Sample records for vegetation cover analysis

  1. Analysis of Vegetative on Six Different Landfill Cover Profiles in an Arid Environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; McClellan, Yvonne; Reavis, Bruce A.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Newman, Gretchen; Wolters, Gale

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs was constructed and monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle 'D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle 'C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for arid environments. The demonstration was intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. A portion of this project involves the characterization of vegetation establishment and growth on the landfill covers. The various prototype landfill covers were expected to have varying flux rates (Dwyer et al 2000). The landfill covers were further expected to influence vegetation establishment and growth, which may impact site erosion potential and long-term site integrity. Objectives of this phase were to quantify the types of plants occupying each site, the percentage of ground covered by these plants, the density (number of plants per unit area) of plants, and the plant biomass production. The results of this vegetation analysis are presented in this report.3 DRAFT07/06/14AcknowledgementsWe would like to thank all technical and support staff from Sandia and the USDA Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Station not included in the authors' list of this document for their valuable contributions to this research. We would also like to acknowledge the Department of Energy's Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area for funding this work.4

  2. VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

  3. Special study on vegetative covers. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions. 28 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Vegetative covers: Special study. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, (2) define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and (3) develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites (Shiprock, New Mexico; Burrell, Pennsylvania; and Clive, Utah) where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions.

  5. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems AnalysisVOLUME I A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES ATOMICVWA-0039Using

  6. 488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

  7. Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

  8. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  9. Vegetative covers: Special study. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, (2) define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and (3) develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites (Shiprock, New Mexico; Burrell, Pennsylvania; and Clive, Utah) where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions.

  10. Calculation set for design and optimization of vegetative soil covers Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrates that containment of municipal and hazardous waste in arid and semiarid environments can be accomplished effectively without traditional, synthetic materials and complex, multi-layer systems. This research demonstrates that closure covers combining layers of natural soil, native plant species, and climatic conditions to form a sustainable, functioning ecosystem will meet the technical equivalency criteria prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. In this study, percolation through a natural analogue and an engineered cover is simulated using the one-dimensional, numerical code UNSAT-H. UNSAT-H is a Richards. equation-based model that simulates soil water infiltration, unsaturated flow, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, and deep percolation. This study incorporates conservative, site-specific soil hydraulic and vegetation parameters. Historical meteorological data are used to simulate percolation through the natural analogue and an engineered cover, with and without vegetation. This study indicates that a 3-foot (ft) cover in arid and semiarid environments is the minimum design thickness necessary to meet the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-prescribed technical equivalency criteria of 31.5 millimeters/year and 1 x 10{sup -7} centimeters/second for net annual percolation and average flux, respectively. Increasing cover thickness to 4 or 5 ft results in limited additional improvement in cover performance.

  11. Evaluation of vegetative cover on reclaimed land by color infrared videography relative to soil properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfordresher, Anne Augusta

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were collected in three reclaimed portions of the Martin Lake mine near Tatum, Texas. Analysis of the video imagery indicated that 11% of the A2 area, 8% of the B area and 15% of the C2 area were poorly vegetated by bermudagrass. Areas totally devoid... as bare soil in these two mine areas are known to be actively used haul roads. Sparsely vegetated areas account for 7. 8'4 of the A2, 4. 8% of the B and 13% of the C2 areas. These values were significantly different at the 5% confidence level...

  12. The effects of fall and spring burning on water quality and vegetative cover in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Nick Ernest

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRE EPFECTS OF FALL AND SPRING BURNING ON WATER QUALITY AND VEGETATIVE COVER IN TRE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF TEKAS A Thesis by NICK ERNEST GARZA Jr. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major Subject: Range Science THE EFFECTS OF FALL AND SPRING BURNING ON WATER QUALITY AND VEGETATIVE COVER IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF TEXAS A Thesis by NICK ERNEST GARZA Jr. Approved as to style...

  13. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  14. Scientific Analysis Cover Sheet for Radionuclide Screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Ragan

    2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The waste forms under consideration for disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain contain scores of radionuclides (Attachments V and VI). It would be impractical and highly inefficient to model all of these radionuclides in a total system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this radionuclide screening analysis is to remove from further consideration (screen out) radionuclides that are unlikely to significantly contribute to radiation dose to the public from the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The remaining nuclides (those screened in) are recommended for consideration in TSPA modeling for license application. This analysis also covers radionuclides that are not screened in based on dose, but need to be included in TSPA modeling for other reasons. For example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require consideration of the combined activity of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in groundwater (40 CFR 197.30, 10 CFR 63.331). Also, Cm-245, Pu-241, and U-235 decay indirectly to potentially important radionuclides, and are not identified by the screening analysis as important. The radionuclide screening analysis separately considers two different postclosure time periods: the 10,000-y regulatory period for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain and the period after 10,000 y up to 1 million y after emplacement. The incremental effect of extending the screening for the regulatory period to 20,000 y is also addressed. Four release scenarios are considered: (1) the nominal scenario, which entails long-term degradation of disposal containers and waste forms, (2) a human-intrusion scenario, (3) an intrusive igneous event, and (4) an eruptive igneous event. Because the first three scenarios require groundwater transport, they are called groundwater scenarios below. The screening analysis considers the following waste forms: spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel, spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and high-level waste (HLW). Average and outlying (high burnup, high initial enrichment, low age, or otherwise exceptional) forms of each waste-form type are considered. This analysis has been prepared in accordance with a technical work plan (BSC 2002c). In a review of Revision 00 of this radionuclide screening analysis, the NRC found that ''processes that affect transport in the biosphere, such as uptake by plants and bioaccumulation are not accounted for'' and that ''the direct exposure pathway is not accounted for'' (Beckman 2001, Section 5.3.2.1). The NRC also found that the solubility and sorption classes were too broadly defined, noting, for example, that Se is in the same solubility and sorptivity groups as Np and U, yet is ''more soluble than Np and U by several orders of magnitude'' (Beckman 2001, Section 5.3.2.1). This revision seeks to build upon the strengths of the earlier screening method while responding to the specific concerns raised by the NRC and other reviewers. In place of simple inhalation and ingestion dose conversion factors, the revised radionuclide screening uses screening factors that also take into account soil accumulation, uptake by plants, exposure to contaminated ground, and other features of the biosphere that were neglected in the previous screening. Whereas the previous screening analysis allowed only two solubility classes (soluble and insoluble), the revised screening introduces an intermediate solubility class to better segregate the radionuclides into transport groups.

  15. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84605, USA; E-Mail: ryan.jensen@byu.edu 4 Savannah River National Laboratory, Department of Energy, Aiken, SC 29808, USA; E-Mail:...

  16. Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Analysis and Design of Evapotranspirative Cover for Hazardous Waste Landfill Jorge G. Zornberg, M, Inc. OII Superfund landfill in southern California. This cover system constitutes the first ET cover:6 427 CE Database subject headings: Evapotranspiration; Coating; Landfills; Hazardous waste; Design

  17. SPECIAL ANALYSIS OF OPERATIONAL STORMWATER RUNOFF COVERS OVER SLIT TRENCHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collard, L; Luther Hamm, L

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid Waste Management (SWM) commissioned this Special Analysis (SA) to determine the effects of placing operational stormwater runoff covers (referred to as covers in the remainder of this document) over slit trench (ST) disposal units ST1 through ST7 (the center set of slit trenches). Previously the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entered into an agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to place covers over Slit Trenches 1 and 2 to be able to continue disposing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) solid waste (see USDOE 2008). Because the covers changed the operating conditions, DOE Order 435.1 (DOE 1999) required that an SA be performed to assess the impact. This Special Analysis has been prepared to determine the effects of placing covers over slit trenches at about years 5, 10 and 15 of the 30-year operational period. Because some slit trenches have already been operational for about 15 years, results from analyzing covers at 5 years and 10 years provide trend analysis information only. This SA also examined alternatives of covering Slit Trenches 1 and 2 with one cover and Slit Trenches 3 and 4 with a second cover versus covering them all with a single cover. Based on modeling results, minimal differences exist between covering Slit Trench groups 1-2 and 3-4 with two covers or one large cover. This SA demonstrates that placement of covers over slit trenches will slow the subsequent release and transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone in the early time periods (from time of placement until about 100 years). Release and transport of some radionuclides in the vadose zone beyond 100 years were somewhat higher than for the case without covers. The sums-of-fractions (SOFs) were examined for the current waste inventory in ST1 and ST2 and for estimated inventories at closure for ST3 through ST7. In all cases SOFs were less than one (except for one SOF for ST5 that remained at one), indicating that there should be no unacceptable impacts on operations from placing covers for the cover alternatives that were analyzed. Minimal operational limits provided in Table 4 should be used as the new set of limits for Slit Trenches 1 through 7. ST1 and ST2 are expected to be covered about 15 years after the first disposal in ST1. Because the time of actual placement of covers over the other slit trenches is unknown, this SA did not consider limit increases, only limit decreases. Thus, each minimal operational limit is the minimum of the Performance Assessment (PA) final limit and the limit calculated in this SA if covers were placed at about 5, 10 or 15 years. If other cover times are desired, further analysis will be required.

  18. How well do we know northern land cover? Comparison of four global vegetation and wetland products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Laurence C.

    Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data (GLCC.AVHRR), (2) the Global Land Cover Classification.AVHRR database underestimates evergreen needleleaf forest in favor of mixed forest; and (3) at high latitudes impacts of climate change on land- atmosphere exchanges of energy, water, carbon and green- house gases [e

  19. Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Program’s land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 2001–2006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

  20. Global Analysis of Snow Cover Changes Using Google Earth Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coll, Jim

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Analysis of Snow Cover Changes Using MODIS and Google Earth Engine By: Jim Coll Importance of This Project • To establish whether or not Google Earth Engine is a viable platform for this type of “big data” analysis • Depending... is Google Earth Engine? Google Earth Engine is a massive data warehouse (2+ petabytes) of remote sensing imagery including all past Landsat and MODIS data. The platform supports JavaScript and Python analysis of these data, and performs the calculations...

  1. Vegetative covers for sediment control and phosphorus sequestration from dairy waste application fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giri, Subhasis

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    . This treatment is active during summer season. Sample collection and laboratory analysis Runoff samples After a runoff producing rainfall event, the barrel from each runoff collection system was removed and the entire mass of water and sediment collected... Fields. (August 2008) Subhasis Giri, B.S., Orissa University of Agriculture and Technology, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr Saqib Mukhtar Excessive phosphorus (P) in runoff contributes to eutrophication of fresh water bodies. Studies have...

  2. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-48 LAKE ERIE REGIONAL ICE COVER ANALYSIS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-48 LAKE ERIE REGIONAL ICE COVER ANALYSIS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS R.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Observation density Average regional ice cover Percentage exceedance from average regional ice cover for discrete ice cover values Contour analysis of percentage ice cover exceedance

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The work involved will be to clear tall growing vegetation that is...

  4. Meteorological and air quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative cover in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Hammer, Hillel; Akbari, Hashem

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study described in this report is part of a project sponsored by the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to assess the potential role of surface property modifications on energy, meteorology, and air quality in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada. Numerical models were used to establish the possible meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative fraction, i.e., ''cool-city'' strategies that can mitigate the urban heat island (UHI), significantly reduce urban energy consumption, and improve thermal comfort, particularly during periods of hot weather in summer. Mitigation is even more important during critical heat wave periods with possible increased heat-related hospitalization and mortality. The evidence suggests that on an annual basis cool-city strategies are beneficial, and the implementation of such measures is currently being investigated in the U.S. and Canada. We simulated possible scenari os for urban heat-island mitigation in the GTA and investigated consequent meteorological changes, and also performed limited air-quality analysis to assess related impacts. The study was based on a combination of mesoscale meteorological modeling, Lagrangian (trajectory), and photochemical trajectory modeling to assess the potential meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of cool-city strategies. As available air-quality and emissions data are incompatible with models currently in use at LBNL, our air-quality analysis was based on photochemical trajectory modeling. Because of questions as to the accuracy and appropriateness of this approach, in our opinion this aspect of the study can be improved in the future, and the air-quality results discussed in this report should be viewed as relatively qualitative. The MM5 meteorological model predicts a UHI in the order of 2 to 3 degrees C in locations of maxima, and about 1 degree C as a typical value over most of the urban area. Our si mulations suggest that cool-city strategies can typically reduce local urban air temperature by 0.5-1 degrees C; as more sporadic events, larger decreases (1.5 degrees C, 2.5-2.7 degrees C and 4-6 degrees C) were also simulated. With regard to ozone mixing ratios along the simulated trajectories, the effects of cool-city strategies appear to be on the order of 2 ppb, a typical decrease. The photochemical trajectory model (CIT) also simulates larger decreases (e.g., 4 to 8 ppb), but these are not taken as representative of the potential impacts in this report. A comparison with other simulations suggest very crudely that a decrease of this magnitude corresponds to significant ''equivalent'' decreases in both NOx and VOCs emissions in the region. Our preliminary results suggest that significant UHI control can be achieved with cool-cities strategies in the GTA and is therefore worth further study. We recommend that better input data and more accurate modeling schemes be used to carry out f uture studies in the same direction.

  5. Satellite image analysis for surveillance, vegetation and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, D Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, many studies have provided abundant evidence to show the trend of tree mortality is increasing in many regions, and the cause of tree mortality is associated with drought, insect outbreak, or fire. Unfortunately, there is no current capability available to monitor vegetation changes, and correlate and predict tree mortality with CO{sub 2} change, and climate change on the global scale. Different survey platforms (methods) have been used for forest management. Typical ground-based forest surveys measure tree stem diameter, species, and alive or dead. The measurements are low-tech and time consuming, but the sample sizes are large, running into millions of trees, covering large areas, and spanning many years. These field surveys provide powerful ground validation for other survey methods such as photo survey, helicopter GPS survey, and aerial overview survey. The satellite imagery has much larger coverage. It is easier to tile the different images together, and more important, the spatial resolution has been improved such that close to or even higher than aerial survey platforms. Today, the remote sensing satellite data have reached sub-meter spatial resolution for panchromatic channels (IKONOS 2: 1 m; Quickbird-2: 0.61 m; Worldview-2: 0.5 m) and meter spatial resolution for multi-spectral channels (IKONOS 2: 4 meter; Quickbird-2: 2.44 m; Worldview-2: 2 m). Therefore, high resolution satellite imagery can allow foresters to discern individual trees. This vital information should allow us to quantify physiological states of trees, e.g. healthy or dead, shape and size of tree crowns, as well as species and functional compositions of trees. This is a powerful data resource, however, due to the vast amount of the data collected daily, it is impossible for human analysts to review the imagery in detail to identify the vital biodiversity information. Thus, in this talk, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges to use high resolution satellite imagery and machine learning theory to monitor tree mortality at the level of individual trees.

  6. A thick homogeneous vegetated cover design proves cost - and schedule-effective for the reclamation of uranium mills sites near Spokane, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blacklaw, J.; Robertson, G.; Stoffel, D.; Ahmad, J.; Fordham, E. [Washington State Dept. of Health, Olympia, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has licensed two medium sized uranium mills with tailings impoundments covering 28 and 40 hectares (70 and 100 acres), respectively, The uranium mill licensees have submitted closure and reclamation plans to the state, and site-specific conditions have determined the closure design features, Conventional uranium mill cover designs usually incorporate an overall cap of one to three meters, which includes a low-permeability clay barrier layer. A technical evaluation of several uranium mill facilities that used this design was published in the fall of 1994 and reported that unexpected vegetation root damage had occurred in the low-permeability clay (or bentonite amended) barrier layers. The technical report suggested that the low-permeability design feature at some sites could be compromised within a very short time and the regulatory goal of 1,000 years performance might not be achieved. In October 1994, WDOH sponsored a technical forum meeting to consider design alternatives to address these reliability concerns. Representatives from the federal government, nuclear industry, licensees, engineering firms, and state regulatory agencies attended the workshop. Risk factors considered in the evaluation of the uranium mill reclamation plans include: (1) radon gas emanation through the cover (the air pathway), and (2) migration of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents (the groundwater pathway). Additional design considerations include site structural stability, longevity of 1,000 years, and no active (ongoing) maintenance. 9 refs.

  7. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from a section of BPA's Ponderosa--Pilot Butte Transmission Line Right-of-way to facilitate relocation of structure 18/3. Work would begin in mid-March and end in April, 2001. (1) Description of right-of-way and vegetation management needed--The project involves cutting all tall growing trees and brush within BPA's 100-foot wide transmission line right-of-way. An encroachment by the City of Bend Sewer Treatment facility, and future expansion plans, compelled the relocation of this portion of the right-of-way. Structures 18/2 and 18/4 will be modified in place to accommodate the new angle of the right-of-way. Structure 18/3 will be moved approximately 300 feet westerly to allow for the expansion of the sewer treatment facility. Only vegetation within the new portion of the right-of-way, totaling approximately 3.5 acres, will be controlled. No herbicides will be used on this project. Vegetation to be controlled: Juniper trees are the only tall growing tree species within this portion of the right-of-way requiring treatment. The density of vegetation within the new right-of-way is light to medium. The right-of-way boundaries will be examined for danger trees and if found, danger trees will be marked and cut according to danger tree policy.

  8. Involving Geospatial Information in the Analysis of Land-Cover Change along the Tanzania Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    Involving Geospatial Information in the Analysis of Land-Cover Change along the Tanzania Coast.1080/08920750590883132 Involving Geospatial Information in the Analysis of Land-Cover Change along the Tanzania Coast YEQIAO WANG and the area of woodland interspersed with agriculture increased. This study demonstrates how geospatial

  9. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartmentDepartment of Energy Photo of aRemote Sens. 2012,

  10. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-09)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the rights of way and access roads for BPA's McNary-Santiam No. 1 Transmission Line, beginning in the summer of 2000 and ending in July, 2001. This Supplemental Analysis finds that: (1) the proposed actions are substantially consistent with the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285) and ROD; and (2) there are no new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the proposed actions or their impacts. Therefore, no further NEPA documentation is required.

  11. A Linear-Time Approach for Static Timing Analysis Covering All Process Corners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    A Linear-Time Approach for Static Timing Analysis Covering All Process Corners Sari Onaissi into the timing analysis of a circuit. With the increase in the number of interesting process vari- ables process variations lead to circuit timing variability and a corresponding timing yield loss. Traditional

  12. Uncertainty analysis of vegetation distribution in the northern high latitudes during the 21st century with a dynamic vegetation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yueyang

    This study aims to assess how high-latitude vegetation may respond under various climate scenarios during the 21st century with a focus on analyzing model parameters induced uncertainty and how this uncertainty compares ...

  13. Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Madagascar)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Université d'Orléans, BP 6759, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2, France Abstract Seven samples from a 1 m long peat core targets because of their dominant or even exclusive OM content, peat deposits have received relatively

  14. Vegetables: Selection, Care, Cooking. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reasonover, Frances; Mason, Louise; Tribble, Marie; Cox, Maeona

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    them well on absorbent paper; salt and serve them hot. How to Steam Vegetables A steamer is a pan with a rack and a tight cover. Place enough water in the steamer to form sufficient steam, but do not let the water touch the rack. Place... the vegetable on the rack, time is somewhat longer than for boiling. cover the steamer and let the water boil vigor- Steaming is more satisfactory for white, yel- ously. Since the vegetables are cooked entirely low and red vegetables than for green vege...

  15. LAI, fAPAR and fCover CYCLOPES global products derived1 from VEGETATION. Part 1: Principles of the algorithm2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    description of the VEGETATION sensors, radiometric calibration19 process, based on vicarious desertic targets24 red, near infrared and short wave infrared bands used to the remaining cloud free observations25 and climate modelling, resource evaluation (water, agriculture or forest3 production). Surface process models

  16. -Wavelet analysis for detecting anisotropy in point patterns -277 Journal of Vegetation Science 15: 277-284, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael S.

    - Wavelet analysis for detecting anisotropy in point patterns - 277 Journal of Vegetation Science methods designed for continuously distributed data. Wavelet analysis, a booming approach to studying into the ecological literature. A simple adaptation of wavelet analysis is proposed for the detection of anisotropy

  17. Screening analysis for EPACT-covered commercial HVAC and water-heating equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Somasundaram; PR Armstrong; DB Belzer; SC Gaines; DL Hadley; S Katipumula; DL Smith; DW Winiarski

    2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    EPCA requirements state that if the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) amends efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90.1-1989, then DOE must establish an amended uniform national manufacturing standard at the minimum level specified in amended Standard 90.1. However, DOE can establish higher efficiency levels if it can show through clear and convincing evidence that a higher efficiency level, that is technologically feasible and economically justified, would produce significant additional energy savings. On October 29, 1999, ASHRAE approved the amended Standard 90.1, which increases the minimum efficiency levels for some of the commercial heating, cooling, and water-heating equipment covered by EPCA 92. DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a screening analysis to determine the energy-savings potential of the efficiency levels listed in Standard 90.1-1999. The analysis estimates the annual national energy consumption and the potential for energy savings that would result if the EPACT-covered products were required to meet these efficiency levels. The analysis also estimates additional energy-savings potential for the EPACT-covered products if they were to exceed the efficiency levels prescribed in Standard 90-1-1999. In addition, a simple life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was performed for some alternative efficiency levels. This paper will describe the methodology, data assumptions, and results of the analysis. The magnitude of HVAC and SWH loads imposed on equipment depends on the building's physical and operational characteristics and prevailing climatic conditions. To address this variation in energy use, coil loads for 7 representative building types at 11 climate locations were estimated based on a whole-building simulation.

  18. Fractional Snow-Cover Mapping Through Artificial Neural Network Analysis of MODIS Surface Reflectance. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobreva, Iliyana D.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate areal measurements of snow-cover extent are important for hydrological and climate modeling. The traditional method of mapping snow cover is binary where a pixel is approximated to either snow-covered or snow-free. ...

  19. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-10)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

  20. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

  1. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-07)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation Management on section of three ROWs. The ROWs include selected sections of the McNary Powerhouse, the present and proposed new sections of the McNary-Roundup and the McNary Switchyard South Transmission lines. BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for pertinent information on each section of referenced transmission line. BPA would conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way and to clear vegetation from new rights-of-way corridors. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

  2. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-Y AN ANALYSIS OF GREAT LAKES ICE COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~ecting the passes to be used were: amount of cloud cover, availability of ground verification data, and number and the primary modes of interaction with incident radiation with respect to the satellite sensor. Table 3, and the path radiance. These effects mu*t be calculated for each frame; this can be achieved by measuring

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-06)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to apply selected herbicides to control annual weeds that are competing with native grasses that were seeded two years ago. Herbicides will also be applied at the base of the existing wooden transmission line poles located in the pasture area. BPA would conduct the vegetation control with the goal of promoting native grass growth and to provide fire protection for the wooden transmission line poles. The pasture area is, for the most part, flat with elevation increasing towards the northwest corner. Slopes are not steep in that area. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

  4. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Clearing C-trees along the south side of the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The project involves controlling all tall growing trees (C-Trees) within the right-of-way. All work is to be done on the south side of centerline. Target vegetation is the tall growing Firs along the edge of the ROW, all of which is located within the back yards of the property owners along the right-of-way. The density of vegetation is low and consists of C-Trees located within backyards, with the branches growing towards the lines. Due to lack of access and past verbal agreements with the landowners, permission/agreement has been difficult to obtain from the property owners. Permission has now been obtained to remove the C-Trees within their back yards which, will soon be a hazard to our transmission line facility. We are working with the landowners to get them to plant low growing scrubs and ornamentals within the right-of-way and adjacent to the right-of-way. A follow up herbicide treatment is not planned because the trees being cut will not re-sprout. This right-of-way or project area is on a three to four year maintenance schedule. Little or no treatment should be required in the immediate future.

