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Sample records for vegetation cover analysis

  1. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... vegetation from AVIRIS data: Decomposing biochemical from structural signals. Remote Sens. ... J. Multiple criteria for evaluating machine learning algorithms for land cover ...

  2. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 327-353; doi:10.3390/rs4020327 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing Article Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Jungho Im 1, *, John R. Jensen 2 , Ryan R. Jensen 3 , John Gladden 4 , Jody Waugh 5 and Mike Serrato 4 1 Department of Environmental Resources Engineering, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA 2

  3. VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

    2012-01-17

    Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

  4. Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

  5. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  6. Using Unmanned Helicopters to Assess Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Randy Lee

    2012-07-01

    Evaluating vegetation cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. Methods that have sufficient accuracy and improved cost efficiency could dramatically alter how biotic resources are monitored on both public and private lands. This will be of interest to land managers because there are rarely enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, unmanned helicopters were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover during May, June, and July in 2005. The images were used to estimate percent cover for six vegetative cover classes (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forbs, litter, and bare ground). The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ocular assessments of digital imagery were performed using a software program called SamplePoint, and the results were compared against field measurements collected using a point-frame method to assess accuracy. The helicopter imagery evaluation showed a high degree of agreement with field cover class values for litter, bare ground, and grass, and reasonable agreement for dead shrubs. Shrub cover was often overestimated and forbs were generally underestimated. The helicopter method took 45% less time than the field method to set plots and collect and analyze data. This study demonstrates that UAV technology provides a viable method for monitoring vegetative cover on rangelands in less time and with lower costs. Tradeoffs between cost and accuracy are critical management decisions that are important when managing vegetative conditions across vast sagebrush ecosystems throughout the Intermountain West.

  7. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosytstems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge

    2005-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

  8. Comparison of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Platforms for Assessing Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Sera White

    2011-09-01

    In this study, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quick and safe method for monitoring biotic resources was evaluated. Vegetation cover and the amount of bare ground are important factors in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems and assessment of rangeland health. Methods that improve speed and cost efficiency could greatly improve how biotic resources are monitored on western lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species (including sage grouse and pygmy rabbit). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, two UAV platforms, fixed wing and helicopter, were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate percent cover for six different vegetation types (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forb, litter, and bare ground) and (2) locate sage grouse using representative decoys. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Engineering (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetation cover. A software program called SamplePoint was used along with visual inspection to evaluate percent cover for the six cover types. Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform to use. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

  9. Calculation set for design and optimization of vegetative soil covers Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-02-01

    This study demonstrates that containment of municipal and hazardous waste in arid and semiarid environments can be accomplished effectively without traditional, synthetic materials and complex, multi-layer systems. This research demonstrates that closure covers combining layers of natural soil, native plant species, and climatic conditions to form a sustainable, functioning ecosystem will meet the technical equivalency criteria prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. In this study, percolation through a natural analogue and an engineered cover is simulated using the one-dimensional, numerical code UNSAT-H. UNSAT-H is a Richards. equation-based model that simulates soil water infiltration, unsaturated flow, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, and deep percolation. This study incorporates conservative, site-specific soil hydraulic and vegetation parameters. Historical meteorological data are used to simulate percolation through the natural analogue and an engineered cover, with and without vegetation. This study indicates that a 3-foot (ft) cover in arid and semiarid environments is the minimum design thickness necessary to meet the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-prescribed technical equivalency criteria of 31.5 millimeters/year and 1 x 10{sup -7} centimeters/second for net annual percolation and average flux, respectively. Increasing cover thickness to 4 or 5 ft results in limited additional improvement in cover performance.

  10. Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

  11. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover and Identify Biotic Resources in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems: Preliminary Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge

    2006-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

  12. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing January 17, 2012 Jungho Im, John R. Jensen, Ryan R. Jensen, John Gladden, Jody Waugh and Mike Serrato PDF icon...

  13. SPECIAL ANALYSIS OF OPERATIONAL STORMWATER RUNOFF COVERS OVER SLIT TRENCHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collard, L; Luther Hamm, L

    2008-12-18

    Solid Waste Management (SWM) commissioned this Special Analysis (SA) to determine the effects of placing operational stormwater runoff covers (referred to as covers in the remainder of this document) over slit trench (ST) disposal units ST1 through ST7 (the center set of slit trenches). Previously the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entered into an agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to place covers over Slit Trenches 1 and 2 to be able to continue disposing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) solid waste (see USDOE 2008). Because the covers changed the operating conditions, DOE Order 435.1 (DOE 1999) required that an SA be performed to assess the impact. This Special Analysis has been prepared to determine the effects of placing covers over slit trenches at about years 5, 10 and 15 of the 30-year operational period. Because some slit trenches have already been operational for about 15 years, results from analyzing covers at 5 years and 10 years provide trend analysis information only. This SA also examined alternatives of covering Slit Trenches 1 and 2 with one cover and Slit Trenches 3 and 4 with a second cover versus covering them all with a single cover. Based on modeling results, minimal differences exist between covering Slit Trench groups 1-2 and 3-4 with two covers or one large cover. This SA demonstrates that placement of covers over slit trenches will slow the subsequent release and transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone in the early time periods (from time of placement until about 100 years). Release and transport of some radionuclides in the vadose zone beyond 100 years were somewhat higher than for the case without covers. The sums-of-fractions (SOFs) were examined for the current waste inventory in ST1 and ST2 and for estimated inventories at closure for ST3 through ST7. In all cases SOFs were less than one (except for one SOF for ST5 that remained at one), indicating that there should be no unacceptable impacts on operations from placing covers for the cover alternatives that were analyzed. Minimal operational limits provided in Table 4 should be used as the new set of limits for Slit Trenches 1 through 7. ST1 and ST2 are expected to be covered about 15 years after the first disposal in ST1. Because the time of actual placement of covers over the other slit trenches is unknown, this SA did not consider limit increases, only limit decreases. Thus, each minimal operational limit is the minimum of the Performance Assessment (PA) final limit and the limit calculated in this SA if covers were placed at about 5, 10 or 15 years. If other cover times are desired, further analysis will be required.

  14. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vegetation 250 o 250 N A Community _ Loblolly Pine D Bottomland Hardwood I!!!I Carolina Bay Wetland _ Bottomland HardwodlPine W Streams ~ Roads A/; Rails [2] SRS Bays Will Hydric Soils 500 Meters Soils Soil Series and Phase D DoA D DoB DRm rn Uo Figure 24-1. Plant COll/llll/lzities and soils associated with the Cypress Bay Set-Aside Area. sc 24-5 Set-Aside 24: Cypress Bay

  15. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  16. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge. The two map products described in this report are 1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and 2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  17. Sloshing analysis of cylindrical shell with rubber-covered surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Mochio, Takashi

    1995-11-01

    The estimation of sloshing in containers is more practically important in marine, aerospace, and civil engineering. Although considerable theoretical works have been done on this problem, little can be found in the literature about the dynamic interaction between liquid and membrane rubber. The present paper describes a new sloshing analysis of a rigid circular cylindrical tank with rubber-covered surface. The static membrane tension force of rubber is controlled in order to avoid the resonance of seismic excitations. The accurate analytical model for treating the coupled oscillations of a liquid and a surface rubber have to be based on the assumption of the large deformation and material nonlinearity of rubber, and the convective terms and viscosity of containing liquid. The new method is, however, the first step of the development of the fully nonlinear numerical analysis. The nonlinear phenomena of coupled system are supposed to be estimated by the present method which considered the nonlinearity of rubber and potential flow of containing liquid. A finite element formulation of membrane theory is given, and Newmark-{beta} method is used to solve the numerical time integration. The present analytical method is verified by comparison of linear analysis with experiment under the horizontal external impulsive load.

  18. Meteorological and air quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative cover in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Hammer, Hillel; Akbari, Hashem

    2002-04-30

    The study described in this report is part of a project sponsored by the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to assess the potential role of surface property modifications on energy, meteorology, and air quality in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada. Numerical models were used to establish the possible meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative fraction, i.e., ''cool-city'' strategies that can mitigate the urban heat island (UHI), significantly reduce urban energy consumption, and improve thermal comfort, particularly during periods of hot weather in summer. Mitigation is even more important during critical heat wave periods with possible increased heat-related hospitalization and mortality. The evidence suggests that on an annual basis cool-city strategies are beneficial, and the implementation of such measures is currently being investigated in the U.S. and Canada. We simulated possible scenari os for urban heat-island mitigation in the GTA and investigated consequent meteorological changes, and also performed limited air-quality analysis to assess related impacts. The study was based on a combination of mesoscale meteorological modeling, Lagrangian (trajectory), and photochemical trajectory modeling to assess the potential meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of cool-city strategies. As available air-quality and emissions data are incompatible with models currently in use at LBNL, our air-quality analysis was based on photochemical trajectory modeling. Because of questions as to the accuracy and appropriateness of this approach, in our opinion this aspect of the study can be improved in the future, and the air-quality results discussed in this report should be viewed as relatively qualitative. The MM5 meteorological model predicts a UHI in the order of 2 to 3 degrees C in locations of maxima, and about 1 degree C as a typical value over most of the urban area. Our si mulations suggest that cool-city strategies can typically reduce local urban air temperature by 0.5-1 degrees C; as more sporadic events, larger decreases (1.5 degrees C, 2.5-2.7 degrees C and 4-6 degrees C) were also simulated. With regard to ozone mixing ratios along the simulated trajectories, the effects of cool-city strategies appear to be on the order of 2 ppb, a typical decrease. The photochemical trajectory model (CIT) also simulates larger decreases (e.g., 4 to 8 ppb), but these are not taken as representative of the potential impacts in this report. A comparison with other simulations suggest very crudely that a decrease of this magnitude corresponds to significant ''equivalent'' decreases in both NOx and VOCs emissions in the region. Our preliminary results suggest that significant UHI control can be achieved with cool-cities strategies in the GTA and is therefore worth further study. We recommend that better input data and more accurate modeling schemes be used to carry out f uture studies in the same direction.

  19. 2014 Offshore Wind Market & Economic Analysis Cover Photo | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 4 Offshore Wind Market & Economic Analysis Cover Photo 2014 Offshore Wind Market & Economic Analysis Cover Photo Image icon Navigant 2014 Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis.JPG More Documents & Publications U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing & Supply Chain Cover Photo Offshore Wind Projects 2014 Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis Wind Program Home About the Program Research & Development WINDExchange Financial Opportunities Information Resources News

  20. Satellite image analysis for surveillance, vegetation and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, D Michael

    2011-01-18

    Recently, many studies have provided abundant evidence to show the trend of tree mortality is increasing in many regions, and the cause of tree mortality is associated with drought, insect outbreak, or fire. Unfortunately, there is no current capability available to monitor vegetation changes, and correlate and predict tree mortality with CO{sub 2} change, and climate change on the global scale. Different survey platforms (methods) have been used for forest management. Typical ground-based forest surveys measure tree stem diameter, species, and alive or dead. The measurements are low-tech and time consuming, but the sample sizes are large, running into millions of trees, covering large areas, and spanning many years. These field surveys provide powerful ground validation for other survey methods such as photo survey, helicopter GPS survey, and aerial overview survey. The satellite imagery has much larger coverage. It is easier to tile the different images together, and more important, the spatial resolution has been improved such that close to or even higher than aerial survey platforms. Today, the remote sensing satellite data have reached sub-meter spatial resolution for panchromatic channels (IKONOS 2: 1 m; Quickbird-2: 0.61 m; Worldview-2: 0.5 m) and meter spatial resolution for multi-spectral channels (IKONOS 2: 4 meter; Quickbird-2: 2.44 m; Worldview-2: 2 m). Therefore, high resolution satellite imagery can allow foresters to discern individual trees. This vital information should allow us to quantify physiological states of trees, e.g. healthy or dead, shape and size of tree crowns, as well as species and functional compositions of trees. This is a powerful data resource, however, due to the vast amount of the data collected daily, it is impossible for human analysts to review the imagery in detail to identify the vital biodiversity information. Thus, in this talk, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges to use high resolution satellite imagery and machine learning theory to monitor tree mortality at the level of individual trees.

  1. Systematic vegetation change analysis of mangrove dieoff in Florida Bay and southern Everglades National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, M.M.; Sargent, F.J.; Sargent, W.B.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief summary is provided of a project to link hydrological and ecological relationships of the Florida Everglades watershed and the Florida Bay estuary. The creation of vegetation maps and systematic spatial analysis of vegetation and hydrological features will provide information about the interaction between these two ecosystems. The distribution of mangroves, salt marshes, and related vegetative communities are being mapped using existing aerial photography. Historical photographic records are being used to create geographic information system data layers. Changes in the composition of wetlands and vegetative patterns will be compared over a 45-year period.

  2. Gradient Analysis and Classification of Carolina Bay Vegetation: A Framework for Bay Wetlands Conservation and Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diane De Steven,Ph.D.; Maureen Tone,PhD.

    1997-10-01

    This report address four project objectives: (1) Gradient model of Carolina bay vegetation on the SRS--The authors use ordination analyses to identify environmental and landscape factors that are correlated with vegetation composition. Significant factors can provide a framework for site-based conservation of existing diversity, and they may also be useful site predictors for potential vegetation in bay restorations. (2) Regional analysis of Carolina bay vegetation diversity--They expand the ordination analyses to assess the degree to which SRS bays encompass the range of vegetation diversity found in the regional landscape of South Carolina's western Upper Coastal Plain. Such comparisons can indicate floristic status relative to regional potentials and identify missing species or community elements that might be re-introduced or restored. (3) Classification of vegetation communities in Upper Coastal Plain bays--They use cluster analysis to identify plant community-types at the regional scale, and explore how this classification may be functional with respect to significant environmental and landscape factors. An environmentally-based classification at the whole-bay level can provide a system of templates for managing bays as individual units and for restoring bays to desired plant communities. (4) Qualitative model for bay vegetation dynamics--They analyze present-day vegetation in relation to historic land uses and disturbances. The distinctive history of SRS bays provides the possibility of assessing pathways of post-disturbance succession. They attempt to develop a coarse-scale model of vegetation shifts in response to changing site factors; such qualitative models can provide a basis for suggesting management interventions that may be needed to maintain desired vegetation in protected or restored bays.

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-09)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-05-01

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the rights of way and access roads for BPA's McNary-Santiam No. 1 Transmission Line, beginning in the summer of 2000 and ending in July, 2001. This Supplemental Analysis finds that: (1) the proposed actions are substantially consistent with the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285) and ROD; and (2) there are no new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the proposed actions or their impacts. Therefore, no further NEPA documentation is required.

  4. Screening analysis for EPACT-covered commercial HVAC and water-heating equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Somasundaram; PR Armstrong; DB Belzer; SC Gaines; DL Hadley; S Katipumula; DL Smith; DW Winiarski

    2000-05-25

    EPCA requirements state that if the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) amends efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90.1-1989, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in amended Standard 90.1. However, DOE can establish higher efficiency levels if it can show through clear and convincing evidence that a higher efficiency level, that is technologically feasible and economically justified, would produce significant additional energy savings. On October 29, 1999, ASHRAE approved the amended Standard 90.1, which increases the minimum efficiency levels for some of the commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equipment covered by EPCA 92. DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential of the efficiency levels listed in Standard 90.1-1999. The analysis estimates the annual national energy consumption and the potential for energy savings that would result if the EPACT-covered products were required to meet these efficiency levels. The analysis also estimates additional energy-savings potential for the EPACT-covered products if they were to exceed the efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90-1-1999. In addition, a simple life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was performed for some alternative efficiency levels. This paper will describe the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis. The magnitude of HVAC and SWH loads imposed on equipment depends on the building's physical and operational characteristics and prevailing climatic conditions. To address this variation in energy use, coil loads for 7 representative building types at 11 climate locations were estimated based on a whole-building simulation.

  5. Screening Analysis for EPACT-Covered Commercial HVAC and Water-Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, Sriram; Armstrong, Peter R.; Belzer, David B.; Gaines, Suzanne C.; Hadley, Donald L.; Katipumula, S.; Smith, David L.; Winiarski, David W.

    2000-04-25

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) establishes that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulate efficiency levels of certain categories of commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equip-ment. EPACT establishes the initial minimum efficiency levels for products falling under these categories, based on ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 requirements. EPCA states that, if ASHRAE amends Standard 90.1-1989 efficiency levels, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in the amended Standard 90.1 and that it can establish higher efficiency levels if they would result in significant additional energy savings. Standard 90.1-1999 increases minimum efficiency levels for some of the equipment categories covered by EPCA 92. DOE conducted a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential for EPACT-covered products meet and exceeding these levels. This paper describes the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis.

  6. Journal Covers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Covers Journal Covers The Crystallization of PEDOT:PSS Polymeric Electrodes Probed In Situ during Printing Print Thursday, 18 June 2015 11:53 Organic electronics have...

  7. Detailed analysis of the energy yield of systems with covered sheet-and-tube PVT collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santbergen, R.; Rindt, C.C.M.; van Zolingen, R.J.Ch.; Zondag, H.A.

    2010-05-15

    Solar cells have a typical efficiency in the range of 5-20%, implying that 80% or more of the incident solar energy can be harvested in the form of heat and applied for low-temperature heating. In a PVT collector one tries to collect this heat. In this work, the electrical and thermal yield of solar domestic hot water systems with one-cover sheet-and-tube PVT collectors were considered. Objectives of the work were to understand the mechanisms determining these yields, to investigate measures to improve these yields and to investigate the yield consequences if various solar cell technologies are being used. The work was carried out using numerical simulations. A detailed quantitative understanding of all loss mechanisms was obtained, especially of those being inherent to the use of PVT collectors instead of PV modules and conventional thermal collectors. The annual electrical efficiencies of the PVT systems investigated were up to 14% (relative) lower compared to pure PV systems and the annual thermal efficiencies up to 19% (relative) lower compared to pure thermal collector systems. The loss of electrical efficiency is mainly caused by the relatively high fluid temperature. The loss of thermal efficiency is caused both by the high emissivity of the absorber and the withdrawal of electrical energy. However, both the loss of electrical and thermal efficiency can be reduced further by the application of anti-reflective coatings. The thermal efficiency can be improved by the application of a low-emissivity coating on the absorber, however at the cost of a reduced electrical efficiency. (author)

  8. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preferred Provider Option (PPO) Medical Program For Active Employees and Their Covered Family Members and Non- Medicare Eligible Retirees and Their Covered Family Members Administered by: N113794 01/15 CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE Customer Service: Medical/Surgical Claims and Prescription Drugs-The 24/7 Nurseline can help when you have a health problem or concern. The 24/7 Nurseline is staffed by registered nurses who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 24/7 Nurseline toll-free telephone number:

  9. Unnumbered in cover letter

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    A John McCray, Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Unnumbered in cover letter The DOE report demonstrates a high level of technical competence; the modeling work and analysis are technically sound. No obviously serious flaws were discovered in the analysis described in the report. We thank the reviewer for sharing his observations in this regard. Unnumbered in cover letter However, I have identified some technical weaknesses that should be considered when evaluating the results in the

  10. UMTRA project disposal cell cover biointrusion sensitivity assessment, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This study provides an analysis of potential changes that may take place in a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell cover system as a result of plant biointrusion. Potential changes are evaluated by performing a sensitivity analysis of the relative impact of root penetrations on radon flux out of the cell cover and/or water infiltration into the cell cover. Data used in this analysis consist of existing information on vegetation growth on selected cell cover systems and information available from published studies and/or other available project research. Consistent with the scope of this paper, no new site-specific data were collected from UMTRA Project sites. Further, this paper does not focus on the issue of plant transport of radon gas or other contaminants out of the disposal cell cover though it is acknowledged that such transport has the potential to be a significant pathway for contaminants to reach the environment during portions of the design life of a disposal cell where plant growth occurs. Rather, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of physical penetration and soil drying caused by plant roots that have and are expected to continue to grow in UMTRA Project disposal cell covers. An understanding of the biological and related physical processes that take place within the cover systems of the UMTRA Project disposal cells helps the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determine if the presence of a plant community on these cells is detrimental, beneficial, or of mixed value in terms of the cover system`s designed function. Results of this investigation provide information relevant to the formulation of a vegetation control policy.

  11. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preferred Provider Option (PPO) Medical Program For Medicare Retirees and Their Covered Family Members Administered by: N113794 01/15 CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE Customer Service: Medical/Surgical Claims and Prescription Drugs-The 24/7 Nurseline can help when you have a health problem or concern. The 24/7 Nurseline is staffed by registered nurses who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 24/7 Nurseline toll-free telephone number: 1-800-973-6329 When you have a non- medical benefit question or

  12. Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

  13. Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Linda Sheader and Marilyn Kastens PDF icon Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site More Documents & Publications Study of Factors Affecting Shrub Establishment on the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the

  14. Analysis of photonic band gaps in two-dimensional photonic crystals with rods covered by a thin interfacial layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trifonov, T.; Marsal, L.F.; Pallares, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Alcubilla, R.

    2004-11-15

    We investigate different aspects of the absolute photonic band gap (PBG) formation in two-dimensional photonic structures consisting of rods covered with a thin dielectric film. Specifically, triangular and honeycomb lattices in both complementary arrangements, i.e., air rods drilled in silicon matrix and silicon rods in air, are studied. We consider that the rods are formed of a dielectric core (silicon or air) surrounded by a cladding layer of silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), or germanium (Ge). Such photonic lattices present absolute photonic band gaps, and we study the evolution of these gaps as functions of the cladding material and thickness. Our results show that in the case of air rods in dielectric media the existence of dielectric cladding reduces the absolute gap width and may cause complete closure of the gap if thick layers are considered. For the case of dielectric rods in air, however, the existence of a cladding layer can be advantageous and larger absolute PBG's can be achieved.

  15. Vegetation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vegetation Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleVegetation&oldid612270" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  16. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  17. ARM - Cover Competition Winners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MeetingsCover Competition Winners Science Team Meetings 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 Cover Competition Winners In order to gather more ARM science images, the ARM Science Team Meeting began a competition for the coveted meeting program cover. From 2004-2009, ARM principal investigators were invited to share their research images with meeting organizers for selection by the ARM Chief Scientist. Covers were selected based on their

  18. Shafts Temporarily Covered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2014 Shafts Temporarily Covered Today, workers continued physical preparations for the filter replacement. The Air Intake Shaft and Salt Handling Shaft openings were temporarily covered to further reduce the amount of air entering the underground. Covering these opening helps maintain ventilation balance while continuing to draw surface air down to the waste shaft, and prevents unfiltered air from exiting the underground. Workers not directly involved in the filter replacement efforts

  19. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Cover Stories Journal Cover Stories Here are papers authored by NERSC users that were featured on the cover of the scientific journal in which they were published. You can sort according to any of the headings below. Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Source | Category JBEIJPCB-2015.png Molecular Dynamics Simulation study on the Dissolution of Cellulose in Ionic Liquid-Water Mixture November 12, 2015 | Author(s): R. Parthasarathi, K. Balamurugan, Jian Shi, V.

  20. Cover Heated, Open Vessels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This tip sheet on covering heated, open vessels provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  1. NERSC Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | png | 729 KB AGU-WRR2015Cover.png Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tightshale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater:...

  2. cover_booked.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This Real Property Asset Management Plan covers the Department of Energy including the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Energy Information Administration, and the ...

  3. Revegetation/rock cover for stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings disposal sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beedlow, P.A.; McShane, M.C.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1982-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing design and performance guidelines for surface stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings. In this work, vegetation and rock covers are being evaluated for maintaining long-term integrity of impoundment systems. Methods are being developed to estimate erosion rates associated with rock and/or vegetation covers, and to determine the effects of surface treatments on soil moisture. Interactions between surface treatments and barriers (radon and biological) are being studied as well. The product will be a set of guidelines to aid in designing surface covers. This report presents the status of this program and a discussion of considerations pertinent to the application of surface covers to tailings. Test plots located in Grand Junction, Colorado and Waterflow, New Mexico are being used to study: (1) the interactions between vegetation and radon and biological barriers, (2) the effects of surface covers on soil moisture, and (3) the effects of rock covers on vegetation.

