 1970. Ph.D., Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1978 Accounting for Black Gold", The Energy Journal 30 (4), October 2009, 113-139. "Value and Income," Ecological of Economic Literature, 2004 "Two Proposals to Improve Price-Cap Regulation", Journal of Institutional

  15. Curriculum Vit Douglas Bradley Meade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meade, Douglas B.

    -Diffusion Models Thesis Advisor: Richard C. MacCamy B.S. in Computer Science, Bowling Green State University, 1984. B.S. in Mathematics, Bowling Green State University, 1984. Summa Cum Laude and with University­1995 Phi Beta Kappa, Bowling Green State University, 1984 Memberships American Mathematical Society (AMS

  16. WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DOUGLAS HELTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the response to the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill and NOAA's ideas for activities to improve future response Horizon oil spill, for which 1 #12;BP is a responsible party, and opportunities to strengthen the Federal the opportunity to discuss the critical roles NOAA serves during oil spills and the importance of our

  17. WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DOUGLAS HELTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horizon oil spill, for which BP is a responsible party; NOAA's role in oil spill research Administration's (NOAA's) role in the response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and NOAA's role in oil spill AND TECHNOLOGY NEEDS FOR OIL SPILL RECOVERY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE

  18. Douglas Factors | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471 FederalDonna Friend Donna

  19. Douglas Schultz | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0andEnergyGlobal NuclearofCommunication |Does Your City Have

  20. Douglas Hollett | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeIdleBiologicalCrosscuttingDepartment

  1. Douglas Jacobsen! NERSC User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69 FederalAdministrationDoug KotheRunning

  2. Douglas County | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open EnergyProject ProjectonlyOak, Texas:

  3. The Water-Wise Vegetable Garden: An Analysis of the Potential for Irrigation through Rainwater Harvesting in Sunny Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Adrienne; Esterer-Vogel, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vegetables spinach and cabbage have a lower water demandmelons, spinach and yellow corn are among the most water-

  4. POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D EA-1 ,Page 1 of 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polissar, Pratigya J.

    POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D EA-1 ,Page 1 of 21 Polissar & Freeman (2010) Effects of Aridity and Vegetation on Plant-wax D in Modern Lake Sediments Electronic annex. References 6. Supplemental Figures #12;POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D

  5. Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

  6. Vegetative covers: Special study. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, (2) define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and (3) develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites (Shiprock, New Mexico; Burrell, Pennsylvania; and Clive, Utah) where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions.

  7. Organic Vegetable Organic Vegetable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentrates on natural processes and how to manage them. Other materials and products are additions to .......................................6 Safety ................................................................6 Insect Management ...........................................7 Disease Management ......................................10 Weed Management

  8. Aridity and vegetation composition are important determinants of leaf-wax dD values in southeastern Mexico and Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mexico and Central America Peter M.J. Douglas a, , Mark Pagani a , Mark Brenner b , David A. Hodell c a marked aridity gradient in southeastern Mexico and northern Central America to investigate the importance to mean annual potential evapotranspi- ration (MAP/PET), explains much of the variability in the hydrogen

  9. Invasive Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Ecosystem Resistance and Resilience: A Comparison of Three Vegetation Types in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Sara Jo Myrtle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mining area under subtropical conditions. Applied Soil Ecologymining area under subtropical conditions. Applied Soil Ecology

  10. Invasive Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Ecosystem Resistance and Resilience: A Comparison of Three Vegetation Types in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Sara Jo Myrtle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the functioning of ecosystems. Science Chatterjee, A. ,inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.

  11. Surface energy partitioning over four dominant vegetation types across the United States in a coupled regional climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    Slopes Model (PRISM) data) and to standard WRF model output. We found that WRF3-CLM3.5 can capture and Forecasting Model 3Community Land Model 3.5 (WRF3-CLM3.5), by comparing model output to observations (Ameri simulation of downward solar radiation could reduce the energy flux and temperature biases. After adding

  12. An Experimental Investigation of Microexplosion in Emulsified Vegetable-Methanol Blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Hyungseok

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of shock waves characteristic of explosions at larger scales. However, little is known about how emulsion composition and droplet size affect the micro-explosion process. Through this research, methanol-in-vegetable oil emulsion has been studied from...

  13. The coupled development of terrain and vegetation : the case of semiarid grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of vegetation in semiarid landscapes organizes as a function of moisture availability, which is often mediated by the form of the land surface. Simultaneously the processes that shape the land surface are ...

  14. NAME: Restoration of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) on the Seaside of Virginia's Eastern Shore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    been shown to be more cost-effective than planting vegetative parts. A SAV restoration program sedimentation and ameliorate siltation of navigation channels, thereby reducing the necessity of dredging

  15. A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ashley

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

  16. Feedbacks between flow, vegetation, deposition, and the implications for landscape development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondziolka, John M. (John Michael)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow and sedimentation around patches of vegetation are important to landscape evolution, and a better understanding of these processes would facilitate more effective river restoration and wetlands engineering. In wetlands ...

  17. Original Texas Land Survey as a Source for Pre-European Settlement Vegetation Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinath, Indumathi

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , coordinates were calculated and species classified according to their National Wetland Indicator (NWI) status. Indicator kriging was performed to create a continuous vegetation cover of Brazos County by interpolating the point biogeographical data (i...

  18. The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences the metabolism of prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodds, Walter

    The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences, the restoration allowed recovery of some features of open-canopy prairie streams. Woody expansion apparently. Keywords: macroalgae, microalgae, primary production, restoration, streams Introduction North American

  19. Effects of dynamic vegetation and topography on hydrological processes in semi-arid areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Valeri Yuryevich, 1974-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystems of dry climates represent a particularly interesting object for ecohydrological studies, as water is generally considered to be the key limiting resource. This work focuses on vegetation-water-energy dynamics ...

  20. Impact of vegetation properties on U.S. summer weather prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Y; Fennessy, M; sellers, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological Center, Mon. Weather Rev. , 108, 1279-1292,VEGETATION IN U.S. SUMMER WEATHER model (SIB) for use withinConference on Numerical Weather Prediction, pp. 726 -733,

  1. Contribution of vegetation and peat fires to particulate air pollution in Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddington, C L

    Smoke haze, caused by vegetation and peat fires in Southeast Asia, is of major concern because of its adverse impact on regional air quality. We apply two different methods (a chemical transport model and a Lagrangian ...

  2. Summer fire impacts and isotopic assessment of vegetation dynamics in Texas coastal Quercus virginiana communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Kelley Ann

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in thickets suggest some thickets may be recent at Kenedy. []?N of plants and soils did not enhance interpretation of vegetation dynamics at either site, but may provide insights regarding the N-cycle of these oak communities....

  3. Momentum and mass transport by coherent structures in a shallow vegetated shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Brian L., 1975-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many aquatic systems, from tidal creeks with fringing mangroves to rivers and associated floodplains, there exists an interface between dense vegetation and a high conveyance channel. A shear flow develops across this ...

  4. Investigation of the utility of the vegetation condition index (VCI) as an indicator of drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesh, Srinivasan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the satellite-based Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) and frequently used agricultural drought indices like Palmer Drought Severity Index, Palmers Z-index, Standard Precipitation Index, percent normal and deciles...

  5. Relationships of exotic plant communities with native vegetation, environmental factors, disturbance, and landscape ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abella, Scott R.

    ecosystems in numerous ways. Theories on relation- ships of exotic species invasions with native vegetation strongly related to the eco- system classification. For example, mean exotic cover ranged from

  6. Harmonic propagation of variability in surface energy balance within a coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, P.

    [1] The response of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum model to incoming radiation forcing is investigated in order to gain insights into the coupling of soil and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) states and fluxes. The ...

  7. Shipping and nitrogen toning effects on postharvest shelf life of vegetative annuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beach, Shannon Elizabeth

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetative annuals are currently popular in the ornamental horticulture industry. Many crops are newly domesticated species and little is known about how they perform during shipping or in the retail environment. Nine species and 21 cultivars were...

  8. An Experimental Investigation of Microexplosion in Emulsified Vegetable-Methanol Blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Hyungseok

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of shock waves characteristic of explosions at larger scales. However, little is known about how emulsion composition and droplet size affect the micro-explosion process. Through this research, methanol-in-vegetable oil emulsion has been studied from...

  9. Using mobile technology to impact fruit and vegetable consumption in low-income youth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheson, Tresza Denae

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The benefits of fruits and vegetables (FV) include supplying nutrients and fiber to the diet, reducing risk of disease, and assisting in weight maintenance by increasing satiety and decreasing energy density of the diet. FV intake has been...

  10. Typed Self-Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Matt

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    type T y[O]. The operator IsIs is self-applicative, in thatargument t is any of Is[O] or IsIs, and otherwise behavesproof constant introduced by IsIs proves that the type of t

  11. Growth response of selected vegetable species to plant residue of guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Debbie John

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Horticulture GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Approved as to style...

  12. A study of historical vegetation in Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Gwendolyn Ann

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    documentation against which past and future changes can be evaluated and to provide information to guide iv management decisions concerning the historic landscape. The results of the study provide vegetation ini'ormation for inter preting both the natural... LITERATURE Historical Overview of Landscape Preservation Landscape Preservation and Restoration Methods Environmental and Cultural Effects on the Landscape Vegetation oi' the Edwards Plateau of Texas Lyndon B. Johnson National Hi. storical Park...

  13. Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson Joseph A for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson,a Joseph A. Shaw,a Rick Lawrence,b Paul W. Nugent,a Laura M of these calibrated imagers is imaging of vegetation for CO2 gas leak detection. During a four-week period

  14. Vegetation response to burning thicketized live oak savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, David Mitchell

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VEGETATION RESPONSE TO BURNING THICKETIZED LIVE OAK SAVANNAH ON THE ARANSAS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE A Thesi. s by DAVID MITCHELL KELLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 6 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... irma f Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) ( lambe-) (Member) Memos Memoerl '. !ay 98O ABSTRACT Vegetation Response to Burning Thicketized Live Oak Savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (May 1980) David Mitchell Kelley, B. S...

  15. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Siu Lim

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF' SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Approved as to style and content by: (C rman...

  16. Use of vegetation to ameliorate building microclimates: an assessment of energy-conservation potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, B.A.; Taylor, F.G.; Wendt, R.L.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The space-conditioning energy conservation potentials of landscapes designed to ameliorate building microclimates are evaluated. The physical bases for vegetative modifications of climate are discussed, and results of past study of the effects of vegetation on space-conditioning energy consumption in buildings are reviewed. The state-of-the-art of energy-conserving landscape designs is assessed and recommendations are presented for further research.