  5. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-5) - Big Eddy-Ostrander Transmission Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the rights of way and access roads for BPA's Big Eddy-Ostrander Transmission Line, beginning April and ending in May, 2001. A Checklist was completed for this project in accordance to the requirements identified in the Bonneville Power Administrations Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285). The Checklist evaluated the following areas: (1) Description of right-of-way and vegetation management needed; (2) Vegetation to be controlled; (3) Surrounding land use and landowner; (4) Natural Resource; (5) Vegetation control methods; (6) Debris disposal; (7) Monitoring; and (8) Appropriate environmental documentation. In preparation of this Supplement Analysis, the Checklist was reviewed. Specific information regarding the areas as identified above are described the attached checklist. This Supplement Analysis finds that: (1) the proposed actions are substantially consistent with the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS0285) and ROD; and (2) there are no new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the proposed actions or their impacts. Therefore, no further NEPA documentation is required.

  6. UMTRA project disposal cell cover biointrusion sensitivity assessment, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides an analysis of potential changes that may take place in a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell cover system as a result of plant biointrusion. Potential changes are evaluated by performing a sensitivity analysis of the relative impact of root penetrations on radon flux out of the cell cover and/or water infiltration into the cell cover. Data used in this analysis consist of existing information on vegetation growth on selected cell cover systems and information available from published studies and/or other available project research. Consistent with the scope of this paper, no new site-specific data were collected from UMTRA Project sites. Further, this paper does not focus on the issue of plant transport of radon gas or other contaminants out of the disposal cell cover though it is acknowledged that such transport has the potential to be a significant pathway for contaminants to reach the environment during portions of the design life of a disposal cell where plant growth occurs. Rather, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of physical penetration and soil drying caused by plant roots that have and are expected to continue to grow in UMTRA Project disposal cell covers. An understanding of the biological and related physical processes that take place within the cover systems of the UMTRA Project disposal cells helps the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determine if the presence of a plant community on these cells is detrimental, beneficial, or of mixed value in terms of the cover system`s designed function. Results of this investigation provide information relevant to the formulation of a vegetation control policy.

  7. The Water-Wise Vegetable Garden: An Analysis of the Potential for Irrigation through Rainwater Harvesting in Sunny Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Adrienne; Esterer-Vogel, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vegetables spinach and cabbage have a lower water demandmelons, spinach and yellow corn are among the most water-

  8. Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Madagascar): diagenesis appraisal and consequences for palaeoenvironmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake and petrographical work [2], we applied such an approach to the analysis of a peat core section to get additional (saturated and unsaturated n-FAs, plus i-C16) at the surface of the peat sequence and low amounts

  9. A vegetational analysis of the Phillips Agricultural Demonstration Project Ranch, Foraker, Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Ronald Gilbert

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Jerry Tomanek, Professor of Range Ecology, Fort Hayes Kansas State Cnllegs~ for:. is helpful advice and cr' ticism. Sincere appreoiation is expressed to the many otherss too numerous to mention by name, for their assistance throughout this study? 88... Unite of Range Sites. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 9 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 18 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 2) VII Relative Composition-Determined by the Point Quadrat Method of Analysis ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ )8 VIII Range...

  10. Vegetable Soup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vegetable Soup 10 cups water 1/4 c tamari, salt reduced 2 potatoes, cut in medium 1 t basil sized chunks 1 t thyme 2 carrots, sliced 1 c string beans, cut in 1 in. ... About 15 minutes before end of cooking time, add cooked grains or spaghetti ...

  11. Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

  12. The Water-Wise Vegetable Garden: An Analysis of the Potential for Irrigation through Rainwater Harvesting in Sunny Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Adrienne; Esterer-Vogel, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water-use vegetables” that can be grown in California are “Cylindra beets, Tepary beans,beans, carrots and peppers. The first five of these crops have somewhat lower water

  13. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  14. Urban slum structure: integrating socioeconomic and land cover data to model slum evolution in Salvador, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    roofs, white-painted roofs, pavement, and cloud land covers.white-painted roofs, pavement, vegetation, water, sand exposed soil and clouds.

  15. Production of Biodiesel from Vegetable Oil Using CaO Catalyst & Analysis of Its Performance in Four Stroke Diesel Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sruthi Gopal; Sajitha C. M; Uma Krishnakumar

    Abstract- The production of biodiesel from vegetable oils stands as a new versatile method of energy generation in the present scenario. Biodiesel is obtained by the transesterification of long chain fatty acids in presence of catalysts. Transesterification is an attractive and widely accepted technique. The purpose of the transesterification process is to lower the viscosity of the oil. The most important variables affecting methyl ester yield during the transesterification reaction are the molar ratio of alcohol to vegetable oil, reaction temperature, catalyst amount and time. Biodiesel is renewable, biodegradable, non-toxic, and essentially free of sulfur and aromatics. It can be used in diesel engines by blending with conventional diesel in various proportions. Biodiesel seems to be a realistic fuel for future. It has become more attractive recently because of its environmental benefits. This paper discuses the production of biodiesel from

  16. A vegetational analysis of an East Texas bottomland hardwood area with special emphasis on wood duck habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrill, William Irl

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in each of 5 activities during each hour of the day. 46 LIST OF FIGURES Figures Page Map of the Angelina-Neches Scientific Area in Jasper County, Texas, showing the four vegetative types and the major water bodies including the Angelina and Neches...) with days at each level on a line and the average designated by a dashed line. 7 Nap of the Angelina-Neches Scientific Area in Jasper County, Texas, showing the ten sloughs (shaded) that wood duck activity transects were run on marked by a number...

  17. Back Cover Front Cover Office of Continuing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Back Cover Front Cover Office of Continuing Professional Education 2012­2013 Professional Landscape of Golf Course Irrigation Systems (p. 13) · Basics of Turf Management (p. 21) · Turfgrass Establishment (p

  18. Hydrodynamics of vegetated channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    This paper highlights some recent trends in vegetation hydrodynamics, focusing on conditions within channels and spanning spatial scales from individual blades, to canopies or vegetation patches, to the channel reach. At ...

  19. Sensing vegetation growth with reflected GPS signals Eric E. Small,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    Vegetative Index (NDVI) to gauge vegetation status. NDVI is inversely correlated with the magnitude- drological hypotheses [RodriguezIturbe, 2000]. Remote sensing using microwave radar is one approach for doc- umenting vegetation growth. Unlike optical methods, radar measurements are not hindered by cloud cover

  20. Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 242GTR-NRS-P-105 BUILDING CAPACITY FOR PROVIDING CANOPY COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water quality and quantity in both rural and urban settings. Tree canopy cover and canopy height.--Tree canopy cover and canopy height information are essential for estimating volume, biomass, and carbon

  1. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrell, James J. (Livingston Manor, NY); Donohoe, Anthony J. (Ovid, NY)

    1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  2. UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).

  3. Covering Walls With Fabrics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TDOC . Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1227 WALLS with ;FABRICS Texas Agricultural Extension Service . The Texas A&M University System Daniel C. Pfannstiel, Director, College Station, Texas Covering Walls with Fabrics* When tastefully applied, fabrics... it is applied, fabric-covered walls improve the sound-absorbing acoustical properties of a room. Also, fabrics can be used for covering walls of either textured gypsum board or wood paneling. Home decorating magazines are good sources for ideas about fabric...

  4. The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

  5. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  6. Vegetable Gardening in Containers. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shade than those which bear fruit, such as cucumbers, peppers, toma toes and eggplant. One advan tage to container gardening is mobility. Container gardening makes it possible to position the vegetables in areas where they can receive the best...

  7. Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    COMMENTARY Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling? Remote sensing- guish among broad classes of vegetation. However, the applicability of remote sensing to classification like from remote sensing ­ a map of tree species ­ and what can be delivered ­ a map of forest types

  8. Alternative Landfill Cover. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of an engineered cover is to isolate the underlying waste. A key element to isolating the wastes from the environment, engineered covers should minimize or prevent water from infiltrating into the landfill and coming into contact with the waste, thereby minimizing leachate generation. The U.S. EPA construction guidelines for soil hydraulic barriers specify that the soil moisture content and compactive effort may be increased to ensure that the barrier achieves a specified permeability of 1 x 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. However, constructing a soil barrier with high moisture content makes the soil more difficult to work and increases the required compactive effort to achieve the specified density, ultimately increasing the construction cost of the barrier. Alternative landfill cover designs rely on soil physical properties, hydraulic characteristics, and vegetation requirements to lower the flux rate of water through the cover. They can achieve greater reliability than the prescriptive RCRA Subtitle C design, especially under arid or semi-arid environmental conditions. With an alternative cover design, compacted soil barriers can be constructed with a soil moisture content that makes placement and compaction of the soil easier and less expensive. Under these conditions, the soil barrier has more capacity to absorb and control moisture within it, thereby enhancing the reliability of the barrier. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance, data.

  9. CoverSheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    overseen by MST-6, that is available for use by qualified users. In FY12 the EML service contract costs were covered by funds from LDRD, BES, NE and other programs. Users...

  10. An Analysis of Self-similarity, Momentum Conservation and Energy Transport for an Axisymmetric Turbulent Jet through a Staggered Array of Rigid Emergent Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jon Scott

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    coefficient c is 85 +/- 5, and the halfwidth spreading rate eta_(1/2) is 0:093 +/- 0:003. Upon the introduction of vegetation, from partially obstructed to fully obstructed, B falls from 5:1+/- 0:2 to 4:2 +/- 0:2 and finally 3:7 +/-0:1 for the fully obstructed...

  11. The influence of vegetation on frost dynamics, infiltration rate and surface stability in Icelandic Andisolic rangelands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orradottir, Berglind

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only occurred where vegetation cover was sparse. Seasonal changes in infiltration rates, measured with double-ring infiltrometers, varied with soil frost depth and type, as indicated by the depth of visible ice crystals and size and number of ice...

  12. Original Texas Land Survey as a Source for Pre-European Settlement Vegetation Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinath, Indumathi

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , coordinates were calculated and species classified according to their National Wetland Indicator’ (NWI) status. Indicator kriging was performed to create a continuous vegetation cover of Brazos County by interpolating the point biogeographical data (i...

  13. Relationships of exotic plant communities with native vegetation, environmental factors, disturbance, and landscape ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abella, Scott R.

    ecosystems in numerous ways. Theories on relation- ships of exotic species invasions with native vegetation strongly related to the eco- system classification. For example, mean exotic cover ranged from

  14. Vegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    by insulating vegetation from winter wind and temperature extremes, modifying winter soil temperaturesVegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow ) open-topped fiberglass chambers (OTCs) to study the effects of changes in winter snow cover and summer

  15. Leguminous ground covers could reduce herbicide use in forestry. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponder, F.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishing tree seedlings in mixed stands after harvesting is difficult without adequate vegetation control. Artificial regeneration can be used to ensure desirable future stands, but competing vegetation decreases survival and growth. Vegetation control can be costly and laborious. Large amounts of herbicides are used annually in forest management to reduce vegetation that competes with trees for growing space, nutrients, water, light, and other essential components. Using herbicides to control weeds is economical, but may not always be environmentally acceptable. One alternative is to establish nitrogen-fixing (legume) ground covers, which may suppress the more competitive weeds and enrich the soil.

  16. Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    with those observed in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Difference Vegetation the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) extending back to 1981. The NDVI is derived by subtracting in the hydrological, energy and carbon cycles, through influences of land cover change on hydrologic responses

  17. Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan

    1 Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines Based on Sustainability Goals for the Macquarie Campus #12.................................................................................................................................10 4.2.5 Shale-Sandstone soil transition...................................................................................................................................11 #12;3 1. Purpose This document provides a guideline for specific grounds management procedures

  18. Covered Product Category: Displays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including displays, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  19. Contemporary Lake Superior Ice Cover Climatology Raymond A. Assel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contemporary Lake Superior Ice Cover Climatology Raymond A. Assel NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Introduction A brief discussion of Lake Superior ice cover climatology (Phillips, 1978) was included) almost three decades ago. Much additional information (and analysis) of Great Lakes ice cover has been

  20. Coverable functions Petr Kucera,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of clauses needed to represent f by a CNF. ess(f) - maximum number of pairwise disjoint essential sets of implicates of f. A function f is coverable, if cnf(f)=ess(f). #12;Talk outline We already know from Horn functions. X E ess(f) = ess(X) + k #12;CNF Graph For a Horn CNF let be the digraph defined as: N

  1. Vegetable Gardening in Containers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are indicated in Table 1. * Growing Media Synthetic "soils" are best suited for vegetable container gardening. These mixes may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, ver miculite or almost any other type of media. Regardless of what... "soils" are available from gar den centers, or one can be pre pared by mixing horticultu ral grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate, and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons...

  2. Vegetable Gardening in Containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masabni, Joseph; Cotner, Sam

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    physical support in order to grow healthy plants. A good growing media must also drain well. Synthetic or soilless mixes are well suited for vegetable container gardening and may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, or vermiculite... by mixing horticultural grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons of limestone, 5 tablespoons of 0-20-0 (superphosphate) and 1 cup of garden fertil- izer...

  3. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  4. NERSC Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1AllocationsNOVA Portal:Ott2006.jpg A NewCEN-Cover.png

  5. Inside Cover.pmd

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    have prevented the systems from performing their safety functions. In addition, the seismic analysis and qualification for many safety systems were inadequate to demonstrate...

  6. The Agilent HaloPlex Target Enrichment System enables fast, simple, and efficient analysis of genomic regions of interest for a large number of samples, covering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary The Agilent HaloPlex Target Enrichment System enables fast, simple, and efficient analysis · Expanded capture size ­ enrich thousands of targets, all in a single tube · Intuitive Design Wizard ENRICHMENT SYSTEM What a Difference a Day Makes Complete Target Enrichment in Less Than a Day Design Size

  7. Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial fryers, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  8. Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial griddles, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program

  9. "TOF2H": A precision toolbox for rapid, high density/high coverage hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry via an LC-MALDI approach, covering the data pipeline from spectral acquisition to HDX rate analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikamanon, Pornpat; Pun, Elroy; Chou, Wayne; Koter, Marek D; Gershon, Paul D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    covering the data pipeline from spectral acquisition to HDXAn integrated data pipeline (Solvent Explorer/TOF2H) has

  10. Texas Home Vegetable Gardening Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masabni, Joseph

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    With this manual, home gardeners are sure to be successful growing vegetables. It includes information on garden planning, crop selection, soil preparation, fertilization, planting techniques, watering, pest control and harvesting. Tables show...

  11. Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Enda

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

  12. Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2008 MANAGEMENT TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    's Wilt 489 Using Herbicides with Plastic Mulch 490 Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial

  13. An internship in postharvest handling of vegetables and fruits at Valley Onions, McAllen, Texas: and an analysis of the postharvest handling system of onions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez-Ramos, Jose Ignacio

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , McALLW, TEXAS ~ AN ANALYSIS OF THE POSTHARVEST HANDLING SYSTEM OF ONIONS A Professional Paper by Jose Ignacio Sanchez-Eamon Approved as to style and content by: Leonard M. Pike (Hort) Chairman, Advisory Committee James Benton Storey (Hort.... Am. Econ. Rev. 50:908-17. 19. Zusman, P. and A. Amiad. 1965. Simulation: A tool for farm planing under conditions of uncertainty. J. Farm. Econ. 47:574-95. 31 VITA NAME PERMANENT ADDRESS TELEPHONE Jose Ignacio Sanchez~os. Callejon de la Rosa...

  14. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

  15. Cover Crops for the Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    matter for your soil or compost pile. Organic matter is thatin the spring or made into compost, cover crops will act asgathered up and added to your compost pile. The first method

  16. Herbicidal Activity of Mustard Seed Meal on Weed and Vegetable Emergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xi

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine the herbicidal activity of MSMs (Sinapis alba ‘IdaGold’ and Brassica juncea ‘Pacific Gold’) on weed and vegetable emergence. In Expt. 1, MSMs were applied at 0, 50, 100, 200 or 300 g/m2 to the bottom of petri dishes and covered with germination mix...

  17. Cover

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy Copyin Salt |Course

  18. Cover

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact Us ContactPractices inCostsCourse Overview

  19. cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ .

  20. Environmental Effects of Woody Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    . In rural loca- tions, woody vegetation provides for man's protection and preservation. Farm windbreaks in improv- ing human comfort by shielding people from direct solar radiation. What happens to the solar but significant amount is used for heating tree parts. The portion of solar radiation used in photosynthesis (food

  1. Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GTOS GTOS 55 Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling and Data Submission Shashi Verma #12;(intentionally blank) #12;Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Forestry University, Bejing 100083, China 5 University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 6 Microsoft Research

  2. Spatiotemporal Monitoring of Urban Vegetation Christopher Small

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Christopher

    in vegetation abundance influence environmental conditions and energy fluxes by selective reflection and absorbtion of solar radiation, by modulation of evapotranspiration and by sequestration of pollutants of the urban/suburban environment. Vegetation influences urban environmental conditions and energy fluxes

  3. Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2005 MANAGEMENT TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Labeled for Row Middle Use in Vegetable Crops 446 Kudzu Turning Over New Leaves in Indiana Counties 447

  4. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-page fact sheet discussing the pitfalls of using straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a transportation fuel.

  5. Covered Product Category: Imaging Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including imaging equipment, which is covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  6. Deans Audit Cover Environmental Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    facilities in central New York to comply with a New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DECDeans Audit Cover Environmental Compliance Guidance Document Approved by: (Pat McNally) Last electronically at: http://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/env/general-environmental-management/environmental

  7. Rangeland Ecol Manage 58:234238 | May 2005 Vegetation Cover and Forb Responses to Cattle Exclusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theimer, Tad

    suministrada por la biomasa en pie y el material herba´ceo muerto asi´ como la riqueza de hierbas y cobertura

  8. Assessing Naturalness in Northern Great Lakes Forests Based on Historical Land-Cover and Vegetation Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was developed to assess to what degree landscapes represent a natural state. Protected areas are often regarded Land-use history Á Land-use change Á Naturalness Á Logging Á Great Lakes Á Protected areas Introduction the question to what degree protected areas represent a natural state. To assess this question conservation

  9. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  10. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  11. RAPID SEPARATION OF ACTINIDES AND RADIOSTRONTIUM IN VEGETATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in vegetation samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. The actinides in vegetation method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in vegetation sample analysis can be performed in less than 8 h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles or vegetation residue after furnace heating is effectively digested.

  12. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  13. What can I do with leftover turkey? Remove meat from turkey carcass and store in a covered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    What can I do with leftover turkey? Remove meat from turkey carcass and store in a covered of chopped leftover turkey, 4 cups of chopped vegetables and 2 cups cooked rice, wild rice or noodles to 3 have blended. Add some parsley, bay leaves, and garlic for extra flavor. Salads: Add leftover turkey

  14. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen He,o

  15. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen

  16. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen/::vI

  17. MONITORING THE PERFORMANCE OF AN ALTERNATIVE COVER USING CAISSON LYSIMETERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Smith, G.M.; Mushovic, P.S.; none,

    2004-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 8, collaborated on a series of field lysimeter studies to design and monitor the performance of an alternative cover for a uranium mill tailings disposal cell at the Monticello, Utah, Superfund Site. Because groundwater recharge is naturally limited at Monticello in areas with thick loess soils, DOE and EPA chose to design a cover for Monticello using local soils and a native plant community to mimic this natural soilwater balance. Two large drainage lysimeters fabricated of corrugated steel culvert lined with high-density polyethylene were installed to evaluate the hydrological and ecological performance of an alternative cover design constructed in 2000 on the disposal cell. Unlike conventional, lowpermeability designs, this cover relies on (1) the water storage capacity of a 163-cm soil “sponge” layer overlying a sand-and-gravel capillary barrier to retain precipitation while plants are dormant and (2) native vegetation to remove precipitation during the growing season. The sponge layer consists of a clay loam subsoil compacted to 1.65 g/cm2 in one lysimeter and a loam topsoil compacted to 1.45 g/cm2 in the other lysimeter, representing the range of as-built conditions constructed in the nearby disposal cell cover. About 0.1 mm of drainage occurred in both lysimeters during an average precipitation year and before they were planted, an amount well below the EPA target of <3.0 mm/yr. However, the cover with less compacted loam topsoil sponge had a 40% greater water storage capacity than the cover with overly compacted clay loam subsoil sponge. The difference is attributable in part to higher green leaf area and water extraction by plants in the loam topsoil. The lesson learned is that seemingly subtle differences in soil types, sources, and compaction can result in salient differences in performance. Diverse, seeded communities of predominantly native perennial species were established on both lysimeters during an extended 3-yr drought, highlighting the importance of a sound understanding of the local ecology and of implementing the science and methods of disturbed-land revegetation.

  18. Construction Costs of Six Landfill Cover Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing and contrasting final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored. Four alternative cover designs and two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side for direct comparison. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper provides an overview of the construction costs of each cover design.

  19. Cost comparisons of alternative landfill final covers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing and contrasting final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored. Four alternative cover designs and two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle ``D`` Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle ``C`` Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed of uniform size, side-by-side. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper provides an overview of the construction costs of each cover design.

  20. The biopolitics of the vegetative subject

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelaprat, Etienne

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Michel. 1984. “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History. ” Pp. 76-100Michel. 2006. “On the Genealogy of Ethics: An Overview ofof life, death and the genealogy of the vegetative

  1. An application of predictive vegetation mapping to mountain vegetation in Sweden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Janet Alexis

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive vegetation mapping was employed to predict the distribution of vegetation communities and physiognomies in the portion of the Scandinavian mountains in Sweden. This was done to address three main research questions: (1) what environmental...

  2. Vegetation of the Northern Korean Peninsula and its relation to Vegetation of Northeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer

    & Valachovic 1996); (4) vegetation of water bodies (Kolbek & Dostálek 1996); (5) nitrophilous ponds and river) and soya bean fields (Dostálek et al. 1990); (8) grassland vegetation (Srtek & Kolbek 1992, Blazková 1993

  3. COVER IMAGE Constraint-satisfaction problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    : MÁRIA ERCSEY-RAVASZ COVER DESIGN: KAREN MOORE ON THE COVER Trilayer graphene A tale of two stackings Gorman, Ilya Drozdov, Yew San Hor, R. J. Cava and Ali Yazdani 944 Observation of an electrically tunable

  4. Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are required forest areas for Vietnam Erosion Risk Map Cover types C1 Natural Forests >1.7 Plantation forest.2 (ESRI, 2008), to generate a map of required protective forest area for Vietnam. (3) (4) (5Results Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5& · Map

  5. Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications) Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center, Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) The Federal Energy Management...