  4. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NatureCoverLarge.png High-quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator using plasma-channel guiding September 30, 2004 | Author(s): C. G. R. Geddes, Cs. Toth, J. van Tilborg, E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, D. Bruhwiler, C. Nieter, J. Cary & W. P. Leemans | Source: Nature | Category: Fusion Energy | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature02900 Download Image: NatureCoverLarge.png | png | 2.7 MB 30 September 2004, Vol. 431, pp. 541-544 PhysTodayCoverLarge.png Integrated Simulation of

  5. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CEN-Cover.png Graphene Moves Toward Applications November 21, 2011 | Author(s): Donghai Mei, et al. | Category: Chemistry | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl203332e Download Image: CEN-Cover.png | png | 986 KB Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode. See also http://pubs.acs.org/NanoLett (2011) 11, 5071-5078 SotirisCoverJPCBLarge.jpg Computational Investigation of the First Solvation Shell Structure of Interfacial and Bulk Aqueous Chloride and Iodide Ions November 14,

  6. Reusable pipe flange covers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holden, James Elliott (Simpsonville, SC); Perez, Julieta (Houston, TX)

    2001-01-01

    A molded, flexible pipe flange cover for temporarily covering a pipe flange and a pipe opening includes a substantially round center portion having a peripheral skirt portion depending from the center portion, the center portion adapted to engage a front side of the pipe flange and to seal the pipe opening. The peripheral skirt portion is formed to include a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs, wherein free ends of the flexible tabs are formed with respective through passages adapted to receive a drawstring for pulling the tabs together on a back side of the pipe flange.

  7. Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vegetables Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sky Vegetables Address: 45 Rosemary Street, Suite F Place: Needham, MA Zip: 02494 Sector: Solar Website: www.skyvegetables.comindex.ht...

  8. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Darmon Chem Science 2015 cover page Increasing the rate of hydrogen oxidation without increasing the overpotential: a bio-inspired iron molecular electrocatalyst with an outer coordination sphere proton relay March 5, 2015 | Author(s): Jonathan M. Darmon, Neeraj Kumar, Elliott B. Hulley, Charles J. Weiss, Simone Raugei, R. Morris Bullocka and Monte L. Helm* Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57, Richland, USA

  9. PAGE Cover: Top Photo

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PAGE Cover: Top Photo Energy Sciences Building. Elevation of the recently completed Energy Sciences Building (ESB) project at Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Illinois. The ESB was a capital line-item project funded by the Science Laboratories Infrastructure program at a total cost of $96 million and was completed on August 6, 2014. The ESB project provided 173,000 gross square feet of interdisciplinary research and collaborative space to accommodate a range of physical sciences research

  10. cover_booked.indd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE/ME-0060 Editors Notes: This Real Property Asset Management Plan covers the Department of Energy including the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Energy Information Administration, and the Power Marketing Administrations. As an independent regulatory agency, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) prepares separate documents. This document is also available on the Department of Energy's web site: http://www.energy.gov. This plan was produced by the Office of Engineering

  11. UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

    2012-06-01

    UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).

  12. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  13. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liu2010.jpg Methanol Synthesis from H2 and CO2 on a Mo6S8 Cluster: A Density Functional Study October 30, 2009 | Author(s): Ping Liu, YongMan Choi, Y. Yang and M. G. White | Source: J. Phys. Chem. A | Category: Chemistry | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp906780a Download Image: Liu2010.jpg | jpg | 2.1 MB J. Phys. Chem. A, 2010, 114 (11), pp 3888-3895 ChingCoverPaper.png A Genomic Approach to the Stability, Elastic, and Electronic Properties of the MAX Phases June 24, 2014 | Author(s): S. Aryal,

  14. U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing & Supply Chain Cover Photo | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Wind Energy Manufacturing & Supply Chain Cover Photo U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing & Supply Chain Cover Photo Image icon GLWN Cover Photo.JPG More Documents & Publications U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing & Supply Chain: A Competitiveness Analysis 2014 Offshore Wind Market & Economic Analysis Cover Photo Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo

  15. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  16. Greasecar Vegetable Fuel Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greasecar Vegetable Fuel Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: Greasecar Vegetable Fuel Systems Place: Florence, Massachusetts Zip: 1062 Product: Manufacturer of vegetable fuel...

  17. N A Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N A Vegetation 680 Meters 340 Compartment 16 Soils o Soil Series and Phase DBaB DBaC DDoA DFuB DLuB .OcA .OrB [:] Rm .TrB .VeC Bay 4 340 Community _ Loblolly Pine _ Slash Pine D Upland Hardwood o Bottomland Hardwood _ Carolina Bay Wetland _ Deep water pool .*. TES Plants (1) o .Openwells cCV,. Utility ROW ~ Roads [ZJ SRS Bays I:~&j Hydric Soils Figure 21-2. Plant commllflities and soils associated with the Flamingo Bay Set-Aside Area. 21-7 Set-Aside 21: Flamingo Bay

  18. Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial griddles, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program

  19. Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial fryers, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  20. Eolian cover sands: a sedimentologic model and paleoenvironmental implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lea, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    In periglacial areas, accumulations of eolian sand commonly form low-relief blankets without well-developed dunes. Internally, these sandsheet deposits exhibit subhorizontal lamination rather than high-angle cross-bedding. Such cover sands of late-Pleistocene age mantle extensive areas in northern Europe, but have been reported more rarely from North America. The processes by which cover sands, as opposed to dunes, accumulate have not yet been determined conclusively. Wind ripples and sand dunes do not form a continuum; flow separation and avalanching and negligible in the former and vital in the latter. Accretion of a sand patch into a mound sufficient to cause flow separation and dune growth requires a consistently available supply of loose sand. In cover-sand areas, sand may be immobilized prior to dune development by several factors: (1) a sparse vegetation cover, (2) moist ground conditions, (3) snow cover, and (4) a shallow permafrost table and/or an ice-cemented active layer. Detailed sedimentologic studies may allow discrimination among these various controls. The importance of the individual controlling factors can vary seasonally in a given deposit, as well as between deposits in different paleogeographic settings. However, all factors imply more mesic conditions than those associated with many dune deposits. The association of cover sands with paraboloid dunes is also consistent with somewhat moist conditions. The relatively mesic nature of cover sands controls their Pleistocene distribution; they become decreasingly important relative to dunes in maritime-to-continental transects across Alaska and northern Europe.

  1. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Journal Cover Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JOURNAL COVER GALLERY

  2. cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  3. Cover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... originally planned for service are discontinued due to political andor economic reasons. ... contractual obligations with third-party power providers in 2007. Under the terms ...

  4. COVER

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Guide Washington, D.C. Office of Environmental Management Office Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization DOE/EM-0341 Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Guideline

  5. Cover

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund's Fiscal Year 2011 Financial Statement Audit OAS-FS-13-01 October 2012 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND Financial Statements September 30, 2011 and 2010 (With Independent Auditors' Reports Thereon) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND Table of

  6. Cover Stories | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Electrochemistry via Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy," Adv. Mater., 23, 5613-5617 (2011). Click to view cover V. G. Pol and...

  7. Journal Cover Gallery | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Cover Gallery Image Image ACS Victor SunJALA2011_cover Image Image Image Image Image Image

  8. Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management ...

  9. MAPSS Vegetation Modeling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    mdrmapss MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Screenshot References: MAPSS1 Applications "A landscape- to global-scale vegetation distribution model that was developed to simulate the...

  10. Biologists Re-Vegetate Historical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Re-Vegetate Historical Disposal Area at the NNSS A large-scale re-vegetation effort is currently underway on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), completing the final stage of closure on a 92-acre disposal area that first began operation in the 1960s. In October 2011, NNSS work crews seeded major portions of the 92- acre disposal area, reintroducing native shrubs (10 species), grasses (3 species), and herbaceous flowering plants (3 species). Then in December, workers completed installation

  11. EIS-0285-SA-75: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-75: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program BPA proposes to remove danger trees as well as unwanted vegetation in...

  12. Corrugated cover plate for flat plate collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollands, K. G. Terry (Elora, CA); Sibbitt, Bruce (Waterloo, CA)

    1978-01-01

    A flat plate radiant energy collector is providing having a transparent cover. The cover has a V-corrugated shape which reduces the amount of energy reflected by the cover away from the flat plate absorber of the collector.

  13. BioChem Cover story

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LSU Researcher discovers a key step in photosynthesis at CAMD, earns cover on Journal of Biological Chemistry Photosynthesis is the process that plants use to convert light into chemical energy for plant growth. This process produces all of the oxygen present on earth and virtually all of the carbohydrate which lies at the base of all food chains. Photosystem II is a protein complex that captures light and begins the first step in this biological chemistry: breaking apart water molecules. At the

  14. Microsoft Word - Cover Sheet - 020711

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    II: Comment Response Document COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) TITLE: Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex (DOE/EIS-0387) (Final Y-12 SWEIS) CONTACT: For further information on this SWEIS, For general information on the DOE contact: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact: Pam Gorman Carol Borgstrom, Director Y-12 SWEIS Document

  15. Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Use Cover Page Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Contact Us * Feedback * PrivacySecurity *...

  16. Water-Balance Cover Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 Conference, February 27-March 3, 2011, Phoenix, AZ Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test C.H. Benson University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin W.J. Waugh S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado W.H. Albright Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada G.M. Smith Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado R.P. Bush U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a

  17. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    /::vI Streams ~Rails 'R Utility ROW Roads oTES Plants (2) [2] Other Set-Asides D Three Rivers Landfill D Hydric Soils 380 Soils Soil Series and Phase DBaB DBaC .Pk _TrB _TuE _TuF _VaC o 380 760 1140 Meters N A sc Figure 6-1. Plant cOllllllunities and soils associated with the Beech-Hardwood Forest Set-Aside Area. 6-5 Set-Aside 6: Beech-Hardwood Forest

  18. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pine D Mixed PineHardwood D Upland Hardwood. IiiiI Carolina Bay Wetland m SRS Bays *. TES Plants (1) fVj Roads o Openwells N Site Boundary N A Soils &Ji I Seri es

  19. Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Improvements, and Long-Term Performance | Department of Energy Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance PDF icon Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance More

  20. EIS-0285-SA-137: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. PDF icon Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation...

  1. EIS-0285-SA-122: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. PDF icon Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation...

  2. EIS-0285-SA-141: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. PDF icon Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation...

  3. EIS-0285-SA-147: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the Big Eddy-Chenoweth NO. 1 and 2 Substation to Substation, Big Eddy - Midway Substation to 2...

  4. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  5. Wheelspace windage cover plate for turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Norman Douglas (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2002-01-01

    Windage cover plates are secured between the wheels and spacer of a turbine rotor to prevent hot flow path gas ingestion into the wheelspace cavities. Each cover plate includes a linear, axially extending body curved circumferentially with a radially outwardly directed wall at one axial end. The wall defines a axially opening recess for receiving a dovetail lug. The cover plate includes an axially extending tongue received in a circumferential groove of the spacer. The cover plate is secured with the tongue in the groove and dovetail lug in the recess. Lap joints between circumferentially adjacent cover plates are provided.

  6. Swimming Pool Covers | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Swimming Pool Covers Swimming Pool Covers Covering a pool when it is not in use is the single most effective means of reducing pool heating costs. | Photo courtesy of Aquatherm Industries. Covering a pool when it is not in use is the single most effective means of reducing pool heating costs. | Photo courtesy of Aquatherm Industries. You can significantly reduce swimming pool heating costs by using a pool cover. On the following pages, see the tables showing the costs of heating pools with and

  7. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  8. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  9. Improved gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1983-09-26

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, sealed as tags in different cladding nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Cladding failure allows fission gases and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas. The isotopes are Ne/sup 20/, Ne/sup 21/ and Ne/sup 22/ and Ar/sup 36/, Ar/sup 38/ and Ar/sup 40/, and the cover gas is He. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between 0 and -25/sup 0/C to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags, and the second or tag recovery system bed between -170 and -185/sup 0/C to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be determined.

  10. Gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C. (Lemont, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1985-01-01

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, that are grouped in preselected different ratios one to the other and are then sealed as tags in different cladded nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Failure of the cladding of any fuel element allows fission gases generated in the reaction and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas held in the reactor over the fuel elements. The isotopes specifically are Ne.sup.20, Ne.sup.21 and Ne.sup.22 of neon and Ar.sup.36, Ar.sup.38 and Ar.sup.40 of argon, and the cover gas is helium. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between approximately 0.degree. and -25.degree. C. operable to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags and the second or tag recovery system bed is held between approximately -170.degree. and -185.degree. C. operable to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis further is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be specifically determined.

  11. Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends...

  12. Covered Product Category: Displays | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Displays Covered Product Category: Displays The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for displays, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies buy ENERGY STAR qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

  13. Covered Product Category: Computers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Computers Covered Product Category: Computers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for computers, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies buy ENERGY STAR-qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

  14. Covered Product Category: Displays | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Displays Covered Product Category: Displays The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for displays, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies buy ENERGY STAR qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

  15. Covered Product Category: Commercial Steam Cookers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial steam cookers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  16. Covered Product Category: Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial refrigerators and freezers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  17. Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for hot food holding cabinets, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  18. Plasticizers Derived from Vegetable Oils - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vegetable Oils Battelle Memorial Institute Contact BMI About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThis technology addresses the known health issues of commonly used...

  19. Plasticizers Derived from Vegetable Oils - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vegetable Oils Battelle Memorial Institute Contact BMI About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary This technology addresses the known health issues of commonly used...

  20. Covered Sites/Populations | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Covered Sites/Populations Covered Sites/Populations Construction Worker Screening Projects Construction Worker Projects, Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Production Worker Screening Projects Production Worker Projects, Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) National Supplemental Screening Program National Supplemental Screening Program Beryllium Vendor Screening Program Defunct Beryllium Vendor Screening Program

  1. DOE-L.__ PROPOSAL PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS - COVER LETTER AND

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    L. PROPOSAL PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS - COVER LETTER AND VOLUME I, OFFER AND OTHER DOCUMENTS (a) Instruction - Cover Letter. The cover letter shall include, but not be limited to,...

  2. Graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngil; Jang, Dae -Heung; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-08-10

    Covering arrays relax the condition of orthogonal arrays by only requiring that all combination of levels be covered but not requiring that the appearance of all combination of levels be balanced. This allows for a much larger number of factors to be simultaneously considered but at the cost of poorer estimation of the factor effects. To better understand patterns between sets of columns and evaluate the degree of coverage to compare and select between alternative arrays, we suggest several new graphical methods that show some of the patterns of coverage for different designs. These graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays are illustrated with a few examples.

  3. DESIGN, PERFORMANCE, AND SUSTAINABILITY OF ENGINEERED COVERS FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W. Jody

    2004-04-21

    Final remedies at most uranium mill tailings sites include engineered covers designed to contain metals and radionuclides in the subsurface for hundreds of years. Early cover designs rely on compacted soil layers to limit water infiltration and release of radon, but some of these covers inadvertently created habitats for deep-rooted plants. Root intrusion and soil development increased the saturated hydraulic conductivity several orders of magnitude above design targets. These covers may require high levels of maintenance to sustain long-term performance. Relatively low precipitation, high potential evapotranspiration, and thick unsaturated soils favor long-term hydrologic isolation of buried waste at arid and semiarid sites. Later covers were designed to mimic this natural soil-water balance with the goal of sustaining performance with little or no maintenance. For example, the cover for the Monticello, Utah, Superfund site relies on a thick soil-sponge layer overlying a sand-and-gravel capillary barrier to store precipitation while plants are dormant and on native vegetation to dry the soil sponge during the growing season. Measurements of both off-site caisson lysimeters and a large 3-ha lysimeter built into the final cover show that drainage has been well below a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency target of less than 3.0 mm/yr. Our stewardship strategy combines monitoring precursors to failure, probabilistic riskbased modeling, and characterization of natural analogs to project performance of covers for a range of possible future environmental scenarios. Natural analogs are needed to understand how ecological processes will influence cover performance, processes that cannot be predicted with short-term monitoring and existing numerical models.

  4. Livestock impacts for management of reclaimed land at Navajo Mine: Vegetation responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, M.K.; Buchanan, B.A.; Estrada, O.

    1997-12-31

    The post-mining land use for Navajo Mine, a large surface coal mine in northwest New Mexico, is livestock grazing. Reclamation began in the early 1970`s and has been primarily directed toward the development of a grassland with shrubs. However, none of these lands were grazed before 1994 and none have been released back to the Navajo Nation. Therefore, it is not known how these reclaimed lands will respond to livestock impacts once the lands are released. Livestock impacts include grazing, trampling, and adding feces and urine. Cattle impacts were applied in 1994 to a land that had been reclaimed in 1978, 1991 and 1992. Vegetation monitoring procedures were implemented to detect and document successful and unsuccessful impact practices for both impacted areas and areas excluded from cattle. After three impact seasons, there were similar levels of perennial plant cover, production, and density on impacted lands compared to excluded lands. Based on age structure analysis, there is a trend that establishment of seedlings is stimulated by cattle. Cattle also decrease the amount of previous years` growth of standing phytomass with a trend to stimulate new growth. It is possible that some of the previous year`s growth was reduced by cattle trampling as much as by grazing because cattle generally prefer to eat the current year`s growth before it cures. No differences in number of seedheads per plant, animal sign, plant pedestals, and soil rills could be detected after three seasons of impacting.

  5. Swimming Pool Covers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of heating pools with and without pool covers in different U.S. cities: Estimating Heat Pump Swimming Pool Heater Costs and Savings Estimating Swimming Pool Gas Heating Costs...

  6. Swimming Pool Covers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gas Heating Costs and Savings Use of a pool cover also can help reduce the size of a solar pool heating system, which can save money. How They Work Swimming pools lose energy in...

  7. The Thermal Collector With Varied Glass Covers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luminosu, I.; Pop, N.

    2010-08-04

    The thermal collector with varied glass covers represents an innovation realized in order to build a collector able to reach the desired temperature by collecting the solar radiation from the smallest surface, with the highest efficiency. In the case of the thermal collector with variable cover glasses, the number of the glass plates covering the absorber increases together with the length of the circulation pipe for the working fluid. The thermal collector with varied glass covers compared to the conventional collector better meet user requirements because: for the same temperature increase, has the collecting area smaller; for the same collection area, realizes the highest temperature increase and has the highest efficiency. This works is addressed to researchers in the solar energy and to engineers responsible with air-conditioning systems design or industrial and agricultural products drying.

  8. Covered Product Category: Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Refrigerators and Freezers Covered Product Category: Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial refrigerators and freezers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Efficiency Requirements for Commercial

  9. Covered Product Category: Refrigerated Beverage Vending Machines |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Refrigerated Beverage Vending Machines Covered Product Category: Refrigerated Beverage Vending Machines The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for refrigerated beverage vending machines, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Efficiency Requirements

  10. Repositioning of Covered Stents: The Grip Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, John Martin; Guo Xiaofeng; Midia, Mehran

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Retrieval and repositioning of a stent deployed beyond its intended target region may be a difficult technical challenge. Materials and Methods: A balloon-mounted snare technique, a variant of the coaxial loop snare technique, is described. Results: The technique is described for the repositioning of a covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent and a covered biliary stent. Conclusion: The balloon-mounted snare technique is a useful technique for retrieval of migrated stents.

  11. 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Peer Review Report Cover 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover.JPG More Documents & Publications NOWEGIS Report Cover Water Power For...

  12. Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detecting vegetation-precipitation...

  13. Assessment of acreage and vegetation change in Florida`s Big Bend tidal wetlands using satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raabe, E.A.; Stumpf, R.P.

    1997-06-01

    Fluctuations in sea level and impending development on the west coast of Florida have aroused concern for the relatively pristine tidal marshes of the Big Bend. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images for 1986 and 1995 are processed and evaluated for signs of change. The images cover 250 km of Florida`s Big Bend Gulf Coast, encompassing 160,000 acres of tidal marshes. Change is detected using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and land cover classification. The imagery shows negligible net loss or gain in the marsh over the 9-year period. However, regional changes in biomass are apparent and are due to natural disturbances such as low winter temperatures, fire, storm surge, and the conversion of forest to marsh. Within the marsh, the most prominent changes in NDVI and in land cover result from the recovery of mangroves from freezes, a decline of transitional upland vegetation, and susceptibility of the marsh edge and interior to variations in tidal flooding.

  14. Graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Youngil; Jang, Dae -Heung; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-08-10

    Covering arrays relax the condition of orthogonal arrays by only requiring that all combination of levels be covered but not requiring that the appearance of all combination of levels be balanced. This allows for a much larger number of factors to be simultaneously considered but at the cost of poorer estimation of the factor effects. To better understand patterns between sets of columns and evaluate the degree of coverage to compare and select between alternative arrays, we suggest several new graphical methods that show some of the patterns of coverage for different designs. As a result, these graphical methods formore » evaluating covering arrays are illustrated with a few examples.« less

  15. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  16. Covered Product Category: Light Fixtures (Luminaires)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including luminaires, or light fixtures. The luminaires product category is very broad and covers a wide variety of lighting products. Both ENERGY STAR® and FEMP provide programmatic guidance for various types of luminaires. See table 2 for more information about which types of light fixtures are covered by which program (FEMP or ENERGY STAR). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  17. Deployment of an alternative cover and final closure of the Mixed Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James; McVey, Michael David (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Borns, David James

    2003-06-01

    An alternative cover design consisting of a monolithic layer of native soil is proposed as the closure path for the Mixed Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The proposed design would rely upon soil thickness and evapotranspiration to provide long-term performance and stability, and would be inexpensive to build and maintain. The proposed design is a 3-ft-thick, vegetated soil cover. The alternative cover meets the intent of RCRA Subtitle C regulations in that: (a) water migration through the cover is minimized; (b) maintenance is minimized by using a monolithic soil layer; (c) cover erosion is minimized by using erosion control measures; (d) subsidence is accommodated by using a ''soft'' design; and (e) the permeability of the cover is less than or equal to that of natural subsurface soil present. Performance of the proposed cover is integrated with natural site conditions, producing a ''system performance'' that will ensure that the cover is protective of human health and the environment. Natural site conditions that will produce a system performance include: (a) extremely low precipitation and high potential evapotranspiration; (b) negligible recharge to groundwater; (c) an extensive vadose zone; (d) groundwater approximately 500 ft below the surface; and (e) a versatile, native flora that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance.

  18. Providing Diurnal Sky Cover Data at ARM Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klebe, Dimitri I.

    2015-03-06

    The Solmirus Corporation was awarded two-year funding to perform a comprehensive data analysis of observations made during Solmirus 2009 field campaign (conducted from May 21 to July 27, 2009 at the ARM SGP site) using their All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (ASIVA) instrument. The objective was to develop a suite of cloud property data products for the ASIVA instrument that could be implemented in real time and tailored for cloud modelers. This final report describes Solmirus research and findings enabled by this grant. The primary objective of this award was to develop a diurnal sky cover (SC) data product utilizing the ASIVAs infrared (IR) radiometrically-calibrated data and is described in detail. Other data products discussed in this report include the sky cover derived from ASIVAs visible channel and precipitable water vapor, cloud temperature (both brightness and color), and cloud height inferred from ASIVAs IR channels.

  19. Covered Product Category: Refrigerated Beverage Vending Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including refrigerated beverage vending machines, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  20. Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial gas water heaters, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  1. 2009 ECR Report Cover Letter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 ECR Report Cover Letter 2009 ECR Report Cover Letter PDF icon 2009_ECR_Report_Cover_Letter.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE_ECR_Report_2006_(2).pdf DOE ECR Report 2006 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010

  2. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel, a renewable fuel produced from animal fats or vegetable oils, is popular among many vehicle owners and fleet managers seeking to reduce emissions and support U.S. energy security. Questions sometimes arise about the viability of fueling vehicles with straight vegetable oil (SVO), or waste oils from cooking and other processes, without intermediate processing. But SVO and waste oils differ from biodiesel (and conventional diesel) in some important ways and are generally not considered acceptable vehicle fuels for large-scale or long-term use.

  3. Reconstruction of Intensity From Covered Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Watkins, Thomas R; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Burchell, Timothy D; Rosseel, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The safe handling of activated samples requires containment and covering the sample to eliminate any potential for contamination. Subsequent characterization of the surface with x-rays ideally necessitates a thin film. While many films appear visually transparent, they are not necessarily x-ray transparent. Each film material has a unique beam attenuation and sometimes have amorphous peaks that can superimpose with those of the sample. To reconstruct the intensity of the underlying activated sample, the x-ray attenuation and signal due to the film needs to be removed from that of the sample. This requires the calculation of unique deconvolution parameters for the film. The development of a reconstruction procedure for a contained/covered sample is described.