  17. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-07)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation Management on section of three ROWs. The ROWs include selected sections of the McNary Powerhouse, the present and proposed new sections of the McNary-Roundup and the McNary Switchyard South Transmission lines. BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for pertinent information on each section of referenced transmission line. BPA would conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way and to clear vegetation from new rights-of-way corridors. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

  18. Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse #12;#12;Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 #12;#12;Contents Learn about Diabetes ............................................................ 1 What is diabetes? .............................................................. 2 What

  19. Texas High Plains Vegetable & Weed Control Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    of Plastic Mulch Type on Tomato Vigor and Yield (2004) 60 Effects of Postemergence Herbicides on Crop Injury (2005) 102 CROP PRODUCTION AND VARIETY TRIALS Transplanted Watermelon Production with Colored Plastic Mulches on the Texas High Plains (2005) 106 Yield and Quality Evaluation for Selected Tomato Varieties

  20. Fejer-type inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitroi, F C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to present some new Fejer-type results for convex functions. Improvements of Young's inequality (the arithmetic-geometric mean inequality) and other applications to special means are pointed as well.

  1. Document Type: Subject Terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Major, Arkady

    Title: Authors: Source: Document Type: Subject Terms: Abstract: Full Text Word Count: ISSN at creating team results. In fact, it's priceless. Managers in Western corporations have received a lifetime

  2. Satellite image analysis for surveillance, vegetation and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, D Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, many studies have provided abundant evidence to show the trend of tree mortality is increasing in many regions, and the cause of tree mortality is associated with drought, insect outbreak, or fire. Unfortunately, there is no current capability available to monitor vegetation changes, and correlate and predict tree mortality with CO{sub 2} change, and climate change on the global scale. Different survey platforms (methods) have been used for forest management. Typical ground-based forest surveys measure tree stem diameter, species, and alive or dead. The measurements are low-tech and time consuming, but the sample sizes are large, running into millions of trees, covering large areas, and spanning many years. These field surveys provide powerful ground validation for other survey methods such as photo survey, helicopter GPS survey, and aerial overview survey. The satellite imagery has much larger coverage. It is easier to tile the different images together, and more important, the spatial resolution has been improved such that close to or even higher than aerial survey platforms. Today, the remote sensing satellite data have reached sub-meter spatial resolution for panchromatic channels (IKONOS 2: 1 m; Quickbird-2: 0.61 m; Worldview-2: 0.5 m) and meter spatial resolution for multi-spectral channels (IKONOS 2: 4 meter; Quickbird-2: 2.44 m; Worldview-2: 2 m). Therefore, high resolution satellite imagery can allow foresters to discern individual trees. This vital information should allow us to quantify physiological states of trees, e.g. healthy or dead, shape and size of tree crowns, as well as species and functional compositions of trees. This is a powerful data resource, however, due to the vast amount of the data collected daily, it is impossible for human analysts to review the imagery in detail to identify the vital biodiversity information. Thus, in this talk, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges to use high resolution satellite imagery and machine learning theory to monitor tree mortality at the level of individual trees.

  3. New frontiers in oilseed biotechnology: meeting the growing global demand for vegetable oils for food, feed, biofuel, and industrial uses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, C; Napier, JA; Clemente, TE; Cahoon, EB

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetable oils have historically been a valued commodity for food use and to a lesser extent for non-edible applications such as detergents and lubricants. The increasing reliance on biodiesel as a transportation fuel has contributed to rising demand and higher prices for vegetable oils. Biotechnology offers a number of solutions to meet the growing need for affordable vegetable oils and vegetable oils with improved fatty acid compositions for food and industrial uses. New insights into oilseed metabolism and its transcriptional control are enabling biotechnological enhancement of oil content and quality. Alternative crop platforms and emerging technologies for metabolic engineering also hold promise for meeting global demand for vegetable oils and for enhancing nutritional, industrial, and biofuel properties of vegetable oils. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of oilseed metabolism and in the development of new oilseed platforms and metabolic engineering technologies.

  4. Multi-Spectral imaging of vegetation for detecting CO2 leaking from underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouse, J.H.; Shaw, J.A.; Lawrence, R.L.; Lewicki, J.L.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.S.; Spangler, L.H.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration will require long-term monitoring for detection of possible leakage back into the atmosphere. One potential monitoring method is multi-spectral imaging of vegetation reflectance to detect leakage through CO{sub 2}-induced plant stress. A multi-spectral imaging system was used to simultaneously record green, red, and near-infrared (NIR) images with a real-time reflectance calibration from a 3-m tall platform, viewing vegetation near shallow subsurface CO{sub 2} releases during summers 2007 and 2008 at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology field site in Bozeman, Montana. Regression analysis of the band reflectances and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index with time shows significant correlation with distance from the CO{sub 2} well, indicating the viability of this method to monitor for CO{sub 2} leakage. The 2007 data show rapid plant vigor degradation at high CO{sub 2} levels next to the well and slight nourishment at lower, but above-background CO{sub 2} concentrations. Results from the second year also show that the stress response of vegetation is strongly linked to the CO{sub 2} sink-source relationship and vegetation density. The data also show short-term effects of rain and hail. The real-time calibrated imaging system successfully obtained data in an autonomous mode during all sky and daytime illumination conditions.

  5. Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at radioactive-waste disposal Area G during the 1994 growing season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Biggs, J.B.; Bennett, K.D.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overstory (pinon pine) and understory (grass and forb) vegetation samples were collected within and around selected points at Area G-a low-level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory-for the analysis of tritium ({sup 3}H), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238} Pu and {sup 239}Pu), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), americium ({sup 241}Am), and total uranium. In general, most vegetation samples collected within and around Area G contained radionuclide levels in higher concentrations than vegetation collected from background areas. Tritium, in particular, was detected as high as 5,800 pCi/mL in overstory vegetation collected outside the fence just west of the tritium shafts; this suggests that tritium is migrating from this waste repository through subsurface pathways. Also, understory vegetation collected north of the transuranic (TRU) pads (outside the fence of Area G) contained the highest values of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am, and may be a result of surface holding, storage, or disposal activities.

  6. 3D magnetic inversion for total magnetization in areas with complicated remanence Peter G. Leli`evre*, Douglas W. Oldenburg and Nigel Phillips,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    this problem we design a methodology for inverting magnetic data for subsurface magnetization, as opposed to magnetic susceptibility. Our approach contains flexibility to obtain different types of magnetization3D magnetic inversion for total magnetization in areas with complicated remanence Peter G. Leli

  7. Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

  8. Vegetative response and cattle activities following patterned herbicide application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Robert Blaine

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Big Williams Pasture (Fig. 4) (USDA, 1967'. ). The major sire, clay loam:, occurs on. about 65/ of the pasture. The other rarge sites are: tight sandy 1oam (16X), gray sandy loam (9X), clay tlat. (6X), sandy loam (3X), and loamy sand (1X). Major... soil type. s of the clay loam range site are Ramadero clay loam and Zavco ilty clay loam (Fig. 5) (USDA, 1972). These soils are deep with a clay loam surface and a clayey subsoil. Permea'oility of. the A horizon i. s moderate, whi' e the E horizon...

  9. Evaluation of vegetative cover on reclaimed land by color infrared videography relative to soil properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfordresher, Anne Augusta

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were collected in three reclaimed portions of the Martin Lake mine near Tatum, Texas. Analysis of the video imagery indicated that 11% of the A2 area, 8% of the B area and 15% of the C2 area were poorly vegetated by bermudagrass. Areas totally devoid... as bare soil in these two mine areas are known to be actively used haul roads. Sparsely vegetated areas account for 7. 8'4 of the A2, 4. 8% of the B and 13% of the C2 areas. These values were significantly different at the 5% confidence level...

  10. Canned and Frozen Vegetables: Getting the Most Nutrition for Your Money

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    and Suggested Uses of Selected Canned and Frozen Vegetables Vegetable Availability Key Nutrients Comments/Uses Asparagus canned,frozen Vitamin C and Folate Expensive. Use as a side dish. Beans,Baked canned Protein, Fiber,Thiamin, Low cost. Use as a main or side... dish. Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc and Phosphorus Beans,Green canned,frozen Fiber (F) and Vitamin C Use cut beans in salads and mixed dishes. or Wax Beans,Lima canned,frozen Protein, Fiber,Vitamins Available in white, green and yellow...

  11. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-09)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the rights of way and access roads for BPA's McNary-Santiam No. 1 Transmission Line, beginning in the summer of 2000 and ending in July, 2001. This Supplemental Analysis finds that: (1) the proposed actions are substantially consistent with the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285) and ROD; and (2) there are no new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the proposed actions or their impacts. Therefore, no further NEPA documentation is required.

  12. Assessment of Pen Branch delta and corridor vegetation changes using multispectral scanner data 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne multispectral scanner data were used to monitor natural succession of wetland vegetation species over a three-year period from 1992 through 1994 for Pen Branch on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Image processing techniques were used to identify and measure wetland vegetation communities in the lower portion of the Pen Branch corridor and delta. The study provided a reliable means for monitoring medium- and large-scale changes in a diverse environment. Findings from the study will be used to support decisions regarding remediation efforts following the cessation of cooling water discharge from K reactor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

  13. The Mixed Carload in Distribution of Vegetables from the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulson, W. E. (William E.)

    1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry: Farm and Ranch Economics: G. S. Fraps, Ph. D., Chief; State Chemist L. P. Gabbard, M. S.. Chief S. E. Asbury, 31. S., Chemist W. E. Paulson, Ph. D., Marketing J. F. Fudge, Ph. D., Chemist C. A. Bonnen, M. S., Farm Management E. C. Carlyle, M..., since it facilitates shipments of new vegetables to the markets of the United States and Canada. Furthermore, after the production of a wide variety of vegetables had been established, the mixed carload offered and continues to offer the means...

  14. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust around Type Ia supernovae Lifan Wang 1,2 LawrenceIa. Subject headings: Supernovae: General, Dust, Extinctionline) bands for Type Ia supernovae. (a), upper panel, shows

  15. Biodiversity Analysis of Vegetation on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. J. Hansen

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) located in south central Nevada encompasses approximately 3,561 square kilometers and straddles two major North American deserts, Mojave and Great Basin. Transitional areas between the two desert types have been created by gradients in elevation, precipitation, temperature, and soils. From 1996-1998, more than 1,500 ecological landform units were sampled at the NTS for numerous biotic and abiotic parameters. These data provide a basis for spatial evaluations of biodiversity over landscape scales at the NTS. Species diversity maps (species richness vs. species abundance) have been produced. Differences in ecosystem diversity at the ecoregion, alliance, association, and ecological landform unit levels are presented. Spatial distribution maps of species presence and abundance provide evidence of where transition zones occur and the resulting impact on biodiversity. The influences of abiotic factors (elevation, soil, precipitation) and anthropogenic disturbance on biodiversity are assessed.

  16. Wolter type i LAMAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catura, R.C.; Joki, E.G.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational objectives for the LAMAR and their influence on the instrument design are discussed. It is concluded that the most important design parameter is the angular resolution of the LAMAR modules since it so strongly influences sensitivity, optical identifications, source confusion, spectral resolution for objective gratings and the ability to resolve small extended sources. A high resolution Wolter Type I LAMAR module is described, its hardware status discussed, and the performance of a LAMAR observatory presented. A promising technique for enhancing the reflectivity of Wolter Type I X-ray optics in a selected bandpass at high energy has been investigated and the performance of the LAMAR module, utilizing this method, has been calculated.