  6. Annual Financial Report 2010 Cover photographs by Marco Sanchez with UCSF Documents, Media & Mail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    Annual Financial Report 2010 #12;Cover photographs by Marco Sanchez with UCSF Documents, Media from the Associate Vice Chancellor ­ Finance 3 Management's Discussion and Analysis 13 FinancialCoopers,whosereportistransmittedtotheRegents. TheaccompanyingFinancialStatementsandManagement'sDiscussionandAnalysis detailonlylocalcampusactivity

  7. Improved gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, sealed as tags in different cladding nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Cladding failure allows fission gases and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas. The isotopes are Ne/sup 20/, Ne/sup 21/ and Ne/sup 22/ and Ar/sup 36/, Ar/sup 38/ and Ar/sup 40/, and the cover gas is He. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between 0 and -25/sup 0/C to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags, and the second or tag recovery system bed between -170 and -185/sup 0/C to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be determined.

  8. Gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C. (Lemont, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, that are grouped in preselected different ratios one to the other and are then sealed as tags in different cladded nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Failure of the cladding of any fuel element allows fission gases generated in the reaction and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas held in the reactor over the fuel elements. The isotopes specifically are Ne.sup.20, Ne.sup.21 and Ne.sup.22 of neon and Ar.sup.36, Ar.sup.38 and Ar.sup.40 of argon, and the cover gas is helium. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between approximately 0.degree. and -25.degree. C. operable to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags and the second or tag recovery system bed is held between approximately -170.degree. and -185.degree. C. operable to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis further is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be specifically determined.

  9. Impact of trail use on the soils and vegetation of Petit Jean State Park, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Elizabeth Anne

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Magill & Nord, 1963). STUDY AREA Petit Jean State Park is located on Petit Jean Mountain. This is one flat-topped ridge among many such ridges along the Arkansas River Valley. It is located in the southwest corner of Conway County, Arkansas... closed canopy E. A sparse ground vegetative cover II. Upland Woodland exhibited the following biotic and physical characteristics (Fig. 5): A. A ridge top or exposed slope location B. A drier environment than that along streams C. An oak...

  10. Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

  11. International Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    of southern Russia and climatic changes" 15.00 ­ Dr. A. Skorobogatov (Voronezh University, Russia). "TheInternational Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human Society to Climatic Changes in Ukraine- Ukrainian team started to investigate Holocene climate changes and the resulting vegetation and human

  12. Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management Plans in Oregon Maribeth V. Gibbons is an integrated aquatic vegetation management plan? When is an IAVMP required? Part II: Developing a Plan Chapter and Reservoirs · Portland State University · Portland OR 97207 #12;Acknowledgements This manual benefited

  13. Metal and arsenic impacts to soils, vegetation communities and wildlife habitat in southwest Montana uplands contaminated by smelter emissions. 1: Field evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbraith, H.; LeJeune, K.; Lipton, J. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of arsenic and metals in soils surrounding a smelter in southwest Montana were correlated with vegetative community structure and composition and wildlife habitat quality. Soils in the uplands surrounding the smelter were highly enriched with arsenic and metals. Concentrations of these analytes decreased with distance from the smelter and with soil depth, suggesting that the smelter is the source of the enrichment. In enriched areas, marked modifications to the native vegetation community structure and composition were observed. These included replacement of evergreen forest with bare unvegetated ground; species impoverishment and increased dominance by weed species in grasslands; and reductions in the vertical complexity of the habitat. Significant negative correlations existed between soil arsenic and metals concentrations and the extent of vegetative cover and the vertical diversity of plant communities. Loss of vegetative cover in the affected areas has been accompanied by reductions in their capacity to support indigenous wildlife populations.

  14. Interaction between flow, transport and vegetation spatial structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhar, Mitul

    This paper summarizes recent advances in vegetation hydrodynamics and uses the new concepts to explore not only how vegetation impacts flow and transport, but also how flow feedbacks can influence vegetation spatial ...

  15. Equivalence demonstration of an alternative cover system 307 EQUIVALENCE DEMONSTRATION OF AN ALTERNATIVE COVER SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    engineered components of municipal and hazardous waste landfills is the cover system. The cover system should systems for arid locations has been acknowledged by field experimental assessments (e.g., Anderson et al for final cover design at hazardous waste sites. Evapotranspirative covers are also referred

  16. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

  17. DESIGN, PERFORMANCE, AND SUSTAINABILITY OF ENGINEERED COVERS FOR URANIUM MILL TAILINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W. Jody

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Final remedies at most uranium mill tailings sites include engineered covers designed to contain metals and radionuclides in the subsurface for hundreds of years. Early cover designs rely on compacted soil layers to limit water infiltration and release of radon, but some of these covers inadvertently created habitats for deep-rooted plants. Root intrusion and soil development increased the saturated hydraulic conductivity several orders of magnitude above design targets. These covers may require high levels of maintenance to sustain long-term performance. Relatively low precipitation, high potential evapotranspiration, and thick unsaturated soils favor long-term hydrologic isolation of buried waste at arid and semiarid sites. Later covers were designed to mimic this natural soil-water balance with the goal of sustaining performance with little or no maintenance. For example, the cover for the Monticello, Utah, Superfund site relies on a thick soil-sponge layer overlying a sand-and-gravel capillary barrier to store precipitation while plants are dormant and on native vegetation to dry the soil sponge during the growing season. Measurements of both off-site caisson lysimeters and a large 3-ha lysimeter built into the final cover show that drainage has been well below a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency target of less than 3.0 mm/yr. Our stewardship strategy combines monitoring precursors to failure, probabilistic riskbased modeling, and characterization of natural analogs to project performance of covers for a range of possible future environmental scenarios. Natural analogs are needed to understand how ecological processes will influence cover performance, processes that cannot be predicted with short-term monitoring and existing numerical models.

  18. Covered Product Category: Residential Central Air Conditioners...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Central Air Conditioners Covered Product Category: Residential Central Air Conditioners The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for residential...

  19. Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for hot food holding cabinets, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  20. Covered Product Category: Commercial Steam Cookers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial steam cookers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  1. Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Resistance Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sets federal efficiency...

  2. Covered Product Category: Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial refrigerators and freezers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  3. 00 cover com_tech

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2A en NGSI Safeguardssun 2-2 Figurepier

  4. Microsoft Word - Cover Sheet - 020711

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis and FeedbackProgrammatic5154:9:CMRR-NF

  5. Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Lan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who...

  6. Quantifying Vegetation Recovery on Santa Rosa Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rentschlar, Elizabeth

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of recovery on barrier islands after hurricanes is not well understood, because the majority of studies have focused on the geomorphic impact of storms on barrier islands. Dune vegetation recovery is a vital component of barrier island...

  7. Safe Storage of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper storage of fresh fruits and vegetables can help consumers avoid foodborne illness. This publication explains how to safely store apples, bananas, berries, beets, broccoli, carrots, corn, grapes, herbs, lettuce and greens, melons, nectarines...

  8. Nonlinear Characteristics of Wave Propagation over Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkattaramanan, Aravinda

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The attenuation of wave energy by submerged or near-emergent coastal vegetation is one of the prominent methods of energy dissipation in areas with significant presence of wetlands. In this thesis, the nature of this dissipation in nearshore random...

  9. The limited growth of vegetated shear layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghisalberti, M.

    In contrast to free shear layers, which grow continuously downstream, shear layers generated by submerged vegetation grow only to a finite thickness. Because these shear layers are characterized by coherent vortex structures ...

  10. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center of the uncertainties with climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems is understanding where transitions

  11. Interdisciplinary Pest Management Potentials of Cover Cropping Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachie, Oli Gurmu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cover Crops: Cowpea, Sunn Hemp, and Velvetbean. HottscienceCover Crops: Cowpea, Sunn Hemp, and Velvetbean. Hottsciencethan grasses using sun hemp mulches. While cover cropping

  12. Safe Handling of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    *Program Specialist, The Texas A&M System Fresh fruits and vegetables are an important part of a healthful diet. They provide vitamins, minerals and fiber to help keep your body healthy. Occasionally, fresh fruits and vegetables can become... contaminated with harmful bacteria or viruses, which are also known as pathogens. Examples of pathogens include Salmonella, E. coli 0157:H7 and Hepatitis A. This contamination can occur at any point from the field to your table. If eaten, contaminated...

  13. Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. D EPARTMENT OF COMM ER CE Great Lakes Ice Cover facts since 1973 - 94.7% ice coverage in 1979 is the maximum on record - 9.5% ice coverage in 2002 is the lowest on record - 11.5% ice coverage in 1998, a strong El Nino

  14. Automated delineation of debris-covered glaciers based on ASTER data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    Automated delineation of debris-covered glaciers based on ASTER data Tobias Bolch, Manfred F, The University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59808, USA, ulrich.kamp@mso.umt.edu Keywords: debris-covered glaciers, glacier mapping, morphometric analysis, ASTER DEM, Corona, Khumbu Himalaya ABSTRACT: Large areas

  15. Deployment of an alternative cover and final closure of the Mixed Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); McVey, Michael David (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Borns, David James

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative cover design consisting of a monolithic layer of native soil is proposed as the closure path for the Mixed Waste Landfill at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The proposed design would rely upon soil thickness and evapotranspiration to provide long-term performance and stability, and would be inexpensive to build and maintain. The proposed design is a 3-ft-thick, vegetated soil cover. The alternative cover meets the intent of RCRA Subtitle C regulations in that: (a) water migration through the cover is minimized; (b) maintenance is minimized by using a monolithic soil layer; (c) cover erosion is minimized by using erosion control measures; (d) subsidence is accommodated by using a ''soft'' design; and (e) the permeability of the cover is less than or equal to that of natural subsurface soil present. Performance of the proposed cover is integrated with natural site conditions, producing a ''system performance'' that will ensure that the cover is protective of human health and the environment. Natural site conditions that will produce a system performance include: (a) extremely low precipitation and high potential evapotranspiration; (b) negligible recharge to groundwater; (c) an extensive vadose zone; (d) groundwater approximately 500 ft below the surface; and (e) a versatile, native flora that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance.

  16. Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

  17. Geomorphic controls on hydrology and vegetation in an arid basin: Turkana district, northern Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppinger, K.D.; Doehring, D.O.; Schimel, D.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a broad ecological study of Kenyan pastoralist adaptation to periodic drought, a study was done to determine how arid region geomorphology affects hydrology and subsequently vegetative patterns. In this study area, 100 kilometers south of Lake Turkana, it appears that irregular precipitation is stored in bajada sediments and is available to deeply rooted vegetation over long periods of time. This vegetation provides a relatively constant food source for people's herds of browsers, the camels and goats, whereas cattle, which graze mainly on grasses, are significant producers only during wet seasons. Field observations suggest that the mountain and abutting pediment soils are too shallow to store appreciable water. However, greater quantities of water are stored in the deeper bajada sediments adjacent to the pediment where pastoralists dig temporary wells in ephemeral channels during wet seasons. Density of tree growth is greater along channels, and highest canopy cover values are found about the pediment-bajada interface. Geohydrologic processes in this area provide the basis for continuous occupation by the desert people, in contrast to recurring famines in adjacent areas, by enhancing the growth of woody vegetation.

  18. Features . . . Cover Crop Value to Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    .............................................................................................Page 6 Fuel Prices Projections - Encouraging News .......................Page 7 Agronomy Notes VolumeFeatures . . . Cotton Cover Crop Value to Cotton Cotton Price and Rotation ..............................................................Page 5 Miscellaneous Large differences in nitrogen prices.......................................Page 6

  19. Combining MSS and AVHRR imagery to assess vegetation biomass and dynamics in an arid pastoral ecosystem, Turkana District, Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, J.E.; Swift, D.M.; Hart, T.C.; Dick, O.B.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landsat multi-spectral scanner (MSS) imagery was used to develop a vegetation type-biomass map of the 84,000 Km/sup 2/ Turkana District, Kenya. NOAA satellite advanced very high resolution radiometry (AVHRR) imagery was overlaid on the MSS map to trace the seasonal and annual dynamics of vegetation communities used by Turkana pastoral nomads, 1981-1984. Four regions (sub-sectional territories) were compared with respect to peak herbaceous biomass, woody canopy cover, and seasonal fluxes in total green biomass. Results demonstrated major variations among regions and between wet and dry season ranges within regions. Pastoral land use patterns appear to minimize effects of seasonal vegetation fluxes on livestock herds.

  20. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ennis, Mike J [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have helped to fuel their resurgence in industrial and urban settings. There are many environmental and economical benefits that can be realized by incorporating a vegetative roof into the design of a building. These include storm-water retention, energy conservation, reduction in the urban heat island effect, increased longevity of the roofing membrane, the ability of plants to create biodiversity and filter air contaminants, and beautification of the surroundings by incorporating green space. The vegetative roof research project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was initiated to quantify the thermal performance of various vegetative roofing systems relative to black and white roofs. Single Ply Roofing Institute (SPRI) continued its long-term commitment to cooperative research with ORNL in this project. Low-slope roof systems for this study were constructed and instrumented for continuous monitoring in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. This report summarizes the results of the annual cooling and heating loads per unit area of three vegetative roofing systems with side-by-side comparison to black and white roofing systems as well as a test section with just the growing media without plants. Results showed vegetative roofs reduced heat gain (reduced cooling loads) compared to the white control system due to the thermal mass, extra insulation, and evapo-transpiration associated with the vegetative roofing systems. The 4-inch and tray systems reduced the heat gain by approximately 61%, while the reduction with the 8-inch vegetative roof was found to be approximately 67%. The vegetative roofing systems were more effective in reducing heat gain than in reducing heat losses (heating loads). The reduction in heat losses for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 40% in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. It should be noted that these values are climate dependent. Vegetative roofs also reduced the temperature (heat exposure) and temperature fluctuations (thermal stress) experienced by the membrane. In the cooling season of East Tennessee, the average peak temperature of the 4-inch and tray systems was found to be approximately 94 F cooler than the control black roofing system. The average temperature fluctuations at the membrane for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 10 F compared to 125 F for black and 64 F for white systems. As expected, the 8-inch vegetative roof had the lowest fluctuations at approximately 2 F. Future work will include modeling of the energy performance of vegetative roof panels in the test climate of East Tennessee. The validated model then will be used to predict energy use in roofs with different insulation levels and in climates different from the test climate.

  1. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  2. Postdoctoral research associate position on vegetation remote sensing at the Free University of Berlin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to 100% of the German TV-L13 salary scale. Title of the post Analysis of global maps of terrestrial vegetation: part of the energy absorbed by chlorophyll is not used for carbon fixation but emitted at longer of GOSAT-FTS spaceborne measurements in the 750-770 nm window. Solar Fraunhofer lines superposed to the Fs

  3. A Water Balance Study of Four Landfill Cover Designs at Material Disposal Area B in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David D. Breshears; Fairley J. Barnes; John W. Nyhan; Johnny A. Salazar

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of disposing of low-level radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose an unacceptable hazard. In order to achieve this, the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Program is comparing the performance of several different surface covers at Material Disposal Area (MDA) B in Los Alamos. Two conventional landfill were compared with an improved cover designed to minimize plant and animal intrusion and to minimize water infiltration into the underlying wastes. The conventional covers varied in depth and both conventional and improved designs had different combinations of vegetation (grass verses shrub) and gravel mulch (no mulch verses mulch). These treatments were applied to each of 12 plots and water balance parameters were measured from March1987 through June 1995. Adding a gravel mulch significantly influenced the plant covered field plots receiving no gravel mulch averaged 21.2% shrub cover, while plots with gravel had a 20% larger percent cover of shrubs. However, the influence of gravel mulch on the grass cover was even larger than the influence on shrub cover, average grass cover on the plots with no gravel was 16.3%, compared with a 42% increase in grass cover due to gravel mulch. These cover relationships are important to reduce runoff on the landfill cover, as shown by a regression model that predicts that as ground cover is increased from 30 to 90%,annual runoff is reduced from 8.8 to 0.98 cm-a nine-fold increase. We also found that decreasing the slope of the landfill cover from 6 to 2% reduced runoff from the landfill cover by 2.7-fold. To minimize the risk of hazardous waste from landfills to humans, runoff and seepage need to be minimized and evapotranspiration maximized on the landfill cover. This has to be accomplished for dry and wet years at MDA B. Seepage consisted of 1.9% and 6.2% of the precipitation in the average and once in ten year events, respectively, whereas corresponding values for runoff were 13% and 16%; these changes were accompanied by corresponding decreases in evapotranspiration, which accounted for 86% and only 78% of the precipitation occurring on the average and once in ten year even~ respectively.

  4. Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Kastens, M.K.; Sheader, L.R.L. [Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Grand Junction, CO (United States); Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States); Mushovic, P.S. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collaborated on the design and monitoring of an alternative cover for the Monticello uranium mill tailings disposal cell, a Superfund site in southeastern Utah. Ground-water recharge is naturally limited at sites like Monticello where thick, fine-textured soils store precipitation until evaporation and plant transpiration seasonally return it to the atmosphere. The cover at Monticello uses local soils and a native plant community to mimic the natural soil water balance. The cover is fundamentally an evapotranspiration (ET) design with a capillary barrier. A 3-hectare drainage lysimeter was embedded in the cover during construction of the disposal cell in 2000. The lysimeter consists of a geo-membrane liner below the capillary barrier that directs percolation water to a monitoring system. Soil water storage is determined by integration of point water content measurements. Meteorological parameters are measured nearby. Plant cover, shrub density, and leaf area index (LAI) are monitored annually. The cover performed well over the 7-year monitoring period (2000-2007). The cumulative percolation was 4.2 mm (0.6 mm yr{sup -1}), satisfying an EPA goal of an average percolation of <3.0 mm yr{sup -1}. Almost all percolation can be attributed to the exceptionally wet winter and spring of 2004-2005 when soil water content slightly exceeded the water storage capacity of the cover. The diversity, percent cover, and LAI of vegetation increased over the monitoring period, although the density of native shrubs that extract water from deeper in the cover has remained less than revegetation targets. DOE and EPA are applying the monitoring results to plan for long-term surveillance and maintenance and to evaluate alternative cover designs for other waste disposal sites. (authors)

  5. Easy Gardening.....Harvesting and Handling Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam; Masabni, Joseph; Wagner, Al

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Easy Gardening Joseph Masabni, Assistant Professor and Extension Horticulturist, The Texas A&M University System HARVESTING ? HANDLING ? STORING VEGETABLES -1- T ohelpensurethatthevegetables yougrowandprepareareofhigh quality.... Acknowledgments Thispublicationwasrevisedfromearlierversionswrittenby SamCotner,ProfessorEmeritusandformerExtension Horticulturist,andAlWagner,formerProfessorand ExtensionHorticulturist. -6- Produced by AgriLife Communications, The Texas A&M System Extension...

  6. Bringing fruit, vegetaBle and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molinari, Marc

    and the Canary Islands do not count as being part of the EU. P P fruits vegetables plant products #12; travelling, Canary Islands, Ceuta, Croatia, Cyprus (the area not effectively controlled by the Government the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands) For these purposes, EU countries also include: Andorra

  7. Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

  8. Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations Jozsef Szilagyi1 Abstract: Multiyear Seevers and Ottmann 1994; Nicholson et al. 1996; Sz- ilagyi et al. 1998; Szilagyi and Parlange 1999; Szilagyi 2000 . Different authors drew differing conclusions about the appli- cability of NDVI to estimate

  9. Influence of physiography and vegetation on small mammals at the Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cypher, B.L.

    1995-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Influence of physiography and vegetation on small mammal abundance and species Composition was investigated at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California to assess prey abundance for Federally endangered San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and to assess the distribution of two Federal candidate species, San Joaquin antelope squirrels (Ammospermophilus nelsoni) and short-nosed kangaroo rats (Dinodomys nitratoides brevinasus). The specific objectives of this investigation were to determine whether small mammal abundance and community composition varied with north-south orientation, terrain, ground cover, and Cypher shrub density, and whether these factors influenced the distribution and abundance of San Joaquin antelope squirrels and short-nosed kangaroo rats.

  10. Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

  11. Momentum and scalar transport in vegetated shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghisalberti, Marco (Marco Andrea), 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental aquatic flows are seldom free of vegetative influence. However, the impact of submerged vegetation on the hydrodynamics and mixing processes in aquatic flows remains poorly understood. In this thesis, I present ...

  12. Multi-Spectral imaging of vegetation for detecting CO2 leaking from underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouse, J.H.; Shaw, J.A.; Lawrence, R.L.; Lewicki, J.L.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.S.; Spangler, L.H.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration will require long-term monitoring for detection of possible leakage back into the atmosphere. One potential monitoring method is multi-spectral imaging of vegetation reflectance to detect leakage through CO{sub 2}-induced plant stress. A multi-spectral imaging system was used to simultaneously record green, red, and near-infrared (NIR) images with a real-time reflectance calibration from a 3-m tall platform, viewing vegetation near shallow subsurface CO{sub 2} releases during summers 2007 and 2008 at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology field site in Bozeman, Montana. Regression analysis of the band reflectances and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index with time shows significant correlation with distance from the CO{sub 2} well, indicating the viability of this method to monitor for CO{sub 2} leakage. The 2007 data show rapid plant vigor degradation at high CO{sub 2} levels next to the well and slight nourishment at lower, but above-background CO{sub 2} concentrations. Results from the second year also show that the stress response of vegetation is strongly linked to the CO{sub 2} sink-source relationship and vegetation density. The data also show short-term effects of rain and hail. The real-time calibrated imaging system successfully obtained data in an autonomous mode during all sky and daytime illumination conditions.

  13. Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at radioactive-waste disposal Area G during the 1994 growing season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Biggs, J.B.; Bennett, K.D.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overstory (pinon pine) and understory (grass and forb) vegetation samples were collected within and around selected points at Area G-a low-level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory-for the analysis of tritium ({sup 3}H), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238} Pu and {sup 239}Pu), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), americium ({sup 241}Am), and total uranium. In general, most vegetation samples collected within and around Area G contained radionuclide levels in higher concentrations than vegetation collected from background areas. Tritium, in particular, was detected as high as 5,800 pCi/mL in overstory vegetation collected outside the fence just west of the tritium shafts; this suggests that tritium is migrating from this waste repository through subsurface pathways. Also, understory vegetation collected north of the transuranic (TRU) pads (outside the fence of Area G) contained the highest values of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am, and may be a result of surface holding, storage, or disposal activities.

  14. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

  15. Covered Product Category: Light Fixtures (Luminaires)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including luminaires, or light fixtures. The luminaires product category is very broad and covers a wide variety of lighting products. Both ENERGY STAR® and FEMP provide programmatic guidance for various types of luminaires. See table 2 for more information about which types of light fixtures are covered by which program (FEMP or ENERGY STAR). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  16. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  17. Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data. Abstract Creation of accurate vegetation maps from optical satellite data requires use of reference data to aid

  18. Improving vegetable preference and consumption among preschool children: evaluating results from an educational intervention using vegetable gardening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Saundra Gail

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's exposure to a variety of vegetables through the incorporation of weekly gardening supplemented with classroom activities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of vegetable gardening to improve preschool children's affective responses...