  4. New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Services » New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation PDF icon New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation More Documents & Publications Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance

  5. A Water Balance Study of Four Landfill Cover Designs at Material Disposal Area B in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David D. Breshears; Fairley J. Barnes; John W. Nyhan; Johnny A. Salazar

    1998-09-01

    The goal of disposing of low-level radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose an unacceptable hazard. In order to achieve this, the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Program is comparing the performance of several different surface covers at Material Disposal Area (MDA) B in Los Alamos. Two conventional landfill were compared with an improved cover designed to minimize plant and animal intrusion and to minimize water infiltration into the underlying wastes. The conventional covers varied in depth and both conventional and improved designs had different combinations of vegetation (grass verses shrub) and gravel mulch (no mulch verses mulch). These treatments were applied to each of 12 plots and water balance parameters were measured from March1987 through June 1995. Adding a gravel mulch significantly influenced the plant covered field plots receiving no gravel mulch averaged 21.2% shrub cover, while plots with gravel had a 20% larger percent cover of shrubs. However, the influence of gravel mulch on the grass cover was even larger than the influence on shrub cover, average grass cover on the plots with no gravel was 16.3%, compared with a 42% increase in grass cover due to gravel mulch. These cover relationships are important to reduce runoff on the landfill cover, as shown by a regression model that predicts that as ground cover is increased from 30 to 90%,annual runoff is reduced from 8.8 to 0.98 cm-a nine-fold increase. We also found that decreasing the slope of the landfill cover from 6 to 2% reduced runoff from the landfill cover by 2.7-fold. To minimize the risk of hazardous waste from landfills to humans, runoff and seepage need to be minimized and evapotranspiration maximized on the landfill cover. This has to be accomplished for dry and wet years at MDA B. Seepage consisted of 1.9% and 6.2% of the precipitation in the average and once in ten year events, respectively, whereas corresponding values for runoff were 13% and 16%; these changes were accompanied by corresponding decreases in evapotranspiration, which accounted for 86% and only 78% of the precipitation occurring on the average and once in ten year even~ respectively.

  6. First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure May 28, 2015 -...

  7. EISA Federal Covered Facility Management and Benchmarking Data...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Independence & Security Act, Section 432 EISA Federal Covered Facility Management and Benchmarking Data EISA Federal Covered Facility Management and Benchmarking Data The ...

  8. Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity Announcements Special Notice Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc...

  9. Overview of vegetation monitoring data, 1952--1983. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, J.P.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Members of the HEDR Project`s Environmental Monitoring Data Task have developed databases of historical environmental measurements of such emissions. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. This report is the third in a series that documents the information available on measurements of iodine-131 concentrations in vegetation. The first two reports provide the data for 1945--1951. This report provides an overview of the historical documents, which contain vegetation data for 1952--1983. The overview is organized according to the documents available for any given year. Each section, covering one year, contains a discussion of the media sampled, the sampling locations, significant events if there were any, emission quantities, constituents measured, and a list of the documents with complete reference information. Because the emissions which affected vegetation were significantly less after 1951, the vegetation monitoring data after that date have not been used in the HEDR Project. However, access to these data may be of interest to the public. This overview is, therefore, being published.

  10. Multispectral Imaging At Rangely Oilfield Area (Pickles & Cover...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Unknown Notes Airborne hyperspectral imaging applied to determine vegetation and CO2 leakage in the Rangely oilfield of northwest Colorado - results may be useful for...

  11. Product Categories Covered by Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Categories Covered by Efficiency Programs Product Categories Covered by Efficiency Programs Document shows a list of energy- and water-efficient product categories covered by various efficiency programs, including ENERGY STAR, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT), FEMP Low Standby Power, and WaterSense. File Download FEMP's list of product categories covered by federal efficiency programs

  12. EERE Program Management Guide - Cover and Table of Contents | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Guide - Cover and Table of Contents EERE Program Management Guide - Cover and Table of Contents Table of contents includes an introduction and eight chapters on the program's background, management, outreach planning, budget formulation, implementation, analysis and evaluation, and information/business management. Also includes appendices. PDF icon pmguide_toc.pdf More Documents & Publications EERE Program Management Guide - Chapter 4 EERE Program Management Guide - Chapter 6

  13. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

  14. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Lloyd A.; Paresol, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  15. Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

  16. ?Aceite Vegetal Puro Como Combustible Diesel? (Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? Spanish Version) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01

    Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

  17. Land cover classification in multispectral imagery using clustering of sparse approximations over learned feature dictionaries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moody, Daniela I.; Brumby, Steven P.; Rowland, Joel C.; Altmann, Garrett L.

    2014-12-09

    We present results from an ongoing effort to extend neuromimetic machine vision algorithms to multispectral data using adaptive signal processing combined with compressive sensing and machine learning techniques. Our goal is to develop a robust classification methodology that will allow for automated discretization of the landscape into distinct units based on attributes such as vegetation, surface hydrological properties, and topographic/geomorphic characteristics. We use a Hebbian learning rule to build spectral-textural dictionaries that are tailored for classification. We learn our dictionaries from millions of overlapping multispectral image patches and then use a pursuit search to generate classification features. Land cover labelsmore » are automatically generated using unsupervised clustering of sparse approximations (CoSA). We demonstrate our method on multispectral WorldView-2 data from a coastal plain ecosystem in Barrow, Alaska. We explore learning from both raw multispectral imagery and normalized band difference indices. We explore a quantitative metric to evaluate the spectral properties of the clusters in order to potentially aid in assigning land cover categories to the cluster labels. In this study, our results suggest CoSA is a promising approach to unsupervised land cover classification in high-resolution satellite imagery.« less

  18. EIS-0285-SA-80: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (July 2002) More Documents & Publications EIS-0285-SA-62: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-40: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-132...

  19. Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

    1994-12-01

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

  20. Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Cover Using Caisson Lysimeters

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Cover Using Caisson Lysimeters Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Cover Using Caisson Lysimeters Proceedings of the Waste Management 2004 Symposium. 2004, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. W.J. Waugh, G.M. Smith , P. Mushovic PDF icon Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Cover Using Caisson Lysimeters More Documents & Publications Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers for

  1. Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Uranium Mill Tailings Site | Department of Energy Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site PDF icon Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site More Documents & Publications Applied Science and

  2. Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site | Department of Energy Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site PDF icon Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site More Documents & Publications Revegetation of the Rocky Flats Site Smooth Brome Monitoring at Rocky Flats-2005 Results Monitoring the Performance

  3. NREL: Energy Analysis - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis The front cover of the Reimagining What's Possible brochure. PDF 3.6 MB Making Sustainable Energy Choices: Insights on the EnergyWater Land Nexus The front cover of...

  4. Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cover sheet.doc Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc More Documents & Publications Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry Microsoft Word - kDE-FOA-0000090.rtf DISCLAIMER:

  5. Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) | Department of Energy Categories » Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center, Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center, Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  6. Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) | Department of Energy Categories » Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center, Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center, Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  7. Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    cover sheet.doc Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Moving North Texas Forward by Addressing Alternative Fuel Barriers Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards Clean Cities 2009 Petroleum Displacement Awards

  8. Coupled Environmental Processes in the Mojave Desert and Implications for ET Covers as Stable Landforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Shafer; M. Y oung; S. Zitzer; E. McDonald; T. Caldwell

    2006-01-18

    Monolayer evapotranspiration (ET) covers are the baseline method for closure of disposal sites for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed LLW, and transuranic (TRU) waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The regulatory timeline is typically 1,000 years for LLW and 10,000 years for TRU waste. Covers for such waste have different technical considerations than those with shorter timelines because they are subject to environmental change for longer periods of time, and because the environmental processes are often coupled. To evaluate these changes, four analog sites (approximately 30, 1,000 to 2,000, 7,000 to 12,500, and 125,000 years in age) on the NTS were analyzed to address the early post-institutional control period (the youngest site), the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of LLW, and the 10,000-year period for TRU waste. Tests included soil texture, structure, and morphology; surface soil infiltration and hydraulic conductivity; vegetation and faunal surveys; and literature reviews. Separate measurements were made in plant undercanopy and intercanopy areas. The results showed a progressive increase in silt and clay content of surface soils with age. Changes in soil texture and structure led to a fivefold decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity in intercanopy areas, but no change in undercanopies, which were subject to bioturbation. These changes may have been responsible for the reduction in total plant cover, most dramatically in intercanopy areas, primarily because more precipitation either runs off the site or is held nearer to the surface where plant roots are less common. The results suggest that covers may evolve over longer timeframes to stable landforms that minimize the need for active maintenance.

  9. EIS-0285-SA-451: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS- 0285/SA-451 Carlton-Tillamook Transmission Line Corridor, PP&A-2068)

  10. EIs-0285-0455: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS- 0285/SA-455 Bandon-Rogue No. 1) PP&A Project #2178

  11. EIS-0285-SA-452: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-452 Ross-St. Johns No. 1) PP&A Project

  12. Study on the reduction of atmospheric mercury emissions from mine waste enriched soils through native grass cover in the Mt. Amiata region of Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fantozzi, L.; Dini, F.; Tamburello, L.; Pirrone, N.; Sprovieri, F.

    2013-08-15

    Atmospheric mercury emissions from mine-waste enriched soils were measured in order to compare the mercury fluxes of bare soils with those from other soils covered by native grasses. Our research was conducted near Mt. Amiata in central Italy, an area that was one of the largest and most productive mining centers in Europe up into the 1980s. To determine in situ mercury emissions, we used a Plexiglas flux chamber connected to a portable mercury analyzer (Lumex RA-915+). This allowed us to detect, in real time, the mercury vapor in the air, and to correlate this with the meteorological parameters that we examined (solar radiation, soil temperature, and humidity). The highest mercury flux values (8000 ng m{sup −2} h{sup −1}) were observed on bare soils during the hours of maximum insulation, while lower values (250 ng m{sup −2} h{sup −1}) were observed on soils covered by native grasses. Our results indicate that two main environmental variables affect mercury emission: solar radiation intensity and soil temperature. The presence of native vegetation, which can shield soil surfaces from incident light, reduced mercury emissions, a result that we attribute to a drop in the efficiency of mercury photoreduction processes rather than to decreases in soil temperature. This finding is consistent with decreases in mercury flux values down to 3500 ng m{sup −2} h{sup −1}, which occurred under cloudy conditions despite high soil temperatures. Moreover, when the soil temperature was 28 °C and the vegetation was removed from the experimental site, mercury emissions increased almost four-fold. This increase occurred almost immediately after the grasses were cut, and was approximately eight-fold after 20 h. Thus, this study demonstrates that enhancing wild vegetation cover could be an inexpensive and effective approach in fostering a natural, self-renewing reduction of mercury emissions from mercury-contaminated soils. -- Highlights: ► Mercury air/surface exchange from grass covered soil is different from bare soil. ► Light enhances mercury emissions and is the main parameter driving the process. ► The presence of wild vegetation covering the soil reduces mercury emission. ► Vegetative covers could be a solution to reduce atmospheric mercury pollution.

  13. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks to climate in Earth system models.

  14. Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Local...

  15. Optimization of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Closure Cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, Greg; Yucel, Vefa

    2009-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual, requires that performance assessments demonstrate that releases of radionuclides to the environment are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Quantitative cost benefit analysis of radiation protection options is one component of the ALARA process. This report summarizes a quantitative cost benefit analysis of closure cover thickness for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site. The optimum cover thickness that maintains doses ALARA is shown to be the thickness with the minimum total closure cost. Total closure cost is the sum of cover construction cost and the health detriment cost. Cover construction cost is estimated based on detailed cost estimates for closure of the 92-acre Low-Level Waste Management Unit (LLWMU). The health detriment cost is calculated as the product of collective dose and a constant monetary value of health detriment in units of dollars per unit collective dose. Collective dose is the sum of all individual doses in an exposed population and has units of person-sievert (Sv). Five discrete cover thickness options ranging from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (m) (8.2 to 15 feet [ft]) are evaluated. The optimization was subject to the constraints that (1) options must meet all applicable regulatory requirements and that (2) individual doses be a small fraction of background radiation dose. Total closure cost is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cover thickness for the 92-ac LLWMU, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The cover construction cost is orders of magnitude greater than the health detriment cost. Two-thousand Latin hypercube sampling realizations of the relationship between total closure cost and cover thickness are generated. In every realization, the optimum cover thickness is 2.5 m (8.2 ft) for the 92-ac Low-Level Waste Management Unit, the Northern Expansion Area, and the entire Area 5 RWMS. The conclusions of the optimization are found to be insensitive to all input parameters, the monetary value of the health detriment over a range of values from $200,000 to $15,000,000 per person-Sv, and the period of integration of collective dose. A 2.5 m (8.2 ft) closure cover at the Area 5 RWMS can meet all applicable regulatory requirements and maintain radionuclide releases ALARA.

  16. Alternative Landfill Cover and Monitoring Systems for Landfills in Arid Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. E. Rawlinson

    2002-09-01

    In December 2000, a performance monitoring facility was constructed adjacent to the mixed waste disposal unit U-3ax/bl at the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site. This facility consists of eight drainage lysimeters measuring 10 feet in diameter, 8 feet deep, and backfilled with native soil. The lysimeters have three different surface treatments: two were left bare, two were revegetated with native species, and two were allowed to revegetate with invader species (two are reserved for future studies). The lysimeters are instrumented with an array of soil water content and soil water potential sensors and have sealed bottoms so that any drainage can be measured. All sensors are working properly and indicate that the bare lysimeters are the wettest, as expected. The vegetated lysimeters, both seeded and those allowed to revegetate with invader species, are significantly drier than the bare cover treatments. No drainage has occurred in any of the lysimeters. The Accelerated Site Technology Deployment program under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science and Technology provided the funding for this project with the objective of reducing the uncertainty associated with the performance of monolayer-evapotranspiration waste covers in arid regions such as the one deployed at U-3ax/bl.

  17. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - Disclaimer and Back Cover |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Disclaimer and Back Cover 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - Disclaimer and Back Cover DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review PDF icon 2008_merit_review_back.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - disclaimer and back cover 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D

  18. Covered Product Category: Commercial Ovens | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ovens Covered Product Category: Commercial Ovens The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial ovens, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies purchase products that are covered by ENERGY STAR or FEMP in all acquisitions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Commercial Ovens ENERGY STAR sets efficiency requirements for commercial

  19. Covered Product Category: Imaging Equipment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Imaging Equipment Covered Product Category: Imaging Equipment The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for imaging equipment, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies buy ENERGY STAR qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S. Environmental

  20. Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Room Air Conditioners Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for room air conditioners, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies purchase ENERGY STAR-qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The

  1. DOE Proposes Requirement for Certification of Admissibility for Covered

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Products and Equipment | Department of Energy Proposes Requirement for Certification of Admissibility for Covered Products and Equipment DOE Proposes Requirement for Certification of Admissibility for Covered Products and Equipment February 22, 2016 - 6:26pm Addthis DOE has issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) in which it proposes to require that a person importing into the United States any covered product or equipment subject to an applicable energy conservation standard provide,

  2. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover, Title Page,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Contents | Department of Energy 08 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover, Title Page, and Contents FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover, Title Page, and Contents Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes. PDF icon cover_tp_toc.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting

  3. First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure | Department of Energy First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure May 28, 2015 - 2:41pm Addthis First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure The Energy Department's 2014 Hydropower Market Report was released last month in an effort to provide taxpayers and industry professionals with a snapshot of the growing hydropower

  4. Covered Product Category: Data Center Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Data Center Storage Covered Product Category: Data Center Storage The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for data center storage, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies buy ENERGY STAR-qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisitions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S. Environmental

  5. Covered Product Category: Enterprise Servers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enterprise Servers Covered Product Category: Enterprise Servers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for enterprise servers, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies buy ENERGY STAR-qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S.

  6. Covered Product Category: Imaging Equipment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Imaging Equipment Covered Product Category: Imaging Equipment The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for imaging equipment, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies buy ENERGY STAR qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S. Environmental

  7. Covered Product Category: Residential Dishwashers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Dishwashers Covered Product Category: Residential Dishwashers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for residential dishwashers, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies purchase ENERGY STAR-qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S.

  8. Covered Product Category: Residential Freezers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Freezers Covered Product Category: Residential Freezers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for residential freezers, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies purchase ENERGY STAR-qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S.

  9. Covered Product Category: Residential Refrigerators | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Refrigerators Covered Product Category: Residential Refrigerators The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for residential refrigerators, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies purchase ENERGY STAR-qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The

  10. Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Room Air Conditioners Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for room air conditioners, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies purchase ENERGY STAR-qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The

  11. Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site | Department of Energy the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site PDF icon Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill

  12. Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

  13. FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Strategies for Renewable Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Strategies for Renewable Energy Deployment The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will present ...

  14. Microsoft Word - DOE_Staffing_Study_Cover.doc | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Word - DOEStaffingStudyCover.doc More Documents & Publications 2010 DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan - Report to the White House Council on Environmental...

  15. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

  16. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    View of the Installed Base and User Behavior Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior Includes information about the ...

  17. Covered Product Category: Air-Cooled Ice Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for air-cooled ice machines, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  18. Six-Year Review of Covered Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Six-Year Review of Covered Products Six-Year Review of Covered Products This memorandum explains that the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires the Department of Energy to re-evaluate efficiency standards for all covered appliances and products every six years. PDF icon Appendix_A_six-year_review_provision_memo.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Independence and Security Act Six-Year Review of Covered Products 15th Semi-Annual Report to Congress on Appliance

  19. USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USGS currently houses the institute at the Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The LCI will address land cover topics from...

  20. Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Pump Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal ...

  1. Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition ...

  2. Savings Project: Attic Stairs Cover Box | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attic Stairs Cover Box Savings Project: Attic Stairs Cover Box Addthis Project Level EASY (KIT OR PRE-BUILT) TO MODERATE (DO-IT-YOURSELF) Energy Savings Savings depend on energy cost and airtightness of new cover box. Can be significant if there are open gaps in existing stair hatch. Time to Complete 1-4 HOURS Overall Cost $50-$150 Sealing gaps in the opening and installing an insulating cover box on your attic stairs access can improve comfort and save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of U.S.

  3. Covered Product Category: Commercial Dishwashers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dishwashers Covered Product Category: Commercial Dishwashers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial dishwashers, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Commercial Dishwashers ENERGY STAR sets efficiency

  4. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.H. [University of WisconsinMadison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energys Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  5. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are extensive and well developed. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Estimates from SPOT HRV, remote sensing satellite data indicated that as much as 120 hectares of emergent wetlands vegetation may have been present along the Par Pond shoreline by early October, 1995. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  6. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    2014-04-25

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  7. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  8. EIS-0285-SA-65: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    65: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-65: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the Raymond - Cosmopolis Transmission Line would include danger tree removal within some areas adjacent to the right-of-way (ROW) (May 2002) PDF icon Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-65) (May 2002) More Documents & Publications EIS-0317-S1: Environmental

  9. Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Analysis Home/Tag:Analysis - Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) large-scale conveyance, (b) groundwater irrigation pumping, (c) surface water irrigation pumping, (d) drinking water, and (e) wastewater. Aggregate electricity use across these sectors (f) is also mapped. Permalink Gallery Sandians Recognized in Environmental Science & Technology's Best Paper Competition Analysis, Capabilities,

  10. Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Home/Analysis - Structures of the zwitterionic coatings synthesized for this study. Permalink Gallery Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Analysis, Capabilities, Energy, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Water Power Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Advanced Materials program has a new publication on the antifouling efficacy

  11. Woody vegetation and succession on the Fonde surface mine demonstration area, Bell County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, G.L.; Thompson, R.L.

    1999-07-01

    The long term impact of surface mining on vegetation and plant succession has always been of concern to environmentalists and residents of Appalachia. The Fonde Surface Mine Demonstration Area is a 7.3-ha, NE-NW-aspect contour coal mine at an elevation of 562 m. It was reclaimed in 1965 to show state-of-the-art surface mine reclamation techniques consistent with then-current law and regulations after coal mining in 1959 and 1963. The mine spoils were lightly graded to control erosion and crates a bench with water control and two sediment ponds. Soil pH ranged from 2.8 to 5.9. About 80 percent of the mine was planted with 18 tree and shrub species including plantations of mixed pine, mixed hardwoods, black locust, and shrubs for wildlife. In a complete floristic inventory conducted 25 years later, the authors found the woody flora consisted of 34 families, 53 genera, and 70 species including 7 exotics. This inventory of the Fonde mine shows that a diverse forest vegetation can be reestablished after extreme disturbances in Appalachia. Black locust, yellow poplar, and Virginia pine reproduction varied significantly among plantation types. Canopy tree species significantly affected ground layer cover, total species richness, number of tree seedling species, and total number of tree seedlings present. Mine soil type affected ground layer percent cover and total species richness. Pre-SMCRA (Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977) reclaimed and inventoried mines can be used to evaluate biodiversity on post-SMCRA mines.

  12. Cover Heated, Open Vessels - Steam Tip Sheet #19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    This revised AMO steam tip sheet on covering heated, open vessels provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  13. FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Updates to 2016 Federal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    page. Requires Google Chrome, Firefox 4.0+, Internet Explorer 7.0+ or Safari, and the Adobe Flash 10+ plugin. Addthis Related Articles FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Updates...

  14. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies...

  15. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978...

  16. On Performance of Covers and Liners In Performance Assessments...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    December 11 and 12, 2014 To view all the P&RA CoP 2014 Technical Exchange Meeting videos click here. Video Presentation PDF icon On Performance of Covers and Liners In...

  17. EIS-0285-SA-136: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. PDF icon DOEEIS-0285-SA-136: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission...

  18. EIS-0285-SA-119: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Snohomish-Murray No. 1 Transmission Line Bonneville Power Administration proposes to remove unwanted...

  19. EIS-0285-SA-151: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0285-SA-151: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Big Eddy-Ostrander Removal of danger trees along the Big Eddy-Ostrander-1 transmission line...

  20. Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley...

  1. EIS-0097: Bonneville Power Administration Transmission Facilities Vegetation Management Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic implications of various alternatives associated with implementing a vegetation management program.

  2. Influence of vegetation and seasonal forcing on carbon dioxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a range of vegetation types typical of the region (northern hardwood, mixed forest, red pine, jack pine, pine barrens and shrub wetland). The hardwood and red pine sites also...

  3. Bed drain cover assembly for a fluidized bed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comparato, Joseph R. (Bloomfield, CT); Jacobs, Martin (Hartford, CT)

    1982-01-01

    A loose fitting movable cover plate (36), suitable for the severe service encountered in a fluidized bed combustor (10), restricts the flow of solids into the combustor drain lines (30) during shutdown of the bed. This cover makes it possible to empty spent solids from the bed drain lines which would otherwise plug the piping between the drain and the downstream metering device. This enables use of multiple drain lines each with a separate metering device for the control of solids flow rate.

  4. FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Strategies for Renewable Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Deployment | Department of Energy Strategies for Renewable Energy Deployment FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Strategies for Renewable Energy Deployment December 7, 2015 - 5:06pm Addthis FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Strategies for Renewable Energy Deployment The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will present Strategic Portfolio Planning for Renewable Energy Deployment: REopt, a new First Thursday Update webinar on January 7, 2015, from 1:30 p.m.

  5. FEMP Releases 10 Updated Covered Product Categories | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Releases 10 Updated Covered Product Categories FEMP Releases 10 Updated Covered Product Categories March 11, 2015 - 4:17pm Addthis Federal agencies are required by five legal authorities, the Energy Security and Independence Act of 2007, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Federal Acquisition Regulations, Executive Order (E.O.) 13423, and E.O. 13221, to use energy-efficient products. By procuring and properly installing efficient products, agencies can meet their requirements, lower energy and water

  6. Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fryers Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial fryers, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Commercial Fryers ENERGY STAR sets efficiency requirements for

  7. Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Gas Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for commercial gas water heaters, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on

  8. Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Griddles Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial griddles, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Commercial Griddles ENERGY STAR sets efficiency requirements for

  9. Covered Product Category: Commercial Steam Cookers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steam Cookers Covered Product Category: Commercial Steam Cookers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial steam cookers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Commercial Steam Cookers ENERGY STAR sets efficiency requirements

  10. Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hot Food Holding Cabinets Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for hot food holding cabinets, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Efficiency Requirements for Hot Food Holding Cabinets ENERGY STAR sets efficiency

  11. Covered Product Category: Light Fixtures (Luminaires) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Light Fixtures (Luminaires) Covered Product Category: Light Fixtures (Luminaires) The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for light fixtures or luminaires. The luminaires product category is very broad and covers a wide variety of lighting products. Both ENERGY STAR and FEMP provide programmatic guidance for various types of luminaires. See Table 2 for more information about which types of light fixtures are

  12. FEMP Releases Three Updated Covered Product Categories | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Three Updated Covered Product Categories FEMP Releases Three Updated Covered Product Categories September 28, 2015 - 4:51pm Addthis Federal agencies are required by five legal authorities, the Energy Security and Independence Act of 2007, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Federal Acquisition Regulations, Executive Order (E.O.) 13693, and E.O. 13221, to use energy-efficient products. By procuring and properly installing efficient products, agencies can meet their requirements, lower

  13. Find Product Categories Covered by Efficiency Programs | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Products & Technologies » Energy-Efficient Products » Find Product Categories Covered by Efficiency Programs Find Product Categories Covered by Efficiency Programs Legend ★ ENERGY STAR △ FEMP Designated O EPEAT ♦ Low Standby Power X WaterSense Federal agencies are required to purchase energy-efficient products. To help buyers meet these requirements, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) maintains acquisition guidance for the following product categories, which are

  14. EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah | Department of Energy 42: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado,

  15. Enhanced cover methods for surface coal refuse reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, L.F.; Cargill, K.W.; McGarvie, S.D.