  17. Rappels: 4) Piles Types abstraits de donnes (Abstract Data Type)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Sylvie

    Rappels: 4) Piles #12;Types abstraits de donnes (Abstract Data Type) IFT2015, A2009, Sylvie Hamel Universit de Montral 1Piles Type de donnes Un ensemble de valeurs Un ensemble d'oprations Structure de Universit de Montral 2Piles #12;Type abstrait de donnes PILE (4.2) Garde en mmoire des objets

  18. Determination of locational error associated with global positioning system (GPS) radio collars in relation to vegetation and topography in north-central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, a study was initiated to assess seasonal habitat use and movement patterns of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using global positioning system (GPS) radio collars. As part of this study, the authors attempted to assess the accuracies of GPS (non-differentially corrected) positions under various vegetation canopies and terrain conditions with the use of a GPS ``test`` collar. The test collar was activated every twenty minutes to obtain a position location and continuously uplinked to Argos satellites to transfer position data files. They used a Telonics, Inc. uplink receiver to intercept the transmission and view the results of the collar in real time. They placed the collar on a stand equivalent to the neck height of an adult elk and then placed the stand within three different treatment categories: (1) topographical influence (canyon and mesa tops), (2) canopy influence (open and closed canopy), and (3) vegetation type influence (ponderosa pine and pinion pine-juniper). The collar was kept at each location for one hour (usually obtaining three fixes). In addition, the authors used a hand-held GPS to obtain a position of the test collar at the same time and location.

  19. SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C][W][OA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Knaap, Esther

    SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C controlling the elongated fruit shape of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is SUN. In this study, we explored the roles of SUN in vegetative and reproductive development using near isogenic lines (NILs) that differ

  20. The temporal mapping of riparian vegetation at Leon Creek in Bexar County, Texas from 1987 to 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummins, Karen Leigh

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and urban zones. Results for both Image Difference Calculation and Percent Area Calculation suggest that for the total watershed, there are higher rates of decreases in vegetation occurring in rural and urban zones. Less vegetation overall in the 0.5 mi...

  1. Genome Sequencing and Mapping Reveal Loss of Heterozygosity as a Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation in the Vegetable Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finely, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Sotrey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30percent of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici.

  2. Applying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies: A Study over Australia*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    , Climate Change Research Centre, Level 4 Mathews Building, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052: A Study over Australia* MARK DECKER, ANDY J. PITMAN, AND JASON EVANS Climate Change Research CentreApplying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies

  3. Improved estimates of forest vegetation structure and biomass with a LiDAR-optimized sampling design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    and Spies, 1992; Jakubauskas and Price, 1997], and forest biomass [Fassnacht et al., 1997; Gower et alImproved estimates of forest vegetation structure and biomass with a LiDAR-optimized sampling, to estimate forest structure and biomass across a 53,600 ha study area in northeastern Wisconsin. Additionally

  4. Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    precipitation, the impacts of climate change on vegetation and water cycle are predicted with relatively low under Climate Change Scenarios* PABLO IMBACH,1 LUIS MOLINA,1 BRUNO LOCATELLI,# OLIVIER ROUPSARD,1,@ GIL MAHE´ ,& RONALD NEILSON,**,&& LENIN CORRALES,11 MARKO SCHOLZE,## AND PHILIPPE CIAIS @@ 1 Climate Change

  5. Effects of interactive vegetation phenology on the 2003 summer Marc Stfanon,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Andrea, Fabio

    , associated with an increase of the temperature mean and variability in the context of global warming its impacts on the economic and ecological sys- tems, through reduction in productivity of natural and culti- vated vegetation [Ciais et al., 2005; COPA-COGECA, 2003], lower energy supply and electricity

  6. Vegetative and reproductive innovations of early land plants: implications for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    Vegetative and reproductive innovations of early land plants: implications for a uni ed phylogeny Karen Sue Renzaglia1 , R. Joel Du¡1 {, Daniel L. Nickrent1 and David J. Garbary2 1Department of Plant (renzaglia@plant.siu.edu) 2 Department of Biology, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia

  7. One-dimensional snow water and energy balance model for vegetated surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    One-dimensional snow water and energy balance model for vegetated surfaces Jiming Jin,2 Xiaogang heat ux (W m2 ) Iprec heat ux of precipitation (W m2) I5 s downwelling solar radiation (W m2, USA. Email: jjm@hwr.arizona.edu or gao@hwr.arizona.edu Contract grant sponsor: NASA

  8. Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keim, Richard

    Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity R.F. Keim a,*, A Little is understood about how storage of water on forest canopies varies during rainfall, even though storage changes intensity of throughfall and thus affects a variety of hydrological processes

  9. The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and during the last in an unresolved extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here we investigate the potential during these extrema when 1 hal-00351408,version1-9Jan2009 #12;Earth's climate and biomes maps were

  10. The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Luc

    The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today and during the last extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here, we investigate the potential during these extrema, when Earth's climate and biomes maps were different from today, we are able to test

  11. Geomorphic controls on hydrology and vegetation in an arid basin: Turkana district, northern Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppinger, K.D.; Doehring, D.O.; Schimel, D.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a broad ecological study of Kenyan pastoralist adaptation to periodic drought, a study was done to determine how arid region geomorphology affects hydrology and subsequently vegetative patterns. In this study area, 100 kilometers south of Lake Turkana, it appears that irregular precipitation is stored in bajada sediments and is available to deeply rooted vegetation over long periods of time. This vegetation provides a relatively constant food source for people's herds of browsers, the camels and goats, whereas cattle, which graze mainly on grasses, are significant producers only during wet seasons. Field observations suggest that the mountain and abutting pediment soils are too shallow to store appreciable water. However, greater quantities of water are stored in the deeper bajada sediments adjacent to the pediment where pastoralists dig temporary wells in ephemeral channels during wet seasons. Density of tree growth is greater along channels, and highest canopy cover values are found about the pediment-bajada interface. Geohydrologic processes in this area provide the basis for continuous occupation by the desert people, in contrast to recurring famines in adjacent areas, by enhancing the growth of woody vegetation.

  12. I. Abstract Vegetation plays an important role in the surface energy and water balance of wetlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    55 I. Abstract Vegetation plays an important role in the surface energy and water balance or reverse the downward trend in streamflow. In this study, we investigated the energy and water balance had been sprayed with herbicide (and remained only as dead, standing biomass). Energy balance

  13. Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas Justin A. Hogan,1 sequestration sites for possible leaks of the CO2 gas from underground reservoirs, a low-cost multispectral are then flagged for closer inspection with in-situ CO2 sensors. The system is entirely self

  14. Postdoctoral research associate position on vegetation remote sensing at the Free University of Berlin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to 100% of the German TV-L13 salary scale. Title of the post Analysis of global maps of terrestrial vegetation: part of the energy absorbed by chlorophyll is not used for carbon fixation but emitted at longer of GOSAT-FTS spaceborne measurements in the 750-770 nm window. Solar Fraunhofer lines superposed to the Fs

  15. -Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings -681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leps, Jan "Suspa"

    - Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings - 681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996 abandoned for half a century and are sur- rounded by Picea abies (Norway spruce) forests. The causes of inhibition of establishment of Norway spruce seedlings in the meadows were tested experimentally

  16. Vegetation changes on an abandoned rice field following herbicide and fertilizer treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cwik, Michael Joseph

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ass (pa icum ~v(r turn L. ), a d rownseed nasn I (~nas alum plicat I ~ Michx. ). In co treat, vegetation of abend ed rice land is composed principally of annual forbs intermixed with three-awns (Aristida spp. ). Forbs, as used in this paper, wili...

  17. A satellite-based biosphere parameterization for net ecosystem CO2 exchange: Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, John Chun-Han

    Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) Pathmathevan Mahadevan,1 Steven C. Wofsy,1 Daniel M. Matross,1 12 April 2008. [1] We present the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM), a satellite of ecosystem photosynthesis, and annual sum of NEE at all eddy flux sites for which it is optimized

  18. Herbicidal Activity of Mustard Seed Meal on Weed and Vegetable Emergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xi

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine the herbicidal activity of MSMs (Sinapis alba IdaGold and Brassica juncea Pacific Gold) on weed and vegetable emergence. In Expt. 1, MSMs were applied at 0, 50, 100, 200 or 300 g/m2 to the bottom of petri dishes and covered with germination mix...

  19. Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

  20. Cattle Selection for Aspen and Meadow Vegetation: Implications for Restoration Bobette E. Jones,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth

    Cattle Selection for Aspen and Meadow Vegetation: Implications for Restoration Bobette E. Jones,1 95616, USA. Abstract There is concern over the decline of aspen and the lack of successful regeneration due to excessive browsing of aspen suckers by cattle and other wild and domestic ungulates. We

  1. Characterizing the molecular composition of epicuticular waxes of vegetation and in surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Characterizing the molecular composition of epicuticular waxes of vegetation and in surface MBL Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543 #12;Abstract: Epicuticular plant waxes are nearly omnipresent of origin. These waxes can provide that information in real time when collected in aerosols, or from

  2. Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three Major Floods, Gila RiverKelvey, Director Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Burkham, D. E. 1927 Hydraulic effects 19.16:655-J 1. Gila River-Floods. 2. Hydraulics. 3. Botany-Ecology-Gila River. 1. Title: Hydraulic

  3. Theoretical Population Biology 71 (2007) 111 Nonlinear dynamics and pattern bifurcations in a model for vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherratt, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are typical, running parallel to the contours. Previously, Klausmeier [1999. Regular and irregular patterns of vegetation up to 250 m wide, separated by gaps of up to 1 km, running along the contours. These patterns zffl}|ffl{ plant loss k3@2 U=@X2 zfflfflfflfflfflfflfflffl}|fflfflfflfflfflfflfflffl{ dispersal , (1a

  4. Relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices and aircraft-based CO2 measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cihlar, J.; Caramori, P.H.; Schuepp, P.H.; Desjardins, R.L.; Macpherson, J.I. (Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa (Canada) McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada) Agriculture Canada, Centre for Land and Biological Resources Research, Ottawa (Canada) National Research Council of Canada, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa (Canada))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices and CO2 uptake, as an initial step in exploring the possibility of using a satellite-derived vegetation index as a measure of net photosynthesis. The study area included the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) site located on the Konza prairie and adjacent area as well as a transect between Manhattan and Salina. One third of the transect exhibited vegetation and terrain characteristics similar to those on the FIFE site, whereas cultivated land predominated in the remaining portion of the 75-km-long flight line. In June, July, August, and October 1987, several CO2 data sets were obtained using the National Research Council of Canada's Twin Otter research aircraft. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the simple ratio (SR) were computed from NOAA AVHRR data acquired as part of FIFE. Aircraft and satellite data were processed to obtain spatially coincident and locally representative flux values. Results show a linear relationship between NDVI and CO2 uptake during a single day; however, a nonlinear relationship emerged when all data sets were combined. The data from FIFE and the regional transect were consistent for one date but differed for other periods. Overall, about 60 percent of total variability in CO2 flux was accounted for by the NDVI and 74 percent by the SR. 14 refs.