  19. Gully potential in soil-covered uranium waste impoundments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abt, S.R. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Pauley, C.J. (Simons, Li, Associates Inc., Phoenix, AZ (United States)); Hogan, S.A. (Lidstone Anderson, Inc., Fort Collins, CO (United States)); Johnson, T.L. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil covers are routinely considered a design alternative to stabilize uranium waste impoundments. Gully intrusion into the cover is one of the greatest potential threats to the long-term stability of an impoundment. An investigation was conducted to estimate the maximum depth of gully intrusion, the approximate top width of the gully at the point of maximum incision, and the approximate location of the maximum intrusion. A large-scale laboratory study was conducted on seven embankments in which approximately 200 years of rainfall was simulated and the resulting gullies were documented. In addition, 11 gullies occurring in actual reclaimed impoundments were documented. An analysis of the laboratory and field data sets was performed in which the maximum depth of gully incision, top width of the gully, and location of the maximum gully incision were related to the pile height, tributary volume of runoff, and soil composition. These relations provide the designers with a means for assessing the cover design to meet the long-term stability of the waste.

  20. Cover Image: The cover shows the crystal structure of the alanate NaAlH4,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of materials, hydrogen "encapsulates" Al to form a hydrogen-rich anion, AlH4 -, whose structure resembles is encapsulated by metal ions, and the hydrogen density is correspondingly lower. In the cover image, the diameter) - p13 (top): The estimated power output from 10% efficient solar cells covering 1.7% of the land area

  1. On Covering Points with Conics and Strips in the Plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, Praveen 1985-

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Geometric covering problems have always been of focus in computer scientific research. The generic geometric covering problem asks to cover a set S of n objects with another set of objects whose cardinality is minimum, in a geometric setting. Many...

  2. ?Aceite Vegetal Puro Como Combustible Diesel? (Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? Spanish Version) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

  3. 1CHANCELLOR'S REPORT 20112012 On the cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Renewable Energy Fueled by a Cell1CHANCELLOR'S REPORT 2011­2012 #12;2 On the cover Examining the role that marine microbes play and Education (C-MORE) at the University of Hawai`i at Mnoa. The first of its kind to focus on microbes, C

  4. Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial gas water heaters, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  5. Corn Ethanol -April 2006 11 Cover Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Corn Ethanol - April 2006 11 Cover Story orn ethanol is the fuel du jour. It's domestic. It oil into gasoline or diesel fuel. Ethanol refineries also use huge amounts of water. An average dry's not oil. Ethanol's going to help promote "energy independence." Magazines trumpet it as the motor vehicle

  6. Marine Fisheries On the cover, top to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Fisheries ~@WD@W On the cover, top to bollom: Yelloweye rock fish, Sebastes ruberrimus Maturity and Fecundity in the Rockfishes, Sebastes spp., a Review Joy Clark, Wade Griffin, Jerry Clark.25 foreign. Publication of material from sources outside the NMFS is not an endorsement and the NMFS

  7. Covered Product Category: Refrigerated Beverage Vending Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including refrigerated beverage vending machines, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  8. Representing the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics by ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    dynamics by ecosystem models applied to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau S. Yi,1 N. Li,2 B. Xiang,3 X. Wang,1 B. In ecosystem, permafrost, and hydrology models, the consideration of soil surface temperature is generally and atmospheric factors on the estimation of soil surface temperature for alpine grassland ecosystems

  9. Using LiDAR and normalized difference vegetation index to remotely determine LAI and percent canopy cover at varying scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Alicia Marie Rutledge

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) as a direct method to evaluate forest canopy parameters is vital in addressing both forest management and ecological concerns. The overall goal of this study was to develop the use of airborne...

  10. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base...

  11. TOWER OF COVERINGS OF QUASI-PROJECTIVE VARIETIES ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    on a tower of coverings of a non-compact Kähler manifold of finite volume with reasonable geometric assumptions to its universal covering. Applicable examples ...

  12. Microsoft Word - 00_Cover_Vol_I.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water quality, geology and soils, transportation, air quality, noise, climate change, fish, vegetation and wetlands, wildlife, power production and energy, aesthetic and visual...

  13. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76 George A. Leshkevich.2 Data Analysis 2 3. DATA PRESENTATION 4 3.1 Freezing Degree-Days 4 3.2 Composite Ice Charts 4 4. DISCUSSION 4 4.1 Winter Characteristics 4 4.2 General Seasonal Trends in Ice-Cover Distribution 5 4.3 Lake

  14. How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs.

  15. E-print Network Topics: V

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cells vegetative compatibility groups vegetative compatibility types vegetative covers umtra vegetative cutting capacity vegetative filter strips vegetative growth yield...

  16. Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

  17. Formation and character of an ancient 19-m ice cover and underlying trapped brine in an ``ice-sealed'' east

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    Formation and character of an ancient 19-m ice cover and underlying trapped brine in an ``ice bed year-round. New ice-core analysis and tempera- ture data show that beneath 19 m of ice is a water°C. The ice cover thickens at both its base and surface, sealing concentrated brine beneath. The ice

  18. Pine Straw as a Ground Cover Mulch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Tate, Jay

    2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    , or half a pound of straw per square foot. An additional inch of pine straw may be applied each year for best appearance. A 40-pound bale will typically cover about 100 square feet (a 10- by 10-foot bed) to a 2-inch depth. For the same amount of coverage... using pine straw may be $1.60 to $4.60 per 10- by 10- foot bed (or 1.6? to 4.6? per square foot). Texas pine straw is available mainly to landscap- ers, but a retail market is developing and it will likely become more available at garden centers...

  19. Journal Cover Gallery | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as Ready for(SC)JointJournal Cover Gallery Image

  20. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks to climate in Earth system models.

  1. arctic vegetation amplify: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamics in arctic vegetation Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the...

  2. african vegetation phenology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rainy season. Further research is needed to address interaction between groundwater under climate change. 1. Introduction "Vegetation phenology" refers to the periodic biological...

  3. african vegetation fires: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vegetation and climate change recorded in alpine bog sediments from the Borreguiles de la Virgen, Sierra Nevada, southern Spain Geosciences Websites Summary: to heating of the...

  4. Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH...

  5. ambiental ceniza vegetal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    roadside vegetation management policies and practices include the encouragement of quick plant growth after construction (to avoid soil erosion), the control of invasive species,...

  6. affects arabidopsis vegetative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The vegetation reacts with changes in species composition and a decrease in biodiversity. Artificial snowing modifies some of these impacts: The soil frost is mitigated due to an...

  7. arctic vegetation damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gradient. Here we examine the complex interrelationships between patterned ground, climate, vegetation and soil along a north-south transect through all five bioclimate...

  8. anthropogenic vegetation fires: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    types of input needed in the development of fire management programs for mediterranean climate on the vegetation in the mediterranean region of France. Vlez carries this...

  9. arctic tundra vegetation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of woody vegetation in arctic tundra? Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: 33124, USA. Global climate warming is projected to promote the increase of woody plants, especially of...

  10. EIS-0285-SA-07: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and proposed new sections of the McNary-Roundup and the McNary Switchyard South Transmission lines. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program...

  11. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The subject corridor traverses, rural, industrial forestlands and State Department of Forestry lands. Landowners were notified of the upcoming work by letters. In addition homes...

  12. Biodiversity Analysis of Vegetation on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. J. Hansen

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) located in south central Nevada encompasses approximately 3,561 square kilometers and straddles two major North American deserts, Mojave and Great Basin. Transitional areas between the two desert types have been created by gradients in elevation, precipitation, temperature, and soils. From 1996-1998, more than 1,500 ecological landform units were sampled at the NTS for numerous biotic and abiotic parameters. These data provide a basis for spatial evaluations of biodiversity over landscape scales at the NTS. Species diversity maps (species richness vs. species abundance) have been produced. Differences in ecosystem diversity at the ecoregion, alliance, association, and ecological landform unit levels are presented. Spatial distribution maps of species presence and abundance provide evidence of where transition zones occur and the resulting impact on biodiversity. The influences of abiotic factors (elevation, soil, precipitation) and anthropogenic disturbance on biodiversity are assessed.

  13. Process analysis and optimization of biodiesel production from vegetable oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myint, Lay L.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dwindling resources of fossil fuels coupled with the steady increase in energy consumption have spurred research interest in alternative and renewable energy sources. Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternatives for fossil fuels. It can...

  14. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    needed as follow-up to treat misses and any other re-growth from 2-3 years after initial treatment. Noxious weed treatments may be needed at this time. Future cycles - As tall...

  15. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-135 Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ____________________________________________________________________________ Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Update: Winters 2003, 2004, and 2005 Raymond A. Assel NOAA, Great..................................................................................................6 DATES OF FIRST (LAST) ICE AND ICE DURATION. .............................................................7 SEASONAL PROGRESSION OF ICE COVER

  16. "Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News "Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab "Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab By the end of the century, the woodlands...

  17. Managing Insect and Mite Pests in Vegetable Gardens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, John A.

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing your own vegetables is a pleasant and satisfying way to enjoy nature and save money. But managing garden pest populations in the vegetable garden isn't always easy. This publication discusses ways to accomplish that goal. 38 pages and 3...

  18. Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

  19. INTRODUCTION 1. The phrase `continuous cover forestry' has featured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INTRODUCTION 1. The phrase `continuous cover forestry' has featured increasingly in discussions about the future management of British forests. For example, The UK forestry standard (Forestry cover forestry system and to build them into the forest design'. `Continuous cover' is defined

  20. CLOUD COVER REPORTING BIAS AT MAJOR AIRPORTS Richard Perez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    CLOUD COVER REPORTING BIAS AT MAJOR AIRPORTS Richard Perez Joshua A. Bonaventura-Sparagna & Marek Kmiecik ASRC, SUNY, Albany, NY Ray George & David Renné NREL, Golden, CO ABSTRACT Cloud cover has been generated all or in part from cloud cover measurements [1,2]. This paper presents evidence

  1. Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

  2. Effects of roller-chopping and shredding, a herbicide, and prescribed burning on vegetation of the Rio Grande Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtz, Stephen Theodore

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and soils. Vegetation Ri story of' land use. NETj. . ODS . R I Si ji, I S I? r e-S Li, dy Treatment s . 1'joody Soecies Composition P:jant density. Stem density, lier. "baceous Vege Lation. Basal cover Page 13 75 '? 5 ?'7 77 Species... that, the general area has an average yearly ra'r&fa11 of' about 50 inches (l'ig. 1). This verage is not truly indicative of the rainfall because of the extreme annua7 fluctuations. Records indic te that the variation hes 'been from a low of 9. r...

  3. ForPeerReview From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ForPeerReview Only From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to polyols and main Auvergne, Remi; ICGM CAILLOL, Sylvain; ICGM, IAM Boutevin, Bernard; ICGM Keywords: vegetable oils, biobased polyols, polyurethanes, epoxidized vegetable oils, commercial polyols URL: http

  4. Interactions among flow, sediment deposition and aquatic vegetation in a channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong, Lijun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquatic vegetation is commonly present in rivers in many forms. This thesis consists of two studies, which examine the flow structure around a patch of emergent, rigid vegetation in a laboratory channel. The vegetation ...

  5. Design of top covers supporting aerobic in situ stabilization of old landfills - An experimental simulation in lysimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrad, Marlies [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Huber-Humer, Marion, E-mail: marion.huber-humer@boku.ac.at [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Wimmer, Bernhard; Reichenauer, Thomas G. [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Konrad-Lorenz-Strasse 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tested engineered covers as surrogate to gas extraction during and after in situ aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined how covers influence gas emissions, water balance and leachate generation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated effect of top covers on air-distribution in waste mass during aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We suggest criteria and cover design to meet the demands during and after aeration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such cover systems may offer greenhouse gas emission reduction also after active aeration. - Abstract: Landfill aeration by means of low pressure air injection is a promising tool to reduce long term emissions from organic waste fractions through accelerated biological stabilization. Top covers that enhance methane oxidation could provide a simple and economic way to mitigate residual greenhouse gas emissions from in situ aerated landfills, and may replace off-gas extraction and treatment, particularly at smaller and older sites. In this respect the installation of a landfill cover system adjusted to the forced-aerated landfill body is of great significance. Investigations into large scale lysimeters (2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Multiplication-Sign 3 m) under field conditions have been carried out using different top covers including compost materials and natural soils as a surrogate to gas extraction during active low pressure aeration. In the present study, the emission behaviour as well as the water balance performance of the lysimeters has been investigated, both prior to and during the first months of in situ aeration. Results reveal that mature sewage sludge compost (SSC) placed in one lysimeter exhibits in principle optimal ambient conditions for methanotrophic bacteria to enhance methane oxidation. Under laboratory conditions the mature compost mitigated CH{sub 4} loadings up to 300 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d. In addition, the compost material provided high air permeability even at 100% water holding capacity (WHC). In contrast, the more cohesive, mineral soil cover was expected to cause a notably uniform distribution of the injected air within the waste layer. Laboratory results also revealed sufficient air permeability of the soil materials (TS-F and SS-Z) placed in lysimeter C. However, at higher compaction density SS-Z became impermeable at 100% WHC. Methane emissions from the reference lysimeter with the smaller substrate cover (12-52 g CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d) were significantly higher than fluxes from the other lysimeters (0-19 g CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} d) during in situ aeration. Regarding water balance, lysimeters covered with compost and compost-sand mixture, showed the lowest leachate rate (18-26% of the precipitation) due to the high water holding capacity and more favourable plant growth conditions compared to the lysimeters with mineral, more cohesive, soil covers (27-45% of the precipitation). On the basis of these results, the authors suggest a layered top cover system using both compost material as well as mineral soil in order to support active low-pressure aeration. Conventional soil materials with lower permeability may be used on top of the landfill body for a more uniform aeration of the waste due to an increased resistance to vertical gas flow. A compost cover may be built on top of the soil cover underlain by a gas distribution layer to improve methane oxidation rates and minimise water infiltration. By planting vegetation with a high transpiration rate, the leachate amount emanating from the landfill could be further minimised. The suggested design may be particularly suitable in combination with intermittent in situ aeration, in the later stage of an aeration measure, or at very small sites and shallow deposits. The top cover system could further regulate water infiltration into the landfill and mitigate residual CH{sub 4} emissions, even beyond the time of active aeration.

  6. This page intentionally blank. ON THE COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIGHLIGHTS CONDENSED MATTER 8 Structural collapse and high-temperature superconductivity in iron-pnictide Ca and mechanical damage in gas pipelines, T. Gnäupel-Herold, et al. 26 Nano-void volume linked to sensitivity activation analysis, I.J. Kim, et al. 49 Directly probing anisotropy gradients using polarized

  7. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  8. Fresh Vegetables: Getting the Most Nutrition for Your Money

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    be poisonous. E-28 5-00 Fresh Vegetables Getting the Most Nutrition For Your Money By Jenna Anding* *Extension Nutrition Specialist, The Texas A&M University System. If there is a concern about the presence of contaminants on the vegetables, simply peel off... the skin. Keep in mind that peeling reduces nutritional value. P r e p a c ka g e d, prewashed vegetables like lettuce and baby carrots should be rinsed before they are eaten just in case any con- tamination occurred during processing or packaging. If you...

  9. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  10. Lysimeter study of vegetative uptake from saltstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1990-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Savannah River Site, liquid, low-level nuclear waste will be disposed of by incorporating the waste in concrete, a wasteform called saltstone. Saltstone monoliths will then be buried in the earth. To study the potential uptake of radionuclides by trees and other plants growing in the soil in the area containing buried saltstone, a lysimeter study has been in progress since 1984. Thirty two lysimeters were designed, constructed, and filled with soil. Saltstone samples, containing the liquid, low-level supernate from the tank 50 in-tank precipitation demonstration, were buried in some of the lysimeters. Other lysimeters, not containing saltstone, were used as controls. Crops, grass, and trees were planted in the lysimeters and sampled periodically to determine radionuclide concentrations. Water samples were also collected from the lysimeter sumps and analyzed for radionuclide content. This report documents the results of vegetative and lysimeter sump water measurements from the beginning of the project in November of 1984 through September of 1989. 6 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. EIS-0097: Bonneville Power Administration Transmission Facilities Vegetation Management Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic implications of various alternatives associated with implementing a vegetation management program.

  12. Columbia River Gorge Vegetation Management Project Final Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    appreciate your addressing in the assessment '" . 1. Chemical Maintenance Off right+f-way mortality- i.e, how willBPA insure that no impacts will result to vegetation and prope...

  13. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Salt Marsh Vegetation across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daehyun

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeographic patterns across a landscape are developed by the interplay of environmental processes operating at different spatial and temporal scales. This research investigated dynamics of salt marsh vegetation on the Skallingen salt marsh...

  14. Flow-induced reconfiguration of buoyant and flexible aquatic vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Plant posture can play a key role in the health of aquatic vegetation, by setting drag, controlling light availability, and mediating the exchange of nutrients and oxygen. We study the flow-induced reconfiguration of ...

  15. Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

  16. Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley...

  17. Spatial distribution of deposition within a patch of vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong, Lijun

    This laboratory study describes the spatial pattern of deposition observed in a patch of vegetation located at the wall of a channel. There are two sources of sediment flux to the patch: the advection of particles across ...

  18. Flow and Transport in Regions with Aquatic Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    This review describes mean and turbulent flow and mass transport in the presence of aquatic vegetation. Within emergent canopies, the turbulent length scales are set by the stem diameter and spacing, and the mean flow is ...

  19. Final Report of the NPS Vegetation Mapping Project at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    1 Final Report of the NPS Vegetation Mapping Project at Fire Island National Seashore Scott DServe Julie Lundgren The Nature Conservancy April 2002 CMI-GRS ­02-03 Conservation Management Institute GIS

  20. Vegetative trends in a young conifer plantation after 10 years of grazing by sheep. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An 11-year-old ponderosa pine (pinus pronderosa) plantation in northern California was grazed annually in summer by 600-1150 dry (nonlactating) ewes in an attempt to reduce competing vegetation and increase growth of pine seedlings. The sheep also provided an opportunity to evaluate density and developmental trends in the pine, shrub, grass, thistle, and forb components of the plant community. A manual release and a deer-only treatment provided contrast to the effects of grazing by sheep. In general, stem diameter and foliar cover of ponderosa pines, rarely damaged by sheep or deer, were significantly greater in manually grubbed areas, but only after 8 years. Pines in grazed areas never differed significantly in height, stem diameter, or foliar cover from control areas. Density, cover, and height of deerbrush (Ceanothus integerrimus) were generally fewer and lower it grubbed and grazed, but grass and bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare) were larger and more numerous in these treatments. Forb cover was highest in the grubbed treatment.

  1. Feasible and accurate algorithms for covering semidefinite programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garud Iyengar

    2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 2, 2010 ... Abstract: In this paper we describe an algorithm to approximately solve a class of semidefinite programs called covering semidefinite programs.

  2. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for gas storage...

  3. Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water-Cooled Electric Chillers Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal...

  4. Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition...

  5. Covered Product Category: Air-Cooled Ice Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for air-cooled ice machines, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  6. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Lightweighting Materials - Cover and Contents Overview of LightweightingMaterials: Past, Present and FutureMaterials 2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials...

  7. First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    website. Addthis Related Articles First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure Hydropower Still in the Mix First-Ever Demonstration of Quantum...

  8. Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Pump Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal...

  9. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

  10. Woody vegetation of the lower Navasota River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Harriet Louise Gell

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WOODY VEGETATION OF THE LOWER NAVASOTA RIVER WATERSHED A Thesis by DIl 5~ HARRIET ?GELL ALLEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1974 Major Subject: Range Science WOODY VEGETATION OF THE LOWER NAVASOTA RIVER WATERSHED A Thesis by HARRIET GELL ALLEN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1974...

  11. CY09 ASER TTR Cover.indd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg U.S. S p e c t i R y R

  12. Microsoft Word - Cover Sheet.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis and FeedbackProgrammatic5154:9:CMRR-NF1, Book

  13. Influence of metal process micronic and submicronic particles on vegetables quality and ecosystems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sativa) and parsley (Petroselinum crispum), vegetables currently cultivated in kitchen gardens with high

  14. Landfill cover revegetation using organic amendments and cobble mulch in the arid southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AGUILAR,RICHARD; DWYER,STEPHEN F.; REAVIS,BRUCE A.; NEWMAN,GRETCHEN CARR; LOFTIN,SAMUEL R.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cobble mulch and composted biosolids, greenwaste, and dairy manure were added to arid soil in an attempt to improve plant establishment and production, minimize erosion, increase evapotranspiration, and reduce leaching. Twenty-four plots (10 x 10 m) were established in a completely randomized block design (8 treatments, 3 plots per treatment). Treatments included (1) non-irrigated control, (2) irrigated control, (3) non-irrigated greenwaste compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (4) irrigated greenwaste compost (5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (5) non-irrigated biosolids compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (6) irrigated biosolids compost (5 yd{sup 3} per plot), (7) cobble-mulch, and (8) non-irrigated dairy manure compost (2.5 yd{sup 3} per plot). Soil samples were collected from each plot for laboratory analyses to assess organic matter contents, macro-nutrient levels and trace metal contents, and nitrogen mineralization potential. All plots were seeded similarly with approximately equal portions of cool and warm season native grasses. The organic composts (greenwaste, biosolids, dairy manure) added to the soils substantially increased soil organic matter and plant nutrients including total nitrogen and phosphorus. However, the results of a laboratory study of the soils' nitrogen mineralization potential after the application of the various composts showed that the soil nitrogen-supplying capability decreased to non-amended soil levels by the start of the second growing season. Thus, from the standpoint of nitrogen fertilizer value, the benefits of the organic compost amendments appear to have been relatively short-lived. The addition of biosolids compost, however, did not produce significant changes in the soils' copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc concentrations and thus did not induce adverse environmental conditions due to excessive heavy metal concentrations. Supplemental irrigation water during the first and second growing seasons did not appear to increase plant biomass production in the irrigated control plots over that produced in the non-irrigated control plots. This surprising result was probably due to the cumulative effects of other factors that influenced the initial establishment and production of plants in the plots (e.g., plant species competition, seed germination delay times, differences in nutrient release and availability). Variation within individual plots, and among the three replicate plots associated with each treatment, rendered many of the recorded differences in vegetation establishment and production statistically insignificant. However, after two complete growing seasons the highest total plant foliar cover and the greatest biomass production and plant species diversity occurred in the cobble-mulched plots. These results suggest that cobble-mulch may be the desired amendment in re-vegetated arid landfill covers if the principal objectives are to quickly establish vegetation cover, stabilize the site from erosion, and increase water usage by plants, thereby reducing the potential for leaching and contaminant movement from the landfill's waste-bearing zone.