    1997-12-31

    Controlling acid rock drainage (ARD) can be a major component of surface mining reclamation. An enhanced reclamation cover system is being constructed to control infiltration of rain water and generation of ARD from coal-refuse disposal areas at a closed mine in southern Illinois. Development of the mine reclamation plan required consideration of ARD generation in coal refuse disposal areas located adjacent to an alluvial aquifer used for public water supply. An integrated site characterization was performed at the mine to provide information to develop and support the enhanced reclamation plan. The enhanced cover system is similar to covers required for municipal solid waste landfills by the Resource Conversation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle D regulations. The system comprises a graded and compacted gob layer, overlain by a compacted clay liner, and a protective soil cover. The results of infiltration modeling and analyses showed that the standard reclamation cover is effective in reducing infiltration by about 18 percent compared to an unreclaimed coal-refuse surface. The modeling results showed that the inhanced cover system should reduce infiltration by about 84 percent. The geochemical modeling results showed that the reduction in infiltration would help minimize ARD generation and contribute to an earlier reclamation of the mine site.

  16. Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo Image icon Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover.JPG More Documents & Publications 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover NOWEGIS Report Cover 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report Cover

  17. TDR calibration for the alternative landfill cover demonstration (ALCD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, J.; Dwyer, S.F.; Swanson, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    The Alternative Landfill Cover Demonstration is a large scale field test that compares the performance of various landfill cover designs in dry environments. An important component of the comparison is the change in the moisture content of the soils throughout the different cover test plots. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is the primary method for the measurement of the volumetric moisture content. Each of the covers is composed of layers of varying types and densities of soils. The probes are therefore calibrated to calculate the volumetric moisture content in each of the different soils in order to gain the optimum performance of the TDR system. The demonstration plots are constructed in two phases; a different probe is used in each phase. The probe that is used in Phase 1 is calibrated for the following soils: compacted native soil, uncompacted native soil, compacted native soil mixed with 6% sodium bentonite by weight, and sand. The probe that is used in Phase 2 is calibrated for the following soils: compacted native soil, uncompacted native soil, and sand. In addition, the probes are calibrated for the varying cable lengths of the TDR probes. The resulting empirically derived equations allow for the calculation of in-situ volumetric moisture content of all of the varying soils throughout the cover test plots in the demonstration.

  18. Radon diffusion through multilayer earthen covers: models and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, D.W.; Oster, C.A.; Nelson, R.W.; Gee, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    A capability to model and analyze the fundamental interactions that influence the diffusion of radon gas through uranium mill tailings and cover systems has been investigated. The purpose of this study is to develop the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion and to develop an understanding of the fundamental interactions that influence radon diffusion. This study develops the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion in one, two and three dimensions. The theory has been incorporated into three computer models that are used to analyze several tailings and cover configurations. This report contains a discussion of the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion, a discussion of the computer models used to analyze uranium mill tailings and multilayered cover systems, and presents the results that have been obtained.

  19. EIS-0285-SA-140: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    140: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-140: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Salem-Albany Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of

  20. Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2011-12-27

    An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

  1. Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip H. Henna

    2008-08-18

    Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

  2. Output-increasing, protective cover for a solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammerbacher, Milfred D.

    1995-11-21

    A flexible cover (14) for a flexible solar cell (12) protects the cell from the ambient and increases the cell's efficiency. The cell(12)includes silicon spheres (16) held in a flexible aluminum sheet matrix (20,22). The cover (14) is a flexible, protective layer (60) of light-transparent material having a relatively flat upper, free surface (64) and an irregular opposed surface (66). The irregular surface (66) includes first portions (68) which conform to the polar regions (31R) of the spheres (16) and second convex (72) or concave (90) portions (72 or 90) which define spaces (78) in conjunction with the reflective surface (20T) of one aluminum sheet (20). Without the cover (14) light (50) falling on the surface (20T) between the spheres (16) is wasted, that is, it does not fall on a sphere (16). The surfaces of the second portions are non-parallel to the direction of the otherwise wasted light (50), which fact, together with a selected relationship between the refractive indices of the cover and the spaces, result in sufficient diffraction of the otherwise wasted light (50) so that about 25% of it is reflected from the surface (20T) onto a sphere (16).

  3. Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Luminaires | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluorescent Luminaires Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Luminaires The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for fluorescent luminaires. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Fluorescent Luminaires Federal purchases must meet or exceed the minimum

  4. Consideration of liners and covers in performance assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Seitz, Robert R.; Suttora, Linda C.

    2014-09-18

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management due to the radioactive waste. The USDOE-Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these CERCLA disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to CERCLA risk assessments and DOE Order 435.1 performance assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement, respectively. One of the issues considered by the working group, which is addressed in this report, was how to appropriately consider the performance of covers and liners/leachate collections systems in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 performance assessment (PA). This same information may be appropriate for consideration within CERCLA risk assessments for these facilities. These OSDCs are generally developed to meet hazardous waste (HW) disposal design standards under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as well as the DOE Order 435.1 performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. To meet the standards for HW, the facilities typically include engineered covers and liner/leachate collection systems. Thus, when considering such facilities in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 PA, there is a need to address the evolution of performance of covers and liner/leachate collection systems in the context of meeting a performance standard considering time frames of 1,000 years for compliance and potentially thousands of years based on the wastes to test the robustness of the system. Experience has shown that there are a range of expectations and perspectives from the different regulators involved at different sites when reviewing assumptions related to cover and liner/leachate collection system performance. However for HW disposal alone under RCRA the design standards are typically considered sufficient by the regulators without a requirement to assess long-term performance thus avoiding the need to consider the details addressed in this report. This report provides suggestions for a general approach to address covers and liners/leachate collection systems in a DOE Order 435.1 PA and how to integrate assessments with defense-in-depth considerations such as design, operations, and waste acceptance criteria to address uncertainties. The emphasis is on water balances and management in such assessments. Specific information and references are provided for details needed to address the evolution of individual components of cover and liner/leachate collection systems. This information was then synthesized into suggestions for best practices for cover and liner system design and examples of approaches to address the performance of covers and liners as part of a performance assessment of the disposal system. Numerous references are provided for sources of information to help describe the basis for performance of individual components of cover and liner systems.

  5. Applicability of the Gallet equation to the vegetation clearances of NERC Reliability Standard FAC-003-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2012-03-31

    NERC has proposed a standard to use to specify clearances between vegetation and power lines. The purpose of the rule is to reduce the probability of flashover to a calculably low level. This report was commissioned by FERCs Office of Electrical Reliability. The scope of the study was analysis of the mathematics and documentation of the technical justification behind the application of the Gallet equation and the assumptions used in the technical reference paper

  6. Project test plan for runoff and erosion on fine-soil barrier surfaces and rock-covered side slopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Hoover, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1990-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company are working together to develop protective barriers to isolate near-surface radioactive waste. The purpose of the barriers is to protect defense wastes at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site from infiltration of precipitation, biointrusion, and surficial erosion for up to 10,000 years without the need for long-term monitoring, maintenance, or institutional control. The barriers will be constructed of layered earth and rock material designed to direct surface and groundwater pathways away from the buried waste. To address soil erosion as it applies to barrier design and long-term stability, a task designed to study this problem has been included in the Protective Barriers Program at PNL. The barrier soil-erosion task will investigate the ability of the soil cover and side slopes to resist the erosional and destabilizing processes from externally applied water. The study will include identification and field testing of the dominant processes contributing to erosion and barrier failure. The effects of rock mulches, vegetation cover on the top fine-grained soil surface, as well as the stability of rock armoring on the side slopes, will be evaluated. Some of the testing will include the effects of animal intrusion on barrier erosion, and these will be coordinated with other animal intrusion studies. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Anisotropic capillary barrier for waste site surface covers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stormont, John C. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Waste sites are capped or covered upon closure. The cover structure incorporates a number of different layers each having a contributory function. One such layer is the barrier layer. Traditionally the barriers have been compacted soil and geosynthetics. These types of barriers have not been successfully implemented in unsaturated ground conditions like those found in dry climates. Capillary barriers have been proposed as barrier layers in dry environments, but the divergence length of these barriers has been found to be inadequate. An alternative to the capillary barrier is a anisotropic capillary barrier. An anisotropic capillary barrier has an increased divergence length which results in more water being diverted laterally preventing the majority of water from percolating in a downward direction through the barrier.

  8. Sandia Research Featured on Journal of Physical Chemistry A Cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Featured on Journal of Physical Chemistry A Cover - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  9. JBEI Featured in Chemical & Engineering News Cover Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Featured in Chemical & Engineering News Cover Article - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense

  10. L.43 EXHIBIT C PAST PERFORMANCE QUESTIONNAIRE COVER LETTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 EXHIBIT C PAST PERFORMANCE QUESTIONNAIRE COVER LETTER The Department of Energy is seeking your assistance on a very important procurement. is participating in a proposal for a DOE contract. has identified you as someone who is familiar with their past performance on similar work. We are asking you to complete the attached Past Performance Information Questionnaire to help DOE evaluate 's past performance. We greatly appreciate your time and assistance in completing this questionnaire. In

  11. Covered Product Category: Air-Cooled Electric Chillers | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Air-Cooled Electric Chillers Covered Product Category: Air-Cooled Electric Chillers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for air-cooled electric chillers, which are a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements

  12. Covered Product Category: Commercial Boilers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boilers Covered Product Category: Commercial Boilers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for commercial boilers, which is a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Commercial Boilers Table 1 displays the

  13. Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cool Roof Products Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label,

  14. Covered Product Category: Exterior Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exterior Lighting Covered Product Category: Exterior Lighting The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for outdoor wall-mounted light fixtures or luminaires, outdoor pole/arm-mounted area and roadway luminaires, outdoor pole/arm-mounted decorative luminaires, fuel pump canopy luminaires, bollards, and parking garage luminaires, all of which are FEMP-designated product categories. Federal laws and requirements mandate that

  15. Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Industrial

  16. Covered Product Category: Light Commercial Heating and Cooling | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Commercial Heating and Cooling Covered Product Category: Light Commercial Heating and Cooling Federal purchases of light commercial heating and cooling equipment must be ENERGY STAR-qualified. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. This product overview explains how to meet energy-efficiency requirements for Federal purchases of light commercial

  17. Covered Product Category: Residential Central Air Conditioners | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Central Air Conditioners Covered Product Category: Residential Central Air Conditioners The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for residential central air conditioners (CACs), which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label

  18. Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water Heaters |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Electric Resistance Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sets federal efficiency requirements and provides acquisition guidance for residential electric resistance water heaters. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. This product overview offers

  19. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Furnaces Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for residential gas furnaces, which is an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label,

  20. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on

  1. Covered Product Category: Residential Geothermal Heat Pumps | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Residential Geothermal Heat Pumps Covered Product Category: Residential Geothermal Heat Pumps The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for geothermal heat pumps, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying

  2. Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Heat Pump Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for residential heat pump water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. The following guidance

  3. Covered Product Category: Residential Windows, Doors, and Skylights |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Windows, Doors, and Skylights Covered Product Category: Residential Windows, Doors, and Skylights The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for residential windows, doors, and skylights, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display

  4. Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Electric Chillers Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for water-cooled electric chillers, which is a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for

  5. Y-12_Front Cover_Summary_Feb2011.ai

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Summary COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) TITLE: Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex (DOE/EIS-0387) (Final Y-12 SWEIS) CONTACT: For further information on this SWEIS, For general information on the DOE contact: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact: Pam Gorman Carol Borgstrom, Director Y-12 SWEIS Document Manager Office of NEPA

  6. EIS-0285-SA-448: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS- 0285/SA448 Pearl-Marion No. 1 Transmission Line Corridor) Project No. PP&A # 2049

  7. Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from two climate models (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation

  8. Economic evaluation of a swine farm covered anaerobic lagoon digester

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusk, P.

    1996-12-31

    It is helpful to evaluate anaerobic digestion technologies using objective economic criteria. Options can then be ranked in terms of their relative cost effectiveness, leading to rational deployment decisions. This study presents the results of a hypothetical pro forma economic evaluation of one type of digestion system that could commonly be found on many swine farms; a covered anaerobic lagoon. The digester was assumed to be located in North Carolina, a major swine-producing state. Electricity generation with waste heat recovery was assumed to be the major end-use application of biogas manufactured from this process.

  9. Production of Oil in Vegetative Tissues - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Production of Oil in Vegetative Tissues Inventors: Christoph Benning, Changcheng Xu, Binbin Lu, Jinpeng Gao Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryProduction of alternative fuels such as biodiesel is on the rise around the world and in the U.S. due to a strong and growing desire to reduce dependency on petroleum-derived diesel fuel. The acceptance of biodiesel has been slowed due to its higher cost relative to petroleum-derived

  10. Ecological Impacts of the Cerro Grande Fire: Predicting Elk Movement and Distribution Patterns in Response to Vegetative Recovery through Simulation Modeling October 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Rupp

    2005-10-01

    In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 17,200 ha in north-central New Mexico as the result of an escaped prescribed burn initiated by Bandelier National Monument. The interaction of large-scale fires, vegetation, and elk is an important management issue, but few studies have addressed the ecological implications of vegetative succession and landscape heterogeneity on ungulate populations following large-scale disturbance events. Primary objectives of this research were to identify elk movement pathways on local and landscape scales, to determine environmental factors that influence elk movement, and to evaluate movement and distribution patterns in relation to spatial and temporal aspects of the Cerro Grande Fire. Data collection and assimilation reflect the collaborative efforts of National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Department of Energy (Los Alamos National Laboratory) personnel. Geographic positioning system (GPS) collars were used to track 54 elk over a period of 3+ years and locational data were incorporated into a multi-layered geographic information system (GIS) for analysis. Preliminary tests of GPS collar accuracy indicated a strong effect of 2D fixes on position acquisition rates (PARs) depending on time of day and season of year. Slope, aspect, elevation, and land cover type affected dilution of precision (DOP) values for both 2D and 3D fixes, although significant relationships varied from positive to negative making it difficult to delineate the mechanism behind significant responses. Two-dimensional fixes accounted for 34% of all successfully acquired locations and may affect results in which those data were used. Overall position acquisition rate was 93.3% and mean DOP values were consistently in the range of 4.0 to 6.0 leading to the conclusion collar accuracy was acceptable for modeling purposes. SAVANNA, a spatially explicit, process-oriented ecosystem model, was used to simulate successional dynamics. Inputs to the SAVANNA included a land cover map, long-term weather data, soil maps, and a digital elevation model. Parameterization and calibration were conducted using field plots. Model predictions of herbaceous biomass production and weather were consistent with available data and spatial interpolations of snow were considered reasonable for this study. Dynamic outputs generated by SAVANNA were integrated with static variables, movement rules, and parameters developed for the individual-based model through the application of a habitat suitability index. Model validation indicated reasonable model fit when compared to an independent test set. The finished model was applied to 2 realistic management scenarios for the Jemez Mountains and management implications were discussed. Ongoing validation of the individual-based model presented in this dissertation provides an adaptive management tool that integrates interdisciplinary experience and scientific information, which allows users to make predictions about the impact of alternative management policies.

  11. Operation of cover-gas system during SLSF tests. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braid, T.H.; Harper, H.A.; Wilson, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    During two tests in the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (W1 and P4), high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy was used to detect pin failure by observing radioactive fission product isotopes of Kr and Xe from exposed fuel. A continuous stream of argon cover gas from the in-pile loop was transferred to a shielded sample volume. Two germanium crystal spectrometers continuously recorded spectra of gamma rays in the energy range 80 keV to approx. 2.7 MeV. A very wide range of signal strength was accommodated without saturation by dilution of the sample, reduction of the sample chamber volume and insertion of detecter collimators. The cover gas system provided an unambiguous indication of fuel failure during a series of boiling tests in W1. In P4, spectra were recorded after a power transient that released molten fuel and from a mass of exposed fuel at a range of reactor power levels. Gamma rays were observed from isotopes of Kr and Xe with half-lives from 3.8 m to 5.2 d.

  12. Process Development for Stamping -Pillar Covers with Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Rohatgi, Aashish; Smith, Mark T.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2015-02-20

    In this work, performed in close collaboration with PACCAR and Magna International, a 6XXX series aluminum alloy was used for the development of A-Pillar cover for the cab of a typical heavy-duty Class-8 truck. The use of Al alloy for the A-pillar cover represents an approximately 40% weight savings over its steel or molded fiberglass composite counterpart. For the selected Al alloy, a small amount of cold work (5% tensile strain), following prior hot-forming, was found to significantly improve the subsequent age-hardening response. The role of solutionizing temperature and rate of cooling on the age-hardening response after paint-bake treatment were investigated. For the temperature range selected in this work, higher solutionizing temperature correlated with greater subsequent age-hardening and vice-versa. However, the age-hardening response was insensitive to the mode of cooling (water quench vs. air cooling). Finally, a two-step forming process was developed where, in the first step, the blank was heated to solutionizing temperature, quenched, and then partially formed at room temperature. For the second step, the pre-form was re-heated and quenched as in the first step, and the forming was completed at room temperature. The resulting A-pillars had sufficient residual ductility to be compatible with hemming and riveting

  13. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Base and User Behavior | Department of Energy Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior Includes information about the installed base of residential windows and window coverings, and the operation of window coverings by households. PDF icon residential_windows_coverings.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Savings from Window

  14. Microsoft Word - DOE_Staffing_Study_Cover.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to contractors. An analysis of the appropriate roles and responsibilities within these functions to be performed by federal and contractor personnel is currently being...

  15. Oil spreading in surface waters with an ice cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapa, P.D.; Weerasuriya, S.A.; Belaskas, D.P.; Chowdhury, T.

    1993-02-01

    A study of oil spreading in surface waters in the presence of a floating ice cover is presented. The ice can be solid or fragmented. Both axi-symmetrical and uni-directional spreading are studied. The report describes the analytical and numerical model development, the experimental set-up, results from the laboratory experiments, and their comparison with the derived theory and the numerical simulation. To analyze the spreading of oil under solid ice, new equations are derived. These equations consider gravity (buoyancy) - inertia phase, gravity (buoyancy) - viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy - surface tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to termination of spreading is presented. The emphasis of the study is on the dominant spreading mechanism for oil under ice, which is the buoyancy-viscous phase.

  16. Performance of Evapotranspirative Covers Under Enhanced Precipitation: Preliminary Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson, Lloyd T. Desotell, David B. Hudson, Gregory J. Shott, Vefa Yucel

    2007-02-01

    Since January 2001, drainage lysimeter studies have been conducted at Yucca Flat, on the Nevada Test Site, in support of an evapotranspirative cover design. Yucca Flat has an arid climate with average precipitation of 16.5 cm annually. The facility consists of six drainage lysimeters 3 m in diameter, 2.4 m deep, and backfilled with a single layer of native soil. The bottom of each lysimeter is sealed and equipped with a small drain that enables direct measurement of saturated drainage. Each lysimeter has eight time-domain reflectometer probes to measure moisture content-depth profiles paired with eight heat-dissipation probes to measure soil-water potential depth profiles. Sensors are connected to dataloggers which are remotely accessed via a phone line. The six lysimeters have three different surface treatments: two are bare-soil; two were revegetated with native species (primarily shadscale, winterfat, ephedra, and Indian rice grass); and two were allowed to revegetate naturally with such species as Russian thistle, halogeton, tumblemustard and cheatgrass. Beginning in October 2003, one half of the paired cover treatments (one bare soil, one invader species, and one native species) were irrigated with an amount of water equal to two times the natural precipitation to achieve a three times natural precipitation treatment. From October 2003 through December 2005, all lysimeters received 52.8 cm precipitation, and the four irrigated lysimeters received an extra 105.6 cm of irrigation. No drainage has occurred from any of the nonirrigated lysimeters, but moisture has accumulated at the bottom of the bare-soil lysimeter and the native-plant lysimeter. All irrigated lysimeters had some drainage. The irrigated baresoil lysimeter had 48.3 cm of drainage or 26.4 percent of the combined precipitation and applied irrigation for the entire monitoring record. The irrigated invader species lysimeter had 5.8 cm of drainage, about 3.2 percent of the combined precipitation and applied irrigation. An irrigation valve failure caused an additional 50.8 cm of irrigation to be applied to the irrigated native plant lysimeter. There has been 29.3 cm of drainage from this lysimeter, which is 11.5 percent of the total applied water. Approximately 40 percent of the drainage from the irrigated native plant lysimeter occurred within four weeks of the valve failure.

  17. File:(2010)2 full paper with cover LEDS FINAL (2).pdf | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (2010)2 full paper with cover LEDS FINAL (2).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:(2010)2 full paper with cover LEDS FINAL (2).pdf Size of this...

  18. Energy Independence and Security Act Six-Year Review of Covered...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Independence and Security Act Six-Year Review of Covered Products Energy Independence and Security Act Six-Year Review of Covered Products This memorandum explains that the Energy ...

  19. Preliminary Analysis of ARM SGP Area Sky Cover and Downwelling SW Irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clarifying and Implementing a Stricter DOD Definition Across Datastreams C. Sivaraman, B. Ermold, M. Macduff Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Definition of DOD: All dimension, attribute and variable types and names are considered part of a DOD. A change in any part of the DOD is considered a version change. Outcomes: ACRF enforces greater consistency in data Downstream users benefit (DQ, VAPs, scientists) Identify inconsistencies across datastreams Datastream development is more efficient

  20. Microsoft Word - Attachment J-1 Covered Site Contractors and Sub-Contractors (Mod 003).doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J-1-1 ATTACHMENT J.1 COVERED SITE CONTRACTORS/SUB-CONTRACTORS Current Covered Prime Contractors and their Covered Sub-Contractors: HPM Corporation (HPMC) (10/1/2012 - present) HPMC Covered Subs: Computer Science Corp (CSC) Advanced Technologies & Laboratories International, Inc. (ATL) (5/16/2005- present) No subcontractors Battelle Memorial Institute/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) No subcontractors CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) (10/01/2008 - present) No

  1. Microsoft Word - Attachment J-1 Covered Site Contractors and Sub-Contractors.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J-1-1 ATTACHMENT J.1 COVERED SITE CONTRACTORS/SUB-CONTRACTORS Covered Prime Contractors And Their Covered Sub-Contractors: HPM Corporation (HPMC) (10/1/2012 - present) HPMC Covered Subs: Computer Science Corp (CSC) Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. (ATL) (5/16/2005- present) No subcontractors Battelle Memorial Institute/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) No subcontractors CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) (10/01/2008 - present) No subcontractors

  2. EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and Second Page |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and Second Page EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and Second Page This template was designed for print material originating from the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office. PDF icon EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and Second Page More Documents & Publications EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and Second Page

  3. Frequently Asked Questions About Southwesterns Vegetation Management Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vegetation Management Program - Frequently Asked Questions Question. Why does Southwestern have to keep its transmission corridor clear of trees? Answer. Southwestern's vegetation management goals are to promote safety, provide for main- tenance access, and ensure electric system reliability. Trees or other vegetation near a trans- mission line can conduct electricity and increase the chance of unintentional contact with people and pets. If electricity flows through a tree to the ground, that

  4. Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-09-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

  5. Dual Durameter Blow Molded Rocker Cover Design With Unique Isolation Strategy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freese, V, Charles Edwin

    2000-07-11

    The rocker arm cover on a diesel engine can be formed of a rigid molded plastic material to minimize the transmission of noise into the atmosphere. Sonic vibration of the cover can be reduced by reducing the cover material stiffness. The reduced stiffness of the cover material allows the roof area of the cover to be momentarily displaced away from the cylinder head in the presence of an acoustic wave, so that the roof area is not able to develop the restoring force that is necessary for vibrational motion.

  6. EIS-0285-SA-148: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    project with US Forest Service for vegetation control for the McNary- Santiam 2 230 kV transmission line that enhances wildlife habitat under powerlines Supplement Analysis for...

  7. EIS-0285-SA-452: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Ross-St. Johns No. 1 PDF icon EIS-0285-SA-452-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0285-SA-452: Supplement Analysis...