  5. Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    is known as Normalized Differ- ence Water Index (NDWI) [12]. It is calculated using reflectance in two near infrared (NIR) channels. Similar indices have been proposed that use reflectance at other NIR wavelengthsNormalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks Kristine

  6. Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight reflection and long-wave infrared (LWIR) thermal emission. During a 4-week period in summer 2011

  7. MODELLING MODIFIED ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING FOR FRUITS AND VEGETABLES USING MEMBRANE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinze, Thomas

    of polymeric film in or- der to modify the O2 and CO2 concentrations inside the package, reducing metabolic are not fully under- stood. As examples we can refer to the little knowl- edge about the effect of CO2MODELLING MODIFIED ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING FOR FRUITS AND VEGETABLES USING MEMBRANE SYSTEMS Gabi

  8. A flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    control in urban storm water runoff [Kirby et al., 2005], and linking tidal hydrodynamic forcing to flow and field studies. The proposed model asymptotically recovers the flow resistance formulation when the waterA flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics Gabriel G

  9. Derivation of pasture biomass in Mongolia from AVHRR-based vegetation health indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitelson, Anatoly

    Derivation of pasture biomass in Mongolia from AVHRR-based vegetation health indices F. KOGAN, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia (Received 28 April 2003; in final form 8 March 2004 ) Abstract. Early drought detection and impact assessment on the amount of pasture biomass are important in Mongolia, whose economy strongly

  10. Sensitivity of Mesoscale Surface Dynamics to Surface Soil and Vegetation Contrasts over the Carolina Sandhills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    Sensitivity of Mesoscale Surface Dynamics to Surface Soil and Vegetation Contrasts over in mesoscale summertime precipitation over this region. Numerical simulations are analyzed to investigate the relationships between mesoscale surface dynamics and the transition from clay to sandy soils over this region

  11. Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked September 2008 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Brownfield sites contribute of a chronosequence of urban brownfield sites in Bremen and Berlin, Germany. These parameters were linked

  12. Self-consistent photothermal techniques: Application for measuring thermal diffusivity in vegetable oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    of Mathematics, Av. Acueducto S/N, Col. Barrio la Laguna, C. P. 07340, Del. Gustavo A. Madero, Me´xico, D. F., Me´xico importance because they can be used as fuel alternatives and lubricants.1,2 Used extensively in the 19th century as base lubricants, vegetable oils were gradually replaced by mineral oils mainly for economic

  13. MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, John C.

    MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate are from land-use conversion to agriculture, streamflow regulation, nutrient enrichment, and climate change editors: N. Bonada & V. H. Resh / Streams in Mediterranean climate regions: lessons learned from the last

  14. Holocene vegetation and fire dynamics in the supra-mediterranean belt of the Nebrodi Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    and the Mediterranean region. Copyright # 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS: climate change; human impact; Ilex TINNER1 1 Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of BernHolocene vegetation and fire dynamics in the supra-mediterranean belt of the Nebrodi Mountains

  15. Global latitudinal-asymmetric vegetation growth trends and their driving mechanisms: 1982-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Zhu, Zaichun [Boston University; Myneni, Ranga B. [Boston University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a recent Leaf Area Index (LAI) dataset and the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), we investigate percent changes and controlling factors of global vegetation growth for the period 1982 to 2009. Over that 28-year period, both the remote-sensing estimate and model simulation show a significant increasing trend in annual vegetation growth. Latitudinal asymmetry appeared in both products, with small increases in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and larger increases at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The south-to-north asymmetric land surface warming was assessed to be the principal driver of this latitudinal asymmetry of LAI trend. Heterogeneous precipitation functioned to decrease this latitudinal LAI gradient, and considerably regulated the local LAI change. CO2 fertilization during the last three decades, was simulated to be the dominant cause for the enhanced vegetation growth. Our study, though limited by observational and modeling uncertainties, adds further insight into vegetation growth trends and environmental correlations. These validation exercises also provide new quantitative and objective metrics for evaluation of land ecosystem process models at multiple spatio-temporal scales.

  16. Ris Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6.2 Risø Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been chemically (canola) oil with methanol. Biodiesel can be burned directly in diesel engines. Robert Diesel himself, but it was not until the oil crisis of the 1970s that biofuels attracted serious interest. Biodiesel is reported

  17. Interaction of Vegetation and Atmospheric Dynamical Mechanisms in the Mid-Holocene African Monsoon*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelin, J. David

    that the problem is highly sensitive to the atmospheric dynamics of each model employed. In other work, dynamical mechanisms have been hypothesized to affect monsoon poleward extent, particularly ventilation, by import of low-moist static energy air to the continent. Here, interactive vegetation and the ventilation

  18. Resilience and recovery potential of duneland vegetation in the southern Kalahari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to changes in wind power and rainfall. However, in modern times disturbances associated with land use unclear whether the region is poised at a tipping point between its current state (i.e., vegetated fixed linear dunes), and a ``degraded'' state (i.e., barren and active dunes). Here we investigate the ability

  19. Vegetation History And Logging Disturbance: Effects On Rain Forest In The Lope Reserve, Gabon (With Special Emphasis On Elephants and Apes)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Lee JT

    An investigation of the effects of commercial mechanised selective logging on rain forest vegetation and mammals, was undertaken in the Lope Reserve, central Gabon, between January 1989 to July 1991. Vegetation in Lope ...

  20. Postdoc Appointment Types

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project Office Press ReleasesPost-Closure BenefitsAppointment Types

  1. On the Proper Use of Statistical Analyses; a Comment on "Evaluation of Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey" by Douglas et al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieman, Carl E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper "Evaluation of Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey" [1] proposes a new, much shorter, version of the CLASS based on standard factor analysis. In this comment we explain why we believe the analysis that is used is inappropriate, and the proposed modified CLASS will be measuring something quite different, and less useful, than the original. The CLASS was based on extensive interviews with students and is intended to be a formative measurement of instruction that is probing a much more complex construct and with different goals than what is handled with classic psychometrics. We are writing this comment to reiterate the value of combining techniques of cognitive science with statistical analyses as described in detail in Adams & Wieman, 2011 [2] when developing a test of expert-like thinking for use in formative assessment. This type of approach is also called for by the National Research Council in a recent report [3].

  2. Rappels: 4) Piles Types abstraits de donnes (Abstract Data Type)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Sylvie

    Rappels: 4) Piles Types abstraits de données (Abstract Data Type) IFT2015, A2009, Sylvie Hamel Université de Montréal 1Piles Type de données Un ensemble de valeurs Un ensemble d'opérations Structure de Université de Montréal 2Piles Type abstrait de données PILE (§4.2) Garde en mémoire des objets arbitraires

  3. Mechanism design with approximate types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zeyuan Allen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In mechanism design, we replace the strong assumption that each player knows his own payoff type exactly with the more realistic assumption that he knows it only approximately: each player i only knows that his true type ...

  4. Types of Farming in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C. A.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .......... .......-.----------------------. 8 Labor -..-.....-----...------------------------------------------------. 9 Land Tenure .--.----....---....--------------------------------- 9 Number and Size of Farms ....----...----.-._--------- 10 Capital... -------------...-------.---------------------------- 21 Hogs -......-....--------------------------------------------------- 22 Poultry .-.---.-.....--.-..------.---------------------------------- 22 Horses and Mules ---..-....---..--..------------------------ 23 Types of Farming and Type-of-farming...

  5. UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).

  6. Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

  7. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-06)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to apply selected herbicides to control annual weeds that are competing with native grasses that were seeded two years ago. Herbicides will also be applied at the base of the existing wooden transmission line poles located in the pasture area. BPA would conduct the vegetation control with the goal of promoting native grass growth and to provide fire protection for the wooden transmission line poles. The pasture area is, for the most part, flat with elevation increasing towards the northwest corner. Slopes are not steep in that area. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

  8. Tornado type wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Cheng-Ting (Ames, IA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  9. Modeling of sorption isotherms of dried vegetable wastes from wholesale market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Iguaz, A.; Esnoz, A.; Virseda, P.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moisture sorption isotherms of dried vegetable wastes (based on green leaves and fruits) from wholesale market were determined at 25, 40, 60 and 90 C by the static gravimetric method. Experimental data were fit by using several mathematical models. The G.A.B. and the Halsey model gave the minimum mean square error. G.A.B. parameters were related with temperature by Arrhenius expressions.

  10. A study of historical vegetation in Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Gwendolyn Ann

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE DECEMBER 1966 Major Subject: Recreation and Resource Development A STUDY OF HISTORICAL VEGETATION IN LYNDON B. JOHNSON NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK A Thesis by GWENDOLYN ANN GARDNER Approved as to style and content by: E. Glenn Carls... Historical Park. (December 1986) Gwendolyn Ann Gardner, B. S. , Texas AAH University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. E. Glenn Car ls Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Par k (LYJO) is located in Blanco and Gillespie Counties, Texas, in a...

  11. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of wave attenuation through artificial vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustin, Lauren Nicole

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ). The first hydrodynamic model developed by Price et al. (1968) simulated the effects of seaweed as a high viscous layer. Mork (1996) extended the idea of the high viscous layer and developed a theory for kelp plants that took into account not only viscous... has been validated by artificial laboratory kelp experiments for the species Laminaria Hyperborea, and is assumed appropriate for representing wave transformation and damping over submerged vegetative fields of variable depths. Mork (1996) studied...

  12. Coastal Marsh Vegetation Dynamics of the East Bay of Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jeremy Scott

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    marshes form partly as a function of relatively little elevation variability, where a gently sloped tidal mudflat is inhabited by marsh vegetation (Mitsch and Gosselink 1986). Because of the small elevation gradient and the disproportionately high... by Connell and Slatyer (1977), facilitation is the theory of positive interactions between two or more species. The basic premise of facilitation in coastal marshes is the trapping of sediment on bare tidal mudflats by pioneer species that leads...

  13. Impact of trail use on the soils and vegetation of Petit Jean State Park, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Elizabeth Anne

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Magill & Nord, 1963). STUDY AREA Petit Jean State Park is located on Petit Jean Mountain. This is one flat-topped ridge among many such ridges along the Arkansas River Valley. It is located in the southwest corner of Conway County, Arkansas... closed canopy E. A sparse ground vegetative cover II. Upland Woodland exhibited the following biotic and physical characteristics (Fig. 5): A. A ridge top or exposed slope location B. A drier environment than that along streams C. An oak...