  15. A Computer Tutorial for Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Computer Tutorial for Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology R.A. ASSELL U.S. Department of Commerce tutorial was developed to provide an overview of the annual ~ r e a fLakes ice cycle. The tutorial includes an animation to aid in visualizing the normal seasonal progression and the spatial patterns of ice cover

  16. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

    2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  17. INDICATOR: LAKE ERIE ICE COVER Winter ice cover on Lake Erie affects the amount of heat and moisture transferred

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    102 INDICATOR: LAKE ERIE ICE COVER Background Winter ice cover on Lake Erie affects the amount of heat and moisture transferred between the lake and the atmosphere. During winter, ice and snow can decrease the amount of light available below the ice surface for photosynthesis. In the absence of an ice

  18. Applicability of the “Gallet equation” to the vegetation clearances of NERC Reliability Standard FAC-003-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    NERC has proposed a standard to use to specify clearances between vegetation and power lines. The purpose of the rule is to reduce the probability of flashover to a calculably low level. This report was commissioned by FERC’s Office of Electrical Reliability. The scope of the study was analysis of the mathematics and documentation of the technical justification behind the application of the Gallet equation and the assumptions used in the technical reference paper

  19. CEES-Authored and Co-Authored Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cover S. A. Odom, M. M. Caruso, A. D. Finke, A. R. Prokup, J. A. Ritchey, J. R. Leonard, S. R. White, N. R. Sottos, and J. S. Moore, "Restoration of Conductivity with...

  20. MICHIGANSTATEUNIVERSITYTheGraduateSchool CoverLettersPhDCareerServices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are apply- ing to; conveying interest in the position and why you are interested. Essentials: Why you think for written credentials http://www.csp.msu.edu/resources-tools/index.html Resume/Cover Letters (Stanford

  1. Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Not) just your typical Lab spin off Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A Government Lab" Far from Silicon Valley, Descartes...

  2. Media Advisory: News Media invited to cover Feb. 10 Virginia...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Media invited to cover Feb. 10 Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl at Jefferson Lab; 19 teams competing January 30, 2007 The Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in...

  3. This overview covers: Connecting to a Chado Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    This overview covers: · Connecting to a Chado Database · Reading From the Database · iBatis Database Mapping · Gene Representation · Gene Building · Gene merging and splitting · Transfer Annotation Tool · Writing To The Database · Opening the Standalone Gene Builder · Community Annotation · Writing

  4. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2008 Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978...

  5. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies...

  6. Alternative barrier layers for surface covers in dry climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stormont, J.C.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface covers are one of the most widespread remediation and waste management options in all climates. Barrier layers to limit percolation through cover systems are principal features of engineered, multi-component cover designs. Conventional barrier layer components developed for humid climates have limitations in dry climates. One alternative barrier layer is a capillary barrier, which consists of a fine-over-coarse soil arrangement. The capacity of capillary barrier to laterally divert downward moving water is the key to their success. Another alternative is a dry barrier, in which atmospheric air is circulated through a coarse layer within the cover to remove water vapor. Incorporating a coarse layer which stores water for subsequent removal by air flow reduces the requirements for the air flow velocity and increases the applicability of the dry barrier.

  7. Effect of swell pressure on GCL cover stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, T.D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the importance of bentonite swell pressure on the stability of cover systems that incorporate a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL). The results of a one-dimensional swell test indicate that the field swell pressure of a needle-punched GCL ranges from 35 to 40 kPa. An effective normal stress at or near this swell pressure may be required to maximize the contact area between the GCL and geomembrane and increase the static and seismic stability of a GCL cover. Since an effective normal stress of 35 to 40 kPa is probably not practical and a soil cover is usually not immediately placed, it is recommended that free swell conditions be assumed for GCL shear testing and the slope be designed using the resulting shear strength parameters. Suggestions for modifying existing products to increase GCL cover stability are also presented.

  8. Growing Fall Vegetables and Annuals in South Central Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, Jerry; Cotner, Sam; Johnson, Jerral; Janne, Everett; Stewart, J. W.; Roberts, Roland; Johnson, Shirley

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetable Variety Selection.. . . . . .. .. . . .. .. .. 7 Micro-Gardens for Mini-Places ............... 18 Establishing Vegetables in Summer Heat ....... 8 Compost Pile Valuable ...................... 19 Watering...-Sept. 1 Radish Aug. 1-Nov. 1 Aug. 13-Nov. 25 Aug. 30-Dec. 1 Spinach Aug. 15-Sept. 30 Sept. 1-0ct. 15 Sept. 15-Dec. 1 Squash, summer July 30-Aug. 30 Aug. 13-Sept. 10 Sept. 1-0ct. 1 Squash, winter July 1-July 30 July 10-Aug. 10 Aug. 1-Sept. 1 Tomato...

  9. The heuristic solutions to a class of circle covering problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Nenghong Norman

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE HEURISTIC SOLUTIONS TO A CLASS OF CIRCLE COVERING PROBLEMS A Thesis by NENGHONG NORMAN GE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AIirM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THE HEURITIC SOLUTIONS TO A CLASS OF CIRCLE COVERING PROBLEMS A Th'esis by NENGHONE NORMAN GE Approved as to style and content by: Mi Lu (Chair. of Commirce& Norman Grisw ld (Member) Karan...

  10. Bed drain cover assembly for a fluidized bed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comparato, Joseph R. (Bloomfield, CT); Jacobs, Martin (Hartford, CT)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loose fitting movable cover plate (36), suitable for the severe service encountered in a fluidized bed combustor (10), restricts the flow of solids into the combustor drain lines (30) during shutdown of the bed. This cover makes it possible to empty spent solids from the bed drain lines which would otherwise plug the piping between the drain and the downstream metering device. This enables use of multiple drain lines each with a separate metering device for the control of solids flow rate.

  11. Treatment duration and time since disturbance affect vegetation development in a young California red fir plantation. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The density and development of greenleaf manzanita, snowbrush, goldenbush (rabbitbrush), and graminoids were evaluated in a young California red fir plantation in northern California from 1986 through 1995. Manual grubbing and herbicides created treatments regimes that lasted for 3 to 6 years and vegetation recovery times of 4 to 10 years. The duration and timing of the grubbing and spraying operations constituted the treatments. Species response was mixed: greenleaf manzanita had higher average values of density, foliar cover, and height when time since disturbance was longest, snowbrush density was lowest but cover and height were highest, and values for goldenbrush and graminoids in general showed no trend. In the control at the end of the study, graminoids numbered 82,350 per acre, greenleaf manzanita 10,850, goldenbrush 10,800, and snowbrush 1,850 plants per acre. Foliar cover of manzanita at 7,300 square feet per acre was more than that of all other naturally estblished species combined. Survival of red fir over all teatments after one growing season was 98 percent and after 10 seasons was 89 percent. Average height of red fir seedlings ranged from 3.2 feet with intensive release to 1.7 feet with no release. No release allowed greenleaf manzanita plants to be slightly taller than red fir seedlings and to place the seedlings in danger of being overtopped.

  12. Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip H. Henna

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

  13. Site vegetation report: Terrestrial vegetation survey (1993--1995) for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring Program (EcMP) was designed to investigate the long-term ecological trends in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems at the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) (DOE 1993). Field sampling was conducted during 1993, 1994, and 1995, until the program was terminated in late 1995. This report presents the terrestrial vegetation data that were gathered by the EcMP. The site is located on the Colorado Piedmont, east of the Front Range, between Boulder and Golden, approximately 25 km (16 miles) northwest of Denver. The topography and proximity of the Site to the mountain front result in an interesting mixture of prairie and mountain plant species. The Site is one of the few large, relatively undisturbed areas of its kind that remains along the Colorado Piedmont. Until 1989, the primary mission of the Site was the production of nuclear weapons components (DOE 1993). After production ceased, Site personnel shifted their focus to cleanup and closure.

  14. Nonreciprocal dispersion of spin waves in ferromagnetic thin films covered with a finite-conductivity metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mruczkiewicz, M.; Krawczyk, M. [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Umultowska 85, Pozna? 61-614 (Poland)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of one-side metallization of a uniform ferromagnetic thin film on its spin-wave dispersion relation in the Damon–Eshbach geometry. Due to the finite conductivity of the metallic cover layer on the ferromagnetic film, the spin-wave dispersion relation may be nonreciprocal only in a limited wave-vector range. We provide an approximate analytical solution for the spin-wave frequency, discuss its validity, and compare it with numerical results. The dispersion is analyzed systematically by varying the parameters of the ferromagnetic film, the metal cover layer and the value of the external magnetic field. The conclusions drawn from this analysis allow us to define a structure based on a 30?nm thick CoFeB film with an experimentally accessible nonreciprocal dispersion relation in a relatively wide wave-vector range.

  15. 9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgman, Mark

    management remains widely cited as the most logical and elegant frame- work for continuous improvement9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes David H Duncan1 of the `adaptive management' paradigm to natural resource man- agement, using regional management of native

  16. Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    urbanization effects on the water cycle. Although there are many stormwater best management practices (BMPs (ET) and soil media water storage between storm events. Lazzarin et al. (2005) estimated that ET ratesVegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1

  17. Influence of Vegetation Management on Yield and Quality Surface Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smeins, F. E.

    of this study was to determine the influence of vegetation characteristics, grazing systems and precipitation on surface runoff from rangeland on the Edwards Plateau region of Texas. Water yield, organic-N, N03-N, NH4-N, N02-N, total and ortho-P, Ca, Mg, K, p...

  18. Carbonaceous aerosol particles from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallock, K.A.; Mazurek, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Cass, G.R. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon due to fine organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere has become an area of increased environmental concern. Aerosol particles can be derived from many emission sources. In this report, we focus on identifying organic aerosols derived from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon. These aerosols are expected to be significant contributors to the total atmospheric organic aerosol content. Aerosol samples from living vegetation were collected by resuspension of surface wax and resin components liberated from the leaves of vegetation common to areas of the Grand Canyon. The samples were analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Probable identification of compounds was made by comparison of sample spectra with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral references and positive identification of compounds was made when possible by comparison with authentic standards as well as NIST references. Using these references, we have been able to positively identify the presence of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid homolog series in the surface waxes of the vegetation sampled. Several monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes were identified also as possible biogenic aerosols which may contribute to the total organic aerosol abundance leading to visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon.

  19. Fire Feedbacks with Vegetation and Alternative Stable States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckage, Brian

    landscape composition and that (ii) hurricane disturbances can mediate the frequency of fire that leads frequency. Our results indicate that gradual changes in global climate that influence disturbance frequency.Beckage@uvm.edu Positive feedbacks between vegetation and fire disturbance may lead to nonlinear ecosystem responses

  20. Vegetarian Chili 2 tbsp. olive or vegetable oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    stock 2 cups water (plus more if too thick) 1 (32oz) can crushed tomatoes 1 (14oz) can black beans 1 (14-5 minutes to soften vegetables. Deglaze pan with broth and water, add tomatoes, beans, lentils, and barleyoz) can of garbanzo beans 1 (14oz) can of dark red kidney beans 1 (14oz) can of green lentils

  1. Beyond Biodiesel Running on Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    20 Beyond Biodiesel ­ Running on Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO) The green tree has many branches in the development and promotion of biodiesel for nearly two decades. Technologies based on the use of hydrogen in a low-percentage mixture with petroleum fuel. Hence the development of biodiesel. Paul Trella, New

  2. Sweet potatoes are a warm-weather vegetable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweet potatoes are a warm- weather vegetable related to the morning glory family.Although Louisiana sweet potatoes are often referred to as yams, they truly are sweet potatoes. The Louisiana producers began calling the orange-fleshed sweet potatoes grown in Louisiana"yams" to distinguish them from

  3. Ecological Impacts of the Cerro Grande Fire: Predicting Elk Movement and Distribution Patterns in Response to Vegetative Recovery through Simulation Modeling October 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Rupp

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 17,200 ha in north-central New Mexico as the result of an escaped prescribed burn initiated by Bandelier National Monument. The interaction of large-scale fires, vegetation, and elk is an important management issue, but few studies have addressed the ecological implications of vegetative succession and landscape heterogeneity on ungulate populations following large-scale disturbance events. Primary objectives of this research were to identify elk movement pathways on local and landscape scales, to determine environmental factors that influence elk movement, and to evaluate movement and distribution patterns in relation to spatial and temporal aspects of the Cerro Grande Fire. Data collection and assimilation reflect the collaborative efforts of National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Department of Energy (Los Alamos National Laboratory) personnel. Geographic positioning system (GPS) collars were used to track 54 elk over a period of 3+ years and locational data were incorporated into a multi-layered geographic information system (GIS) for analysis. Preliminary tests of GPS collar accuracy indicated a strong effect of 2D fixes on position acquisition rates (PARs) depending on time of day and season of year. Slope, aspect, elevation, and land cover type affected dilution of precision (DOP) values for both 2D and 3D fixes, although significant relationships varied from positive to negative making it difficult to delineate the mechanism behind significant responses. Two-dimensional fixes accounted for 34% of all successfully acquired locations and may affect results in which those data were used. Overall position acquisition rate was 93.3% and mean DOP values were consistently in the range of 4.0 to 6.0 leading to the conclusion collar accuracy was acceptable for modeling purposes. SAVANNA, a spatially explicit, process-oriented ecosystem model, was used to simulate successional dynamics. Inputs to the SAVANNA included a land cover map, long-term weather data, soil maps, and a digital elevation model. Parameterization and calibration were conducted using field plots. Model predictions of herbaceous biomass production and weather were consistent with available data and spatial interpolations of snow were considered reasonable for this study. Dynamic outputs generated by SAVANNA were integrated with static variables, movement rules, and parameters developed for the individual-based model through the application of a habitat suitability index. Model validation indicated reasonable model fit when compared to an independent test set. The finished model was applied to 2 realistic management scenarios for the Jemez Mountains and management implications were discussed. Ongoing validation of the individual-based model presented in this dissertation provides an adaptive management tool that integrates interdisciplinary experience and scientific information, which allows users to make predictions about the impact of alternative management policies.

  4. Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

  5. Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Mammalian and Vegetative Communities of the Barrier Islands of Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoggin, Annaliese K.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The barrier islands of the gulf coast of the U.S. have been shaped and changed by hurricanes for centuries. These storms can alter the vegetation of the barrier islands by redistributing sediments, scouring off vegetation, physical damage...

  6. Vegetation and sediment characteristics of created and natural Spartina alterniflora marshes in Lower Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albertson, Andrea Kai

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five natural and ten created Spartina altemiflora marshes in the Lower Galveston Bay System, Texas, were compared to determine if there were significantly different vegetative and sediment characteristics associated with each marsh type. Vegetative...

  7. The role of vegetation in the CO[subscript 2] flux from a tropical urban neighbourhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velasco, E.

    Urban surfaces are usually net sources of CO[subscript 2]. Vegetation can potentially have an important role in reducing the CO[subscript 2] emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly when vegetation is ...

  8. Bales away... Hay baler can be used to roll up plastic used for vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compress plastic used for growing vegetables into a 4-feet by 5-feet ball, saving growers money in labor's dirty, often with vegetable material left in and it's black, not usually favored by recycling companies

  9. Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation GLAS Optimization Remote sensing Vegetation structure The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) has optimized a noise coefficient which could be constant or vary according to observation period or noise

  10. Best Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    . Develop educational materials related to aquatic plant identification and their specific managementBest Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E vegetation management with the ultimate goal of producing the best management practices protocol in Iowa

  11. The effects of nutrition education on attitudes and behaviors of children regarding fruits and vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Sharon Elaine, 1976-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1997). This questionnaire has also been used in a study involving Junior Girl Scouts and similar reliabilities of alpha=0. 74 for the vegetable portion and alpha=0. 72 for the fruit portion were reported (Cullen et al. , 1997). The questionnaire... for interventions to change nutrition behavior (Cullen et. al. , 1997). Importance of Eating Fruits and Vegetables Diets lacking in fruits and vegetables can contribute to chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Fruits and vegetables...

  12. Trends in vegetation activity and their climatic correlates: China 1982 to 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    suggests an increasing carbon stock in forest biomass in China, which supports previous studies basedTrends in vegetation activity and their climatic correlates: China 1982 to 1998 JINGFENG XIAO in vegetation activity and their correlation with climate variability in China between 1982 and 1998. Vegetation

  13. Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban neighbourhoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban the Queen in Right of Canada 2013 Abstract Estimating the relative importance of vegetation on residential land (gardens, yards, and street-trees) and vegetation on non-residential land (parks and other large

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

  15. Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

  16. Dielectric covered hairpin probe for its application in reactive plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M. [NCPST, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Karkari, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research Center, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The hairpin probe is a well known technique for measuring local electron density in low temperature plasmas. In reactive plasmas, the probe characteristics are affected by surface sputtering, contamination, and secondary electron emission. At higher densities, the plasma absorbs the entire electromagnetic energy of hairpin and hence limits the density measurements. These issues can be resolved by covering the hairpin surface with a thin layer of dielectric. In this letter, the dielectric contribution to the probe characteristics is incorporated in a theory which is experimentally verified. The dielectric covering improves the performance of probe and also allows the hairpin tip to survive in reactive plasma where classical electrical probes are easily damaged.

  17. Mapping of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles in Nearshore Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Mark E.; Miller, Lee M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Ewert, Daniel W.

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) equipped with sidescan sonar was investigated for determining the boundaries of nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation beds, specifically eelgrass (Zostera marina). Shifts in eelgrass bed morphology, size, and distribution are used as indicators in monitoring programs to measure the impacts of coastal development and environmental stressors on eelgrass and to establish the efficacy of restoration programs. However, many monitoring programs necessarily extend over multiple-year time periods. Therefore, techniques that are easily reproducible, accurate, and cost-effective can demonstrate distinct advantages over some of the more traditional and labor-intensive methods, such as diver assessments and transects of shoot counts. Remote monitoring of eelgrass beds using satellite and aerial imagery has been demonstrated with moderate success, but requires groundtruthing, which can be costly and which frequently cannot delineate the deeper boundaries of eelgrass beds. One possible means for low-cost mapping is the use of AUVs equipped with acoustic imaging hardware. AUVs provide an ideal platform, because they can be deployed by small teams (two people), they are highly maneuverable, they can cover large areas over a relatively short time period (3knot operational speed), and they are equipped with multiple oceanographic instruments for correlated data collection. This paper describes the use of sidescan-equipped AUV technology deployed over multiple time periods at the same location where imagery of eelgrass beds was obtained and analyzed for comparative purposes.

  18. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. IMPACTS OF LAND COVER CHANGE: ENERGY REGULATION, BREADBASKET PRODUCTION, AND PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    IMPACTS OF LAND COVER CHANGE: ENERGY REGULATION, BREADBASKET PRODUCTION, AND PRECIPITATION;! i! IMPACTS OF LAND COVER CHANGE: ENERGY REGULATION, BREADBASKET PRODUCTION, AND PRECIPITATION Justin of scales through biophysical exchanges of water and energy, this widespread conversion of land cover has

  20. Update and Expand Existing Landcover Classification A landcover classification is a visual description of the type vegetation or ground cover in an area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    due to natural or human impacts, such as hurricanes or dredging. Further, resource mapping be determined. It is less costly and time-consuming to map the benthic resources by major habitat type, although

  1. RIGHT CANCELLATIVE AND LEFT AMPLE QUASIVARIETIES AND PROPER COVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Victoria

    RIGHT CANCELLATIVE AND LEFT AMPLE MONOIDS: QUASIVARIETIES AND PROPER COVERS VICTORIA GOULD Abstract, as elsewhere, the idea is to `expand' Date: August 3, 1999. 1991 Mathematics Subject Classi#12;cation. 20 M 10. The diagrams in this paper are drawn using Paul Taylor's commutative diagram package. 1 #12; 2 VICTORIA GOULD

  2. Rhodes and Marshall Scholarships Campus Level Competition --Cover Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    Rhodes and Marshall Scholarships Campus Level Competition -- Cover Sheet Please submit this form with your Rhodes/Marshall Campus Application by Sept 3, 2013 to the Overseas Resource Center, Bechtel Address Permanent Phone MARSHALL Applicants Region through which you will apply Choice of universities

  3. Moduli of Galois p-covers in mixed characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramovich, Dan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We define a proper moduli stack for degree $p$ covers $f:Y \\to \\cX$ where $\\cX$ is a twisted stable curve in the sense of [5] and [4], and $Y$ is a stable curve which via $f$ is a torsor over $\\cX$ under a finite flat group scheme $\\cG \\to \\cX$.

  4. GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 6 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset' ABSTRACT: Theformation of ice on the Lallrentian (~rthe Great Lakes anel local weather and climate. The (I1Inllal seasonal and ~'Patialprogression of ice Lake (Section 6.2) incillding ice thickness, the different types of iceformed, and ice classification

  5. 2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2009 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  6. 2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2008 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  7. 2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2012 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  8. 2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project- and Ocean Drilling Program Services on behalf of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program September 2007 #12;#12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which in February 2007 contained

  9. 2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2007 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  10. 2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2011 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  11. Studying and Working Cover: 9 Muses, Achillion, Corfu, Greece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremen, Universität

    Studying and Working in Greece #12;Cover: 9 Muses, Achillion, Corfu, Greece At one time in their name. #12;E.K.E.P. Euroguidance Centre of Greece E.K.E.P., the National Centre for Vocational Orientation of Greece operates since 2000 under the auspices of the Ministry of National Education

  12. Capstone Proposal Cover Sheet Approved: 12/1/2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Capstone Proposal Cover Sheet Approved: 12/1/2011 Capstone Project Information Project Title Author Advisor Submission and Graduation Dates When you submit your paper and a reviewer agrees to review it, you graduation or capstone completion date. If your first submission of a substantially complete paper falls

  13. Cover sheet: Web Improvement Project: Preliminary Business Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UEC on a number of priorities, models and questions to inform the development of a full business caseCover sheet: Web Improvement Project: Preliminary Business Case Aims of Preliminary Business Case This preliminary business case is intended to update the University Executive Committee on progress to

  14. alternative cover materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alternative cover materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Equivalence demonstration...

  15. DISCIPLINE AND TERMINATION POLICY Employees covered by this policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISCIPLINE AND TERMINATION POLICY Employees covered by this policy This policy applies to all non to discipline, suspend with or without pay, or terminate employees for just cause. Just cause includes to discipline or termination for just cause, the University reserves the right to demote, suspend or terminate

  16. Spring 2012 Cover image: Scooter art designed by Isaac Tobin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    Inside Back Cover Most of Chicago's publications are available in e-book format and are indicated and history to his adventures along the ancient highway. A footsore Roman soldier pushing the imperial power- dents have been lured by that vision--and been transformed by their sojourn in the City of Light

  17. International Students & Scholars Accident and Sickness Insurance COVERED ACTIVITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    and substance abuse treatment. All benefits require treatment by a licensed Physician, hosptial, or outpatient treatment for the covered Sickness Pre-Existing Condition Definition, any injury or illness contracted-private room rate, general nursing care, or 2 times the semi-private room rate for ICU Charges made

  18. Ann Arbor, Michigan May 29, 2010 Book cover for "Builder's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    Ann Arbor, Michigan May 29, 2010 Book cover for "Builder's Apprentice," published by Huron River and author of "Builders Apprentice," confronted that suspicion in the mid-1980s while mulling grad school's Apprentice" Andy Hoffman reflects on crafting a custom-built life By Domenica Trevor May 29, 2010 #12;And

  19. Law Update Cover 2,3 No More Spreading Lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    to customers by contractors, of the "Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home" pamphlet, be- fore beginning because the lead tastes sweet, you need to readjust your thinking. Lead poisoning occurs across allINSIDE Law Update Cover 2,3 No More Spreading Lead Tip of the Month Page 4 Rental Unit Condition

  20. Covering Note INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhingra, Narender K.

    Covering Note for INTER-ACADEMY REPORT ON GM CROPS (Updated) The Inter-Academy Report on GM crops the main conclusions and recommendations. The literature on GM crops is voluminous. More than a hundred seek to enunciate a national strategy on GM crops. The rest deals with concerns, surveillance etc. #12

  1. Harvard Law School Student Financial Services Document FAX Cover Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, James

    are a paperless office and use a document management system to store all data electronically. The useHarvard Law School Student Financial Services Document FAX Cover Sheet Submitting your documents. This Information is Being Submitted for: 3. Type of Document Being Submitted: 6. Federal Employer Tax ID DO NOT USE

  2. UESC Status Data Collection and Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the UESC status data collection and analysis, and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  3. Activity of polymerized trichloroacetic acid for highway vegetation control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiedenfeld, R. P

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mem r ember Play 1/74 ABSTRACT Activity of Polymer- zed Trichloroacetic Acid for Highway Vegetation Control. (May 1/74) Hobert Phillip Wieaenfeld, B. S. , California State University, Humboldt Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wayne G. Mc... applied to highway roadsides near Fort Worth, Lufkin and Yoakum, Texas in the spring of 1g'7$. Two polymerizing activates which differed in their solubility were used. TCA polymerized with the more soluble activate and applied at a rate of '3 lbs...