  8. Final closure cover for a Hanford radioactive mixed waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.D.

    1996-02-06

    This study provides a preliminary design for a RCRA mixed waste landfill final closure cover. The cover design was developed by a senior class design team from Seattle University. The design incorporates a layered design of indigenous soils and geosynthetics in a layered system to meet final closure cover requirements for a landfill as imposed by the Washington Administrative Code WAC-173-303 implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  9. Cover Letter for Motion to Intervene and Comments of the District of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Columbia Government | Department of Energy Cover Letter for Motion to Intervene and Comments of the District of Columbia Government Cover Letter for Motion to Intervene and Comments of the District of Columbia Government Docket No. EO-05-01: Cover letter for Motion to Intervene and Comments of the District of Columbia Government, being filed today with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and served upon all parties designated on the official service list, in Docket No. EL05-145-000

  10. Nuke Watch New Mexico Perspective on MDA G Cap and Cover | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Nuke Watch New Mexico Perspective on MDA G Cap and Cover Nuke Watch New Mexico Perspective on MDA G Cap and Cover Topic: Scott Kovac NWNM, Provided Information pertaining to the Proposed Cap and Cover of Material Disposal Area G and NWNMs perspective on it. PDF icon NWNM MDA G - February 12, 2014 More Documents & Publications EA-1464: Final Environmental Assessment NNMCAB Board Minutes: January 2011 Pojoaque EIS-0380: Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement

  11. FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Updates to 2016 Federal Energy and Water

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management Awards Criteria | Department of Energy Update Covers Updates to 2016 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Criteria FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Updates to 2016 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Criteria January 7, 2016 - 1:26pm Addthis FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Updates to 2016 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Criteria The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will present 2016 Federal Energy and Water Management

  12. Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_FINAL1.DOC | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy FINAL1.DOC Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_FINAL1.DOC PDF icon Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_FINAL1.DOC More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_R1_Draft_3.DOC EA-1552: Final Environmental Assessment Probabilistic Modeling and Phase 2 Decision Making at the West Valley Demonstration Project and the Western New York Nuclear Service Center

  13. A Glimpse at What's Between the Covers of the Market Assessment |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A Glimpse at What's Between the Covers of the Market Assessment A Glimpse at What's Between the Covers of the Market Assessment This brief provides an overview of motor system energy use and savings. PDF icon A Glimpse at What's Between the Covers of the Market Assessment (December 2002) More Documents & Publications United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment United States Industrial Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment:

  14. KineticsFinal Report Cover Page Bakajin, O 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    KineticsFinal Report Cover Page Bakajin, O 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 42 ENGINEERING; CONSUMPTION RATES; DEAD TIME; DETECTION; DIFFUSION; DNA; ENERGY TRANSFER; FABRICATION;...

  15. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Paper presented at the Waste Management 2011 Conference. February 27 through March 3, 2011, Phoenix, Arizona. C.H. Benson, W.J. Waugh, W.H. Albright, G.M. Smith, R.P. Bush PDF icon Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test More Documents & Publications New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation Monitoring the Performance of an

  16. Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-06-23

    Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

  17. Advanced Combustion/Modeling and Analysis Toward HCCI/PCCI in a 60% Efficient Free-Piston Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation covers analysis and prediction of attainable combustion ratios in an HCCI/PCCI free-piston engine

  18. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - Cover and Table of Contents |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Cover and Table of Contents 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - Cover and Table of Contents DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review PDF icon 2008_merit_review_contents.pdf More Documents & Publications 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Table of Contents EIS-0436: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

  19. EPACT Representation for Covered Awards Over $100,000 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy EPACT Representation for Covered Awards Over $100,000 EPACT Representation for Covered Awards Over $100,000 PDF icon EPACT Representation More Documents & Publications 2007 Annual Plan 2007 Annual Plan for the Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program 2008 Annual Plan

  20. Trajectories of change in sagebrush steppe vegetation communities in relation to multiple wildfires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, G. M.; Bakker, J. D.; Dettweiler-Robinson, E.; Dunwiddie, Peter W.; Hall, S. A.; Downs, Janelle L.; Evans, J.

    2012-07-01

    Repeated perturbations, both biotic and abiotic, can lead to fundamental changes in the nature of ecosystems including changes in state. Sagebrush-steppe communities provide important habitat for wildlife and grazing for livestock. Fire is an integral part of these systems, but there is concern that increased ignition frequencies and invasive species are fundamentally altering these systems. Despite these issues, the majority of studies of fire effects in Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis-dominated systems have focused on the effects of single burns. The Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), in south-central Washington (U.S.A.), was one of the largest areas of continuous shrub-steppe habitat in the state until large wildfires burnt the majority of it in 2000 and 2007. We analysed data from permanent vegetation transects established in 1996 and resampled in 2002 and 2009. Our objective was to describe how the fires, and subsequent post-fire restoration efforts, affected communities successional pathways. Plant communities differed in response to repeated fire and restoration; these differences could largely be ascribed to the functional traits of the dominant species. Low elevation communities, previously dominated by obligate seeders, moved farthest from their initial composition and were dominated by weedy, early successional species in 2009. Higher elevation sites with resprouting shrubs, native bunchgrasses and few invasive species were generally more resilient to the effects of repeated disturbances. Shrub cover has been almost entirely removed from ALE, though there is evidence of recovery where communities were dominated by re-sprouters. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) dominance was reduced by herbicide application in areas where it was previously abundant but increased significantly in untreated areas. Several re-sprouting species, notably Phlox longifolia and Poa secunda, expanded remarkably following competitive release from shrub canopies and/or abundant cheatgrass. Our results suggest that community dynamics can be understood through a state-and-transition model with two axes (shrub/grass and native/invasive abundance), though such models also need to account for differences in plant functional traits and disturbance regimes. We use our results to develop an illustrative model that will be expanded with further research.

  1. EIS-0285-SA-449: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    449: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-449: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Kalispell-Kerr #1 Transmission Line Corridor PDF icon EIS-0285-SA-449-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0285-SA-450: Supplement Analysis EA-1961: Draft Environmental Assessment CX-010590: Categorical Exclusion Determination

  2. Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from two climate models (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is

  3. Delivery of Vegetable Oil Suspensions in a Shear Thinning Fluid for Enhanced Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Lirong; Truex, Michael J.; Kananizadeh, Negin; Li, Yusong; Lea, Alan S.; Yan, Xiulan

    2015-04-01

    In situ anaerobic biological processes are widely applied for dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in groundwater. A wide range of organic substrates have been tested and applied to support the dechlorination processes. Vegetable oils are a promising substrate and have been shown to induce effective dechlorination, have limited geochemical impacts, and good longevity. Distribution of vegetable oil in the subsurface, because it is a non-aqueous phase material, has typically been addressed by creating emulsified oil solutions. In this study, inexpensive waste vegetable oils were suspended in a xanthan gum solution, a shear-thinning fluid, as an alternative oil delivery mechanism. The stability, oil droplet size and distribution, and rheological behavior of the oil suspensions that are created in the xanthan solutions were studied in batch experiments. The injectability of the suspensions and oil distribution in porous medium were evaluated in column tests. Numerical modeling of the oil droplet transport and distribution in porous media was conducted to help interpret the column-test data. Batch studies showed that simple mixing of vegetable oil and xanthan solution produced stable suspensions of the oil as micron-size droplets. The mixture rheology retains shear-thinning properties that facilitate improved uniformity of substrate distribution in heterogeneous aquifers. Column tests demonstrated successful injection of the vegetable oil suspension into porous medium. This study provided evidence that vegetable oil suspensions in xanthan are a potential substrate to support in situ anaerobic bioremediation with favorable injection properties.

  4. The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" Given the stakes in the sensitive negotiations [with Iran], the labs would check and recheck one another, making sure the answers held up. May 15, 2015 The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" Los Alamos National Laboratory's main complex, Los Alamos, New Mexico National labs race to stop Iran Given the stakes in the sensitive

  5. Microsoft Word - Cover Letter Regulatory Burden RFI 4-15-11 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cover Letter Regulatory Burden RFI 4-15-11 Microsoft Word - Cover Letter Regulatory Burden RFI 4-15-11 Comments in response to the U.S. Department of Energy request for public comment on "Improving DOE Regulations," published in the Federal Register on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2011. PDF icon Microsoft Word - Cover Letter Regulatory Burden RFI 4-15-11 More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI - Docket No. DOE-HQ-2011-0014-0001 DOE Preliminary Plan for Retrospective

  6. Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_R1_Draft_3.DOC | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy R1_Draft_3.DOC Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_R1_Draft_3.DOC PDF icon Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_R1_Draft_3.DOC More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - DP_cover_and_front matter_FINAL1.DOC WVDP Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation for the Concentrator Feed Makeup Tank and the Melter Feed Hold Tank Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Melter

  7. Task Cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SOLICITATION NO. DE-SOL-0003641 Exhibit G The following item(s) are contained in this file: ITEM NAME NO. OF PAGES(S) Sample Task Order 1 Site Support Services 14 Sample Task Order 2 Health Program Services 16 Sample Task Order 3 Janitorial Services (including Child 30 Care Center Cleaning Standards) Task Order Transition 4 DE-SOL-0003641 Sample Task Order 1 (including Exhibit I) SAMPLE TASK ORDER 1 SITE OPERATIONS SUPPORT TASK ORDER REQUEST INFORMATION: a) Task Order Period of Performance -

  8. Task Cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... (Natural Gas) 3,550 FEET NETL Morgantown CNG Fueling Station Other Site Facilities 4321 ... The Contractor shall provide a seamless transfer of responsibility for ongoing and new ...

  9. Front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INVESTMENT IN COMMODITIES MARKETS: POTENTIAL IMPACT ON COMMODITY PRICES & VOLATILITY IIF Commodities Task Force Submission to the G20 September 2011 IIF Commodities Task Force Submission to the G20 Financial Investment in Commodity Markets: Potential Impact on Commodity Prices & Volatility 1 Preface Amidst increasing concerns about global growth prospects and financial market volatility, commodity prices con- tinue to be a focus for policymakers. The French G-20 presidency has made this

  10. COVER3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... decontamination and decommissioning, waste management, and ... --- 300 --- Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (Bettis) --- --- ... that have other special status are found on and in the ...

  11. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    registered nurses who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 247 Nurseline toll-free telephone number: 1-800-973-6329 When you have a non- medical benefit question or...

  12. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    services (diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical) S removal of tori, exostoses, or impacted teeth S procedures involving orthodontic care, the teeth, dental implants,...

  13. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  14. Plasmas as cover art for The American Journal of Physics | Princeton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasmas as cover art for The American Journal of Physics November 5, 2013 American Journal of Physics, Volume 81, No. 9, September 2013 (Photo by American Journal of Physics,...

  15. Support pedestals for interconnecting a cover and nozzle band wall in a gas turbine nozzle segment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC); Webbon, Waylon Willard (Greenville, SC); Bagepalli, Radhakrishna (Schenectady, NY); Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Kellock, Iain Robertson (Simpsonville, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner band portions. Each band portion includes a nozzle wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through the apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. Structural pedestals interconnect the cover and nozzle wall and pass through holes in the impingement plate to reduce localized stress otherwise resulting from a difference in pressure within the chamber of the nozzle segment and the hot gas path and the fixed turbine casing surrounding the nozzle stage. The pedestals may be cast or welded to the cover and nozzle wall.

  16. al2000-08withoutCoverMemo.pdf | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    al2000-08withoutCoverMemo.pdf More Documents & Publications AbrahamMemoToMcSlarrow-Brooks.pdf MemoAdvisoryAssistanceContractWaiver.pdf 2010.01.15_FY10_TYSP_Guidance_memo.pdf

  17. 2014-02-21 Issuance: Proposed Determination of Computer Servers as a Covered Consumer Product; Withdrawal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice withdrawing the previously proposed determination that computer servers qualify as a covered product, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on February 21, 2014.

  18. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5

  19. "PBS NEWSHOUR" covers new technique that may make solar panel production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    less expensive "PBS NEWSHOUR" covers new technique that may make solar panel production less expensive "PBS NEWSHOUR" covers new technique that may make solar panel production less expensive Scientists have developed a more efficient method of creating the material that makes solar panels work, according to a report published this week, which researchers say could be key to creating clean global energy in the future. April 24, 2015 image description Scientists Aditya

  20. Seventh Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers Cleanup

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    along Columbia River - Breathtaking river views...nice graphics...glimpses of the future of Hanford | Department of Energy Seventh Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers Cleanup along Columbia River - Breathtaking river views...nice graphics...glimpses of the future of Hanford Seventh Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers Cleanup along Columbia River - Breathtaking river views...nice graphics...glimpses of the future of Hanford June 20, 2012 -

  1. Taking off the training wheels: the properties of a dynamic vegetation model without climate envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R. A.; Muszala, S.; Verteinstein, M.; Lawrence, P.; Xu, C.; McDowell, N. G.; Knox, R. G.; Koven, C.; Holm, J.; Rogers, B. M.; Lawrence, D.; Bonan, G.

    2015-04-29

    We describe an implementation of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) concept in the Community Land Model. The structure of CLM(ED) and the physiological and structural modifications applied to the CLM are presented. A major motivation of this development is to allow the prediction of biome boundaries directly from plant physiological traits via their competitive interactions. Here we investigate the performance of the model for an example biome boundary in Eastern North America. We explore the sensitivity of the predicted biome boundaries and ecosystem properties to the variation of leaf properties determined by the parameter space defined by the GLOPNET global leaf trait database. Further, we investigate the impact of four sequential alterations to the structural assumptions in the model governing the relative carbon economy of deciduous and evergreen plants. The default assumption is that the costs and benefits of deciduous vs. evergreen leaf strategies, in terms of carbon assimilation and expenditure, can reproduce the geographical structure of biome boundaries and ecosystem functioning. We find some support for this assumption, but only under particular combinations of model traits and structural assumptions. Many questions remain regarding the preferred methods for deployment of plant trait information in land surface models. In some cases, plant traits might best be closely linked with each other, but we also find support for direct linkages to environmental conditions. We advocate for intensified study of the costs and benefits of plant life history strategies in different environments, and for the increased use of parametric and structural ensembles in the development and analysis of complex vegetation models.

  2. Taking off the training wheels: the properties of a dynamic vegetation model without climate envelopes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fisher, R. A.; Muszala, S.; Verteinstein, M.; Lawrence, P.; Xu, C.; McDowell, N. G.; Knox, R. G.; Koven, C.; Holm, J.; Rogers, B. M.; et al

    2015-04-29

    We describe an implementation of the Ecosystem Demography (ED) concept in the Community Land Model. The structure of CLM(ED) and the physiological and structural modifications applied to the CLM are presented. A major motivation of this development is to allow the prediction of biome boundaries directly from plant physiological traits via their competitive interactions. Here we investigate the performance of the model for an example biome boundary in Eastern North America. We explore the sensitivity of the predicted biome boundaries and ecosystem properties to the variation of leaf properties determined by the parameter space defined by the GLOPNET global leafmore » trait database. Further, we investigate the impact of four sequential alterations to the structural assumptions in the model governing the relative carbon economy of deciduous and evergreen plants. The default assumption is that the costs and benefits of deciduous vs. evergreen leaf strategies, in terms of carbon assimilation and expenditure, can reproduce the geographical structure of biome boundaries and ecosystem functioning. We find some support for this assumption, but only under particular combinations of model traits and structural assumptions. Many questions remain regarding the preferred methods for deployment of plant trait information in land surface models. In some cases, plant traits might best be closely linked with each other, but we also find support for direct linkages to environmental conditions. We advocate for intensified study of the costs and benefits of plant life history strategies in different environments, and for the increased use of parametric and structural ensembles in the development and analysis of complex vegetation models.« less

  3. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Models (GCAMs) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAMs afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAMs pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  4. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

  5. Double-Layered PTFE-Covered Nitinol Stents: Experience in 32 Patients with Malignant Esophageal Strictures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jung Gu; Jung, Gyoo-Sik Oh, Kyung Seung; Park, Seon-Ja

    2010-08-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a double-layered polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stent in the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal strictures. A double-layered PTFE-covered nitinol stent was designed to reduce the propensity to migration of conventional covered stent. The stent consists of an inner PTFE-covered stent and an outer uncovered nitinol stent tube. With fluoroscopic guidance, the stent was placed in 32 consecutive patients with malignant esophageal strictures. During the follow-up period, the technical and clinical success rates, complications, and cumulative patient survival and stent patency were evaluated. Stent placement was technically successful in all patients, and no procedural complications occurred. After stent placement, the symptoms of 30 patients (94%) showed improvement. During the mean follow-up of 103 days (range, 9-348 days), 11 (34%) of 32 patients developed recurrent symptoms due to tumor overgrowth in five patients (16%), tumor ingrowth owing to detachment of the covering material (PTFE) apart from the stent wire in 3 (9%), mucosal hyperplasia in 2 (6%), and stent migration in 1 (3%). Ten of these 11 patients were treated by means of placing a second covered stent. Thirty patients died, 29 as a result of disease progression and 1 from aspiration pneumonia. The median survival period was 92 days. The median period of primary stent patency was 190 days. The double-layered PTFE-covered nitinol stent seems to be effective for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal strictures. We believe that the double-layer configuration of this stent can contribute to decreasing the stent's migration rate.

  6. High temperature flow-through device for rapid solubilization and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Jason A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Peterson, Kenneth A.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2009-09-22

    Devices and methods for thermally lysing of biological material, for example vegetative bacterial cells and bacterial spores, are provided. Hot solution methods for solubilizing bacterial spores are described. Systems for direct analysis are disclosed including thermal lysers coupled to sample preparation stations. Integrated systems capable of performing sample lysis, labeling and protein fingerprint analysis of biological material, for example, vegetative bacterial cells, bacterial spores and viruses are provided.

  7. High temperature flow-through device for rapid solubilization and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Jason A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Peterson, Kenneth A.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2013-04-23

    Devices and methods for thermally lysing of biological material, for example vegetative bacterial cells and bacterial spores, are provided. Hot solution methods for solubilizing bacterial spores are described. Systems for direct analysis are disclosed including thermal lysers coupled to sample preparation stations. Integrated systems capable of performing sample lysis, labeling and protein fingerprint analysis of biological material, for example, vegetative bacterial cells, bacterial spores and viruses are provided.

  8. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    1997-01-01

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  9. ARM: Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    Fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux for each of 25 individual SGP facilities.

  10. Modelling vegetation dynamics at global scale due to climate changes: Comparison of two approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belotelov, N.V.; Bogatyrev, B.G.; Lobanov, A.I.

    1996-12-31

    Climate changes will influence vegetation dynamics. One of the ways of forecasting these changes is the creation of mathematical models describing vegetation dynamics. Computer experiments can then be conducted under climate change scenarios. Two main approaches are used to create such models. The first approach is based on a bioclimatic dynamic approach. The second approach is based on modelling the main eco-physiological processes. The bioclimatic dynamic approach consists of hypotheses about vegetation types or biomes, and their interrelationships with climate. In the eco-physiological approach, a detailed description of the processes, such as production, mortality, plants migration and their competition is presented. A number of computer experiments has been conducted for several climatic scenario for Russia and the whole world. A qualitative comparison of the results with the results of an earlier bioclimatic model has been done.

  11. Issues in Midterm Analysis and Forecasting

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    Final issue of this report. Presents a series of eight papers, which cover topics in analysis and modeling that underlie the Annual Energy Outlook 1999, as well as other significant issues in midterm energy markets.

  12. FCC Pilot Plant Results with Vegetable Oil and Pyrolysis Oil Feeds |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy FCC Pilot Plant Results with Vegetable Oil and Pyrolysis Oil Feeds FCC Pilot Plant Results with Vegetable Oil and Pyrolysis Oil Feeds Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-D: Working Together: Conventional Refineries and Bio-Oil R&D Technologies E. Thomas (Tom) Habib, Jr., Director, Customer Research Partnerships, W.R. Grace & Co. PDF icon biomass13_habib_2-d.pdf More Documents & Publications Opportunities for Biomass-Based Fuels and Products

  13. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-15

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of atmospheric air. For one material with elevated levels of fine particles and high organic matter content, methane production impeded the quantification of methane oxidation potentials. Regarding the design of landfill cover layers it was concluded that the magnitude of the expected methane load, the texture and expected compaction of the cover material are key variables that need to be known. Based on these, a column study can serve as an appropriate testing system to determine the methane oxidation capacity of a soil intended as landfill cover material.

  14. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, P.; George, R.A.

    1999-07-27

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell. 4 figs.

  15. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1999-01-01

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell.

  16. Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spun Off From A Government Lab" (Not) just your typical Lab spin off Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government Lab" Far from Silicon Valley, Descartes Labs aims to turn a national research facility's AI research into new ways of understanding the world. July 30, 2015 Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government Lab" Descartes Labs cofounders Mark

  17. "Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab "Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab By the end of the century, the woodlands of the Southwest will likely be reduced to weeds and shrubs. And scientists worry that the rest of the planet may see similar effects. March 26, 2015 image description The Fate of Trees: How Climate Change May Alter Forests Worldwide is focus of article in Rolling Stone magazine The Fate of Trees: How Climate

  18. Sixth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers History

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Cleanup of Most Hazardous Facility at Hanford | Department of Energy Sixth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers History and Cleanup of Most Hazardous Facility at Hanford Sixth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers History and Cleanup of Most Hazardous Facility at Hanford April 18, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the sixth

  19. Low-level Waste Safely Dispositioned Under Runoff Cover at SRS | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Low-level Waste Safely Dispositioned Under Runoff Cover at SRS Low-level Waste Safely Dispositioned Under Runoff Cover at SRS April 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis The liner installer heat-welds a sand anchor closed. The sand anchors are installed under the liner and across the length of the slit trench to keep the liner in place and minimize the effects of wind lift. The liner installer heat-welds a sand anchor closed. The sand anchors are installed under the liner and across the

  20. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 | Department of Energy 8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility. PDF icon "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) More

  1. Application of satellite and GIS technologies for land-cover and land-use mapping at the rural-urban fringe - A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treitz, P.M.; Howarth, P.J.; Gong, Peng )

    1992-04-01

    SPOT HRV multispectral and panchromatic data were recorded and coregistered for a portion of the rural-urban fringe of Toronto, Canada. A two-stage digital analysis algorithm incorporating a spectral-class frequency-based contextual classification of eight land-cover and land-use classes resulted in an overall Kappa coefficient of 82.2 percent for training-area data and a Kappa coefficient of 70.3 percent for test-area data. A matrix-overlay analysis was then performed within the geographic information system (GIS) to combine the land-cover and land-use classes generated from the SPOT digital classification with zoning information for the area. The map that was produced has an estimated interpretation accuracy of 78 percent. Global Positioning System (GPS) data provided a positional reference for new road networks. These networks, in addition to the new land-cover and land-use map derived from the SPOT HRV data, provide an up-to-date synthesis of change conditions in the area. 51 refs.

  2. Middle to Late Holocene Fluctuations of C3 and C4 Vegetation in a Northern New England Salt Marsh, Sprague Marsh, Phippsburg Maine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, B J; Moore, K A; Lehmann, C; Bohlen, C; Brown, T A

    2006-05-26

    A 3.1 meter sediment core was analyzed for stable carbon isotope composition of organic matter and higher plant leaf wax (HPLW) lipid biomarkers to determine Holocene shifts in C{sub 3} (higher high marsh) and C{sub 4} (low and/or high marsh) plant deposition at the Sprague River Salt Marsh, Phippsburg, Maine. The carbon isotope composition of the bulk sediment and the HPLW parallel each other throughout most of the core, suggesting that terrestrial plants are an important source of organic matter to the sediments, and diagenetic alteration of the bulk sediments is minimal. The current salt marsh began to form 2500 cal yr BP. Low and/or high C{sub 4} marsh plants dominated deposition at 2000 cal yr BP, 700 cal yr BP, and for the last 200 cal yr BP. Expansion of higher high marsh C{sub 3} plants occurred at 1300 and 600 cal yr BP. These major vegetation shifts result from a combination of changes in relative sea-level rise and sediment accumulation rates. Average annual carbon sequestration rates for the last 2500 years approximate 40 g C yr{sup -1} m{sup -2}, and are in strong agreement with other values published for the Gulf of Maine. Given that Maine salt marshes cover an area of {approx}79 km{sup 2}, they represent an important component of the terrestrial carbon sink. More detailed isotopic and age records from a network of sediment cores at Sprague Marsh are needed to truly evaluate the long term changes in salt marsh plant communities and the impact of more recent human activity, including global warming, on salt marsh vegetation.

  3. Water balance relationships in four alternative cover designs for radioactive and mixed waste landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.W.; Hakonson, T.E. [Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins, CO (United States); Trujillo, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a field study to evaluate the relative hydrologic performance of various landfill capping technologies installed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Four cover designs (two Los Alamos capillary barrier designs, one modified EPA RCRA design, and one conventional design) were installed in large lysimeters instrumented to monitor the fate of natural precipitation between 01 January 1990 and 20 September 1993. After 45 months of study, results showed that the cover designs containing barrier layers were effective in reducing deep percolation as compared to a simple soil cap design. The RCRA cover, incorporating a clay hydraulic barrier, was the most effective of all cover designs in controlling percolation but was not 100% effective. Over 90% of all percolation and barrier lateral flow occurred during the months of February through May of each year, primarily as a result of snow melt, early spring rains and low evapotranspiration. Gravel mulch surface treatments (70--80% coverage) were effective in reducing runoff and erosion. The two plots receiving gravel mulch treatments exhibited equal but enhanced amounts of evapotranspiration despite the fact that one plot was planted with additional shrubs.