  14. Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

  15. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Clearing C-trees along the south side of the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The project involves controlling all tall growing trees (C-Trees) within the right-of-way. All work is to be done on the south side of centerline. Target vegetation is the tall growing Firs along the edge of the ROW, all of which is located within the back yards of the property owners along the right-of-way. The density of vegetation is low and consists of C-Trees located within backyards, with the branches growing towards the lines. Due to lack of access and past verbal agreements with the landowners, permission/agreement has been difficult to obtain from the property owners. Permission has now been obtained to remove the C-Trees within their back yards which, will soon be a hazard to our transmission line facility. We are working with the landowners to get them to plant low growing scrubs and ornamentals within the right-of-way and adjacent to the right-of-way. A follow up herbicide treatment is not planned because the trees being cut will not re-sprout. This right-of-way or project area is on a three to four year maintenance schedule. Little or no treatment should be required in the immediate future.

  16. A dependent nominal type theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheney, James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nominal abstract syntax is an approach to representing names and binding pioneered by Gabbay and Pitts. So far nominal techniques have mostly been studied using classical logic or model theory, not type theory. Nominal extensions to simple, dependent and ML-like polymorphic languages have been studied, but decidability and normalization results have only been established for simple nominal type theories. We present a LF-style dependent type theory extended with name-abstraction types, prove soundness and decidability of beta-eta-equivalence checking, discuss adequacy and canonical forms via an example, and discuss extensions such as dependently-typed recursion and induction principles.

  17. Brush types of the Nueces River watershed as related to soil, climatic and geological factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huss, Donald Lee

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Savanna . 21 3. Mesquite-Chaparral 23 4. Mesquite Woodland 28 5. Switch Mesquite 29 6. Running Mesquite 30 7. Scrub Mesquite 31 Communities with Live oak dominant 32 8. Live oak-Mesquite Savanna 32 9. Mesquite-Live oak-Chaparral 33 10. Live oak...-Guajillo Chaparral 34 11. Live oak-Post oak-Mesquite Woodland 35 Communities with Post oak dominant 35 12. Post oak-Blackjack oak Woodland 37 CHAPARRAL SHRUB COMMUNITIES 37 13. Guajillo Chaparral 39 14. Blackbrush Chaparral 39 SUFFRUTESCENT VEGETATIONAL TYPES...

  18. Brush types of the Nueces River watershed as related to soil, climatic and geological factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huss, Donald Lee

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Savanna . 21 3. Mesquite-Chaparral 23 4. Mesquite Woodland 28 5. Switch Mesquite 29 6. Running Mesquite 30 7. Scrub Mesquite 31 Communities with Live oak dominant 32 8. Live oak-Mesquite Savanna 32 9. Mesquite-Live oak-Chaparral 33 10. Live oak...-Guajillo Chaparral 34 11. Live oak-Post oak-Mesquite Woodland 35 Communities with Post oak dominant 35 12. Post oak-Blackjack oak Woodland 37 CHAPARRAL SHRUB COMMUNITIES 37 13. Guajillo Chaparral 39 14. Blackbrush Chaparral 39 SUFFRUTESCENT VEGETATIONAL TYPES...

  19. Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kicklighter, D W

    Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

  20. OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY AT 5 YEARS OF AGE IN RELATION TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INTAKE OVER TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cody, Claire McCaslin

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Childhood overweight and obesity has increased as American diets have evolved to include fewer fruits and vegetables. It is important to evaluate the effect of dietary components on childhood overweight and obesity. Objective...

  1. Vegetation classification and the efficacy of plant dominance-based classifications in predicting the occurrence of plant and animal species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yantis, James Hugh

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Vegetation associations are often distinguished on the basis of the dominant plant species. Associations with markedly different dominants (e.g., evergreen and deciduous trees) are expected to indicate high complementarity. In this study I evaluated...

  2. The Water-Wise Vegetable Garden: An Analysis of the Potential for Irrigation through Rainwater Harvesting in Sunny Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Adrienne; Esterer-Vogel, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water-use vegetables that can be grown in California are Cylindra beets, Tepary beans,beans, carrots and peppers. The first five of these crops have somewhat lower water

  3. The wake structure behind a porous obstruction and its implications for deposition near a finite patch of emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhengbing

    This experimental study describes the mean and turbulent flow structure in the wake of a circular array of cylinders, which is a model for a patch of emergent vegetation. The patch diameter, D, and patch density, a (frontal ...

  4. Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale-waste lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale and total Al concentrations showed a significant decrease after planting S. cumini plantation onto the shale

  5. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  6. A newsletter for commercial vegetable growers prepared by the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service April 03, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    ://www.btny.purdue.edu/pubs/vegcrop> Vegetable Crops Hotline 1 IN THIS ISSUE Powdery Mildew of MuskMelon using Herbicides witH Plastic MulcH application. using Herbicides witH Plastic MulcH - (Liz Maynard and Steve Weller) - Herbicides combined with plastic mulch are used to control weeds on many vegetable farms. Improper use of herbicides under or over

  7. On the asymptotic homotopy type of inductive limit Type ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In this note we exhibit large classes of (projeetionless) stable, nuclear C*- algebras whose asymptotic homotopy type is determined by K-theoretical data.

  8. Type of Space Bulb Type #/House Fixture Style Greenhouse #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Type of Space Bulb Type #/House Fixture Style Greenhouse # 1 Lu 430/Lu 400 24 White box style 2 Lu No bulbs 0 N/A Seed harvest room F32 T8/TL 841 90 bulbs VIGS Room F032 /741/ECO 60 bulbs Chamber Model Bulb

  9. Radionuclide concentrations in terrestrial vegetation and soil on and around the Hanford Site, 1983 through 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, T.M.; Antonio, E.J.; Cooper, A.T.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews concentrations of {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, U isotopes, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soil and vegetation samples collected from 1983 through 1993 during routine surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling locations were grouped in study areas associated with operational areas on the Site. While radionuclide concentrations were very low and representative of background concentrations from historic fallout, some study areas on the Site contained slightly elevated concentrations compared to other study areas onsite and offsite. The 100 Areas had concentrations of {sup 60}Co comparable to the minimum detectable concentration of 0.02 pCi/g in soil. Concentrations of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in 200 Area soils were slightly elevated. The 300 Area had a slight elevation of U in soil. These observations were expected because many of the sampling locations were selected to monitor specific facilities or operations at the operational areas. Generally, concentrations of the radionuclides studied were greater and more readily measured in soil samples compared to vegetation samples. The general pattern of concentrations of radionuclide concentrations in vegetation by area mirrored that observed in soil. Declines in {sup 90}Sr in soil appear to be attributed to radioactive decay and possibly downward migration out of the sampling horizon. The other radionuclides addressed in this report strongly sorb to soil and are readily retained in surface soil. Because of their long half-lives compared to the length of the study period, there was no significant indication that concentrations of U isotopes and Pu isotopes were decreasing over time.

  10. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    runaway in Type Ia supernovae: How to run away? oIgnition in Type Ia Supernovae. II. A Three- dimensionalnumber modeling of type Ia supernovae. I. hydrodynamics.

  11. The effects of cattle on shoreline vegetation of ponds and tanks in south Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whyte, Richard John

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ Hilvy !1 s udy wa conducted to determine the eft'ects of cattle on pond and ', ink shorelj. ne vegetation in south Texas from June i977 to Nay L)78. F iur 'I! . . wore selectedi on the Rob end Bessie welder Wildlife Foundation Reiuge near Hinton... ~: most grat ofu 1. Dr. L. J. Folse contributed. a real taler t fox making ocmlactor run smoothly. I acv grateful to the Rob and Bessie Melclex Wxldlife Four dation for *"onerously fun~!. g this study and for the 15 mor, ths accommodation cluxin. , my...

  12. Retention by vegetation of radionuclides deposited in rainfall: A literature summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anspaugh, L.R.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data include the results of experiments with artificial tracers and information from direct measurements of naturally occurring and fallout-produced radionuclides washed out or rained out by storms. Individual measurements of retention varied from negative to over 100%. The conclusion is that a value of 0.4 to 0.5 would be appropriate for average retention, and a value of 1.0 would not be unreasonable if one wished to be conservative, particularly where high vegetation densities might be expected. 35 refs., 16 tabs.

  13. Influence of physiography and vegetation on small mammals at the Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cypher, B.L.

    1995-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Influence of physiography and vegetation on small mammal abundance and species Composition was investigated at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California to assess prey abundance for Federally endangered San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and to assess the distribution of two Federal candidate species, San Joaquin antelope squirrels (Ammospermophilus nelsoni) and short-nosed kangaroo rats (Dinodomys nitratoides brevinasus). The specific objectives of this investigation were to determine whether small mammal abundance and community composition varied with north-south orientation, terrain, ground cover, and Cypher shrub density, and whether these factors influenced the distribution and abundance of San Joaquin antelope squirrels and short-nosed kangaroo rats.

  14. Crop and vegetative growth impact on water infiltration into gulf coast soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Dwayne Jack

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Advisory Committee: Dr. Lloyd R. Hossner Water infiltration rates and the time to initial runoff (TTIR) of water were determined using a rainfall simulator on two select rice land soils in the Texas Gulf Coast. Non-vegetated (control), rice, and soybean... in the infiltration rate were due to variations in soil moisture content. The TTIR on the control plots decreased significantly during the course of the growing seasons on the Nada soil. The TTIR on the rice and soybean plots did not significantly change...

  15. Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

  16. Regular Type III and Type N Approximate Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Downes; Paul MacAllevey; Bogdan Nita; Ivor Robinson

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New type III and type N approximate solutions which are regular in the linear approximation are shown to exist. For that, we use complex transformations on self-dual Robinson-Trautman metrics rather then the classical approach. The regularity criterion is the boundedness and vanishing at infinity of a scalar obtained by saturating the Bel-Robinson tensor of the first approximation by a time-like vector which is constant with respect to the zeroth approximation.