  4. Woody vegetation of the lower Navasota River watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Harriet Louise Gell

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characteristics: Upland, Transition, Bottomland and Ephemeral Stream. Within these habitat types, stands were grouped into dominance types based on the leading dominant(s). Nine dominance types were found: Post Oak, Post Oak-Hickory, Winged Elm, Cedar Elm..., Overcup Oak, Hackberry-Cedar Elm, Swamp Privet and Water Elm. Post oak was the most widespread upland dominant, while cedar elm dominated the bottomlands. The woody vegetation is best viewed as dominance types along a iv community continuum...

  5. Consideration of liners and covers in performance assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, Mark A. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Seitz, Robert R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [USDOE Enviromental Management, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management due to the radioactive waste. The USDOE-Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these CERCLA disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to CERCLA risk assessments and DOE Order 435.1 performance assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement, respectively. One of the issues considered by the working group, which is addressed in this report, was how to appropriately consider the performance of covers and liners/leachate collections systems in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 performance assessment (PA). This same information may be appropriate for consideration within CERCLA risk assessments for these facilities. These OSDCs are generally developed to meet hazardous waste (HW) disposal design standards under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as well as the DOE Order 435.1 performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. To meet the standards for HW, the facilities typically include engineered covers and liner/leachate collection systems. Thus, when considering such facilities in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 PA, there is a need to address the evolution of performance of covers and liner/leachate collection systems in the context of meeting a performance standard considering time frames of 1,000 years for compliance and potentially thousands of years based on the wastes to test the robustness of the system. Experience has shown that there are a range of expectations and perspectives from the different regulators involved at different sites when reviewing assumptions related to cover and liner/leachate collection system performance. However for HW disposal alone under RCRA the design standards are typically considered sufficient by the regulators without a requirement to assess long-term performance thus avoiding the need to consider the details addressed in this report. This report provides suggestions for a general approach to address covers and liners/leachate collection systems in a DOE Order 435.1 PA and how to integrate assessments with defense-in-depth considerations such as design, operations, and waste acceptance criteria to address uncertainties. The emphasis is on water balances and management in such assessments. Specific information and references are provided for details needed to address the evolution of individual components of cover and liner/leachate collection systems. This information was then synthesized into suggestions for best practices for cover and liner system design and examples of approaches to address the performance of covers and liners as part of a performance assessment of the disposal system. Numerous references are provided for sources of information to help describe the basis for performance of individual components of cover and liner systems.

  6. Planning document for the Advanced Landfill Cover Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakonson, T.E. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Center for Ecological Risk Assessment & Management; Bostick, K.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Environmental Science Group

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy and Department of Defense are faced with the closure of thousands of decommissioned radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste landfills as a part of ongoing Environmental Restoration activities. Regulations on the closure of hazardous and radioactive waste landfills require the construction of a ``low-permeability`` cover over the unit to limit the migration of liquids into the underlying waste. These landfills must be maintained and monitored for 30 years to ensure that hazardous materials are not migrating from the landfill. This test plan is intended as an initial road map for planning, designing, constructing, evaluating, and documenting the Advanced Landfill Cover Demonstration (ALCD). It describes the goals/ objectives, scope, tasks, responsibilities, technical approach, and deliverables for the demonstration.

  7. DOE Qualified List of ESCO Application Cover Letter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document displays the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) application cover letter, which thanks a firm for its interest in the DOE Qualified List of Energy Service Companies (ESCOs) and describes the application documents and application review process. Firms on the DOE Qualified List may perform energy savings performance contracting (ESPC) in accordance with the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and 10 CFR 436. Also see the Standard Form 129 and Supplemental Questionnaire.

  8. Accelerated Wear Tests on Common Floor-covering Materials.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price.

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    *'r** qd** ""~c- web*- !,* . flccelerated Wear Tests e" f loor-couering materials AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. D. LEWIS, DIRECTOR, COLLEGE STATION. TEXAS SUMMARY I .. - " : 5: Accelerated wear tests made on six common floor covering... materials indicated there are variations in the changes of appearance and wear in these materials. Solid sheet vinyls and rubber tiles showed significantly less wear than asphalt tiles, vinyl- asbestos tiles, linoleums and cork. Asphalt tiles showed...

  9. S e c t i o n 44Cover feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    #12;S e c t i o n 44Cover feature: Small StepS, Big reSultS B y a m y m a s t From recycling, from lab assistants to senior personnel, look back on the path that led them to a life of science, electric bills and water usage. From small steps such as recycling to hugely ambitious ones

  10. Sandia Energy - Sandians on the Cover of Advanced Functional Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757KelleyEffectson the Cover of Advanced Functional

  11. The Covered Device Recycling (Act 108) of 2010 (CDRA) A General Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    The Covered Device Recycling (Act 108) of 2010 (CDRA) A General Overview Electronic products address the manufacture, sales, and end-of-life collection, management and recycling of covered devices to their covered devices. o Must establish and conduct ongoing recycling programs that offer covered device

  12. IMPLICATIONS OF CO, GLOBAL WARMING O N GREAT LAKES ICE COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLICATIONS OF CO, GLOBAL WARMING O N GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RAYMOND A. ASSEL US. Department to project daily mean basin ice cover and annual ice cover duration for Lakes Superior and Erie. Models were), and the Oregon State University (OSU)general circulationmodels. Ice cover estimateswere made for the West

  13. Last update: September 2014 www.utsc.utoronto.ca/aacc The Cover Letter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    , laptop, tablet or smart phone There is no standard way of writing a cover letter or resume See our cover/her consideration of your application. State the best method of contacting you (home phone, cell phone and/or email) Cover Letter Basics Marketing Yourself Resumes, cover letters, LinkedIn, and interview skills are your

  14. Revegetation and rock cover for stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings disposal sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beedlow, P.A.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidelines for using vegetation and rock to protect inactive uranium mill tailings from erosion were developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technology Development program. Information on soils, climate, and vegetation were collected for 20 inactive tailings sites in the western United States. Sites were grouped according to similarities in climate and vegetation. Soil loss for those sites was characterized using the Universal Soil Loss Equation. Test plots were used to evaluate (1) the interaction between vegetation and sealant barrier systems and (2) the effects of surface rock on soil water and vegetation. Lysimeter and simulation studies were used to direct and support field experiments. 49 references, 17 figures, 16 tables.

  15. Nutrient leaching characteristics of vegetation common to Texas reservoir sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weldon, Clark Pierce

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decomposition of vegetation and the higher rate of nitrogen release that was observed. The fact that oxygen depletion was greatest when nitrogen 80 S 60 o m bO o 4 4J Distilled Water Lake Somerville Yegua Creek 40 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13... Lake Somerville Yegua Creek 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Time in Days Figure 6: K)eldahl Nitrogen Release with Time for Coastal Bermuda Grass Using Three Different Leaching Solutions Under Aeration (Test Series 1) m 6 c Distilled Water...

  16. Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Copyright ? 2010 Royal Meteorological Society and Crown Copyright. KEY WORDS land use; land cover; Earth system models; integrated assessment models; research priorities Received 12 January 2009; Revised 9 March 2010; Accepted 14 March 2010 1. Introduction 1... biogeophysical, socio- economic and human decision-making perspectives. The Earth System Modeling (ESM) and the Integrated Assessment Modeling (IAM) communities play an impor- tant role in understanding and quantifying Earth system analysis and, specifically...

  17. Some dry season plants recommended as edible vegetables in Anyigba, Kogi State, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiga, AKPOVUGHAYE Dr.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vegetables cultivated in Nigeria are: cabbage, lettuce,Community in Kogi State, Nigeria, there are inadequateGovernment Area, Kogi State, Nigeria. Each of the fresh

  18. Percutaneous Endoluminal Bypass of Iliac Aneurysms with a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruebben, Alexander; Tettoni, Serena; Muratore, Pierluigi; Rossato, Dennis; Savio, Daniele; Rabbia, Claudio [Radiologia del Pronto Soccorso, Servizio di Angioradiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera San Giovanni Battista, Corso Bramante 88, I-10126 Turin (Italy)

    1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous treatment of iliac aneurysms, a covered stent was inserted in nine men suffering from common iliac artery aneurysms (six cases), external iliac aneurysms (one case), or pseudoaneurysms (two cases). Placement of the stent was successful in all patients. In one patient, an endoprosthesis thrombosed after 15 days, but was successfully treated by thrombolysis and additional stent placement. At the follow-up examinations (mean period 22 months) all stent-grafts had remained patent. No late leakage or stenosis was observed.

  19. Covered Product Category: Commercial Boilers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013Department ofU.S.forCategories » Covered

  20. Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013Department ofU.S.forCategories »Fryers Covered

  1. Covered Product Category: Enterprise Servers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013DepartmentEnterprise Servers Covered Product

  2. Covered Product Category: Exterior Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013DepartmentEnterprise Servers Covered

  3. Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Ballasts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013DepartmentEnterprise Servers CoveredDepartment

  4. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013DepartmentEnterpriseDepartment ofFurnaces Covered

  5. USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin HydropowerTrinityTurnbullGlobal Map-AnnexUSFS-ClimateLand Cover

  6. Bentonite mat demonstration: Field performance evaluation of an alternative geosynthetic composite cover system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Site

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site is investigating an alternative RCRA closure cover system configuration for hazardous solid-waste landfills. The bentonite mat demonstration is a field performance test of an alternative composite geosynthetic material cover configuration. The bentonite mat demonstration consists of four test pads; each test pad is a compacted sandy clay layer 30 ft wide, 80 ft long, and 2 ft deep. Three of the test pads will be blanketed with one of the commercially available bentonite mats (geosynthetic clay liner), then overlain by a flexible membrane liner to form the composite barrier. The remaining test pad will not contain any geosynthetic materials and will be used as the control pad for the demonstration. Each test pad will be constructed over a 4-ft sand layer. A series of access pipes will be embedded in the sand layer to provide a means for evacuating portions of the sand layer in order to create underlying cavities, thus inducing localized subsidence in the test pad. Material stress data will be collected to identify the composite barrier failure point. Infiltration data will be collected for each test pad to correlate permeability as a function of deflection. At the conclusion of the subsidence testing, the test pads will be dismantled to identify the failure mechanisms of the barriers. A finite-element analysis computer model is being developed to predict the structural behavior of the composite barrier system. The bentonite mat demonstration data will be used to verify this model, which will serve as a diagnostic tool for future designs. The formulation and execution of this demonstration is one element in achieving regulatory approval of the composite geosynthetic materials alternative cover system design configuration.

  7. Landfill cover performance monitoring using time domain reflectometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neher, E.R.; Cotten, G.B. [Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McElroy, D. [Lockheed-Martin Idaho Technologies Company, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) systems were installed to monitor soil moisture in two newly constructed landfill covers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Each TDR system includes four vertical arrays with each array consisting of four TDR probes located at depths of 15, 30, 45, and 60 cm. The deepest probes at 60 cm were installed beneath a compacted soil layer to analyze infiltration through the compacted layer. Based on the TDR data, infiltration through the two covers between March and October, 1997 ranged from less than measurable to 1.5 cm. However, due to a prohibition on penetrating the buried waste and resulting limits on probe placement depths, deeper percolation was not evaluated. Some of the advantages found in the application of TDR for infiltration monitoring at this site are the relative low cost and rugged nature of the equipment. Also, of particular importance, the ability to collect frequent moisture measurements allows the capture and evaluation of soil moisture changes resulting from episodic precipitation events. Disadvantages include the inability to install the probes into the waste, difficulties in interpretation of infiltration during freeze/thaw periods, and some excessive noise in the data.

  8. Improved vertex cover algorithms for fixed genus graphs through genus reduction and planar separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupton, Kevin Thomas

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , problems are restricted to decision problems? problems with yes/no answers. The VERTEX CovER problem formulated as a decision problem is "Given a graph G = (V, E) and positive cover k, does there exist a vertex cover of G whose size is at most k...: "Given a graph G = (V, E) and parameter k, does there exist a vertex cover C c: V for G such that C~ & k?" As a decision problem, Karp first demonstrated quantitatively how "hard" VERTEx CovER is to solve by showing that vERTEx covER is NP-complete [16...

  9. Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California; revised 29 March 2011; accepted 1 April 2011; published 7 May 2011. [1] Beryllium7 is a potentially potential as a sediment tracer in desert environments. Beryllium7 in vegetation and the upper few cm of soil

  10. Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new numerical scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    ii Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new.S. Fairbanks, Alaska August 2005 #12;iii Abstract The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS........................................................................................................................... 24 Evaluation of snow depth and soil temperatures predicted by the Hydro- Thermodynamic Soil

  11. Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS) Pamela Spier, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK Abstract This paper presents an evaluation of the Hydro. Introduction and Motivation The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS, Kramm et al. 1996, Mölders

  12. Comparing Optical and Microwave Remote Sensing-based Vegetation Density over Mongolia for 1988-2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Vegetation Index (NDVI), derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) series.vandijk@csiro.au Abstract ­ Vegetation density plays an important role in water and energy balance. Satellite-based optical product (Tucker et al., 2005). It can provide a relatively high spatial resolution product (up to 1km

  13. Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1@mnhn.fr Abstract. In French Guiana, inselbergs are granite outcrops rising abruptly from the surrounding rain substrate. Shrub granitic vegetation, organised in thickets on open exposed rocks of inselbergs

  14. Climate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    : burning; arid ecosystems; livestock; climate; broad-scale climate; Southern Russia; socio-economic change by decreasing livestock numbers, vegetation changes, climate change, or interactions of these factors. OurClimate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid Ecosystems of Southern

  15. VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND KU for submission to the university library. Date Dr. David Long Chair, Graduate Committee Accepted of Engineering and Technology #12;ABSTRACT VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER

  16. VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH the urbanization process. This study evaluated the performance and feasibility of using vegetated or green roof systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

  17. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A. Atchley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A purposes. #12;ABSTRACT Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have

  18. The Potential for Reducing Urban Air Temperatures and Energy Consumption Through Vegetative Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consumption Through Vegetative Coolingt Dan M. Kurn, Sarah E. Bretz, Benson Huang*, Hashem Akbari Heat Island Consumption Through Vegetative Cooling May 1994 Dan M. Kum, Sarah E. Bretz, Benson Huang, and Hashem Akbari in obtaining the data used in this study. Disclaimer The research reported here was funded in part

  19. P.M. Vermeersch (ed.) 3 -WOODY VEGETATION AND ITS USE DURING THE NEOLITHIC AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinova, Elena

    because they have been submitted for 14 C dating. The site is located in a tributary wadi of the wadi). The modern arboreal vegetation of the Tree Shelter wadi is limited to a lonely Acacia tree at the en- trance of the wadi. The modern vegetation in the broad area of the Red Sea coastal land between wadi Qena

  20. The consequences of pleistocene climate change on lowland neotropical vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Oliveira, P.E.; Colinvaux, P.A. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama City (Panama))

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Palynological reconstructions indicate that lowland tropical America was subject to intense cooling during the last ice-age. The descent of presently montane taxa into the lowlands of Amazonia and Minas Gerais indicate temperature depressions ranging from 5[degrees]C to 9[degrees]C cooler-than-present. The strengthened incursion of southerly airmasses caused a reassortment of vegetation throughout Amazonia. Presently allopatric species are found to have been sympatric as novel forest assemblages and formed and dissolved. Modest drying, perhaps a 20% reduction in precipitation, accounts for all the records that show a Pleistocene expansion of savanna. No evidence is found to support the fragmentation of Amazonian forests during glacial times, and the hypothesis of forest refuges as an explanation of tropical speciation is rejected on empirical grounds.

  1. Save Time and Money... Serve Nutritious Fruits and Vegetables.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ing, instead of butter or margarine. . ? Get vitamin C from oranges, grapefruit, straw berries, cantaloup, broccoli, cabbage, spinach, peppers, white and sweet potatoes, and tomatoes. ? To retain vitamin C while cooking cabbage, try "panning...." For six servings, add 1 % quarts of finely shredded cabbage to 1 % -2 tablespoons mar ari ne ina heavy pan over moderate heat. Add 3 t ? espoons water and cover pan tightly to hold in steam. Cook over low heat for 6-8 minutes or until cabbage...

  2. Soil Insulation For Barrier Layer Protection In Landfill Covers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory Smith Roy

    Landfill covers are designed to isolate waste from the environment by incorporating low-permeability barrier layers. The barrier layer minimizes and controls gas escaping from the waste and the amount of infiltrating moisture available for leachate generation. Barrier layers are typically designed and constructed of a thick layer of compacted fine-grain native soil material or a manufactured geosynthetic clay liner. The barrier layer must be protected from frost damage. Freezing of a compacted soil layer has been shown to cause quick and irreversible degradation. Large increases in permeability have been demonstrated in compacted clay barriers subjected to a minimum number of freezing and thawing cycles. Design methods to protect the barrier layer from frost damage have not been addressed in the research literature. A design procedure is addressed in this paper that determines the thickness of soil required to protect a barrier layer. The procedure is based on sitespecific temperature ...

  3. Remote sensing for continuous cover forestry: quantifying spatial structure and canopy gap distribution. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaulton, Rachel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conversion of UK even-aged conifer plantations to continuous cover forestry (CCF), a form of forest management that maintains forest cover over time and avoids clear-cutting, requires more frequent and spatially ...

  4. The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" The New York Times covers "National Labs Race to Stop Iran" Given the stakes in the sensitive negotiations with Iran,...

  5. Set Multicover The Set Multicover problem is the same as set cover except

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golin, Mordecai J.

    during that step. Notice that the average cost can not decrease. Then 8e 2 U price(e; 1) Ÿ price(e; 2) Ÿ to be covered a specified number of times. That is we want to pick a minimum­cost set cover such that element e algorithm to multi­ cover A Greedy MultiCover algorithm U / X C / ; select a F 2 F that minimizes Cost(F ) j

  6. Fruit and Vegetable Servings in Local Farm-Sourced and Standard Lunches Offered to Children in a Head Start Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Amy M.

    2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    . Independent-samples t-tests were performed using SPSS. There were no significant differences in either fruit or vegetable consumption between conventional lunches and locally-sourced lunches. Even though there was more variety of fruit and vegetable offerings...

  7. Investigation of the effect of a circular patch of vegetation on turbulence generation and sediment deposition using four case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Alejandra C

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study describes the spatial distribution of sediment deposition in the wake of a circular patch of model vegetation and the effect of the patch on turbulence and mean flow. Two difference types pf vegetation were used ...

  8. Long-term Trends in Laurentian Great Lakes Ice Cover Raymond A. Assel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-term Trends in Laurentian Great Lakes Ice Cover Raymond A. Assel OPEN FILE REPORT December Commonwealth Blvd. Ann Arbor, MI 48105 #12;Long-Term Trends in Laurentian Great Lakes Ice Cover Raymond A is to give a brief overview of nearshore and lake wide trends in Great Lakes ice cover over the past one

  9. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-33 CATEGORIZATION OF NORTHERN GREEN BAY ICE COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-33 CATEGORIZATION OF NORTHERN GREEN BAY ICE COVER USING LANDSAT the group means for snow- covered ice (group 15). 4. Comparison of LANDSAT 1 band 4 and band 7 to illustrate the influence of water on the tone of ice cover. 5. Mean digital counts of training sets--bands 4, 5, 6, and 7

  10. Adult Routine Physical This health plan covers routine physical exams furnished by a General Hospital, Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppo, Delia W.

    covered related services). 1 #12;Pediatric Routine Physical This health plan covers routine pediatric careAdult Routine Physical This health plan covers routine physical exams furnished by a General Hospital, Community Health Center, Physician, Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Midwife or Independent Lab

  11. PREFERENTIAL FLOW THROUGH EARTHEN LANDFILL COVERS: FIELD EVALUATION OF ROOT ZONE WATER QUALITY MODEL (RZWQM) AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract PREFERENTIAL FLOW THROUGH EARTHEN LANDFILL COVERS: FIELD EVALUATION OF ROOT ZONE WATER into the waste, earthen landfill covers are constructed once a landfill reaches its capacity. Formation earthen landfill covers during service. Most commonly used water balance models that are used

  12. Geosynthetics International, 2010, 17, No.3 Design of a landfill final cover system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geosynthetics International, 2010, 17, No.3 Design of a landfill final cover system T. D. Stark containment, Strength, Stability, Shearbox test, Failure, Final cover system, Landfill REFERENCE: Stark, T. D. & Newman, E. J. (20 I0). Design of a landfill final cover systcm. Geosynthetics [ntemational17, No.3, 124

  13. Simplified Models for Exhaled Airflow from a Cough with the Mouth Covered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Simplified Models for Exhaled Airflow from a Cough with the Mouth Covered Chun Chen1 , Chao: (765) 496-0539, Email: yanchen@purdue.edu Abstract Covering a cough can be useful in reducing for predicting the exhaled airflow from a cough with the mouth covered. This investigation used smoke

  14. Covering Cuts in Bridgeless Cubic Graphs Sylvia BOYD, Satoru IWATA, Kenjiro TAKAZAWA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are interested in algorithms for finding 2-factors that cover certain prescribed edge-cuts in bridgeless cubic graphs. We present an algorithm for finding a minimum-weight 2-factor covering all the 3-edge cuts for finding a 2-factor covering all the 3- and 4-edge cuts in bridgeless cubic graphs. Both

  15. Cloud cover increase with increasing aerosol absorptivity: A counterexample to the conventional semidirect aerosol effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    humidity. The net effect is more low cloud cover with increasing aerosol absorption. The higher specific by dust radiative heating. Although in some areas our model exhibits a reduction of low cloud cover due are expected to have a similar effect. Citation: Perlwitz, J., and R. L. Miller (2010), Cloud cover increase

  16. Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Decomposing aerosol cloud radiative effects into cloud cover, liquid water path and Twomey interactions radiative effects, i.e., the cloud cover, liquid water path (LWP) and cloud drop radius (Twomey negative radiative forcing on the global scale, mainly due to the cloud cover effect. © 2013 Elsevier B

  17. Enhancement of cloud cover and suppression of nocturnal drizzle in stratocumulus polluted by haze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to amplify the negative radiative forcing by increasing cloud cover and cloud water [Albrecht, 1989]. [3] We in ship tracks [Ackerman et al., 2000]. Evidence for secondary effects is ambiguous. Cloud cover is seenEnhancement of cloud cover and suppression of nocturnal drizzle in stratocumulus polluted by haze A

  18. Complexity of Minimum Irreducible Infeasible Subsystem Covers for ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imke Joormann

    2015-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing infeasibility of linear programs (LPs) is an important topic, since it can help to ... The analysis of general infeasible linear systems has been extensively ...... [25] Mateti, P., Deo, N.: On algorithms for enumerating all circuits of a graph.