  4. Process Description for the Retrieval of Earth Covered Transuranic (TRU) Waste Containers at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DEROSA, D.C.

    2000-01-13

    This document describes process and operational options for retrieval of the contact-handled suspect transuranic waste drums currently stored below grade in earth-covered trenches at the Hanford Site. Retrieval processes and options discussed include excavation, container retrieval, venting, non-destructive assay, criticality avoidance, incidental waste handling, site preparation, equipment, and shipping.

  5. Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichenauer, Thomas G.; Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann; Gerzabek, Martin H.

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. > Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. > Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

  6. EVALUATION OF THE TEMPORARY TENT COVER TRUSS SYSTEM AP PRIMARY VENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAQ MA

    2009-12-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate a temporary ten cover truss system. This system will be used to provide weather protection to the workers during replacement of the filter for the Primary Ventilation System in AP Tank Farm. The truss system has been fabricated utilizing tubes and couplers, which are normally used for scaffoldings.

  7. Covered Biodegradable Stent: New Therapeutic Option for the Management of Esophageal Perforation or Anastomotic Leak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerna, Marie; Koecher, Martin Valek, Vlastimil; Aujesky, Rene; Neoral, Cestmir; Andrasina, Tomas; Panek, Jiri; Mahathmakanthi, Shankari

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate our experience with the treatment of postoperative anastomotic leaks and benign esophageal perforations with covered biodegradable stents. Materials and Methods: From 2008 to 2010, we treated five men with either an anastomotic leak or benign esophageal perforation by implanting of covered biodegradable Ella-BD stents. The average age of the patients was 60 (range, 38-74) years. Postoperative anastomotic leaks were treated in four patients (1 after esophagectomy, 1 after resection of diverticulum, 2 after gastrectomy). In one patient, perforation occurred as a complication of the treatment of an esophageal rupture (which occurred during a balloon dilatation of benign stenosis) with a metallic stent. Results: Seven covered biodegradable stents were implanted in five patients. Primary technical success was 100%. Clinical success (leak sealing) was achieved in four of the five patients (80%). Stent migration occurred in three patients. In two of these patients, the leak had been sealed by the time of stent migration, therefore no reintervention was necessary. In one patient an additional stent had to be implanted. Conclusion: The use of biodegradable covered stents for the treatment of anastomotic leaks or esophageal perforations is technically feasible and safe. The initial results are promising; however, larger number of patients will be required to evaluate the capability of these biodegradable stents in the future. The use of biodegradable material for coverage of the stent is essential.

  8. The potential for reducing urban air temperatures and energy consumption through vegetative cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurn, D.M.; Bretz, S.E.; Huang, B.; Akbari, H.

    1994-05-01

    A network of 23 weather stations was used to detect existing oases in Southern California. Four stations, separated from one another by 15--25 miles (24--40 km), were closely examined. Data were strongly affected by the distance of the stations from the Pacific Ocean. This and other city-scale effects made the network inadequate for detection of urban oases. We also conducted traverse measurements of temperature and humidity in the Whittier Narrows Recreation Area in Los Angeles County on September 8--10, 1993. Near-surface air temperatures over vegetated areas were 1--2{degrees}C lower than background air temperatures. We estimate that vegetation may lower urban temperatures by 1{degrees}C, while the establishment of vegetative canopies may lower local temperatures by an additional 2{degrees}C. An increase in vegetation in residential neighborhoods may reduce peak loads in the Los Angeles area by 0.3 GW, and reduce energy consumption by 0.2 BkWh/year, saving $20 million annually. Large additional savings would result from regional cooling.

  9. Influence of the atmosphere on remotely sensed reflection from vegetation surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmer, C.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple scattering of solar radiation in a vegetation canopy is modelled equivalent to absorbing and scattering in a turbid medium with direction-dependent cross sections. Perturbations of plant reflection patterns due to atmospheric effects are computed at different altitudes and compared to the angular reflection characteristics caused by Lambertian surfaces of varying albedoes.

  10. Global latitudinal-asymmetric vegetation growth trends and their driving mechanisms: 1982-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter E; Hoffman, Forrest M; Zhu, Zaichun; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2013-01-01

    Using a recent Leaf Area Index (LAI) dataset and the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), we investigate percent changes and controlling factors of global vegetation growth for the period 1982 to 2009. Over that 28-year period, both the remote-sensing estimate and model simulation show a significant increasing trend in annual vegetation growth. Latitudinal asymmetry appeared in both products, with small increases in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and larger increases at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The south-to-north asymmetric land surface warming was assessed to be the principal driver of this latitudinal asymmetry of LAI trend. Heterogeneous precipitation functioned to decrease this latitudinal LAI gradient, and considerably regulated the local LAI change. CO2 fertilization during the last three decades, was simulated to be the dominant cause for the enhanced vegetation growth. Our study, though limited by observational and modeling uncertainties, adds further insight into vegetation growth trends and environmental correlations. These validation exercises also provide new quantitative and objective metrics for evaluation of land ecosystem process models at multiple spatio-temporal scales.

  11. Measurement of directional thermal infrared emissivity of vegetation and soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, J.M. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Soil Science; Balick, L.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A new method has been developed for measuring directional thermal emissivity as a function of view angle for plant canopies and soils using two infrared thermometers each sensitive to a different wavelength band. By calibrating the two infrared thermometers to 0.1C consistency, canopy directional emissivity can be estimated with typical errors less than 0.005 in the 8--14 um wavelength band, depending on clarity of the sky and corrections for CO{sub 2} absorption by the atmosphere. A theoretical justification for the method is developed along with an error analysis. Laboratory measurements were used to develop corrections for CO{sub 2}, absorption and a field calibration method is used to obtain the necessary 0.1C consistency for relatively low cost infrared thermometers. The emissivity of alfalfa (LAI=2.5) and corn (LAI=3.2) was near 0.995 and independent of view angle. Individual corn leaves had an emissivity of 0.97. A wheat (LAI=3.0) canopy had an emissivity of 0.985 at nadir and 0.975 at 75 degree view angle. The canopy emissivity values tend to be higher than values in the literature, and are useful for converting infrared thermometer measurements to kinetic temperature and interpreting satellite thermal observations.

  12. Approaches to consider covers and liners in a low-level waste disposal facility performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R.

    2015-03-17

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several USDOE sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the USEPA in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. One task completed by the working group addressed approaches for considering the performance of covers and liners/leachate collections systems in the context of a performance assessment (PA). A document has been prepared which provides recommendations for a general approach to address covers and liners/leachate collection systems in a PA and how to integrate assessments with defense-in-depth considerations such as design, operations and waste acceptance criteria to address uncertainties. Specific information and references are provided for details needed to address the evolution of individual components of cover and liner/leachate collection systems. This information is then synthesized into recommendations for best practices for cover and liner system design and examples of approaches to address the performance of covers and liners as part of a performance assessment of the disposal system.

  13. Overview of Opportunities for Co-Location of Solar Energy Technologies and Vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Beatty, B.; Hill, G.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale solar facilities have the potential to contribute significantly to national electricity production. Many solar installations are large-scale or utility-scale, with a capacity over 1 MW and connected directly to the electric grid. Large-scale solar facilities offer an opportunity to achieve economies of scale in solar deployment, yet there have been concerns about the amount of land required for solar projects and the impact of solar projects on local habitat. During the site preparation phase for utility-scale solar facilities, developers often grade land and remove all vegetation to minimize installation and operational costs, prevent plants from shading panels, and minimize potential fire or wildlife risks. However, the common site preparation practice of removing vegetation can be avoided in certain circumstances, and there have been successful examples where solar facilities have been co-located with agricultural operations or have native vegetation growing beneath the panels. In this study we outline some of the impacts that large-scale solar facilities can have on the local environment, provide examples of installations where impacts have been minimized through co-location with vegetation, characterize the types of co-location, and give an overview of the potential benefits from co-location of solar energy projects and vegetation. The varieties of co-location can be replicated or modified for site-specific use at other solar energy installations around the world. We conclude with opportunities to improve upon our understanding of ways to reduce the environmental impacts of large-scale solar installations.

  14. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  15. Geotechnical properties of paper mill sludges for use in landfill covers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moo-Young, H.K.; Zimmie, T.F.

    1996-09-01

    This study investigates the geotechnical properties of seven paper mill sludges. Paper mill sludges have a high water content and a high degree of compressibility and behave like a highly organic soil. Consolidation tests reveal a large reduction in void ratio and high strain values that are expected due to the high compressibility. Triaxial shear-strength tests conducted on remolded and undisturbed samples showed variations in the strength parameters resulting from the differences in sludge composition (i.e., water content and organic content). Laboratory permeability tests conducted on in-situ specimens either met the regulatory requirement for the permeability of a landfill cover or were very close. With time, consolidation and dewatering of the paper sludge improved the permeability of cover. Freezing and thawing cycles increased the sludge permeability about one to two orders of magnitude. Maximum permeability changes occurred within 10 freeze and thaw cycles.

  16. Field measurements of frost penetration into a landfill cover that uses a paper sludge barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moo-Young, H.K.; LaPlante, C.; Zimmie, T.F.; Quiroz, J.

    1999-07-01

    Frost penetration is a major environmental concern in landfill design. Freezing and thawing cycles may deteriorate the permeability of the liner or cap. In this study, the depth of frost penetration into a landfill cover that uses paper sludge as the impermeable barrier (the Hubbardston landfill in Massachusetts) was measured using a frost measurement system. A thermistor probe measured the temperature at various depths. Although temperature measurements are important, soil resistivity measurements are required to accurately predict the freezing level, since soil resistivity increases greatly upon freezing. A conductivity probe measured the half-bridge voltage between conductivity rings and a ground rod. Data were collected in data loggers. The data collected from 1992--1996 showed that the frost level did not penetrate the paper sludge capping layer. Heavy snow cover throughout the winters decreased the depth of frost penetration by insulating the landfill. The high water content in the sludge also contributed to the lack of freezing.

  17. Sandia/CINT Research on the Cover of Applied Physics Letters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia/CINT Research on the Cover of Applied Physics Letters - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle

  18. Sandia Research to Be Featured on Upcoming Cover of Journal of Physical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry B to Be Featured on Upcoming Cover of Journal of Physical Chemistry B - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing

  19. News Media invited to cover Feb. 12 Virginia Regional High School Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bowl at Jefferson Lab; 22 teams competing | Jefferson Lab World Year of Physics News Media invited to cover Feb. 12 Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl at Jefferson Lab; 22 teams competing February 7, 2005 The Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in Newport News, Va., is hosting this year's Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl on Saturday, Feb. 12. Twenty-two teams, representing high schools from across the state are participating in this annual, academic competition. News media

  20. News Media invited to cover Virginia Regional Science Bowl with record 23

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High School teams competing | Jefferson Lab News Media invited to cover Virginia Regional Science Bowl with record 23 High School teams competing January 30, 2004 The Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Va., is hosting this year's Virginia Regional Science Bowl on Saturday, Feb. 7. Twenty-three teams, representing high schools from across the state are participating in this annual, academic competition, and nine schools from

  1. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior SEPTEMBER 2013 Prepared for: Building Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: D&R International, Ltd. September 2013 Prepared for: Building Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared By: D&R International, Ltd. 1300 Spring Street, Suite 500 Silver Spring, MD 20910

  2. Joint BioEnergy Institute Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on the Cover of ACS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Biology Oxime-NIMS Work Featured on the Cover of ACS Chemical Biology - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing

  3. Joint Sandia/University of Texas-Austin Research Featured on the Cover of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal of Physical Chemistry C Sandia/University of Texas-Austin Research Featured on the Cover of Journal of Physical Chemistry C - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power

  4. Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations in Covered Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility Energy Management Guidelines and Criteria for Energy and Water Evaluations in Covered Facilities (42 U.S.C. 8253 Subsection (f), Use of Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Federal Buildings) 25 November 2008 I. Background A. Authority Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) amends section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, by adding a new subsection (f) Use of Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Federal Buildings (42 U.S.C.

  5. Covered Product Category: Residential Air-Source Heat Pumps | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Air-Source Heat Pumps Covered Product Category: Residential Air-Source Heat Pumps The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for residential air-source heat pumps, which is an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Efficiency Requirements for Federal Purchases The U.S.

  6. Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for whole-home gas tankless water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most

  7. Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Ice Machines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ice Machines Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Ice Machines The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and federal efficiency requirements for water-cooled ice machines. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Efficiency Requirements for Water-Cooled Ice Machines Federal agencies must purchase water-cooled ice machines

  8. Media Advisory: News Media invited to cover Feb. 10 Virginia Regional High

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    School Science Bowl at Jefferson Lab; 19 teams competing | Jefferson Lab News Media invited to cover Feb. 10 Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl at Jefferson Lab; 19 teams competing January 30, 2007 The Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in Newport News, Va., is hosting this year's Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl on Saturday, Feb. 10. Nineteen teams, representing high schools from across the state are participating in this annual, academic competition. News media are

  9. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised | Department of Energy 6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility.

  10. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 | Department of Energy 9 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required to publish a list identifying each electric utility

  11. Y-12_Front Cover_Vol I_Feb2011.ai

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Volume I COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) TITLE: Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex (DOE/EIS-0387) (Final Y-12 SWEIS) CONTACT: For further information on this SWEIS, For general information on the DOE contact: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact: Pam Gorman Carol Borgstrom, Director Y-12 SWEIS Document Manager Office of NEPA

  12. A water balance study of four landfill cover designs varying in slope for semiarid regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Schofield, T.G.; Salazar, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    The goal of disposing of radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and to the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose a hazard. In order to achieve this, the performance of a landfill cover design without an engineered barrier (Conventional Design) was compared with three designs containing either a hydraulic barrier (EPA Design) or a capillary barrier (Loam and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier Designs). Water balance parameters were measured since 1991 at six-hour intervals for four different landfill cover designs in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15, and 25%. Whereas runoff generally accounted for only 2-3% of the precipitation losses on these designs, similar values for evapotranspiration ranged from 86% to 91%, with increased evapotranspiration occurring with increases in slope. Consequently, interflow and seepage usually decreased with increasing slope for each landfill cover design. Seepage consisted of up to 10% of the precipitation on the Conventional Design, whereas the hydraulic barrier in the EPA Design effectively controlled seepage at all slopes, and both of the capillary designs worked effectively to eliminate seepage at the higher slopes.

  13. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  14. SO/sub 2/ dose-response sensitivity classification data for crops and natural vegetation species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irving, P.M.; Ballou, S.W.

    1980-09-01

    Over the past several years studies have been made on the interaction of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and vegetation by performing field research and by developing analytical procedures for applying field observation data to energy impact assessments. As a result of this work, numerous reports have been prepared on crop-pollutant interactions, such as dose-response data; on the applications of such data to screening approaches for identifying crops at risk; and on models that predict crop yield reductions from point source emissions of SO/sub 2/. Data that were used for these studies, such as the crop-at-risk screening procedure, are presented in this report. Maps are also presented that show the national distribution of SO/sub 2/-sensitive crops and natural vegetation.

  15. Study of technetium uptake in vegetation in the vicinity of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acox, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Technetium-99 was measured in vegetation and soil collected on and near the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to obtain an estimate of the soil-to-vegetation concentration factors. The concentration factors appear to be lognormally distributed with a geometric mean of 3.4 (Bq/kg dry wt. tissue per Bq/kg dry wt. soil) and a geometric standard deviation of 4.7. A dose commitment was calculated using a hypothetical 3.7 x 10/sup 10/ Bq Tc-99/year release and the actual CY-1981 concentration release of Tc-99. The radiological significance of Tc-99 in the terrestial food chain is substantially less than previously believed.

  16. Economics of on-farm production and use of vegetable oils for fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, C.S.; Withers, R.V.; Smith, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    The technology of oilseed processing, on a small scale, is much simpler than that for ethanol production. This, coupled with the fact that most energy intensive farm operations use diesel powered equipment, has created substantial interest in vegetable oils as an alternative source of liquid fuel for agriculture. The purpose of this study was to estimate the impact on gross margins resulting from vegetable oil production and utilization in two case study areas, Latah and Power Counties, in Iadho. The results indicate that winter rape oil became a feasible alternative to diesel when the price of diesel reached $0.84 per liter in the Latah County model. A diesel price of $0.85 per liter was required in the Power County model before it became feasible to produce sunflower oil for fuel. 5 tables.

  17. Vegetation of plowed and unplowed playa lake wetlands in southwestern Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, S.L.; Buckley, J.E.

    1995-12-01

    Playa lakes are shallow, circular basins within the High Plains that were formed by wind during the Pleistocene Era. These basins are often referred to as {open_quotes}buffalo wallows{close_quotes} by local residents. When rainfall occurs, playas pond water, allowing formation of hydric soils and wetland vegetation. Playa provide excellent waterfowl habitat and are second only to the Gulf Coast in importance as winter habitat for birds in the Central Flyway. Highly variable climatic conditions along with extensive changes in surrounding hydrology on agricultural lands contribute to alternating wet and dry cycles within the playas. As a result, the vegetative mixture of the playas can change drastically from one season to another.

  18. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-- Microcosm tests and model development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping; Wu, Wei-min; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Shi, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Microcosm tests were conducted to study U(VI) bioreduction in contaminated sediments with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor. In the microcosms, EVO was degraded by indigenous microorganisms and stimulated Fe, U, and sulfate bioreduction, and methanogenesis. Removal of aqueous U occurred concurrently with sulfate reduction, with more reduction of total U in the case of higher initial sulfate concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV). As the acetate concentration peaked in 10~20 days in oleate microcosms, the maximum was reached in 100~120 days in the EVO microcosms, indicating that EVO hydrolysis was rate-limiting. The acetate accumulation was sustained over 50 days longer in the oleate and EVO than in the ethanol microcosms, suggesting that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the cases of oleate and EVO. Both slow hydrolysis and methanogenesis could contribute to potential sustained bioreduction in field application. Biogeochemical models were developed to couple degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of microbial functional groups. The models were used to simulate the coupled processes in a field test in a companion article.

  19. Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-10-01

    This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

  20. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanolmethanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: Pulse sonication effect on transesterification of waste vegetable oil was studied. Effects of ethanol, methanol, and alcohol mixtures on FAMEs yield were evaluated. Effect of ultrasonic intensity, power density, and its output rates were evaluated. Alcohol mixtures resulted in higher biodiesel yields due to better solubility. - Abstract: This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanolmethanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanolmethanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 12 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanolmethanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  1. Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounting for Circumsolar and Horizon Cloud Determination Errors in Sky Image Inferral of Sky Cover. C. N. Long, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1) Introduction In observing the cloudless sky, one can often notice that the area near the sun is whiter and brighter than the rest of the hemisphere. Additionally, even a slight haze will make a large angular area of the horizon whiter and brighter when the sun is low on the horizon. The human eye has an amazing ability to handle a range of

  2. NREL: Energy Analysis - Manufacturing Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Analysis Home Capabilities & Expertise Key Activities Analysis of Project Finance ... Supply Constraints Analysis Workforce Development Analysis Resource Assessment Models & ...

  3. Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Semrau; Sung-Woo Lee; Jeongdae Im; Sukhwan Yoon; Michael Barcelona

    2010-09-30

    The overall objective of this project, 'Strategies to Optimize Microbially-Mediated Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Landfill Cover Soils' was to develop effective, efficient, and economic methodologies by which microbial production of nitrous oxide can be minimized while also maximizing microbial consumption of methane in landfill cover soils. A combination of laboratory and field site experiments found that the addition of nitrogen and phenylacetylene stimulated in situ methane oxidation while minimizing nitrous oxide production. Molecular analyses also indicated that methane-oxidizing bacteria may play a significant role in not only removing methane, but in nitrous oxide production as well, although the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea to nitrous oxide production can not be excluded at this time. Future efforts to control both methane and nitrous oxide emissions from landfills as well as from other environments (e.g., agricultural soils) should consider these issues. Finally, a methanotrophic biofiltration system was designed and modeled for the promotion of methanotrophic activity in local methane 'hotspots' such as landfills. Model results as well as economic analyses of these biofilters indicate that the use of methanotrophic biofilters for controlling methane emissions is technically feasible, and provided either the costs of biofilter construction and operation are reduced or the value of CO{sub 2} credits is increased, can also be economically attractive.

  4. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  5. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

  6. Production and fuel characteristics of vegetable oil from oilseed crops in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auld, D.L.; Bettis, B.L.; Peterson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the potential yield and fuel quality of various oilseed crops adapted to the Pacific Northwest as a source of liquid fuel for diesel engines. The seed yield and oil production of three cultivars of winter rape (Brassica napus L.), two cultivars of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) and two cultivars of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were evaluated in replicated plots at Moscow. Additional trials were conducted at several locations in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. Sunflower, oleic and linoleic safflower, and low and high erucic acid rapeseed were evaluated for fatty acid composition, energy content, viscosity and engine performance in short term tests. During 20 minute engine tests power output, fuel economy and thermal efficiency were compared to diesel fuel. Winter rape produced over twice as much farm extractable oil as either safflower or sunflower. The winter rape cultivars, Norde and Jet Neuf had oil yields which averaged 1740 and 1540 L/ha, respectively. Vegetable oils contained 94 to 95% of the KJ/L of diesel fuel, but were 11.1 to 17.6 times more viscous. Viscosity of the vegetable oils was closely related to fatty acid chain length and number of unsaturated bonds (R/sup 2/=.99). During short term engine tests all vegetable oils produced power outputs equivalent to diesel, and had thermal efficiencies 1.8 to 2.8% higher than diesel. Based on these results it appears that species and cultivars of oilseed crops to be utilized as a source of fuel should be selected on the basis of oil yield. 1 figure, 5 tables.

  7. Rapid engine test to measure injector fouling in diesel engines using vegetable oil fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korus, R.A.; Jaiduk, J.; Peterson, C.L.

    1985-11-01

    Short engine tests were used to determine the rate of carbon deposition on direct injection diesel nozzles. Winter rape, high-oleic and high-linoleic safflower blends with 50% diesel were tested for carbon deposit and compared to that with D-2 Diesel Control Fuel. Deposits were greatest with the most unsaturated fuel, high-linoleic safflower, and least with winter rape. All vegetable oil blends developed power similar to diesel fueled engines with a 6 to 8% greater fuel consumption. 8 references.

  8. Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-18

    The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

  9. Evapotranspiration Cover for the 92-Acre Area Retired Mixed Waste Pits:Interim CQA Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Delphi Groupe, Inc., and J. A. Cesare and Associates, Inc.

    2011-06-20

    This Interim Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report is for the 92-Acre Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division (WMD) Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for the period of January 20, 2011 to May 12, 2011. This Interim Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report is for the 92-Acre Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division (WMD) Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for the period of January 20, 2011 to May 12, 2011. Construction was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) under the Approval of Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, on January 6, 2011, pursuant to Subpart XII.8a of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The project is located in Area 5 of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site, located in southern Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, in Nye County. The project site, in Area 5, is located in a topographically closed basin approximately 14 additional miles north of Mercury Nevada, in the north-central part of Frenchman Flat. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste. The 92-Acre Area encompasses the southern portion of the Area 5 RWMS, which has been designated for the first final closure operations. This area contains 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes, 16 narrow trenches, and 9 broader pits. With the exception of two active pits (P03 and P06), all trenches and pits in the 92-Acre Area had operational covers approximately 2.4 meters thick, at a minimum, in most areas when this project began. The units within the 92-Acre Area are grouped into the following six informal categories based on physical location, waste types and regulatory requirements: (1) Pit 3 Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU); (2) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111; (3) CAU 207; (4) Low-level waste disposal units; (5) Asbestiform low-level waste disposal units; and (6) One transuranic (TRU) waste trench.

  10. A comparison of two models for simulating the water balance of soil covers under semi-arid conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chammas, G.A.; Geddis, M.; McCaulou, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    Numerical water-balance modeling of store-and-release soil covers for hypothetical mine tailings was conducted using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) and SoilCover models. The objective of the modeling was to compare the utility of both models in a semi-arid environment. Although values for input parameters were chosen to make simulations as identical as possible between models, differences in model solution methods and discretization led to different water-balance predictions. Specifically, SoilCover predicted less percolation than HELP, because HELP uses simplified water-routing algorithms which may over predict infiltration and under predict subsequent evapotranspiration. Since SoilCover explicitly solves physically based governing equations for heat and water flow, its predictions more accurately represent the water balance in semi-arid regions where evapotranspiration dominates, HELP can only conservatively predict percolation in dry environments.

  11. Comment on "Evaluation of evapotranspirative covers for waste containment in arid and semiarid regions in the southwestern USA"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Benson, C H.; Albright, William H.