  17. P-type gallium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Montara, CA); Fu, Tracy (Berkeley, CA); Ross, Jennifer (Pleasanton, CA); Chan, James (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  18. P-type gallium nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  19. IMS Member's Publications DOUGLAS J. ADAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

    -based Analysis of Bench-Scale Fixed-Bed Units for Chemical-Looping Combustion, Chem.Eng. J., 233, 331. Han, L Zhou, Z., Han, L., & Bollas, G.M., (2014), Overview of Chemical-Looping Reduction in Fixed Bed and Fluidized Bed Reactors Focused on Oxygen Carrier Utilization and Reactor Efficiency, Aerosol Air Qual. Res

  20. Overview of Remote Procedure Douglas C. Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    frame- works may be viewed as an extension of RPC RPC on steriods e.g., OMG CORBA RPC falls somewhere

  1. SEED SOURCE ASSESSMENTS--DOUGLAS-FIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    (TGC, RGC) just after lifting and after cold storage, and for survival and growth on cleared planting extent are TGC and RGC at lifting altered by seedling cold storage to spring planting time? · When during the winter season can seedlings in the nursery be safely lifted for cold storage and spring planting? · How

  2. A "Circle Limit III" Calculation Douglas Dunham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Doug

    lines make with the bounding circle, and (2) are other such patterns of fish possible? H.S.M. Coxeter answered the first question and I described a 3-parameter family of possible fish patterns in my 2006 for any such fish pattern. 1. Introduction Figure 1 below shows a computer rendition of the Dutch artist M

  3. Douglas W. McCowan Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    ­1538. McCowan, D. W., Glover, P., and Alexander, S. S., 1978, A crust and upper mantle structure for Novaya­544. McCowan, D. W., Glover, P., and Alexander, S. S., 1977, A static and dynamic finite element analysis., and Glover, P., 1973, Numerical calcul

  4. COMPUTER-AIDED INSTRUCTION Douglas N. Arnold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Douglas N.

    , animation, speech, and music. The guided drill is a computer program that poses questions to students. For example, computers can be used to display human anatomy, molecular structures, or complex geometrical virtual laboratory experiments that may be too difficult, expensive, or dangerous to perform in a school

  5. DOUGLAS NATELSON Department of Physics and Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    experience with Oxford 400 (toploading) and Kelvinox dilution refrigerators, 3 He refrigerators, and a variety of other cryostats; design and fabrication of nuclear demagnetization refrigeration stage, 3 He

  6. CHANGE-POINT METHODS Douglas M. Hawkins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Peihua

    been proposed as tools for following up signals given by other charting methods, when their likelihood: Change-point, LRT, GLR, Phase I, Phase II, SPC. 1 #12;1 INTRODUCTION Statistical process control methods will assume is unknown. If both 0 and 1 are known, then the SPC diagnostic of choice is generally

  7. Douglas Scott Richm ond, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    , and economic effectiveness of different lawn ca programs. Urban Ecosystems (In Press). Cheng, Z., D.S. R ns

  8. Douglas W. Jones January 15, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Douglas W.

    in Europe Election Observing or Assessment Missions for the December 4, 2005 presidential elections that it is not taking place. If a voter decides to permit someone to watch over their shoulder while filling out

  9. Douglas, AZ Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469Decade Year-0CubicCubic8 Final May 2010 2008 of

  10. Douglas Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjin Semichem Co

  11. Douglas, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:EmerlingDoorDothan,Nevada:

  12. Douglas, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:EmerlingDoorDothan,Nevada:Massachusetts: Energy

  13. Douglas, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:EmerlingDoorDothan,Nevada:Massachusetts:

  14. Douglas Jacobsen! NERSC Bioinformatics Computing Consultant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69 FederalAdministrationDoug Kothe About

  15. Douglas Jacobsen! NERSC Bioinformatics Computing Consultant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69 FederalAdministrationDoug Kothe

  16. Douglas Jacobsen! NERSC Bioinformatics Computing Consultant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69 FederalAdministrationDoug KotheRunning Jobs

  17. Douglas Jacobsen! NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69 FederalAdministrationDoug

  18. Douglas, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open EnergyProject ProjectonlyOak,

  19. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetable Processing/Cold Storage Facilities. Proceedings ofControl System in a Food Cold Storage Facility. Case Studyare discussed below. Cold storage involves the storage of

  20. The effects of applied water at various fractions of measured evapotranspiration on water relations and vegetative growth of Thompson Seedless grapevines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, L. E.; Grimes, D. W.; Phene, C. J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water productivity of Thompson Seedless grapevines. Irrigand vegetative growth of Thompson Seedless grapevines L. E.and water relations of Thompson Seedless grapevines in

  1. Calculation set for design and optimization of vegetative soil covers Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrates that containment of municipal and hazardous waste in arid and semiarid environments can be accomplished effectively without traditional, synthetic materials and complex, multi-layer systems. This research demonstrates that closure covers combining layers of natural soil, native plant species, and climatic conditions to form a sustainable, functioning ecosystem will meet the technical equivalency criteria prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. In this study, percolation through a natural analogue and an engineered cover is simulated using the one-dimensional, numerical code UNSAT-H. UNSAT-H is a Richards. equation-based model that simulates soil water infiltration, unsaturated flow, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, and deep percolation. This study incorporates conservative, site-specific soil hydraulic and vegetation parameters. Historical meteorological data are used to simulate percolation through the natural analogue and an engineered cover, with and without vegetation. This study indicates that a 3-foot (ft) cover in arid and semiarid environments is the minimum design thickness necessary to meet the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-prescribed technical equivalency criteria of 31.5 millimeters/year and 1 x 10{sup -7} centimeters/second for net annual percolation and average flux, respectively. Increasing cover thickness to 4 or 5 ft results in limited additional improvement in cover performance.

  2. Uranium and other heavy metals in soil and vegetation from the Hanford environs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, K.R.; Kinnison, R.R.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong winds that could transport contaminated dust and other materials offsite from the Hanford 300 Area typically blow from the west or southwest. Samples were collected from an offsite study area located across the Columbia River and downwind from the 300 Area to estimate the concentrations of uranium and other heavy metals in soils and vegetation. Results were compared to similar measurements collected at control sites located both on and off the Hanford Site. These comparisons were used to test hypotheses that uranium and other heavy metals had been transported offsite by wind-blown dust or other materials. The conclusion from this study was that operations at the 300 Area have not resulted in a detectable impact on the offsite environs across the river. The concentration of uranium in soil samples from the study area was statistically greater than comparable samples from control sites, but there was no evidence that the uranium in the study-area samples was other than naturally occurring. There was no statistical difference in the concentration of lead, silver, zinc or copper in soil samples from the study area as compared to the control sites. No statistically significant differences in uranium or other heavy metals were noted among vegetation samples from the various sampling sites.

  3. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  4. Vegetation and sediment characteristics of created and natural Spartina alterniflora marshes in Lower Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albertson, Andrea Kai

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and sediment parameters were compared on the basis of marsh type, age, habitat zone and microhabitat type. Created marshes were characterized by consistently taller stems and greater live plant biomass, but lower densities of live and dead stems and lower...

  5. The effects of fall and spring burning on water quality and vegetative cover in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Nick Ernest

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRE EPFECTS OF FALL AND SPRING BURNING ON WATER QUALITY AND VEGETATIVE COVER IN TRE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF TEKAS A Thesis by NICK ERNEST GARZA Jr. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major Subject: Range Science THE EFFECTS OF FALL AND SPRING BURNING ON WATER QUALITY AND VEGETATIVE COVER IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF TEXAS A Thesis by NICK ERNEST GARZA Jr. Approved as to style...

  6. STOMP Sparse Vegetation Evapotranspiration Model for the Water-Air-Energy Operational Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water-Air-Energy (WAE) Operational Mode of the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) numerical simulator solves the coupled conservation equations for water mass, air mass, and thermal energy in multiple dimensions. This addendum describes the theory, input file formatting, and application of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) scheme for STOMP that is based on a sparse vegetation evapotranspiration model. The SVAT scheme is implemented as a boundary condition on the upper surface of the computational domain and has capabilities for simulating evaporation from bare surfaces as well as evapotranspiration from sparsely vegetated surfaces populated with single or multiple plant species in response to meteorological forcings. With this extension, the model calculates water mass, air mass and thermal energy across a boundary surface in addition to root-water transport between the subsurface and atmosphere. This mode represents the barrier extension of the WAE mode and is designated as STOMP-WAE-B. Input for STOMP-WAE-B is specified via three input cards and include: atmospheric conditions through the Atmospheric Conditions Card; time-invariant plant species data through the Plant Properties Card; and time varying plant species data through the Boundary Conditions Card. Two optional cards, the Observed Data and UCODE Control Cards allow use of STOMP-WAE with UCODE in an inverse mode to estimate model parameters. STOMP-WAE was validated by solving a number of test problems from the literature that included experimental observations as well as analytical or numerical solutions. Several of the UNSAT-H verification problems are included along with a benchmark simulation derived from a recently published intercode comparison for barrier design tools. Results show that STOMP is able to meet, and in most cases, exceed performance of other commonly used simulation codes without having to resort to may of their simplifying assumptions. Use of the fully coupled STOMP simulator to guide barrier design will result in optimized designs with reduced construction costs; reduced environmental impacts at borrow sites; and minimized post-closure care and monitoring needs, while meeting regulatory requirements.

  7. R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Vegetation Recovery in Slash-Pile Scars Following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern, Charles B.

    R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Vegetation Recovery in Slash-Pile Scars Following Conifer Removal piles to reduce woody residues from forest restoration practices generates intense, prolonged heating, with adverse effects on soils and vegetation. In this study, we examined veg- etation responses to pile burning

  8. Long-term evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme's frozen ground/permafrost component using observations at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    Long-term evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme's frozen ground/permafrost component of the hydro-thermodynamic soil-vegetation scheme (HTSVS) was evaluated by means of permafrost computational time. Citation: Mo¨lders, N., and V. E. Romanovsky (2006), Long-term evaluation of the Hydro

  9. 34 Jong-Seok Lee : Utilizing Concept of Vegetation Freeboard Equivalence in River Restoration International Journal of Contents, Vol.8, No.3, Sep 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    : Vegetation Freeboard Equivalence (VFE); River Restoration; Stream Rehabilitation; Levee Design; Flood Control34 Jong-Seok Lee : Utilizing Concept of Vegetation Freeboard Equivalence in River Restoration in River Restoration Jong-Seok Lee* Department of Civil Engineering Hanbat National University, Daejeon 301

  10. Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

    2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Because calibrated light curves of Type Ia supernovae have become a major tool to determine the local expansion rate of the Universe and also its geometrical structure, considerable attention has been given to models of these events over the past couple of years. There are good reasons to believe that perhaps most Type Ia supernovae are the explosions of white dwarfs that have approached the Chandrasekhar mass, M_ch ~ 1.39 M_sun, and are disrupted by thermonuclear fusion of carbon and oxygen. However, the mechanism whereby such accreting carbon-oxygen white dwarfs explode continues to be uncertain. Recent progress in modeling Type Ia supernovae as well as several of the still open questions are addressed in this review. Although the main emphasis will be on studies of the explosion mechanism itself and on the related physical processes, including the physics of turbulent nuclear combustion in degenerate stars, we also discuss observational constraints.

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gutschick, Vincent P. (Los Alamos, NM); Barron, Michael H. (Los Alamos, NM); Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

  12. Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

    1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

  13. Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 C increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

  14. Synthesis, droplet combustion, and sooting characteristics of biodiesel produced from waste vegetable oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, T. X.; Zhu, D. L.; Akafuah, N.; Saito, K.; Law, C. K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In light of the potential of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME, i.e. biodiesel) as a renewable energy source, an innovative acid catalyzed process was developed for the synthesis of biodiesel from waste vegetable oils. The synthesized biodiesels were analytically characterized for their major components, molar fraction and molecular weight of each component, the average molecular weight, and the heat of combustion. Their droplet combustion characteristics in terms of the burning rate, flame size, and sooting tendency were subsequently determined in a high-temperature, freely-falling droplet apparatus. Results show that the biodiesel droplet has higher burning rate, and that biodiesel in general has a lower propensity to soot because its molecular oxygen content promotes the oxidation of the soot precursors.