  19. On Hammersley's Method for OneDimensional Covering Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimmett, Geoffrey

    been J.E. Mayer the architect of the well known cluster integral theory of a condensing gas. I myself an appointment in a department with the intriguing title Lectureship in the Design and Analysis of Scientific

  20. POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D EA-1 ,Page 1 of 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polissar, Pratigya J.

    POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D EA-1 ,Page 1 of 21 Polissar & Freeman (2010) Effects of Aridity and Vegetation on Plant-wax D in Modern Lake Sediments Electronic annex. References 6. Supplemental Figures #12;POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D

  1. An investigation of the cadmium absorption of resonance neutrons in cadmium covered indium foils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, James Edward

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thicknesses and Cadmium Covers Page 25 II Fcd Determined by E3 and Logarithmic Fits for Various Foil Thickness 29 III Experimental Values of Fcd for Various Foil Thicknesses and Cadmium Covers 32 LIST OF FIGURES No. Title Bare Infinite Disk Showing... The Coordinates g and B Cadmium Covered Infinite Disk Indicating the Directions X and 8 . Page Theoretically Determine)Bare and Cadmium Covered Activity of a 18. 5 mg/cm Foil. Theoretically Determined Bare and Cadmium Covered Activities of a 184. 5 mg/cm2...

  2. Dual Durameter Blow Molded Rocker Cover Design With Unique Isolation Strategy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freese, V, Charles Edwin (Westland, MI)

    2000-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The rocker arm cover on a diesel engine can be formed of a rigid molded plastic material to minimize the transmission of noise into the atmosphere. Sonic vibration of the cover can be reduced by reducing the cover material stiffness. The reduced stiffness of the cover material allows the roof area of the cover to be momentarily displaced away from the cylinder head in the presence of an acoustic wave, so that the roof area is not able to develop the restoring force that is necessary for vibrational motion.

  3. Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

  4. A Supersolid Skin Covering both Water and Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Chang Q

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mysterious nature and functionality of water and ice skins remain baffling to the community since 1859 when Farady firstly proposed liquid skin lubricating ice. Here we show the presence of supersolid phase that covers both water and ice using Raman spectroscopy measurements and quantum calculations. In the skin of two molecular layers thick, molecular undercoordination shortens the H-O bond by ~16% and lengthens the OH nonbond by ~25% through repulsion between electron pairs on adjacent O atoms, which depresses the density from 0.92 for bulk ice to 0.75 gcm-3. The O:H-O cooperative relaxation stiffens the H-O stretching phonon from 3200/3150 cm-1 to the same value of 3450 cm-1 and raises the melting temperature of both skins by up to ~310 K. Numerical derivatives on the viscosity and charge accumulation suggests that the elastic, polarized, and thermally stable supersolid phase makes the ice frictionless and water skin hydrophobic and ice like at room temperature.

  5. Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

  6. Organic Vegetable Organic Vegetable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentrates on natural processes and how to manage them. Other materials and products are additions to .......................................6 Safety ................................................................6 Insect Management ...........................................7 Disease Management ......................................10 Weed Management

  7. Fractional Snow-Cover Mapping Through Artificial Neural Network Analysis of MODIS Surface Reflectance.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobreva, Iliyana D.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    unmixing and the empirical Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) method. Machine learning is an alternative to these approaches for estimating FSC, as Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) have been used for estimating the subpixel abundances of other...

  8. Consistency of wind erosion assessments across land use and land cover types: A critical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, J; Okin, GS; Tatarko, J; Webb, NP; Herrick, JE

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the SWEEP model during high wind on the Columbia Plateau.J.D. , 1998a. A single event wind erosion model. Trans. ASAEZobeck, T.M. , 1998. Revised Wind Erosion Equation (RWEQ).

  9. Covering the story: a rhetorical analysis of Brownsville's television news coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groenendyk, Kathi Lynn

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the accentuation of risk and drama in the news. But not all environmental communication research involves the media. For example, Petermn and Peterson (1993) examine how nonmarket economic valuation methods constrained policy in both the Exxon Valdez disaster... and with endangered whooping cranes. In the Exxon case, Peterson and Peterson argue that "the cultural damage to area residents cannot be appropriately measured in dollars" (p. 61). The nonmarket economic valuation methods also allow shipping of petrochemicals...

  10. An Analysis of Cloud Cover and Water Vapor for the ALMA Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Chile), Chalviri (Bolivia) and Five Sites in Argentina using Satellite Data and a Verification and water vapor at Chajnantor (Chile), Chalviri (Bolivia) and four sites in Argentina. Since time

  11. Preliminary Analysis of ARM SGP Area Sky Cover and Downwelling SW Irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARD ACCOUNTING SYSTEMMeso-ScalePPO

  12. 2014 Offshore Wind Market & Economic Analysis Cover Photo | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is always evolving, soFuel Cell2 -ofSecurityof Energy2014 LMLoad

  13. Climate-Soil-Vegetation Control on Groundwater Table Dynamics and its Feedbacks in a Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Qian, Yun; Liang, Xu

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the three dynamically linked branches of the water cycle, including atmospheric, surface, and subsurface water, groundwater is the largest reservoir and an active component of the hydrologic system. Because of the inherent slow response time, groundwater may be particularly relevant for long time-scale processes such as multi-years or decadal droughts. This study uses regional climate simulations with and without surface water – groundwater interactions for the conterminous U.S. to assess the influence of climate, soil, and vegetation on groundwater table dynamics, and its potential feedbacks to regional climate. Analysis shows that precipitation has a dominant influence on the spatial and temporal variations of groundwater table depth (GWT). The simulated GWT is found to decrease sharply with increasing precipitation. Our simulation also shows some distinct spatial variations that are related to soil porosity and hydraulic conductivity. Vegetation properties such as minimum stomatal resistance, and root depth and fraction are also found to play an important role in controlling the groundwater table. Comparing two simulations with and without groundwater table dynamics, we find that groundwater table dynamics mainly influences the partitioning of soil water between the surface (0 – 0.5 m) and subsurface (0.5 – 5 m) rather than total soil moisture. In most areas, groundwater table dynamics increases surface soil moisture at the expense of the subsurface, except in regions with very shallow groundwater table. The change in soil water partitioning between the surface and subsurface is found to strongly correlate with the partitioning of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes. The evaporative fraction (EF) is generally higher during summer when groundwater table dynamics is included. This is accompanied by increased cloudiness, reduced diurnal temperature range, cooler surface temperature, and increased cloud top height. Although both convective and non-convective precipitation are enhanced, the higher EF changes the partitioning to favor more non-convective precipitation, but this result could be sensitive to the convective parameterization used. Compared to simulations without groundwater table dynamics, the dry bias in the summer precipitation is slightly reduced over the central and eastern U.S. Groundwater table dynamics can provide important feedbacks to atmospheric processes, and these feedbacks are stronger in regions with deeper groundwater table, because the interactions between surface and subsurface are weak when the groundwater table is deep. This increases the sensitivity of surface soil moisture to precipitation anomalies, and therefore enhances land surface feedbacks to the atmosphere through changes in soil moisture and evaporative fraction. By altering the groundwater table depth, land use change and groundwater withdrawal can alter land surface response and feedback to the climate system.

  14. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

  15. Estimation of mass transport parameters of gases for quantifying CH{sub 4} oxidation in landfill soil covers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, J.; Moon, S.; Nam, K.; Kim, Y.-J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.Y. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jaeykim@snu.ac.kr

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane (CH{sub 4}), which is one of the most abundant anthropogenic greenhouse gases, is produced from landfills. CH{sub 4} is biologically oxidized to carbon dioxide, which has a lower global warming potential than methane, when it passes through a cover soil. In order to quantify the amount of CH{sub 4} oxidized in a landfill cover soil, a soil column test, a diffusion cell test, and a mathematical model analysis were carried out. In the column test, maximum oxidation rates of CH{sub 4} (V{sub max}) showed higher values in the upper part of the column than those in the lower part caused by the penetration of O{sub 2} from the top. The organic matter content in the upper area was also higher due to the active microbial growth. The dispersion analysis results for O{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} in the column are counter-intuitive. As the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of CH{sub 4} slightly increased, possibly due to the effect of mechanical dispersion. On the other hand, as the upward flow rate of the landfill gas increased, the dispersion coefficient of O{sub 2} decreased. It is possible that the diffusion of gases in porous media is influenced by the counter-directional flow rate. Further analysis of other gases in the column, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, may be required to support this hypothesis, but in this paper we propose the possibility that the simulations using the diffusion coefficient of O{sub 2} under the natural condition may overestimate the penetration of O{sub 2} into the soil cover layer and consequently overestimate the oxidation of CH{sub 4}.

  16. COVER IMAGE How quantum many-body systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    the dynamics of strongly correlated cold atoms with theoretical analysis now provides quantitative insight established for spin-½ particles. Now an elegant demonstration of squeezing in spin-1 condensates generalizes. Pfleiderer, K. Everschor, M. Garst and A. Rosch 305 Spin-nematic squeezed vacuum in a quantum gas C. D

  17. Microbial Diversity Studies in Sediments of Perennially Ice-covered Lakes, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Chao

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    perennial ice cover. Sedimentology 38: 363-379. Takacs,perennial ice cover. Sedimentology 38: 363-379. Suzuki, M. ,perennial ice cover. Sedimentology 38: 363-379. Tamaki, H. ,

  18. High temperature flow-through device for rapid solubilization and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Jason A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Peterson, Kenneth A.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices and methods for thermally lysing of biological material, for example vegetative bacterial cells and bacterial spores, are provided. Hot solution methods for solubilizing bacterial spores are described. Systems for direct analysis are disclosed including thermal lysers coupled to sample preparation stations. Integrated systems capable of performing sample lysis, labeling and protein fingerprint analysis of biological material, for example, vegetative bacterial cells, bacterial spores and viruses are provided.

  19. High temperature flow-through device for rapid solubilization and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Jason A. A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hukari, Kyle W. (San Ramon, CA); Patel, Kamlesh D. (Dublin, CA); Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices and methods for thermally lysing of biological material, for example vegetative bacterial cells and bacterial spores, are provided. Hot solution methods for solubilizing bacterial spores are described. Systems for direct analysis are disclosed including thermal lysers coupled to sample preparation stations. Integrated systems capable of performing sample lysis, labeling and protein fingerprint analysis of biological material, for example, vegetative bacterial cells, bacterial spores and viruses are provided.

  20. aquatic vegetation stressors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Rakamaz-Tiszanagyfalui Nagy-morotva with determined spectrums. During the image analysis, SAM classification method was used, where Pter Burai; Gabriella Zsuzsanna;...

  1. An Experimental Investigation of Microexplosion in Emulsified Vegetable-Methanol Blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Hyungseok

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of shock waves characteristic of explosions at larger scales. However, little is known about how emulsion composition and droplet size affect the micro-explosion process. Through this research, methanol-in-vegetable oil emulsion has been studied from...

  2. The coupled development of terrain and vegetation : the case of semiarid grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of vegetation in semiarid landscapes organizes as a function of moisture availability, which is often mediated by the form of the land surface. Simultaneously the processes that shape the land surface are ...

  3. NAME: Restoration of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) on the Seaside of Virginia's Eastern Shore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    been shown to be more cost-effective than planting vegetative parts. A SAV restoration program sedimentation and ameliorate siltation of navigation channels, thereby reducing the necessity of dredging

  4. A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ashley

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

  5. Feedbacks between flow, vegetation, deposition, and the implications for landscape development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondziolka, John M. (John Michael)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow and sedimentation around patches of vegetation are important to landscape evolution, and a better understanding of these processes would facilitate more effective river restoration and wetlands engineering. In wetlands ...

  6. The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences the metabolism of prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodds, Walter

    The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences, the restoration allowed recovery of some features of open-canopy prairie streams. Woody expansion apparently. Keywords: macroalgae, microalgae, primary production, restoration, streams Introduction North American

  7. Effects of dynamic vegetation and topography on hydrological processes in semi-arid areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Valeri Yuryevich, 1974-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystems of dry climates represent a particularly interesting object for ecohydrological studies, as water is generally considered to be the key limiting resource. This work focuses on vegetation-water-energy dynamics ...

  8. Impact of vegetation properties on U.S. summer weather prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Y; Fennessy, M; sellers, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological Center, Mon. Weather Rev. , 108, 1279-1292,VEGETATION IN U.S. SUMMER WEATHER model (SIB) for use withinConference on Numerical Weather Prediction, pp. 726 -733,

  9. Contribution of vegetation and peat fires to particulate air pollution in Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddington, C L

    Smoke haze, caused by vegetation and peat fires in Southeast Asia, is of major concern because of its adverse impact on regional air quality. We apply two different methods (a chemical transport model and a Lagrangian ...

  10. Summer fire impacts and isotopic assessment of vegetation dynamics in Texas coastal Quercus virginiana communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Kelley Ann

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in thickets suggest some thickets may be recent at Kenedy. []¹?N of plants and soils did not enhance interpretation of vegetation dynamics at either site, but may provide insights regarding the N-cycle of these oak communities....

  11. Momentum and mass transport by coherent structures in a shallow vegetated shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Brian L., 1975-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many aquatic systems, from tidal creeks with fringing mangroves to rivers and associated floodplains, there exists an interface between dense vegetation and a high conveyance channel. A shear flow develops across this ...

  12. Investigation of the utility of the vegetation condition index (VCI) as an indicator of drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesh, Srinivasan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the satellite-based Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) and frequently used agricultural drought indices like Palmer Drought Severity Index, Palmer’s Z-index, Standard Precipitation Index, percent normal and deciles...

  13. Harmonic propagation of variability in surface energy balance within a coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, P.

    [1] The response of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum model to incoming radiation forcing is investigated in order to gain insights into the coupling of soil and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) states and fluxes. The ...

  14. Fire Regimes of the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Temporal and Spatial Variability and Implications for Vegetation Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatley, William 1977-

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    influence of climate on past fire occurrence. Third, I sampled vegetation composition in four different stand types along a topographic moisture gradient, including mesic cove, sub-mesic white pine (Pinus strobus L.) hardwood, sub-xeric oak (Quercus L...

  15. Shipping and nitrogen toning effects on postharvest shelf life of vegetative annuals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beach, Shannon Elizabeth

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetative annuals are currently popular in the ornamental horticulture industry. Many crops are newly domesticated species and little is known about how they perform during shipping or in the retail environment. Nine species and 21 cultivars were...

  16. An Experimental Investigation of Microexplosion in Emulsified Vegetable-Methanol Blend 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Hyungseok

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of shock waves characteristic of explosions at larger scales. However, little is known about how emulsion composition and droplet size affect the micro-explosion process. Through this research, methanol-in-vegetable oil emulsion has been studied from...

  17. Using mobile technology to impact fruit and vegetable consumption in low-income youth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheson, Tresza Denae

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The benefits of fruits and vegetables (FV) include supplying nutrients and fiber to the diet, reducing risk of disease, and assisting in weight maintenance by increasing satiety and decreasing energy density of the diet. FV intake has been...

  18. Growth response of selected vegetable species to plant residue of guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Debbie John

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Horticulture GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Approved as to style...

  19. A study of historical vegetation in Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Gwendolyn Ann

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    documentation against which past and future changes can be evaluated and to provide information to guide iv management decisions concerning the historic landscape. The results of the study provide vegetation ini'ormation for inter preting both the natural... LITERATURE Historical Overview of Landscape Preservation Landscape Preservation and Restoration Methods Environmental and Cultural Effects on the Landscape Vegetation oi' the Edwards Plateau of Texas Lyndon B. Johnson National Hi. storical Park...

  20. Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson Joseph A for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson,a Joseph A. Shaw,a Rick Lawrence,b Paul W. Nugent,a Laura M of these calibrated imagers is imaging of vegetation for CO2 gas leak detection. During a four-week period

  1. Vegetation response to burning thicketized live oak savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, David Mitchell

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VEGETATION RESPONSE TO BURNING THICKETIZED LIVE OAK SAVANNAH ON THE ARANSAS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE A Thesi. s by DAVID MITCHELL KELLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 6 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... irma f Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) ( lambe-) (Member) Memos Memoerl '. !ay 98O ABSTRACT Vegetation Response to Burning Thicketized Live Oak Savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (May 1980) David Mitchell Kelley, B. S...

  2. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Siu Lim

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF' SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Approved as to style and content by: (C rman...

  3. Use of vegetation to ameliorate building microclimates: an assessment of energy-conservation potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, B.A.; Taylor, F.G.; Wendt, R.L.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The space-conditioning energy conservation potentials of landscapes designed to ameliorate building microclimates are evaluated. The physical bases for vegetative modifications of climate are discussed, and results of past study of the effects of vegetation on space-conditioning energy consumption in buildings are reviewed. The state-of-the-art of energy-conserving landscape designs is assessed and recommendations are presented for further research.

  4. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2028-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  5. Final closure cover for a Hanford radioactive mixed waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.D.

    1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a preliminary design for a RCRA mixed waste landfill final closure cover. The cover design was developed by a senior class design team from Seattle University. The design incorporates a layered design of indigenous soils and geosynthetics in a layered system to meet final closure cover requirements for a landfill as imposed by the Washington Administrative Code WAC-173-303 implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  6. LARGE-SCALE COVER SONG RECOGNITION USING THE 2D FOURIER TRANSFORM MAGNITUDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Dan

    for self-identified cover songs of Lady Gaga on YouTube on November 22nd, 2011. This simple query produces

  7. Engineering guides for estimating cover material thickness and volume for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, V.C.; Nielson, K.K.; Merrell, G.B.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five nomographs have been prepared that facilitate the estimation of cover thickness and cover material volume for the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action Program. Key parameters determined include the cover thickness with either a surface radon flux or a boundary radon air concentration criterion and the total volume of cover material required for two different treatments of the edge slopes. Also included in the engineering guide are descriptions and representative values for the radon source term, the diffusion coefficients and the key meteorological parameters. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. 2009 ECR Report Cover Letter | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems AnalysisVOLUME I A1/19/1015 Blog Posts to6 TEPP2009 ECR FINAL REPORT9

  9. Y-12_Front Cover_Summary_Feb2011.ai

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 | NUMBER643|About Us /Summary

  10. Y-12_Front Cover_Summary_Feb2011.ai

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 | NUMBER643|About Us

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Cover-v1 [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis and Feedback onWorking GroupContinued

  12. Microsoft Word - B&W Cover 2008.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysis and FeedbackProgrammatic515 FinalPAGEG:5

  13. Analysis of postharvest handling and marketing systems for vegetable production in East and Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vamosy, Margaret Laurain

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    happens to the produce that you sort out [on the farm]?" 94 19 Responses to question 223, "What happens to the produce that you don't sell by the time you leave the market7" 96 20 Means Of transporting produce from fields to post harvest handling... of produce storage after handling procedures are completed and before departure for market. 104 25 Market arrival times. 105 26 Responses to question 220, "How long do you wait at the market before you get a stall or start selling?" 106 27 Responses...

  14. THE RELATIVE BRAUER GROUP AND GENERALIZED CYCLIC CROSSED PRODUCTS FOR A RAMIFIED COVERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Timothy J.

    in the Picard group of S. For the rest of the homomorphisms in the seven term sequence explicit descriptionsTHE RELATIVE BRAUER GROUP AND GENERALIZED CYCLIC CROSSED PRODUCTS FOR A RAMIFIED COVERING TIMOTHY J the relative Brauer group fits into the exact sequence of Galois cohomology associated to the ramified covering

  15. ccsd-00004260,version1-15Feb2005 Galois coverings, Morita equivalence and smash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ccsd-00004260,version1-15Feb2005 Galois coverings, Morita equivalence and smash extensions to Morita equivalence of k-categories. For this purpose we describe processes providing Morita equivalences that there is a coincidence up to Morita equivalence between Galois coverings of k-categories and smash extensions

  16. Cover your Cough! Quantifying the Benefits of a Localized Healthy Behavior Intervention on Flu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swarup, Samarth

    Cover your Cough! Quantifying the Benefits of a Localized Healthy Behavior Intervention on Flu a policy that encourages healthy behaviors (such as covering your cough and using hand sanitizers) at four coughs, minimizing contact with potential fomites) at major tourist locations. We use a synthetic

  17. Museum Regulations The term `Museum' covers the museum collections managed within Library, Special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pym, David J.

    Museum Regulations Note The term `Museum' covers the museum collections managed within Library, Special Collections & Museums (including university art collection and the ethnographic and archaeological not cover the museums and collections managed within academic Schools (e.g. the Zoology Museum). 1 Visitors

  18. Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co-Investigators: Thomas Croley - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover affects mass and energy exchange between the planetary boundary layer and the waters of the Great Lakes. The improved ice

  19. Improving Ice Cover and Evaporation Estimates Primary Investigator: Thomas E. Croley (Emeritus), Raymond Assel (Emeritus) -NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improving Ice Cover and Evaporation Estimates Primary Investigator: Thomas E. Croley (Emeritus. For example, ice cover is projected to be significantly less under global warming, air temperature higher, and precipitation greater (Lofgren, et al, in press). Improved long-range ice forecasts would be of interest

  20. Late-Quaternary Variations in Tree Cover at the Northern Forest-Tundra Ecotone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    and contemporary observations of woody cover from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor. Our about land-use and land-cover change [DeFries, 2008]. The widespread availability, low cost, and high. Biogeophysical feedbacks, involving exchanges of water and energy between the land surface and atmosphere [Bonan

  1. Bile Duct Disruption Following Radiofrequency Ablation: Successful Repair Using a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Philip M.; Hare, Christopher M.B., E-mail: christopher.hare@uclh.org; Lees, William R. [Middlesex Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Persistent biliary leaks, whether iatrogenic or secondary to malignancy, often present a difficult management problem. Recent reports have suggested a role for covered metallic stents in this context. We describe the successful use of a covered stent to seal a persistent biliary leak following radiofrequency ablation of colorectal liver metastases.