    2006-05-26

    Landfill covers relying on a balance between soil water storage and evapotranspiration (ET) as the primary means to control drainage have been described in the recent paper by Scanlon et al. (2005) in the Vadose Zone Journal. These so-called "ET Covers" have been receiving considerable interest in the past few years as economically viable cover systems for landfills in arid and semi-arid environments (Hauser et al. 2001, Madalinksi et al. 2003) Scanlon et al. (2005) have provided a summary of their studies in Texas and New Mexico, demonstrating an acceptable performance of ET covers in minimizing drainage under their test conditions. Further, they illustrate with both measurement and modeling that capillary barriers (fine soils over coarse soils) similar in concept to those previously built and tested at Los Alamos, NM and Hanford, WA over the past 20 years, store more water than surface barriers that have uniform profiles.

  12. Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-15

    The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

  13. Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll: Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation, soil, animals, cistern water, and ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.

    1988-05-31

    This report is intended as a resource document for the eventual cleanup of Bikini Atoll and contains a summary of the data for the concentrations of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in vegetation through 1987 and in soil through 1985 for 14 islands at Bikini Atoll. The data for the main residence island, Bikini, and the most important island, Eneu, are extensive; these islands have been the subject of a continuing research and monitoring program since 1974. Data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, and pigs from Bikini and Eneu Islands are presented. Also included are general summaries of our resuspension and rainfall data from Bikini and Eneu Islands. The data for the other 12 islands are much more limited because samples were collected as part of a screening survey and the islands have not been part of a continuing research and monitoring program. Cesium-137 is the radionuclide that produces most of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake by terrestrial foods and secondly by direct external gamma exposure. Remedial measures for reducing the /sup 137/Cs uptake in vegetation are discussed. 40 refs., 32 figs., 131 tabs.

  14. Advanced engineering analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, W.R.

    1992-11-01

    The Advanced Engineering Analysis project is being used to improve the breadth of engineering analysis types, the particular phenomena which may be simulated, and also increase the accuracy and usability of the results of both new and current types of simulations and analyses. This is an interim report covering several topics under this project. Information on two new implementations of failure criteria for metal forming, the implementation of coupled fluid flow/heat transfer analysis capabilities, the integration of experimental shock and vibration test data with analyses, a correction to a contact solution problem with a 3-D parabolic brick finite element, and the development and implementation of a file translator to link IDEAS to DYNA3D is provided in this report.

  15. Estimation of total cloud cover from solar radiation observations at Lake Rotorua, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Liancong; Hamilton, David; Han, Boping

    2010-03-15

    The DYRESM-CAEDYM model is a valuable tool for simulating water temperature for biochemical studies in aquatic ecosystem. The model requires inputs of surface short-wave radiation and long-wave radiation or total cloud cover fraction (TC). Long-wave radiation is often not measured directly so a method to determine TC from commonly measured short-wave solar irradiance (E{sub 0}) and theoretical short-wave solar irradiance under a clear sky (E{sub c}) has broad application. A more than 17-year (15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009) hourly solar irradiance data set was used to estimate the peak solar irradiance for each ordinal date over one year, which was assumed to be representative of solar irradiance in the absence of cloud. Comparison between these daily observed values and the modelled clear-sky solar radiation over one year was in close agreement (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.995 and root mean squared error, RMSE = 12.54 W m{sup -2}). The downloaded hourly cloudiness measurements from 15 November 1991 to 20 February 2009 was used to calculate the daily values for this period and then the calculated daily values over the 17 years were used to calculate the average values for each ordinal date over one year. A regression equation between (1 - E{sub 0}/E{sub c}) and TC produced a correlation coefficient value of 0.99 (p > 0.01, n = 71). The validation of this cloud cover estimation model was conducted with observed short-wave solar radiation and TC at two sites. Values of TC derived from the model at the Lake Rotorua site gave a reasonable prediction of the observed values (RMSE = 0.10, r = 0.86, p > 0.01, n = 61). The model was also tested at Queenstown (South Island of New Zealand) and it provided satisfactory results compared to the measurements (RMSE = 0.16, r = 0.67, p > 0.01, n = 61). Therefore the model's good performance and broad applicability will contribute to the DYRESM-CAEDYM accuracy of water temperature simulation when long-wave radiation is not available. (author)

  16. STOMP Sparse Vegetation Evapotranspiration Model for the Water-Air-Energy Operational Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2005-09-15

    The Water-Air-Energy (WAE) Operational Mode of the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) numerical simulator solves the coupled conservation equations for water mass, air mass, and thermal energy in multiple dimensions. This addendum describes the theory, input file formatting, and application of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) scheme for STOMP that is based on a sparse vegetation evapotranspiration model. The SVAT scheme is implemented as a boundary condition on the upper surface of the computational domain and has capabilities for simulating evaporation from bare surfaces as well as evapotranspiration from sparsely vegetated surfaces populated with single or multiple plant species in response to meteorological forcings. With this extension, the model calculates water mass, air mass and thermal energy across a boundary surface in addition to root-water transport between the subsurface and atmosphere. This mode represents the barrier extension of the WAE mode and is designated as STOMP-WAE-B. Input for STOMP-WAE-B is specified via three input cards and include: atmospheric conditions through the Atmospheric Conditions Card; time-invariant plant species data through the Plant Properties Card; and time varying plant species data through the Boundary Conditions Card. Two optional cards, the Observed Data and UCODE Control Cards allow use of STOMP-WAE with UCODE in an inverse mode to estimate model parameters. STOMP-WAE was validated by solving a number of test problems from the literature that included experimental observations as well as analytical or numerical solutions. Several of the UNSAT-H verification problems are included along with a benchmark simulation derived from a recently published intercode comparison for barrier design tools. Results show that STOMP is able to meet, and in most cases, exceed performance of other commonly used simulation codes without having to resort to may of their simplifying assumptions. Use of the fully coupled STOMP simulator to guide barrier design will result in optimized designs with reduced construction costs; reduced environmental impacts at borrow sites; and minimized post-closure care and monitoring needs, while meeting regulatory requirements.

  17. Environmental factors affecting long-term stabilization of radon suppression covers for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.K.; Long, L.W.; Reis, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon suppression cover applied to uranium mill tailings. To help determine design stresses for the tailings piles, environmental parameters are characterized for the five active uranium-producing regions on a site-specific basis. Only conventional uranium mills that are currently operating or that are scheduled to open in the mid 1980s are considered. Available data indicate that flooding has the most potential for disrupting a tailings pile. The arid regions of the Wyoming Basins and the Colorado Plateau are subject to brief storms of high intensity. The Texas Gulf Coast has the highest potential for extreme precipitation from hurricane-related storms. Wind data indicate average wind speeds from 3 to 6 m/sec for the sites, but extremes of 40 m/sec can be expected. Tornado risks range from low to moderate. The Colorado Plateau has the highest seismic potential, with maximum acceleration caused by earthquakes ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 g. Any direct effect from volcanic eruption is negligible, as all mills are located 90 km or more from an igneous or hydrothermal system.

  18. Domain patterning by electron beam of MgO doped lithium niobate covered by resist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shur, V. Ya. Chezganov, D. S.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Kuznetsov, D. K.

    2015-06-08

    Periodical domain structuring by focused electron beam irradiation of MgO-doped lithium niobate (MgOCLN) single crystalline plate covered by resist layer was studied both experimentally and by computer simulation. The dependences of domain size on the charge dose and distance between isolated domains were measured. It has been shown that the quality of periodical domain pattern depends on the thickness of resist layer and electron energy. The experimentally obtained periodic domain structures have been divided into four types. The irradiation parameters for the most uniform patterning were obtained experimentally. It was shown by computer simulation that the space charge slightly touching the crystal surface produced the maximum value of electric field at the resist/LN interface thus resulting in the best pattern quality. The obtained knowledge allowed us to optimize the poling process and to make the periodical domain patterns in 1-mm-thick wafers with an area up to 1 5?mm{sup 2} and a period of 6.89??m for green light second harmonic generation. Spatial distribution of the efficiency of light frequency conversion confirmed the high homogeneity of the tailored domain patterns.

  19. Effect of Inert Cover Gas on Performance of Radioisotope Stirling Space Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, Robert; Kumar, V; Ore, C; Schock, Alfred

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an updated Orbital design of a radioisotope Stirling power system and its predicted performance at the beginning and end of a six-year mission to the Jovian moon Europa. The design is based on General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules identical to those previously developed and safety-qualified by the Department of Energy (DOE) which were successfully launched to Jupiter and Saturn by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In each generator, the heat produced by the decay of the Pu-238 isotope is converted to electric power by two free-piston Stirling engines and linear alternators developed by Stirling Technology Company (STC), and their rejected waste heat is transported to radiators by heat pipes. The principal difference between the proposed system design and previous Orbital designs (Or et al. 2000) is the thermal insulation between the heat source and the generator's housing. Previous designs had employed multifoil insulation, whereas the design described here employs Min-K-1800 thermal insulation. Such insulation had been successfully used by Teledyne and GE in earlier RTGs (Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators). Although Min-K is a much poorer insulator than multifoil in vacuum and requires a substantially greater thickness for equivalent performance, it offers compensating advantages. Specifically it makes it possible to adjust the generator's BOM temperatures by filling its interior volume with inert cover gas. This makes it possible to meet the generator's BOM and EOM performance goals without exceeding its allowable temperature at the beginning of the mission.

  20. Innovative permeable cover system to reduce risks at a chemical munitions burial site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powels, C.C.; Bon, I.; Okusu, N.M.

    1997-12-31

    An innovative permeable sand cover with various integrated systems has been designed to contain and treat the Old O-Field chemical munitions landfill at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The 18,200 m{sup 2} (4.5 acre) landfill was used from the mid 1930s to the mid 1950s for the disposal of chemical, incendiary, and explosive munitions from domestic and foreign origins, together with contaminated wastes associated with the development and production of chemical warfare agents (CWA). The site is suspected to be contaminated with white phosphorous (WP) (which when dry, spontaneously burns when exposed to air), shock sensitive picric acid fuses and has the potential to contain large quantities of CWA-filled munitions. Historically, one to three explosions or fires occurred per ten-year period at the landfill. Such events have the potential to cause a CWA release to the environment, which could potentially affect densely populated areas. Recovery and decontamination projects conducted at the site in the late 1940s and early 1950s used large amounts of decontamination chemicals (containing solvents) and fuels which further contaminated the area. The groundwater downgradient of the landfill is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, metals, explosives and CWA degradation compounds and is currently being contained by a groundwater extraction and treatment system. This report describes a remedial action program for the site.

  1. Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gutschick, Vincent P. (Los Alamos, NM); Barron, Michael H. (Los Alamos, NM); Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

  2. Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

    1985-04-30

    An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

  3. Feasibility of irradiating Washington fruits and vegetables for Asian export markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eakin, D.E.; Hazelton, R.F.; Young, J.K.; Prenguber, B.A.; O'Rourke, A.D.; Heim, M.N.

    1987-05-01

    US agricultural export marketing opportunities are limited by the existence of trade barriers in many overseas countries. For example, Japan and South Korea do not permit the importation of apples due to their stated concern over codling moth infestation. One of the purposes of this study was to evaluate the potential of exporting irradiated fruits and vegetables from Washington State to overcome existing trade barriers and prevent the establishment of future barriers. The Asian countries specifically evaluated in this study are Japan, Hong Kong and Singapore. Another purpose of this project was to determine the feasibility of locating an irradiation facility in Washington State. Advantages that irradiated agricultural products would bring in terms of price and quality in export markets were also evaluated.

  4. Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-11-08

    Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 C increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

  5. Vegetation regulation on streamflow intra-annual variability through adaption to climate variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Li, Shuai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Demissie, Yonas; Ran, Qihua; Blschl, Gnter

    2015-12-16

    This study aims to provide a mechanistic explanation of the empirical patterns of streamflow intra-annual variability revealed by watershed-scale hydrological data across the contiguous United States. A mathematical extension of the Budyko formula with explicit account for the soil moisture storage change is used to show that, in catchments with a strong seasonal coupling between precipitation and potential evaporation, climate aridity has a dominant control on intra-annual streamflow variability, but in other catchments, additional factors related to soil water storage change also have important controls on how precipitation seasonality propagates to streamflow. More importantly, use of leaf area index as a direct and indirect indicator of the above ground biomass and plant root system, respectively, reveals the vital role of vegetation in regulating soil moisture storage and hence streamflow intra-annual variability under different climate conditions.

  6. Issues in midterm analysis and forecasting, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    This document consists of papers which cover topics in analysis and modeling that underlie the Annual Energy Outlook 1996. Topics include: The Potential Impact of Technological Progress on U.S. Energy Markets; The Outlook for U.S. Import Dependence; Fuel Economy, Vehicle Choice, and Changing Demographics, and Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation.

  7. A tiered approach for the human health risk assessment for consumption of vegetables from with cadmium-contaminated land in urban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartjes, Frank A. Versluijs, Kees W.; Otte, Piet F.

    2013-10-15

    Consumption of vegetables that are grown in urban areas takes place worldwide. In developing countries, vegetables are traditionally grown in urban areas for cheap food supply. In developing and developed countries, urban gardening is gaining momentum. A problem that arises with urban gardening is the presence of contaminants in soil, which can be taken up by vegetables. In this study, a scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables from cadmium-contaminated land. Starting from a contaminated site, the procedure follows a tiered approach which is laid out as follows. In Tier 0, the plausibility of growing vegetables is investigated. In Tier 1 soil concentrations are compared with the human health-based Critical soil concentration. Tier 2 offers the possibility for a detailed site-specific human health risk assessment in which calculated exposure is compared to the toxicological reference dose. In Tier 3, vegetable concentrations are measured and tested following a standardized measurement protocol. To underpin the derivation of the Critical soil concentrations and to develop a tool for site-specific assessment the determination of the representative concentration in vegetables has been evaluated for a range of vegetables. The core of the procedure is based on Freundlich-type plantsoil relations, with the total soil concentration and the soil properties as variables. When a significant plantsoil relation is lacking for a specific vegetable a geometric mean of BioConcentrationFactors (BCF) is used, which is normalized according to soil properties. Subsequently, a conservative vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor is calculated as basis for the Critical soil concentration (Tier 1). The tool to perform site-specific human health risk assessment (Tier 2) includes the calculation of a realistic worst case site-specific vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. -- Highlights: A scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables. Uptake characteristics of cadmium in a series of vegetables is represented by a vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. Calculations and measurement steps are combined.

  8. Distributed PV Interconnection Recent Analysis Findings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recent Analysis Findings Page 1 of 18 Kristen Ardani, Miriam Makhyoun Page 1 of 18 [Speaker: Kristen Ardani] Cover Slide: Good afternoon, everyone. Thank you for joining the Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative informational webinar. Today, we are kicking off 2015 with a joint presentation from SEPA and NREL, in which each will discuss recent research and analysis findings related to interconnection. Slide 2: So really, the purpose of today's meeting is to hear recent research

  9. 2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Livermore Field

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office | Department of Energy 2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Livermore Field Office 2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Livermore Field Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address

  10. 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office | Department of Energy 1 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field Office 2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense

  11. 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Nevada Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office | Department of Energy 2 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Nevada Site Office 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Nevada Site Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense

  12. 2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office | Department of Energy Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field Office 2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense

  13. Natural vegetation at the proposed Reference Repository Location in southeastern Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickard, W.H.

    1988-02-01

    The dominant shrubs were sagebrush and spiny hopsage; the herbs were dominated by cheatgrass and Sandberg bluegrass. Spiny hopsage appeared to be vulnerable to burning and also to damage by off-road vehicular traffic. It appears to have little or no ability to reproduce through seedlings; once the existing plants are killed they are not likely to be replaced, even if seed-producing plants are nearby. The only pure stand of spiny hopsage known to exist on the Hanford Site is on and near study plot 2H. Sagebrush, like spiny hopsage, is killed by burning and by heavy vehicles. Sagebrush is capable of reproducing via seeds, indicating that it is an inherently aggressive species with a capacity to reestablish itself if parent plants are in the vicinity to act as seed sources. Alien, annual plants, especially cheatgrass, were a major contributor to the herbaceous canopy cover in plots 3S, 4S, and 5S. However, native perennial grasses, especially Sandberg bluegrass, were a major contributor to the canopy cover in plots 1S and 2H. These differences are probably caused by differences in soil properties (e.g., water retention capacity), rather than to historical disturbances such as livestock grazing or wildfire. Specimens of Sandwort, Arenaria franklinii, growing near the Reference Repository Location were collected for examination by taxonomists to determine if the specimens are of the variety A. f. thompsonii, a taxon currently listed as threatened in the state of Washington. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. EIS-0285-SA-99: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement - Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1

  15. EIS-0285-SA-103: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, located in Washington and Multnomah Counties, Oregon

  16. EIS-0285-SA-22: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, King and Snohomish Counties, WA, in the Snohomish Region

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - new-gallery-cover page.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2011 1 Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration November 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 8, 2011 Release Highlights  EIA expects the U.S. average refiner acquisition cost of crude oil to remain relatively flat, averaging about $100 per barrel in 2011 and 2012. The value of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) benchmark crude oil was about $11 per barrel below the U.S. refiner acquisition cost of crude oil in the third quarter of this year. The

  18. Microsoft Word - S04902_LetterReport Cover Letter.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Task Order LM00-502 Control Number 09-0301 December 15, 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management ATTN: Jack Craig Site Manager 3600 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26505 SUBJECT: Rulison Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2008 Dear Mr. Craig: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado site, for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 12, and 13,

  19. Geotechnical, Hydrogeologic and Vegetation Data Package for 200-UW-1 Waste Site Engineered Surface Barrier Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.

    2007-11-26

    Fluor Hanford (FH) is designing and assessing the performance of engineered barriers for final closure of 200-UW-1 waste sites. Engineered barriers must minimize the intrusion and water, plants and animals into the underlying waste to provide protection for human health and the environment. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator is being used to optimize the performance of candidate barriers. Simulating barrier performance involves computation of mass and energy transfer within a soil-atmosphere-vegetation continuum and requires a variety of input parameters, some of which are more readily available than others. Required input includes parameter values for the geotechnical, physical, hydraulic, and thermal properties of the materials comprising the barrier and the structural fill on which it will be constructed as well as parameters to allow simulation of plant effects. This report provides a data package of the required parameters as well as the technical basis, rationale and methodology used to obtain the parameter values.

  20. Desulfurization of coal with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. [Quarterly] report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, Ruozhi; Cheng, Jianjun

    1994-12-31

    This project proposes a new method for removing organic sulfur from Illinois coals using readily available farm products. It proposes to use air and vegetable oils to disrupt the coal matrix, oxidize sulfur forms, increase volatiles, and desulfurize coal. This will be accomplished by impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of the solid products. Preliminary experiments showed that EBC 104 coal catalyzes the formation of hydroperoxides in safflower oil and that more sulfur is extracted from the treated than untreated coal. During this first quarter the requirement of an added photosensitizer has been eliminated, the catalytic effect of coal has been confirmed, and the existence of a complex set of reactions revealed. These reactions between the oxygen, oil, hydroperoxides, and coal are hydroperoxide formation, which is catalyzed by the coal surface and by heat, an unknown coal-hydroperoxide reaction, and oil polymerization. Additionally, diffusion phenomena must be playing a role because oil polymerization occurs, but the importance of diffusion is difficult to assess because less polymerization occurs when coal is present. The first task has been completed and we are now ready to determine the ability of linseed oil hydroperoxides to oxidize organic sulfur in EBC 108 coal.

  1. A Survey of Vegetation and Wildland Fire Hazards on the Nevada Test Site, September 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-09-01

    In the spring of 2004 a survey was conducted by Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services on the Nevada Test Site to characterize vegetation resources and climatic components of the environment that contribute to wildland fires. The field surveyed assessed 211 sites along major Nevada Test Site corridors for the abundance of native perennial and annual species and invasive weeds. The abundance of fine-textured (grasses and herbs) and coarse-textured (woody) biomass was visually estimated on numerical scales ranging from one to five. Wildland fires are costly to control and to mitigate once they occur. Revegetation of burned areas is very slow without reseeding or transplanting with native species and other rehabilitation efforts. Untreated areas become much more vulnerable to future fires once invasive species, rather than native species, colonize a burned area.The annual assessment of wildland fire hazards on the Nevada Test Site is scheduled to be implemented each spring in the near future with results being reported directly to the U.S. Department of Energy and the Bechtel Nevada Fire Marshal.

  2. Training package 1 for slitting data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prime, Michael Bruce

    2015-03-23

    This document and accompanying files are intended as a first training package on how to analyze slitting data. The end goal is to have Idaho National Laboratory (INL) personnel trained to analyze future slitting data taken in the INL Hot Cell on clad, Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel plates. This first data package will cover data analysis for a monolithic material (as compared to a layered material like the clad fuel plates). The additional issues for layered specimens will be covered in a future training package.

  3. Covering complete proteomes with X-ray structures: a current snapshot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Fan, Xiao; Yan, Jing; Chalmers, Eric; Woloschuk, Christopher; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-11-01

    The current and the attainable coverage by X-ray structures of proteins and their functions on the scale of the protein universe are estimated. A detailed analysis of the coverage across nearly 2000 proteomes from all superkingdoms of life and functional annotations is performed, with particular focus on the human proteome and the family of GPCR proteins. Structural genomics programs have developed and applied structure-determination pipelines to a wide range of protein targets, facilitating the visualization of macromolecular interactions and the understanding of their molecular and biochemical functions. The fundamental question of whether three-dimensional structures of all proteins and all functional annotations can be determined using X-ray crystallography is investigated. A first-of-its-kind large-scale analysis of crystallization propensity for all proteins encoded in 1953 fully sequenced genomes was performed. It is shown that current X-ray crystallographic knowhow combined with homology modeling can provide structures for 25% of modeling families (protein clusters for which structural models can be obtained through homology modeling), with at least one structural model produced for each Gene Ontology functional annotation. The coverage varies between superkingdoms, with 19% for eukaryotes, 35% for bacteria and 49% for archaea, and with those of viruses following the coverage values of their hosts. It is shown that the crystallization propensities of proteomes from the taxonomic superkingdoms are distinct. The use of knowledge-based target selection is shown to substantially increase the ability to produce X-ray structures. It is demonstrated that the human proteome has one of the highest attainable coverage values among eukaryotes, and GPCR membrane proteins suitable for X-ray structure determination were determined.

  4. Distribution and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Validation of Cloud Cover Derived from AVHRR Data Over the Arctic Ocean During the SHEBA Year P. Minnis National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia D. A. Spangenberg and V. Chakrapani Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia Introduction Determination of cloud radiation interactions over large areas of the Arctic is possible only with the use of data from polar orbiting satellites. Cloud detection using satellite data is difficult

  5. ARM: Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    1997-01-01

    Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

  6. ISSUANCE 2016-02-26: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Supplemental Proposed Determination of Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products as Covered Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Supplemental Proposed Determination of Miscellaneous Refrigeration Products as Covered Products

  7. ARM: Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Krista Gaustad; Laura Riihimaki

    Gridded (0.25 x 0.25 lat/lon) fractional cloud cover, clear-sky and all-sky shortwave flux over the SGP site.

  8. Radionuclide Concentration in Soils and Vegetation at Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area G during 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.R. Fresquez; M.W. McNaughton; M.J. Winch

    2005-10-01

    Soil samples were collected at 15 locations and unwashed overstory and understory vegetation samples were collected from up to nine locations within and around the perimeter of Area G, the primary disposal facility for low-level radioactive solid waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Soil and plant samples were also collected from the proposed expansion area west of Area G for the purpose of gaining preoperational baseline data. Soil and plant samples were analyzed for radionuclides that have shown a history of detection in past years; these included {sup 3}H, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U for soils and {sup 3}H, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 239,240}Pu for plants. As in previous years, the highest levels of {sup 3}H in soils and vegetation were detected at the south portion of Area G near the {sup 3}H shafts; whereas, the highest concentrations of the Pu isotopes were detected in the northern and northeastern portions near the pads for transuranic waste. All concentrations of radionuclides in soils and vegetation, however, were still very low (pCi range) and far below LANL screening levels and regulatory standards.

  9. Desulfurization of coal with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. Technical progress report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, Feng; Gholson, K.L.