  15. Exploring the relationships between vegetation measurements and temperature in residential areas by integrating LIDAR and remotely sensed imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemonds, Matthew A

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    at higher resolutions is much more difficult to obtain. This has allowed researchers to study urban heat island dynamics at a micro-scale. However, this study suggests that a vegetation index alone might not be the best surrogate variable for providing...

  16. -RECORDING RELATIVE WATER TABLE DEPTH USING PVC TAPE DISCOLOURATION -21 Applied Vegetation Science 8: 21-26, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navrátilová, Jana

    - RECORDING RELATIVE WATER TABLE DEPTH USING PVC TAPE DISCOLOURATION - 21 Applied Vegetation during restoration. The PVC tape discolouration method enables spatially and temporally extensive studies and the same variables indicated by discolouration of PVC tape attached to green bamboo stakes installed

  17. Vegetation and climate dynamics during the early Middle Miocene from Lake Sinj (Dinaride Lake System, SE Croatia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo

    System, SE Croatia) Gonzalo Jiménez-Moreno a, , Oleg Mandic b , Mathias Harzhauser b , Davor Paveli c of Zagreb, Pierottijeva 6, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia A B S T R A C TA R T I C L E I N F O Article history 2008 Keywords: pollen vegetation climate change Miocene Croatia Pollen data from sediments from

  18. INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF RIPARIAN AND MARSH VEGETATION ON DREDGED-MATERIAL ISLANDS IN THE SACRAMENTO-SAN JOAQUIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF RIPARIAN AND MARSH VEGETATION ON DREDGED-MATERIAL ISLANDS IN THE SACRAMENTO establishment and de- velopment were monitored for 3 1/2 years on a new, dredged-material island located within elevations when de- signing future levees, dredged-material deposition areas, and fish and wildlife habitat

  19. Ecosystem water exchange and partitioning of evapotranspiration along vegetation gradients: Implications of projected dust-bowl climate in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Ecosystem water exchange and partitioning of evapotranspiration along vegetation gradients of water cycling have been identified to produce, among other effects, changes in ecosystem composition with changes associated with these ecosystem-climate interactions (Jacobs et al., 2005) One of the key water

  20. VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA --Much of the previous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    49 NOTES VEGETATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF PRONGHORN BED SITES IN WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, SOUTH DAKOTA mortality (Beale 1978, Barrett 1984, Gregg et al. 2001) and social behavior (Kitchen 1974, Autenrieth. The pronghorn was reintroduced into Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota, in 1914 and thus, has been maintained

  1. -Wavelet analysis for detecting anisotropy in point patterns -277 Journal of Vegetation Science 15: 277-284, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael S.

    - Wavelet analysis for detecting anisotropy in point patterns - 277 Journal of Vegetation Science methods designed for continuously distributed data. Wavelet analysis, a booming approach to studying into the ecological literature. A simple adaptation of wavelet analysis is proposed for the detection of anisotropy

  2. Nutrient Availability in Rangeland Soils: Influence of Prescribed Burning, Herbaceous Vegetation Removal, Overseeding with Bromus tectorum, Season, and Elevation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Availability in Rangeland Soils: Influence of Prescribed Burning, Herbaceous Vegetation availability influences plant invasions. Resin capsules were used to examine soil nutrient bioavailability installed at 15-cm depth in a shrub interspace and a B. tectorumoverseeded area. Nutrient availability

  3. int. j. remote sensing, 2002, vol. 23, no. 21, 47614776 A multivariate approach to vegetation mapping of Manitoba's Hudson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenkel, Norm

    12­14 June 2000. International Journal of Remote Sensing ISSN 0143-1161 print/ISSN 1366-5901 onlineint. j. remote sensing, 2002, vol. 23, no. 21, 4761­4776 A multivariate approach to vegetation the likelihood of errors in classi cation caused by overlap between classes. 1. Introduction Remotely sensed data

  4. Identifying changes in tropical vegetation coverage productivity at Cueva Dos Ojos, Puerto Rico using IKONOS, ETM+, and OLI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    using ENVI software and images from IKONOS, ETM+, and OLI sensors and CIR (color infrared) aerial using IKONOS, ETM+, and OLI Sensors and CIR aerial photography Flora P. Sperberg Geology Department in the evaluation of the carbon isotope signature. Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVI) were calculated

  5. Comparison of Georgia and US Per Capita Fruit, Vegetable, Livestock, and Poultry Consumption, 2011 Estimated 2011 Georgia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Robert A.

    Comparison of Georgia and US Per Capita Fruit, Vegetable, Livestock, and Poultry Consumption, 2011 Capita) Data System 4 Value= Per capita consumption (column 3) multiplied by Georgia Population (9 Estimated 2011 Georgia Population (9,687,653)1 2011 Farm Gate Production (lbs)2 2010 Per Capita US

  6. Sociology and Agriculture Interwoven (or Nonwoven?) Vegetable growers depend on plastic mulches to control weeds, conserve moisture, warm soil and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Sociology and Agriculture Interwoven (or Nonwoven?) Vegetable growers depend on plastic mulches-based mulch, along with the standard black plastic and a biodegradable paper mulch. UT materials scientists mulches (BDMs) in Washington, Texas and Tennessee. The objective of the project is to compare tomato

  7. A Bit About Bulbs Night temperatures are cool, the air is almost crisp. The vegetable harvest is tapering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    A Bit About Bulbs Night temperatures are cool, the air is almost crisp. The vegetable harvest! There is always something to do, and right now is the time to plant spring-flowering bulbs. Whether your preference is for naturalized or formal bulb plantings, on a small or large scale, keep kinds and colors

  8. -Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load -751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18: 751-754, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCune, Bruce

    as predictors. Heat load was calculated as a 45 degree rotation of the PDIR response surface. Results- Improved estimates of incident radiation and heat load - 751 Journal of Vegetation Science 18 regression (NPMR) improve estimates of potential direct incident radia- tion (PDIR) and heat load based

  9. Vegetation patterns of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas, in relation to elevation and slope aspect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bryan Joseph

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data on the woody vegetation of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas was gathered on an elevational gradient from 1250 m to 2000 m elevation using the point-centered quarter method. Sampling was conducted at 12 sites at 1250 m, 1500 m, 1625 m...

  10. Country Scotland Type Single malt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izzard, Rob

    Country Scotland Type Single malt Distillery Aberfeldy Region Highlands Age 12 years ABV 40% Cask, the perfume characteristics become more spicy, with a bitter hint of Seville oranges in a decidedly dry finish. Drying citrus/oak with a gentle spiciness, held in a warm embrace of cigar smoke, and a little vanilla

  11. Country Scotland Type Single malt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izzard, Rob

    Country Scotland Type Single malt Distillery Jura Region Island Name Prophecy ABV 46 Cask French airport Notes Limited annual release: 10,000 bottles only. Nose Some peat, aniseed, oily, dry, pungent, dried hay, and anise round things out. Palate Smoky and dry, a muscular, powerful Jura with notes

  12. Automatic Utterance Type Detection Using Suprasegmental Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Helen

    that different types of utterances have different suprasegmental characteristics. The categorisation of these utterance types is based on the theory of conversation games and consists of 12 move types (e.g. reply to a question, wh-question, acknowledgement...

  13. Russell W. Wallace, Ph.D. & John C. Hodges Extension Vegetable Specialist & Research Technician

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    effects of selected plastic mulch types or caged systems on fresh market tomatoes. Materials and Methods and SRM Silver plastic mulches (Figure 1). Six- week old tomato seedlings (Var. "Celebrity") were' and contained 8 plants each. Table 1. The Effects of Plastic Mulch Type and Caging on Tomato (Var. "Celebrity

  14. Tridiagonal pairs of Krawtchouk type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Tatsuro

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $K$ denote an algebraically closed field with characteristic 0 and let $V$ denote a vector space over $K$ with finite positive dimension. Let $A,A^*$ denote a tridiagonal pair on $V$ with diameter $d$. We say that $A,A^*$ has Krawtchouk type whenever the sequence $\\lbrace d-2i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ is a standard ordering of the eigenvalues of $A$ and a standard ordering of the eigenvalues of $A^*$. Assume $A,A^*$ has Krawtchouk type. We show that there exists a nondegenerate symmetric bilinear form $$ on $V$ such that $= $ and $= $ for $u,v\\in V$. We show that the following tridiagonal pairs are isomorphic: (i) $A,A^*$; (ii) $-A,-A^*$; (iii) $A^*,A$; (iv) $-A^*,-A$. We give a number of related results and conjectures.

  15. Abstract DNA-type systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diederik Aerts; Marek Czachor

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An abstract DNA-type system is defined by a set of nonlinear kinetic equations with polynomial nonlinearities that admit soliton solutions associated with helical geometry. The set of equations allows for two different Lax representations: A von Neumann form and a Darboux-covariant Lax pair. We explain why non-Kolmogorovian probability models occurring in soliton kinetics are naturally associated with chemical reactions. The most general known characterization of soliton kinetic equations is given and a class of explicit soliton solutions is discussed. Switching between open and closed states is a generic behaviour of the helices. The effect does not crucially depend on the order of nonlinearity (i.e. types of reactions), a fact that may explain why simplified models possess properties occuring in realistic systems. We explain also why fluctuations based on Darboux transformations will not destroy the dynamics but only switch between a finite number of helical structures.

  16. Niger Delta play types, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akinpelu, A.O. [Chevron Nigeria Limited, Lagos (Nigeria)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration databases can be more valuable when sorted by play type. Play specific databases provide a system to organize E & P data used in evaluating the range of values of parameters for reserve estimation and risk assessment. It is important both in focusing the knowledge base and in orienting research effort. A play in this context is any unique combination of trap, reservoir and source properties with the right dynamics of migration and preservation that results in hydrocarbon accumulation. This definitions helps us to discriminate the subtle differences found with these accumulation settings. About 20 play types were identified around the Niger Delta oil province in Nigeria. These are grouped into three parts: (1) The proven plays-constituting the bulk of exploration prospects in Nigeria today. (2) The unproven or semi-proven plays usually with some successes recorded in a few tries but where knowledge is still inadequate. (3) The unproven or analogous play concept. These are untested but geologically sound ideas which may or may not have been tried elsewhere. With classification and sub grouping of these play types into specific databases, intrinsic attributes and uniqueness of each of them with respect to the four major risk elements and the eight parameters for reserve estimation can be better understood.