  2. Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Geophysical methods applied to characterize landfill covers with geocomposite F. Genelle1, 2 , C attempt to characterize with geophysical methods the state of landfill covers to detect damages that can. The geophysical methods used were the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), cartography with an Automatic

  3. Clogging Potential of Tire Shred-Drainage Layer in Landfill Cover Systems Krishna R. Reddy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , drainage, hydraulic conductivity, landfill, recycling, tires #12;3 Introduction Over 280 million used1 Clogging Potential of Tire Shred-Drainage Layer in Landfill Cover Systems Krishna R. Reddy of shredded scrap tire drainage layers in landfill covers. Laboratory clogging tests were conducted using soil

  4. Beneficial Use of Shredded Tires as Drainage Material in Cover Systems for Abandoned Landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Landfills; Recycling; Slope stability; Drainage. Author keywords: Waste tires; Landfill cover; DrainageBeneficial Use of Shredded Tires as Drainage Material in Cover Systems for Abandoned Landfills Krishna R. Reddy1 ; Timothy D. Stark2 ; and Aravind Marella3 Abstract: Over 280 million tires

  5. A Sample-based Convex Cover for Rapidly Finding an Object in a 3-D Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Seth

    A Sample-based Convex Cover for Rapidly Finding an Object in a 3-D Environment Alejandro Sarmientoy in a known 3-D environment as quickly as possible on average. We use a sampling scheme that generates of scaling well with the dimensionality of the environment. We then use the resulting convex covering to gen

  6. Importance of moisture transport, snow cover and soil freezing to ground temperature predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Importance of moisture transport, snow cover and soil freezing to ground temperature predictions moisture transport, snow accumulation and melting, and soil freezing and thawing are investigated transport, snow cover, and soil freezing. 1. Introduction Prediction of ground temperature is an important

  7. Changes in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types Over the Ocean from Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    Total cloud cover 54 68 Clear sky (frequency) 22 3 #12;Low Clouds & Solar Radiation Low clouds scatterChanges in Cloud Cover and Cloud Types Over the Ocean from Surface Observations, 1954-2008 Ryan This produces a weak net warming effect in the atmosphere, since more radiation comes in, and less goes out

  8. New frontiers in oilseed biotechnology: meeting the growing global demand for vegetable oils for food, feed, biofuel, and industrial uses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, C; Napier, JA; Clemente, TE; Cahoon, EB

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetable oils have historically been a valued commodity for food use and to a lesser extent for non-edible applications such as detergents and lubricants. The increasing reliance on biodiesel as a transportation fuel has contributed to rising demand and higher prices for vegetable oils. Biotechnology offers a number of solutions to meet the growing need for affordable vegetable oils and vegetable oils with improved fatty acid compositions for food and industrial uses. New insights into oilseed metabolism and its transcriptional control are enabling biotechnological enhancement of oil content and quality. Alternative crop platforms and emerging technologies for metabolic engineering also hold promise for meeting global demand for vegetable oils and for enhancing nutritional, industrial, and biofuel properties of vegetable oils. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of oilseed metabolism and in the development of new oilseed platforms and metabolic engineering technologies.

  9. Lectures on Survival Analysis Richard D. Gill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gill, Richard D.

    in survival analysis--is product-integration, and to begin with I have tried to cover its basic theory in fair1 Lectures on Survival Analysis Richard D. Gill Mathematical Institute, University Utrecht `topics in and around survival analysis which interest me at the moment, with an audience of French

  10. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  11. Maximal Net Baryon Density in the Energy Region Covered by NICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cleymans

    2010-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several theoretical indications that the energy region covered by the proposed NICA accelerator in Dubna is an extremely interesting one. We present a review of data obtained in relativistic heavy ion collisions and show that there is a gap around 10 GeV where more and better precise measurements are needed. The theoretical interpretation can only be clarified by covering this energy region. In particular the strangeness content needs to be determined, data covering the full phase space ($4 \\pi$) would be very helpful to establish the thermal parameters of a possible phase transition.

  12. USING PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS FOR VERIFICATION OF CAP AND COVER SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) office has committed itself to an accelerated cleanup of its national facilities. The goal is to have much of the DOE legacy waste sites remediated by 2006. This includes closure of several sites (e.g., Rocky Flats and Fernald). With the increased focus on accelerated cleanup, there has been considerable concern about long-term stewardship issues in general, and verification and long-term monitoring (LTM) of caps and covers, in particular. Cap and cover systems (covers) are vital remedial options that will be extensively used in meeting these 2006 cleanup goals. Every buried waste site within the DOE complex will require some form of cover system. These covers are expected to last from 100 to 1000 years or more. The stakeholders can be expected to focus on system durability and sustained performance. DOE EM has set up a national committee of experts to develop a long-term capping (LTC) guidance document. Covers are subject to subsidence, erosion, desiccation, animal intrusion, plant root infiltration, etc., all of which will affect the overall performance of the cover. Very little is available in terms of long-term monitoring other than downstream groundwater or surface water monitoring. By its very nature, this can only indicate that failure of the cover system has already occurred and contaminants have been transported away from the site. This is unacceptable. Methods that indicate early cover failure (prior to contaminant release) or predict approaching cover failure are needed. The LTC committee has identified predictive monitoring technologies as a high priority need for DOE, both for new covers as well as existing covers. The same committee identified a Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technology as one approach that may be capable of meeting the requirements for LTM. The Environmental Research and Technology Division (ERTD) at BNL developed a novel methodology for verifying and monitoring subsurface barriers (1,2). The technology uses perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) to determine flaws (e.g., holes or cracks) and high permeability areas in subsurface barriers. Gaseous tracers are injected on one side of the barrier and searched for on the opposite side of the barrier. The sampling grid, concentration, and time of arrival of the tracer(s) on the opposite side are used to determine the size and location of flaws and relative permeability of the barrier. In addition, there are multiple tracers available, which allows different tracers to be injected in different quadrants of the barrier. This yields additional information on transport phenomena of the barrier.

  13. Assessment of an active dry barrier for a landfill cover system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stormont, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ankeny, M.D.; Burkhard, M.E.; Tansey, M.K.; Kelsey, J.A. [Stephens (Daniel B.) and Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dry barrier is a layer of geologic material that is dried by air flow. An active dry barrier system can be designed, installed, and operated as part of a landfill cover system. An active system uses blowers and fans to move air through a high-permeability layer within the cover system. Depending principally on the air-flow rate, it is possible for a dry barrier to remove enough water to substantially reduce the likelihood of water percolating through the cover system. If a material with a relatively great storage capacity, such as processed tuff, is used as the coarse layer, then the efficiency of the dry barrier will be increased.

  14. Canned and Frozen Vegetables: Getting the Most Nutrition for Your Money

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    and Suggested Uses of Selected Canned and Frozen Vegetables Vegetable Availability Key Nutrients Comments/Uses Asparagus canned,frozen Vitamin C and Folate Expensive. Use as a side dish. Beans,Baked canned Protein, Fiber,Thiamin, Low cost. Use as a main or side... dish. Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc and Phosphorus Beans,Green canned,frozen Fiber (F) and Vitamin C Use cut beans in salads and mixed dishes. or Wax Beans,Lima canned,frozen Protein, Fiber,Vitamins Available in white, green and yellow...

  15. Assessment of Pen Branch delta and corridor vegetation changes using multispectral scanner data 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne multispectral scanner data were used to monitor natural succession of wetland vegetation species over a three-year period from 1992 through 1994 for Pen Branch on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Image processing techniques were used to identify and measure wetland vegetation communities in the lower portion of the Pen Branch corridor and delta. The study provided a reliable means for monitoring medium- and large-scale changes in a diverse environment. Findings from the study will be used to support decisions regarding remediation efforts following the cessation of cooling water discharge from K reactor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

  16. The Mixed Carload in Distribution of Vegetables from the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulson, W. E. (William E.)

    1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry: Farm and Ranch Economics: G. S. Fraps, Ph. D., Chief; State Chemist L. P. Gabbard, M. S.. Chief S. E. Asbury, 31. S., Chemist W. E. Paulson, Ph. D., Marketing J. F. Fudge, Ph. D., Chemist C. A. Bonnen, M. S., Farm Management E. C. Carlyle, M..., since it facilitates shipments of new vegetables to the markets of the United States and Canada. Furthermore, after the production of a wide variety of vegetables had been established, the mixed carload offered and continues to offer the means...

  17. Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-8200, USA Abstract: In this work, we used the Regional Hydro

  18. Below Canopy Meteorological Measurements at Three Florida Sites with Varying Tree Cover and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonne, J. K.; Vieira, R. K.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . However, less research has examined how the heat island is impacted by the more localized meteorological environment. How does suburban development and tree canopy cover impact micro-climates in a suburban environment? This has implications, both...

  19. Retrieval of subpixel snow covered area, grain size, and albedo from MODIS Thomas H. Painter a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    the energy and mass balance of the snow cover are its spatial extent and albedo (Blöschl, 1991; Dozier a Department of Geography, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA b Donald Bren School

  20. Support pedestals for interconnecting a cover and nozzle band wall in a gas turbine nozzle segment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip (Simpsonville, SC); Itzel, Gary Michael (Simpsonville, SC); Webbon, Waylon Willard (Greenville, SC); Bagepalli, Radhakrishna (Schenectady, NY); Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY); Kellock, Iain Robertson (Simpsonville, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner band portions. Each band portion includes a nozzle wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through the apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. Structural pedestals interconnect the cover and nozzle wall and pass through holes in the impingement plate to reduce localized stress otherwise resulting from a difference in pressure within the chamber of the nozzle segment and the hot gas path and the fixed turbine casing surrounding the nozzle stage. The pedestals may be cast or welded to the cover and nozzle wall.

  1. Mount Cheops Cirque Glacier: Response of a Small Debris Covered Glacier to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Dan

    Mount Cheops Cirque Glacier: Response of a Small Debris Covered Glacier of a microclimate cirque glacier on Mount Cheops in Glacier National Park of Canada. Rapidly receding glaciers are becoming an important water resource concern

  2. Using satellite remote sensing to quantify woody cover and biomass across Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchard, Edward Thomas Alexander

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of quantifying the woody cover and biomass of tropical savannas, woodlands and forests using satellite data is becoming increasingly important, but limitations in current scientific understanding reduce the ...

  3. 26 umass amherst dense morning fog covered the vast snowy landscape,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    substantially changed by a massive system of dams, res- ervoirs, power plants, roads, and transmission lines that cover an area as large as the state of Florida. The steel towers and power lines loomed above us like

  4. Scientists, growers assess trade-offs in use of tillage, cover crops and compost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    depth depth depth depth compost was added two times perConv. crops were present. Compost was ap- Main effect Fof tillage, cover crops and compost Louise E. Jackson Irenee

  5. Rogatus – a planned open source toolset to cover the whole lifecycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkow, Ingo; Schiller, David

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last years several different tools for DDI Lifecycle have been published. Nevertheless none of the current tools is able to cover the full lifecycle from beginning to end. This presentation wants to show a first outlook into Rogatus...

  6. MONITORING LANDFILL COVER BY ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY1 TOMOGRAPHY ON AN EXPERIMENTAL SITE2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with geosynthetics44 (geomembranes or Geosynthetic Clay Liners), depending on the date of closure (Silvestre et45 al: landfill cover, gravelly clay material, heterogeneity, compaction, electrical30 resistivity, multivariate

  7. Modeling the effect of land cover land use change on estuarine environmental flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Debabrata

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental flows are important to maintain the ecological integrity of the estuary. In a watershed, it is influenced by land use land cover (LULC) change, climate variability, and water regulations. San Antonio, Texas, ...

  8. SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C][W][OA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Knaap, Esther

    SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C controlling the elongated fruit shape of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is SUN. In this study, we explored the roles of SUN in vegetative and reproductive development using near isogenic lines (NILs) that differ

  9. The temporal mapping of riparian vegetation at Leon Creek in Bexar County, Texas from 1987 to 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummins, Karen Leigh

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and urban zones. Results for both Image Difference Calculation and Percent Area Calculation suggest that for the total watershed, there are higher rates of decreases in vegetation occurring in rural and urban zones. Less vegetation overall in the 0.5 mi...

  10. Set Multicover The Set Multicover problem is the same as set cover except

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golin, Mordecai J.

    price(e; j) = Cost(F ) jF ``U j If j = r e remove e from U: return(C) This algorithm is very similar during that step. Notice that the average cost can not decrease. Then 8e 2 U price(e; 1) Ÿ price(e; 2) Ÿ to be covered a specified number of times. That is we want to pick a minimum­cost set cover such that element e

  11. Evaluation of erosion and cover re-establishment following site preparation on east Texas forest lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blume, Timothy Allen

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    damage following mechanical site prepara- tion. (uantitative data characterizing the rate of recovery of soi. l protective cover, used in combination with erosion data, gives planners and forest managers an indication of the total impact of mechanical...EVALUATION OF EROSION AND COVER RE-ESTABLISHMENT 1'OLLOWING SITE PREPARATION ON EAST TEXAS FOREST LANDS A Thesis by Timothy Allen Blume Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Uniuersity in partial fullfillment of the requir ment...

  12. Uranium-mill-tailings remedial-action project (UMTRAP) cover and liner technology development project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, J.N.; Gee, G.W.; Freeman, H.D.; Cline, J.F.; Beedlow, P.A.; Buelt, J.L.; Relyea, J.R.; Tamura, T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cover and liner systems for uranium mill tailings in the United States must satisfy stringent requirements regarding long-term stability, radon control, and radionuclide and hazardous chemical migration. The cover placed over a tailings pile serves three basic purposes: (1) to reduce the release of radon, (2) to prevent the intrusion of plant roots and burrowing animals into the tailings, and (3) to limit surface erosion. The liner placed under a tailings pile prevents the migration of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals to groundwater. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing and evaluating cover and liner systems that meet these objectives and conform to federal standards. The cover and liner technology discussed in this paper involves: (1) single and multilayer earthen cover systems, (2) asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems, (3) biobarrier systems, (4) revegetation and rock covers, and (5) asphalt, clay, and synthetic liner systems. These systems have been tested at the Grand Junction, Colorado, tailings pile, where they have been shown to effectively reduce radon releases and radionuclide and chemical migration.

  13. The Distribution of Submersed Aquatic Vegetation in the Fresh and Oligohaline Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Cover: Summer 2005 aerial photo of Dogue Creek and the Potomac River showing extensive dark areas to Dogue Creek, VA, 2005 ....................................................... 9 3. Percent cover of hydrilla in SAV beds located in the tidal Potomac River from Dogue Creek, VA to Quantico Creek, VA, 2005

  14. A newsletter for commercial vegetable growers prepared by the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    the hole and mound a "soil dome." 4. Cover the mound with an18-inch-square black plastic mulch, and cover the edges with soil to hold the plastic sheet down. 5. Place one trap for each acre or at least ten traps

  15. Applying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies: A Study over Australia*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    , Climate Change Research Centre, Level 4 Mathews Building, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052: A Study over Australia* MARK DECKER, ANDY J. PITMAN, AND JASON EVANS Climate Change Research CentreApplying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies

  16. Improved estimates of forest vegetation structure and biomass with a LiDAR-optimized sampling design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    and Spies, 1992; Jakubauskas and Price, 1997], and forest biomass [Fassnacht et al., 1997; Gower et alImproved estimates of forest vegetation structure and biomass with a LiDAR-optimized sampling, to estimate forest structure and biomass across a 53,600 ha study area in northeastern Wisconsin. Additionally

  17. Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    precipitation, the impacts of climate change on vegetation and water cycle are predicted with relatively low under Climate Change Scenarios* PABLO IMBACH,1 LUIS MOLINA,1 BRUNO LOCATELLI,# OLIVIER ROUPSARD,1,@ GIL MAHE´ ,& RONALD NEILSON,**,&& LENIN CORRALES,11 MARKO SCHOLZE,## AND PHILIPPE CIAIS @@ 1 Climate Change

  18. Effects of interactive vegetation phenology on the 2003 summer Marc Stfanon,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Andrea, Fabio

    , associated with an increase of the temperature mean and variability in the context of global warming its impacts on the economic and ecological sys- tems, through reduction in productivity of natural and culti- vated vegetation [Ciais et al., 2005; COPA-COGECA, 2003], lower energy supply and electricity

  19. Vegetative and reproductive innovations of early land plants: implications for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    Vegetative and reproductive innovations of early land plants: implications for a uni ed phylogeny Karen Sue Renzaglia1 , R. Joel Du¡1 {, Daniel L. Nickrent1 and David J. Garbary2 1Department of Plant (renzaglia@plant.siu.edu) 2 Department of Biology, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia

  20. One-dimensional snow water and energy balance model for vegetated surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    One-dimensional snow water and energy balance model for vegetated surfaces Jiming Jin,2 Xiaogang heat ¯ux (W mÀ2 ) Iprec heat ¯ux of precipitation (W mÀ2) I5 s downwelling solar radiation (W mÀ2, USA. Email: jjm@hwr.arizona.edu or gao@hwr.arizona.edu Contract grant sponsor: NASA

  1. Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keim, Richard

    Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity R.F. Keim a,*, A Little is understood about how storage of water on forest canopies varies during rainfall, even though storage changes intensity of throughfall and thus affects a variety of hydrological processes

  2. The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and during the last in an unresolved extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here we investigate the potential during these extrema when 1 hal-00351408,version1-9Jan2009 #12;Earth's climate and biomes maps were

  3. The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Luc

    The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today and during the last extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here, we investigate the potential during these extrema, when Earth's climate and biomes maps were different from today, we are able to test

  4. I. Abstract Vegetation plays an important role in the surface energy and water balance of wetlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    55 I. Abstract Vegetation plays an important role in the surface energy and water balance or reverse the downward trend in streamflow. In this study, we investigated the energy and water balance had been sprayed with herbicide (and remained only as dead, standing biomass). Energy balance

  5. Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas Justin A. Hogan,1 sequestration sites for possible leaks of the CO2 gas from underground reservoirs, a low-cost multispectral are then flagged for closer inspection with in-situ CO2 sensors. The system is entirely self

  6. -Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings -681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leps, Jan "Suspa"

    - Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings - 681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996 abandoned for half a century and are sur- rounded by Picea abies (Norway spruce) forests. The causes of inhibition of establishment of Norway spruce seedlings in the meadows were tested experimentally

  7. Vegetation changes on an abandoned rice field following herbicide and fertilizer treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cwik, Michael Joseph

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ass (pa icum ~v(r turn L. ), a d rownseed nasn I (~nas alum plicat I ~ Michx. ). In co treat, vegetation of abend ed rice land is composed principally of annual forbs intermixed with three-awns (Aristida spp. ). Forbs, as used in this paper, wili...

  8. A satellite-based biosphere parameterization for net ecosystem CO2 exchange: Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, John Chun-Han

    Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) Pathmathevan Mahadevan,1 Steven C. Wofsy,1 Daniel M. Matross,1 12 April 2008. [1] We present the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM), a satellite of ecosystem photosynthesis, and annual sum of NEE at all eddy flux sites for which it is optimized

  9. Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

  10. Cattle Selection for Aspen and Meadow Vegetation: Implications for Restoration Bobette E. Jones,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth

    Cattle Selection for Aspen and Meadow Vegetation: Implications for Restoration Bobette E. Jones,1 95616, USA. Abstract There is concern over the decline of aspen and the lack of successful regeneration due to excessive browsing of aspen suckers by cattle and other wild and domestic ungulates. We

  11. Effects of aridity and vegetation on plant-wax dD in modern lake sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polissar, Pratigya J.

    Effects of aridity and vegetation on plant-wax dD in modern lake sediments Pratigya J. Polissar Abstract We analyzed the deuterium composition of individual plant-waxes in lake sediments from 28 fractionation (ea) between plant-wax n-alkanes and precipitation differs with watershed ecosystem type

  12. Characterizing the molecular composition of epicuticular waxes of vegetation and in surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Characterizing the molecular composition of epicuticular waxes of vegetation and in surface MBL Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543 #12;Abstract: Epicuticular plant waxes are nearly omnipresent of origin. These waxes can provide that information in real time when collected in aerosols, or from

  13. Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three Major Floods, Gila RiverKelvey, Director Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Burkham, D. E. 1927 Hydraulic effects 19.16:655-J 1. Gila River-Floods. 2. Hydraulics. 3. Botany-Ecology-Gila River. 1. Title: Hydraulic

  14. Theoretical Population Biology 71 (2007) 111 Nonlinear dynamics and pattern bifurcations in a model for vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherratt, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are typical, running parallel to the contours. Previously, Klausmeier [1999. Regular and irregular patterns of vegetation up to 250 m wide, separated by gaps of up to 1 km, running along the contours. These patterns zffl}|ffl{ plant loss þ k3@2 U=@X2 zfflfflfflfflfflfflfflffl}|fflfflfflfflfflfflfflffl{ dispersal , (1a

  15. Relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices and aircraft-based CO2 measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cihlar, J.; Caramori, P.H.; Schuepp, P.H.; Desjardins, R.L.; Macpherson, J.I. (Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa (Canada) McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada) Agriculture Canada, Centre for Land and Biological Resources Research, Ottawa (Canada) National Research Council of Canada, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa (Canada))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices and CO2 uptake, as an initial step in exploring the possibility of using a satellite-derived vegetation index as a measure of net photosynthesis. The study area included the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) site located on the Konza prairie and adjacent area as well as a transect between Manhattan and Salina. One third of the transect exhibited vegetation and terrain characteristics similar to those on the FIFE site, whereas cultivated land predominated in the remaining portion of the 75-km-long flight line. In June, July, August, and October 1987, several CO2 data sets were obtained using the National Research Council of Canada's Twin Otter research aircraft. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the simple ratio (SR) were computed from NOAA AVHRR data acquired as part of FIFE. Aircraft and satellite data were processed to obtain spatially coincident and locally representative flux values. Results show a linear relationship between NDVI and CO2 uptake during a single day; however, a nonlinear relationship emerged when all data sets were combined. The data from FIFE and the regional transect were consistent for one date but differed for other periods. Overall, about 60 percent of total variability in CO2 flux was accounted for by the NDVI and 74 percent by the SR. 14 refs.

  16. Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    is known as Normalized Differ- ence Water Index (NDWI) [12]. It is calculated using reflectance in two near infrared (NIR) channels. Similar indices have been proposed that use reflectance at other NIR wavelengthsNormalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks Kristine

  17. Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight reflection and long-wave infrared (LWIR) thermal emission. During a 4-week period in summer 2011

  18. MODELLING MODIFIED ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING FOR FRUITS AND VEGETABLES USING MEMBRANE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinze, Thomas

    of polymeric film in or- der to modify the O2 and CO2 concentrations inside the package, reducing metabolic are not fully under- stood. As examples we can refer to the little knowl- edge about the effect of CO2MODELLING MODIFIED ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING FOR FRUITS AND VEGETABLES USING MEMBRANE SYSTEMS Gabi

  19. A flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    control in urban storm water runoff [Kirby et al., 2005], and linking tidal hydrodynamic forcing to flow and field studies. The proposed model asymptotically recovers the flow resistance formulation when the waterA flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics Gabriel G

  20. Derivation of pasture biomass in Mongolia from AVHRR-based vegetation health indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitelson, Anatoly

    Derivation of pasture biomass in Mongolia from AVHRR-based vegetation health indices F. KOGAN, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia (Received 28 April 2003; in final form 8 March 2004 ) Abstract. Early drought detection and impact assessment on the amount of pasture biomass are important in Mongolia, whose economy strongly