    1995-12-31

    This project proposes a new method for removing organic sulfur from Illinois coals using readily available farm products. It proposes to use air and vegetable oils to disrupt the coal matrix, oxidize sulfur forms, increase volatiles, and desulfurize coal. This will be accomplished by impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of solid products. Preliminary experiments showed that IBC 104 coal catalyzes the formation of hydroperoxides in safflower oil and that more sulfur is extracted from the treated than untreated coal. During the first quarter the requirement of an added photosensitizer was eliminated, the catalytic effect of coal was confirmed, and the existence of a complex set of reactions was revealed. During the second quarter, working with IBC-108 coal (2.3% organic S, 0.4% pyrite S), the effects of different extraction solvents were examined. A new pretreatment which combines alkali with linseed oil was discovered. Best organic sulfur removal is approximately 26% using alkali pretreatment combined with linseed oil at 100[degrees]C. BTU loses can be kept to a minimum of 3% with proper use of solvents. During this third quarter the effects of different ratios of oil:coal, different temperatures, and different reaction times were completely examined. The effects of alkali on sulfur removal were further investigated. Best organic sulfur removal reaches 34% using ammonia pretreatment, then oil and finally aqNA2CO3 extraction.

  10. Covering complete proteomes with X-ray structures: A current snapshot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Fan, Xiao; Yan, Jing; Chalmers, Eric; Woloschuk, Christopher; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-10-23

    Structural genomics programs have developed and applied structure-determination pipelines to a wide range of protein targets, facilitating the visualization of macromolecular interactions and the understanding of their molecular and biochemical functions. The fundamental question of whether three-dimensional structures of all proteins and all functional annotations can be determined using X-ray crystallography is investigated. A first-of-its-kind large-scale analysis of crystallization propensity for all proteins encoded in 1953 fully sequenced genomes was performed. It is shown that current X-ray crystallographic knowhow combined with homology modeling can provide structures for 25% of modeling families (protein clusters for which structural models can be obtained through homology modeling), with at least one structural model produced for each Gene Ontology functional annotation. The coverage varies between superkingdoms, with 19% for eukaryotes, 35% for bacteria and 49% for archaea, and with those of viruses following the coverage values of their hosts. It is shown that the crystallization propensities of proteomes from the taxonomic superkingdoms are distinct. The use of knowledge-based target selection is shown to substantially increase the ability to produce X-ray structures. It is demonstrated that the human proteome has one of the highest attainable coverage values among eukaryotes, and GPCR membrane proteins suitable for X-ray structure determination were determined.

  11. Covering complete proteomes with X-ray structures: A current snapshot

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Fan, Xiao; Yan, Jing; Chalmers, Eric; Woloschuk, Christopher; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-10-23

    Structural genomics programs have developed and applied structure-determination pipelines to a wide range of protein targets, facilitating the visualization of macromolecular interactions and the understanding of their molecular and biochemical functions. The fundamental question of whether three-dimensional structures of all proteins and all functional annotations can be determined using X-ray crystallography is investigated. A first-of-its-kind large-scale analysis of crystallization propensity for all proteins encoded in 1953 fully sequenced genomes was performed. It is shown that current X-ray crystallographic knowhow combined with homology modeling can provide structures for 25% of modeling families (protein clusters for which structural models can be obtainedmore » through homology modeling), with at least one structural model produced for each Gene Ontology functional annotation. The coverage varies between superkingdoms, with 19% for eukaryotes, 35% for bacteria and 49% for archaea, and with those of viruses following the coverage values of their hosts. It is shown that the crystallization propensities of proteomes from the taxonomic superkingdoms are distinct. The use of knowledge-based target selection is shown to substantially increase the ability to produce X-ray structures. It is demonstrated that the human proteome has one of the highest attainable coverage values among eukaryotes, and GPCR membrane proteins suitable for X-ray structure determination were determined.« less

  12. Research/Evaluate Restoration of NE Oregon Streams: Effects of Livestock Exclosures (Corridor Fencing) on Riparian Vegetation, Stream Geomorphic Features and Fish Populations; Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, J. Boone

    2002-09-17

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 indicated ''The council shall properly develop and adopt a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife, including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries.'' As a result, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has spent millions of dollars on various instream projects throughout the Columbia Basin with the goal of increasing system-wide production of anadromous fisheries through a combination of habitat restoration and enhancement measures. For two decades, numerous BPA-funded projects have been initiated in the upper Columbia River Basin for the express intent of improving the aquatic habitats of anadromous salmonids. Largely missing from most of these projects has been any rigorous evaluation of project success or failure. Some field reviews of some habitat projects have been undertaken (e.g., Beschta et al. 1991, Kauffman et al. 1993) and provide an overview of major problems and opportunities associated with selected projects. However, there continues to be a lack of quantifiable information, collected in a systematic manner that could be used as the basis for scientifically assessing the effects of individual projects on riparian/aquatic habitats, functions, or processes. Recent publications (e.g., NRC 1992, ISG 1996, NRC 1996, Beschta 1997, and Kauffman et al. 1997) have identified and summarized important concepts associated with the restoration and improvement of aquatic ecosystems. While such conceptual approaches provide an important structure for those undertaking restoration efforts, there remains a paucity of basic information throughout the upper Columbia Basin on the hydrologic, geomorphic, and biologic responses that occur from various enhancement approaches. Basic data on the spatial and temporal responses of restoration approaches would provide: (1) a better understanding of project effects upon aquatic habitats and associated riparian functions; (2) a means of determining rates of aquatic habitat improvement; and (3) a basis for projecting future trends of habitat recovery. The proposed research is intended to provide an improved understanding of both the effects and effectiveness of a commonly used habitat enhancement approach in the upper Columbia River Basin. This is the exclusion of domestic livestock from streamside communities and streams via corridor fencing (exclosures). This final report is broken into three separate chapters. The first chapter covers the vegetation change associated with livestock exclusion. The second chapter focuses on the physical geomorphic changes to the streambank and channel. The final chapter covers the response of salmonids and warmwater fishes to livestock exclusion at the spatial scales of exclosures as is commonly constructed today. It is expected that this study will provide an important scientific basis, currently lacking, for understanding the ecological principles of restoration/enhancement of sustainable aquatic habitats for salmonids. Thus, the results of this work are likely to have important ramifications for habitat improvement projects within and beyond the general geographic region of northeastern Oregon.

  13. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  14. 2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Portsmouth

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paducah Project Office | Department of Energy Portsmouth Paducah Project Office 2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear

  15. 2015 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Livermore Field

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office | Department of Energy Livermore Field Office 2015 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Livermore Field Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards.

  16. 2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office | Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office 2010 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards.

  17. 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office | Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards.

  18. 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Livermore Field

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office | Department of Energy Livermore Field Office 2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Livermore Field Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards.

  19. 2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office | Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office 2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Carlsbad Field Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards.

  20. 2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office | Department of Energy NNSA Production Office 2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA Production Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards.

  1. 2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Nevada Field

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office | Department of Energy Nevada Field Office 2014 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Nevada Field Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards.

  2. Hydrogen Fueling Station in Honolulu, Hawaii Feasibility Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Fueling Station in Honolulu, Hawaii Feasibility Analysis Hydrogen Fueling Station in Honolulu, Hawaii Feasibility Analysis This feasibility report assesses the technical and economic feasibility of developing a vacant, undeveloped General Services Administration-owned property into an income-producing site equipped with a hydrogen fueling station and a covered 175-stall parking structure with roof-top solar panels. According to the analysis, the proposed station will

  3. 2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Livermore Field

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office | Department of Energy Livermore Field Office 2013 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - Livermore Field Office Managers perform an annual workforce analysis of their organization and develop staffing plans that identify technical capabilities and positions they need to ensure safe operation of defense nuclear facilities. This workforce analysis process continues to cover technical capability needs to address defense nuclear facility and related operational hazards.

  4. Remotely estimating photosynthetic capacity, and its response to temperature, in vegetation canopies using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serbin, Shawn P.; Singh, Aditya; Desai, Ankur R.; Dubois, Sean G.; Jablonski, Andrew D.; Kingdon, Clayton C.; Kruger, Eric L.; Townsend, Philip A.

    2015-06-11

    To date, the utility of ecosystem and Earth system models (EESMs) has been limited by poor spatial and temporal representation of critical input parameters. For example, EESMs often rely on leaf-scale or literature-derived estimates for a key determinant of canopy photosynthesis, the maximum velocity of RuBP carboxylation (Vcmax, ?mol m2 s1). Our recent work (Ainsworth et al., 2014; Serbin et al., 2012) showed that reflectance spectroscopy could be used to estimate Vcmax at the leaf level. Here, we present evidence that imaging spectroscopy data can be used to simultaneously predict Vcmax and its sensitivity to temperature (EV) at the canopy scale. In 2013 and 2014, high-altitude Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy (AVIRIS) imagery and contemporaneous ground-based assessments of canopy structure and leaf photosynthesis were acquired across an array of monospecific agroecosystems in central and southern California, USA. A partial least-squares regression (PLSR) modeling approach was employed to characterize the pixel-level variation in canopy Vcmax (at a standardized canopy temperature of 30 C) and EV, based on visible and shortwave infrared AVIRIS spectra (4142447 nm). Our approach yielded parsimonious models with strong predictive capability for Vcmax (at 30 C) and EV (R2 of withheld data = 0.94 and 0.92, respectively), both of which varied substantially in the field (? 1.7 fold) across the sampled crop types. The models were applied to additional AVIRIS imagery to generate maps of Vcmax and EV, as well as their uncertainties, for agricultural landscapes in California. The spatial patterns exhibited in the maps were consistent with our in-situ observations. As a result, these findings highlight the considerable promise of airborne and, by implication, space-borne imaging spectroscopy, such as the proposed HyspIRI mission, to map spatial and temporal variation in key drivers of photosynthetic metabolism in terrestrial vegetation.

  5. Remotely estimating photosynthetic capacity, and its response to temperature, in vegetation canopies using imaging spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Serbin, Shawn P.; Singh, Aditya; Desai, Ankur R.; Dubois, Sean G.; Jablonski, Andrew D.; Kingdon, Clayton C.; Kruger, Eric L.; Townsend, Philip A.

    2015-06-11

    To date, the utility of ecosystem and Earth system models (EESMs) has been limited by poor spatial and temporal representation of critical input parameters. For example, EESMs often rely on leaf-scale or literature-derived estimates for a key determinant of canopy photosynthesis, the maximum velocity of RuBP carboxylation (Vcmax, μmol m–2 s–1). Our recent work (Ainsworth et al., 2014; Serbin et al., 2012) showed that reflectance spectroscopy could be used to estimate Vcmax at the leaf level. Here, we present evidence that imaging spectroscopy data can be used to simultaneously predict Vcmax and its sensitivity to temperature (EV) at the canopymore » scale. In 2013 and 2014, high-altitude Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy (AVIRIS) imagery and contemporaneous ground-based assessments of canopy structure and leaf photosynthesis were acquired across an array of monospecific agroecosystems in central and southern California, USA. A partial least-squares regression (PLSR) modeling approach was employed to characterize the pixel-level variation in canopy Vcmax (at a standardized canopy temperature of 30 °C) and EV, based on visible and shortwave infrared AVIRIS spectra (414–2447 nm). Our approach yielded parsimonious models with strong predictive capability for Vcmax (at 30 °C) and EV (R2 of withheld data = 0.94 and 0.92, respectively), both of which varied substantially in the field (≥ 1.7 fold) across the sampled crop types. The models were applied to additional AVIRIS imagery to generate maps of Vcmax and EV, as well as their uncertainties, for agricultural landscapes in California. The spatial patterns exhibited in the maps were consistent with our in-situ observations. As a result, these findings highlight the considerable promise of airborne and, by implication, space-borne imaging spectroscopy, such as the proposed HyspIRI mission, to map spatial and temporal variation in key drivers of photosynthetic metabolism in terrestrial vegetation.« less

  6. THE STRUCTURE OF SURFACE H{sub 2}O LAYERS OF ICE-COVERED PLANETS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE ICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueta, S.; Sasaki, T. E-mail: takanori@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    Many extrasolar (bound) terrestrial planets and free-floating (unbound) planets have been discovered. While the existence of bound and unbound terrestrial planets with liquid water is an important question, of particular importance is the question of these planets' habitability. Even for a globally ice-covered planet, geothermal heat from the planetary interior may melt the interior ice, creating an internal ocean covered by an ice shell. In this paper, we discuss the conditions that terrestrial planets must satisfy for such an internal ocean to exist on the timescale of planetary evolution. The question is addressed in terms of planetary mass, distance from a central star, water abundance, and abundance of radiogenic heat sources. In addition, we investigate the structure of the surface H{sub 2}O layers of ice-covered planets by considering the effects of ice under high pressure (high-pressure ice). As a fiducial case, a 1 M{sub ?} planet at 1 AU from its central star and with 0.6-25 times the H{sub 2}O mass of the Earth could have an internal ocean. We find that high-pressure ice layers may appear between the internal ocean and the rock portion on a planet with an H{sub 2}O mass over 25 times that of the Earth. The planetary mass and abundance of surface water strongly restrict the conditions under which an extrasolar terrestrial planet may have an internal ocean with no high-pressure ice under the ocean. Such high-pressure ice layers underlying the internal ocean are likely to affect the habitability of the planet.

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - Snippet 5.4 PARS II Analysis-Variance Analysis Reports 20140627 [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    variances at both the Performance Measurement Baseline level and at the Work Breakdown Structure levels. In PARS II under the SSS Reports selection on the left, there are folders to the right. The reports being discussed are in the Analysis Reports folder. That folder is broken down into various subfolders pertaining to OAPM's EVMS Project Analysis Standard Operating Procedure (EPASOP). This Snippet covers the subfolder named Variance Analysis. These reports are useful for anyone responsible for

  8. Multitemporal spectral analysis for cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) classification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Nagendra; Glenn, Nancy F

    2009-07-01

    Operational satellite remote sensing data can provide the temporal repeatability necessary to capture phenological differences among species. This study develops a multitemporal stacking method coupled with spectral analysis for extracting information from Landsat imagery to provide species-level information. Temporal stacking can, in an approximate mathematical sense, effectively increase the 'spectral' resolution of the system by adding spectral bands of several multitemporal images. As a demonstration, multitemporal linear spectral unmixing is used to successfully delineate cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) from soil and surrounding vegetation (77% overall accuracy). This invasive plant is an ideal target for exploring multitemporal methods because of its phenological differences with other vegetation in early spring and, to a lesser degree, in late summer. The techniques developed in this work are directly applicable for other targets with temporally unique spectral differences.

  9. Potential effects of four Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operational scenarios on riparian vegetation of the Green River, Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K.E.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    Four hydropower operational scenarios at Flaming Gorge Dam were evaluated to determine their potential effects on riparian vegetation along the Green River in Utah and Colorado. Data collected in June 1992 indicated that elevation above the river had the largest influence on plant distribution. A lower riparian zone occupied the area between the approximate elevations of 800 and 4,200-cfs flows--the area within the range of hydropower operational releases. The lower zone was dominated by wetland plants such as cattail, common spikerush, coyote willow, juncus, and carex. An upper riparian zone was above the elevation of historical maximum power plant releases from the dam (4,200 cfs), and it generally supported plants adapted to mesic, nonwetland conditions. Common species in the upper zone included box elder, rabbitbrush, grasses, golden aster, and scouring rush. Multispectral aerial videography of the Green River was collected in May and June 1992 to determine the relationship between flow and the areas of water and the riparian zone. From these relationships, it was estimated that the upper zone would decrease in extent by about 5% with year-round high fluctuation, seasonally adjusted high fluctuation, and seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuation, but it would increase by about 8% under seasonally adjusted steady flow. The lower zone would increase by about 13% for both year-round and seasonally adjusted high fluctuation scenarios but would decrease by about 40% and 74% for seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuation and steady flows, respectively. These changes are considered to be relatively minor and would leave pre-dam riparian vegetation unaffected. Occasional high releases above power plant capacity would be needed for long-term maintenance of this relict vegetation.

  10. Observed high-altitude warming and snow cover retreat over Tibet and the Himalayas enhanced by black carbon aerosols

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Washington, W. M.

    2015-07-10

    Himalayan mountain glaciers and the snowpack over the Tibetan Plateau provide the headwater of several major rivers in Asia. In-situ observations of snow cover fraction since the 1960s suggest that the snow pack in the region have retreated significantly, accompanied by a surface warming of 22.5 C observed over the peak altitudes (5000 m). Using a high-resolution oceanatmosphere global climate model and an observationally constrained black carbon (BC) aerosol forcing, we attribute the observed altitude dependence of the warming trends as well as the spatial pattern of reductions in snow depths and snow cover fraction to various anthropogenic factors. Atmorethe Tibetan Plateau altitudes, the increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration exerted a warming of 1.7 C, BC 1.3 C where as cooling aerosols cause about 0.7 C cooling, bringing the net simulated warming consistent with the anomalously large observed warming. We therefore conclude that BC together with CO2 has contributed to the snow retreat trends. Especially, BC increase is the major factor in the strong elevation dependence of the observed surface warming. The atmospheric warming by BC as well as its surface darkening of snow are coupled with the positive snow albedo feedbacks to account for the disproportionately large role of BC in high-elevation regions. These findings reveal that BC impact needs to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections, in particular on high-altitude cryosphere.less

  11. Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1988-07-01

    Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. EIS-0285-SA-149: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the Captain Jack-Malin 1 500 kV transmission line from structure 24 to Malin Substation (reference...

  13. EIS-0285-SA-129: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the Ashe-Marion 2 500 kV transmission line from structure 1502 through structure 1577. Bonneville...

  14. EIS-0285-SA-134: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the Bandon-Rogue-Gold Beach transmission line corridor. This corridor includes the Bandon-Rogue 1 115...

  15. EIS-0285-SA-132: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for portion of the Big Eddy - Ostrander 1 500 kV transmission line located from tower structure 312 to 393...

  16. EIS-0285-SA-104: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the Lynch Creek to LaGrande-Cowlitz No. 1 (EIS-0285-SA-104) (August 2002) PDF icon Supplement...

  17. The Future Through the Past: The Use of Analog Sites for Design Criteria and Long Term Performance Assessment of Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, D. S.; Miller, J. J.; Young, M. H.; Edwards, S. C.; Rawlinson, S. E.

    2002-02-26

    There is growing support for using evapotranspiration (ET) covers for closure of low-level waste (LLW) and other types of waste disposal sites, particularly in the lower latitude arid regions of the western United States. At the Nevada Test Site (NTS), monolayer ET covers are the baseline technology for closure of LLW and mixed LLW cells. To better predict the long-term performance of monolayer ET covers, as well as to identify design criteria that will potentially improve their performance, the properties of, and processes occurring on, analog sites for ET covers on the NTS are being studied. The project is funded through the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area of the U.S. Department of Energy. Four analog sites on the NTS have been selected to predict performance of ET covers over a 1,000-year compliance period. Two sites are relatively recently disturbed (within the last 50 years) and have been selected to evaluate processes and changes on ET covers for the early period after active cover maintenance is discontinued. Two other sites, late to mid-Holocene in age, are intended as analogs for the end of the compliance period (1,000 years or more); both surfaces are abandoned alluvial/colluvial deposits. The history of the early post-institutional control analog sites are being evaluated by an archaeologist to help determine when the sites were last disturbed or modified, and the mode of disturbance to help set baseline conditions. Similar to other ''landforms,'' ET covers will evolve over time because of pedogenic, biotic, and climatic processes. Properties of analog sites that could affect ET water balance performance will be evaluated to help understand ET cover performance over time.

  18. SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    812 Supplement Analysis 1 October 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS for the FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for NECO (FORMERLY HAXTUN) WIND ENERGY PROJECT LOGAN AND PHILLIPS COUNTIES, COLORADO U. S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office and U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Customer Service Region OCTOBER 2013 DOE/EA-1812/SA-1 DOE/EA-1812 Supplement Analysis 2 October 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS for the FINAL

  19. Methodology for Validating Building Energy Analysis Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; O'Doherty, B.; Burch, J.

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this report was to develop a validation methodology for building energy analysis simulations, collect high-quality, unambiguous empirical data for validation, and apply the validation methodology to the DOE-2.1, BLAST-2MRT, BLAST-3.0, DEROB-3, DEROB-4, and SUNCAT 2.4 computer programs. This report covers background information, literature survey, validation methodology, comparative studies, analytical verification, empirical validation, comparative evaluation of codes, and conclusions.

  20. Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, F.; Wang, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Organic sulfur is removed from coals by treatment with aqueous base, air, and vegetable oils with minimal loss of BTU. Such results were revealed during exploratory experiments on an ICCI funded project to remove organic sulfur from Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. In fact, prewashing IBC-108 coal with dilute alkali prior to treating with linseed oil and air results in 26% removal of sulfur. This new method will be investigated by treating coals with alkali, impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of the solid products. During this first quarter the selection of base for pretreatment and extraction (Task 1) has been completed. NaOH is better than NH{sub 4}OH for the pretreatment and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is better than NaOH for the oil extraction. About 40% of sulfur is removed from IBC-108 coal using 5% NaOH for pretreatment followed by linseed oil oxidation in air and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} extraction.

  1. EMF cover.final

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    melatonin was considered a possible hypothesis (see page 24). This idea provided motivation to conduct research addressing a possible link between EMF exposure and breast...

  2. 11554_cover_CR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... ing commodity cluster I have seen, Bassi is the best machine I have seen, period." ... On the time and space scales used in this study, the solar plus volcanic signals are ...

  3. cover.indd

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    Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance Studies on π-conjugated semiconductor systems By Ying Chen A dissertation submitted to the graduate faculty in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Major: Condensed Matter Physics Program of Study Committee: Joseph Shinar, Major Professor Adam Kaminski Vladimir Kogan Curtis Struck Gary Tuttle Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 2011 Copyright © Ying Chen, 2011. All rights reserved. ii TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction

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    Los Alamos National Laboratory Hydrodynamic Test Program DOE/IG-0699 September 2005 THE LOS ALAMOS HYDRODYNAMIC TEST PROGRAM Page 1 Details of Findings Testing Delays Los Alamos did not complete all hydrotests as scheduled. Fifteen hydrotests were scheduled in Fiscal Years (FY) 2002 through 2004. Of these, six were completed as scheduled, six were delayed up to two years, and three had not been completed as of April 2005. Future hydrotests may also be at risk. Hydrotest Objectives In FY 2002,

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    299 (Accepted Manuscript) Shale gas and non-aqueous fracturing fluids: Opportunities and challenges for supercritical CO2 Middleton, Richard Stephen Carey, James William Currier, Robert Patrick Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven Kang, Qinjun Karra, Satish Viswanathan, Hari S. Porter, Mark L. Gimenez Martinez, Joaquin Provided by the author(s) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (2015-07-09). To be published in: Applied Energy, Vol.147, p.500-509, JUN 1 2015. DOI to publisher's version:

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    0029 (Accepted Manuscript) The global context of the 14 November 2012 storm event Dixon, P. MacDonald, E. A. Funsten, Herbert O. Glocer, H. O. Kletzing, C. Larsen, Brian Arthur Reeves, Geoffrey D. Skoug, Ruth M. Spence, H. E. Thomsen, M. F. Provided by the author(s) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (2015-07-13). To be published in: Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, Vol.120, iss.3, p.1939-1956, MAR 2015. DOI to publisher's version: 10.1002/2014JA020826 Permalink to record:

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    193 (Accepted Manuscript) A Chandrasekhar Mass Progenitor for the Type Ia Supernova Remnant 3C 397 from The Enhanced Abundances of Nickel and Manganese Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Badenes, Carles; Foster, Adam R.; Bravo, Eduardo; Williams, Brian J.; Maeda, Keiichi; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Petre, Robert; Koyama, Katsuji Provided by the author(s) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (2016-02-18). To be published in: ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL LETTERS ; Vol.801,

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    7701 (Accepted Manuscript) Possible Demonstration of a Polaronic Bose-Einstein(-Mott) Condensate in UO2(+x) by Ultrafast THz Spectroscopy and Microwave Dissipation Conradson, Steven D; Gilbertson, Steve Michael; Daifuku, Stephanie L; Kehl, Jeffrey A; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Andersson, Anders David Ragnar; Bishop, Alan; Byler, Darrin David; Maldonado, Pablo; Oppeneer, Peter; Valdez, James Anthony; Neidig, Michael L; Rodriguez, George Provided by the author(s) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory

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    2255 (Accepted Manuscript) Opposite correlations between cation disordering and amorphization resistance in spinels versus pyrochlores Uberuaga, Blas P. Tang, Ming Jiang, Chao Valdez, James Anthony Smith, Roger Wang, Yongqiang Sickafus, Kurt E. Provided by the author(s) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (2016-02-03). To be published in: Nature Communications, Vol.6, p.8750, OCT 2015 DOI to publisher's version: 10.1038/ncomms9750 Permalink to record:

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    DOE/IG-0034 OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL SEMIANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS OCTOBER 1, 2003 - MARCH 31, 2004 April 29, 2004 The Honorable Spencer Abraham Secretary U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Dear Secretary Abraham: I am pleased to submit the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) Semiannual Report to Congress. This Report summarizes significant OIG activities and accomplishments during the 6-month period ending March 31, 2004. The Report reflects our continuing commitment to focus OIG

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