  17. Climate-Soil-Vegetation Control on Groundwater Table Dynamics and its Feedbacks in a Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Qian, Yun; Liang, Xu

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the three dynamically linked branches of the water cycle, including atmospheric, surface, and subsurface water, groundwater is the largest reservoir and an active component of the hydrologic system. Because of the inherent slow response time, groundwater may be particularly relevant for long time-scale processes such as multi-years or decadal droughts. This study uses regional climate simulations with and without surface water groundwater interactions for the conterminous U.S. to assess the influence of climate, soil, and vegetation on groundwater table dynamics, and its potential feedbacks to regional climate. Analysis shows that precipitation has a dominant influence on the spatial and temporal variations of groundwater table depth (GWT). The simulated GWT is found to decrease sharply with increasing precipitation. Our simulation also shows some distinct spatial variations that are related to soil porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Vegetation properties such as minimum stomatal resistance, and root depth and fraction are also found to play an important role in controlling the groundwater table. Comparing two simulations with and without groundwater table dynamics, we find that groundwater table dynamics mainly influences the partitioning of soil water between the surface (0 0.5 m) and subsurface (0.5 5 m) rather than total soil moisture. In most areas, groundwater table dynamics increases surface soil moisture at the expense of the subsurface, except in regions with very shallow groundwater table. The change in soil water partitioning between the surface and subsurface is found to strongly correlate with the partitioning of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. The evaporative fraction (EF) is generally higher during summer when groundwater table dynamics is included. This is accompanied by increased cloudiness, reduced diurnal temperature range, cooler surface temperature, and increased cloud top height. Although both convective and non-convective precipitation are enhanced, the higher EF changes the partitioning to favor more non-convective precipitation, but this result could be sensitive to the convective parameterization used. Compared to simulations without groundwater table dynamics, the dry bias in the summer precipitation is slightly reduced over the central and eastern U.S. Groundwater table dynamics can provide important feedbacks to atmospheric processes, and these feedbacks are stronger in regions with deeper groundwater table, because the interactions between surface and subsurface are weak when the groundwater table is deep. This increases the sensitivity of surface soil moisture to precipitation anomalies, and therefore enhances land surface feedbacks to the atmosphere through changes in soil moisture and evaporative fraction. By altering the groundwater table depth, land use change and groundwater withdrawal can alter land surface response and feedback to the climate system.

  18. hal00270574, Testing Data Types Implementations from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is data type abstraction, testing a concrete implementation raises the issue of the gap betweenhal­00270574, version 1 ­ 6 Apr 2008 Testing Data Types Implementations from Algebraic Speci#12.legall@ibisc.univ-evry.fr Abstract. Algebraic speci#12;cations of data types provide a natural basis for testing data types

  19. XML Document XML Document Types and Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Gregory D.

    XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 Objectives XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 April, 2010 #12;XML Document Types and Validation IIM-I340 Objectives Learning Objectives Understand: The need for validation Two ways to specify validity: Document Type Definitions (DTDs) XML Schemas #12;XML

  20. Mapping of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles in Nearshore Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Mark E.; Miller, Lee M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Ewert, Daniel W.

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) equipped with sidescan sonar was investigated for determining the boundaries of nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation beds, specifically eelgrass (Zostera marina). Shifts in eelgrass bed morphology, size, and distribution are used as indicators in monitoring programs to measure the impacts of coastal development and environmental stressors on eelgrass and to establish the efficacy of restoration programs. However, many monitoring programs necessarily extend over multiple-year time periods. Therefore, techniques that are easily reproducible, accurate, and cost-effective can demonstrate distinct advantages over some of the more traditional and labor-intensive methods, such as diver assessments and transects of shoot counts. Remote monitoring of eelgrass beds using satellite and aerial imagery has been demonstrated with moderate success, but requires groundtruthing, which can be costly and which frequently cannot delineate the deeper boundaries of eelgrass beds. One possible means for low-cost mapping is the use of AUVs equipped with acoustic imaging hardware. AUVs provide an ideal platform, because they can be deployed by small teams (two people), they are highly maneuverable, they can cover large areas over a relatively short time period (3knot operational speed), and they are equipped with multiple oceanographic instruments for correlated data collection. This paper describes the use of sidescan-equipped AUV technology deployed over multiple time periods at the same location where imagery of eelgrass beds was obtained and analyzed for comparative purposes.

  1. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  2. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalu, E. Eric (FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL); Chen, Ken Shuang

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

  4. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load.

  5. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.

    1982-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load.

  6. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load. 7 figs.

  7. Douglas J. Fouts -Assistant Professor Douglas Jai Fouts, PhD, PE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for use in the U.S. Navy Advanced Integrated Electronic Warfare System. Principal Investigator - U synthesize false radar return images in electronic attack systems to counter wideband imaging radars of an automated software interface between CEPXS (Coupled Electron/Proton Transport Simulator) and SPICE

  8. Weak Protein-Protein Interactions in Lectins: The Crystal Structure of a Vegetative Lectin from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamelryck, Thomas

    of a previously unobserved type, in addition to a tetramer consisting of two such dimers. This tetramer resembles DBL-like tetramer in solution, but does not prohibit its formation in suit- able conditions, which

  9. Baseline concentrations of radionuclides and heavy metals in soils and vegetation around the DARHT facility: Construction phase (1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Haagenstad, H.T.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Department of Energy`s Mitigation Action Plan for the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), baseline concentrations of radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, total U), and heavy metals (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se and Tl) in soil, sediment, and vegetation (overstory and understory) around the DARHT facility during the construction phase in 1996 were determined. Also, U and Be concentrations in soil samples collected in 1993 from within the proposed DARHT facility area are reported. Most radionuclides in soils, sediments, and vegetation were within current background and/or long-term regional statistical reference levels.

  10. Production of Biodiesel from Vegetable Oil Using CaO Catalyst & Analysis of Its Performance in Four Stroke Diesel Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sruthi Gopal; Sajitha C. M; Uma Krishnakumar

    Abstract- The production of biodiesel from vegetable oils stands as a new versatile method of energy generation in the present scenario. Biodiesel is obtained by the transesterification of long chain fatty acids in presence of catalysts. Transesterification is an attractive and widely accepted technique. The purpose of the transesterification process is to lower the viscosity of the oil. The most important variables affecting methyl ester yield during the transesterification reaction are the molar ratio of alcohol to vegetable oil, reaction temperature, catalyst amount and time. Biodiesel is renewable, biodegradable, non-toxic, and essentially free of sulfur and aromatics. It can be used in diesel engines by blending with conventional diesel in various proportions. Biodiesel seems to be a realistic fuel for future. It has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits. This paper discuses the production of biodiesel from

  11. Distribution of Flux Vacua around Singular Points in Calabi-Yau Moduli Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tohru Eguchi; Yuji Tachikawa

    2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the distribution of type IIB flux vacua in the moduli space near various singular loci, e.g. conifolds, ADE singularities on P1, Argyres-Douglas point etc, using the Ashok- Douglas density det(R + omega). We find that the vacuum density is integrable around each of them, irrespective of the type of the singularities. We study in detail an explicit example of an Argyres-Douglas point embedded in a compact Calabi-Yau manifold.

  12. Conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of Iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation, 1945--1947: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mart, E.I.; Denham, D.H.; Thiede, M.E.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project whose goal is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The report describes in detail the reconstructed conversion and correction factors for historical measurements of iodine-131 in Hanford-area vegetation which was collected from the beginning of October 1945 through the end of December 1947.

  13. Water use by saltcedar (Tamarix sp.) and associated vegetation on the Canadian, Colorado and Pecos Rivers in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Kenneth Brian

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . B. Thomas were at full capacity. The study location was approximately 460 m from the river channel. The soils at this location were alluvial deposits and consisted primarily of loams and sandy clay loams. The vegetation at this site consisted... season; however, the flow changed with water releases (for irrigation) from Red Bluff Lake. Water Level Recorder Global Water' (Global Water Instrumentation, Inc. Gold River, Ca. USA) WL14X water level loggers were used to measure hourly water levels...

  14. Applicability of the Gallet equation to the vegetation clearances of NERC Reliability Standard FAC-003-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NERC has proposed a standard to use to specify clearances between vegetation and power lines. The purpose of the rule is to reduce the probability of flashover to a calculably low level. This report was commissioned by FERCs Office of Electrical Reliability. The scope of the study was analysis of the mathematics and documentation of the technical justification behind the application of the Gallet equation and the assumptions used in the technical reference paper

  15. EA-1982: Parker-Davis Transmission System Routine Operation and Maintenance Project and Proposed Integrated Vegetation Management Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed continuation of operations and maintenance activities and implementation of a vegetation management program on Westerns Parker-Davis Transmission System. These actions would occur on existing transmission line and access road rights-of-way, and at substations and maintenance facilities associated with the transmission system.

  16. Quality Assurance Manual for the "Frutas y Verduras" produce operation: 1. Initial considerations on the evaluaton and conservation of vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riba, Edgard Luis

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract This professional paper is the starting point for the development of the Quality Assurance Manual for the produce operation "Frutas y Verduras, " in the Republic of Panama. The paper deals with the main vegetables handled by the Frutas y... description of what the handling practices are at the present time, and also, gives recommendations on what they should be. 2 ALLIUM 2. 1 Bunching onion (Cebollina, Allium fistulosum): 2. 1. 1 Description Bunching onions, as consumed in Panama, do...

  17. Radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in soil, vegetation, and fish collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, total U) and heavy metal (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Tl) contents were determined in soil, vegetation (overstory and understory), and fish (rainbow trout) collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon in 1995. All heavy metal and most radionuclide contents around or within the lake, except for U in soil, vegetation, and fish, were within or just above upper limit background. Detectable levels (where the analytical result was greater than two times counting uncertainty) of U in soils, vegetation, and fish were found in slightly higher concentrations than in background samples. Overall, however, maximum total committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE)(95% confidence level)--based on consumption of 46 lb of fish--from Tsicoma Lake (0.066 mrem/y) was within the maximum total CEDE from the ingestion of fish from the Mescalero National Fish Hatchery (background)(0.113 mrem/y).

  18. Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 1: Field evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbraith, H.; LeJeune, K.; Lipton, J. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of arsenic and metals in soils surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana were correlated with vegetative community structure and composition and wildlife habitat quality. Soils in the uplands surrounding the smelter were highly enriched with arsenic and metals. Concentrations of these analytes decreased with distance from the smelter and with soil depth, suggesting that the smelter is the source of the enrichment. In enriched areas, marked modifications to the native vegetation community structure and composition were observed. These included replacement of evergreen forest with bare unvegetated ground; species impoverishment and increased dominance by weed species in grasslands; and reductions in the vertical complexity of the habitat. Significant negative correlations existed between soil arsenic and metals concentrations and the extent of vegetative cover and the vertical diversity of plant communities. Loss of vegetative cover in the affected areas has been accompanied by reductions in their capacity to support indigenous wildlife populations.

  19. Influence of application methods and varying rates of uniconazol on the vegetative and reproductive response of pecan trees, Carya illinoensis (Wang) K. Koch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Charles Jordan

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Horticulture INFLUENCE OF APPLICATION METHODS AND VARYING RATES OF UNICONAZOL ON THE VEGETATIVE AND REPRODUCTIVE RESPONSE OF PECAN TREES... Influence of Application Methods and Varying Rates of Uniconazol on the Vegetative and Reproductive Response of Pecan Trees, Carya illinoensis (Wang) K. Koch. (May 1990) Charles Jordan Graham, B. S. , Texas ARM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr...

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.